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Sample records for acute brain slices

  1. Effects of normobaric versus hyperbaric oxygen on cell injury induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation in acute brain slices

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    Laurent Chazalviel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Normobaric oxygen (NBO and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO are emerging as a possible co-treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Both have been shown to reduce infarct volume, to improve neurologic outcome, to promote endogenous tissue plasminogen activator-induced thrombolysis and cerebral blood flow, and to improve tissue oxygenation through oxygen diffusion in the ischemic areas, thereby questioning the interest of HBO compared to NBO. In the present study, in order to investigate and compare the oxygen diffusion effects of NBO and HBO on acute ischemic stroke independently of their effects at the vascular level, we used acute brain slices exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation, an ex vivo model of brain ischemia that allows investigating the acute effects of NBO (partial pressure of oxygen (pO 2 = 1 atmospheres absolute (ATA = 0.1 MPa and HBO (pO 2 = 2.5 ATA = 0.25 MPa through tissue oxygenation on ischemia-induced cell injury as measured by the release of lactate dehydrogenase. We found that HBO, but not NBO, reduced oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced cell injury, indicating that passive tissue oxygenation (i.e. without vascular support of the brain parenchyma requires oxygen partial pressure higher than 1 ATA.

  2. Analysis of acute brain slices by electron microscopy: a correlative light-electron microscopy workflow based on Tokuyasu cryo-sectioning.

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    Loussert Fonta, Celine; Leis, Andrew; Mathisen, Cliff; Bouvier, David S; Blanchard, Willy; Volterra, Andrea; Lich, Ben; Humbel, Bruno M

    2015-01-01

    Acute brain slices are slices of brain tissue that are kept vital in vitro for further recordings and analyses. This tool is of major importance in neurobiology and allows the study of brain cells such as microglia, astrocytes, neurons and their inter/intracellular communications via ion channels or transporters. In combination with light/fluorescence microscopies, acute brain slices enable the ex vivo analysis of specific cells or groups of cells inside the slice, e.g. astrocytes. To bridge ex vivo knowledge of a cell with its ultrastructure, we developed a correlative microscopy approach for acute brain slices. The workflow begins with sampling of the tissue and precise trimming of a region of interest, which contains GFP-tagged astrocytes that can be visualised by fluorescence microscopy of ultrathin sections. The astrocytes and their surroundings are then analysed by high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). An important aspect of this workflow is the modification of a commercial cryo-ultramicrotome to observe the fluorescent GFP signal during the trimming process. It ensured that sections contained at least one GFP astrocyte. After cryo-sectioning, a map of the GFP-expressing astrocytes is established and transferred to correlation software installed on a focused ion beam scanning electron microscope equipped with a STEM detector. Next, the areas displaying fluorescence are selected for high resolution STEM imaging. An overview area (e.g. a whole mesh of the grid) is imaged with an automated tiling and stitching process. In the final stitched image, the local organisation of the brain tissue can be surveyed or areas of interest can be magnified to observe fine details, e.g. vesicles or gold labels on specific proteins. The robustness of this workflow is contingent on the quality of sample preparation, based on Tokuyasu's protocol. This method results in a reasonable compromise between preservation of morphology and maintenance of

  3. Brain perfusion CT for acute stroke using a 256-slice CT: improvement of diagnostic information by large volume coverage.

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    Dorn, F; Muenzel, D; Meier, R; Poppert, H; Rummeny, E J; Huber, A

    2011-09-01

    To compare a 256-slice CT with a simulated standard CT for brain CT perfusion (CTP). CTP was obtained in 51 patients using a 256-slice CT (128 detector rows, flying z-focus, 8-cm detector width, 80 kV, 120mAs, 20 measurements, 1 CT image/2.5 s). Signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) were compared in grey and white matter. Perfusion maps were evaluated for cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in hypoperfused areas and corresponding contralateral regions. Two reconstructed 10-mm slices for simulation of a standard CT (SDCT) were compared with the complete data sets (large-volume CT, LVCT). Adequate image quality was achieved in 50/51 cases. SNR were significantly different in grey and white matter. A perfusion deficit was present in 27 data sets. Differences between the hypoperfusions and the control regions were significant for MTT and CBF, but not for CBV. Three lesions were missed by SDCT but detected by LVCT; 24 lesions were covered incompletely by SDCT, and 6 by LVCT. 21 lesions were detected completely by LVCT, but none by SDCT. CTP imaging of the brain using an increased detector width can detect additional ischaemic lesions and cover most ischaemic lesions completely.

  4. Brain perfusion CT for acute stroke using a 256-slice CT: improvement of diagnostic information by large volume coverage

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    Dorn, F. [Technical University, Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Institut fuer Radiologie, Klinikum rechts der Isar der Technischen Universitaet Muenchen, Muenchen (Germany); Muenzel, D.; Meier, R.; Rummeny, E.J.; Huber, A. [Technical University, Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Poppert, H. [Technical University, Department of Neurology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    To compare a 256-slice CT with a simulated standard CT for brain CT perfusion (CTP). CTP was obtained in 51 patients using a 256-slice CT (128 detector rows, flying z-focus, 8-cm detector width, 80 kV, 120mAs, 20 measurements, 1 CT image/2.5 s). Signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) were compared in grey and white matter. Perfusion maps were evaluated for cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV) and mean transit time (MTT) in hypoperfused areas and corresponding contralateral regions. Two reconstructed 10-mm slices for simulation of a standard CT (SDCT) were compared with the complete data sets (large-volume CT, LVCT). Adequate image quality was achieved in 50/51 cases. SNR were significantly different in grey and white matter. A perfusion deficit was present in 27 data sets. Differences between the hypoperfusions and the control regions were significant for MTT and CBF, but not for CBV. Three lesions were missed by SDCT but detected by LVCT; 24 lesions were covered incompletely by SDCT, and 6 by LVCT. 21 lesions were detected completely by LVCT, but none by SDCT. CTP imaging of the brain using an increased detector width can detect additional ischaemic lesions and cover most ischaemic lesions completely. (orig.)

  5. Patch-clamp recordings of rat neurons from acute brain slices of the somatosensory cortex during magnetic stimulation.

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    Pashut, Tamar; Magidov, Dafna; Ben-Porat, Hana; Wolfus, Shuki; Friedman, Alex; Perel, Eli; Lavidor, Michal; Bar-Gad, Izhar; Yeshurun, Yosef; Korngreen, Alon

    2014-01-01

    Although transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a popular tool for both basic research and clinical applications, its actions on nerve cells are only partially understood. We have previously predicted, using compartmental modeling, that magnetic stimulation of central nervous system neurons depolarized the soma followed by initiation of an action potential in the initial segment of the axon. The simulations also predict that neurons with low current threshold are more susceptible to magnetic stimulation. Here we tested these theoretical predictions by combining in vitro patch-clamp recordings from rat brain slices with magnetic stimulation and compartmental modeling. In agreement with the modeling, our recordings demonstrate the dependence of magnetic stimulation-triggered action potentials on the type and state of the neuron and its orientation within the magnetic field. Our results suggest that the observed effects of TMS are deeply rooted in the biophysical properties of single neurons in the central nervous system and provide a framework both for interpreting existing TMS data and developing new simulation-based tools and therapies.

  6. Patch-clamp recordings of rat neurons from acute brain slices of the somatosensory cortex during magnetic stimulation

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    Tamar ePashut

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Although transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS is a popular tool for both basic research and clinical applications, its actions on nerve cells are only partially understood. We have previously predicted, using compartmental modeling, that magnetic stimulation of central nervous system neurons depolarized the soma followed by initiation of an action potential in the initial segment of the axon. The simulations also predict that neurons with low current threshold are more susceptible to magnetic stimulation. Here we tested these theoretical predictions by combining in vitro patch-clamp recordings from rat brain slices with magnetic stimulation and compartmental modeling. In agreement with the modeling, our recordings demonstrate the dependence of magnetic stimulation-triggered action potentials on the type and state of the neuron and its orientation within the magnetic field. Our results suggest that the observed effects of TMS are deeply rooted in the biophysical properties of single neurons in the central nervous system and provide a framework both for interpreting existing TMS data and developing new simulation-based tools and therapies.

  7. Long-term brain slice culturing in a microfluidic platform

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    Vedarethinam, Indumathi; Avaliani, N.; Tønnesen, J.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, we present the development of a transparent poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) based microfluidic culture system for handling long-term brain slice cultures independent of an incubator. The different stages of system development have been validated by culturing GFP producing brain...... brain slice culturing for 16 days....

  8. Biocytin staining of glia and neurons in brain slices.

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    Kang, Jian

    2014-09-02

    This protocol describes the use of biocytin to visualize and distinguish the morphology of glia and neurons in rat brain slices. Patch pipettes are used to load biocytin into different cell types. The slices are subsequently fixed, stained, and mounted in preparation for imaging. © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  9. Localized gene transfer into organotypic hippocampal slice cultures and acute hippocampal slices

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    Casaccia-Bonnefil, P; Benedikz, Eirikur; Shen, H

    1993-01-01

    that directs expression of E. coli beta-galactosidase (beta-gal), were microapplied into stratum pyramidale or stratum granulosum of slice cultures. Twenty-four hours later, a cluster of transduced cells expressing beta-gal was observed at the microapplication site. Gene transfer by microapplication was both...... effective and rapid. The titer of the HSVlac stocks was determined on NIH3T3 cells. Eighty-three percent of the beta-gal forming units successfully transduced beta-gal after microapplication to slice cultures. beta-Gal expression was detected as rapidly as 4 h after transduction into cultures of fibroblasts...... or hippocampal slices. The rapid expression of beta-gal by HSVlac allowed efficient transduction of acute hippocampal slices. Many genes have been transduced and expressed using HSV vectors; therefore, this microapplication method can be applied to many neurobiological questions....

  10. An aerator for brain slice experiments in individual cell culture plate wells.

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    Dorris, David M; Hauser, Caitlin A; Minnehan, Caitlin E; Meitzen, John

    2014-12-30

    Ex vivo acute living brain slices are a broadly employed and powerful experimental preparation. Most new technology regarding this tissue has involved the chamber used when performing electrophysiological experiments. Alternatively we instead focus on the creation of a simple, versatile aerator designed to allow maintenance and manipulation of acute brain slices and potentially other tissue in a multi-well cell culture plate. Here we present an easily manufactured aerator designed to fit into a 24-well cell culture plate. It features a nylon mesh and a single microhole to enable gas delivery without compromising tissue stability. The aerator is designed to be individually controlled, allowing both high throughput and single well experiments. The aerator was validated by testing material leach, dissolved oxygen delivery, brain slice viability and neuronal electrophysiology. Example experiments are also presented, including a test of whether β1-adrenergic receptor activation regulates gene expression in ex vivo dorsal striatum using qPCR. Key differences include enhanced control over gas delivery to individual wells containing brain slices, decreased necessary volume, a sample restraint to reduce movement artifacts, the potential to be sterilized, the avoidance of materials that absorb water and small biological molecules, minimal production costs, and increased experimental throughput. This new aerator is of high utility and will be useful for experiments involving brain slices and other potentially tissue samples in 24-well cell culture plates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Novel culturing platform for brain slices and neuronal cells

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    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Al Atraktchi, Fatima Al-Zahraa; Bakmand, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate a novel culturing system for brain slices and neuronal cells, which can control the concentration of nutrients and the waste removal from the culture by adjusting the fluid flow within the device. The entire system can be placed in an incubator. The system has been te...... tested successfully with brain slices and PC12 cells. The culture substrate can be modified using metal electrodes and/or nanostructures for conducting electrical measurements while culturing and for better mimicking the in vivo conditions....

  12. Specificity of exogenous acetate and glutamate as astrocyte substrates examined in acute brain slices from female mice using methionine sulfoximine (MSO) to inhibit glutamine synthesis

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    Andersen, Jens Velde; McNair, Laura Frendrup; Schousboe, Arne

    2017-01-01

    cortical slices from female NMRI mice were incubated in media containing [1,2-(13) C]acetate or [U-(13) C]glutamate, with or without methionine sulfoximine (MSO) to inhibit glutamine synthetase (GS). Tissue extracts were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Blocking GS abolished the majority...... of glutamine (13) C-labeling from [1,2-(13) C]acetate as intended. However, (13) C-labeling of GABA was only 40-50% reduced by MSO, suggesting considerable neuronal uptake of acetate. Moreover, labeling of glutamate from [1,2-(13) C]acetate in the presence of MSO exceeded the level probable from exclusive...

  13. Hexose transport by brain slices: further studies on energy dependence

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    Kyle-Lillegard, J.; Gold, B.I.

    1983-04-01

    We studied the uptake of (/sup 3/H)2-deoxyglucose ((/sup 3/H)2DG) by slices of rat cerebral cortex in vitro as a model of glucose transport by brain. Slices were incubated with (/sup 3/H)2DG, or with L-(/sup 3/H)glucose as a marker for diffusion; the difference between (/sup 3/H)2DG uptake and L-(/sup 3/H)glucose uptake was defined as net (/sup 3/H)2DG transport. Net (/sup 3/H)2DG transport was a function of incubation temperature, with an estimated temperature coefficient of 1.87 from 15 degrees C to 25 degrees C. The net uptake of (/sup 3/H)2DG was not inhibited by phlorizin or phloretin in concentrations well above the reported Ki of these inhibitors for hexose uptake in other systems. To examine the hypothesis that (/sup 3/H)2DG transport by brain slices is dependent on mitochondrial energy, we studied net (/sup 3/H)2DG uptake by slices which had been preincubated in media designed to alter intracellular ATP stores. The transport process was very sensitive to inhibition by DNP, but the correlation between (/sup 3/H)2DG transport and ATP levels was unclear. In contrast to our published hypothesis that the transport process required mitochondrial energy, these data indicate that dependence on energy is not absolute.

  14. 5-HT4-receptors modulate induction of long-term depression but not potentiation at hippocampal output synapses in acute rat brain slices.

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    Matthias Wawra

    Full Text Available The subiculum is the principal target of CA1 pyramidal cells and mediates hippocampal output to various cortical and subcortical regions of the brain. The majority of subicular pyramidal cells are burst-spiking neurons. Previous studies indicated that high frequency stimulation in subicular burst-spiking cells causes presynaptic NMDA-receptor dependent long-term potentiation (LTP whereas low frequency stimulation induces postsynaptic NMDA-receptor-dependent long-term depression (LTD. In the present study, we investigate the effect of 5-hydroxytryptamine type 4 (5-HT4 receptor activation and blockade on both forms of synaptic plasticity in burst-spiking cells. We demonstrate that neither activation nor block of 5-HT4 receptors modulate the induction or expression of LTP. In contrast, activation of 5-HT4 receptors facilitates expression of LTD, and block of the 5-HT4 receptor prevents induction of short-term depression and LTD. As 5-HT4 receptors are positively coupled to adenylate cyclase 1 (AC1, 5-HT4 receptors might modulate PKA activity through AC1. Since LTD is blocked in the presence of 5-HT4 receptor antagonists, our data are consistent with 5-HT4 receptor activation by ambient serotonin or intrinsically active 5-HT4 receptors. Our findings provide new insight into aminergic modulation of hippocampal output.

  15. The energy demand of fast neuronal network oscillations: insights from brain slice preparations

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    Oliver eKann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fast neuronal network oscillations in the gamma range (30-100 Hz in the cerebral cortex have been implicated in higher cognitive functions such as sensual perception, working memory, and, perhaps, consciousness. However, little is known about the energy demand of gamma oscillations. This is mainly caused by technical limitations that are associated with simultaneous recordings of neuronal activity and energy metabolism in small neuronal networks and at the level of mitochondria in vivo. Thus recent studies have focused on brain slice preparations to address the energy demand of gamma oscillations in vitro. Here, reports will be summarized and discussed that combined electrophysiological recordings, oxygen sensor microelectrodes and live-cell fluorescence imaging in acutely prepared slices and organotypic slice cultures of the hippocampus from both, mouse and rat. These reports consistently show that gamma oscillations can be reliably induced in hippocampal slice preparations by different pharmacological tools. They suggest that gamma oscillations are associated with high energy demand, requiring both rapid adaptation of oxidative energy metabolism and sufficient supply with oxygen and nutrients. These findings might help to explain the exceptional vulnerability of higher cognitive functions during pathological processes of the brain, such as circulatory disturbances, genetic mitochondrial diseases, and neurodegeneration.

  16. Slices

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    McCrae, James

    2011-01-01

    Minimalist object representations or shape-proxies that spark and inspire human perception of shape remain an incompletely understood, yet powerful aspect of visual communication. We explore the use of planar sections, i.e., the contours of intersection of planes with a 3D object, for creating shape abstractions, motivated by their popularity in art and engineering. We first perform a user study to show that humans do define consistent and similar planar section proxies for common objects. Interestingly, we observe a strong correlation between user-defined planes and geometric features of objects. Further we show that the problem of finding the minimum set of planes that capture a set of 3D geometric shape features is both NP-hard and not always the proxy a user would pick. Guided by the principles inferred from our user study, we present an algorithm that progressively selects planes to maximize feature coverage, which in turn influence the selection of subsequent planes. The algorithmic framework easily incorporates various shape features, while their relative importance values are computed and validated from the user study data. We use our algorithm to compute planar slices for various objects, validate their utility towards object abstraction using a second user study, and conclude showing the potential applications of the extracted planar slice shape proxies. © 2011 ACM.

  17. Human brain slices for epilepsy research: Pitfalls, solutions and future challenges.

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    Jones, Roland S G; da Silva, Anderson Brito; Whittaker, Roger G; Woodhall, Gavin L; Cunningham, Mark O

    2016-02-15

    Increasingly, neuroscientists are taking the opportunity to use live human tissue obtained from elective neurosurgical procedures for electrophysiological studies in vitro. Access to this valuable resource permits unique studies into the network dynamics that contribute to the generation of pathological electrical activity in the human epileptic brain. Whilst this approach has provided insights into the mechanistic features of electrophysiological patterns associated with human epilepsy, it is not without technical and methodological challenges. This review outlines the main difficulties associated with working with epileptic human brain slices from the point of collection, through the stages of preparation, storage and recording. Moreover, it outlines the limitations, in terms of the nature of epileptic activity that can be observed in such tissue, in particular, the rarity of spontaneous ictal discharges, we discuss manipulations that can be utilised to induce such activity. In addition to discussing conventional electrophysiological techniques that are routinely employed in epileptic human brain slices, we review how imaging and multielectrode array recordings could provide novel insights into the network dynamics of human epileptogenesis. Acute studies in human brain slices are ultimately limited by the lifetime of the tissue so overcoming this issue provides increased opportunity for information gain. We review the literature with respect to organotypic culture techniques that may hold the key to prolonging the viability of this material. A combination of long-term culture techniques, viral transduction approaches and electrophysiology in human brain slices promotes the possibility of large scale monitoring and manipulation of neuronal activity in epileptic microcircuits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Large-scale, high-resolution electrophysiological imaging of field potentials in brain slices with microelectronic multielectrode arrays.

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    Ferrea, E; Maccione, A; Medrihan, L; Nieus, T; Ghezzi, D; Baldelli, P; Benfenati, F; Berdondini, L

    2012-01-01

    Multielectrode arrays (MEAs) are extensively used for electrophysiological studies on brain slices, but the spatial resolution and field of recording of conventional arrays are limited by the low number of electrodes available. Here, we present a large-scale array recording simultaneously from 4096 electrodes used to study propagating spontaneous and evoked network activity in acute murine cortico-hippocampal brain slices at unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution. We demonstrate that multiple chemically induced epileptiform episodes in the mouse cortex and hippocampus can be classified according to their spatio-temporal dynamics. Additionally, the large-scale and high-density features of our recording system enable the topological localization and quantification of the effects of antiepileptic drugs in local neuronal microcircuits, based on the distinct field potential propagation patterns. This novel high-resolution approach paves the way to detailed electrophysiological studies in brain circuits spanning spatial scales from single neurons up to the entire slice network.

  19. Fast whole-brain optical tomography capable of automated slice-collection (Conference Presentation)

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    Yuan, Jing; Jiang, Tao; Deng, Lei; Long, Beng; Peng, Jie; Luo, Qingming; Gong, Hui

    2016-03-01

    Acquiring brain-wide composite information of neuroanatomical and molecular phenotyping is crucial to understand brain functions. However, current whole-brain imaging methods based on mechnical sectioning haven't achieved brain-wide acquisition of both neuroanatomical and molecular phenotyping due to the lack of appropriate whole-brain immunostaining of embedded samples. Here, we present a novel strategy of acquiring brain-wide structural and molecular maps in the same brain, combining whole-brain imaging and subsequent immunostaining of automated-collected slices. We developed a whole-brain imaging system capable of automatically imaging and then collecting imaged tissue slices in order. The system contains three parts: structured illumination microscopy for high-throughput optical sectioning, vibratome for high-precision sectioning and slice-collection device for automated collecting of tissue slices. Through our system, we could acquire a whole-brain dataset of agarose-embedded mouse brain at lateral resolution of 0.33 µm with z-interval sampling of 100 µm in 9 h, and automatically collect the imaged slices in sequence. Subsequently, we performed immunohistochemistry of the collected slices in the routine way. We acquired mouse whole-brain imaging datasets of multiple specific types of neurons, proteins and gene expression profiles. We believe our method could accelerate systematic analysis of brain anatomical structure with specific proteins or genes expression information and understanding how the brain processes information and generates behavior.

  20. Coupling of organotypic brain slice cultures to silicon-based arrays of electrodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahnsen, Henrik; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Thiébaud, P

    1999-01-01

    such hippocampal rat brain slice cultures on biocompatible silicon-based chips with arrays of electrodes with a histological organization comparable to that of conventional brain slice cultures grown by the roller drum technique and on semiporous membranes. Intracellular and extracellular recordings from neurons...

  1. Fluidic system for long-term in vitro culturing and monitoring of organotypic brain slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakmand, Tanya; Troels-Smith, Ane R.; Dimaki, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Brain slice preparations cultured in vitro have long been used as a simplified model for studying brain development, electrophysiology, neurodegeneration and neuroprotection. In this paper an open fluidic system developed for improved long term culturing of organotypic brain slices is presented....... The positive effect of continuous flow of growth medium, and thus stability of the glucose concentration and waste removal, is simulated and compared to the effect of stagnant medium that is most often used in tissue culturing. Furthermore, placement of the tissue slices in the developed device was studied...... by numerical simulations in order to optimize the nutrient distribution. The device was tested by culturing transverse hippocampal slices from 7 days old NMRI mice for a duration of 14 days. The slices were inspected visually and the slices cultured in the fluidic system appeared to have preserved...

  2. Optimized Protocol of Methanol Treatment for Immunofluorescent Staining in Fixed Brain Slices.

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    Yuan, Feng; Xiong, Guoxiang; Cohen, Noam A; Cohen, Akiva S

    2017-03-01

    We optimized methanol treatment in paraformaldehyde-fixed slices for immunofluorescent staining of ependymal basal bodies in brain ventricles. As 100% methanol induced severe deformations to the slices (including rolling and folding over), we tried to decrease methanol concentration. We found that 33.3% to 75% methanol could result in ideal immunostaining of basal bodies without inducing obvious deformations. Instead of treating slices at -20°C (without proper cryoprotection measurements) as suggested in previous studies, we carried out methanol treatment at room temperature. Our modified protocol can not only raise immunostaining efficiency in tissue slices, it may also prevent potential freezing damages to the samples.

  3. Microfluidic culture chamber for the long-term perfusion and precise chemical stimulation of organotypic brain tissue slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caicedo, H. H.; Vignes, M.; Brugg, B.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a microfluidic perfusion-based culture system to study long-term in-vitro responses of organo-typic brain slices exposed to localized neurochemical stimulation. Using this microperfusion chamber we show that hip-pocampal organotypic brain slices cultures grown on nitrocellulose......-vitro micro environment, long-term culture of viable brain slices, and delivery of fluids to selected brain regions in a multiplexed and spatially defined manner....

  4. Accumulation of pantothenic acid by the isolated choroid plexus and brain slices in vitro. [Rabbits

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    Spector, R.; Boose, B.

    1984-08-01

    In vitro, the transport of (/sup 14/C)pantothenic acid into and from the isolated rabbit choroid plexus, an anatomical locus of the blood-CSF barrier, and brain slices was studied. The choroid plexus accumulated (/sup 14/C)pantothenic acid from the medium against a concentration gradient, although at low concentrations (less than 1 microM) there was substantial intracellular phosphorylation and binding of the (/sup 14/C)pantothenic acid. The saturable accumulation process in choroid plexus was inhibited by probenecid and caproic acid but not by nicotinic acid or by weak bases. The accumulation process was markedly inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide, poly-L-lysine (which blocks sodium transport), and low temperatures. (/sup 14/C)Pantothenic acid was readily released from choroid plexus by a temperature-dependent process. Brain slices also accumulated and, at low concentrations, phosphorylated (/sup 14/C)pantothenic acid from the medium by a temperature-, probenecid-, and N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive saturable process. However, unlike choroid plexus, brain slices did not concentrate free pantothenic acid and (/sup 14/C)pantothenic acid accumulation was not sensitive to poly-L-lysine. (/sup 14/C)Pantothenic acid was readily released from brain slices by a temperature-sensitive process. These results are consistent with the view that (/sup 14/C)pantothenic acid enters the isolated choroid plexus and brain slices by active transport and facilitated diffusion, respectively.

  5. Acute death of astrocytes in blast-exposed rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

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    Anna P Miller

    Full Text Available Blast traumatic brain injury (bTBI affects civilians, soldiers, and veterans worldwide and presents significant health concerns. The mechanisms of neurodegeneration following bTBI remain elusive and current therapies are largely ineffective. It is important to better characterize blast-evoked cellular changes and underlying mechanisms in order to develop more effective therapies. In the present study, our group utilized rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHCs as an in vitro system to model bTBI. OHCs were exposed to either 138 ± 22 kPa (low or 273 ± 23 kPa (high overpressures using an open-ended helium-driven shock tube, or were assigned to sham control group. At 2 hours (h following injury, we have characterized the astrocytic response to a blast overpressure. Immunostaining against the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP revealed acute shearing and morphological changes in astrocytes, including clasmatodendrosis. Moreover, overlap of GFAP immunostaining and propidium iodide (PI indicated astrocytic death. Quantification of the number of dead astrocytes per counting area in the hippocampal cornu Ammonis 1 region (CA1, demonstrated a significant increase in dead astrocytes in the low- and high-blast, compared to sham control OHCs. However only a small number of GFAP-expressing astrocytes were co-labeled with the apoptotic marker Annexin V, suggesting necrosis as the primary type of cell death in the acute phase following blast exposure. Moreover, western blot analyses revealed calpain mediated breakdown of GFAP. The dextran exclusion additionally indicated membrane disruption as a potential mechanism of acute astrocytic death. Furthermore, although blast exposure did not evoke significant changes in glutamate transporter 1 (GLT-1 expression, loss of GLT-1-expressing astrocytes suggests dysregulation of glutamate uptake following injury. Our data illustrate the profound effect of blast overpressure on astrocytes in

  6. Metabolic Characterization of Acutely Isolated Hippocampal and Cerebral Cortical Slices Using [U-13C]Glucose and [1,2-13C]Acetate as Substrates.

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    McNair, Laura F; Kornfelt, Rasmus; Walls, Anne B; Andersen, Jens V; Aldana, Blanca I; Nissen, Jakob D; Schousboe, Arne; Waagepetersen, Helle S

    2017-03-01

    Brain slice preparations from rats, mice and guinea pigs have served as important tools for studies of neurotransmission and metabolism. While hippocampal slices routinely have been used for electrophysiology studies, metabolic processes have mostly been studied in cerebral cortical slices. Few comparative characterization studies exist for acute hippocampal and cerebral cortical slices, hence, the aim of the current study was to characterize and compare glucose and acetate metabolism in these slice preparations in a newly established incubation design. Cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices prepared from 16 to 18-week-old mice were incubated for 15-90 min with unlabeled glucose in combination with [U-13C]glucose or [1,2-13C]acetate. Our newly developed incubation apparatus allows accurate control of temperature and is designed to avoid evaporation of the incubation medium. Subsequent to incubation, slices were extracted and extracts analyzed for 13C-labeling (%) and total amino acid contents (µmol/mg protein) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Release of lactate from the slices was quantified by analysis of the incubation media. Based on the measured 13C-labeling (%), total amino acid contents and relative activity of metabolic enzymes/pathways, we conclude that the slice preparations in the current incubation apparatus exhibited a high degree of metabolic integrity. Comparison of 13C-labeling observed with [U-13C]glucose in slices from cerebral cortex and hippocampus revealed no significant regional differences regarding glycolytic or total TCA cycle activities. On the contrary, results from the incubations with [1,2-13C]acetate suggest a higher capacity of the astrocytic TCA cycle in hippocampus compared to cerebral cortex. Finally, we propose a new approach for assessing compartmentation of metabolite pools between astrocytes and neurons using 13C-labeling (%) data obtained from mass

  7. Evaluation of registration strategies for multi-modality images of rat brain slices

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    Palm, Christoph; Vieten, Andrea; Salber, Dagmar; Pietrzyk, Uwe

    2009-05-01

    In neuroscience, small-animal studies frequently involve dealing with series of images from multiple modalities such as histology and autoradiography. The consistent and bias-free restacking of multi-modality image series is obligatory as a starting point for subsequent non-rigid registration procedures and for quantitative comparisons with positron emission tomography (PET) and other in vivo data. Up to now, consistency between 2D slices without cross validation using an inherent 3D modality is frequently presumed to be close to the true morphology due to the smooth appearance of the contours of anatomical structures. However, in multi-modality stacks consistency is difficult to assess. In this work, consistency is defined in terms of smoothness of neighboring slices within a single modality and between different modalities. Registration bias denotes the distortion of the registered stack in comparison to the true 3D morphology and shape. Based on these metrics, different restacking strategies of multi-modality rat brain slices are experimentally evaluated. Experiments based on MRI-simulated and real dual-tracer autoradiograms reveal a clear bias of the restacked volume despite quantitatively high consistency and qualitatively smooth brain structures. However, different registration strategies yield different inter-consistency metrics. If no genuine 3D modality is available, the use of the so-called SOP (slice-order preferred) or MOSOP (modality-and-slice-order preferred) strategy is recommended.

  8. The effect of acute ethanol administration on phosphorylethanolamine uptake and metabolism in rat liver slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazzi, L; Arienti, G; Tirillini, B; Arienti, U G; Porcellati, G; Orlando, P

    1977-08-01

    Double-labelled phosphorylethanolamine with a [32P]//[14IA1 ratio of 1 was incubated in vitro with rat liver slices prepared from control and ethanol-intoxicated rats, and the radioactivity measured at given time intervals in liver ethanolamine, phosphorylethanolamine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine. Evidence is presented that after 10 and 15 minutes phosphorylethanolamine enters the slices as an intact molecule, which is directly converted into lipid forms by the Kennedy's pathways. At longer times a hydrolysis of the ester occurs which lowers considerably the theoretical [32P]/[14C]ratio. Fatty liver slices produced by acute ethanol intoxication uptake from the medium more phosphorylethanolamine than controls, and hydrolyze less efficiently than controls the phosphoric ester to ethanolamine and inorganic phosphate.

  9. Rat brain slices produce and liberate kynurenic acid upon exposure to L-kynurenine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turski, W A; Gramsbergen, J B; Traitler, H

    1989-01-01

    The incorporation of L-kynurenine (L-KYN) into kynurenic acid (KYNA) was examined in rat brain slices. KYNA was measured in the slices and in the incubation medium after purification by ion-exchange and HPLC chromatography. In pilot experiments, the formation of KYNA was confirmed by gas...... chromatography. KYNA was produced stereoselectively from L-KYN, and approximately 90% of the newly synthesized KYNA was recovered from the incubation medium. Intracellular KYNA was not actively retained by the tissue and was lost from the cells upon repeated washes. Thus, regulation of the levels...

  10. Regulation of dopamine synthesis and release in striatal and prefrontal cortical brain slices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    Brain slices were used to investigate the role of nerve terminal autoreceptors in modulating dopamine (DA) synthesis and release in striatum and prefrontal cortex. Accumulation of dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) was used as an index of tyrosine hydroxylation in vitro. Nomifensine, a DA uptake blocker, inhibited DOPA synthesis in striatal but not prefrontal slices. This effect was reversed by the DA antagonist sulpiride, suggesting it involved activation of DA receptors by elevated synaptic levels of DA. The autoreceptor-selective agonist EMD-23-448 also inhibited striatal but not prefrontal DOPA synthesis. DOPA synthesis was stimulated in both brain regions by elevated K/sup +/, however only striatal synthesis could be further enhanced by sulpiride. DA release was measured by following the efflux of radioactivity from brain slices prelabeled with (/sup 3/H)-DA. EMD-23-448 and apomorphine inhibited, while sulpiride enhanced, the K/sup +/-evoked overflow of radioactivity from both striatal and prefrontal cortical slices. These findings suggest that striatal DA nerve terminals possess autoreceptors which modulate tyrosine hydroxylation as well as autoreceptors which modulate release. Alternatively, one site may be coupled to both functions through distinct transduction mechanisms. In contrast, autoreceptors on prefrontal cortical terminals appear to regulate DA release but not DA synthesis.

  11. Dopaminergic differentiation of human neural stem cells mediated by co-cultured rat striatal brain slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anwar, Mohammad Raffaqat; Andreasen, Christian Maaløv; Lippert, Solvej Kølvraa

    2008-01-01

    differentiation, we co-cultured cells from a human neural forebrain-derived stem cell line (hNS1) with rat striatal brain slices. In brief, coronal slices of neonatal rat striatum were cultured on semiporous membrane inserts placed in six-well trays overlying monolayers of hNS1 cells. After 12 days of co......Properly committed neural stem cells constitute a promising source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson's disease, but a protocol for controlled dopaminergic differentiation is not yet available. To establish a setting for identification of secreted neural compounds promoting dopaminergic......-culture, large numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunoreactive, catecholaminergic cells could be found underneath individual striatal slices. Cell counting revealed that up to 25.3% (average 16.1%) of the total number of cells in these areas were TH-positive, contrasting a few TH-positive cells (

  12. Organotypic brain slice cultures of adult transgenic P301S mice--a model for tauopathy studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agneta Mewes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Organotypic brain slice cultures represent an excellent compromise between single cell cultures and complete animal studies, in this way replacing and reducing the number of animal experiments. Organotypic brain slices are widely applied to model neuronal development and regeneration as well as neuronal pathology concerning stroke, epilepsy and Alzheimer's disease (AD. AD is characterized by two protein alterations, namely tau hyperphosphorylation and excessive amyloid β deposition, both causing microglia and astrocyte activation. Deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau, called neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs, surrounded by activated glia are modeled in transgenic mice, e.g. the tauopathy model P301S. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study we explore the benefits and limitations of organotypic brain slice cultures made of mature adult transgenic mice as a potential model system for the multifactorial phenotype of AD. First, neonatal (P1 and adult organotypic brain slice cultures from 7- to 10-month-old transgenic P301S mice have been compared with regard to vitality, which was monitored with the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH- and the MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assays over 15 days. Neonatal slices displayed a constant high vitality level, while the vitality of adult slice cultures decreased significantly upon cultivation. Various preparation and cultivation conditions were tested to augment the vitality of adult slices and improvements were achieved with a reduced slice thickness, a mild hypothermic cultivation temperature and a cultivation CO(2 concentration of 5%. Furthermore, we present a substantial immunohistochemical characterization analyzing the morphology of neurons, astrocytes and microglia in comparison to neonatal tissue. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Until now only adolescent animals with a maximum age of two months have been used to prepare organotypic brain slices. The current study

  13. All-diamond functional surface micro-electrode arrays for brain-slice neural analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Vahidpour, Farnoosh; Curley, Lowry; Biró, István; McDonald, Matthew; Croux, Dieter; POBEDINSKAS, Paulius; Haenen, Ken; Giugliano, Michele; Zivcova, Zuzana Vlckova; Kavan, Ladislav; Nesladek, Milos

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Diamond-based microelectrode arrays were fabricated by using nanocrystalline diamond as an insulating layer and conductive boron-doped in order to used them for analysis of brain cortical slices. MEA surface is solely composed of diamond, exposed to the cells. The impedance measurements showed negligible cross-talk between neighbouring diamond microelectrodes. Local field potentials related to neural signals were then successfully recorded from pharmacologically disinhibited rat cor...

  14. Intersection-based registration of slice stacks to form 3D images of the human fetal brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Kio; Hansen, Mads Fogtmann; Habas, Piotr

    2008-01-01

    Clinical fetal MR imaging of the brain commonly makes use of fast 2D acquisitions of multiple sets of approximately orthogonal 2D slices. We and others have previously proposed an iterative slice-to-volume registration process to recover a geometrically consistent 3D image. However, these approac...

  15. Towards 1H-MRSI of the human brain at 7T with slice-selective adiabatic refocusing pulses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenen, T.W.J.; Heerschap, A.; Klomp, D.W.J.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore the possibilities of proton spectroscopic imaging (1H-MRSI) of the human brain at 7 Tesla with adiabatic refocusing pulses. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A combination of conventional slice selective excitation and two pairs of slice selective adiabatic refocusing pulses (semi-LASER)

  16. Automatic brain cropping and atlas slice matching using a PCNN and a generalized invariant Hough transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swathanthira Kumar, M. M.; Sullivan, John M., Jr.

    2007-03-01

    Medical research is dominated by animal models, especially rats and mice. Within a species most laboratory subjects exhibit little variation in brain anatomy. This uniformity of features is used to crop regions of interest based upon a known, cropped brain atlas. For any study involving N subjects, image registration or alignment to an atlas is required to construct a composite result. A highly resolved stack of T2 weighted MRI anatomy images of a Sprague-Dawley rat was registered and cropped to a known segmented atlas. This registered MRI volume was used as the reference atlas. A Pulse Coupled Neural Network (PCNN) was used to separate brain tissue from surrounding structures, such as cranium and muscle. Each iteration of the PCNN produces binary images of increasing area as the intensity spectrum is increased. A rapid filtering algorithm is applied that breaks narrow passages connecting larger segmented areas. A Generalized Invariant Hough Transform is applied subsequently to each PCNN segmented area to identify which segmented reference slice it matches. This process is repeated for multiple slices within each subject. Since we have apriori knowledge of the image ordering and fields of view this information provides initial estimates for subsequent registration codes. This process of subject slice extraction to PCNN mask creations and GIHT matching with known atlas locations is fully automatic.

  17. Neuroprotective effects of cactus polysaccharide on oxygen and glucose deprivation induced damage in rat brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xianju; Li, Qin; Zhang, Yingpei; Lü, Qing; Guo, Lianjun; Huang, Lin; He, Zhi

    2008-06-01

    1. The neuroprotective effect of cactus polysaccharide (CP) on oxygen and glucose deprivation (OGD) and reoxygenation (REO)-induced damage in the cortical and hippocampal slices of rat brain was investigated. 2. Cell viability was evaluated by using the 2, 3, 5-triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC) method. The fluorescence of propidium iodide (PI) staining was used for quantification of cellular survival, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity in incubation medium was assessed by LDH assay to evaluate the degree of injury. 3. The OGD ischemic condition significantly decreased cellular viability and increased LDH release in the incubation medium. CP (0.2 mg/l approximately 2 mg/l) protected brain slices from OGD injury in a dosage dependent manner as demonstrated by increased A 490 value of TTC, decreased PI intensity and LDH release. At the above concentration, CP also prevented the increase of nitric oxide (NO) content and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity induced by OGD. 4. CP can protect the brain slices (cortical and hippocampus) against injury induced by OGD. Its neuroprotective effect may be partly mediated by the NO/iNOS system induced by OGD insult.

  18. Parkia biglobosa Improves Mitochondrial Functioning and Protects against Neurotoxic Agents in Rat Brain Hippocampal Slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayode Komolafe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Methanolic leaf extracts of Parkia biglobosa, PBE, and one of its major polyphenolic constituents, catechin, were investigated for their protective effects against neurotoxicity induced by different agents on rat brain hippocampal slices and isolated mitochondria. Methods. Hippocampal slices were preincubated with PBE (25, 50, 100, or 200 µg/mL or catechin (1, 5, or 10 µg/mL for 30 min followed by further incubation with 300 µM H2O2, 300 µM SNP, or 200 µM PbCl2 for 1 h. Effects of PBE and catechin on SNP- or CaCl2-induced brain mitochondrial ROS formation and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm were also determined. Results. PBE and catechin decreased basal ROS generation in slices and blunted the prooxidant effects of neurotoxicants on membrane lipid peroxidation and nonprotein thiol contents. PBE rescued hippocampal cellular viability from SNP damage and caused a significant boost in hippocampus Na+, K+-ATPase activity but with no effect on the acetylcholinesterase activity. Both PBE and catechin also mitigated SNP- or CaCl2-dependent mitochondrial ROS generation. Measurement by safranine fluorescence however showed that the mild depolarization of the ΔΨm by PBE was independent of catechin. Conclusion. The results suggest that the neuroprotective effect of PBE is dependent on its constituent antioxidants and mild mitochondrial depolarization propensity.

  19. Excitatory amino acid neurotoxicity and modulation of glutamate receptor expression in organotypic brain slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmer, J; Kristensen, Bjarne Winther; Jakobsen, B

    2000-01-01

    -induced excitotoxicity and KA-glutamate receptor subunit mRNA expression after long-term exposure to low, non-toxic doses of KA and NBQX. We conclude that organotypic brain slice cultures, combined with standardized procedures for quantitation of cell damage and receptor subunit changes is of great potential use......Using organotypic slice cultures of hippocampus and cortex-striatum from newborn to 7 day old rats, we are currently studying the excitotoxic effects of kainic acid (KA), AMPA and NMDA and the neuroprotective effects of glutamate receptor blockers, like NBQX. For detection and quantitation......-associated protein 2, and --e) general and specific neuronal and glial cell stains. The results show good correlation between the different markers, and are in accordance with results obtained in vivo. Examples presented in this review will focus on the use of PI uptake to monitor the excitotoxic effects of --a) KA...

  20. Coronary ostial involvement in acute aortic dissection: detection with 64-slice cardiac CT.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, E Ronan

    2012-02-01

    A 41-year-old man collapsed after lifting weights at a gym. Following admission to the emergency department, a 64-slice cardiac computed tomography (CT) revealed a Stanford Type A aortic dissection arising from a previous coarctation repair. Multiphasic reconstructions demonstrated an unstable, highly mobile aortic dissection flap that extended proximally to involve the right coronary artery ostium. Our case is an example of the application of electrocardiogram-gated cardiac CT in directly visualizing involvement of the coronary ostia in acute aortic dissection, which may influence surgical management.

  1. Uptake of 3-hydroxykynurenine measured in rat brain slices and in a neuronal cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, C L; Guilarte, T R; Lever, J R

    1992-07-03

    The uptake of 3-hydroxykynurenine (3HK), a tryptophan metabolite with reported convulsant and cytotoxic properties, has been investigated in a neuronally derived hybrid cell line and in tissue slices prepared from rat brain. In both systems, the observed uptake was temperature-dependent and inhibited in the presence of large neutral amino acids. The apparent Km and Vmax determined for 3HK uptake into N18-RE-105 cells were 1.65 mM and 25.5 nmol/(min x mg protein), respectively. The uptake of 3HK into rat brain slices could be resolved into two components on the basis of their requirements for sodium. Kinetic analyses performed using hippocampal slices revealed a Km of 1.1 mM and Vmax of 18.8 nmol/(h x mg protein) for the sodium-independent process and a Km of 4.8 mM and Vmax of 54.5 nmol/(h x mg protein) for the sodium-dependent process. While sodium-dependent uptake was abolished following treatment with metabolic inhibitors, sodium-independent uptake was only slightly impaired. Sodium-independent uptake was inhibited in the presence of the non-metabolizable amino acids, aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) and aminobicyclo(2,2,1)heptane-2-carboxylic acid (BCH), but not by N-methylated amino acid substrates. Sodium-dependent uptake was insensitive to AIB and was completely abolished by BCH. These results indicate that an uptake process for 3HK is present in the mammalian brain, and suggest that the sodium-dependent component of 3HK transport may be mediated by a system which has not previously been described in CNS tissue.

  2. Multiphysics simulation of a microfluidic perfusion chamber for brain slice physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caicedo, Hector H.; Hernandez, Maximiliano; Fall, Christopher P.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding and optimizing fluid flows through in vitro microfluidic perfusion systems is essential in mimicking in vivo conditions for biological research. In a previous study a microfluidic brain slice device (μBSD) was developed for microscale electrophysiology investigations. The device consisted of a standard perfusion chamber bonded to a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel substrate. Our objective in this study is to characterize the flows through the μBSD by using multiphysics simulations of injections into a pourous matrix to identify optimal spacing of ports. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations are performed with CFD-ACE + software to model, simulate, and assess the transport of soluble factors through the perfusion bath, the microchannels, and a material that mimics the porosity, permeability and tortuosity of brain tissue. Additionally, experimental soluble factor transport through a brain slice is predicted by and compared to simulated fluid flow in a volume that represents a porous matrix material. The computational results are validated with fluorescent dye experiments. PMID:20464499

  3. Coculture system with an organotypic brain slice and 3D spheroid of carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Han-Ning; Lohaus, Raphaela; Hanisch, Uwe-Karsten; Binder, Claudia; Dehghani, Faramarz; Pukrop, Tobias

    2013-10-09

    Patients with cerebral metastasis of carcinomas have a poor prognosis. However, the process at the metastatic site has barely been investigated, in particular the role of the resident (stromal) cells. Studies in primary carcinomas demonstrate the influence of the microenvironment on metastasis, even on prognosis(1,2). Especially the tumor associated macrophages (TAM) support migration, invasion and proliferation(3). Interestingly, the major target sites of metastasis possess tissue-specific macrophages, such as Kupffer cells in the liver or microglia in the CNS. Moreover, the metastatic sites also possess other tissue-specific cells, like astrocytes. Recently, astrocytes were demonstrated to foster proliferation and persistence of cancer cells(4,5). Therefore, functions of these tissue-specific cell types seem to be very important in the process of brain metastasis(6,7). Despite these observations, however, up to now there is no suitable in vivo/in vitro model available to directly visualize glial reactions during cerebral metastasis formation, in particular by bright field microscopy. Recent in vivo live imaging of carcinoma cells demonstrated their cerebral colonization behavior(8). However, this method is very laborious, costly and technically complex. In addition, these kinds of animal experiments are restricted to small series and come with a substantial stress for the animals (by implantation of the glass plate, injection of tumor cells, repetitive anaesthesia and long-term fixation). Furthermore, in vivo imaging is thus far limited to the visualization of the carcinoma cells, whereas interactions with resident cells have not yet been illustrated. Finally, investigations of human carcinoma cells within immunocompetent animals are impossible(8). For these reasons, we established a coculture system consisting of an organotypic mouse brain slice and epithelial cells embedded in matrigel (3D cell sphere). The 3D carcinoma cell spheres were placed directly next to

  4. Clenbuterol enhances the production of kynurenic acid in brain cortical slices and glial cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchowska, Elzbieta; Kloc, Renata; Wnuk, Sebastian; Olajossy, Bartosz; Wielosz, Marian; Urbańska, Ewa M

    2008-01-01

    The effect of a beta(2)-adrenergic agonist, clenbuterol on the production of a glutamate receptor antagonist, kynurenic acid was studied in vitro. Clenbuterol enhanced the production of kynurenic acid in brain cortical slices (0.1-1.0 mM) and in glial cultures (1-50 muM). Timolol, a non-selective beta-adrenergic antagonist prevented this effect. The presented data indicate a novel mechanism of action of beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonists and suggest that an increased formation of the endogenous glutamate receptor antagonist, kynurenic acid could partially contribute to their neuroprotective activity.

  5. Organotypic hippocampal slice cultures for studies of brain damage, neuroprotection and neurorepair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noraberg, Jens; Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Blaabjerg, Morten

    2005-01-01

    ), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and epilepsia. Studies of non-excitotoxic neurotoxic compounds and the experimental use of slice cultures in studies of HIV neurotoxicity, traumatic brain injury (TBI) and neurogenesis are included. For cerebral ischemia, experimental models with oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD......) and exposure to glutamate receptor agonists (excitotoxins) are reviewed. For epilepsia, focus is on induction of seizures with effects on neuronal loss, axonal sprouting and neurogenesis. For Alzheimer's disease, the review centers on the use of beta-amyloid (Abeta) in different models, while the section...

  6. Culturing of PC12 Cells, Neuronal Cells, Astrocytes Cultures and Brain Slices in an Open Microfluidic System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al Atraktchi, Fatima Al-Zahraa; Bakmand, Tanya; Rømer Sørensen, Ane

    The brain is the center of the nervous system, where serious neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and Huntington’s are products of functional loss in the neural cells (1). Typical techniques used to investigate these diseases lack precise control of the cellular surroundings...... cells, neuronal cells, astrocytes cultures and brain slices. The microfluidic system provides efficient nutrient delivery, waste removal, access to oxygen, fine control over the neurochemical environment and access to modern microscopy. Additionally, the setup consists of an in vitro culturing...... and electrochemical sensor system that enables real time detection of metabolites, e.g. dopamine from cell cultures and brain slices. In summary we present results on culturing of brain slices and cells in the microfluidic system as well as on the incorporation of an electrochemical sensor system for characterization...

  7. Glucose-stimulated calcium dynamics in islets of Langerhans in acute mouse pancreas tissue slices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andraž Stožer

    Full Text Available In endocrine cells within islets of Langerhans calcium ions couple cell stimulation to hormone secretion. Since the advent of modern fluorimetry, numerous in vitro studies employing primarily isolated mouse islets have investigated the effects of various secretagogues on cytoplasmic calcium, predominantly in insulin-secreting beta cells. Due to technical limitations, insights of these studies are inherently limited to a rather small subpopulation of outermost cells. The results also seem to depend on various factors, like culture conditions and duration, and are not always easily reconcilable with findings in vivo. The main controversies regard the types of calcium oscillations, presence of calcium waves, and the level of synchronized activity. Here, we set out to combine the in situ acute mouse pancreas tissue slice preparation with noninvasive fluorescent calcium labeling and subsequent confocal laser scanning microscopy to shed new light on the existing controversies utilizing an innovative approach enabling the characterization of responses in many cells from all layers of islets. Our experiments reproducibly showed stable fast calcium oscillations on a sustained plateau rather than slow oscillations as the predominant type of response in acute tissue slices, and that calcium waves are the mechanistic substrate for synchronization of oscillations. We also found indirect evidence that even a large amplitude calcium signal was not sufficient and that metabolic activation was necessary to ensure cell synchronization upon stimulation with glucose. Our novel method helped resolve existing controversies and showed the potential to help answer important physiological questions, making it one of the methods of choice for the foreseeable future.

  8. Domoic acid disrupts the activity and connectivity of neuronal networks in organotypic brain slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiolski, E M; Ito, S; Beggs, J M; Lefebvre, K A; Litke, A M; Smith, D R

    2016-09-01

    Domoic acid is a neurotoxin produced by algae and is found in seafood during harmful algal blooms. As a glutamate agonist, domoic acid inappropriately stimulates excitatory activity in neurons. At high doses, this leads to seizures and brain lesions, but it is unclear how lower, asymptomatic exposures disrupt neuronal activity. Domoic acid has been detected in an increasing variety of species across a greater geographical range than ever before, making it critical to understand the potential health impacts of low-level exposure on vulnerable marine mammal and human populations. To determine whether prolonged domoic acid exposure altered neuronal activity in hippocampal networks, we used a custom-made 512 multi-electrode array with high spatial and temporal resolution to record extracellular potentials (spikes) in mouse organotypic brain slice cultures. We identified individual neurons based on spike waveform and location, and measured the activity and functional connectivity within the neuronal networks of brain slice cultures. Domoic acid exposure significantly altered neuronal spiking activity patterns, and increased functional connectivity within exposed cultures, in the absence of overt cellular or neuronal toxicity. While the overall spiking activity of neurons in domoic acid-exposed cultures was comparable to controls, exposed neurons spiked significantly more often in bursts. We also identified a subset of neurons that were electrophysiologically silenced in exposed cultures, and putatively identified those neurons as fast-spiking inhibitory neurons. These results provide evidence that domoic acid affects neuronal activity in the absence of cytotoxicity, and suggest that neurodevelopmental exposure to domoic acid may alter neurological function in the absence of clinical symptoms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Implantation of glioblastoma spheroids into organotypic brain slice cultures as a model for investigating effects of irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petterson, Stine Asferg; Jakobsen, Ida Pind; Jensen, Stine Skov

    2016-01-01

    , models for studying the effects of radiotherapy in combination with novel strategies are lacking but important since radiotherapy is the most successful non-surgical treatment of brain tumors. The aim of this study was to establish a glioblastoma spheroid-organotypic rat brain slice culture model....... Using confocal time-lapse microscopy and detection of tumor cells by immunohistochemistry, tumor cell migration from the spheroids into the slice cultures was revealed, and found to be unaffected by irradiation. However, the expression of the proliferation marker MIB-1 decreased. In conclusion...

  10. Nimodipine enhances neurite outgrowth in dopaminergic brain slice co-cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sygnecka, Katja; Heine, Claudia; Scherf, Nico; Fasold, Mario; Binder, Hans; Scheller, Christian; Franke, Heike

    2015-02-01

    Calcium ions (Ca(2+)) play important roles in neuroplasticity and the regeneration of nerves. Intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations are regulated by Ca(2+) channels, among them L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, which are inhibited by dihydropyridines like nimodipine. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of nimodipine on neurite growth during development and regeneration. As an appropriate model to study neurite growth, we chose organotypic brain slice co-cultures of the mesocortical dopaminergic projection system, consisting of the ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra and the prefrontal cortex from neonatal rat brains. Quantification of the density of the newly built neurites in the border region (region between the two cultivated slices) of the co-cultures revealed a growth promoting effect of nimodipine at concentrations of 0.1μM and 1μM that was even more pronounced than the effect of the growth factor NGF. This beneficial effect was absent when 10μM nimodipine were applied. Toxicological tests revealed that the application of nimodipine at this higher concentration slightly induced caspase 3 activation in the cortical part of the co-cultures, but did neither affect the amount of lactate dehydrogenase release or propidium iodide uptake nor the ratio of bax/bcl-2. Furthermore, the expression levels of different genes were quantified after nimodipine treatment. The expression of Ca(2+) binding proteins, immediate early genes, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and myelin components did not change significantly after treatment, indicating that the regulation of their expression is not primarily involved in the observed nimodipine mediated neurite growth. In summary, this study revealed for the first time a neurite growth promoting effect of nimodipine in the mesocortical dopaminergic projection system that is highly dependent on the applied concentrations. Copyright © 2014 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of acute and repeated restraint stress on glucose oxidation to CO2 in hippocampal and cerebral cortex slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres I.L.S.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that glucocorticoids released during stress might impair neuronal function by decreasing glucose uptake by hippocampal neurons. Previous work has demonstrated that glucose uptake is reduced in hippocampal and cerebral cortex slices 24 h after exposure to acute stress, while no effect was observed after repeated stress. Here, we report the effect of acute and repeated restraint stress on glucose oxidation to CO2 in hippocampal and cerebral cortex slices and on plasma glucose and corticosterone levels. Male adult Wistar rats were exposed to restraint 1 h/day for 50 days in the chronic model. In the acute model there was a single exposure. Immediately or 24 h after stress, the animals were sacrificed and the hippocampus and cerebral cortex were dissected, sliced, and incubated with Krebs buffer, pH 7.4, containing 5 mM glucose and 0.2 µCi D-[U-14C] glucose. CO2 production from glucose was estimated. Trunk blood was also collected, and both corticosterone and glucose were measured. The results showed that corticosterone levels after exposure to acute restraint were increased, but the increase was smaller when the animals were submitted to repeated stress. Blood glucose levels increased after both acute and repeated stress. However, glucose utilization, measured as CO2 production in hippocampal and cerebral cortex slices, was the same in stressed and control groups under conditions of both acute and chronic stress. We conclude that, although stress may induce a decrease in glucose uptake, this effect is not sufficient to affect the energy metabolism of these cells.

  12. A Finite Element Study of the Dynamic Response of Brain Based on Two Parasagittal Slice Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuewei Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate the influence of gyri and sulci on the response of human head under transient loading. To this end, two detailed parasagittal slice models with and without gyri and sulci have been developed. The models comprised not only cerebrum and skull but also cerebellum, brain stem, CSF, and corpus callosum. In addition, white and gray matters were separated. The material properties were adopted from the literature and assigned to different parts of the models. Nahum’s and Trosseille’s experiments reported in relevant literature were simulated and the simulation results were compared with the test data. The results show that there is no evident difference in terms of intracranial pressure between the models with and without gyri and sulci under simulated conditions. The equivalent stress below gyri and sulci in the model with gyri and sulci is slightly higher than that in the counterpart model without gyri and sulci. The maximum principle strain in brain tissue is lower in the model with gyri and sulci. The stress and strain distributions are changed due to the existence of gyri and sulci. These findings highlight the necessity to include gyri and sulci in the finite element head modeling.

  13. Dopamine Modulates Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity and Action Potential Properties in CA1 Pyramidal Neurons of Acute Rat Hippocampal Slices

    OpenAIRE

    Edelmann, Elke; Lessmann, Volkmar

    2011-01-01

    Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity (STDP) is a cellular model of hebbian synaptic plasticity which is believed to underlie memory formation. In an attempt to establish a STDP paradigm in CA1 of acute hippocampal slices from juvenile rats (P15-20), we found that changes in excitability resulting from different slice preparation protocols correlate with the success of STDP induction. Slice preparation with sucrose containing ACSF prolonged rise time, reduced frequency adaptation, and decreased l...

  14. Variable slice thickness (VAST) EPI for the reduction of susceptibility artifacts in whole-brain GE-EPI at 7 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunheim, Sascha; Johst, Sören; Pfaffenrot, Viktor; Maderwald, Stefan; Quick, Harald H; Poser, Benedikt A

    2017-07-10

    A new technique for 2D gradient-recalled echo echo-planar imaging (GE-EPI) termed 'variable slice thickness' (VAST) is proposed, which reduces signal losses caused by through-slice susceptibility artifacts, while keeping the volume repetition time (TR) manageable. The slice thickness is varied across the brain, with thinner slices being used in the inferior brain regions where signal voids are most severe. Various axial slice thickness schemes with identical whole-brain coverage were compared to regular EPI, which may either suffer from unfeasibly long TR if appropriately thin slices are used throughout, or signal loss if no counter-measures are taken. Evaluation is based on time-course signal-to-noise (tSNR) maps from resting state data and a statistical group-level region of interest (ROI) analysis on breath-hold fMRI measurements. The inferior brain region signal voids with static B0 inhomogeneities could be markedly reduced with VAST GE-EPI in contrast to regular GE-EPI. ROI-averaged event-related signal changes showed 48% increase in VAST compared to GE-EPI with regular "thick" slices. tSNR measurements proved the comparable signal robustness of VAST in comparison to regular GE-EPI with thin slices. A novel acquisition strategy for functional 2D GE-EPI at ultrahigh magnetic field is presented to reduce susceptibility-induced signal voids and keep TR sufficiently short for whole-brain coverage.

  15. Long-Term Tissue Culture of Adult Brain and Spleen Slices on Nanostructured Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallendrusch, Sonja; Merz, Felicitas; Bechmann, Ingo; Mayr, Stefan G; Zink, Mareike

    2017-05-01

    Long-term tissue culture of adult mammalian organs is a highly promising approach to bridge the gap between single cell cultures and animal experiments, and bears the potential to reduce in vivo studies. Novel biomimetic materials open up new possibilities to maintain the complex tissue structure in vitro; however, survival times of adult tissues ex vivo are still limited to a few days with established state-of-the-art techniques. Here, it is demonstrated that TiO2 nanotube scaffolds with specific tissue-tailored characteristics can serve as superior substrates for long-term adult brain and spleen tissue culture. High viability of the explants for at least two weeks is achieved and compared to tissues cultured on standard polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membranes. Histological and immunohistochemical staining and live imaging are used to investigate tissue condition after 5 and 14 d in vitro, while environmental scanning electron microscopy qualifies the interaction with the underlying scaffold. In contrast to tissues cultured on PTFE membranes, enhanced tissue morphology is detected in spleen slices, as well as minor cell death in neuronal tissue, both cultured on nanotube scaffolds. This novel biomimetic tissue model will prove to be useful to address fundamental biological and medical questions from tissue regeneration up to tumor progression and therapeutic approaches. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Castanea sativa Mill. Bark Extract Protects U-373 MG Cells and Rat Brain Slices Against Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santulli, Chiara; Brizi, Claudia; Micucci, Matteo; Del Genio, Ambra; De Cristofaro, Assunta; Bracco, Federica; Pepe, Giuseppina Lucia; di Perna, Ilaria; Budriesi, Roberta; Chiarini, Alberto; Frosini, Maria

    2017-04-01

    Ischemic brain injury is one of the most important causes of death worldwide. The use of one-drug-multi-target agents based on natural compounds is a promising therapeutic option for cerebral ischemia due to their pleiotropic properties. This study assessed the neuroprotective properties of Castanea sativa Mill. bark extract (ENC) in human astrocytoma U-373 MG cells subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation and reperfusion and rat cortical slices subjected to ischemia-like conditions or treated with glutamate or hydrogen peroxide. Neuroprotective effects were determined by assessing cells or slices viability (MTT assay), ROS formation (DCFH-DA assay), apoptosis (sub G0/G1 peak), nuclear fragmentation and chromatin condensation (DAPI staining) as well as changes in lysosomes and mitochondria morphology (Acridine Orange and Rhodamine123 staining, respectively). ENC treatment before injury on U-373 MG cells (5-50 μg/ml) and cortical slices (50-100 μg/ml) provided neuroprotection, while lower or higher concentrations (100 μg/ml U-373 MG cells, 200 μg/ml brain slices) were ineffective. ENC addition during reperfusion or after the injury was not found to be effective. The results suggest that ENC might hold potential as preventive neuroprotective agent, and indicate the importance of further studies exploring its mechanism of action. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 839-850, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Linking Binge Alcohol-Induced Neurodamage to Brain Edema and Potential Aquaporin-4 Upregulation: Evidence in Rat Organotypic Brain Slice Cultures and In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Sripathirathan, Kumar; Brown, James; Neafsey, Edward J.; Collins, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Brain edema and derived oxidative stress potentially are critical events in the hippocampal-entorhinal cortical (HEC) neurodegeneration caused by binge alcohol (ethanol) intoxication and withdrawal in adult rats. Edema's role is based on findings that furosemide diuretic antagonizes binge alcohol–dependent brain overhydration and neurodamage in vivo and in rat organotypic HEC slice cultures. However, evidence that furosemide has significant antioxidant potential and knowledge that alcohol can...

  18. Linking binge alcohol-induced neurodamage to brain edema and potential aquaporin-4 upregulation: evidence in rat organotypic brain slice cultures and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sripathirathan, Kumar; Brown, James; Neafsey, Edward J; Collins, Michael A

    2009-02-11

    Brain edema and derived oxidative stress potentially are critical events in the hippocampal-entorhinal cortical (HEC) neurodegeneration caused by binge alcohol (ethanol) intoxication and withdrawal in adult rats. Edema's role is based on findings that furosemide diuretic antagonizes binge alcohol-dependent brain overhydration and neurodamage in vivo and in rat organotypic HEC slice cultures. However, evidence that furosemide has significant antioxidant potential and knowledge that alcohol can cause oxidative stress through non-edemic pathways has placed edema's role in question. We therefore studied three other diuretics and a related non-diuretic that, according to our oxygen radical antioxidant capacity (ORAC) assays or the literature, possess minimal antioxidant potential. Acetazolamide (ATZ), a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor/diuretic with negligible ORAC effectiveness and, interestingly, an aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channel inhibitor, prevented alcohol-dependent tissue edema and neurodegeneration in HEC slice cultures. Likewise, in binge alcohol-intoxicated rats, ATZ suppressed brain edema while inhibiting neurodegeneration. Torasemide, a loop diuretic lacking furosemide's ORAC capability, also prevented alcohol-induced neurodamage in HEC slice cultures. However, bumetanide (BUM), a diuretic blocker of Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) channels, and L-644, 711, a nondiuretic anion channel inhibitor--both lacking antioxidant capabilities as well as reportedly ineffective against alcohol-dependent brain damage in vivo--reduced neither alcohol-induced neurotoxicity nor (with BUM) edema in HEC slices. Because an AQP4 blocker (ATZ) was neuroprotective, AQP4 expression in the HEC slices was examined and found to be elevated by binge alcohol. The results further indicate that binge ethanol-induced brain edema/swelling, potentially associated with AQP4 upregulation, may be important in consequent neurodegeneration that could derive from neuroinflammatory processes, for example, membrane

  19. Impact of 64-slice coronary CT on the management of patients presenting with acute chest pain: results of a prospective two-centre study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiaens, Luc; Duchat, Florent; Boudiaf, Mourad; Tasu, Jean-Pierre; Fargeaudou, Yann; Ledref, Olivier; Soyer, Philippe; Sirol, Marc

    2012-05-01

    Our two-centre prospective study evaluates the usefulness of 64-slice coronary computed tomography (CCT) to rule out significant coronary artery stenosis in patients admitted in emergency departments (ED) for acute coronary syndromes (ACS) with low-to-intermediate risk score. Patients (175) admitted for acute chest pain (ACP), unmodified electrocardiogram and first troponin measurement within normal ranges were included. A second troponin measurement and a 64-slice CCT within 24 h were performed. Major adverse cardiac events (MACE) were recorded during follow-up (6 months ± 2). 64-slice CCT was either normal or showed non-significant coronary stenosis in the majority of patients (78%). 64-slice CCT depicted significant stenosis (>50% diameter) in 22% of patient whereas initial clinical and biological evaluation was reassuring. For negative CCTs, elevated troponin at second measurement did not modify the strategy or treatment of patients. No MACEs were noted during follow up. In 12% of patients CCT identified unsuspected non-coronary abnormalities. Our study confirms 64-slice CCT utility to rule out significant coronary artery stenosis in 8/10 patients admitted in ED with ACP or ACS with low-to-intermediate risk score. Early discharge with a negative 64-slice CCT is associated with very low risk of cardiac events at 6 months. • 64-slice coronary computed tomography (CCT) offers a critical role in acute chest pain. • 64-slice CCT allows differentiation between significant and non-significant coronary artery stenosis. • Normal 64-slice CCT allows rapid discharge of patients with ACP. • 64-slice CCT helps make appropriate therapeutic decision in patients with ACP.

  20. Metabolic Characterization of Acutely Isolated Hippocampal and Cerebral Cortical Slices Using [U-(13)C]Glucose and [1,2-(13)C]Acetate as Substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McNair, Laura F; Kornfelt, Rasmus; Walls, Anne B

    2017-01-01

    comparative characterization studies exist for acute hippocampal and cerebral cortical slices, hence, the aim of the current study was to characterize and compare glucose and acetate metabolism in these slice preparations in a newly established incubation design. Cerebral cortical and hippocampal slices...... prepared from 16 to 18-week-old mice were incubated for 15-90 min with unlabeled glucose in combination with [U-(13)C]glucose or [1,2-(13)C]acetate. Our newly developed incubation apparatus allows accurate control of temperature and is designed to avoid evaporation of the incubation medium. Subsequent...... to incubation, slices were extracted and extracts analyzed for (13)C-labeling (%) and total amino acid contents (µmol/mg protein) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. Release of lactate from the slices was quantified by analysis of the incubation...

  1. Electrophysiological recordings from rat hippocampus slices following in vivo brain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, M S; Lambert, J D; Johansen, F F

    1991-07-19

    Pyramidal neurons in area CA1 of the septal hippocampus degenerate 2-3 days after an episode of transient global cerebral ischemia. The purpose of this study was to investigate synaptic transmission and passive neuronal properties in the post-ischemic period prior to neuronal death. Electrophysiological recordings were made from area CA1 in hippocampal slices prepared from rats which had survived a period of 20 min of ischemia for up to 5 days. In septal slices, field responses were in area CA1 unaltered up to 24 h after the ischemic insult. Forty-eight hours after ischemia, the mean amplitude of the population spike, but not the field-EPSP, was significantly reduced. In septal slices prepared more than 48 h after ischemia field potentials were absent or strongly attenuated, whereas they were intact in slices prepared from the temporal pole. No spontaneous discharges were detected in slices prepared at any time from post-ischemic rats. Intracellular recordings were obtained from slices up to 48 h after the ischemic episode. There was no significant difference in the resting membrane potential or input resistance between these neurons and those from control slices. Action potentials followed by a fast afterhyperpolarization and spike accommodation were preserved in all post-ischemic neurons. In all neurons investigated, orthodromic stimulation evoked an EPSP followed by a fast- and then a slow-IPSP. One hour after ischemia, the slow-IPSP was reduced. Forty-eight hours after ischemia, the fast-IPSP was significantly increased. The EPSP was markedly attenuated by the non N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor blocker 6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (10 microM). The residual depolarizing component was amplified by perfusing with Mg(2+)-free medium and blocked by the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist DL-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid. Paired-pulse facilitation of the EPSP was also preserved. As in control slices, the slow-IPSP and paired-pulse depression of the fast

  2. Effects of the pyrethroid insecticide, deltamethrin, on respiratory modulated hypoglossal motoneurons in a brain stem slice from newborn mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, J C; Theophilidis, G

    1995-01-01

    We have studied the action of deltamethrin on respiratory modulated hypoglossal motoneurons in a brain stem slice from newborn mice. Deltamethrin depolarized the hypoglossal motoneurons, increased the background synaptic noise and reduced the frequency and amplitude of current elicited action...... potentials. Deltamethrin transiently increased the frequency of the respiratory rhythm. Inspiratory potentials in hypoglossal motoneurons were decreased in amplitude and increased in duration. In conclusion, deltamethrin perturbs the respiratory output from the hypoglossal nucleus through postsynaptic...... actions on hypoglossal motoneurons and by affecting the inspiratory synaptic drive....

  3. The impact of computed tomography slice thickness on the assessment of stereotactic, 3D conformal and intensity-modulated radiotherapy of brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caivano, R; Fiorentino, A; Pedicini, P; Califano, G; Fusco, V

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate radiotherapy treatment planning accuracy by varying computed tomography (CT) slice thickness and tumor size. CT datasets from patients with primary brain disease and metastatic brain disease were selected. Tumor volumes ranging from about 2.5 to 100 cc and CT scan at different slice thicknesses (1, 2, 4, 6 and 10 mm) were used to perform treatment planning (1-, 2-, 4-, 6- and 10-CT, respectively). For any slice thickness, a conformity index (CI) referring to 100, 98, 95 and 90 % isodoses and tumor size was computed. All the CI and volumes obtained were compared to evaluate the impact of CT slice thickness on treatment plans. The smallest volumes reduce significantly if defined on 1-CT with respect to 4- and 6-CT, while the CT slice thickness does not affect target definition for the largest volumes. The mean CI for all the considered isodoses and CT slice thickness shows no statistical differences when 1-CT is compared to 2-CT. Comparing the mean CI of 1- with 4-CT and 1- with 6-CT, statistical differences appear only for the smallest volumes with respect to 100, 98 and 95 % isodoses-the CI for 90 % isodose being not statistically significant for all the considered PTVs. The accuracy of radiotherapy tumor volume definition depends on CT slice thickness. To achieve a better tumor definition and dose coverage, 1- and 2-CT would be suitable for small targets, while 4- and 6-CT are suitable for the other volumes.

  4. Acute hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation is associated with increased extracellular brain adenosine in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerring, Peter Nissen; Dale, Nicholas; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2015-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF) can lead to brain edema, cerebral hyperperfusion and intracranial hypertension. These complications are thought to be mediated by hyperammonemia and inflammation leading to altered brain metabolism. As increased levels of adenosine degradation products have been found...... in brain tissue of patients with ALF we investigated whether hyperammonemia could induce adenosine release in brain tissue. Since adenosine is a potent vasodilator and modulator of cerebral metabolism we furthermore studied the effect of adenosine receptor ligands on intracranial pressure (ICP......) and cerebral blood flow (CBF). We measured the adenosine concentration with biosensors in rat brain slices exposed to ammonia and in a rat model with hyperammonemia and systemic inflammation. Exposure to ammonia in concentrations from 0.15-10 mM led to increases in the cortical adenosine concentration up to 18...

  5. In situ formation of protease-resistant prion protein in transmissible spongiform encephalopathy-infected brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessen, R A; Raymond, G J; Caughey, B

    1997-06-13

    The transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs) comprise a group of fatal neurodegenerative diseases that are characterized by the conversion of the normal host cellular prion protein (PrPC), to the abnormal protease-resistant prion protein isoform (PrP-res). It has been proposed, though not proven, that the infectious TSE agent consists solely of PrP-res and that PrP-res-induced conformational conversion of PrPC to additional PrP-res represents agent replication. In this study we demonstrate in situ conversion of protease-sensitive PrPC to PrP-res in TSE-infected brain slices. One step in this process is the binding of soluble PrPC to endogenous PrP-res deposits. The newly formed PrP-res associated with the slices in a pattern that correlated with the pre-existing brain distribution of PrP-res. Punctate in situ PrP conversion was observed in brain regions containing PrP-res amyloid plaques, and a more dispersed conversion product was detected in areas containing diffuse PrP-res deposits. These studies provide direct evidence that PrP-res formation involves the incorporation of soluble PrPC into both nonfibrillar and fibrillar PrP-res deposits in TSE-infected brain. Our findings suggest that the in situ PrP conversion reaction leads to additional polymerization of endogenous PrP-res aggregates and is analogous to the process of PrP-res fibril and subfibril growth in vivo.

  6. Impact of 64-slice coronary CT on the management of patients presenting with acute chest pain: results of a prospective two-centre study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christiaens, Luc [Departement d' imagerie Cardiovasculaire, Assistance Publique- Hopitaux de Paris, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); CHU de Poitiers, Departement de Cardiologie, Poitiers (France); Duchat, Florent; Boudiaf, Mourad; Fargeaudou, Yann; Ledref, Olivier; Soyer, Philippe [Departement d' imagerie Cardiovasculaire, Assistance Publique- Hopitaux de Paris, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Tasu, Jean-Pierre [CHU de Poitiers, Departement de Radiologie, Poitiers (France); Sirol, Marc [Departement d' imagerie Cardiovasculaire, Assistance Publique- Hopitaux de Paris, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); INSERM UFR U942, Insuffisance Cardiaque et Biomarqueurs, Universite Paris 7 - Denis Diderot, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France); Universite Paris VII - Denis Diderot, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, Service de Radiologie Vasculaire, Hopital Lariboisiere, Paris (France)

    2012-05-15

    Our two-centre prospective study evaluates the usefulness of 64-slice coronary computed tomography (CCT) to rule out significant coronary artery stenosis in patients admitted in emergency departments (ED) for acute coronary syndromes (ACS) with low-to-intermediate risk score. Patients (175) admitted for acute chest pain (ACP), unmodified electrocardiogram and first troponin measurement within normal ranges were included. A second troponin measurement and a 64-slice CCT within 24 h were performed. Major adverse cardiac events (MACE) were recorded during follow-up (6 months {+-} 2). 64-slice CCT was either normal or showed non-significant coronary stenosis in the majority of patients (78%). 64-slice CCT depicted significant stenosis (>50% diameter) in 22% of patient whereas initial clinical and biological evaluation was reassuring. For negative CCTs, elevated troponin at second measurement did not modify the strategy or treatment of patients. No MACEs were noted during follow up. In 12% of patients CCT identified unsuspected non-coronary abnormalities. Our study confirms 64-slice CCT utility to rule out significant coronary artery stenosis in 8/10 patients admitted in ED with ACP or ACS with low-to-intermediate risk score. Early discharge with a negative 64-slice CCT is associated with very low risk of cardiac events at 6 months. (orig.)

  7. Role of 64-slice cardiac computed tomography in the evaluation of patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnoli, A; Martuscelli, E; Sperandio, M; Arganini, C; De Angelis, B; Acampora, V; Patrei, A; Bazzocchi, G; Romeo, F; Simonetti, G

    2010-04-01

    This study was done to evaluate the feasibility, sensitivity and specificity of 64-slice computed tomography (CT) in identifying haemodynamically significant (>50%) coronary artery stenoses in patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS) by correlating the CT findings with the clinical event and data provided by conventional coronary angiography (CCA). Sixty-four patients (38 men and 26 women; mean age 65 years; range+/-10 years) presenting to our hospital's emergency department with a clinical suspicion of ACS were studied with 64-slice CT followed by CCA within 24 h of arrival. Two patients (3.1%) were excluded from the analysis due to artefacts. Per-patient analysis in the remaining 62 patients identified 24 cases (38.7%) of negative CT findings (no stenoses or stenoses 50%, seven overestimated vessels (3.7%) due to extensive calcifications, three vessels (1.6%) with underestimated stenosis and 98 vessels (52.6%) without stenosis. Sensitivity and specificity were 95.3% and 93.3%, respectively. In this type of emergency, coronary CT angiography could lead to considerably lower healthcare costs by identifying patients without coronary disease and allowing immediate discharge without any need for further diagnostic procedures.

  8. The role of multi slice computed tomography in the evaluation of acute non-cardiac chest pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Vegar Zubović

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Differential diagnosis of acute chest pain encompasses a broad spectrum of illnesses which are most likely followed by benign outcomes (pneumonia, pneumothorax, pleurisy, pericardial effusion, hiatus hernia, but also illnesses of lethal outcomes (pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, aortic dissection,thoracic aortic aneurysms, thoracic aortic aneurysm rupture, etc. Illnesses associated with benign and lethal outcomes may present very similar if not the same symptoms, resulting in a diffi cult establishment of accurate diagnosis.Methods: During the period of one year, 123 patients presented with non-cardiac acute chest pain were referred for the multi slice computed tomography (MSCT examination. Scanning of thorax was conductedin two series: unenhanced and contrast-enhanced, using a window for pulmonary parenchyma and mediastinum.Results: From a total number of patients 21.1% had normal results while the other 79.9% had pathological results. Out of the total number of patients with pathological result MSCT established potentially lethal outcome for 35.0%, out of which 83.7% was contributed to vascular territory of pulmonary artery, while 16.3% was contributed to aorta.Conclusion: MSCT scanning, owe to its ability of simultaneous analysis of vascular and non-vascular thoracic structures, represents a very effi cient and reliable method for establishing accurate diagnosis and appropriatetriage of patients with acute chest pain. Accurate and effi cient diagnosis enables benefi cial outcome for the patient in this group of illness. MSCT enables the differentiation of etiological factors, which present as acute onset of non-cardiac chest pain.

  9. A LED-based method for monitoring NAD(P)H and FAD fluorescence in cell cultures and brain slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rösner, Jörg; Liotta, Agustin; Schmitz, Dietmar; Heinemann, Uwe; Kovács, Richard

    2013-01-30

    Nicotinamide- and flavine-adenine-dinucleotides (NAD(P)H and FADH₂) are electron carriers involved in cellular energy metabolism and in a multitude of enzymatic processes. As reduced NAD(P)H and oxidised FAD molecules are fluorescent, changes in tissue auto-fluorescence provide valuable information on the cellular redox state and energy metabolism. Since fluorescence excitation, by mercury arc lamps (HBO) is inherently coupled to photo-bleaching and photo-toxicity, microfluorimetric monitoring of energy metabolism might benefit from the replacement of HBO lamps by light emitting diodes (LEDs). Here we describe a LED-based custom-built setup for monitoring NAD(P)H and FAD fluorescence at the level of single cells (HEK293) and of brain slices. We compared NAD(P)H bleaching characteristics with two light sources (HBO lamp and LED) as well as sensitivity and signal to noise ratio of three different detector types (multi-pixel photon counter (MPPC), photomultiplier tube (PMT) and photodiode). LED excitation resulted in reduced photo-bleaching at the same fluorescence output in comparison to excitation with the HBO lamp. Transiently increasing LED power resulted in reversible bleaching of NAD(P)H fluorescence. Recovery kinetics were dependent on metabolic substrates indicating coupling of NAD(P)H fluorescence to metabolism. Electrical stimulation of brain slices induced biphasic redox changes, as indicated by NAD(P)H/FAD fluorescence transients. Increasing the gain of PMT and decreasing the LED power resulted in similar sensitivity as obtained with the MPPC and the photodiode, without worsening the signal to noise ratio. In conclusion, replacement of HBO lamp with LED might improve conventional PMT based microfluorimetry of tissue auto-fluorescence. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Rat Brain Biogenic Amine Levels during Acute and Subacute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rat Brain Biogenic Amine Levels during Acute and Subacute Phosphamidon Treatment with Reference to Behavioral Tolerance. ... African Research Review ... The present study examines if the levels of amine neurotransmitter substances in rat brain regions are altered during acute and sub-acute treatment with an ...

  11. GABA, taurine and learning: release of amino acids from slices of chick brain following filial imprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, B J; Horn, G; Kendrick, K M

    2001-01-01

    The intermediate and medial hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV) is a forebrain region in the domestic chick that is a site of information storage for the learning process of imprinting. We enquired whether imprinting is associated with learning-related increases in calcium-dependent, potassium-stimulated release of neurotransmitter amino acids from the IMHV. Chicks were hatched and reared in darkness until 15-30 h after hatching. They then either remained in darkness or were trained for 2 h by exposure to an imprinting stimulus. One hour later, the chicks were given a preference test and a preference score was calculated from the results of this test, as a measure of imprinting. Chicks were killed 2 h after training. Slices from the left and right IMHV of trained and untrained chicks were superfused with Krebs' solution either with or without calcium and the superfusate assayed for arginine, aspartate, citrulline, GABA, glutamate, glycine and taurine using high-performance liquid chromatography. For calcium-containing superfusates from the left IMHV, preference score was significantly correlated with potassium-stimulated release of (i) GABA (r=0.51, 23 d.f., P=0.008) and (ii) taurine (r=0.77, 23 d.f., Pimprinting is associated with increases in releasable pools of GABA and taurine and/or membrane excitability in the left IMHV.

  12. Direct Visualization of Neurotransmitters in Rat Brain Slices by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging (DESI - MS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Anna Maria A. P.; Vendramini, Pedro H.; Galaverna, Renan; Schwab, Nicolas V.; Alberici, Luciane C.; Augusti, Rodinei; Castilho, Roger F.; Eberlin, Marcos N.

    2016-12-01

    Mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) of neurotransmitters has so far been mainly performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) where derivatization reagents, deuterated matrix and/or high resolution, or tandem MS have been applied to circumvent problems with interfering ion peaks from matrix and from isobaric species. We herein describe the application of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry imaging (DESI)-MSI in rat brain coronal and sagittal slices for direct spatial monitoring of neurotransmitters and choline with no need of derivatization reagents and/or deuterated materials. The amino acids γ-aminobutyric (GABA), glutamate, aspartate, serine, as well as acetylcholine, dopamine, and choline were successfully imaged using a commercial DESI source coupled to a hybrid quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer. The spatial distribution of the analyzed compounds in different brain regions was determined. We conclude that the ambient matrix-free DESI-MSI is suitable for neurotransmitter imaging and could be applied in studies that involve evaluation of imbalances in neurotransmitters levels.

  13. Acute Management of Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Michael A; Crandall, Marie L; Patel, Mayur B

    2017-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability in patients with trauma. Management strategies must focus on preventing secondary injury by avoiding hypotension and hypoxia and maintaining appropriate cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP), which is a surrogate for cerebral blood flow. CPP can be maintained by increasing mean arterial pressure, decreasing intracranial pressure, or both. The goal should be euvolemia and avoidance of hypotension. Other factors that deserve important consideration in the acute management of patients with TBI are venous thromboembolism, stress ulcer, and seizure prophylaxis, as well as nutritional and metabolic optimization. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Comparison of iterative model, hybrid iterative, and filtered back projection reconstruction techniques in low-dose brain CT: impact of thin-slice imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaura, Takeshi; Iyama, Yuji; Kidoh, Masafumi; Yokoyama, Koichi; Oda, Seitaro; Tokuyasu, Shinichi; Harada, Kazunori; Yamashita, Yasuyuki

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of iterative model reconstruction (IMR) in brain CT especially with thin-slice images. This prospective study received institutional review board approval, and prior informed consent to participate was obtained from all patients. We enrolled 34 patients who underwent brain CT and reconstructed axial images with filtered back projection (FBP), hybrid iterative reconstruction (HIR) and IMR with 1 and 5 mm slice thicknesses. The CT number, image noise, contrast, and contrast noise ratio (CNR) between the thalamus and internal capsule, and the rate of increase of image noise in 1 and 5 mm thickness images between the reconstruction methods, were assessed. Two independent radiologists assessed image contrast, image noise, image sharpness, and overall image quality on a 4-point scale. The CNRs in 1 and 5 mm slice thickness were significantly higher with IMR (1.2 ± 0.6 and 2.2 ± 0.8, respectively) than with FBP (0.4 ± 0.3 and 1.0 ± 0.4, respectively) and HIR (0.5 ± 0.3 and 1.2 ± 0.4, respectively) (p reconstruction techniques. IMR offers significant noise reduction and higher contrast and CNR in brain CT, especially for thin-slice images, when compared to FBP and HIR.

  15. Architectural slicing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak; Hansen, Klaus Marius

    2013-01-01

    Architectural prototyping is a widely used practice, con- cerned with taking architectural decisions through experiments with light- weight implementations. However, many architectural decisions are only taken when systems are already (partially) implemented. This is prob- lematic in the context...... a system and a slicing criterion, architectural slicing produces an architectural prototype that contain the elements in the architecture that are dependent on the ele- ments in the slicing criterion. Furthermore, we present an initial design and implementation of an architectural slicer for Java....

  16. Methodology for Rapid Measures of Glutamate Release in Rat Brain Slices Using Ceramic-Based Microelectrode Arrays: Basic Characterization and Drug Pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintero, Jorge E.; Pomerleau, François; Huettl, Peter; Johnson, Kirk W.; Offord, James; Gerhardt, Greg A.

    2011-01-01

    Excessive excitability or hyperexcitability of glutamate-containing neurons in the brain has been proposed as a possible explanation for anxiety, stress-induced disorders, epilepsy, and some neurodegenerative diseases. However, direct measurement of glutamate on a rapid time scale has proven to be difficult. Here we adapted enzyme-based microelectrode arrays (MEA) capable of detecting glutamate in vivo, to assess the effectiveness of hyperexcitability modulators on glutamate release in brain slices of the rat neocortex. Using glutamate oxidase coated ceramic MEAs coupled with constant voltage amperometry, we measured resting glutamate levels and synaptic overflow of glutamate after K+ stimulation in brain slices. MEAs reproducibly detected glutamate on a second-by-second time scale in the brain slice preparation after depolarization with high K+ to evoke glutamate release. This stimulus-evoked glutamate release was robust, reproducible, and calcium dependent. The K+-evoked glutamate release was modulated by ligands to the a2δ subunit of voltage sensitive calcium channels (PD-0332334 and PD-0200390). Meanwhile, agonists to Group II metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors (LY379268 and LY354740), which are known to alter hyperexcitability of glutamate neurons, attenuated K+-evoked glutamate release but did not alter resting glutamate levels. This new MEA technology provides a means of directly measuring the chemical messengers involved in glutamate neurotransmission and thereby helping to reveal the role multiple glutamatergic system components have on glutamate signaling. PMID:21664606

  17. Whole-brain CT perfusion and CT angiography assessment of Moyamoya disease before and after surgical revascularization: preliminary study with 256-slice CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: The 256-slice CT enables the entire brain to be scanned in a single examination. We evaluated the application of 256-slice whole-brain CT perfusion (CTP in determining graft patency as well as investigating cerebral hemodynamic changes in Moyamoya disease before and after surgical revascularization. METHODS: Thirty-nine cases of Moyamoya disease were evaluated before and after surgical revascularization with 256-slice CT. Whole-brain perfusion images and dynamic 3D CT angiographic images generated from perfusion source data were obtained in all patients. Cerebral blood flow (CBF, cerebral blood volume (CBV, time to peak (TTP and mean transit time (MTT of one hemisphere in the region of middle cerebral artery (MCA distribution and contralateral mirroring areas were measured. Relative CTP values (rCBF, rCBV, rTTP, rMTT were also obtained. Differences in pre- and post- operation perfusion CT values were assessed with paired t test or matched-pairs signed-ranks test. RESULTS: Preoperative CBF, MTT and TTP of potential surgical side were significantly different from those of contralateral side (P<0.01 for all. All graft patencies were displayed using the 3D-CTA images. Postoperative CBF, rCBF and rCBV values of surgical side in the region of MCA were significantly higher than those before operation (P<0.01 for all. Postoperative MTT, TTP, rMTT and rTTP values of the surgical side in the region of MCA were significantly lower than those before operation (P<0.05 for all. CONCLUSION: The 256-slice whole-brain CTP can be used to evaluate cerebral hemodynamic changes in Moyamoya disease before and after surgery and the 3D-CTA is useful for assessing the abnormalities of intracranial arteries and graft patencies.

  18. β-Adrenoceptor activation depresses brain inflammation and is neuroprotective in lipopolysaccharide-induced sensitization to oxygen-glucose deprivation in organotypic hippocampal slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cilio Corrado

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inflammation acting in synergy with brain ischemia aggravates perinatal ischemic brain damage. The sensitizing effect of pro-inflammatory exposure prior to hypoxia is dependent on signaling by TNF-α through TNF receptor (TNFR 1. Adrenoceptor (AR activation is known to modulate the immune response and synaptic transmission. The possible protective effect of α˜ and β˜AR activation against neuronal damage caused by tissue ischemia and inflammation, acting in concert, was evaluated in murine hippocampal organotypic slices treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS and subsequently subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD. Method Hippocampal slices from mice were obtained at P6, and were grown in vitro for 9 days on nitrocellulose membranes. Slices were treated with β1(dobutamine-, β2(terbutaline-, α1(phenylephrine- and α2(clonidine-AR agonists (5 and 50 μM, respectively during LPS (1 μg/mL, 24 h -exposure followed by exposure to OGD (15 min in a hypoxic chamber. Cell death in the slice CA1 region was assessed by propidium iodide staining of dead cells. Results Exposure to LPS + OGD caused extensive cell death from 4 up to 48 h after reoxygenation. Co-incubation with β1-agonist (50 μM during LPS exposure before OGD conferred complete protection from cell death (P -/- and TNFR2-/- slices exposed to LPS followed by OGD. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that activation of both β1- and β2-receptors is neuroprotective and may offer mechanistic insights valuable for development of neuro-protective strategies in neonates.

  19. Comparison of bNOS and chat immunohistochemistry in the laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) and the pedunculopontine tegmentum (PPT) of the mouse from brain slices prepared for electrophysiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veleanu, Maxime; Axen, Tina E; Kristensen, Morten P; Kohlmeier, Kristi A

    2016-04-01

    Identification of cell phenotype from brain slices upon which in vitro electrophysiological recordings have been performed often relies on conducting post hoc immunohistochemistry on tissue that necessarily has not been ideally prepared for immunohistochemical procedures. In such studies, antibody labeling against neuronal nitric oxide synthase (bNOS) has been used to identify cholinergic neurons of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) and the pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei (PPT), two brainstem nuclei importantly involved in arousal. However, a widespread perception maintains that antibody staining for enzymes involved in synthesis or transport, of acetylcholine would be a more definitive marker and hence, preferable. Colocalization of bNOS and CHAT in the LDT/PPT, and presence of parvalbumin (PV), was examined in non-ideally prepared mouse brain slices using currently available antibodies. Using fluorescent-based immunohistochemistry in LDT/PPT slices prepared for in vitro recordings, a near 100% colocalization of bNOS and CHAT was observed. We confirm in the mouse, findings of near 100% colocalization of bNOS and CHAT in the LDT/PPT, and we expand upon data from rat studies using optimally prepared tissue, that for dendritic visualization, bNOS staining exceeded the quality of CHAT staining for visualization of a higher degree of detail of fine processes. PV is not highly present in the mouse LDT/PPT. CHAT and bNOS are equally useful target proteins for immunofluorescent identification of cholinergic LDT/PPT cells in mouse brain slices prepared for in vitro recordings, however, antibody targeting of bNOS allows for a superior appreciation of structural detail. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparison of iterative model, hybrid iterative, and filtered back projection reconstruction techniques in low-dose brain CT: impact of thin-slice imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakaura, Takeshi; Iyama, Yuji; Kidoh, Masafumi; Yokoyama, Koichi [Amakusa Medical Center, Diagnostic Radiology, Amakusa, Kumamoto (Japan); Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Oda, Seitaro; Yamashita, Yasuyuki [Kumamoto University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kumamoto (Japan); Tokuyasu, Shinichi [Philips Electronics, Kumamoto (Japan); Harada, Kazunori [Amakusa Medical Center, Department of Surgery, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2016-03-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of iterative model reconstruction (IMR) in brain CT especially with thin-slice images. This prospective study received institutional review board approval, and prior informed consent to participate was obtained from all patients. We enrolled 34 patients who underwent brain CT and reconstructed axial images with filtered back projection (FBP), hybrid iterative reconstruction (HIR) and IMR with 1 and 5 mm slice thicknesses. The CT number, image noise, contrast, and contrast noise ratio (CNR) between the thalamus and internal capsule, and the rate of increase of image noise in 1 and 5 mm thickness images between the reconstruction methods, were assessed. Two independent radiologists assessed image contrast, image noise, image sharpness, and overall image quality on a 4-point scale. The CNRs in 1 and 5 mm slice thickness were significantly higher with IMR (1.2 ± 0.6 and 2.2 ± 0.8, respectively) than with FBP (0.4 ± 0.3 and 1.0 ± 0.4, respectively) and HIR (0.5 ± 0.3 and 1.2 ± 0.4, respectively) (p < 0.01). The mean rate of increasing noise from 5 to 1 mm thickness images was significantly lower with IMR (1.7 ± 0.3) than with FBP (2.3 ± 0.3) and HIR (2.3 ± 0.4) (p < 0.01). There were no significant differences in qualitative analysis of unfamiliar image texture between the reconstruction techniques. IMR offers significant noise reduction and higher contrast and CNR in brain CT, especially for thin-slice images, when compared to FBP and HIR. (orig.)

  1. Abnormal whole-brain functional networks in homogeneous acute mild traumatic brain injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shumskaya, E.; Andriessen, T.; Norris, David Gordon; Vos, P.E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the whole-brain resting-state networks in a homogeneous group of patients with acute mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) and to identify alterations in functional connectivity induced by MTBI. Methods: Thirty-five patients with acute MTBI and 35 healthy control subjects,

  2. Targeting Dopamine in Acute Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, James W.; Kline, Anthony E.; Wagner, Amy K.; Dixon, C. Edward

    2010-01-01

    In addition to the initial mechanical damage, traumatic brain injury (TBI) induces a series of secondary insults, such as, but not limited to, excitotoxicity, metabolic disruption, and oxidative stress. Neuroprotective strategies after TBI have traditionally focused on cellular preservation as the measurable endpoint although multiple lines of evidence indicate that even with significant neuronal sparing deficits remain at both the cellular and behavioral level. As such, the development of therapies that can effectively confer both neuronal sparing and post-injury functional benefit is critical to providing the best treatment options for clinical TBI. Targeting dopaminergic signaling pathways is a novel approach in TBI that provides benefits to both neuronal survival and functional outcomes. Dopamine, like glutamate, can cause oxidative stress and significant cellular dysfunction when either depleted or over-expressed, and also plays an important role in central nervous system inflammation. The purpose of this review is to discuss dopamine in acute TBI and the role that dopaminergic therapies have as neuroprotective strategies. PMID:22308176

  3. Comparison of bNOS and chat immunohistochemistry in the laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) and the pedunculopontine tegmentum (PPT) of the mouse from brain slices prepared for electrophysiology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veleanu, Maxime; Axen, Tina E; Kristensen, Morten P

    2016-01-01

    maintains that antibody staining for enzymes involved in synthesis or transport, of acetylcholine would be a more definitive marker and hence, preferable. NEW METHOD: Colocalization of bNOS and CHAT in the LDT/PPT, and presence of parvalbumin (PV), was examined in non-ideally prepared mouse brain slices...... using currently available antibodies. RESULTS: Using fluorescent-based immunohistochemistry in LDT/PPT slices prepared for in vitro recordings, a near 100% colocalization of bNOS and CHAT was observed. COMPARISON WITH EXISTING METHOD: We confirm in the mouse, findings of near 100% colocalization of b......NOS and CHAT in the LDT/PPT, and we expand upon data from rat studies using optimally prepared tissue, that for dendritic visualization, bNOS staining exceeded the quality of CHAT staining for visualization of a higher degree of detail of fine processes. PV is not highly present in the mouse LDT...

  4. Multi-slice spiral CT in routine diagnosis of suspected acute left-sided colonic diverticulitis: a prospective study of 120 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werner, A.; Diehl, S.J.; Dueber, C. [Institut fuer Klinische Radiologie, Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, 68167, Mannheim (Germany); Farag-Soliman, M. [Chirurgische Klinik, Universitaetsklinikum Mannheim, Theodor-Kutzer-Ufer 1-3, 68167, Mannheim (Germany)

    2003-12-01

    This prospective study evaluated the use of multi-slice CT (MSCT) for detection of clinically suspected left-sided colonic diverticulitis with regard to diagnosis, complications and alternative diagnoses. One hundred twenty patients with clinically suspected acute left-colonic diverticulitis underwent MSCT of the lower abdomen with IV contrast after rectal application of iodic contrast. The MSCT results were compared with histopathological and intraoperative findings or other radiological or endoscopic methods and clinical outcome. Acute diverticulitis was proven in 67 of the 120 (55.8%) patients, which was detected by MSCT with an accuracy of 98% (sensitivity 97%, specificity 98%). Contained perforation or abscess formation were detected with an accuracy of 96% (sensitivity 100%, specificity 91%) and 98% (sensitivity 100%, specificity 97%), respectively. In 31 of 120 (25.8%) patients diagnoses other than diverticulitis caused abdominal pain, which was correctly diagnosed by MSCT in 71%. The MSCT as well as other concurrently performed diagnostic methods showed normal findings and no causes for the patients symptoms in 22 of the 120 (18.4%) patients. Multi-slice CT is reliable in detecting diverticulitis, including extracolic complications, and often reveals other diagnoses; therefore, MSCT is recommended as standard diagnostic procedure in suspected acute diverticulitis. (orig.)

  5. Estrogen receptor beta and 2-arachydonoylglycerol mediate the suppressive effects of estradiol on frequency of postsynaptic currents in gonadotropin-releasing hormone neurons of metestrous mice: an acute slice electrophysiological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flóra eBálint

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH neurons are controlled by 17β-estradiol (E2 contributing to the steroid feedback regulation of the reproductive axis. In rodents, E2 exerts a negative feedback effect upon GnRH neurons throughout the estrus-diestrus phase of the ovarian cycle. The present study was undertaken to reveal the role of estrogen receptor subtypes in the mediation of the E2 signal and elucidate the downstream molecular machinery of suppression. The effect of E2 administration at low physiological concentration (10 pM on GnRH neurons in acute brain slices obtained from metestrous GnRH-GFP mice was studied under paradigms of blocking or activating estrogen receptor subtypes and interfering with retrograde 2-arachydonoylglycerol (2-AG signaling. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings revealed that E2 significantly diminished the frequency of spontaneous postsynaptic currents (sPSCs in GnRH neurons (49. 62±7.6% which effect was abolished by application of the ERα/β blocker Faslodex (1 µM. Pretreatment of the brain slices with cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1 inverse agonist AM251 (1 µM and intracellularly applied endocannabinoid synthesis blocker THL (10 µM significantly attenuated the effect of E2 on the sPSCs. E2 remained effective in the presence of TTX indicating a direct action of E2 on GnRH cells. The ERβ specific agonist DPN (10 pM also significantly decreased the frequency of miniature postsynaptic currents (mPSCs in GnRH neurons. In addition, the suppressive effect of E2 was completely blocked by the selective ERβ antagonist PHTPP (1 µM indicating that ERβ is required for the observed rapid effect of the E2. In contrast, the ERα agonist PPT (10 pM or the membrane-associated G protein-coupled estrogen receptor (GPR30 agonist G1 (10 pM had no significant effect on the frequency of mPSCs in these neurons. AM251 and THL significantly abolished the effect of E2 whereas AM251 eliminated the action of DPN on the mPSCs. These

  6. [Ca2+]i recordings from neural cells in acutely isolated cerebellar slices employing differential loading of the membrane-permeant form of the calcium indicator fura-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirischuk, S; Verkhratsky, A

    1996-04-01

    This paper contains a description of the procedure for monitoring the cytoplasmic free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) from intact neurones and glial cells in acutely isolated cerebellar slices. The loading of cells with the calcium indicator fura-2 was achieved by slice incubation in Tyrode solution containing 5 "mu"M fura-2 acetoxymethylester (fura-2/AM) and 0.02% (w/v) pluronic-F127 under a controlled (temperature, 35 degrees C; humidity, 98%; and gas, 5% O2 +95% CO2) environment. In such conditions, different cellular elements of the cerebellum (namely granule neurones, Bergmann glial cells and Purkinje neurones) acquired fura-2 at different rates. Ten minutes of slice incubation gave adequate staining of granule neurones only, 20 min of incubation allowed calcium-dependent changes of fluorescence signal measurements in Bergmann glial cells, whereas loading of Purkinje neurones required 40 min of slice exposure to fura-2/AM. In order to assure dye deesterification, slices were kept in continuously gassed bicarbonate-buffered solution for not less than 1 h thereafter. The fluorescence signals (excited at 360 and 380 nm) were collected from either a 25- "mu"m or 40- "mu"m area limited by fixed diaphragm inserted in front of the photomultiplier tube; an individual cell was positioned in approximately the centre of the fluorescence measurement area. These signals were comprised of [Ca2+]i-related changes in fura-2 fluorescence recorded from a cell of interest and background fluorescence. The latter resulted from the summation of slice autofluorescence, signals from the fura-2 acquired by neighbouring tissue and signals from fura-2 compartmentalized by intracellular organelles. After the end of fluorescence recordings, the cell was internally dialysed with dye-free intracellular solution in order to determine the actual levels of background fluorescence. In parallel, electrophysiological properties were determined, allowing identification of cell type and viability

  7. Whole brain CT perfusion in acute anterior circulation ischemia: coverage size matters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emmer, B.J. [Erasmus Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Postbus 2040, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rijkee, M.; Walderveen, M.A.A. van [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Radiology, Leiden (Netherlands); Niesten, J.M.; Velthuis, B.K. [University Medical Centre Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wermer, M.J.H. [Leiden University Medical Centre, Department of Neurology, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2014-12-15

    Our aim was to compare infarct core volume on whole brain CT perfusion (CTP) with several limited coverage sizes (i.e., 3, 4, 6, and 8 cm), as currently used in routine clinical practice. In total, 40 acute ischemic stroke patients with non-contrast CT (NCCT) and CTP imaging of anterior circulation ischemia were included. Imaging was performed using a 320-multislice CT. Average volumes of infarct core of all simulated partial coverage sizes were calculated. Infarct core volume of each partial brain coverage was compared with infarct core volume of whole brain coverage and expressed using a percentage. To determine the optimal starting position for each simulated CTP coverage, the percentage of infarct coverage was calculated for every possible starting position of the simulated partial coverage in relation to Alberta Stroke Program Early CT Score in Acute Stroke Triage (ASPECTS 1) level. Whole brain CTP coverage further increased the percentage of infarct core volume depicted by 10 % as compared to the 8-cm coverage when the bottom slice was positioned at the ASPECTS 1 level. Optimization of the position of the region of interest (ROI) in 3 cm, 4 cm, and 8 cm improved the percentage of infarct depicted by 4 % for the 8-cm, 7 % for the 4-cm, and 13 % for the 3-cm coverage size. This study shows that whole brain CTP is the optimal coverage for CTP with a substantial improvement in accuracy in quantifying infarct core size. In addition, our results suggest that the optimal position of the ROI in limited coverage depends on the size of the coverage. (orig.)

  8. Increases in the number of brain metastases detected at frame-fixed, thin-slice MRI for gamma knife surgery planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Aiko; Shibamoto, Yuta; Mori, Yoshimasa; Hashizume, Chisa; Hagiwara, Masahiro; Kobayashi, Tatsuya

    2010-01-01

    For gamma knife planning, 2.4-mm-slice MRIs are taken under rigid frame fixation, so tiny tumors become visible. This study evaluated differences in the numbers of brain metastases between conventional contrast-enhanced MRI (6 ± 1 mm slice thickness) taken before patient referral and contrast-enhanced MRI for gamma knife planning. The numbers of metastases on the 2 images were counted by at least 2 oncologists. For gamma knife planning, spoiled gradient-recalled echo images were obtained after 0.1 mmol/kg gadolinium administration using a 1.5-T system. Images from 1045 patients with an interval between the 2 MRI studies of 6 weeks or less were analyzed. Increases in the number of metastases were found in 33.7% of the 1045 patients, whereas the number was identical in 62.3%. In 4.0%, the number decreased, indicating overdiagnosis at conventional MRI. These proportions did not differ significantly by the interval before gamma knife. An increase from single to multiple metastases was found in 16.0%. Meningeal dissemination was newly diagnosed in 2.3%. On planning images, the proportions of patients with 1, 2, 3, and 4 or more lesions were 37.6%, 19.3%, 9.3%, and 33.8%, respectively. In cases of colorectal cancer and hepatoma, the proportions of patients with a single metastasis (32 of 61 [52%] and 5 of 6 [83%], respectively) were higher than that of patients with other malignancies. In about one-third of the patients, an increased number of metastases were found on the thin-slice images. This should be kept in mind when deciding the treatment strategy for brain metastases. PMID:20864500

  9. A Unified Approach to Diffusion Direction Sensitive Slice Registration and 3-D DTI Reconstruction From Moving Fetal Brain Anatomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Mads Fogtmann; Seshamani, Sharmishtaa; Kroenke, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    to the underlying anatomy. Previous image registration techniques have been described to estimate the between slice fetal head motion, allowing the reconstruction of 3D a diffusion estimate on a regular grid using interpolation. We propose Approach to Unified Diffusion Sensitive Slice Alignment and Reconstruction...... motion added to sedated fetal monkey dataset show a significant improvement in motion-trajectory estimation compared to current state-of-the-art approaches. The performance of the method is then evaluated on challenging but clinically typical in utero fetal scans of four different human cases, showing...... improved rendition of cortical anatomy and extraction of white matter tracts. While the experimental work focuses on DTI reconstruction (second-order tensor model), the proposed reconstruction framework can employ any 5-D diffusion volume model that can be represented by the spatial parameterizations...

  10. Organotypic slice cultures containing the preBötzinger complex generate respiratory-like rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Wiktor S; Herly, Mikkel; Del Negro, Christopher A; Rekling, Jens C

    2016-02-01

    Study of acute brain stem slice preparations in vitro has advanced our understanding of the cellular and synaptic mechanisms of respiratory rhythm generation, but their inherent limitations preclude long-term manipulation and recording experiments. In the current study, we have developed an organotypic slice culture preparation containing the preBötzinger complex (preBötC), the core inspiratory rhythm generator of the ventrolateral brain stem. We measured bilateral synchronous network oscillations, using calcium-sensitive fluorescent dyes, in both ventrolateral (presumably the preBötC) and dorsomedial regions of slice cultures at 7-43 days in vitro. These calcium oscillations appear to be driven by periodic bursts of inspiratory neuronal activity, because whole cell recordings from ventrolateral neurons in culture revealed inspiratory-like drive potentials, and no oscillatory activity was detected from glial fibrillary associated protein-expressing astrocytes in cultures. Acute slices showed a burst frequency of 10.9 ± 4.2 bursts/min, which was not different from that of brain stem slice cultures (13.7 ± 10.6 bursts/min). However, slice cocultures that include two cerebellar explants placed along the dorsolateral border of the brainstem displayed up to 193% faster burst frequency (22.4 ± 8.3 bursts/min) and higher signal amplitude (340%) compared with acute slices. We conclude that preBötC-containing slice cultures retain inspiratory-like rhythmic function and therefore may facilitate lines of experimentation that involve extended incubation (e.g., genetic transfection or chronic drug exposure) while simultaneously being amenable to imaging and electrophysiology at cellular, synaptic, and network levels. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  11. The Appetite-Inducing Peptide, Ghrelin, Induces Intracellular Store-Mediated Rises in Calcium in Addiction and Arousal-Related Laterodorsal Tegmental Neurons in Mouse Brain Slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauberg, Katrine; Kohlmeier, Kristi Anne

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin, a gut and brain peptide, has recently been shown to be involved in motivated behavior and regulation of the sleep and wakefulness cycle. The laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) is involved in appetitive behavior and control of the arousal state of an organism, and accordingly, behavioral...... actions of ghrelin could be mediated by direct cellular actions within this nucleus. Consistent with this interpretation, postsynaptically mediated depolarizing membrane actions of ghrelin on LDT neurons have been reported. Direct actions were ascribed solely to closure of a potassium conductance however...... this peptide has been shown in other cell types to lead to rises in calcium via release of calcium from intracellular stores. To determine whether ghrelin induced intracellular calcium rises in mouse LDT neurons, we conducted calcium imaging studies in LDT brain slices loaded with the calcium binding dye, Fura...

  12. Sixty-four-slice CT in the assessment of global and regional left ventricular function: Comparison with MRI in a porcine model of acute and subacute myocardial infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodoefel, H.; Reimann, A.; Klumpp, B.; Fenchel, M.; Heuschmid, M.; Miller, S.; Claussen, C.D.; Kopp, A.F. [Eberhard-Karls-University, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Burgstahler, C.; Schroeder, S. [Eberhard-Karls-University, Department of Cardiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Scheule, A.M. [Cardiac and Vascular Surgery, Department of Thoracic, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    The purpose was to assess 64-slice CT in the analysis of global and regional ventricular function, using a model of acute and subacute myocardial infarction in comparison with cine-MRI. Seven pigs underwent standard MSCT and MRI examination a median 1 and 21 days following creation of reperfused myocardial infarction. Endocardial and epicardial contours were manually defined and ventricular volumes calculated according to Simpson's method. Results were compared by Pearson's correlation coefficient and Blant-Altman analysis. Wall motion was assessed on cine-images and evaluated by kappa statistics. MSCT revealed a strong correlation with cine-MRI regarding quantification of end-diastolic volume (EDV; r = 0.97), end-systolic volume (ESV; r = 0.97), stroke volume (SV; r = 0.94), ejection fraction (EF; r = 0.95) or myocardial mass (MM; r =0.94). Minor overestimation was observed for EDV and ESV (bias -1.7 ml; -1.5 ml; P=0.095; 0.025), whilst the mean difference for EF was found to be negligible (bias 0.9%; P = 0.18). Both modalities showed a 96.2% segmental agreement in regional wall motion (weighted-kappa 0.91 for 238 segments). This was true for both acute and subacute infarct phase and MSCT, and thereby enabled accurate intraindividual follow-up of segmental dysfunction. Sixty-four-slice CT allows for reliable analysis of global cardiac function and, moreover, provides accurate evaluation of wall motion in acute and subacute myocardial infarct. (orig.)

  13. Acute Blast Injury Reduces Brain Abeta in Two Rodent Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita eDe Gasperi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (TBI has been a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan. How the primary blast wave affects the brain is not well understood. In particular, it is unclear whether blast injures the brain through mechanisms similar to those found in non-blast closed impact injuries (nbTBI. The β-amyloid (Aβ peptide associated with the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD is elevated acutely following TBI in humans as well as in experimental animal models of nbTBI. We examined levels of brain Aβ following experimental blast injury using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for Aβ 40 and 42. In both rat and mouse models of blast injury, rather than being increased, endogenous rodent brain Aβ levels were decreased acutely following injury. Levels of the amyloid precursor protein (APP were increased following blast exposure although there was no evidence of axonal pathology based on APP immunohistochemical staining. Unlike the findings in nbTBI animal models, levels of the β-secretase, BACE-1, and the γ-secretase component presenilin-1 were unchanged following blast exposure. These studies have implications for understanding the nature of blast injury to the brain. They also suggest that strategies aimed at lowering Aβ production may not be effective for treating acute blast injury to the brain.

  14. Spreading depolarization monitoring in neurocritical care of acute brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartings, Jed A

    2017-04-01

    Spreading depolarizations are unique in being discrete pathologic entities that are well characterized experimentally and also occur commonly in patients with substantial acute brain injury. Here, we review essential concepts in depolarization monitoring, highlighting its clinical significance, interpretation, and future potential. Cortical lesion development in diverse animal models is mediated by tissue waves of mass spreading depolarization that cause the toxic loss of ion homeostasis and limit energy substrate supply through associated vasoconstriction. The signatures of such deterioration are observed in electrocorticographic recordings from perilesional cortex of patients with acute stroke or brain trauma. Experimental work suggests that depolarizations are triggered by energy supply-demand mismatch in focal hotspots of the injury penumbra, and depolarizations are usually observed clinically when other monitoring variables are within recommended ranges. These results suggest that depolarizations are a sensitive measure of relative ischemia and ongoing secondary injury, and may serve as a clinical guide for personalized, mechanistically targeted therapy. Both existing and future candidate therapies offer hope to limit depolarization recurrence. Electrocorticographic monitoring of spreading depolarizations in patients with acute brain injury provides a sensitive measure of relative energy shortage in focal, vulnerable brains regions and indicates ongoing secondary damage. Depolarization monitoring holds potential for targeted clinical trial design and implementation of precision medicine approaches to acute brain injury therapy.

  15. Rat Brain Biogenic Amine Levels during Acute and Sub- acute ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2011-05-20

    May 20, 2011 ... Phosphamidon significantly inhibited both MAO-A and MAO-B activities in rat brain mitochondria, suggesting that the mechanism of action of OP pesticides is through phosphorylation of serine residue present in active centre of MAO (Nag and Nandy, 2001). Organophosphate insecticide chlorpyrifos and ...

  16. Binge Ethanol-induced Neurodegeneration in Rat Organotypic Brain Slice Cultures: Effects of PLA2 Inhibitor Mepacrine and Docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, James; Achille, Nicholas; Neafsey, Edward J.

    2010-01-01

    Using rat organotypic hippocampal-entorhinal cortical (HEC) slice cultures, we examined whether phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity is involved in binge alcohol (ethanol)-induced neurodegeneration, and whether docosahexaenoic acid (DHA; 22:6n-3), a fish oil-enriched fatty acid that is anti-inflammatory in brain damage models, is neuroprotective. Assessed with propidium iodide and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage, neurodamage from ethanol (6 days 100 mM ethanol with four withdrawal periods) was prevented by the PLA2 pan-inhibitor, mepacrine. Also, ethanol-dependent neurodegeneration— particularly in the entorhinal region—was significantly ameliorated by DHA supplementation (25 µM); however, adrenic acid, a 22:4n-6 analog, was ineffective. Consistent with PLA2 activation, [3H] liberation was approximately fivefold greater in [3H]arachidonic acid-preloaded HEC slice cultures during ethanol withdrawal compared to controls, and DHA supplementation suppressed [3H] release to control levels. DHA might antagonize PLA2 activity directly or suppress upstream activators (e.g., oxidative stress); however, other DHA mechanisms could be important in subdueing ethanol-induced PLA2-dependent and independent neuroinflammatory processes. PMID:18592376

  17. Acute stress enhances emotional face processing in the aging brain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everaerd, D.S.; Klumpers, F.; Oude Voshaar, R.C.; Fernandez, G.S.E.; Tendolkar, I.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Healthy aging has been associated with stable emotional wellbeing and attenuated brain responses to negative stimuli. At the same time, depressive symptoms are common in older adults. The neural mechanisms behind this paradox remain to be clarified. We hypothesized that acute stress

  18. Salicylate-Induced Suppression of Electrically Driven Activity in Brain Slices from the Auditory Cortex of Aging Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Namikawa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of tinnitus is known to increase with age. The age-dependent mechanisms of tinnitus may have important implications for the development of new therapeutic treatments. High doses of salicylate can be used experimentally to induce transient tinnitus and hearing loss. Although accumulating evidence indicates that salicylate induces tinnitus by directly targeting neurons in the peripheral and central auditory systems, the precise effect of salicylate on neural networks in the auditory cortex (AC is unknown. Here, we examined salicylate-induced changes in stimulus-driven laminar responses of AC slices with salicylate superfusion in young and aged senescence-accelerated-prone (SAMP and -resistant (SAMR mice. Of the two strains, SAMP1 is known to be a more suitable model of presbycusis. We recorded stimulus-driven laminar local field potential (LFP responses at multi sites in AC slice preparations. We found that for all AC slices in the two strains, salicylate always reduced stimulus-driven LFP responses in all layers. However, for the amplitudes of the LFP responses, the two senescence-accelerated mice (SAM strains showed different laminar properties between the pre- and post-salicylate conditions, reflecting strain-related differences in local circuits. As for the relationships between auditory brainstem response (ABR thresholds and the LFP amplitude ratios in the pre- vs. post-salicylate condition, we found negative correlations in layers 2/3 and 4 for both older strains, and in layer 5 (L5 in older SAMR1. In contrast, the GABAergic agonist muscimol (MSC led to positive correlations between ABR thresholds and LFP amplitude ratios in the pre- vs. post-MSC condition in younger SAM mice from both strains. Further, in younger mice, salicylate decreased the firing rate in AC L4 pyramidal neurons. Thus, salicylate can directly reduce neural excitability of L4 pyramidal neurons and thereby influence AC neural circuit activity. That we

  19. Implantation of glioblastoma spheroids into organotypic brain slice cultures as a model for investigating effects of irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petterson, Stine Asferg; Jakobsen, Ida Pind; Jensen, Stine Skov

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most frequent malignant brain tumor with an overall survival of only 14.6 months. Novel in vitro models preserving both tumor tissue and the interface between tumor and brain tissue are highly needed in order to develop novel efficient therapeutic strategies. Additionally, mod...

  20. A brain slice culture model for studies of endogenous and exogenous precursor cell migration in the rostral migratory stream

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tanvig, Mette; Blaabjerg, Morten; Andersen, Rikke K

    2009-01-01

    week old cultures. For testing the migratory abilities of exogenous precursor cells, rat SVZ neurospheres and human neural (HNS1 cells) and mesenchymal (hMSC-TERT) stem cell lines were micrografted to the rostral SVZ of 1 and 7 day old cultures. Two weeks later graft derivatives were identified......The rostral migratory stream (RMS) is the main pathway by which newly born subventricular zone (SVZ) cells reach the olfactory bulb (OB) in rodents. This migration has been well studied in vivo, but an organotypic in vitro model would facilitate more experimental investigations. Here we introduce...... a slice culture preparation of the rat forebrain including en suite the rostral part of the lateral ventricle, the RMS and the OB. The preparation was validated with regard to endogenous cell proliferation and migration by tracking bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labelled cells in newly established and 3 and 6...

  1. The role of multi slice computed tomography in the evaluation of acute non-cardiac chest pain

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Vegar Zubović; Spomenka Kristić

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Differential diagnosis of acute chest pain encompasses a broad spectrum of illnesses which are most likely followed by benign outcomes (pneumonia, pneumothorax, pleurisy, pericardial effusion, hiatus hernia), but also illnesses of lethal outcomes (pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, aortic dissection,thoracic aortic aneurysms, thoracic aortic aneurysm rupture, etc). Illnesses associated with benign and lethal outcomes may present very similar if not the same symptoms, res...

  2. N-Acetylaspartate distribution in rat brain striatum during acute brain ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sager, T.N.; Laursen, H; Fink-Jensen, A

    1999-01-01

    Brain N-acetylaspartate (NAA) can be quantified by in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) and is used in clinical settings as a marker of neuronal density. It is, however, uncertain whether the change in brain NAA content in acute stroke is reliably measured by 1H-MRS and how NAA......]e increased linearly to 4 mmol/L after 3 hours and this level was maintained for the next 4 h. From the change in in vivo recovery of the interstitial space volume marker [14C]mannitol, the relative amount of NAA distributed in the interstitial space was calculated to be 0.2% of the total brain NAA during...... normal conditions and only 2 to 6% during ischemia. It was concluded that the majority of brain NAA is intracellularly located during ischemia despite large increases of interstitial [NAA]. Thus, MR quantification of NAA during acute ischemia reflects primarily changes in intracellular levels of NAA...

  3. The inflammatory molecules IL-1β and HMGB1 can rapidly enhance focal seizure generation in a brain slice model of temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela eChiavegato

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized by a hyperexcitable brain tissue and unpredictable seizures, i.e., aberrant firing discharges in large neuronal populations. It is well established that proinflammatory cytokines, in addition to their canonical involvement in the immune response, have a crucial role in the mechanism of seizure generation. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of interleukin-1β (IL-1β and high mobility group B1 (HMGB1 in the generation of seizure-like discharges using two models of focal epilepsy in a rat entorhinal cortex slice preparation. Seizure like-discharges were evoked by either slice perfusion with low Mg2+ and picrotoxin or with a double NMDA local stimulation in the presence of the proconvulsant 4-amino-pyridine. The effects of IL-1β or HMGB1 were evaluated by monitoring seizure discharge generation through laser scanning microscope imaging of Ca2+ signals from neurons and astrocytes. In the picrotoxin model, we revealed that both cytokines increased the mean frequency of spontaneous ictal-like discharges, whereas only IL-1β reduced the latency and prolonged the duration of the first ictal-like event. In the second model, a single NMDA pulse, per se ineffective, became successful when it was performed after IL-β or HMGB1 local applications. These findings demonstrate that both IL-1β and HMGB1 can rapidly lower focal ictal event threshold and strengthen the possibility that targeting these inflammatory pathways may represent an effective therapeutic strategy to prevent seizures.

  4. MR-visible brain water content in human acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Rosenbaum, S; Sperling, B

    1999-01-01

    Quantification of metabolite concentrations by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in the human brain using water as an internal standard is based on the assumption that water content does not change significantly in pathologic brain tissue. To test this, we used 1H-MRS to estimate...... brain water content during the course of cerebral infarction. Measurements were performed serially in the acute, subacute, and chronic phase of infarction. Fourteen patients with acute cerebral infarction were examined as well as 9 healthy controls. To correlate with regional cerebral blood flow (r......CBF from Day 0-3 to Day 4-7 (p = 0.050) and from Day 0-3 to Day 8-21 (p = 0.028). No correlation between rCBF and water content was found. Water content in ischemic brain tissue increased significantly between Day 4-7 after stroke. This should be considered when performing quantitative 1H-MRS using water...

  5. Alpha-1-acute phase globulin in the blood of tunicamycin-injected rats. Isolation of the non-glycosylated form, its inhibitory properties and synthesis in liver slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koj, A; Bereta, J; Dubin, A; Kurdowska, A; Chindemi, P; Regoeczi, E

    1986-01-01

    Plasma of rats injected with tunicamycin (2 micrograms/g body wt) shows on crossed immunoelectrophoresis the presence of an additional, slowly migrating component of alpha 1-acute-phase globulin (alpha 1-AP-globulin). The native and modified forms of alpha 1-AP-globulin were jointly isolated on the column of immobilized antibodies and then separated by chromatofocusing on polybuffer exchanger. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate demonstrated that tunicamycin-induced form of rat alpha 1-AP-globulin has Mr of 50,000 and is devoid of carbohydrates as inferred from the lack of staining with Schiff reagent. However, during incubation with papain in vitro it is only slightly less effective than mature glycosylated alpha 1-AP-globulin (Mr 68 000) in inhibiting hydrolysis of CBZ-Lys-ONp. Incubation of liver slices from control and tunicamycin-injected rats with 14C-leucine demonstrated that tunicamycin reduces synthesis and release to the medium of alpha 1-AP-globulin and some other plasma proteins, but the proportion of aglyco-alpha 1-AP-globulin is higher than in plasma.

  6. Monitoring the Neuroinflammatory Response Following Acute Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelin, Eric Peter; Tajsic, Tamara; Zeiler, Frederick Adam; Menon, David K.; Hutchinson, Peter J. A.; Carpenter, Keri L. H.; Morganti-Kossmann, Maria Cristina; Helmy, Adel

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) are major contributors to morbidity and mortality. Following the initial insult, patients may deteriorate due to secondary brain damage. The underlying molecular and cellular cascades incorporate components of the innate immune system. There are different approaches to assess and monitor cerebral inflammation in the neuro intensive care unit. The aim of this narrative review is to describe techniques to monitor inflammatory activity in patients with TBI and SAH in the acute setting. The analysis of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in compartments of the central nervous system (CNS), including the cerebrospinal fluid and the extracellular fluid, represent the most common approaches to monitor surrogate markers of cerebral inflammatory activity. Each of these compartments has a distinct biology that reflects local processes and the cross-talk between systemic and CNS inflammation. Cytokines have been correlated to outcomes as well as ongoing, secondary injury progression. Alongside the dynamic, focal assay of humoral mediators, imaging, through positron emission tomography, can provide a global in vivo measurement of inflammatory cell activity, which reveals long-lasting processes following the initial injury. Compared to the innate immune system activated acutely after brain injury, the adaptive immune system is likely to play a greater role in the chronic phase as evidenced by T-cell-mediated autoreactivity toward brain-specific proteins. The most difficult aspect of assessing neuroinflammation is to determine whether the processes monitored are harmful or beneficial to the brain as accumulating data indicate a dual role for these inflammatory cascades following injury. In summary, the inflammatory component of the complex injury cascade following brain injury may be monitored using different modalities. Using a multimodal monitoring approach can potentially aid in the development of therapeutics

  7. Acute and chronic changes in brain activity with deep brain stimulation for refractory depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conen, Silke; Matthews, Julian C; Patel, Nikunj K; Anton-Rodriguez, José; Talbot, Peter S

    2017-12-01

    Deep brain stimulation is a potential option for patients with treatment-refractory depression. Deep brain stimulation benefits have been reported when targeting either the subgenual cingulate or ventral anterior capsule/nucleus accumbens. However, not all patients respond and optimum stimulation-site is uncertain. We compared deep brain stimulation of the subgenual cingulate and ventral anterior capsule/nucleus accumbens separately and combined in the same seven treatment-refractory depression patients, and investigated regional cerebral blood flow changes associated with acute and chronic deep brain stimulation. Deep brain stimulation-response was defined as reduction in Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale score from baseline of ≥50%, and remission as a Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale score ≤8. Changes in regional cerebral blood flow were assessed using [15O]water positron emission tomography. Remitters had higher relative regional cerebral blood flow in the prefrontal cortex at baseline and all subsequent time-points compared to non-remitters and non-responders, with prefrontal cortex regional cerebral blood flow generally increasing with chronic deep brain stimulation. These effects were consistent regardless of stimulation-site. Overall, no significant regional cerebral blood flow changes were apparent when deep brain stimulation was acutely interrupted. Deep brain stimulation improved treatment-refractory depression severity in the majority of patients, with consistent changes in local and distant brain regions regardless of target stimulation. Remission of depression was reached in patients with higher baseline prefrontal regional cerebral blood flow. Because of the small sample size these results are preliminary and further evaluation is necessary to determine whether prefrontal cortex regional cerebral blood flow could be a predictive biomarker of treatment response.

  8. Comparing culprit lesions in ST-segment elevation and non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome with 64-slice multidetector computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, W.-C. [School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Cardiovascular Medical Center, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, No. 386, Dar-Chung First Road, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: w.c.huang@yahoo.com.tw; Liu, C.-P. [School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Cardiovascular Medical Center, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, No. 386, Dar-Chung First Road, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: cpliu@isca.vghks.gov.tw; Wu, M.-T. [School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, No. 386, Dar-Chung First Road, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: wu.mingting@gmail.com; Mar, G.-Y. [Cardiovascular Medical Center, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, No. 386, Dar-Chung First Road, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: gymar@isca.vghks.gov.tw; Lin, S.-K. [Cardiovascular Medical Center, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, No. 386, Dar-Chung First Road, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: skyii89@yahoo.com.tw; Hsiao, S.-H. [Cardiovascular Medical Center, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, No. 386, Dar-Chung First Road, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: a841120@ms3.hinet.net; Lin, S.-L. [School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Cardiovascular Medical Center, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, No. 386, Dar-Chung First Road, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: sllin@isca.vghks.gov.tw; Chiou, K.-R. [School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Cardiovascular Medical Center, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, No. 386, Dar-Chung First Road, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: krchiou@isca.vghks.gov.tw

    2010-01-15

    Background: Classifying acute coronary syndrome (ACS) as ST elevation ACS (STE-ACS) or non-ST elevation ACS (NSTE-ACS) is critical for clinical prognosis and therapeutic decision-making. Assessing the differences in composition and configuration of culprit lesions between STE-ACS and NSTE-ACS can clarify their pathophysiologic differences. Objective: This study focused on evaluating the ability of 64-slice multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) to investigate these differences in culprit lesions in patients with STE-ACS and NSTE-ACS. Methods: Of 161 ACS cases admitted, 120 who fit study criteria underwent MDCT and conventional coronary angiography. The following MDCT data were analyzed: calcium volume, Agatston calcium scores, plaque area, plaque burden, remodeling index, and plaque density. Results: The MDCT angiography had a good correlation with conventional coronary angiography regarding the stenotic severity of culprit lesions (r = 0.86, p < 0.001). The STE-ACS culprit lesions (n = 54) had significantly higher luminal area stenosis (78.6 {+-} 21.2% vs. 66.7 {+-} 23.9%, p = 0.006), larger plaque burden (0.91 {+-} 0.10 vs. 0.84 {+-} 0.12, p = 0.007) and remodeling index (1.28 {+-} 0.34 vs. 1.16 {+-} 0.22, p = 0.021) than those with NSTE-ACS (n = 66). The percentage of expanding remodeling index (remodeling index >1.05) was significantly higher in the STE-ACS group (81.5% vs. 63.6%, p = 0.031). The patients with STE-ACS had significantly lower MDCT density of culprit lesions than patients with NSTE-ACS (25.8 {+-} 13.9 HU vs. 43.5 {+-} 19.1 HU, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Sixty-four-slice MDCT can accurately evaluate the stenotic severity and composition of culprit lesions in selected patients with either STE-ACS or NSTE-ACS. Culprit lesions in NSTE-ACS patients had significantly lower luminal area stenosis, plaque burden, remodeling index and higher MDCT density, which possibly reflect differences in the composition of vulnerable culprit plaques and thrombi.

  9. Trimethyltin (TMT) neurotoxicity in organotypic rat hippocampal slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noraberg, J; Gramsbergen, J B; Fonnum, F

    1998-01-01

    to in vivo cell stain observations of rats acutely exposed to TMT. The mean PI uptake of the cultures and the LDH efflux into the medium were highly correlated. The combined results obtained by the different markers indicate that the hippocampal slice culture method is a feasible model for further studies......The neurotoxic effects of trimethyltin (TMT) on the hippocampus have been extensively studied in vivo. In this study, we examined whether the toxicity of TMT to hippocampal neurons could be reproduced in organotypic brain slice cultures in order to test the potential of this model...... for neurotoxicological studies, including further studies of neurotoxic mechanisms of TMT. Four-week-old cultures, derived from 7-day-old donor rats and grown in serum-free medium, were exposed to TMT (0.5-100 microM) for 24 h followed by 24 h in normal medium. TMT-induced neurodegeneration was then monitored by (a...

  10. N-Methyl-d-aspartate Modulation of Nucleus Accumbens Dopamine Release by Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors: Fast Cyclic Voltammetry Studies in Rat Brain Slices in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavas, Ersin; Young, Andrew M J

    2017-02-15

    The N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, phencyclidine, induces behavioral changes in rodents mimicking symptoms of schizophrenia, possibly mediated through dysregulation of glutamatergic control of mesolimbic dopamine release. We tested the hypothesis that NMDA receptor activation modulates accumbens dopamine release, and that phencyclidine pretreatment altered this modulation. NMDA caused a receptor-specific, dose-dependent decrease in electrically stimulated dopamine release in nucleus accumbens brain slices. This decrease was unaffected by picrotoxin, making it unlikely to be mediated through GABAergic neurones, but was decreased by the metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist, (RS)-α-methyl-4-sulfonophenylglycine, indicating that NMDA activates mechanisms controlled by these receptors to decrease stimulated dopamine release. The effect of NMDA was unchanged by in vivo pretreatment with phencyclidine (twice daily for 5 days), with a washout period of at least 7 days before experimentation, which supports the hypothesis that there is no enduring direct effect of PCP at NMDA receptors after this pretreatment procedure. We propose that NMDA depression of accumbal dopamine release is mediated by metabotropic glutamate receptors located pre- or perisynaptically, and suggest that NMDA evoked increased extrasynaptic spillover of glutamate is sufficient to activate these receptors that, in turn, inhibit dopamine release. Furthermore, we suggest that enduring functional changes brought about by subchronic phencyclidine pretreatment, modeling deficits in schizophrenia, are downstream effects consequent on chronic blockade of NMDA receptors, rather than direct effects on NMDA receptors themselves.

  11. MR-visible brain water content in human acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gideon, P; Rosenbaum, S; Sperling, B

    1999-01-01

    CBF) SPECT-scanning using 99mTc-HMPAO as flow tracer was performed in the patients. Mean water content (SD) in the infarct area was 37.7 (5.1); 41.8 (4.8); 35.2 (5.4); and 39.3 (5.1) mol x [kg wet weight](-1) at 0-3; 4-7; 8-21; and >180 days after stroke, respectively. Water content increased between Day 0......Quantification of metabolite concentrations by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in the human brain using water as an internal standard is based on the assumption that water content does not change significantly in pathologic brain tissue. To test this, we used 1H-MRS to estimate...... brain water content during the course of cerebral infarction. Measurements were performed serially in the acute, subacute, and chronic phase of infarction. Fourteen patients with acute cerebral infarction were examined as well as 9 healthy controls. To correlate with regional cerebral blood flow (r...

  12. Brain stem slice conditioned medium contains endogenous BDNF and GDNF that affect neural crest boundary cap cells in co-culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Kale, Ajay; Novozhilova, Ekaterina; Siratirakun, Piyaporn; Aquino, Jorge B; Thonabulsombat, Charoensri; Ernfors, Patrik; Olivius, Petri

    2014-05-30

    Conditioned medium (CM), made by collecting medium after a few days in cell culture and then re-using it to further stimulate other cells, is a known experimental concept since the 1950s. Our group has explored this technique to stimulate the performance of cells in culture in general, and to evaluate stem- and progenitor cell aptitude for auditory nerve repair enhancement in particular. As compared to other mediums, all primary endpoints in our published experimental settings have weighed in favor of conditioned culture medium, where we have shown that conditioned culture medium has a stimulatory effect on cell survival. In order to explore the reasons for this improved survival we set out to analyze the conditioned culture medium. We utilized ELISA kits to investigate whether brain stem (BS) slice CM contains any significant amounts of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). We further looked for a donor cell with progenitor characteristics that would be receptive to BDNF and GDNF. We chose the well-documented boundary cap (BC) progenitor cells to be tested in our in vitro co-culture setting together with cochlear nucleus (CN) of the BS. The results show that BS CM contains BDNF and GDNF and that survival of BC cells, as well as BC cell differentiation into neurons, were enhanced when BS CM were used. Altogether, we conclude that BC cells transplanted into a BDNF and GDNF rich environment could be suitable for treatment of a traumatized or degenerated auditory nerve. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Thick Slice and Thin Slice Teaching Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom, Gail; Tong, Stephanie Tom; Hesse, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Student-based teaching evaluations are an integral component to institutions of higher education. Previous work on student-based teaching evaluations suggest that evaluations of instructors based upon "thin slice" 30-s video clips of them in the classroom correlate strongly with their end of the term "thick slice" student evaluations. This study's…

  14. Clinical application of magnetic resonance in acute traumatic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morais, Dionei F.; Gaia, Felipe F.P. [Hospital de Base de Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil). Servico de Neurocirurgia]. E-mail: centro@cerebroecoluna.com.br; Spotti, Antonio R.; Tognola, Waldir A. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Neurologicas; Andrade, Almir F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Neurocirurgia da Emergencia

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI): to identify the type, quantity, severity; and improvement clinical-radiological correlation. Method: Assessment of 55 patients who were imaged using CT and MRI, 34 (61.8%) males and 21 (38.2%) females, with acute (0 to 5 days) and closed TBI. Results: Statistical significant differences (McNemar test): occurred fractures were detected by CT in 29.1% and by MRI in 3.6% of the patients; subdural hematoma by CT in 10.9% and MRI in 36.4 %; diffuse axonal injury (DAI) by CT in 1.8% and MRI in 50.9%; cortical contusions by CT in 9.1% and MRI in 41.8%; subarachnoid hemorrhage by CT in 18.2% and MRI in 41.8%. Conclusion: MRI was superior to the CT in the identification of DAI, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cortical contusions, and acute subdural hematoma; however it was inferior in diagnosing fractures. The detection of DAI was associated with the severity of acute TBI. (author)

  15. An associative Brain-Computer-Interface for acute stroke patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Stevenson, Andrew James Thomas; Aliakbaryhosseinabadi, Susan

    2016-01-01

    An efficient innovative Brain-Computer-Interface system that empowers chronic stroke patients to control an artificial activation of their lower limb muscle through task specific motor intent has been tested in the past. In the current study it was applied to acute stroke patients. The system...... (tibialis anterior). This activation is precisely and individually timed such that the sensory signal arising from the stimulation reaches the motor cortex during its maximum activation due to the intention. The output of the motor cortical area representing the dorsiflexor muscles was significantly...

  16. The value of brain CT findings in acute methanol toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taheri, Morteza Sanei [Department of Radiology, Shohada Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Poison Control Center, Loghman-Hakim Poison Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: saneim@yahoo.com; Moghaddam, Hossein Hassanian [Poison Control Center, Loghman-Hakim Poison Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moharamzad, Yashar; Dadgari, Shahrzad [Department of Radiology, Shohada Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nahvi, Vahideh [Poison Control Center, Loghman-Hakim Poison Hospital, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-02-15

    Objective: Due to depressant effects of methanol on the central nervous system, brain computed tomography (CT) scan has been introduced as a diagnostic device in methanol intoxication. The authors aimed to present brain CT findings in patients with acute methanol intoxication and to determine signs associated with death. Materials and methods: This cohort study involved 42 consecutive patients with acute methanol intoxication. Inclusion criteria were consisted of characteristic clinical presentation of methanol poisoning, and metabolic acidosis with increased anion and osmolar gaps. Brain CT scans without contrast medium were obtained. To determine the association between the CT findings and death, the chi-square test or the Fisher's exact test, odds ratio (OR) and its 95% confidence interval (95% CI) were calculated. Results: Twenty-eight patients (66.6%) had a total of 55 abnormal findings on brain CT, in which bilateral putaminal hypodense lesions was the most common manifestation (27 cases, 96.4%). Putaminal hemorrhage with varying degrees was observed in 7 patients (25%). Six patients (21.4%) had low attenuation lesions in the subcortical white matter of the insula. A significant association was observed between putaminal hemorrhage (OR = 8, 95% CI = 1.187-53.93, P = 0.018) and subcortical necrosis of the insula (OR = 11, 95% CI = 1.504-80.426, P = 0.007) with death. Conclusion: In addition to clinical and laboratory findings, presence of putaminal hemorrhage and insular subcortex white matter necrosis are associated with a poor clinical outcome in patients with methanol poisoning.

  17. Central Administration of Lipopolysaccharide Induces Depressive-like Behavior in Vivo and Activates Brain Indoleamine 2,3 Dioxygenase In Murine Organotypic Hippocampal Slice Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavelaars Annemieke

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transient stimulation of the innate immune system by an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS activates peripheral and central expression of the tryptophan degrading enzyme indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO which mediates depressive-like behavior. It is unknown whether direct activation of the brain with LPS is sufficient to activate IDO and induce depressive-like behavior. Methods Sickness and depressive-like behavior in C57BL/6J mice were assessed by social exploration and the forced swim test, respectively. Expression of cytokines and IDO mRNA was measured by real-time RT-PCR and cytokine protein was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs. Enzymatic activity of IDO was estimated as the amount of kynurenine produced from tryptophan as determined by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC with electrochemical detection. Results Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v. administration of LPS (100 ng increased steady-state transcripts of TNFα, IL-6 and the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS in the hippocampus in the absence of any change in IFNγ mRNA. LPS also increased IDO expression and induced depressive-like behavior, as measured by increased duration of immobility in the forced swim test. The regulation of IDO expression was investigated using in situ organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs derived from brains of newborn C57BL/6J mice. In accordance with the in vivo data, addition of LPS (10 ng/ml to the medium of OHSCs induced steady-state expression of mRNA transcripts for IDO that peaked at 6 h and translated into increased IDO enzymatic activity within 8 h post-LPS. This activation of IDO by direct application of LPS was preceded by synthesis and secretion of TNFα and IL-6 protein and activation of iNOS while IFNγ expression was undetectable. Conclusion These data establish that activation of the innate immune system in the brain is sufficient to activate IDO and induce

  18. Exogenous anandamide protects rat brain against acute neuronal injury in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Stelt, M. van der; Veldhuis, W.B.; Haaften, G.W. van; Fezza, F.; Bisogno, T.; Bär, P.R; Veldink, G.A.

    2001-01-01

    The endocannabinoid anandamide [N-arachidonoylethanolamine (AEA)] is thought to function as an endogenous protective factor of the brain against acute neuronal damage. However, this has never been tested in an in vivo model of acute brain injury. Here, we show in a longitudinal pharmacological

  19. Optimizing sedation in patients with acute brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Mauro; Crippa, Ilaria Alice; Mehta, Sangeeta; Menon, David; Payen, Jean-Francois; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Citerio, Giuseppe

    2016-05-05

    Daily interruption of sedative therapy and limitation of deep sedation have been shown in several randomized trials to reduce the duration of mechanical ventilation and hospital length of stay, and to improve the outcome of critically ill patients. However, patients with severe acute brain injury (ABI; including subjects with coma after traumatic brain injury, ischaemic/haemorrhagic stroke, cardiac arrest, status epilepticus) were excluded from these studies. Therefore, whether the new paradigm of minimal sedation can be translated to the neuro-ICU (NICU) is unclear. In patients with ABI, sedation has 'general' indications (control of anxiety, pain, discomfort, agitation, facilitation of mechanical ventilation) and 'neuro-specific' indications (reduction of cerebral metabolic demand, improved brain tolerance to ischaemia). Sedation also is an essential therapeutic component of intracranial pressure therapy, targeted temperature management and seizure control. Given the lack of large trials which have evaluated clinically relevant endpoints, sedative selection depends on the effect of each agent on cerebral and systemic haemodynamics. Titration and withdrawal of sedation in the NICU setting has to be balanced between the risk that interrupting sedation might exacerbate brain injury (e.g. intracranial pressure elevation) and the potential benefits of enhanced neurological function and reduced complications. In this review, we provide a concise summary of cerebral physiologic effects of sedatives and analgesics, the advantages/disadvantages of each agent, the comparative effects of standard sedatives (propofol and midazolam) and the emerging role of alternative drugs (ketamine). We suggest a pragmatic approach for the use of sedation-analgesia in the NICU, focusing on some practical aspects, including optimal titration and management of sedation withdrawal according to ABI severity.

  20. Is management of acute traumatic brain injury effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LEI Jin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】 Objective: To evaluate all the possible therapeutic measures concerning the acute management of traumatic brain injury (TBI mentioned in Cochrane System-atic Reviews published in the Cochrane Database of Sys-tematic Reviews (CDSR. Methods: An exhausted literature search for all pub-lished Cochrane Systematic Reviews discussing therapeu-tic rather than prevention or rehabilitative interventions of TBI was conducted. We retrieved such databases as CDSR and Cochrane Injury Group, excluded the duplications, and eventually obtained 20 results, which stand for critical ap-praisal for as many as 20 different measures for TBI patients. The important data of each systematic review, including total population, intervention, outcome, etc, were collected and presented in a designed table. Besides, we also tried to find out the possible weakness of these clinical trials in-cluded in each review. Results: Analysis of these reviews yielded meanfuling observations: (1 The effectiveness of most ordinary treat-ments in TBI is inconclusive except that corticosteroids are likely to be ineffective or harmful, and tranexamic acid, nimodipine and progesterone show a promising effect in bleeding trauma, traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage, TBI or severe TBI. (2 A majority of the systematic reviews in-clude a small number of clinical trials and the modest num-bers of patients, largely due to the uncertainty of the effectiveness. (3 The quality of most trials reported in the systematic reviews is more or less questionable. (4 In addition, lots of other complex factors together may lead to the inconclusive results demonstrated in the Cochrane Sys-tematic Reviews. Conclusions: For clinical physicians, to translate these conclusions into practice with caution is essential. Basic medication and nursing care deserve additional attention as well and can be beneficial. For researchers, high quality trials with perfect design and comprehensive consideration of

  1. Exacerbation of Acute Traumatic Brain Injury by Circulating Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelton, Isla; Yates, Abi; Dale, Ashley; Roodselaar, Jay; Akbar, Naveed; Ruitenberg, Marc J; Anthony, Daniel C; Couch, Yvonne

    2018-02-15

    Inflammatory lesions in the brain activate a systemic acute-phase response (APR), which is dependent on the release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) into the circulation. The resulting APR is responsible for regulating leukocyte mobilization and subsequent recruitment to the brain. Factors that either exacerbate or inhibit the APR will also exacerbate or inhibit central nervous system (CNS) inflammation as a consequence and have the potential to influence ongoing secondary damage. Here, we were interested to discover how the circulating EV population changes after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and how manipulation of the circulating EV pool impacts on the outcome of TBI. We found the number of circulating EVs increased rapidly post-TBI, and this was accompanied by an increase in CNS and hepatic leukocyte recruitment. In an adoptive transfer study, we then evaluated the outcomes of TBI after administering EVs derived from either in vitro macrophage or endothelial cell lines stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or from murine plasma from an LPS challenge using the air-pouch model. By manipulating the circulating EV population, we were able to demonstrate that each population of transferred EVs increased the APR. However, the characteristics of the response were dependent on the nature of the EVs; specifically, it was significantly increased when animals were challenged with macrophage-derived EVs, suggesting that the cellular origins of EVs may determine their function. Selectively targeting EVs from macrophage/monocyte populations is likely to be of value in reducing the impact of the systemic inflammatory response on the outcome of traumatic CNS injury.

  2. Cerebellar input to magnocellular neurons in the red nucleus of the mouse: synaptic analysis in horizontal brain slices incorporating cerebello-rubral pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, M C; Alheid, G F; Nunzi, M G; Houk, J C

    2002-01-01

    We studied the synaptic input from the nucleus interpositus of the cerebellum to the magnocellular division of the red nucleus (RNm) in the mouse using combined electrophysiological and neuroanatomical methods. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were made from brain slices (125-150 microm) cut in a horizontal plane oriented to pass through both red nucleus and nucleus interpositus. Large cells that were visually selected and patched were injected with Lucifer Yellow and identified as RNm neurons. Using anterograde tracing from nucleus interpositus in vitro, we examined the course of interposito-rubral axons which are dispersed in the superior cerebellar peduncle. In vitro monosynaptic responses in RNm were elicited by an electrode array placed contralaterally in this pathway but near the midline. Mixed excitatory post-synaptic potentials (EPSPs)/inhibitory post-synaptic potentials (IPSPs) were observed in 48 RNm neurons. Excitatory components of the evoked potentials were studied after blocking inhibitory components with picrotoxin (100 microM) and strychnine (5 microM). All RNm neurons examined continued to show monosynaptic EPSPs after non-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor components were blocked with 10 microM 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione or 5 microM 2,3-dihydro-6-nitro-7-sulfamoyl-benzo(f)-quinoxaline (NBQX; n=12). The residual potentials were identified as NMDA receptor components since they (i) were blocked by the addition of the NMDA receptor antagonist, D,L-2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (APV), (ii) were voltage-dependent, and (iii) were enhanced by Mg(2+) removal. Inhibitory components of the evoked potentials were studied after blocking excitatory components with NBQX and APV. Under these conditions, all RNm neurons studied continued to show IPSPs. Blockade of GABA(A) receptors reduced but did not eliminate the IPSPs. These were eliminated when GABA(A) receptor blockade was combined with strychnine to eliminate glycine components of the

  3. Parametric Trace Slicing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosu, Grigore (Inventor); Chen, Feng (Inventor); Chen, Guo-fang; Wu, Yamei; Meredith, Patrick O. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A program trace is obtained and events of the program trace are traversed. For each event identified in traversing the program trace, a trace slice of which the identified event is a part is identified based on the parameter instance of the identified event. For each trace slice of which the identified event is a part, the identified event is added to an end of a record of the trace slice. These parametric trace slices can be used in a variety of different manners, such as for monitoring, mining, and predicting.

  4. Patch-clamp recordings of rat neurons from acute brain slices of the somatosensory cortex during magnetic stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Tamar ePashut; Dafna eMagidov; Hana eBen-Porat; Shuki eWolfus; Alex eFriedman; Eli ePerel; Michal eLavidor; Izhar eBar‐Gad; Yosef eYeshurun; Alon eKorngreen

    2014-01-01

    Although transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a popular tool for both basic research and clinical applications, its actions on nerve cells are only partially understood. We have previously predicted, using compartmental modeling, that magnetic stimulation of central nervous system neurons depolarized the soma followed by initiation of an action potential in the initial segment of the axon. The simulations also predict that neurons with low current threshold are more susceptible to magne...

  5. Cerebral effect of acute normovolemic hemodilution during brain tumor resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daif, Ahmed Attia Atwa; Hassan, Younis Mohamed Abd El Mageed; Ghareeb, Nawal Abd El-Galil; Othman, Mahmoud Mahmoud; Mohamed, Sherif Abdo Mousa

    2012-01-01

    Acute normovolemic hemodilution (ANH) is used in major surgery expected to be accompanied by excessive blood loss. Reducing the hemoglobin content may disturb cerebral oxygen balance. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of ANH on cerebral oxygen balance in patients subjected to brain tumor resection. Forty patients were randomly allocated into 2 groups (hemodilution and control). In the hemodilution group (HG), 1000 mL of blood was drawn and replaced with the same volume of HES 130/0.4 (6%, Voluven) colloid. In the control group (CG), no blood was drawn, and hemodynamics were stabilized using normal saline until allogenic blood was needed. Arterial and jugular bulb blood samples obtained after induction (basal, sample 1), 40 minutes after induction (or on completion of hemodilution, sample 2), after surgical hemostasis (sample 3), and just before extubation (sample 4) were used for the calculation of arterial-jugular oxygen content difference "Ca-jO(2)," cerebral oxygen extraction "CEO(2)," estimated cerebral metabolic rate for oxygen "eCMRO(2)," cerebral blood flow equivalent "CBFe," and jugular-arterial lactate difference "J-ALD" in both groups. Jugular oxygen saturation "SjvO(2)", CEO(2), and J-ALD showed no significant difference when the 2 groups were compared at the corresponding time points and when the values obtained at different time points were compared with the basal value in the same group. In CG, "Ca-jO(2)" significantly decreased at the end of surgery and before tracheal extubation (Pcerebral oxygenation parameters in patients subjected to brain tumor resection.

  6. Organotypic slice cultures containing the preBötzinger complex generate respiratory-like rhythms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Wiktor S; Herly, Mikkel; Del Negro, Christopher A

    2016-01-01

    Acute brainstem slice preparations in vitro have advanced understanding of the cellular and synaptic mechanisms of respiratory rhythm generation, but their inherent limitations preclude long-term manipulation and recording experiments. Here, we developed an organotypic slice culture preparation...

  7. Different characteristics of cell volume and intracellular calcium ion concentration dynamics between the hippocampal CA1 and lateral cerebral cortex of male mouse brain slices during exposure to hypotonic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Nanae; Omi, Akibumi; Uchino, Hiroyuki; Kudo, Yoshihisa

    2018-01-01

    The mechanism of brain edema is complex and still remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate the regional differences of cell volume and intracellular Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] i ) dynamics during hypotonic stress in male mouse hemi-brain slices. Brain slices were loaded with the fluorescence Ca 2+ indicator fura-2, and cell volume and [Ca 2+ ] i in the lateral cerebral cortex (LCC) and hippocampal CA1 (CA1) region were measured simultaneously during exposure to hypotonic stress using Ca 2+ insensitive (F360) and Ca 2+ sensitive fluorescence (F380), respectively. Brain cell swelling induced by hypotonic stress was followed by a regulatory volume change that coincided with an increase in [Ca 2+ ] i . The degrees of change in cell volume and [Ca 2+ ] i were significantly different between the LCC and CA1. The increase in cell volume and [Ca 2+ ] i in the LCC, but not in the CA1, was decreased by the transient receptor potential channel blockers LaCl 3 and GdCl 3 . The increase in [Ca 2+ ] i in both the LCC and CA1, was significantly decreased by the intracellular Ca 2+ modulators thapsigargin and xestospongin C. The K + channel activator isoflurane and Cl - channel blocker NPPB significantly decreased [Ca 2+ ] i in the LCC. This study demonstrated that, between cells located in the LCC and in the CA1, the characteristics of brain edema induced by hypotonic stress are different. This can be ascribed to the different contribution of volume sensitive G-protein coupled receptor and stretch sensitive Ca 2+ channels. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Oxygen Mapping within Healthy and Acutely Infarcted Brain Tissue in Humans Using the NMR Relaxation of Lipids: A Proof-Of-Concept Translational Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Colliez

    Full Text Available The clinical applicability of brain oxygenation mapping using the MOBILE (Mapping of Oxygen By Imaging Lipids relaxation Enhancement magnetic resonance (MR technique was assessed in the clinical setting of normal brain and of acute cerebral ischemia as a founding proof-of-concept translational study. Changes in the oxygenation level within healthy brain tissue can be detected by analyzing the spin-lattice proton relaxation ('Global T1' combining water and lipid protons because of the paramagnetic properties of molecular oxygen. It was hypothesized that selective measurement of the relaxation of the lipid protons ('Lipids T1' would result in enhanced sensitivity of pO2 mapping because of higher solubility of oxygen in lipids than in water, and this was demonstrated in pre-clinical models using the MOBILE technique. In the present study, 12 healthy volunteers and eight patients with acute (48-72 hours brain infarction were examined with the same clinical 3T MR system. Both Lipids R1 (R1 = 1/T1 and Global R1 were significantly different in the infarcted area and the contralateral unaffected brain tissue, with a higher statistical significance for Lipids R1 (median difference: 0.408 s-1; p<0.0001 than for Global R1 (median difference: 0.154 s-1; p = 0.027. Both Lipids R1 and Global R1 values in the unaffected contralateral brain tissue of stroke patients were not significantly different from the R1 values calculated in the brain tissue of healthy volunteers. The main limitations of the present prototypic version of the MOBILE sequence are the long acquisition time (4 min, hampering robustness of data in uncooperative patients, and a 2 mm slice thickness precluding accurate measurements in small infarcts because of partial volume averaging effects.

  9. Oxygen Mapping within Healthy and Acutely Infarcted Brain Tissue in Humans Using the NMR Relaxation of Lipids: A Proof-Of-Concept Translational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colliez, Florence; Safronova, Marta M; Magat, Julie; Joudiou, Nicolas; Peeters, André P; Jordan, Bénédicte F; Gallez, Bernard; Duprez, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The clinical applicability of brain oxygenation mapping using the MOBILE (Mapping of Oxygen By Imaging Lipids relaxation Enhancement) magnetic resonance (MR) technique was assessed in the clinical setting of normal brain and of acute cerebral ischemia as a founding proof-of-concept translational study. Changes in the oxygenation level within healthy brain tissue can be detected by analyzing the spin-lattice proton relaxation ('Global T1' combining water and lipid protons) because of the paramagnetic properties of molecular oxygen. It was hypothesized that selective measurement of the relaxation of the lipid protons ('Lipids T1') would result in enhanced sensitivity of pO2 mapping because of higher solubility of oxygen in lipids than in water, and this was demonstrated in pre-clinical models using the MOBILE technique. In the present study, 12 healthy volunteers and eight patients with acute (48-72 hours) brain infarction were examined with the same clinical 3T MR system. Both Lipids R1 (R1 = 1/T1) and Global R1 were significantly different in the infarcted area and the contralateral unaffected brain tissue, with a higher statistical significance for Lipids R1 (median difference: 0.408 s-1; p<0.0001) than for Global R1 (median difference: 0.154 s-1; p = 0.027). Both Lipids R1 and Global R1 values in the unaffected contralateral brain tissue of stroke patients were not significantly different from the R1 values calculated in the brain tissue of healthy volunteers. The main limitations of the present prototypic version of the MOBILE sequence are the long acquisition time (4 min), hampering robustness of data in uncooperative patients, and a 2 mm slice thickness precluding accurate measurements in small infarcts because of partial volume averaging effects.

  10. Automated Computer-Assisted Diagnosis of Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease in Emergency Department Patients Undergoing 256-Slice Coronary Computed Tomography Angiography for Acute Chest Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashoul, Sharbell; Gaspar, Tamar; Halon, David A; Lewis, Basil S; Shenkar, Yuval; Jaffe, Ronen; Peled, Nathan; Rubinshtein, Ronen

    2015-10-01

    A 256-slice coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is an accurate method for detection and exclusion of obstructive coronary artery disease (OBS-CAD). However, accurate image interpretation requires expertise and may not be available at all hours. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a fully automated computer-assisted diagnosis (COMP-DIAG) tool for exclusion of OBS-CAD in patients in the emergency department (ED) presenting with chest pain. Three hundred sixty-nine patients in ED without known coronary disease underwent 256-slice CCTA as part of the assessment of chest pain of uncertain origin. COMP-DIAG (CorAnalyzer II) automatically reported presence or exclusion of OBS-CAD (>50% stenosis, ≥1 vessel). Performance characteristics of COMP-DIAG for exclusion and detection of OBS-CAD were determined using expert reading as the reference standard. Seventeen (5%) studies were unassessable by COMP-DIAG software, and 352 patients (1,056 vessels) were therefore available for analysis. COMP-DIAG identified 33% of assessable studies as having OBS-CAD, but the prevalence of OBS-CAD on CCTA was only 18% (66 of 352 patients) by standard expert reading. However, COMP-DIAG correctly identified 61 of the 66 patients (93%) with OBS-CAD with 21 vessels (2%) with OBS-CAD misclassified as negative. In conclusion, compared to expert reading, automated computer-assisted diagnosis using the CorAnalyzer showed high sensitivity but only moderate specificity for detection of obstructive coronary disease in patients in ED who underwent 256-slice CCTA. The high negative predictive value of this computer-assisted algorithm may be useful in the ED setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Slice hyperholomorphic Schur analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Alpay, Daniel; Sabadini, Irene

    2016-01-01

    This book defines and examines the counterpart of Schur functions and Schur analysis in the slice hyperholomorphic setting. It is organized into three parts: the first introduces readers to classical Schur analysis, while the second offers background material on quaternions, slice hyperholomorphic functions, and quaternionic functional analysis. The third part represents the core of the book and explores quaternionic Schur analysis and its various applications. The book includes previously unpublished results and provides the basis for new directions of research.

  12. Investigating Metacognition, Cognition, and Behavioral Deficits of College Students with Acute Traumatic Brain Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Sarah; Davalos, Deana

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Executive dysfunction in college students who have had an acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) was investigated. The cognitive, behavioral, and metacognitive effects on college students who endorsed experiencing a brain injury were specifically explored. Participants: Participants were 121 college students who endorsed a mild TBI, and 121…

  13. Contrasting Acute and Slow-Growing Lesions: A New Door to Brain Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmurget, Michel; Bonnetblanc, FranCois; Duffau, Hugues

    2007-01-01

    The concept of plasticity describes the mechanisms that rearrange cerebral organization following a brain injury. During the last century, plasticity has been mainly investigated in humans with acute strokes. It was then shown: (i) that the brain is organized into highly specialized functional areas, often designated "eloquent" areas and (ii) that…

  14. Functional MRI for Assessment of the Default Mode Network in Acute Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Fisher, Patrick M.; Larsen, Vibeke Andrée

    2017-01-01

    Background: Assessment of the default mode network (DMN) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may improve assessment of the level of consciousness in chronic brain injury, and therefore, fMRI may also have prognostic value in acute brain injury. However, fMRI is much m...

  15. Quantitative multivoxel H-1 MR spectroscopy of the brain in children with acute liver failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sijens, Paul E.; Alkefaji, Heyder; Lunsing, Roelineke J.; van Spronsen, Francjan J.; Meiners, Linda C.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; Verkade, Henkjan J.

    2008-01-01

    Acute liver failure (ALF)-related encephalopathy was previously characterized by MR spectroscopy of single voxels containing both grey and white matter brain tissue. Quantitative multivoxel MRS was used here to compare grey and white matter brain tissue concentrations of glutamate/glutamine (Glx)

  16. Novel Mechanism for Reducing Acute and Chronic Neurodegeneration After Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0195 TITLE: Novel Mechanism for Reducing Acute and Chronic Neurodegeneration after Traumatic Brain Injury...Purpose: The purpose of this project is to develop a radically different strategy to reduce brain glutamate excitotoxicity and treat TBI. We will...objective of reducing blood levels of glutamate. This will produce a brain -to-blood gradient of glutamate which will enhance the removal of excess

  17. Pathological changes in the structures of the blood-brain barrier in acute cerebral circulatory disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. І. Tertyshny

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Morphological changes of the blood-brain barrier were investigated in case of an acute brain disturbed circulation. Autocontrol of vessels with their dilatation and formation of aggregation from formal elements were shown from the onset of the disease. Distructive changes of the endothelium, basement membranes, pericytes, asrtocytosal processes are marked in the microvessels with formation of the perivascular edema. Increase permeability of the blood-brain barrier promotes hemorrhagic transformation and lymphomicrophagical infi ltration of the perivascular zones.

  18. Acute Blast Injury Reduces Brain Abeta in Two Rodent Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury: football , warfare, and long- term effects. N. Engl. J. Med. 363, 1293–1296. Elder, G. A., Dorr, N. P., De Gasperi, R., Gama Sosa, M. A...al. (2012). Intranasal administration of nerve growth fac - tor ameliorate beta-amyloid deposi- tion after traumatic brain injury in rats. Brain Res

  19. Brain expression of the water channels Aquaporin-1 and -4 in mice with acute liver injury, hyperammonemia and brain edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eefsen, Martin; Jelnes, Peter; Schmidt, Lars E

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral edema is a feared complication to acute liver failure (ALF), but the pathogenesis is still poorly understood. The water channels Aquaporin-1 (Aqp1) and -4 (Aqp4) has been associated with brain edema formation in several neuropathological conditions, indicating a possible role of Aqp1 and...

  20. The virtual slice setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytton, William W; Neymotin, Samuel A; Hines, Michael L

    2008-06-30

    In an effort to design a simulation environment that is more similar to that of neurophysiology, we introduce a virtual slice setup in the NEURON simulator. The virtual slice setup runs continuously and permits parameter changes, including changes to synaptic weights and time course and to intrinsic cell properties. The virtual slice setup permits shocks to be applied at chosen locations and activity to be sampled intra- or extracellularly from chosen locations. By default, a summed population display is shown during a run to indicate the level of activity and no states are saved. Simulations can run for hours of model time, therefore it is not practical to save all of the state variables. These, in any case, are primarily of interest at discrete times when experiments are being run: the simulation can be stopped momentarily at such times to save activity patterns. The virtual slice setup maintains an automated notebook showing shocks and parameter changes as well as user comments. We demonstrate how interaction with a continuously running simulation encourages experimental prototyping and can suggest additional dynamical features such as ligand wash-in and wash-out-alternatives to typical instantaneous parameter change. The virtual slice setup currently uses event-driven cells and runs at approximately 2 min/h on a laptop.

  1. siRNA Treatment: “A Sword-in-the-Stone” for Acute Brain Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome Badaut

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ever since the discovery of small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA a little over a decade ago, it has been highly sought after for its potential as a therapeutic agent for many diseases. In this review, we discuss the promising possibility of siRNA to be used as a drug to treat acute brain injuries such as stroke and traumatic brain injury. First, we will give a brief and basic overview of the principle of RNA interference as an effective mechanism to decrease specific protein expression. Then, we will review recent in vivo studies describing siRNA research experiments/treatment options for acute brain diseases. Lastly, we will discuss the future of siRNA as a clinical therapeutic strategy against brain diseases and injuries, while addressing the current obstacles to effective brain delivery.

  2. Imaging findings of the brain abnormalities in acute lymphoblastic leukemia of children during and after treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kyung Joo; Lee, Seung Rho; Park, Dong Woo; Joo, Kyung Bin; Kim, Jang Wook; Hahm, Chang Kok; Kim, Ki Joong; Lee, Hahng [College of Medicine, Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-09-01

    We evaluated the imaging abnormalities of the brain observed during and after treatment of acute childhood lymphoblastic leukemia. The study group consisted of 30 patients (male : female=19 : 11 ; mean age, 64 months) with acute childhood lymphoblastic leukemia during the previous ten-year period who had undergone prophylaxis of the central nervous system. Irrespective of the CNS symptoms, base-line study of the brain involving CT and follow-up CT or MRI was undertaken more than once. We retrospectively evaluated the imaging findings, methods of treatment, associated CNS symptoms, and the interval between diagnosis and the time at which brain abnormalities were revealed by imaging studies. In 15 (50% ; male : female=9 : 6 ; mean age, 77 months) of 30 patients, brain abnormalities that included brain atrophy (n=9), cerebral infarctions (n=4), intracranial hemorrhage (n=1), mineralizing microangiopathy (n=2), and periventricular leukomalacia (n=3) were seen on follow-up CT or MR images. In four of nine patients with brain atrophy, imaging abnormalities such as periventricular leukomalacia (n=2), infarction (n=1) and microangiopathy (n=1) were demonstrated. Fourteen of the 15 patients underwent similar treatment ; the one excluded had leukemic cells in the CSF. Six patients had CNS symptoms. In the 15 patients with abnormal brain imaging findings, the interval between diagnosis and the demonstration of brain abnormalities was between one month and four years. After the cessation of treatment, imaging abnormalities remained in all patients except one with brain atrophy. Various imaging abnormalities of the brain may be seen during and after the treatment of acute childhood lymphoblastic leukemia and persist for a long time. In children with this condition, the assessment of brain abnormalities requires follow-up study of the brain.

  3. Volumetric Integral Phase-shift Spectroscopy for Noninvasive Detection of Hemispheric Bioimpedance Asymmetry in Acute Brain Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-18

    Stroke; Stroke, Acute; Ischemic Stroke; Hemorrhage; Clot (Blood); Brain; Subarachnoid Hemorrhage; Cerebral Infarction; Cerebral Hemorrhage; Cerebral Stroke; Intracerebral Hemorrhage; Intracerebral Injury

  4. Effect of taurine on chronic and acute liver injury: Focus on blood and brain ammonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Heidari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperammonemia is associated with chronic and acute liver injury. There is no promising therapeutic agent against ammonia-induced complications. Hence, finding therapeutic molecules with safe profile of administration has clinical value. The present study was conducted to evaluate the role of taurine (TA administration on plasma and brain ammonia and its consequent events in different models of chronic and acute liver injury and hyperammonemia. Bile duct ligated (BDL rats were used as a model of chronic liver injury. Thioacetamide and acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure were used as acute liver injury models. A high level of ammonia was detected in blood and brain of experimental groups. An increase in brain ammonia level coincided with a decreased total locomotor activity of animals and significant changes in the biochemistry of blood and also liver tissue. TA administration (500 and 1000 mg/kg, i.p, effectively alleviated liver injury and its consequent events including rise in plasma and brain ammonia and brain edema. The data suggested that TA is not only a useful and safe agent to preserve liver function, but also prevented hyperammonemia as a deleterious consequence of acute and chronic liver injury.

  5. The effect of head size/shape, miscentering, and bowtie filter on peak patient tissue doses from modern brain perfusion 256-slice CT: How can we minimize the risk for deterministic effects?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perisinakis, Kostas; Seimenis, Ioannis; Tzedakis, Antonis; Papadakis, Antonios E.; Damilakis, John [Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, Heraklion 71003, Crete (Greece); Medical Diagnostic Center ' Ayios Therissos,' P.O. Box 28405, Nicosia 2033, Cyprus and Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, Panepistimioupolis, Dragana 68100, Alexandroupolis (Greece); Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital of Heraklion, P.O. Box 1352, Heraklion 71110, Crete (Greece); Department of Medical Physics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Crete, P.O. Box 2208, Heraklion 71003, Crete (Greece)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To determine patient-specific absorbed peak doses to skin, eye lens, brain parenchyma, and cranial red bone marrow (RBM) of adult individuals subjected to low-dose brain perfusion CT studies on a 256-slice CT scanner, and investigate the effect of patient head size/shape, head position during the examination and bowtie filter used on peak tissue doses. Methods: The peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were measured in 106 individual-specific adult head phantoms subjected to the standard low-dose brain perfusion CT on a 256-slice CT scanner using a novel Monte Carlo simulation software dedicated for patient CT dosimetry. Peak tissue doses were compared to corresponding thresholds for induction of cataract, erythema, cerebrovascular disease, and depression of hematopoiesis, respectively. The effects of patient head size/shape, head position during acquisition and bowtie filter used on resulting peak patient tissue doses were investigated. The effect of eye-lens position in the scanned head region was also investigated. The effect of miscentering and use of narrow bowtie filter on image quality was assessed. Results: The mean peak doses to eye lens, skin, brain, and RBM were found to be 124, 120, 95, and 163 mGy, respectively. The effect of patient head size and shape on peak tissue doses was found to be minimal since maximum differences were less than 7%. Patient head miscentering and bowtie filter selection were found to have a considerable effect on peak tissue doses. The peak eye-lens dose saving achieved by elevating head by 4 cm with respect to isocenter and using a narrow wedge filter was found to approach 50%. When the eye lies outside of the primarily irradiated head region, the dose to eye lens was found to drop to less than 20% of the corresponding dose measured when the eye lens was located in the middle of the x-ray beam. Positioning head phantom off-isocenter by 4 cm and employing a narrow wedge filter results in a moderate reduction of

  6. Assessment of seizure liability of Org 306039, a 5-HT2c agonist, using hippocampal brain slice and rodent EEG telemetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markgraf, Carrie G; DeBoer, Erik; Zhai, Jin; Cornelius, Lara; Zhou, Ying Ying; MacSweeney, Cliona

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of the seizure potential for a CNS-targeted pharmaceutical compound before it is administered to humans is an important part of development. The current in vitro and in vivo studies were undertaken to characterize the seizure potential of the potent and selective 5-HT2c agonist Org 306039. Rat hippocampal slices (n=5) were prepared and Org 306039 was applied over a concentration range of 0-1000μM. Male Sprague-Dawley rats, implanted with telemetry EEG recording electrodes received either vehicle (n=4) or 100mg/kg Org 306039 (n=4) by oral gavage daily for 10days. EEG was recorded continuously for 22±1h post-dose each day. Post-dose behavior observations were conducted daily for 2h. Body temperature was measured at 1 and 2h post-dose. On Day 7, blood samples were drawn for pharmacokinetic analysis of Org 306039. In hippocampal slice, Org 306039 elicited a concentration-dependent increase in population spike area and number recorded from CA1 area, indicating seizure-genic potential. In telemetered rats, Org 306039 was associated with a decrease in body weight, a decrease in body temperature and the appearance of seizure-related behaviors and pre-seizure waveforms on EEG. One rat exhibited an overt seizure. Plasma concentrations of Org 306039 were similar among the 4 rats in the Org-treated group. Small group size made it difficult to determine a PK-PD relationship. These results indicate that the in vitro and in vivo models complement each other in the characterization of the seizure potential of CNS-targeted compounds such as the 5-HT2c agonist Org 306039. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Brain perfusion studies in the evaluation of acute neurologic abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuckier, Lionel S; Sogbein, O O

    2013-03-01

    Two categories of single-photon radiopharmaceuticals for brain perfusion exist, nonlipophilic and lipophilic compounds. The former are useful in performing simple flow examinations which today have application primarily in the determination of brain death. The latter also exhibit a parenchymal uptake phase that allows for evaluation of the distribution of blood flow within the brain. The lipophilic radiopharmaceuticals, therefore, have application in the evaluation of patients following catastrophic brain injury and traumatic brain injury (TBI) and in prognosticating the outcome following cerebral vascular accidents. Use of these agents to monitor therapy with thrombolytic agents, although theoretically helpful, is technically difficult due to the need to institute treatment rapidly, without undue delay. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Clinically relevant concentration of pregabalin has no acute inhibitory effect on excitation of dorsal horn neurons under normal or neuropathic pain conditions: An intracellular calcium-imaging study in spinal cord slices from adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baba, Hiroshi; Petrenko, Andrey B; Fujiwara, Naoshi

    2016-10-01

    Pregabalin is thought to exert its therapeutic effect in neuropathic pain via binding to α2δ-1 subunits of voltage-gated calcium (Ca(2+)) channels. However, the exact analgesic mechanism after its binding to α2δ-1 subunits remains largely unknown. Whether a clinical concentration of pregabalin (≈10μM) can cause acute inhibition of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord is controversial. To address this issue, we undertook intracellular Ca(2+)-imaging studies using spinal cord slices with an intact attached L5 dorsal root, and examined if pregabalin acutely inhibits the primary afferent stimulation-evoked excitation of dorsal horn neurons in normal rats and in rats with streptozotocin-induced painful diabetic neuropathy. Under normal conditions, stimulation of a dorsal root evoked Ca(2+) signals predominantly in the superficial dorsal horn. Clinically relevant (10μM) and a very high concentration of pregabalin (100μM) did not affect the intensity or spread of dorsal root stimulation-evoked Ca(2+) signals, whereas an extremely high dose of pregabalin (300μM) slightly but significantly attenuated Ca(2+) signals in normal rats and in diabetic neuropathic (DN) rats. There was no difference between normal rats and DN rats with regard to the extent of signal attenuation at all concentrations tested. These results suggest that the activity of dorsal horn neurons in the spinal cord is not inhibited acutely by clinical doses of pregabalin under normal or DN conditions. It is very unlikely that an acute inhibitory action in the dorsal horn is the main analgesic mechanism of pregabalin in neuropathic pain states. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Interleukin-6 enhances expression of adenosine A(1) receptor mRNA and signaling in cultured rat cortical astrocytes and brain slices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biber, K; Lubrich, B; Fiebich, BL; Boddeke, HWGM; van Calker, D

    The inhibitory neuromodulator adenosine is released in the brain in high concentrations under conditions of exaggerated neuronal activity such as ischemia and seizures, or electroconvulsive treatment. By inhibiting neural overactivity, adenosine counteracts seizure activity and promotes neuronal

  10. Oxidative stress and apoptosis after acute respiratory hypoxia and reoxygenation in rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Coimbra-Costa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Acute hypoxia increases the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in the brain. However, the effect of reoxygenation, unavoidable to achieve full recovery of the hypoxic organ, has not been clearly established. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of exposition to acute severe respiratory hypoxia followed by reoxygenation on the evolution of oxidative stress and apoptosis in the brain. We investigated the effect of in vivo acute severe normobaric hypoxia (rats exposed to 7% O2 for 6 h and reoxygenation in normoxia (21% O2 for 24 h or 48 h on oxidative stress markers, the antioxidant system and apoptosis in the brain. After respiratory hypoxia we found increased levels of HIF-1α expression, lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation and nitric oxide in brain extracts. Antioxidant defence systems such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, reduced glutathione (GSH and glutathione peroxidase (GPx and the reduced/oxidized glutathione (GSH/GSSG ratio were significantly decreased in the brain. After 24 h of reoxygenation, oxidative stress parameters and the anti-oxidant system returned to control values. Regarding the apoptosis parameters, acute hypoxia increased cytochrome c, AIF and caspase 3 activity in the brain. The apoptotic effect is greatest after 24 h of reoxygenation. Immunohistochemistry suggests that CA3 and dentate gyrus in the hippocampus seem more susceptible to hypoxia than the cortex. Severe acute hypoxia increases oxidative damage, which in turn could activate apoptotic mechanisms. Our work is the first to demonstrate that after 24 h of reoxygenation oxidative stress is attenuated, while apoptosis is maintained mainly in the hippocampus, which may, in fact, be the cause of impaired brain function.

  11. The acute lethality of acrylonitrile is not due to brain metabolic arrest

    OpenAIRE

    Campian, E. Cristian; Benz, Frederick W.

    2008-01-01

    Acrylonitrile (AN) is an organic compound produced in large quantities by the chemical industry and is acutely toxic. One mechanism proposed to explain the toxicity of AN is metabolism by P450 into cyanide (CN). Although blood and brain levels of CN in rats following an LD90 dose of AN are consistent with acute toxicity, blocking CN formation with P450 inhibitors does not prevent lethality. Another mechanism implicated in toxicity is covalent binding of AN to cysteine residues in tissue prote...

  12. Novel Mechanism for Reducing Acute and Chronic Neurodegeneration After Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    chronic neuronal cell loss, glial activation, and chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) measure of β-amyloid and hyper-phosphorylated tau protein...Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0195 TITLE: Novel Mechanism for Reducing Acute and Chronic Neurodegeneration After Traumatic Brain Injury...30 Jun 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Novel Mechanism for Reducing Acute and Chronic Neurodegeneration After TBI 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1

  13. Systems biomarkers as acute diagnostics and chronic monitoring tools for traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kevin K. W.; Moghieb, Ahmed; Yang, Zhihui; Zhang, Zhiqun

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant biomedical problem among military personnel and civilians. There exists an urgent need to develop and refine biological measures of acute brain injury and chronic recovery after brain injury. Such measures "biomarkers" can assist clinicians in helping to define and refine the recovery process and developing treatment paradigms for the acutely injured to reduce secondary injury processes. Recent biomarker studies in the acute phase of TBI have highlighted the importance and feasibilities of identifying clinically useful biomarkers. However, much less is known about the subacute and chronic phases of TBI. We propose here that for a complex biological problem such as TBI, multiple biomarker types might be needed to harness the wide range of pathological and systemic perturbations following injuries, including acute neuronal death, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and neuroregeneration to systemic responses. In terms of biomarker types, they range from brain-specific proteins, microRNA, genetic polymorphism, inflammatory cytokines and autoimmune markers and neuro-endocrine hormones. Furthermore, systems biology-driven biomarkers integration can help present a holistic approach to understanding scenarios and complexity pathways involved in brain injury.

  14. The Role of Gut?brain Axis in Regulating Glucose Metabolism After Acute Pancreatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Pendharkar, Sayali A; Asrani, Varsha M.; Murphy, Rinki; Cutfield, Richard; Windsor, John A; Petrov, Maxim S.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Diabetes has become an epidemic in developed and developing countries alike, with an increased demand for new efficacious treatments. A large body of pre-clinical evidence suggests that the gut?brain axis may be exploited as a potential therapeutic target for defective glucose homeostasis. This clinical study aimed to investigate a comprehensive panel of glucoregulatory peptides, released by both the gut and brain, in individuals after acute pancreatitis. Methods: Fasting levels o...

  15. [Clinical-diagnostic features of the acute period of brain concussion in military personnel].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachov, A V

    2008-01-01

    The comparative analysis of a complex examination of 78 patients aged 16-45 years in acute period of closed craniocereberal trauma (CCRCT) has been carried out. Physical examination was done on the first 10th and 30th day of the treatment. The author used specially developed multiple-aspect scales and questionnaires for objectification of patient complaints, magnetic resonance tomography, brain electroencephalography. A complex clinical and neuropsychological examination revealed that all cases of brain concussion were accompanied by various signs of asthenic disorders and in 81% of cases--by cognitive disorders. Patients in the acute period of brain concussion had significantly low indicators of cerebral neurodynamics in comparison with healthy individuals. It was shown by increase in signs of irritation, changes of bioelectric activity of the brain that was expressed by considerable blurriness of regional disjunctions and fading of an alpha rhythm. Specific changes of brain tissue in acute period of brain concussion were not registered when CT or MRT were used.

  16. The value of whole-brain CT perfusion imaging and CT angiography using a 320-slice CT scanner in the diagnosis of MCI and AD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Gu, Guo-Jun; Jiang, Hong; Guo, Yi; Shen, Xing; Li, Bo; Zhang, Wei

    2017-06-02

    To validate the value of whole-brain computed tomography perfusion (CTP) and CT angiography (CTA) in the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whole-brain CTP and four-dimensional CT angiography (4D-CTA) images were acquired in 30 MCI, 35 mild AD patients, 35 moderate AD patients, 30 severe AD patients and 50 normal controls (NC). Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time to peak (TTP), and correlation between CTP and 4D-CTA were analysed. Elevated CBF in the left frontal and temporal cortex was found in MCI compared with the NC group. However, TTP was increased in the left hippocampus in mild AD patients compared with NC. In moderate and severe AD patients, hypoperfusion was found in multiple brain areas compared with NC. Finally, we found that the extent of arterial stenosis was negatively correlated with CBF in partial cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and positively correlated with TTP in these areas of AD and MCI patients. Our findings suggest that whole-brain CTP and 4D-CTA could serve as a diagnostic modality in distinguishing MCI and AD, and predicting conversion from MCI based on TTP of left hippocampus. • Whole-brain perfusion using the full 160-mm width of 320 detector rows • Provide clinical experience of 320-row CT in cerebrovascular disorders of Alzheimer's disease • Initial combined 4D CTA-CTP data analysed perfusion and correlated with CT angiography • Whole-brain CTP and 4D-CTA have high value for monitoring MCI to AD progression • TTP in the left hippocampus may predict the transition from MCI to AD.

  17. How the brain connects in response to acute stress: A review at the human brain systems level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oort, J; Tendolkar, I; Hermans, E J; Mulders, P C; Beckmann, C F; Schene, A H; Fernández, G; van Eijndhoven, P F

    2017-10-24

    The brain's response to stress is a matter of extensive neurocognitive research in an attempt to unravel the mechanistic underpinnings of neural adaptation. In line with the broadly defined concept of acute stress, a wide variety of induction procedures are used to mimic stress experimentally. We set out to review commonalities and diversities of the stress-related functional activity and connectivity changes of functional brain networks in healthy adults across procedures. The acute stress response is consistently associated with both increased activity and connectivity in the salience network (SN) and surprisingly also with increased activity in the default mode network (DMN), while most studies show no changes in the central executive network. These results confirm earlier findings of an essential, coordinating role of the SN in the acute stress response and indicate a dynamic role of the DMN whose function is less clear. Moreover, paradigm specific brain responses have to be taken into account when investigating the role and the within and between network connectivity of these three networks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Análise comparativa de cortes de encéfalos humanos com coloração por três técnicas diferentes Comparative analysis of human brain slices with three different staining techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murilo Sousa de Meneses

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available O estudo anatômico do encéfalo em cortes é facilitado empregando-se métodos de coloração para substância cinzenta. Os métodos mais freqüentemente empregados são os de Barnard, Robert e Brown, Mulligan e Green. O objetivo deste estudo foi determinar qual dessas técnicas apresenta melhores resultados com relação à diferenciação entre substâncias branca e cinzenta. Trinta cortes coronais de hemisfério cerebral humano foram submetidos às três técnicas, comparados entre si e analisados de acordo com três parâmetros estabelecidos: grau de diferenciação entre as substâncias branca e cinzenta; presença de linha única e contínua separando a substância branca do córtex cerebral; grau de impregnação da coloração em outros locais de substância branca. Atribuíram-se pontuações de 0 a 3 conforme a presença destes parâmetros, cada corte recebendo pontuação total que variava de 0 a 9. Após análise estatística, a técnica de Barnard, Robert e Brown apresentou média 8,33; a de Green 7,93 e a de Mulligan, 7,5, com diferença estatisticamente significativa.Studing neuroanatomy at brain slices with gray matter staining techniques has several advantages. More often, the models described by Barnard, Robert and Brown, Mulligan, and Green are used. The aim of this study was to identify which of them achieves the best results on differentiation between the gray and the white matter. Thirty coronal slices of human brains underwent staining by the three techniques, and thus compared and analysed according this three parameters: degree of differentiation between white and gray matter, presence of a single and uninterrupted line dividing the white matter from the brain cortex; and degree of impregnation of the color staining in the white matter; scores from 0 to 3 have been given for the three parameters, with total score from 0 to 9. After statistic analysis, the Barnard, Robert and Brown model showed the best results, followed

  19. Rapid whole-brain resting-state fMRI at 3 T: Efficiency-optimized three-dimensional EPI versus repetition time-matched simultaneous-multi-slice EPI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirnberg, Rüdiger; Huijbers, Willem; Brenner, Daniel; Poser, Benedikt A; Breteler, Monique; Stöcker, Tony

    2017-09-18

    State-of-the-art simultaneous-multi-slice (SMS-)EPI and 3D-EPI share several properties that benefit functional MRI acquisition. Both sequences employ equivalent parallel imaging undersampling with controlled aliasing to achieve high temporal sampling rates. As a volumetric imaging sequence, 3D-EPI offers additional means of acceleration complementary to 2D-CAIPIRINHA sampling, such as fast water excitation and elliptical sampling. We performed an application-oriented comparison between a tailored, six-fold CAIPIRINHA-accelerated 3D-EPI protocol at 530 ms temporal and 2.4 mm isotropic spatial resolution and an SMS-EPI protocol with identical spatial and temporal resolution for whole-brain resting-state fMRI at 3 T. The latter required eight-fold slice acceleration to compensate for the lack of elliptical sampling and fast water excitation. Both sequences used vendor-supplied on-line image reconstruction. We acquired test/retest resting-state fMRI scans in ten volunteers, with simultaneous acquisition of cardiac and respiration data, subsequently used for optional physiological noise removal (nuisance regression). We found that the 3D-EPI protocol has significantly increased temporal signal-to-noise ratio throughout the brain as compared to the SMS-EPI protocol, especially when employing motion and nuisance regression. Both sequence types reliably identified known functional networks with stronger functional connectivity values for the 3D-EPI protocol. We conclude that the more time-efficient 3D-EPI primarily benefits from reduced parallel imaging noise due to a higher, actual k-space sampling density compared to SMS-EPI. The resultant BOLD sensitivity increase makes 3D-EPI a valuable alternative to SMS-EPI for whole-brain fMRI at 3 T, with voxel sizes well below 3 mm isotropic and sampling rates high enough to separate dominant cardiac signals from BOLD signals in the frequency domain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The value of whole-brain CT perfusion imaging and CT angiography using a 320-slice CT scanner in the diagnosis of MCI and AD patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Bo; Gu, Guo-jun; Jiang, Hong; Guo, Yi [Medical School of Tongji University, Department of Medical Imaging, Tongji Hospital, Shanghai (China); Shen, Xing [Traditional Chinese Hospital, Department of Radiology, Kun Shan, Jiangsu Province (China); Li, Bo; Zhang, Wei [Medical School of Jiaotong University, Department of Medical Imaging, Renji Hospital, Shanghai (China)

    2017-11-15

    To validate the value of whole-brain computed tomography perfusion (CTP) and CT angiography (CTA) in the diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Whole-brain CTP and four-dimensional CT angiography (4D-CTA) images were acquired in 30 MCI, 35 mild AD patients, 35 moderate AD patients, 30 severe AD patients and 50 normal controls (NC). Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), mean transit time (MTT), time to peak (TTP), and correlation between CTP and 4D-CTA were analysed. Elevated CBF in the left frontal and temporal cortex was found in MCI compared with the NC group. However, TTP was increased in the left hippocampus in mild AD patients compared with NC. In moderate and severe AD patients, hypoperfusion was found in multiple brain areas compared with NC. Finally, we found that the extent of arterial stenosis was negatively correlated with CBF in partial cerebral cortex and hippocampus, and positively correlated with TTP in these areas of AD and MCI patients. Our findings suggest that whole-brain CTP and 4D-CTA could serve as a diagnostic modality in distinguishing MCI and AD, and predicting conversion from MCI based on TTP of left hippocampus. (orig.)

  1. Acute Alcohol Intoxication in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: Characteristics, Recovery and Outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenen, Myrthe; de Koning, Myrthe; van der Horn, Harm; van der Naalt, Joukje; Spikman, Jacoba

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate the incidence of acute alcohol intoxication (AAI) at the time of sustaining mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), describe the characteristics of this intoxicated subgroup, and evaluate recovery and outcome in comparison to sober mTBI patients. Methods. Multicenter cohort

  2. Protective effect of grifolin against brain injury in an acute cerebral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the protective effects of grifolin against brain injury in an acute cerebral ischemia rat model. Methods: Rats were assigned to five groups: control, negative control, and grifolin (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, p.o.) treated groups, which received the drug for 2 weeks. All the animals were sacrificed at the end of ...

  3. Acute Alcohol Intoxication in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury : Characteristics, Recovery, and Outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenen, Myrthe E.; de Koning, Myrthe E.; van der Horn, Harm; Roks, Gerwin; Yilmaz, Tansel; van der Naalt, Joukje; Spikman, Jacoba M.

    2016-01-01

    A substantial number of patients (30% to 50%) sustains a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) while they are under the influence of alcohol. An acute alcohol intoxication (AAI) at the time of injury has been subject of research in severe TBI, but little is known about the relation between AAI and

  4. Brain and spinal cord MR imaging in a case of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feydy, A. [Service d`Imagerie Medicale, Hopital Raymond Poincare, Garches (France); Carlier, R. [Service d`Imagerie Medicale, Hopital Raymond Poincare, Garches (France); Mompoint, D. [Service d`Imagerie Medicale, Hopital Raymond Poincare, Garches (France); Clair, B. [Service de Reanimation Neurologique, Hopital Raymond Poincare, Garches (France); Chillet, P. [Service de Reanimation Neurologique, Hopital Raymond Poincare, Garches (France); Vallee, C. [Service d`Imagerie Medicale, Hopital Raymond Poincare, Garches (France)

    1997-04-01

    We describe a case of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis following varicella infection presenting as transverse myelitis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse cord swelling and signal increase without gadolinium enhancement and several silent brain lesions, all of which completely resolved at follow-up. (orig.). With 1 fig.

  5. Patients' and relatives' experience of difficulties following severe traumatic brain injury: the sub-acute stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Sara; Schönberger, Michael; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2008-01-01

    was low compared to other studies using the EBIQ. Furthermore, the effects of injury severity and general level of functioning had limited impact on the subjective experience of difficulties. Implications of these findings, specifically as they pertain to the sub-acute stage are discussed Udgivelsesdato......The present study aimed to (1) identify the difficulties most frequently reported by individuals with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) at the time of discharge from a sub-acute rehabilitation brain injury unit as well as difficulties reported by their relatives, (2) compare patients......' and relatives' reports of patient difficulties, and (3) explore the role of injury severity, disability and other factors on subjective experience of difficulties. The primary measure was the European Brain Injury Questionnaire (EBIQ) administered to patients and to one of their close relatives at discharge...

  6. Hemoglobin concentrations and RBC transfusion thresholds in patients with acute brain injury: an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badenes, Rafael; Oddo, Mauro; Suarez, José I; Antonelli, Massimo; Lipman, Jeffrey; Citerio, Giuseppe; Taccone, Fabio Silvio

    2017-06-17

    The optimal hemoglobin (Hb) threshold at which to initiate red blood cell (RBC) transfusion in patients with acute brain injury is unknown. The aim of this survey was to investigate RBC transfusion practices used with these patients. We conducted a web-based survey within various societies of critical care medicine for intensive care unit (ICU) physicians who currently manage patients with primary acute brain injury. A total of 868 responses were obtained from around the world, half of which (n = 485) were from European centers; 204 (24%) respondents had a specific certificate in neurocritical care, and most were specialists in anesthesiology or intensive care and had less than 15 years of practice experience. Four hundred sixty-six respondents (54%) said they used an Hb threshold of 7-8 g/dl to initiate RBC transfusion after acute brain injury, although half of these respondents used a different threshold (closer to 9 g/dl) in patients with traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid hemorrhage, or ischemic stroke. Systemic and cerebral factors were reported as influencing the need for higher Hb thresholds. Most respondents agreed that a randomized clinical trial was needed to compare two different Hb thresholds for RBC transfusion, particularly in patients with traumatic brain injury, subarachnoid hemorrhage, and ischemic stroke. The Hb threshold used for RBC transfusion after acute brain injury was less than 8 g/dl in half of the ICU clinicians who responded to our survey. However, more than 50% of these physicians used higher Hb thresholds in certain conditions.

  7. Brain infarction and blasts with bilobed nuclei in a patient with monocytic acute myeloid leukemia mimicking acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elghazaly, Assem A; Ibrahim, Mamoun H; AlGwaiz, Layla A

    2016-09-01

    We are presenting a case of an adult male patient with monocytic acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who had on presentation brain infarction and bilobed nuclei had been demonstrated in many of the leukemic blasts. There was no laboratory evidence of acute disseminated intravascular coagulopathy, on presentation or later on. Initially the diagnosis of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) was considered, so all trans-retinoic acid (ATRA) was added to induction chemo therapy. As the diagnosis of APL was ruled out, based on the flow cytometry, fluorescent in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction findings, the ATRA was discontinued and the patient continued on the standard AML chemo therapy induction regimen. Later on chromosomal analysis was also normal. Sever dehydration on presentation, would have contributed to brain infarction. AML particularly monocytic, can mimic APL, especially its microgranular variant. The possible ATRA therapy side effects, can be avoided by early confirmation of the diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute Brain Failure: Pathophysiology, Diagnosis, Management, and Sequelae of Delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, José R

    2017-07-01

    Delirium is the most common psychiatric syndrome found in the general hospital setting, with an incidence as high as 87% in the acute care setting. Delirium is a neurobehavioral syndrome caused by the transient disruption of normal neuronal activity secondary to systemic disturbances. The development of delirium is associated with increased morbidity, mortality, cost of care, hospital-acquired complications, placement in specialized intermediate and long-term care facilities, slower rate of recovery, poor functional and cognitive recovery, decreased quality of life, and prolonged hospital stays. This article discusses the epidemiology, known etiological factors, presentation and characteristics, prevention, management, and impact of delirium. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Reversible brain damage following acute organic solvents' poisoning determined by magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dujmović Irena

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute exposure to the effects of volatile solvents is characterized by the abrupt onset of symptoms and signs of poisoning, and relatively fast recovery in the majority of cases. Case report. We report a 24-year-old patient with an acute, accidental poisoning with a mixture of volatile organic solvents (most probably toluene, styrene and xylene, which led to the development of upward gaze paresis, diplopia, hemiparesis, ataxic gate, and the late onset truncal ataxia episodes. After 6 weeks, he recovered completely, while his extensive brain MRI lesions in the caudate nuclei, laterobasal putaminal regions, bilateral anterior insular cortex, central midbrain tegmental area withdrew completely after 4 months. Conclusion. Acute toxic encephalopathy should be a part of the differential diagnosis in any patient with acute neurobehavioral and neurological deficit.

  10. Prognostic value of brain natriuretic peptide in acute heart failure: mortality and hospital readmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Julio; Núñez, Eduardo; Robles, Rocío; Bodí, Vicent; Sanchis, Juan; Carratalá, Arturo; Aparici, Manuel; Llàcer, Angel

    2008-12-01

    The prognostic value of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) measurement in patients with acute heart failure is not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the BNP level and mortality and readmission for acute heart failure. We studied 569 consecutive patients who were admitted with a diagnosis of acute heart failure. The BNP level was measured after the patient became clinically stable. The relationship between the BNP level and mortality was assessed by Cox regression analysis, and the relationship with readmission, by competing risks regression analysis. During a median follow-up period of 9 (range, 3-18) months, 156 deaths (27.4%) and 140 readmissions (24.6%) occurred. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a positive linear association between the risk of death and the BNP quintile. In contrast, the BNP level did not predict readmission for acute heart failure, mainly because of the effect of death as a competing outcome.

  11. Acute effects of 2-nitropropane on rat liver and brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zitting, A; Savolainen, H; Nickels, J

    1981-11-01

    Intraperitoneal injection (50 mg/kg) of 2-nitropropane (2-NP) induced lipid accumulation, centrilobular necrosis, degranulation of rough endoplasmic reticulum, proliferation of smooth endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial abnormalities in rat liver 24 h after exposure. These pathological changes were accompanied by elevated serum alanine aminotransferase (ALAT) levels. Hepatic glutathione content increased rapidly in exposed rats. 2-NP depressed markedly hepatic cytochrome P-450 and microsomal monooxygenase activity while the enzyme, epoxide hydratase, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase and cytosolic glutathione peroxidase were enhanced. 2-NP caused an increase of acetylcholine esterase activity in the brain. This effect was also detected in synaptosomes isolated from exposed rats. The results suggest peroxidative damage in the cells.

  12. MRI findings of acute cerebral swelling and brain edema in the acute stage. A report of two cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oki, Hideo; Ueda, Shin; Matsumoto, Keizo; Kashihara, Michiharu; Furuichi, Masashi.

    1988-08-01

    We report two cases, one of acute cerebral swelling and the other with a major stroke, whose MRI has shown very interesting findings. Case 1, a 32-year-old male, was admitted to our service because of a lowering of his consciousness immediately after a head injury. On admission, the patient was semicomatous (E/sub 1/M/sub 2/V/sub 1/, with anisocoria (R > L). His plain skull X-ray was normal. A CT scan, however, demonstrated right isodensity hemispheric swelling associated with a subarachnoid hemorrhage in the right Sylvian fissure. A right carotid angiogram showed no vascular disorders. MR imaging of the spin density demonstrated a hyperintensitive thickening of the gray matter in the whole right hemisphere. Case 2, a 58-year-old female, was admitted because of a sudden onset of loss of consciousness, with right hemiparesis and dysarthria. On admission, her consciousness was semicomatous (E/sub 1/M/sub 3/V/sub 1/), and it deteriorated to a deep coma 1 hour later. A CT scan demonstrated a diffuse left hemispheric low density, with a finding of hemorrhagic infarction in the basal ganglia. MR imaging of the spin density showed a hyperintensitive thickening of the gray matter resembling that of Case 1. The findings of the spin-echo images of our two cases showed a hyperintensitive thickening of the gray matter in both. The hyperintensity and thickening of the gray matter apparently indicated a sort of hyperemia and brain edema. These findings led us to suspect that the hyperemia associated with acute cerebral swelling and ischemic brain edema of our two cases originated in the gray matter, although it has been considered that the pathogenesis of acute cerebral swelling is not known and that brain edema, especially vasogenic edema, will mostly develop in the white matter rather than in the gray matter.

  13. Serial Serum Leukocyte Apoptosis Levels as Predictors of Outcome in Acute Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Chen Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Apoptosis associates with secondary brain injury after traumatic brain injury (TBI. This study posits that serum leukocyte apoptosis levels in acute TBI are predictive of outcome. Methods. Two hundred and twenty-nine blood samples from 88 patients after acute TBI were obtained on admission and on Days 4 and 7. Serial apoptosis levels of different leukocyte subsets were examined in 88 TBI patients and 27 control subjects. Results. The leukocyte apoptosis was significantly higher in TBI patients than in controls. Brief unconsciousness (P=0.009, motor deficits (P≤0.001, GCS (P≤0.001, ISS (P=0.001, WBC count (P=0.015, late apoptosis in lymphocytes and monocytes on Day 1 (P=0.004 and P=0.022, resp., subdural hemorrhage on initial brain CT (P=0.002, neurosurgical intervention (P≤0.001, and acute posttraumatic seizure (P=0.046 were significant risk factors of outcome. Only motor deficits (P=0.033 and late apoptosis in monocytes on Day 1 (P=0.037 were independently associated with outcome. A cutoff value of 5.72% of late apoptosis in monocytes was associated with poor outcome in acute TBI patients. Conclusion. There are varying degrees of apoptosis in patients following TBI and in healthy individuals. Such differential expression suggests that apoptosis in different leukocyte subsets plays an important role in outcome following injury.

  14. Acute rosmarinic acid treatment enhances long-term potentiation, BDNF and GluR-2 protein expression, and cell survival rate against scopolamine challenge in rat organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Eun-Sang; Kim, Hyun-Bum; Choi, Ga-Young; Lee, Seok; Lee, Sung-Ok; Kim, SangSeong; Park, Ji-Ho

    2016-06-17

    Rosmarinic acid (RA) is a polyphenolic ester of caffeic acid and is commonly found in the Nepetoideae subfamily of flowering mint plants. Because RA has previously exhibited antioxidant, neuroprotective, and antidepressant-like effects, we evaluated its influences on cellular functions in neuronal cultures. To elucidate possible mechanisms of RA, we investigated the influences of acute RA administration on long-term potentiation (LTP), plasticity-related protein expression, and scopolamine-induced cell death in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures. LTP analysis in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) was carried out with various ion channel blockers, such as AP5 (10 μM), CNQX (10 μM), niflumic acid (100 μM), and scopolamine (300 μM) in response to RA (1, 10 or 100 μg/mL) treatment. Protein expression and cell death assays in the presence of scopolamine were examined to observe the effects of RA. For LTP analysis, baseline field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) were recorded in CA1 by a 60-channel multielectrode array (MEA) every min for 40 min before 15 min of high-frequency stimulation (HFS) to the Schaffer collaterals and commissural pathways, followed by a successive 50 min of recording. For protein expression measurements, anti-BDNF and anti-GluR2 antibodies were used for Western blotting assays in whole-hippocampal tissue homogenate. Finally, for cell death assays, OHSCs were exposed to a culture medium containing propidium iodide (PI) for 24 or 48 h, followed by the assessment of cell death by fluorescent image analysis of PI uptake. and discussion: Our results indicate that RA treatment enhances fEPSPs following HFS in CA1 synapses at 1 and 10 μg/ml RA, an effect that was inhibited by CNQX and NFA but not by AP5. RA treatment also increases the expression of BDNF and GluR-2 proteins and prevents cell death of scopolamine-exposed OHSCs. Our results suggest the possibility that rosmarinic acid can enhance neural

  15. Gene expression changes in female zebrafish (Danio rerio) brain in response to acute exposure to methylmercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Catherine A.; Garcia-Reyero, Natàlia; Martyniuk, Chris; Knoebl, Iris; Pope, Marie; Wright-Osment, Maureen K.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Tillitt, Donald E.

    2011-01-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a potent neurotoxicant and endocrine disruptor that accumulates in aquatic systems. Previous studies have shown suppression of hormone levels in both male and female fish, suggesting effects on gonadotropin regulation in the brain. The gene expression profile in adult female zebrafish whole brain induced by acute (96 h) MeHg exposure was investigated. Fish were exposed by injection to 0 or 0.5(mu or u)g MeHg/g. Gene expression changes in the brain were examined using a 22,000-feature zebrafish microarray. At a significance level of pfemale brain. Future studies will compare the gene expression profile induced in response to MeHg with that induced by other toxicants and will investigate responsive genes as potential biomarkers of MeHg exposure.

  16. The differential effects of acute right- vs. left-sided vestibular failure on brain metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker-Bense, Sandra; Dieterich, Marianne; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Bartenstein, Peter; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Brandt, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The human vestibular system is represented in the brain bilaterally, but it has functional asymmetries, i.e., a dominance of ipsilateral pathways and of the right hemisphere in right-handers. To determine if acute right- or left-sided unilateral vestibular neuritis (VN) is associated with differential patterns of brain metabolism in areas representing the vestibular network and the visual-vestibular interaction, patients with acute VN (right n = 9; left n = 13) underwent resting state (18)F-FDG PET once in the acute phase and once 3 months later after central vestibular compensation. The contrast acute vs. chronic phase showed signal differences in contralateral vestibular areas and the inverse contrast in visual cortex areas, both more pronounced in VN right. In VN left additional regions were found in the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis bilaterally, accentuated in severe cases. In general, signal changes appeared more pronounced in patients with more severe vestibular deficits. Acute phase PET data of patients compared to that of age-matched healthy controls disclosed similarities to these patterns, thus permitting the interpretation that the signal changes in vestibular temporo-parietal areas reflect signal increases, and in visual areas, signal decreases. These data imply that brain activity in the acute phase of right- and left-sided VN exhibits different compensatory patterns, i.e., the dominant ascending input is shifted from the ipsilateral to the contralateral pathways, presumably due to the missing ipsilateral vestibular input. The visual-vestibular interaction patterns were preserved, but were of different prominence in each hemisphere and more pronounced in patients with right-sided failure and more severe vestibular deficits.

  17. Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment for Somatic Dysfunction After Acute Severe Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallister, Adrienne; Brown, Christopher; Smith, Michael; Ettlinger, Hugh; Baltazar, Gerard A

    2016-12-01

    Somatic dysfunction caused by traumatic brain injury (TBI) may be managed by osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT). In this case report, the authors describe 2 patients with severe TBI who were each treated with OMT in a level-1 regional trauma center. Both patients received OMT beginning in the acute care phase of injury. Somatic dysfunction improved during the course of treatment, and no adverse effects of OMT were noted. More comprehensive research may clarify the efficacy and adverse effects of OMT as part of multimodal acute care of patients with severe TBI.

  18. How Acute Total Sleep Loss Affects the Attending Brain: A Meta-Analysis of Neuroimaging Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Dinges, David F.; Basner, Mathias; Rao, Hengyi

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Attention is a cognitive domain that can be severely affected by sleep deprivation. Previous neuroimaging studies have used different attention paradigms and reported both increased and reduced brain activation after sleep deprivation. However, due to large variability in sleep deprivation protocols, task paradigms, experimental designs, characteristics of subject populations, and imaging techniques, there is no consensus regarding the effects of sleep loss on the attending brain. The aim of this meta-analysis was to identify brain activations that are commonly altered by acute total sleep deprivation across different attention tasks. Design: Coordinate-based meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies of performance on attention tasks during experimental sleep deprivation. Methods: The current version of the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) approach was used for meta-analysis. The authors searched published articles and identified 11 sleep deprivation neuroimaging studies using different attention tasks with a total of 185 participants, equaling 81 foci for ALE analysis. Results: The meta-analysis revealed significantly reduced brain activation in multiple regions following sleep deprivation compared to rested wakefulness, including bilateral intraparietal sulcus, bilateral insula, right prefrontal cortex, medial frontal cortex, and right parahippocampal gyrus. Increased activation was found only in bilateral thalamus after sleep deprivation compared to rested wakefulness. Conclusion: Acute total sleep deprivation decreases brain activation in the fronto-parietal attention network (prefrontal cortex and intraparietal sulcus) and in the salience network (insula and medial frontal cortex). Increased thalamic activation after sleep deprivation may reflect a complex interaction between the de-arousing effects of sleep loss and the arousing effects of task performance on thalamic activity. Citation: Ma N, Dinges DF, Basner M, Rao H. How acute total

  19. Coagulopathy as prognostic marker in acute traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaurav Chhabra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Coagulopathy frequently occurs following traumatic brain injury (TBI and usually occurs 6-72 hour post-trauma. The incidence and the probable risk factors for development of coagulopathy and poor outcome following TBI are largely unknown and vary considerably. Aims: To assess the incidence and probable risk factors for development of coagulopathy and to identify the risk factors for poor outcome in terms of median survival time following TBI. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study over two years, patients of isolated moderate and severe traumatic brain injury (GCS≤12 admitted to trauma center had coagulation profile (PT, APTT, thrombin time, fibrinogen and D-dimer, arterial lactate and ABG analysis done on day of admission and on day three. Coagulopathy was defined as prothrombin time (PT or/and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT more than 1.5 times the normal control. Incidence of in-hospital mortality was assessed in all cases. Statistical Analysis: A stepwise logistic regression analysis was performed to identify risk factors for coagulopathy and mortality in these patients. Results: A total of 208 patients were enrolled in the study. The mean age was 32 ± 12 years and mean GCS was 7.1 ± 2.8. Coagulopathy was present in 46% ( n = 96 of patients. Risk factors for development of coagulopathy were found out to be severity of head injury (OR: 2.81, elevated D-dimer (OR: 3.43, low hemoglobin (OR: 3.13, and effaced cisterns in the CT scan (OR: 2.72. Presence of coagulopathy (OR: 2.97 and severity of head injury (OR: 5.70 strongly predicted poor outcome, and were associated with a decreased median survival time. Conclusions: There is a high incidence of coagulopathy following TBI. The presence of coagulopathy as well as of severity of TBI are strong predictors of in-hospital mortality in these patients.

  20. Induction of acute brain injury in mice by irradiation with high-LET charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Zhang, Hong

    The present study was performed to evaluate the induction of acute brain injury in mice after 235 Mev/u carbon ion irradiation. In our study, young outbred Kunming mice were divided into four treatment groups according to the penetration depth of carbon ions. Animals were irradiated with a sublethal dose of carbon ion beams prior to the Bragg curve. An experiment was performed to evaluate the acute alterations in histology, DNA double-strand breaks (DNA DSBs) as well as p53and Bax expression in the brain 96 h post-irradiation. The results demonstrated that various histopathological changes, a significant number of DNA DSBs and elevated p53 and Bax protein expression were induced in the brain following exposure to carbon ions. This was particularly true for mice irradiated with ions having a 9.1 cm-pentration depth, indicating that carbon ions can led to deleterious lesions in the brain of young animals within 96 h. Moreover, there was a remarkable increase in DNA DSBs and in the severity of histopathological changes as the penetration depths of ions increased, which may be associated with the complex track structure of heavy ions. These data reveal that carbon ions can promote serious neuropathological degeneration in the cerebral cortex of young mice. Given that damaged neurons cannot regenerate, these findings warrant further investigation of the adverse effects of the space radiation and the passage of a therapeutic heavy ion beam in the plateau region of the Bragg curve through healthy brain tissue.

  1. Acute Ethanol-Induced Changes in Edema and Metabolite Concentrations in Rat Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huimin Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to describe the acute effects of EtOH on brain edema and cerebral metabolites, using diffusion weight imaging (DWI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS at a 7.0T MR and to define changes in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC values and the concentration of metabolites in the rat brain after acute EtOH intoxication. ADC values in each ROI decreased significantly at 1 h and 3 h after ethanol administration. ADC values in frontal lobe were decreased significantly compared with other regions at 3 h. For EtOH/Cr+PCr and cerebral metabolites (Cho, Tau, and Glu differing over time, no significant differences for Ins, NAA, and Cr were observed in frontal lobes. Regression analysis revealed a significant association between TSEtOH/Cr+PCr and TSCho, TSTau, TSGlu, and TSADC. The changes of ADC values in different brain regions reflect the process of the cytotoxic edema in vivo. The characterization of frontal lobes metabolites changes and the correlations between TSEtOH/Cr+PCr and TSCho, TSTau, and TSGlu provide a better understanding for the biological mechanisms in neurotoxic effects of EtOH on the brain. In addition, the correlations between TSEtOH/Cr+PCr and TSADC will help us to understand development of the ethanol-induced brain cytotoxic edema.

  2. Slice Segal-Bargmann transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cnudde, L.; De Bie, H.

    2017-06-01

    The Segal-Bargmann transform is a unitary map between the Schrödinger and Fock space, which is used, for example, to show the integrability of quantum Rabi models. Slice monogenic functions provide the framework in which functional calculus for quaternionic quantum mechanics can be developed. In this paper, a generalisation of the Segal-Bargmann transform, to the context of slice monogenic functions, is constructed and studied in detail. It is shown to interact appropriately with the recently constructed slice Fourier transform. This leads furthermore to a construction of a slice Fock space, which is shown to be a reproducing kernel space.

  3. Altered spontaneous brain activity in patients with acute spinal cord injury revealed by resting-state functional MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Zhu

    Full Text Available Previous neuroimaging studies have provided evidence of structural and functional reorganization of brain in patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI. However, it remains unknown whether the spontaneous brain activity changes in acute SCI. In this study, we investigated intrinsic brain activity in acute SCI patients using a regional homogeneity (ReHo analysis based on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.A total of 15 patients with acute SCI and 16 healthy controls participated in the study. The ReHo value was used to evaluate spontaneous brain activity, and voxel-wise comparisons of ReHo were performed to identify brain regions with altered spontaneous brain activity between groups. We also assessed the associations between ReHo and the clinical scores in brain regions showing changed spontaneous brain activity.Compared with the controls, the acute SCI patients showed decreased ReHo in the bilateral primary motor cortex/primary somatosensory cortex, bilateral supplementary motor area/dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, right inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and bilateral caudate; and increased ReHo in bilateral precuneus, the left inferior parietal lobe, the left brainstem/hippocampus, the left cingulate motor area, bilateral insula, bilateral thalamus and bilateral cerebellum. The average ReHo values of the left thalamus and right insula were negatively correlated with the international standards for the neurological classification of spinal cord injury motor scores.Our findings indicate that acute distant neuronal damage has an immediate impact on spontaneous brain activity. In acute SCI patients, the ReHo was prominently altered in brain regions involved in motor execution and cognitive control, default mode network, and which are associated with sensorimotor compensatory reorganization. Abnormal ReHo values in the left thalamus and right insula could serve as potential biomarkers for

  4. Effects of the acute and chronic ethanol intoxication on acetate metabolism and kinetics in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ya-Ju; Wu, Liang-Chih; Ke, Chien-Chih; Chang, Chi-Wei; Kuo, Jung-Wen; Huang, Wen-Sheng; Chen, Fu-Du; Yang, Bang-Hung; Tai, Hsiao-Ting; Chen, Sharon Chia-Ju; Liu, Ren-Shyan

    2017-12-05

    Ethanol intoxication inhibits glucose transport and decreases overall brain glucose metabolism; however, humans with long-term ethanol consumption were found to have a significant increase in [1-11 C]-acetate uptake in the brain. The relationship between the cause and effect of [1-11 C]-acetate kinetics and acute/chronic ethanol intoxication, however, are still unclear. [1-11 C]-acetate positron emission tomography (PET) with dynamic measurement of K1 and k2 rate constants was used to investigate the changes in acetate metabolism in different brain regions of rats with acute or chronic ethanol intoxication. PET imaging demonstrated decreased [1-11 C]-acetate uptake in rat brain with acute ethanol intoxication, but this increased with chronic ethanol intoxication. Tracer uptake rate constant K1 and clearance rate constant k2 were decreased in acutely intoxicated rats. No significant change was noted in K1 and k2 in chronic ethanol intoxication, although six of seven brain regions showed slightly higher k2 than baseline. These results indicate that acute ethanol intoxication accelerated acetate transport and metabolism in the rat brain, whereas chronic ethanol intoxication status showed no significant effect. In vivo PET study confirmed the modulatory role of ethanol, administered acutely or chronically, in [1-11 C]-acetate kinetics and metabolism in the rat brain. Acute ethanol intoxication may inhibit the transport and metabolism of acetate in the brain, whereas chronic ethanol exposure may lead to the adaptation of the rat brain to ethanol in acetate utilisation. [1-11 C]-Acetate PET imaging is a feasible approach to study the effect of ethanol on acetate metabolism in rat brain. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Neurosensory Symptom Complexes after Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Hoffer

    Full Text Available Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI is a prominent public health issue. To date, subjective symptom complaints primarily dictate diagnostic and treatment approaches. As such, the description and qualification of these symptoms in the mTBI patient population is of great value. This manuscript describes the symptoms of mTBI patients as compared to controls in a larger study designed to examine the use of vestibular testing to diagnose mTBI. Five symptom clusters were identified: Post-Traumatic Headache/Migraine, Nausea, Emotional/Affective, Fatigue/Malaise, and Dizziness/Mild Cognitive Impairment. Our analysis indicates that individuals with mTBI have headache, dizziness, and cognitive dysfunction far out of proportion to those without mTBI. In addition, sleep disorders and emotional issues were significantly more common amongst mTBI patients than non-injured individuals. A simple set of questions inquiring about dizziness, headache, and cognitive issues may provide diagnostic accuracy. The consideration of other symptoms may be critical for providing prognostic value and treatment for best short-term outcomes or prevention of long-term complications.

  6. Change in brain magnetic resonance spectroscopy after treatment during acute HIV infection.

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    Napapon Sailasuta

    Full Text Available Single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS can be used to monitor changes in brain inflammation and neuronal integrity associated with HIV infection and its treatments. We used MRS to measure brain changes during the first weeks following HIV infection and in response to antiretroviral therapy (ART.Brain metabolite levels of N-acetyl aspartate (NAA, choline (tCHO, creatine (CR, myoinositol (MI, and glutamate and glutamine (GLX were measured in acute HIV subjects (n = 31 and compared to chronic HIV+individuals (n = 26 and HIV negative control subjects (n = 10 from Bangkok, Thailand. Metabolites were measured in frontal gray matter (FGM, frontal white matter (FWM, occipital gray matter (OGM, and basal ganglia (BG. Repeat measures were obtained in 17 acute subjects 1, 3 and 6 months following initiation of ART.After adjustment for age we identified elevated BG tCHO/CR in acute HIV cases at baseline (median 14 days after HIV infection compared to control (p = 0.0014, as well as chronic subjects (p = 0.0023. A similar tCHO/CR elevation was noted in OGM; no other metabolite abnormalities were seen between acute and control subjects. Mixed longitudinal models revealed resolution of BG tCHO/CR elevation after ART (p = 0.022 with tCHO/CR similar to control subjects at 6 months.We detected cellular inflammation in the absence of measurable neuronal injury within the first month of HIV infection, and normalization of this inflammation following acutely administered ART. Our findings suggest that early ART may be neuroprotective in HIV infection by mitigating processes leading to CNS injury.

  7. Dynamic metabolic response to multiple spreading depolarizations in patients with acute brain injury: an online microdialysis study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feuerstein, Delphine; Manning, Andrew; Hashemi, Parastoo

    2010-01-01

    Spreading depolarizations (SDs) occur spontaneously with high incidence in patients with acute brain injury. They can be detected by subdural electrocorticographic recordings. We here characterize the dynamic metabolic response to these events. A microdialysis catheter was inserted into perilesio...

  8. Neuroinflammation in traumatic brain injury: A chronic response to an acute injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha J Schimmel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Every year, approximately 1.4 million US citizens visit emergency rooms for traumatic brain injuries. Formerly known as an acute injury, chronic neurodegenerative symptoms such as compromised motor skills, decreased cognitive abilities, and emotional and behavioral changes have caused the scientific community to consider chronic aspects of the disorder. The injury causing impact prompts multiple cell death processes, starting with neuronal necrosis, and progressing to various secondary cell death mechanisms. Secondary cell death mechanisms, including excitotoxicity, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, blood–brain barrier disruption, and inflammation accompany chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI and often contribute to long-term disabilities. One hallmark of both acute and chronic TBI is neuroinflammation. In acute stages, neuroinflammation is beneficial and stimulates an anti-inflammatory response to the damage. Conversely, in chronic TBI, excessive inflammation stimulates the aforementioned secondary cell death. Converting inflammatory cells from pro-inflammatory to anti-inflammatory may expand the therapeutic window for treating TBI, as inflammation plays a role in all stages of the injury. By expanding current research on the role of inflammation in TBI, treatment options and clinical outcomes for afflicted individuals may improve. This paper is a review article. Referred literature in this paper has been listed in the references section. The data sets supporting the conclusions of this article are available online by searching various databases, including PubMed. Some original points in this article come from the laboratory practice in our research center and the authors' experiences.

  9. The effects of acute ethanol exposure and ageing on rat brain glutathione metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommavilla, Michela; Sánchez-Villarejo, M Victoria; Almansa, Inmaculada; Sánchez-Vallejo, Violeta; Barcia, Jorge M; Romero, Francisco Javier; Miranda, María

    2012-09-01

    Binge alcohol consumption in adolescents is increasing, and it has been proposed that immature brain deals poorly with oxidative stress. The aim of our work was to study the effect of an acute dose of ethanol on glutathione (GSH) metabolism in frontal cortex, hippocampus and striatum of juvenile and adult rats. We have observed no change in levels of glutathione produced by acute alcohol in the three brain areas studied of juvenile and adult rats. Only in the frontal cortex the ratio of GSH/GSSG was increased in the ethanol-treated adult rats. GSH levels in the hippocampus and striatum were significantly higher in adult animals compared to young ones. Higher glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity in adult rats was observed in frontal cortex and in striatum. Our data show an increased GSH concentration and GPx activity in different cerebral regions of the adult rat, compared to the young ones, suggesting that age-related variations of total antioxidant defences in brain may predispose young brain structures to ethanol-induced, oxidative stress-mediated tissue damage.

  10. Microfluidics and multielectrode array-compatible organotypic slice culture method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdichevsky, Yevgeny; Sabolek, Helen; Levine, John B.; Staley, Kevin J.; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2009-01-01

    Organotypic brain slice cultures are used for a variety of molecular, electrophysiological, and imaging studies. However, the existing culture methods are difficult or expensive to apply in studies requiring long-term recordings with multielectrode arrays (MEAs). In this work, a novel method to maintain organotypic cultures of rodent hippocampus for several weeks on standard MEAs in an unmodified tissue culture incubator is described. Polydimethylsiloxane (Sylgard) mini-wells were used to stabilize organotypic cultures on glass and MEA surfaces. Hippocampus slices were successfully maintained within PDMS mini-wells for multiple weeks, with preserved pyramidal layer organization, connectivity, and activity. MEAs were used to record the development of spontaneous activity in an organotypic cultures for four weeks. This method is compatible with integration of microchannels into the culture substrate. Microchannels were incorporated into the mini-wells and applied to the guidance of axons originating within the slice, paving the way for studies of axonal sprouting using organotypic slices. PMID:19100768

  11. Trafficking of astrocytic vesicles in hippocampal slices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potokar, Maja; Kreft, Marko [Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology-Molecular Cell Physiology, Institute of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Zaloska 4, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Celica Biomedical Center, Technology Park 24, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Lee, So-Young; Takano, Hajime; Haydon, Philip G. [Department of Neuroscience, Room 215, Stemmler Hall, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104 (United States); Zorec, Robert, E-mail: Robert.Zorec@mf.uni-lj.si [Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology-Molecular Cell Physiology, Institute of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Zaloska 4, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Celica Biomedical Center, Technology Park 24, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2009-12-25

    The increasingly appreciated role of astrocytes in neurophysiology dictates a thorough understanding of the mechanisms underlying the communication between astrocytes and neurons. In particular, the uptake and release of signaling substances into/from astrocytes is considered as crucial. The release of different gliotransmitters involves regulated exocytosis, consisting of the fusion between the vesicle and the plasma membranes. After fusion with the plasma membrane vesicles may be retrieved into the cytoplasm and may continue to recycle. To study the mobility implicated in the retrieval of secretory vesicles, these structures have been previously efficiently and specifically labeled in cultured astrocytes, by exposing live cells to primary and secondary antibodies. Since the vesicle labeling and the vesicle mobility properties may be an artifact of cell culture conditions, we here asked whether the retrieving exocytotic vesicles can be labeled in brain tissue slices and whether their mobility differs to that observed in cell cultures. We labeled astrocytic vesicles and recorded their mobility with two-photon microscopy in hippocampal slices from transgenic mice with fluorescently tagged astrocytes (GFP mice) and in wild-type mice with astrocytes labeled by Fluo4 fluorescence indicator. Glutamatergic vesicles and peptidergic granules were labeled by the anti-vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (vGlut1) and anti-atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) antibodies, respectively. We report that the vesicle mobility parameters (velocity, maximal displacement and track length) recorded in astrocytes from tissue slices are similar to those reported previously in cultured astrocytes.

  12. Quantitative multivoxel {sup 1}H MR spectroscopy of the brain in children with acute liver failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sijens, Paul E.; Alkefaji, Heyder; Meiners, Linda C.; Oudkerk, Matthijs [University Medical Center Groningen and University of Groningen, Department of Radiology, Beatrix Children' s Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands); Lunsing, Roelineke J. [University Medical Center Groningen and University of Groningen, Department of Child Neurology, Beatrix Children' s Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands); Spronsen, Francjan J. van; Verkade, Henkjan J. [University Medical Center Groningen and University of Groningen, Department of Pediatrics, Beatrix Children' s Hospital, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2008-11-15

    Acute liver failure (ALF)-related encephalopathy was previously characterized by MR spectroscopy of single voxels containing both grey and white matter brain tissue. Quantitative multivoxel MRS was used here to compare grey and white matter brain tissue concentrations of glutamate/glutamine (Glx) and lactate in ALF and associate the results with other liver function parameters. Five pediatric patients with ALF-related encephalopathy and five controls, examined after successful liver transplantation, were examined by brain MRI/MRS. ALF patients had higher Glx and lactate concentrations in brain white matter than controls (Glx + 125%: P < 0.01; lactate + 33%, P < 0.05) and higher Glx in grey matter (Glx + 125%: P < 0.01). Within the group of ALF patients positive correlations were found between grey or white matter lactate concentration and serum ammonia (P < 0.05), and negative correlations between grey or white matter Glx and venous pH (P < 0.001). This is the first study presenting evidence of high Glx levels in both white and grey matter brain tissue in ALF-related encephalopathy. The elevations in CNS Glx and lactate concentrations appear to relate to hepatic detoxification (ammonia, venous pH), rather than to liver parenchymal integrity (aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase) or biliary cholestasis (bilirubin, {gamma}-glutamyl transpeptidase, alkaline phosphatase). (orig.)

  13. Fatal deterioration of delayed acute subdural hematoma after mild traumatic brain injury: two cases with brief review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shiwen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Both delayed posttraumatic intracerebral hemorrhage and epidural hematoma have been well described in the neurosurgical literatures. However, delayed posttraumatic acute subdural hematoma which happens more than a week with a rapid progress after mild traumatic brain injury and causes death of patient is rarely after mild traumatic brain injury: two cases with brief review reported. We show two such cases and briefly review the literature and discuss the probable pathogenesis of their rapid progress. Key words: Hematoma, subdural, acute; Brain injuries; Delayed diagnosis

  14. The acute lethality of acrylonitrile is not due to brain metabolic arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campian, E Cristian; Benz, Frederick W

    2008-11-20

    Acrylonitrile (AN) is an organic compound produced in large quantities by the chemical industry and is acutely toxic. One mechanism proposed to explain the toxicity of AN is metabolism by P450 into cyanide (CN). Although blood and brain levels of CN in rats following an LD90 dose of AN are consistent with acute toxicity, blocking CN formation with P450 inhibitors does not prevent lethality. Another mechanism implicated in toxicity is covalent binding of AN to cysteine residues in tissue proteins. Previous work in our laboratory has shown that AN can irreversibly inactivate the catalytically active cysteine-149 in glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Inactivation of GAPDH by AN would be expected to impair glycolytic ATP production and, when coupled to the inhibition of mitochondrial ATP synthesis by the AN metabolite CN, would result in metabolic arrest, particularly in brain. In this study we have measured the high energy metabolites phosphocreatine (PCr), ATP, ADP and AMP by HPLC and compared their levels in the brains of rats treated with an LD90 dose of AN, when respiration ceased, vs. controls. Two methods of rapid brain freezing in liquid nitrogen were used: funnel freezing (FF) and head immersion (HI). AN administration resulted in large decreases in PCr of 74% (FF) and 80% (HI) but relatively minor decreases in ATP of 5% (FF) and 21% (HI) and Energy Charge of 6% (FF) and 10% (HI). Thus, although substantial depletion of PCr was observed, possibly due to inhibition of creatine kinase by AN, we found no evidence that brain ATP is depleted when respiration ceases in AN-intoxicated rats.

  15. How acute total sleep loss affects the attending brain: a meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Dinges, David F; Basner, Mathias; Rao, Hengyi

    2015-02-01

    Attention is a cognitive domain that can be severely affected by sleep deprivation. Previous neuroimaging studies have used different attention paradigms and reported both increased and reduced brain activation after sleep deprivation. However, due to large variability in sleep deprivation protocols, task paradigms, experimental designs, characteristics of subject populations, and imaging techniques, there is no consensus regarding the effects of sleep loss on the attending brain. The aim of this meta-analysis was to identify brain activations that are commonly altered by acute total sleep deprivation across different attention tasks. Coordinate-based meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies of performance on attention tasks during experimental sleep deprivation. The current version of the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) approach was used for meta-analysis. The authors searched published articles and identified 11 sleep deprivation neuroimaging studies using different attention tasks with a total of 185 participants, equaling 81 foci for ALE analysis. The meta-analysis revealed significantly reduced brain activation in multiple regions following sleep deprivation compared to rested wakefulness, including bilateral intraparietal sulcus, bilateral insula, right prefrontal cortex, medial frontal cortex, and right parahippocampal gyrus. Increased activation was found only in bilateral thalamus after sleep deprivation compared to rested wakefulness. Acute total sleep deprivation decreases brain activation in the fronto-parietal attention network (prefrontal cortex and intraparietal sulcus) and in the salience network (insula and medial frontal cortex). Increased thalamic activation after sleep deprivation may reflect a complex interaction between the de-arousing effects of sleep loss and the arousing effects of task performance on thalamic activity. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  16. The acute lethality of acrylonitrile is not due to brain metabolic arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campian, E. Cristian; Benz, Frederick W.

    2008-01-01

    Acrylonitrile (AN) is an organic compound produced in large quantities by the chemical industry and is acutely toxic. One mechanism proposed to explain the toxicity of AN is metabolism by P450 into cyanide (CN). Although blood and brain levels of CN in rats following an LD90 dose of AN are consistent with acute toxicity, blocking CN formation with P450 inhibitors does not prevent lethality. Another mechanism implicated in toxicity is covalent binding of AN to cysteine residues in tissue proteins. Previous work in our laboratory has shown that AN can irreversibly inactivate the catalytically active cysteine-149 in glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Inactivation of GAPDH by AN would be expected to impair glycolytic ATP production and, when coupled to the inhibition of mitochondrial ATP synthesis by the AN metabolite CN, would result in metabolic arrest, particularly in brain. In this study we have measured the high energy metabolites Phosphocreatine (PCr), ATP, ADP and AMP by HPLC and compared their levels in the brains of rats treated with an LD90 dose of AN, when respiration ceased, vs. controls. Two methods of rapid brain freezing in liquid nitrogen were used: Funnel Freezing (FF) and Head Immersion (HI). AN administration resulted in large decreases in PCr of 74% (FF) and 80% (HI) but relatively minor decreases in ATP of 5% (FF) and 21% (HI) and Energy Charge of 6% (FF) and 10% (HI). Thus, although substantial depletion of PCr was observed, possibly due to inhibition of creatine kinase by AN, we found no evidence that brain ATP is depleted when respiration ceases in AN-intoxicated rats. PMID:18834918

  17. Stress hormonal changes in the brain and plasma after acute noise exposure in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Sang Gyun; Kim, Min Jung; Park, So Young; Park, Shi Nae

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the effects of acute noise stress on two amine stress hormones, norepinephrine (NE) and 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the brain and plasma of mice after noise exposure. Mice were grouped into the control and noise groups. Mice in the noise group were exposed to white noise of 110dB sound pressure level for 60min. Auditory brainstem response thresholds, distortion product otoacoustic emissions, the organ of Corti grading scores, western blots of NE/5-HIAA in the whole brain and hippocampus, and the plasma levels of NE/5-HIAA were compared between the two groups. Significant hearing loss and cochlear damage were demonstrated in the noise group. NE and 5-HIAA in the hippocampus were elevated in the noise group (p=0.019/0.022 for NE/5-HIAA vs. the control). Plasma levels of NE and 5-HIAA were not statistically different between the groups (p=0.052/0.671 for NE/5-HIAA). Hearing loss with outer hair cell dysfunction and morphological changes of the organ of Corti after noise exposure in C57BL/6 mice proved the reliability of our animal model as an acute noise stress model. NE and 5-HIAA are suggested to be the potential biomarkers for acute noise stress in the hippocampus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. THE EFFECT OF FLUOROCARBON ARTIFICIAL BLOOD (FC-34 IN ACUTE VASOGENIC BRAIN EDEMA

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    M NEEMATBAKHSH

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Oxygen transport to tissue after an acute ischemia is strongly important. Fluorocarbon liquids are able to facilitated the oxygen transport. An animal experiment was designed to study the effect of FC-34 in acute brain ischemia. Methods. The left common carotid arteries were ligated in three groups of anesthetized animals for 30 minutes to obtain acute brain edema. The animals were subjected to received 15 ml/kg saline (group 1, 10% monitol (group 2 or FC-43 (group 3. All animals were recovered, and they monitored for two weeks. The electrolytes, BUN, and creatinine were measured before (all animals and after two weeks (survived animals. Pathological investigation was obtained by light and electron microscope via pathological process. Findings. The group 1 animals were died during first five days, but one and four animals were survived by two weeks in groups 2 & 3 respectively (P < 0.05. The pathological determinations indicate less cellular damages in group 3. No significant differences were detected in potassium, calcium, BUN, and creatinine before and after the experiment. Conclusion. The particle size and oxygen solubility in FC-43 is the major factors for better oxygen transport in ischem

  19. Aspiration-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Victims with Isolated Severe Brain Injury

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    Yu. A. Gorodovikova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the time and development rate of acute lung injury (ALI in severe brain injury (SBI complicated by aspiration of gastric contents or blood. Subjects and methods. Twenty-nine patients aged 19 to 70 years, who had isolated SBI, of whom there were 24 males and 5 females, were examined. The patients were divided into 2 groups: those with aspiration of gastric contents (n=9 or blood (n=10. A control group included 10 patients with SBI without aspiration. A PiCCO plus device was used to determine pulmonary extravascular fluid. ALI was diagnosed in accordance with the recommendations of the Research Institute of General Reanimatology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. Results. SBI patients with aspiration of gastric contents or blood were found to have significantly increased pulmonary extravascular water (p<0.01 and a lower oxygenation index (<300, which correlated with each other. ALI was recorded in the first hours after injury in about 50% of cases in both patients with gastric contents aspiration and those with blood aspiration. Conclusion. In patients with SBI complicated by aspiration of gastric contents or blood, pulmonary extravascular fluid accumulation concurrent with other signs of injury may be regarded as a criterion for acute lung injury. Key words: severe brain injury, aspiration, acute lung lesion.

  20. Post-acute traumatic brain injury rehabilitation: effects on outcome measures and life care costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesbach, Grace S; Kreber, Lisa A; Harrington, David; Ashley, Mark J

    2015-05-15

    Rehabilitation is the predominant post-acute treatment for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). We retrospectively evaluated the effectiveness of post-acute TBI rehabilitation by comparing outcome measures and life care cost with that of patients with cerebrovascular accident (CVA) who underwent a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program within the same facility. To better assess the effects of rehabilitation, we only included patients with no benefit limitations from the insurance carrier. Functional effectiveness was determined by comparing outcome scales, which included the Disability Rating Scale, Mayo Portland Inventory, Occupational Status Scale, Living Status Scale, and the Centre for Neuro Skills Scale. Cost-effectiveness was determined by having certified life care planners create separate cost projections from the admission and discharge patient files. This allowed us to compare cost projections with and without rehabilitation for each patient. Significant decreases in the cost projections, i.e., rehabilitation savings (RS), were found after rehabilitation for TBI. These RS were equivalent to those of patients with CVA. Likewise, equivalent improvements were found on all of the outcome scales for both brain injury groups. We also evaluated if the latency from TBI to admission in the rehabilitation program had an influence on outcome. Cost and functional effectiveness was more marked when rehabilitation was initiated within the first year after TBI. The effects of age of TBI were also evaluated. Although RS were most marked in younger patients, improvements in outcome measures were observed in all age groups after post-acute rehabilitation.

  1. Parallel recovery of consciousness and sleep in acute traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclos, Catherine; Dumont, Marie; Arbour, Caroline; Paquet, Jean; Blais, Hélène; Menon, David K; De Beaumont, Louis; Bernard, Francis; Gosselin, Nadia

    2017-01-17

    To investigate whether the progressive recuperation of consciousness was associated with the reconsolidation of sleep and wake states in hospitalized patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study comprised 30 hospitalized patients (age 29.1 ± 13.5 years) in the acute phase of moderate or severe TBI. Testing started 21.0 ± 13.7 days postinjury. Consciousness level and cognitive functioning were assessed daily with the Rancho Los Amigos scale of cognitive functioning (RLA). Sleep and wake cycle characteristics were estimated with continuous wrist actigraphy. Mixed model analyses were performed on 233 days with the RLA (fixed effect) and sleep-wake variables (random effects). Linear contrast analyses were performed in order to verify if consolidation of the sleep and wake states improved linearly with increasing RLA score. Associations were found between scores on the consciousness/cognitive functioning scale and measures of sleep-wake cycle consolidation (p sleep duration (p = 0.018), and nighttime fragmentation index (p sleep-wake quality. Consolidated 24-hour sleep-wake cycle occurred when patients were able to give context-appropriate, goal-directed responses. Our results showed that when the brain has not sufficiently recovered a certain level of consciousness, it is also unable to generate a 24-hour sleep-wake cycle and consolidated nighttime sleep. This study contributes to elucidating the pathophysiology of severe sleep-wake cycle alterations in the acute phase of moderate to severe TBI. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  2. CT Perfusion in Acute Stroke: "Black Holes" on Time-to-Peak Image Maps Indicate Unsalvageable Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Ruairi; Shankar, Jai Jai Shiva

    2016-11-01

    CT perfusion is becoming important in acute stroke imaging to determine optimal patient-management strategies. The purpose of this study was to examine the predictive value of time-to-peak image maps and, specifically, a phenomenon coined a "black hole" for assessing infarcted brain tissue at the time of scan. Acute stroke patients were screened for the presence of black holes and their follow-up imaging (noncontrast CT or MR) was reviewed to assess for infarcted brain tissue. Of the 23 patients with signs of acute ischemia on CT perfusion, all had black holes. The black holes corresponded with areas of infarcted brain on follow-up imaging (specificity 100%). Black holes demonstrated significantly lower cerebral blood volumes (P Black holes on time-to-peak image maps represent areas of unsalvageable brain. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  3. Impact of Various Sedation Methods in Patients with Acute Severe Brain Injury on Lipid Peroxidation

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    V. V. Unzhakov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the impact of various sedation methods on lipid peroxidation in patients with acute severe brain injury. Subjects and methods. For this, 44 victims with this condition were examined. According the option of posttraumatic sedation therapy, the victims were divided into 3 groups: 1 12 patients in whom sodium oxybutyrate was used for sedation; 2 12 received thiopental sodium; 3 20 patients were given propofol. The lipid peroxidation and antioxidant system were judged from the serum levels of fatty acid hydroperoxides and secondary lipid peroxidation products (malonic dialdehyde and from the content of the endogenous antioxidant a-tocopherol. Results. The study performed indicated that the highest concentrations of fatty acid hydroperoxides were observed in Groups 1 and 2 within the first 24 posttraumatic hours. In Group 3 where propofol was used for sedation, the concentration of the hydroperoxides remained in the normal range although there was a tendency for their rise. Conclusion. Thus, propofol is the agent of choice for sedation that prevents the activation of lipid peroxidation and stabilizes some indices of the antioxidant system in patients with acute severe brain injury. Key words: brain injury, lipid peroxidation, sedation, sodium oxybutyrate, thiopental sodium, propofol.

  4. Acute administration of fenproporex increased acetylcholinesterase activity in brain of young rats

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    BRENA P. TEODORAK

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Fenproporex is the second most commonly amphetamine-based anorectic consumed worldwide; this drug is rapidly converted into amphetamine, in vivo, and acts by increasing dopamine levels in the synaptic cleft. Considering that fenproporex effects on the central nervous system are still poorly known and that acetylcholinesterase is a regulatory enzyme which is involved in cholinergic synapses and may indirectly modulate the release of dopamine, the present study investigated the effects of acute administration of fenproporex on acetylcholinesterase activity in brain of young rats. Young male Wistar rats received a single injection of fenproporex (6.25, 12.5 or 25mg/kg i.p. or vehicle (2% Tween 80. Two hours after the injection, the rats were killed by decapitation and the brain was removed for evaluation of acetylcholinesterase activity. Results showed that fenproporex administration increased acetylcholinesterase activity in the hippocampus and posterior cortex, whereas in the prefrontal cortex, striatum and cerebellum the enzyme activity was not altered. In conclusion, in the present study we demonstrated that acute administration of fenproporex exerts an effect in the cholinergic system causing an increase in the activity of acetylcholinesterase in a dose-dependent manner in the hippocampus and posterior cortex. Thus, we suggest that the imbalance in cholinergic homeostasis could be considered as an important pathophysiological mechanism underlying the brain damage observed in patients who use amphetamines such as fenproporex.

  5. Inter- and intra-tester reliability of the acute brain injury physiotherapy assessment (ABIPA) in patients with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesch, Janelle M; Low Choy, Nancy L; Weeks, Benjamin K; Nascimento, Margarida; Steele, Michael; Kuys, Suzanne S

    2017-01-01

    The Acute Brain Injury Physiotherapy Assessment (ABIPA) is a new outcome measure with face validity and sensitivity to change in the early stages of neuromotor recovery after acquired brain injury (ABI). Reliability of physiotherapists using the tool has not been established. Determine inter- and intra-tester reliability of physiotherapists using the ABIPA. An observational study using video-recorded assessments of patient performance (n = 7) was undertaken with two cohorts of physiotherapists: those receiving training (n = 23) and those provided with guidelines only (n = 7) to administer the ABIPA. Across all physiotherapists (n = 30), inter-tester reliability was excellent (α ≥ 0.9) for total ABIPA score. All individual items, except trunk alignment in supine (α = 0.5), showed excellent or good internal consistency (α ≥ 0.7). For intra-tester reliability, substantial or perfect agreement was achieved for eight items (weighted Kappa Kw ≥ 0.6), moderate agreement for four items (Kw = 0.4-0.6) and three items achieved fair agreement (alignment head supine: Kw = 0.289; alignment trunk supine: Kw = 0.387 and tone left upper limb: Kw = 0.366). Physiotherapists are highly consistent using the ABIPA but several items may need revision to improve intra-tester reliability.

  6. Acute brain ischemia as a complication of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, the case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajak, Michal; Majos, Marcin A; Szubert, Wojciech; Stefanczyk, Ludomir; Majos, Agata

    2014-10-01

    Vascular type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome involves many severe complications leading not only to organ-specific symptoms but often ends in a sudden death. The aim of this paper was to present a diagnostic possibilities and its efficiency rate in patients with vascular complications of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome who suffered from artery dissection resulting in acute brain or limb ischemia. We analysed three patients with diagnosed Ehlers-Danlos syndrome who were referred to radiology department for diagnostic imaging of affected vascular beds, each experienced brain ischemia. The paper also aims at offering some general recommendations for patients suffering from possible complications of type IV Ehlers-Danlos syndrome basing on our own experience and available literature data. © The Author(s) 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  7. The association of the kynurenine pathway of tryptophan metabolism with acute brain dysfunction during critical illness*.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams Wilson, Jessica R; Morandi, Alessandro; Girard, Timothy D; Thompson, Jennifer L; Boomershine, Chad S; Shintani, Ayumi K; Ely, E Wesley; Pandharipande, Pratik P

    2012-03-01

    Plasma tryptophan levels are associated with delirium in critically ill patients. Although tryptophan has been linked to the pathogenesis of other neurocognitive diseases through metabolism to neurotoxins via the kynurenine pathway, a role for kynurenine pathway activity in intensive care unit brain dysfunction (delirium and coma) remains unknown. This study examined the association between kynurenine pathway activity as determined by plasma kynurenine concentrations and kynurenine/tryptophan ratios and presence or absence of acute brain dysfunction (defined as delirium/coma-free days) in intensive care unit patients. This was a prospective cohort study that utilized patient data and blood samples from the Maximizing Efficacy of Targeted Sedation and Reducing Neurologic Dysfunction trial, which compared sedation with dexmedetomidine vs. lorazepam in mechanically ventilated patients. Baseline plasma kynurenine and tryptophan concentrations were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography with or without tandem mass spectrometry. Delirium was assessed daily using the Confusion Assessment Method for the Intensive Care Unit. Linear regression examined associations between kynurenine pathway activity and delirium/coma-free days after adjusting for sedative exposure, age, and severity of illness. Among 84 patients studied, median age was 60 yrs and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II score was 28.5. Elevated plasma kynurenine and kynurenine/tryptophan ratio were both independently associated with significantly fewer delirium/coma-free days (i.e., fewer days without acute brain dysfunction). Specifically, patients with plasma kynurenine or kynurenine/tryptophan ratios at the 75th percentile of our population had an average of 1.8 (95% confidence interval 0.6-3.1) and 2.1 (95% confidence interval 1.0-3.2) fewer delirium/coma-free days than those patients with values at the 25th percentile (p = .006 and p < .001, respectively). Increased kynurenine

  8. Prevention and management of brain edema in patients with acute liver failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendon, J.; Larsen, Finn Stolze

    2008-01-01

    pressure. 4. If intracranial hypertension evolves despite these first-tier interventions, increased sedation, induction of hypothermia (body temperature of 33 degrees C to 34 degrees C), and the use of anti-inflammatory drugs may help secure brain viability Udgivelsesdato: 2008/10......) and an increase in cerebral blood flow while the cerebrospinal fluid volume remains constant. 3. The development of intracranial hypertension in patients with acute liver failure may be controlled by manipulation of the position, body temperature, plasma tonicity, arterial carbon dioxide tension, and arterial...

  9. Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: prognostic value of early follow-up brain MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koelman, Diederik L H; Benkeser, David C; Klein, Joshua P; Mateen, Farrah J

    2017-08-01

    Patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) are presumed to have radiological monophasic disease, but this is uncertain since follow-up brain MRI is not routinely performed. We aimed to ascertain combined radiological and clinical monophasic disease in ADEM patients and to assess whether performing early (3 months after onset) (n = 45), and (2) clinically multiphasic (clinical relapse >3 months after onset) (n = 17). All clinically monophasic patients with brain MRI follow-up (n = 30) also had radiological monophasic disease a median of 2 years after ADEM onset. New lesions (58 vs. 14%) and persistent lesions (100 vs. 18%) on early brain MRI [available in 40 patients (65%)], as well as clinical flares (53 vs. 20%), were more common in clinically multiphasic versus monophasic patients. These early follow-up data allowed us to predict multiphasic disease with reasonable accuracy in a multivariable model (AUC = 0.73). We conclude that performing early follow-up brain MRI routinely in ADEM patients would aid clinicians in predicting multiphasic disease and may stratify patients who would benefit from initiation of disease-modifying therapy for multiple sclerosis.

  10. Leukotriene-mediated neuroinflammation, toxic brain damage, and neurodegeneration in acute methanol poisoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Sergey; Kotikova, Katerina; Nurieva, Olga; Hlusicka, Jiri; Kacer, Petr; Urban, Pavel; Vaneckova, Manuela; Seidl, Zdenek; Diblik, Pavel; Kuthan, Pavel; Navratil, Tomas; Pelclova, Daniela

    2017-04-01

    The role of neuroinflammation in methanol-induced toxic brain damage has not been studied. We studied acute concentrations and the dynamics of leukotrienes (LT) in serum in hospitalized patients with acute methanol poisoning and in survivors. Series of acute cysteinyl-LT and LTB4 concentration measurements were performed in 28/101 hospitalized patients (mean observation time: 88 ± 20 h). In 36 survivors, control LT measurements were performed 2 years after discharge. The acute maximum (Cmax) LT concentrations were higher than concentrations in survivors: Cmax for LTC4 was 80.7 ± 5.6 versus 47.9 ± 4.5 pg/mL; for LTD4, 51.0 ± 6.6 versus 23.1 ± 2.1 pg/mL; for LTE4, 64.2 ± 6.0 versus 26.2 ± 3.9 pg/mL; for LTB4, 59.8 ± 6.2 versus 27.2 ± 1.4 pg/mL (all p  0.05). The mean decrease in LT concentration was 30.9 ± 9.0 pg/mL for LTC4, 26.3 ± 8.6 pg/mL for LTD4, 37.3 ± 6.4 pg/mL for LTE4, and 32.0 ± 8.8 pg/mL for LTB4. Our findings suggest that leukotriene-mediated neuroinflammation may play an important role in the mechanisms of toxic brain damage in acute methanol poisoning in humans. Acute elevation of LT concentrations was moderate, transitory, and was not followed by chronic neuroinflammation in survivors.

  11. Not Just the Brain: Methamphetamine Disrupts Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier and Induces Acute Glial Activation and Structural Damage of Spinal Cord Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Eugene A Kiyatkin; Sharma, Hari S.

    2015-01-01

    Acute methamphetamine (METH) intoxication induces metabolic brain activation as well as multiple physiological and behavioral responses that could result in life-threatening health complications. Previously, we showed that METH (9 mg/kg) used in freely moving rats induces robust leakage of blood-brain barrier (BBB), acute glial activation, vasogenic edema, and structural abnormalities of brain cells. These changes tightly correlated with drug-induced brain hyperthermia and were greatly potent...

  12. Connectomic and surface-based morphometric correlates of acute mild traumatic brain injury

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    Patrizia eDall'Acqua

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Reduced integrity of white matter (WM pathways and subtle anomalies in gray matter (GM morphology have been hypothesized as mechanisms in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI. However, findings on structural brain changes in early stages after mTBI are inconsistent and findings related to early symptoms severity are rare.Fifty-one patients were assessed with multimodal neuroimaging and clinical methods exclusively within 7 days following mTBI and compared to 53 controls. Whole-brain connectivity based on diffusion tensor imaging was subjected to network-based statistics, whereas cortical surface area, thickness, and volume based on T1-weighted MRI scans were investigated using surface-based morphometric analysis. Reduced connectivity strength within a subnetwork of 59 edges located predominantly in bilateral frontal lobes was significantly associated with higher levels of self-reported symptoms. In addition, cortical surface area decreases were associated with stronger complaints in five clusters located in bilateral frontal and postcentral cortices, and in the right inferior temporal region. Alterations in WM and GM were localized in similar brain regions and moderately-to-strongly related to each other. Furthermore, the reduction of cortical surface area in the frontal regions was correlated with poorer attentive-executive performance in the mTBI group. Finally, group differences were detected in both the WM and GM, especially when focusing on a subgroup of patients with greater complaints, indicating the importance of classifying mTBI patients according to severity of symptoms. This study provides evidence that mTBI affects not only the integrity of WM networks by means of axonal damage but also the morphology of the cortex during the initial post-injury period. These anomalies might be greater in the acute period than previously believed and the involvement of frontal brain regions was consistently pronounced in both findings. The dysconnected

  13. Neurotrauma: The Crosstalk between Neurotrophins and Inflammation in the Acutely Injured Brain

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    Lindolfo da Silva Meirelles

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a major cause of morbidity and mortality among young individuals worldwide. Understanding the pathophysiology of neurotrauma is crucial for the development of more effective therapeutic strategies. After the trauma occurs, immediate neurologic damage is produced by the traumatic forces; this primary injury triggers a secondary wave of biochemical cascades together with metabolic and cellular changes, called secondary neural injury. In the scenario of the acutely injured brain, the ongoing secondary injury results in ischemia and edema culminating in an uncontrollable increase in intracranial pressure. These areas of secondary injury progression, or areas of “traumatic penumbra”, represent crucial targets for therapeutic interventions. Neurotrophins are a class of signaling molecules that promote survival and/or maintenance of neurons. They also stimulate axonal growth, synaptic plasticity, and neurotransmitter synthesis and release. Therefore, this review focuses on the role of neurotrophins in the acute post-injury response. Here, we discuss possible endogenous neuroprotective mechanisms of neurotrophins in the prevailing environment surrounding the injured areas, and highlight the crosstalk between neurotrophins and inflammation with focus on neurovascular unit cells, particularly pericytes. The perspective is that neurotrophins may represent promising targets for research on neuroprotective and neurorestorative processes in the short-term following TBI.

  14. Acute minocycline treatment prevents neurobehavioral impairment in a rat model of mild blast traumatic brain injury

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    Erzsebet eKovesdi

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Mild blast induced traumatic brain injury (mbTBI and its associated memory impairment and anxiety elevation currently represent one of the major military health challenges. Our earlier work using a rodent model of mbTBI indicated that the pathology underlying the observed neurobehavioral abnormalities includes neuroinflammation. The aim of our present study was to determine the effect of acute treatment with minocycline, an FDA approved non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug, on the functional and molecular outcomes of mbTBI. Beginning four hours after a single exposure to mild blast overpressure, animals received a daily dose of minocycline (50 mg/kg or physiological saline intraperitoneally (i.p. for 4 days. Physiological parameters (arterial blood O2 saturation, heart and breath rates, and pulse distension and neurobehavior (locomotor activity, anxiety, and spatial memory were monitored at multiple time points. At the termination of the experiment (51 days post-injury, we analyzed sera and select brain regions for changes in protein markers of inflammation as well as vascular, neuronal, and glial integrity. We found that acute treatment with minocycline completely prevented memory impairment and anxiety development by ameliorating the inflammatory response to injury and substantially reducing neuronal and glial cell loss. Based on our findings, we urge testing the effect of minocycline treatment in human mbTBI.

  15. Comparative Brain Stem Lesions on MRI of Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis, Neuromyelitis Optica, and Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Zhuang; Shen, Liping; Long, Youming; Huang, Junqi; Hu, Xueqiang

    2011-01-01

    Background Brain stem lesions are common in patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), neuromyelitis optica (NMO), and multiple sclerosis (MS). Objectives To investigate comparative brain stem lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) among adult patients with ADEM, NMO, and MS. Methods Sixty-five adult patients with ADEM (n = 17), NMO (n = 23), and MS (n = 25) who had brain stem lesions on MRI were enrolled. Morphological features of brain stem lesions among these diseases were assessed. Results Patients with ADEM had a higher frequency of midbrain lesions than did patients with NMO (94.1% vs. 17.4%, P<0.001) and MS (94.1% vs. 40.0%, P<0.001); patients with NMO had a lower frequency of pons lesions than did patients with MS (34.8% vs. 84.0%, P<0.001) and ADEM (34.8% vs. 70.6%, P = 0.025); and patients with NMO had a higher frequency of medulla oblongata lesions than did patients with ADEM (91.3% vs. 35.3%, P<0.001) and MS (91.3% vs. 36.0%, P<0.001). On the axial section of the brain stem, the majority (82.4%) of patients with ADEM showed lesions on the ventral part; the brain stem lesions in patients with NMO were typically located in the dorsal part (91.3%); and lesions in patients with MS were found in both the ventral (44.0%) and dorsal (56.0%) parts. The lesions in patients with ADEM (100%) and NMO (91.3%) had poorly defined margins, while lesions of patients with MS (76.0%) had well defined margins. Brain stem lesions in patients with ADEM were usually bilateral and symmetrical (82.4%), while lesions in patients with NMO (87.0%) and MS (92.0%) were asymmetrical or unilateral. Conclusions Brain stem lesions showed various morphological features among adult patients with ADEM, NMO, and MS. The different lesion locations may be helpful in distinguishing these diseases. PMID:21853047

  16. Comparative brain stem lesions on MRI of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, neuromyelitis optica, and multiple sclerosis.

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    Zhengqi Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain stem lesions are common in patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM, neuromyelitis optica (NMO, and multiple sclerosis (MS. OBJECTIVES: To investigate comparative brain stem lesions on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI among adult patients with ADEM, NMO, and MS. METHODS: Sixty-five adult patients with ADEM (n = 17, NMO (n = 23, and MS (n = 25 who had brain stem lesions on MRI were enrolled. Morphological features of brain stem lesions among these diseases were assessed. RESULTS: Patients with ADEM had a higher frequency of midbrain lesions than did patients with NMO (94.1% vs. 17.4%, P<0.001 and MS (94.1% vs. 40.0%, P<0.001; patients with NMO had a lower frequency of pons lesions than did patients with MS (34.8% vs. 84.0%, P<0.001 and ADEM (34.8% vs. 70.6%, P = 0.025; and patients with NMO had a higher frequency of medulla oblongata lesions than did patients with ADEM (91.3% vs. 35.3%, P<0.001 and MS (91.3% vs. 36.0%, P<0.001. On the axial section of the brain stem, the majority (82.4% of patients with ADEM showed lesions on the ventral part; the brain stem lesions in patients with NMO were typically located in the dorsal part (91.3%; and lesions in patients with MS were found in both the ventral (44.0% and dorsal (56.0% parts. The lesions in patients with ADEM (100% and NMO (91.3% had poorly defined margins, while lesions of patients with MS (76.0% had well defined margins. Brain stem lesions in patients with ADEM were usually bilateral and symmetrical (82.4%, while lesions in patients with NMO (87.0% and MS (92.0% were asymmetrical or unilateral. CONCLUSIONS: Brain stem lesions showed various morphological features among adult patients with ADEM, NMO, and MS. The different lesion locations may be helpful in distinguishing these diseases.

  17. Frequency and pathogenesis of silent subcortical brain infarction in acute first-ever ischemic stroke

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    Adachi, Tomohide; Kobayashi, Shotai; Yamaguchi, Shuhei [Shimane Medical Univ., Izumo (Japan)

    2002-02-01

    We have often observed silent subcortical brain lesions on CT or MRI in first-ever ischemic stroke, but there is little published information on the relationship of these lesions to stroke subtypes. Here, we describe the incidence of MRI-detected silent subcortical brain lesions, including infarctions and white matter lesions, in a series of patients with first-ever ischemic stroke classified according to stroke subtypes. We also discuss the pathogenesis of these silent subcortical lesions. We evaluated 171 patients with acute first-ever ischemic stroke. The subjects were divided into three groups: lacunar, atherothrombotic and cardioembolic infarction groups. We evaluated silent subcortical brain infarction (SSBI), enlargement of perivascular space (EPS), and other white-matter lesions using MRI. Hypertension was observed in 67.6% of lacunar infarction, 57.1% of atherosclerotic infarction, and 54.1% of cardioembolic infarction. SSBI was more frequently observed in lacunar infarction than the others (lacunar vs. atherothrombotic vs. cardiogenic infarction, 81.5% vs. 44.4% vs. 42.1%, p=0.006). High-grade EPS (grade 2 or higher) was also observed more frequently in lacunar infarction than in the others (lacunar vs. atherothrombotic vs. cardiogenic infarction, 63.3% vs. 24.2% vs. 0%, p<0.001). Scheltens' score of silent subcortical lesions was significantly higher in lacunar infarction than in the others. The frequency of silent subcortical ischemic brain lesions was significantly higher in lacunar infarction than in atherosclerotic or cardioembolic infarction. We suggest that the pathogenesis of silent subcortical ischemic brain lesions is common to that of lacunar infarction, that is, small-vessel vasculopathy. (author)

  18. PROGNOSTIC VALUE OF BRAIN AND ACUTE LEUKEMIA CYTOPLASMIC GENE EXPRESSION IN EGYPTIAN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    adel abd elhaleim hagag

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract      Background: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML accounts for 25%-35% of the acute leukemia in children. BAALC (Brain and Acute Leukemia, Cytoplasmic gene is a recently identified gene on chromosome 8q22.3 that has prognostic significance in AML.  The aim of this work was to study the impact of BAALC gene expression on prognosis of AML in Egyptian children. Patients and methods: This study was conducted on 40 patients of newly diagnosed AML who were subjected to the following: Full history taking, clinical examination, laboratory investigations including: complete blood count, LDH, bone marrow aspiration, cytochemistry and immunophenotyping, assessment of BAALC Gene by real time PCR in bone marrow aspirate mononuclear cells before the start of chemotherapy. Results: BAALC gene expression showed positive expression in 24 cases (60% and negative expression in 16 cases (40%. Patients who showed positive BAALC gene expression included 10 patients achieved complete remission, 8 patients died and 6 relapsed patients, while patients who showed negative expression include 12 patients achieved complete remission, 1 relapsed patient and 3 patients died. There was significant association between BAALC gene expression and FAB classification of patients of AML patientsas positive BAALC expression is predominantly seen in FAB subtypes M1 and M2 compared with negative BAALC gene expression that was found more in M3 and M4 (8 cases with M1, 12 cases with M2, 1 case with M3 and 3 cases with M4 in positive BAALC expression versus 2 cases with M1, 3 cases with M2, 4 cases with M3 and 7 cases with M4 in BAALC gene negative expression group with significant difference regarding FAB subtypes. As regard age, sex, splenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, pallor, purpura, platelets count, WBCs count, and percentage of blast cells in BM, the present study showed no significant association with BAALC. Conclusion: BAALC expression is an important prognostic factor in AML

  19. Altered brain function in new onset childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia before chemotherapy: A resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhanqi; Zou, Dongfang; Mai, Huirong; Yuan, Xiuli; Wang, Lihong; Li, Yue; Liao, Jianxiang; Liu, Liwei; Liu, Guosheng; Zeng, Hongwu; Wen, Feiqiu

    2017-10-01

    Cognitive impairments had been reported in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, what caused the impairments needed to be demonstrated, chemotherapy-related or the disease itself. The primary aim of this exploratory investigation was to determine if there were changes in brain function of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia before chemotherapy. In this study, we advanced a measure named regional homogeneity to evaluate the resting-state brain activities, intelligence quotient test was performed at same time. Using regional homogeneity, we first investigated the resting state brain function in patients with new onset childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia before chemotherapy, healthy children as control. The decreased ReHo values were mainly founded in the default mode network and left frontal lobe, bilateral inferior parietal lobule, bilateral temporal lobe, bilateral occipital lobe, precentral gyrus, bilateral cerebellum in the newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients compared with the healthy control. While in contrast, increased ReHo values were mainly shown in the right frontal lobe (language area), superior frontal gyrus-R, middle frontal gyrus-R and inferior parietal lobule-R for acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients group. There were no significant differences for intelligence quotient measurements between the acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient group and the healthy control in performance intelligence quotient, verbal intelligence quotient, total intelligence quotient. The altered brain functions are associated with cognitive change and language, it is suggested that there may be cognition impairment before the chemotherapy. Regional homogeneity by functional magnetic resonance image is a sensitive way for early detection on brain damage in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Role of Gut-brain Axis in Regulating Glucose Metabolism After Acute Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendharkar, Sayali A; Asrani, Varsha M; Murphy, Rinki; Cutfield, Richard; Windsor, John A; Petrov, Maxim S

    2017-01-05

    Diabetes has become an epidemic in developed and developing countries alike, with an increased demand for new efficacious treatments. A large body of pre-clinical evidence suggests that the gut-brain axis may be exploited as a potential therapeutic target for defective glucose homeostasis. This clinical study aimed to investigate a comprehensive panel of glucoregulatory peptides, released by both the gut and brain, in individuals after acute pancreatitis. Fasting levels of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glicentin, oxyntomodulin, peptide YY, ghrelin, cholecystokinin, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and secretin were studied. Modified Poisson and multivariable linear regression analyses were conducted. Pre-determined concentration ranges were used to categorize each peptide into quartiles. A total of 83 individuals were included, of who 30 (36%) developed abnormal glucose metabolism (AGM) after acute pancreatitis. In individuals with AGM, the highest quartile of oxyntomodulin differed most significantly from the lowest quartile with a prevalence ratio (PR; 95% confidence interval) of 0.50 (0.21, 1.20; P=0.005); of glicentin with a PR of 0.26 (0.13, 0.54; PVIP with a PR of 0.34 (0.13, 0.89; P=0.043). Peptide YY, GLP-1, cholecystokinin, ghrelin, and secretin were not significantly associated with AGM. Fasting circulating oxyntomodulin, glicentin, and VIP levels are significantly decreased in patients with defective glucose homeostasis after acute pancreatitis. Oxyntomodulin appears to be a promising therapeutic target for future clinical studies on diabetes associated with diseases of the exocrine pancreas.

  1. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis presenting as acute cerebellar ataxia and brain stem hyperintensities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Arushi Gahlot; Sankhyan, Naveen; Padmanabh, Hansashree; Sahu, Jitendra Kumar; Vyas, Sameer; Singhi, Pratibha

    2016-05-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis is a devastating neurodegenerative disease with a characteristic clinical course. Atypical presentations may be seen in 10% of the cases. To describe the atypical clinical and radiological features of SSPE in a child form endemic country. A 5-year-old boy presented with acute-onset cerebellar ataxia without associated encephalopathy, focal motor deficits, seizures or cognitive decline. He had varicella-like illness with vesicular, itchy truncal rash erupting one month prior to the onset of these symptoms. He underwent detailed neurological assessment, relevant laboratory and radiological investigations. Neuroimaging revealed peculiar brain stem lesions involving the pons and cerebellum suggestive of demyelination. With a presumptive diagnosis of clinically isolated syndrome of demyelination, he was administered pulse methylprednisolone (30 mg/kg/day for 5 days). Four weeks later he developed myoclonic jerks. Electroencephalogram showed characteristic periodic complexes time-locked with myoclonus. CSF and serum anti-measles antibody titres were elevated (1:625). Our report highlights that subacute sclerosing panencephalitis can present atypically as isolated acute cerebellar ataxia and peculiar involvement of longitudinal and sparing of transverse pontine fibres. The predominant brainstem abnormalities in the clinical setting may mimick acute demyelinating syndrome. Hence, it is important to recognize these features of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in children, especially in the endemic countries. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Whether Metal Element-Containing Herbal Formula Angong Niuhuang Pill Is Safe for Acute Brain Disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lei; Peng, Fu; Guan, Binghe; Li, Xia; Wu, Wei; Chen, Jianping; Shen, Jiangang

    2015-07-01

    "Angong Niuhuang Pill" (AGNH Pill) has been used as patented herbal formula for treatment of acute brain disorders including ischemic stroke, hemorrhage stroke, and trauma brain injury in traditional Chinese medicine for a thousand years. It is widely used in treatment of many diseases. As AGNH Pill contains metal elements named realgar and cinnabar, whether AGNH Pill is safe attracts great concerns. To address this question, we reviewed adverse drug reactions (ADR) and adverse events (AE) to assess the safety of AGNH Pill clinically. We searched PubMed, Embase, Cochrane library, TOXNET, and Chinese databases CNKI and Wanfang for articles published between January 1974 and January 2015. A total of 49 cases contained in 10 articles were included in this study. We were unable to determine the frequency of ADR/AE induced by AGNH Pill due to the lack of complete production and market information provided by pharmaceutical manufacturers and hospitals. Based on current literature data, we estimated that the risk of ADR/AE from AGNH Pill administration was low. The majority of ADR/AE was attributed to the improper use of AGNH Pill, such as use in children with overdosage or use with incompatible drugs. We were unable to distinguish whether incidents were ADR or AE because of the poor reports. To date, published evidence indicates that AGNH Pill appears to carry a relatively low risk of ADR/AE. As the quality of clinical assessment for the safety of AGNH Pill is poor, it is desirable to conduct well-designed randomized clinical trials to assess its safety for the treatment of acute brain disorders.

  3. Acute caffeine administration effect on brain activation patterns in mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, Sven; Montandon, Marie-Louise; Rodriguez, Cristelle; Moser, Dominik; Toma, Simona; Hofmeister, Jeremy; Sinanaj, Indrit; Lovblad, Karl-Olof; Giannakopoulos, Panteleimon

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies showed that acute caffeine administration enhances task-related brain activation in elderly individuals with preserved cognition. To explore the effects of this widely used agent on cognition and brain activation in early phases of cognitive decline, we performed a double-blinded, placebo-controlled functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study during an n-back working memory task in 17 individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) compared to 17 age-matched healthy controls (HC). All individuals were regular caffeine consumers with an overnight abstinence and given 200 mg caffeine versus placebo tablets 30 minutes before testing. Analyses included assessment of task-related activation (general linear model), functional connectivity (tensorial-independent component analysis, TICA), baseline perfusion (arterial spin labeling, ASL), grey matter density (voxel-based morphometry, VBM), and white matter microstructure (tract-based spatial statistics, TBSS). Acute caffeine administration induced a focal activation of the prefrontal areas in HC with a more diffuse and posteromedial activation pattern in MCI individuals. In MCI, TICA documented a significant caffeine-related enhancement in the prefrontal cortex, supplementary motor area, ventral premotor and parietal cortex as well as the basal ganglia and cerebellum. The absence of significant group differences in baseline ASL perfusion patterns supports a neuronal rather than a purely vascular origin of these differences. The VBM and TBSS analyses excluded potentially confounding differences in grey matter density and white matter microstructure between MCI and HC. The present findings suggest a posterior displacement of working memory-related brain activation patterns after caffeine administration in MCI that may represent a compensatory mechanism to counterbalance a frontal lobe dysfunction.

  4. Acute Administration of Diazepam Provokes Redox Homeostasis Imbalance in the Rat Brain: Prevention by Simvastatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eger, Guilherme André; Ferreira, Vinícius Vialle; Batista, Camila Ribeiro; Bonde, Henrique LuisPetrek; de Lima, Daniela Delwing; Rodrigues, André Felipe; da Cruz, José Geraldo Pereira; Magro, Débora Delwing Dal

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the effects of acute diazepam (DZP) administration on thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance (TBARS) levels, protein carbonyl content, and on the activities of the antioxidant enzymes catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase in the brain of rats. Additionally, we investigated the antioxidant role of chronic pretreatment with simvastatin on the effects provoked by DZP. Simvastatin was administered (1 or 10 mg/kg by oral gavage) for 30 days. On the 30th day of treatment, groups were randomized and DZP was administered (0.5 or 1.0 mg/kg by intraperitoneal injection). Control groups received saline. Results showed that DZP enhanced TBARS levels and protein carbonyl content and altered enzymatic activity in the brain of rats. Simvastatin prevented most of the alterations caused by DZP on the oxidative stress parameters. Data indicate that DZP administration causes an oxidative imbalance in the brain areas studied; however, in the presence of simvastatin, some of these alterations in oxidative stress were prevented. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Whole brain magnetization transfer histogram analysis of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients receiving intrathecal methotrexate therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, Akira [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]. E-mail: yakira@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Miki, Yukio [Department of Diagnostic Imaging and Nuclear Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]. E-mail: mikiy@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Adachi, Souichi [Department of Pediatrics, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto University, 54 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto-shi Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)]. E-mail: sadachi@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp (and others)

    2006-03-15

    Background and purpose: The purpose of this prospective study was to evaluate the hypothesis that magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) histogram analysis of the whole brain could detect early and subtle brain changes nonapparent on conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) receiving methotrexate (MTX) therapy. Materials and methods: Subjects in this prospective study comprised 10 children with ALL (mean age, 6 years; range, 0-16 years). In addition to conventional MRI, magnetization transfer images were obtained before and after intrathecal and intravenous MTX therapy. MTR values were calculated and plotted as a histogram, and peak height and location were calculated. Differences in peak height and location between pre- and post-MTX therapy scans were statistically analyzed. Conventional MRI was evaluated for abnormal signal area in white matter. Results: MTR peak height was significantly lower on post-MTX therapy scans than on pre-MTX therapy scans (p = 0.002). No significant differences in peak location were identified between pre- and post-chemotherapy imaging. No abnormal signals were noted in white matter on either pre- or post-MTX therapy conventional MRI. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that MTR histogram analysis allows better detection of early and subtle brain changes in ALL patients who receive MTX therapy than conventional MRI.

  6. Interferon-α acutely impairs whole-brain functional connectivity network architecture - A preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipasquale, Ottavia; Cooper, Ella A; Tibble, Jeremy; Voon, Valerie; Baglio, Francesca; Baselli, Giuseppe; Cercignani, Mara; Harrison, Neil A

    2016-11-01

    Interferon-alpha (IFN-α) is a key mediator of antiviral immune responses used to treat Hepatitis C infection. Though clinically effective, IFN-α rapidly impairs mood, motivation and cognition, effects that can appear indistinguishable from major depression and provide powerful empirical support for the inflammation theory of depression. Though inflammation has been shown to modulate activity within discrete brain regions, how it affects distributed information processing and the architecture of whole brain functional connectivity networks have not previously been investigated. Here we use a graph theoretic analysis of resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rfMRI) to investigate acute effects of systemic interferon-alpha (IFN-α) on whole brain functional connectivity architecture and its relationship to IFN-α-induced mood change. Twenty-two patients with Hepatitis-C infection, initiating IFN-α-based therapy were scanned at baseline and 4h after their first IFN-α dose. The whole brain network was parcellated into 110 cortical and sub-cortical nodes based on the Oxford-Harvard Atlas and effects assessed on higher-level graph metrics, including node degree, betweenness centrality, global and local efficiency. IFN-α was associated with a significant reduction in global network connectivity (node degree) (p=0.033) and efficiency (p=0.013), indicating a global reduction of information transfer among the nodes forming the whole brain network. Effects were similar for highly connected (hub) and non-hub nodes, with no effect on betweenness centrality (p>0.1). At a local level, we identified regions with reduced efficiency of information exchange and a sub-network with decreased functional connectivity after IFN-α. Changes in local and particularly global functional connectivity correlated with associated changes in mood measured on the Profile of Mood States (POMS) questionnaire. IFN-α rapidly induced a profound shift in whole brain network structure

  7. Executive function disorder in acute traumatic brain injury in Manado, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekplin A.S. Sekeon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is known as a major cause of death and chronic disability worldwide. It is one of the leading causes of economic and social problems for patient, family and community. Patients will have serious complication on physics, mental and personality aspect. Executive function disorder is one of the cognitive functions that could be affected by TBI. There is scarcity of data about executive function in acute TBI, especially from developing countries. Our study aimed to investigate the association between acute TBI and executive function disorder. This study was a hospital-based cross-sectional study. Samples consisted of 20 patients and 40 demographically matched controls that meet the inclusion criteria. For executive function measurement we applied TMT-A, TMT-B and Stroop Test. The result showed that mean score of TMT-A for case group was 1.06 minute (95% CI 0.70-1.06 which was longer than control group (0.32 minute. For TMT- B test, the mean score was 2.68 minute (95% CI 2.05-2.8 for case group and 0.77 minute for control group. On Stroop Test 3 we found that the mean score was 17 correct items (95% CI 13.52-20.48 which was lower than control group (52.5. For all of the tests, we detected that acute TBI significantly associate with executive function disorder (p > 0.05. Conclusion: There was a significant association between acute TBI and executive function disorder.

  8. Ankle passive and active movement training in children with acute brain injury using a wearable robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a wearable robotic device in guiding isometric torque generation and passive-active movement training for ankle motor recovery in children with acute brain injury. Participants/setting: Ten inpatient children with acute brain injury being treated in a rehabilitation hospital. Design: Daily robot-guided ankle passive-active movement therapy for 15 sessions, including isometric torque generation under real-time feedback, stretch-ing, and active movement training with motivating games using a wearable ankle rehabilitation robot. Main measures: Ankle biomechanical improvements induced by each training session including ankle range of motion (ROM, muscle strength, and clinical (Fugl-Meyer Lower-Extremity (FMLE, Pediatric Balance Scale (PBS and biomechanical (ankle ROM and muscle strength outcomes over 15 training sessions. Results: As training progressed, improvements in biomechanical performance measures followed logarithmic curves. Each training session increased median dorsiflexion active range of motion (AROM 2.73° (standard deviation (SD 1.14, dorsiflexion strength 0.87 Nm (SD 0.90, and plantarflexion strength 0.60 Nm (SD 1.19. After 15 training sessions the median FMLE score had increased from 14.0 (SD 10.11 to 23.0 (SD 11.4, PBS had increased from 33.0 (SD 19.99 to 50.0 (SD 23.13 (p < 0.05, median dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength had improved from 0.21 Nm (SD 4.45 to 4.0 Nm (SD 7.63 and 8.33 Nm (SD 10.18 to 18.45 Nm (SD 14.41, respectively, median dorsiflexion AROM had improved from –10.45° (SD 12.01 to 11.87° (SD 20.69, and median dorsiflexion PROM increased from 20.0° (SD 9.04 to 25.0° (SD 8.03. Conclusion: Isometric torque generation with real-time feedback, stretching and active movement training helped promote neuroplasticity and improve motor performance in children with acute brain injury.

  9. Ankle passive and active movement training in children with acute brain injury using a wearable robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Xiong, Bo; Ren, Yupeng; Dvorkin, Assaf Y; Gaebler-Spira, Deboah; Sisung, Charles E; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2018-01-10

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a wearable robotic device in guiding isometric torque generation and passive-active movement training for ankle motor recovery in children with acute brain injury. Ten inpatient children with acute brain injury being treated in a rehabilitation hospital. Daily robot-guided ankle passive-active movement therapy for 15 sessions, including isometric torque generation under real-time feedback, stretch-ing, and active movement training with motivating games using a wearable ankle rehabilitation robot. Ankle biomechanical improvements induced by each training session including ankle range of motion (ROM), muscle strength, and clinical (Fugl-Meyer Lower-Extremity (FMLE), Pediatric Balance Scale (PBS)) and biomechanical (ankle ROM and muscle strength) outcomes over 15 training sessions. As training progressed, improvements in biomechanical performance measures followed logarithmic curves. Each training session increased median dorsiflexion active range of motion (AROM) 2.73° (standard deviation (SD) 1.14), dorsiflexion strength 0.87 Nm (SD 0.90), and plantarflexion strength 0.60 Nm (SD 1.19). After 15 training sessions the median FMLE score had increased from 14.0 (SD 10.11) to 23.0 (SD 11.4), PBS had increased from 33.0 (SD 19.99) to 50.0 (SD 23.13) (p dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength had improved from 0.21 Nm (SD 4.45) to 4.0 Nm (SD 7.63) and 8.33 Nm (SD 10.18) to 18.45 Nm (SD 14.41), respectively, median dorsiflexion AROM had improved from -10.45° (SD 12.01) to 11.87° (SD 20.69), and median dorsiflexion PROM increased from 20.0° (SD 9.04) to 25.0° (SD 8.03). Isometric torque generation with real-time feedback, stretching and active movement training helped promote neuroplasticity and improve motor performance in children with acute brain injury.

  10. Brain DNA damage and behavioral changes after repeated intermittent acute ethanol withdrawal by young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Priscila A; Poli, Jefferson H Z; Sperotto, Nathalia D M; Moura, Dinara J; Saffi, Jenifer; Nin, Maurício S; Barros, Helena M T

    2015-10-01

    Alcohol addiction causes severe problems, and its deprivation may potentiate symptoms such as anxiety. Furthermore, ethanol is a neurotoxic agent that induces degeneration and the consequences underlying alcohol-mediated brain damage remain unclear. This study assessed the behavioral changes during acute ethanol withdrawal periods and determined the levels of DNA damage and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in multiple brain areas. Male Wistar rats were subjected to an oral ethanol self-administration procedure with a forced diet where they were offered 8% (v/v) ethanol solution for 21 days followed by five repeated 24-h cycles alternating between ethanol withdrawal and re-exposure. Control animals received an isocaloric control diet without ethanol. Behavioral changes were analyzed on ethanol withdrawal days in the open-field (OF) and elevated plus-maze (EPM) tests within the first 6 h of ethanol deprivation. The pre-frontal cortex, hypothalamus, striatum, hippocampus, and cerebellum were dissected for alkaline and neutral comet assays and for dichlorofluorescein ROS testing. The repeated intermittent ethanol access enhanced solution intake and alcohol-seeking behavior. Decreased exploratory activity was observed in the OF test, and the animals stretched less in the EPM test. DNA single-strand breaks and ROS production were significantly higher in all structures evaluated in the ethanol-treated rats compared with controls. The animal model of repeated intermittent ethanol access induced behavioral changes in rats, and this ethanol exposure model induced an increase in DNA single-strand breaks and ROS production in all brain areas. Our results suggest that these brain damages may influence future behaviors.

  11. Cognitive Improvement after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Measured with Functional Neuroimaging during the Acute Period.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn R Wylie

    Full Text Available Functional neuroimaging studies in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI have been largely limited to patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms, utilizing images obtained months to years after the actual head trauma. We sought to distinguish acute and delayed effects of mild traumatic brain injury on working memory functional brain activation patterns < 72 hours after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI and again one-week later. We hypothesized that clinical and fMRI measures of working memory would be abnormal in symptomatic mTBI patients assessed < 72 hours after injury, with most patients showing clinical recovery (i.e., improvement in these measures within 1 week after the initial assessment. We also hypothesized that increased memory workload at 1 week following injury would expose different cortical activation patterns in mTBI patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms, compared to those with full clinical recovery. We performed a prospective, cohort study of working memory in emergency department patients with isolated head injury and clinical diagnosis of concussion, compared to control subjects (both uninjured volunteers and emergency department patients with extremity injuries and no head trauma. The primary outcome of cognitive recovery was defined as resolution of reported cognitive impairment and quantified by scoring the subject's reported cognitive post-concussive symptoms at 1 week. Secondary outcomes included additional post-concussive symptoms and neurocognitive testing results. We enrolled 46 subjects: 27 with mild TBI and 19 controls. The time of initial neuroimaging was 48 (+22 S.D. hours after injury (time 1. At follow up (8.7, + 1.2 S.D., days after injury, time 2, 18 of mTBI subjects (64% reported moderate to complete cognitive recovery, 8 of whom fully recovered between initial and follow-up imaging. fMRI changes from time 1 to time 2 showed an increase in posterior cingulate activation in the mTBI subjects

  12. [CHARACTERIZATION OF VESTIBULAR DISORDERS IN THE INJURED PERSONS WITH THE BRAIN CONCUSSION IN ACUTE PERIOD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skobska, O E; Kadzhaya, N V; Andreyev, O A; Potapov, E V

    2015-04-01

    There were examined 32 injured persons, ageing (34.1 ± 1.3) yrs at average, for the brain commotion (BC). The adopted protocol SCAT-3 (Standardized Concussion Assessment Tool, 3rd ed.), DHI (Dizziness Handicap Inventory questionnaire), computer stabilography (KS) were applied for the vestibular disorders diagnosis. There was established, that in acute period of BC a dyssociation between regression of objective neurological symptoms and permanence of the BC indices occurs, what confirms a latent disorder of the balance function. Changes of basic indices of statokinesiography, including increase of the vibration amplitude enhancement in general centre of pressure in a saggital square and the BC square (235.3 ± 13.7) mm2 in a modified functional test of Romberg with the closed eyes is possible to apply as objective criteria for the BC diagnosis.

  13. 'Spreading depression of Leão' and its emerging relevance to acute brain injury in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Martin; Strong, Anthony J

    2017-01-01

    A new research field in translational neuroscience has opened as a result of the recognition since 2002 that "spreading depression of Leão" can be detected in many patients with acute brain injury, whether vascular and spontaneous, or traumatic in origin, as well as in those many individuals...

  14. The Acute Inflammatory Response in Trauma/Hemorrhage and Traumatic Brain Injury : Current State and Emerging Prospects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Namas, R.; Ghuma, A.; Hermus, L.; Zamora, R.; Okonkwo, D. O.; Billiar, T. R.; Vodovotz, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Traumatic injury/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) elicits an acute inflammatory response that may result in death. Inflammation describes a coordinated series of molecular, cellular, tissue, organ, and systemic responses that drive the pathology of various diseases including T/HS and traumatic brain injury

  15. Fatal deterioration of delayed acute subdural hematoma after mild traumatic brain injury: two cases with brief review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiwen; Xu, Chen; Yuan, Lutao; Tian, Hengli; Cao, Heli; Guo, Yan

    2014-04-01

    Both delayed posttraumatic intracerebral hemorrhage and epidural hematoma have been well described in the neurosurgical literatures. However, delayed posttraumatic acute subdural hematoma which happens more than a week with a rapid progress after mild traumatic brain injury and causes death of patient is rarely reported. We show two such cases and briefly review the literature and discuss the probable pathogenesis of their rapid progress.

  16. Altered free radical metabolism in acute mountain sickness: implications for dynamic cerebral autoregulation and blood-brain barrier function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, D M; Evans, K A; James, P E

    2008-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that dynamic cerebral autoregulation (CA) and blood-brain barrier (BBB) function would be compromised in acute mountain sickness (AMS) subsequent to a hypoxia-mediated alteration in systemic free radical metabolism. Eighteen male lowlanders were examined in normoxia (21% O...

  17. Correlation of Computed Tomography findings with Glasgow Coma Scale in patients with acute traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SK Sah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To correlate Computed Tomography (CT findings with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS in patients with acute traumatic brain injury attending in Chitwan Medical College teaching hospital Chitwan, Nepal. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was performed among 50 patients of acute (less than24 hours cases of craniocerebral trauma over a period of four months. The patient’s level of consciousness (GCS was determined and a brain CT scan without contrast media was performed. A sixth generation General Electric (GE CT scan was utilized and 5mm and 10mm sections were obtained for infratentorial and supratentorial parts respectively. RESULT The age range of the patients was 1 to 75 years (mean age 35.6± 21.516 years and male: female ratio was 3.1:1. The most common causes of head injury were road traffic accident (RTA (60%, fall injury (20%, physical assault (12% and pedestrian injuries (8%. The distribution of patients in accordance with consciousness level was found to be 54% with mild TBI (GCS score 12 to 14, 28% with moderate TBI (GCS score 11 to 8 and 18% with severe TBI (GCS score less than 7. The presence of mixed lesions and midline shift regardless of the underlying lesion on CT scan was accompanied by lower GCS. CONCLUSION The presence of mixed lesions and midline shift regardless of the underlying lesion on CT scan were accompanied with lower GCS. Patients having single lesion had more GCS level than mixed level and mid line shift type of injury.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i2.12947 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol.10(2; 4-9

  18. [Possibilities of magnetic-laser therapy in comprehensive treatment of patients with brain concussion in acute period].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubkova, O V; Samosiuk, I Z; Polishchuk, O V; Shul'ga, N M; Samosiuk, N I

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of magnetic-laser therapy used according to the method developed by us was studied in patients having the brain concussion (BC) in an acute period. The study was based on the dynamics of values of the evoked vestibular potentials and the disease clinical course. It was shown that following the magnetic-laser therapy in combination with traditional pharmacotherapy in BC acute period, the statistically significant positive changes were registered in the quantitative characteristics of the evoked vestibular brain potentials that correlated with the dynamics of the disease clinical course. The data obtained substantiate the possibility of using the magnetic-laser therapy in patients with a mild craniocereblal injury in an acute period.

  19. Treating reading comprehension deficits in sub-acute brain injury rehabilitation: Identifying clinical practice and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watter, Kerrin; Copley, Anna; Finch, Emma

    There is limited evidence for cognitive-communication reading comprehension (CCRC) interventions for adults following acquired brain injury (ABI), particularly during sub-acute rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical practice of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) with CCRC deficits during sub-acute ABI rehabilitation and compare it to the best available evidence. An electronic survey was used to gather information from clinicians across Australia regarding clinical practice in the areas of assessment, intervention, treatment hierarchies and service delivery; survey questions were developed from an extensive review of the literature and expert clinician opinion. Survey findings were then compared with the literature in the form of a systematic review. Surveyed clinicians provided multiple interventions for CCRC rehabilitation, including impairment based (94.7%), activity based (94.7%) and reading strategy interventions (100.0%). Five strategies were used by >94% of SLPs (highlighting, identifying main points/wh- questioning, re-reading, summarising, reducing visual load). When compared with the literature, strong similarities were found for strategy-based interventions and individual service delivery, with broad similarities for functional and impairment-based interventions, and impairment based treatment hierarchies. Strong differences in assessment were identified. Strategy use reported in clinical practice (100.0% SLPs) was higher than in the literature. Further investigation into the effectiveness of specific reading strategies for people with ABI is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Circadian phase dependent acute toxicity and pharmacokinetics of etidocaine in serum and brain of mice.

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    Bruguerolle, B; Prat, M

    1990-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible influence of the time of administration on etidocaine acute toxicity and kinetics in mice. Different groups of adult male NMRI mice maintained under controlled environmental conditions (lights on 06.00-18.00) were injected at one of the following times: 10.00, 16.00, 19.00, 22.00, 01.00 and 04.00 h with four doses of etidocaine at each time point to establish the acute toxicity (LD 50). To assess chronokinetics, a single 40 mg kg-1 i.p. dose of etidocaine was given to adult male NMRI mice at four fixed times: 10.00, 16.00, 22.00 and 04.00 h. Etidocaine serum levels were determined by GLC. The data showed significant 24 h variations of the Cmax only (highest value = 9.64 +/- 1.31 micrograms mL-1 at 10.00 P less than 0.05; amplitude, (maximum-minimum) mean x 100 = 84%) Vd, (amplitude = 59.7%), alpha and beta phase elimination half-lives (amplitude = 52 and 35%, respectively), clearance (amplitude = 23%) and AUC infinity 0 (amplitude = 22%) were not found to be significantly time dependent. Etidocaine kinetics in brain were determined similarly; a significant temporal variation was found for the elimination half life (amplitude, 161.9%) and AUC (amplitude, 133.2%) but not for Cmax. These data demonstrate a temporal pattern of etidocaine kinetics similar to those reported previously for other local anaesthetic agents, bupivacaine and mepivacaine. The temporal changes in etidocaine induced acute toxicity may result in part from its chronokinetic changes.

  1. Acute aerobic exercise increases brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in elderly with Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Flávia Gomes de Melo; Vital, Thays Martins; Stein, Angelica Miki; Arantes, Franciel José; Rueda, André Veloso; Camarini, Rosana; Teodorov, Elizabeth; Santos-Galduróz, Ruth Ferreira

    2014-01-01

    Studies indicate the involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Decreased BDNF levels may constitute a lack of trophic support and contribute to cognitive impairment in AD. The benefits of acute and chronic physical exercise on BDNF levels are well-documented in humans, however, exercise effects on BDNF levels have not been analyzed in older adults with AD. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of acute aerobic exercise on BDNF levels in older adults with AD and to verify associations among BDNF levels, aerobic fitness, and level of physical activity. Using a controlled design, twenty-one patients with AD (76.3 ± 6.2 years) and eighteen healthy older adults (74.6 ± 4.7 years) completed an acute aerobic exercise. The outcomes included measures of BDNF plasma levels, aerobic fitness (treadmill grade, time to exhaustion, VO2, and maximal lactate) and level of physical activity (Baecke Questionnaire Modified for the Elderly). The independent t-test shows differences between groups with respect to the BDNF plasma levels at baseline (p = 0.04; t = 4.53; df = 37). In two-way ANOVA, a significant effect of time was found (p = 0.001; F = 13.63; df = 37), the aerobic exercise significantly increased BDNF plasma levels in AD patients and healthy controls. A significant correlation (p = 0.04; r = 0.33) was found between BDNF levels and the level of physical activity. The results of our study suggest that aerobic exercise increases BDNF plasma levels in patients with AD and healthy controls. In addition to that, BDNF levels had association with level of physical activity.

  2. Acute ethanol effects on brain activation in low- and high-level responders to alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trim, Ryan S; Simmons, Alan N; Tolentino, Neil J; Hall, Shana A; Matthews, Scott C; Robinson, Shannon K; Smith, Tom L; Padula, Claudia B; Paulus, Martin P; Tapert, Susan F; Schuckit, Marc A

    2010-07-01

    A low level of response (LR) to alcohol is an important endophenotype associated with an increased risk of alcoholism. However, little is known about how neural functioning may differ between individuals with low and high LRs to alcohol. This study examined whether LR group effects on neural activity varied as a function of acute alcohol consumption. A total of 30 matched high- and low-LR pairs (N = 60 healthy young adults) were recruited from the University of California, San Diego, and administered a structured diagnostic interview and laboratory alcohol challenge followed by two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sessions under placebo and alcohol conditions, in randomized order. Task performance and blood oxygen level-dependent response contrast to high relative to low working memory load in an event-related visual working memory (VWM) task were examined across 120 fMRI sessions. Both LR groups performed similarly on the VWM task across conditions. A significant LR group by condition interaction effect was observed in inferior frontal and cingulate regions, such that alcohol attenuated the LR group differences found under placebo (p group by condition effect remained even after controlling for cerebral blood flow, age, and typical drinking quantity. Alcohol had differential effects on brain activation for low- and high-LR individuals within frontal and cingulate regions. These findings represent an additional step in the search for physiological correlates of a low LR and identify brain regions that may be associated with the low LR response.

  3. Balint's syndrome and post-acute brain injury rehabilitation: a case report.

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    Zgaljardic, Dennis J; Yancy, Sybil; Levinson, Jason; Morales, Gabrielle; Masel, Brent E

    2011-01-01

    Balint's syndrome includes the clinical symptom triad of simultagnosia, ocular apraxia and optic ataxia. These symptoms, in combination, are rare and can be quite debilitating as they impact visuospatial skills, visual scanning and attentional mechanisms. The literature addressing rehabilitation of individuals with Balint's syndrome is sparse. The current case report describes the outcome of a 58-year old male who presented with Balint's syndrome secondary to severe traumatic brain injury and following completion of a comprehensive post-acute brain injury rehabilitation programme. The patient was 4-months post-injury onset upon admission and received 6 months of rehabilitation services as an inpatient. The patient's comprehensive rehabilitation programme involved a 3-pronged approach including the implementation of (a) compensatory strategies, (b) remediation exercises and (c) transfer of learned skills in multiple environments and situations with implementation of psychoeducation and psychotherapy. Comprehensive neuropsychological and occupational therapy evaluations were performed at admission and at discharge in order to monitor cognitive, affective, neurological and functional change over time. Neuropsychological test improvements were noted on tasks that assess visuospatial functioning, although most gains were noted for functional and physical abilities.

  4. Factors associated with discharge destination from acute care after acquired brain injury in Ontario, Canada

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    Chen Amy Y

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this paper is to examine factors associated with discharge destination after acquired brain injury in a publicly insured population using the Anderson Behavioral Model as a framework. Methods We utilized a retrospective cohort design. Inpatient data from provincial acute care records from fiscal years 2003/4 to 2006/7 with a diagnostic code of traumatic brain injury (TBI and non-traumatic brain injury (nTBI in Ontario, Canada were obtained for the study. Using multinomial logistic regression models, we examined predisposing, need and enabling factors from inpatient records in relation to major discharge outcomes such as discharge to home, inpatient rehabilitation and other institutionalized care. Results Multinomial logistic regression revealed that need factors were strongly correlated with discharge destinations overall. Higher scores on the Charlson Comorbidity Index were associated with discharge to other institutionalized care in the nTBI population. Length of stay and special care days were identified as markers for severity and were both strongly positively correlated with discharge to other institutionalized care and inpatient rehabilitation, compared to discharge home, in both nTBI and TBI populations. Injury by motor vehicle collisions was found to be positively correlated with discharge to inpatient rehabilitation and other institutionalized care for patients with TBI. Controlling for need factors, rural location was associated with discharge to home versus inpatient rehabilitation. Conclusions These findings show that need factors (Charlson Comorbidity Index, length of stay, and number of special care days are most significant in terms of discharge destination. However, there is evidence that other factors such as rural location and access to supplemental insurance (e.g., through motor vehicle insurance may influence discharge destination outcomes as well. These findings should be considered in creating

  5. Cerebral Hemodynamic Effects of Acute Hyperoxia and Hyperventilation after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Rangel-Castilla, Leonardo; Lara, Lucia Rivera; Gopinath, Shankar; Swank, Paul R.; Valadka, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of hyperventilation or hyperoxia on cerebral hemodynamic parameters over time in patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). We prospectively studied 186 patients with severe TBI. CO2 and O2 reactivity tests were conducted twice a day on days 1–5 and once daily on days 6–10 after injury. During hyperventilation there was a significant decrease in intracranial pressure (ICP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), jugular venous oxygen saturation (Sjvo2), brain tissue Po2 (Pbto2), and flow velocity (FV). During hyperoxia there was an increase in Sjvo2 and Pbto2, and a small but consistent decrease in ICP, end-tidal carbon dioxide (etco2), partial arterial carbon dioxide pressure (Paco2), and FV. Brain tissue oxygen reactivity during the first 12 h after injury averaged 19.7 ± 3.0%, and slowly decreased over the next 7 days. The autoregulatory index (ARI; normal = 5.3 ± 1.3) averaged 2.2 ± 1.5 on day 1 post-injury, and gradually improved over the 10 days of monitoring. The ARI significantly improved during hyperoxia, by an average of 0.4 ± 1.8 on the left, and by 0.5 ± 1.8 on the right. However, the change in ARI with hyperoxia was much smaller than that observed with hyperventilation. Hyperventilation increased ARI by an average of 1.3 ± 1.9 on the left, and 1.5 ± 2.0 on the right. Pressure autoregulation, as assessed by dynamic testing, was impaired in these head-injured patients. Acute hyperoxia significantly improved pressure autoregulation, although the effect was smaller than that induced by hyperventilation. The very small change in Paco2 induced by hyperoxia does not appear to explain this finding. Rather, the vasoconstriction induced by acute hyperoxia may allow the cerebral vessels to respond better to transient hypotension. Further studies are needed to define the clinical significance of these observations. PMID:20684672

  6. Early detection of consciousness in patients with acute severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlow, Brian L; Chatelle, Camille; Spencer, Camille A; Chu, Catherine J; Bodien, Yelena G; O'Connor, Kathryn L; Hirschberg, Ronald E; Hochberg, Leigh R; Giacino, Joseph T; Rosenthal, Eric S; Wu, Ona

    2017-09-01

    See Schiff (doi:10.1093/awx209) for a scientific commentary on this article. Patients with acute severe traumatic brain injury may recover consciousness before self-expression. Without behavioural evidence of consciousness at the bedside, clinicians may render an inaccurate prognosis, increasing the likelihood of withholding life-sustaining therapies or denying rehabilitative services. Task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography techniques have revealed covert consciousness in the chronic setting, but these techniques have not been tested in the intensive care unit. We prospectively enrolled 16 patients admitted to the intensive care unit for acute severe traumatic brain injury to test two hypotheses: (i) in patients who lack behavioural evidence of language expression and comprehension, functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography detect command-following during a motor imagery task (i.e. cognitive motor dissociation) and association cortex responses during language and music stimuli (i.e. higher-order cortex motor dissociation); and (ii) early responses to these paradigms are associated with better 6-month outcomes on the Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended. Patients underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging on post-injury Day 9.2 ± 5.0 and electroencephalography on Day 9.8 ± 4.6. At the time of imaging, behavioural evaluation with the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised indicated coma (n = 2), vegetative state (n = 3), minimally conscious state without language (n = 3), minimally conscious state with language (n = 4) or post-traumatic confusional state (n = 4). Cognitive motor dissociation was identified in four patients, including three whose behavioural diagnosis suggested a vegetative state. Higher-order cortex motor dissociation was identified in two additional patients. Complete absence of responses to language, music and motor imagery was only observed in coma patients. In patients with behavioural evidence

  7. Metabolic Alterations of the Zebrafish Brain after Acute Alcohol Treatment by 1H Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

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    Dong-Cheol Woo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the metabolic alterations associated with acute alcohol treatment in zebrafish by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMRS. The brain metabolism of zebrafish was investigated after acute alcohol treatment (one-hour long exposure of adult fish to 0.00%, 0.25%, 0.50%, or 1.00% ethyl alcohol with whole brain extraction. The results of this study showed that glutamate (Glu was significantly decreased, scyllo-inositol (sIns showed a small apparent increase only in the highest acute treatment dose group, and myoinositol (mIns showed a significant decrease. [Glu]/[tCr] and [mIns]/[tCr] levels were significantly reduced regardless of the alcohol dose, and [sIns]/[tCr] was increased in the highest alcohol treatment dose group. The present NMR study revealed that specific metabolites, such as Glu and mIns, were substantially decreased in case of acute alcohol exposed zebrafish brain.

  8. Venous or arterial blood components trigger more brain swelling, tissue death after acute subdural hematoma compared to elderly atrophic brain with subdural effusion (SDE) model rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wajima, Daisuke; Sato, Fumiya; Kawamura, Kenya; Sugiura, Keisuke; Nakagawa, Ichiro; Motoyama, Yasushi; Park, Young-Soo; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2017-09-01

    Acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) is a frequent complication of severe head injury, whose secondary ischemic lesions are often responsible for the severity of the disease. We focused on the differences of secondary ischemic lesions caused by the components, 0.4ml venous- or arterial-blood, or saline, infused in the subdural space, evaluating the differences in vivo model, using rats. The saline infused rats are made for elderly atrophic brain with subdural effusion (SDE) model. Our data showed that subdural blood, both venous- and arterial-blood, aggravate brain edema and lesion development more than SDE. This study is the first study, in which different fluids in rats' subdural space, ASDH or SDE are compared with the extension of early and delayed brain damage by measuring brain edema and histological lesion volume. Blood constituents started to affect the degree of ischemia underneath the subdural hemorrhage, leading to more pronounced breakdown of the blood-brain barrier and brain damage. This indicates that further strategies to treat blood-dependent effects more efficiently are in view for patients with ASDH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Transient Ischemic Attacks and Presence of an Acute Brain Lesion in Diffusion-Weighted MRI: Study of 50 Patients

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    SM Paknejad

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Finding an acute brain lesion by diffusion-weighted (DW MRI upon an episode of transient ischemic attack (TIA is a predictor of imminent stroke in the near future. Therefore, exploring risk factors associated with lesions in DW-MRI of the brain is important in adopting an approach to TIA management. In the current study, we tried to determine the risk factors associated with lesions in DW-MRI of the brain in patients experiencing TIA episodes.Methods: Fifty patients with TIA were recruited consecutively in Sina Hospital, Tehran, Iran, over a 6-month period between July 2008 and January 2009. All of the patients underwent a complete neurological examination and laboratory tests. Brain DW-MRIs were performed for all the patients within 72 hours of a TIA episode.Results: DW-MRI revealed an acute lesion in 16% of the participants. There was a significant correlation between presence of an acute lesion in DW-MRI and TIA duration, history of diabetes mellitus and presence of unilateral facial palsy (P=0.0003, P=0.02 and P=0.008, respectively. Other variables such as age, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, past history of TIA, headache, vertigo, and sensory or visual disturbances had no significant relation with the presence of an acute lesion in DW-MRI.Conclusion: Duration of TIA, presence of diabetes mellitus and unilateral facial palsy are risk factors for an acute lesion in DW-MRI, meaning that patients with such risk factors are at risk for stroke in the near future.

  10. Acute and chronic glucocorticoid treatments regulate astrocyte-enriched mRNAs in multiple brain regions in vivo

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    Bradley S. Carter

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have primarily interpreted gene expression regulation by glucocorticoids in the brain in terms of impact on neurons; however, less is known about the corresponding impact of glucocorticoids on glia and specifically astrocytes in vivo. Recent microarray experiments have identified glucocorticoid-sensitive mRNAs in primary astrocyte cell culture, including a number of mRNAs that have reported astrocyte-enriched expression patterns relative to other brain cell types. Here, we have tested whether elevations of glucocorticoids regulate a subset of these mRNAs in vivo following acute and chronic corticosterone exposure in adult mice. Acute corticosterone exposure was achieved by a single injection of 10 mg/kg corticosterone, and tissue samples were harvested two hours post-injection. Chronic corticosterone exposure was achieved by administering 10 mg/mL corticosterone via drinking water for two weeks. Gene expression was then assessed in two brain regions associated with glucocorticoid action (prefrontal cortex and hippocampus by qPCR and by in situ hybridization. The majority of measured mRNAs regulated by glucocorticoids in astrocytes in vitro were similarly regulated by acute and/or chronic glucocorticoid exposure in vivo. In addition, the expression levels for mRNAs regulated in at least one corticosterone exposure condition (acute/chronic demonstrated moderate positive correlation between the two conditions by brain region. In situ hybridization analyses suggest that select mRNAs are regulated by chronic corticosterone exposure specifically in astroctyes based on (1 similar general expression patterns between corticosterone-treated and vehicle-treated animals and (2 similar expression patterns to the pan-astrocyte marker Aldh1l1. Our findings demonstrate that glucocorticoids regulate astrocyte-enriched mRNAs in vivo and suggest that glucocorticoids regulate gene expression in the brain in a cell type-dependent fashion.

  11. Acute stress potentiates brain response to milkshake as a function of body weight and chronic stress.

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    Rudenga, K J; Sinha, R; Small, D M

    2013-02-01

    Stress is associated with an increased intake of palatable foods and with weight gain, particularly in overweight women. Stress, food and body mass index (BMI) have been separately shown to affect amygdala activity. However, it is not known whether stress influences amygdala responses to palatable foods, and whether this response is associated with chronic stress or BMI. A total of 14 overweight and obese women participated in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scan as they consumed a palatable milkshake during script-driven, autobiographical, guided imagery of stressful and neutral-relaxing scenarios. We report that a network including insula, somatomotor mouth area, ventral striatum and thalamus responds to milkshake receipt, but none of these areas are affected by stress. In contrast, whereas the left amygdala responds to milkshake irrespective of condition, the right amygdala responds to milkshake only under stressful conditions. Moreover, this right amygdala response is positively associated with basal cortisol levels, an objective measure of chronic stress. We also found a positive relationship between BMI and stress-related increased response to milkshake in the orbitofrontal cortex(OFC). These results demonstrate that acute stress potentiates response to food in the right amygdala and OFC as a function of chronic stress and body weight, respectively. This suggests that the influence of acute stress in potentiating amygdala and OFC responses to food is dependent upon individual factors like BMI and chronic stress. We conclude that BMI and chronic stress play a significant role in brain response to food and in stress-related eating.

  12. Pituitary dysfunction in traumatic brain injury: Is evaluation in the acute phase worthwhile?

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    Pradip P Dalwadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is an under-recognized cause of hypopituitarism. According to recent data, it could be more frequent than previously known. However, there is a scarcity of data in Indian population. Aims: The main aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of pituitary hormone deficiencies in the acute phase of TBI. The secondary objectives were to correlate the severity of trauma with basal hormone levels and to determine whether initial hormone deficiencies predict mortality. Subjects and Methods: Forty-nine TBI patients (41 men and 8 women were included in this study. Pituitary functions were evaluated within 24 h of admission. Results: Gonadotropin deficiency was found in 65.3% patient while 46.9% had low insulin-like growth factor-1, 12.24% had cortisol level <7 mcg/dl. Cortisol and prolactin level were positively correlated with the severity of TBI suggestive of stress response. Free triiodothyronine (fT3 and free thyroxine were significantly lower in patients with increasing severity of tuberculosis. Logistic regression analysis revealed that mortality after TBI was unrelated to the basal pituitary hormone levels except low T3 level, which was found to be positively related to mortality. Conclusions: Pituitary dysfunction is common after TBI and the most commonly affected axes are growth hormone and gonadotropin axis. Low fT3 correlates best with mortality. During the acute phase of TBI, at least an assessment of cortisol is vital as undetected cortisol deficiency can be life-threatening

  13. Rebound of affective symptoms following acute cessation of deep brain stimulation in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

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    Ooms, Pieter; Blankers, Matthijs; Figee, Martijn; Mantione, Mariska; van den Munckhof, Pepijn; Schuurman, P Richard; Denys, Damiaan

    2014-01-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is regarded as an effective way to treat refractory obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Little is known about the effects of DBS cessation following a longer period of stimulation. To determine the relapse and rebound effects of psychiatric symptoms, and their impact on Quality of Life (QoL) following acute cessation of DBS in OCD patients. We included 16 out of 32 patients who were treated with DBS between April 2005 and January 2011 at the Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam. After treatment for at least one year, patients entered a 1-week phase in which DBS was switched off. We evaluated psychiatric symptoms and QoL at three time points: before DBS surgery (pre-DBS), following at least one year of DBS treatment (DBS-on) and following 1 week of DBS off (DBS-off). Psychiatric symptoms were assessed with the Yale-Brown obsessive-compulsive disorder scale (Y-BOCS), the Hamilton anxiety rating scale (HAM-A) and the Hamilton depression rating scale (HAM-D). QoL was assessed using the World Health Organization QOL scale (WHOQOL-Bref). Switching from DBS-on to DBS-off, Y-BOCS scores increased with 50%, HAM-A scores with 80% and HAM-D scores with 83%. In the DBS-off period, HAM-A and HAM-D scores exceeded pre-surgery levels with approximately 40%, suggesting a rebound phenomenon. Furthermore, a deterioration of physical and psychological QoL to levels comparable with pre-surgery was found during DBS-off. Acute DBS cessation causes a relapse of obsessions and compulsions and a rebound of anxiety and depression. Additionally, improvements on QoL disappear. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Acute response of non-motor symptoms to subthalamic deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

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    Fabbri, Margherita; Coelho, Miguel; Guedes, Leonor Correia; Rosa, Mario M; Abreu, Daisy; Gonçalves, Nilza; Antonini, Angelo; Ferreira, Joaquim J

    2017-08-01

    Subthalamic deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is an established treatment for the motor complications of Parkinson's disease (PD) and may have beneficial effects on non-motor symptoms (NMS). However, the acute effect of STN stimulation on NMS has only been explored in small PD cohorts with short post-surgical follow-up. To study NMS response to an acute stimulation challenge in an STN-DBS PD population with a medium/long-term post-surgical follow-up. 32 STN-DBS PD patients were tested twice (MED OFF/STIM OFF and MED OFF/STIM ON). MDS-UPDRS-III, blood pressure (BP) assessment, a visual analogue scale for pain and fatigue and State Trait Anxiety Scale score were evaluated during both stimulation conditions. NMS were assessed with MDS-UPDRS-I, Non-Motor Symptoms Scale, Geriatric Depression Scale and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory scale. Mean (SD) age was 62.5 (±13.3) years, mean disease duration 18.7 (±5.1) years, mean post-surgical follow-up 4.6 (±1.3) years, and the mean reduction of levodopa equivalent daily dose after surgery was 58.9% (±25.4%). Mean (SD) motor response to stimulation was 40% (15%). STN stimulation significantly improved anxiety (mean 18% ± 19%, P stimulation ON, BP significantly decreased during orthostatism (P stimulation improves anxiety and fatigue but decreases orthostatic BP in PD, several years after surgery. These effects should be considered when assessing long-term effect of DBS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Brain modifications after acute alcohol consumption analyzed by resting state fMRI.

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    Spagnolli, Federica; Cerini, Roberto; Cardobi, Nicolò; Barillari, Marco; Manganotti, Paolo; Storti, Silvia; Mucelli, Roberto Pozzi

    2013-10-01

    Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is a recent breakthrough in neuroimaging research able to describe "in vivo" the spontaneous baseline neuronal activity characterized by blood oxygen level dependent (BOLD) signal fluctuations at slow frequency (0.01-0.1Hz) that, in the absence of any task, forms spatially distributed functional connectivity networks, called resting state networks (RSNs). The aim of this study was to investigate, in the young and healthy population, the changing of the RSNs after acute ingestion of an alcohol dose able to determine a blood concentration (0.5g/L) that barely exceeds the legal limits for driving in the majority of European Countries. Fifteen healthy volunteers underwent two fMRI sessions using a 1.5T MR scanner before and after alcohol oral consumption. The main sequence acquired was EPI 2D BOLD, one per each session. To prevent the excessive alcohol consumption the subjects underwent the estimation of blood rate by breath test and after the stabilization of blood alcohol level (BAL) at 0.5g/L the subjects underwent the second fMRI session. Functional data elaboration was carried out using the probabilistic independent component analysis (PICA). Spatial maps so obtained were further organized, with MELODIC multisession temporal concatenation FSL option, in a cluster representing the group of pre-alcohol sessions and the group of post-alcohol sessions, followed by the dual regression approach in order to evaluate the increase or decrease in terms of connectivity in the RSNs between the two sessions at group level. The results we obtained reveal that acute consumption of alcohol reduces in a significant way the BOLD signal fluctuations in the resting brain selectively in the sub-callosal cortex (SCC), in left temporal fusiform cortex (TFC) and left inferior temporal gyrus (ITG), which are cognitive regions known to be part of the reward brain network and the ventral visual system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc

  16. A new method for evaluation of motor injury after acute brain ischemic damage.

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    Hu, Zeng-Chun; Ma, Hui; Fan, Qing; Yin, Jian; Wei, Ming-Hai; Lin, Yong-Zhong; Fan, Ming; Sun, Chang-Kai

    2015-04-01

    Motor impairment is an important index for assessing the extent of brain injury. The present study uses a new method, the movement capture analysis (MOCA) system, for assessing motor damage after acute ischemia. Forty rats were divided into four groups: standard ischemia, sham-operated, Dizocilpine (MK-801), and Ginkgo biloba extract (GBE) groups. Brain ischemia was induced using the temporary right middle cerebral artery occlusion model. Longa score and MOCA were used to assess motor injury one day after ischemia. Infarct volume was delineated with 2% 2,3,5-triphenyltetrazolium chloride (TTC) staining. The correlation of infarct volume with Longa score and MOCA data was calculated. Compared with the sham-operated group (0.10 ± 0.31), Longa scores of MK-801 (2.33 ± 0.73), GBE (1.80 ± 0.58), and standard (2.88 ± 0.83) groups showed a statistical difference (p 801 and standard groups. MOCA was able to clearly discern the differences in motor disparity among the four groups, standard (1.00 ± 0.19), sham-operated group (0.17 ± 0.02), MK-801 (0.79 ± 0.08), GBE (0.38 ± 0.05) (p 801 (18.03 ± 0.96%) and GBE (10.82 ± 1.93%) treatment reduced infarct size compared with the standard ischemia group (25.88 ± 1.16%) (p < 0.05). The MOCA data showed a more significant correlation with infarct size than Longa score (r = 0.85:0.53). MOCA system proved to be more sensitive than the Longa score. It may potentially be more accurate method for behavioral evaluation in clinical trials.

  17. Acute stress affects the global DNA methylation profile in rat brain: modulation by physical exercise.

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    Rodrigues, Gelson M; Toffoli, Leandro V; Manfredo, Marcelo H; Francis-Oliveira, José; Silva, Andrey S; Raquel, Hiviny A; Martins-Pinge, Marli C; Moreira, Estefânia G; Fernandes, Karen B; Pelosi, Gislaine G; Gomes, Marcus V

    2015-02-15

    The vulnerability of epigenetic marks of brain cells to environmental stimuli and its implication for health have been recently debated. Thus, we used the rat model of acute restraint stress (ARS) to evaluate the impact of stress on the global DNA methylation and on the expression of the Dnmt1 and Bdnf genes of hippocampus, cortex, hypothalamus and periaqueductal gray (PAG). Furthermore, we verified the potential of physical exercise to modulate epigenetic responses evoked by ARS. Sedentary male Wistar rats were submitted to ARS at the 75th postnatal day (PND), whereas animals from a physically active group were previously submitted to swimming sessions (35-74th PND) and to ARS at the 75th PND. Global DNA methylation profile was quantified using an ELISA-based method and the quantitative expression of the Dnmt1 and Bdnf genes was evaluated by real-time PCR. ARS induced a decrease in global DNA methylation in hippocampus, cortex and PAG of sedentary animals and an increased expression of Bdnf in PAG. No change in DNA methylation was associated with ARS in the exercised animals, although it was associated with abnormal expression of Dnmt1 and Bdnf in cortex, hypothalamus and PAG. Our data reveal that ARS evokes adaptive changes in global DNA methylation of rat brain that are independent of the expression of the Dnmt1 gene but might be linked to abnormal expression of the Bdnf gene in the PAG. Furthermore, our evidence indicates that physical exercise has the potential to modulate changes in DNA methylation and gene expression consequent to ARS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Acute and chronic administration of cannabidiol increases mitochondrial complex and creatine kinase activity in the rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samira S. Valvassori

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the effects of cannabidiol (CBD on mitochondrial complex and creatine kinase (CK activity in the rat brain using spectrophotometry. Method: Male adult Wistar rats were given intraperitoneal injections of vehicle or CBD (15, 30, or 60 mg/kg in an acute (single dose or chronic (once daily for 14 consecutive days regimen. The activities of mitochondrial complexes and CK were measured in the hippocampus, striatum, and prefrontal cortex. Results: Both acute and chronic injection of CBD increased the activity of the mitochondrial complexes (I, II, II-III, and IV and CK in the rat brain. Conclusions: Considering that metabolism impairment is certainly involved in the pathophysiology of mood disorders, the modulation of energy metabolism (e.g., by increased mitochondrial complex and CK activity by CBD could be an important mechanism implicated in the action of CBD.

  19. Prominent hypointense veins on susceptibility weighted image in the cat brain with acute infarction: DWI, SWI, and PWI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong-Woo; Kim, Hak Jin; Choi, Seon Hee; Kim, Dong Chan

    2014-10-01

    The multiple prominent hypointense veins on susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) have been found in the ischemic territory of patients with acute ischemic stroke. Venous side is the unknown area in the hemodynamics of brain infarction. To evaluate the venous aspect in acute brain infarction through an animal study. The acute infarction in cat brains was induced with a bolus infusion of 0.25 mL of triolein through one side of the common carotid artery. The magnetic resonance (MR) images, including diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map, SW, and perfusion-weighted (PWI) images, were obtained serially at 2 h (n = 17), 1 day (n = 11), and 4 days (n = 4) after triolein infusion. The obtained MR images were evaluated qualitatively and quantitatively. For qualitative assessment, the signal intensity of the serial MR images was evaluated. The presence or absence and the location with serial changes of infarction were identified on DWI and ADC map images. The presence or absence of prominent hypointense veins and the serial changes of cortical veins were also evaluated on SWI. Quantitative assessment was performed by comparing the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), cerebral blood flow (rCBF), and mean transit times (MTT) of the lesions with those of the contralateral normal side calculated on PWI. The serial changes of rCBV, rCBF, and MTT ratio were also evaluated. Acute infarction in the first and second medial gyrus of lesion hemisphere was found by qualitative evaluation of DWI and ADC map images. On the serial evaluation of SWI, the cortical veins of cat brain with infarction were obscured at 2 h and then re-appeared at 1 day. The hemorrhage transformation and prominent hypointense veins were seen at 4 days on SWI. The quantitative evaluation revealed increased MTT ratios and decreased rCBV and rCBF ratios on PWIs in the acute infarction of cat brain. The prominent hypointense veins on SWI were seen in the half of the acute

  20. Yueju Pill Rapidly Induces Antidepressant-Like Effects and Acutely Enhances BDNF Expression in Mouse Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenda Xue

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional antidepressants have a major disadvantage in delayed onset of efficacy, and the emerging fast-acting antidepressant ketamine has adverse behavioral and neurotoxic effects. Yueju pill, an herb medicine formulated eight hundred years ago by Doctor Zhu Danxi, has been popularly prescribed in China for alleviation of depression-like symptoms. Although several clinical outcome studies reported the relative short onset of antidepressant effects of Yueju, this has not been scientifically investigated. We, therefore, examined the rapid antidepressant effect of Yueju in mice and tested the underlying molecular mechanisms. We found that acute administration of ethanol extract of Yueju rapidly attenuated depressive-like symptoms in learned helpless paradigm, and the antidepressant-like effects were sustained for at least 24 hours in tail suspension test in ICR mice. Additionally, Yueju, like ketamine, rapidly increased the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF in the hippocampus, whereas the BDNF mRNA expression remained unaltered. Yueju rapidly reduced the phosphorylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF2, leading to desuppression of BDNF synthesis. Unlike ketamine, both the BDNF expression and eEF2 phosphorylation were revered at 24 hours after Yueju administration. This study is the first to demonstrate the rapid antidepressant effects of an herb medicine, offering an opportunity to improve therapy of depression.

  1. The Effects of Acute Exercise on Memory and Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etnier, Jennifer L; Wideman, Laurie; Labban, Jeffrey D; Piepmeier, Aaron T; Pendleton, Daniel M; Dvorak, Kelly K; Becofsky, Katie

    2016-08-01

    Acute exercise benefits cognition, and some evidence suggests that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a role in this effect. The purpose of this study was to explore the dose-response relationship between exercise intensity, memory, and BDNF. Young adults completed 3 exercise sessions at different intensities relative to ventilator threshold (Vt) (VO 2max , Vt - 20%, Vt + 20%). For each session, participants exercised for approximately 30 min. Following exercise, they performed the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT) to assess short-term memory, learning, and long-term memory recall. Twenty-four hours later, they completed the RAVLT recognition trial, which provided another measure of long-term memory. Blood was drawn before exercise, immediately postexercise, and after the 30-min recall test. Results indicated that long-term memory as assessed after the 24-hr delay differed as a function of exercise intensity with the largest benefits observed following maximal intensity exercise. BDNF data showed a significant increase in response to exercise; however, there were no differences relative to exercise intensity and there were no significant associations between BDNF and memory. Future research is warranted so that we can better understand how to use exercise to benefit cognitive performance.

  2. Erythropoietin-Derived Peptide Protects Against Acute Lung Injury After Rat Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Liu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Traumatic brain injury (TBI can be complicated by TBI-triggered acute lung injury (ALI, in which inflammation plays a central role. It has been reported that an Erythropoietin-derived peptide (pHBSP was able to ameliorate TBI; however, its function in TBI-caused ALI has not been reported yet. Methods: In this study, we studied the effect of pHBSP on TBI-caused ALI by using a weight-drop induced TBI model. At 8 h and 24 h post-TBI, pulmonary edema (PE and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF proteins were measured, and haematoxylin and eosin (H&E staining of lung sections was carried out. At 24 h following TBI, the lungs were harvested for immunofluorescence staining and qRT-PCR analysis. Results: At 8 h and 24 h post-TBI, pHBSP treatment significantly decreased wet/dry ratios, decreased total BALF protein, and attenuated the histological signs of pulmonary injury. At 24 h post-TBI, pHBSP treatment decreased the accumulation of CD68+ macrophages in the lung and reduced the mRNA levels of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-1β and iNOS in the lung. Conclusions: We identified the protective role that pHBSP played in TBI-caused ALI, suggesting that pHBSP is a potent candidate for systemic therapy in TBI patients.

  3. Distinct gene expression profiles in adult rat brains after acute MK-801 and cocaine treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storvik, Markus; Tiikkainen, Pekka; van Iersel, Martijn; Wong, Garry

    2006-04-01

    Uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists have been suggested to attenuate the self-administration and rewarding effects of psychostimulants. Microarrays containing 14,500 rat cDNAs were hybridized to identify alterations in gene expression levels in rat brain regions elicited by the uncompetitive NMDA receptor antagonist MK-801 (dizocilpine, 1 mg/kg), the dopamine agonist cocaine (20 mg/kg), or combined treatment (MK-801 15 min prior to cocaine) 4 h after injections. Total genes up regulated (Z-ratio >2) in parietal cortex and nucleus accumbens were 111 and 158, respectively. Total genes down regulated (Z-ratio 18%), and nucleic acid (15%) binding. In nucleus accumbens, genes up regulated by MK-801 (87 genes) did not overlap those up regulated by cocaine (46 genes). Genes down regulated by MK-801 (33 genes) consisted of 2 overlapping genes with those down regulated by cocaine (89 genes). In parietal cortex, low numbers of overlapping regulated genes were also observed. Combined treatments also indicated low numbers (0-10) of genes commonly regulated when compared with single treatments alone. In situ hybridisation studies indicated significant increases in b-ZIP transcription factors (CREM, ICER, CBP, and c-fos) elicited by MK-801 and decreases in c-fos elicited by cocaine. The results indicate independent gene expression signatures following acute MK-801 and cocaine administration that appears to be largely non-overlapping and context dependent.

  4. Sleep Duration and Sleep Quality following Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Propensity Score Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Yun Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI has been widely studied and the effects of injury can be long term or even lifelong. This research aims to characterize the sleep problems of patients following acute mTBI. Methods. A total of 171 patients with mTBI within one month and 145 non-mTBI controls were recruited in this study. The questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, was used to evaluate seven aspects of sleep problems. A propensity score method was used to generate a quasirandomized design to account for the background information, including gender, age, Beck’s Anxiety Index, Beck’s Depression Index, and Epworth Sleepiness Scale. The effect was evaluated via cumulative logit regression including propensity scores as a covariate. Results. Before adjustment, about 60% mTBI patients and over three quarters of control subjects had mild sleep disturbance while one third mTBI patients had moderate sleep disturbance. After adjusting by the propensity scores, the scores of sleep quality and duration were significant between mTBI and control groups. Conclusion. Our study supports that sleep problem is common in mTBI group. After adjusting the confounders by propensity score, sleep duration and subjective sleep quality are the most frequently reported problems in mTBI patients within one month after the injury.

  5. Childhood acute disseminated encephalomyelitis: the role of brain and spinal cord MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khong, Pek-Lan; Cheng, Pui-Wai; Chan, Fu-Luk [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong); Ho, Hok-Kung; Wong, Virginia C.N.; Goh, Winnie [Department of Paediatrics, University of Hong Kong, Queen Mary Hospital (Hong Kong)

    2002-01-01

    Background. It is recognised that the clinical and radiological spectrum of childhood acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is wide. Objective. To determine whether initial MRI features are predictive of clinical outcome and to determine the role of MRI in the management of ADEM. Materials and methods. The MRI scans of ten consecutive children (eight boys, two girls), clinically and radiologically diagnosed to have ADEM, were retrospectively reviewed. Follow-up MRI was available for eight patients. Results. Lesions ranged from small and punctate (<1 cm) to moderate sized and confluent (4-5 cm) to diffuse and extensive. Spinal cord lesions, seen in five of seven children, were contiguous or segmental. Seven children (70%) made good clinical recovery while three children (30%) remained severely handicapped. There was no correlation between the site, extent and pattern of involvement and clinical outcome. However, the evolution of MRI findings on follow-up correlated well with the subsequent clinical course and outcome. Conclusions. Although the extent and site of lesions on initial MRI scans are not predictive of clinical outcome, early MRI of the brain and spine is useful in aiding clinical diagnosis, and subsequent follow-up MRI is helpful in monitoring disease progression. (orig.)

  6. Robust reflective pupil slicing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Jeffrey T.; Behr, Bradford B.; Cenko, Andrew T.; Hajian, Arsen R.

    2014-07-01

    Tornado Spectral Systems (TSS) has developed the High Throughput Virtual Slit (HTVSTM), robust all-reflective pupil slicing technology capable of replacing the slit in research-, commercial- and MIL-SPEC-grade spectrometer systems. In the simplest configuration, the HTVS allows optical designers to remove the lossy slit from pointsource spectrometers and widen the input slit of long-slit spectrometers, greatly increasing throughput without loss of spectral resolution or cross-dispersion information. The HTVS works by transferring etendue between image plane axes but operating in the pupil domain rather than at a focal plane. While useful for other technologies, this is especially relevant for spectroscopic applications by performing the same spectral narrowing as a slit without throwing away light on the slit aperture. HTVS can be implemented in all-reflective designs and only requires a small number of reflections for significant spectral resolution enhancement-HTVS systems can be efficiently implemented in most wavelength regions. The etendueshifting operation also provides smooth scaling with input spot/image size without requiring reconfiguration for different targets (such as different seeing disk diameters or different fiber core sizes). Like most slicing technologies, HTVS provides throughput increases of several times without resolution loss over equivalent slitbased designs. HTVS technology enables robust slit replacement in point-source spectrometer systems. By virtue of pupilspace operation this technology has several advantages over comparable image-space slicer technology, including the ability to adapt gracefully and linearly to changing source size and better vertical packing of the flux distribution. Additionally, this technology can be implemented with large slicing factors in both fast and slow beams and can easily scale from large, room-sized spectrometers through to small, telescope-mounted devices. Finally, this same technology is directly

  7. Acute Effects of Moderate and Strenuous Running on Trace Element Distribution in the Brain, Liver, and Spleen of Trained Rats

    OpenAIRE

    ERGEN, Kıvanç; İnce, Hürrem; Düzova, Halil; KARAKOÇ, Yunus; EMRE, M. Hanifi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Trace elements such as manganese (Mn), cobalt (Co) and chromium (Cr) play key roles in metabolic reactions and are important in many physiological enzymatic processes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the acute effects of moderate and strenuous running (treadmill) exercise on the levels of Mn, Co and Cr in the brain, liver, and spleen of trained rats. Study Design: Animal experiment. Material and Methods: Twenty-one Wistar-Albino adult male rats were used in t...

  8. Acute and subchronic toxicity of inhaled toluene in male Long Evans rats: oxidative stress markers in brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research interested in oxidative stress markers following exposure to VOCsThis dataset is associated with the following publication:Kodavanti , P., J. Royland , D.A. Moore-Smith, J. Beas, J. Richards , T. Beasley , P. Evansky , and P.J. Bushnell. Acute and Subchronic Toxicity of Inhaled Toluene in Male Long-Evans Rats: Oxidative Stress Markers in Brain. NEUROTOXICOLOGY. Elsevier B.V., Amsterdam, NETHERLANDS, 51: 10-19, (2015).

  9. Traumatic brain injury and post-acute decline: what role does environmental enrichment play? A scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eFrasca

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. While a number of studies provide evidence of neural and cognitive decline in traumatic brain injury (TBI survivors during the post-acute stages of injury, there is a dearth of research on the possible mechanisms underlying this decline. The purposes of this paper, therefore, are to (1 examine evidence that environmental enrichment (EE can influence long-term outcome following TBI, and (2 examine the nature of post-acute environments, whether they vary in degree of EE, and what impact these variations have on outcomes.Methods. We conducted a scoping review to identify studies on EE in animals and humans, and post-discharge experiences that relate to barriers to recovery.Results. Ninety-six articles that met inclusion criteria demonstrated the benefits of EE on brain and behaviour in healthy and brain-injured animals and humans. Nineteen papers on post-discharge experiences provided evidence that variables such as insurance coverage, financial and social support, home therapy, and transition from hospital to home, also play a vital role in regaining independence. Conclusion. There is evidence to suggest that lack of EE, whether from lack of resources or limited ability to engage in such environments, may play a role in post-recovery cognitive and neural decline. Maximizing EE in the post-acute stages of TBI may improve long-term outcomes for the individual, their family and society.

  10. Computer simulations suggest that acute correction of hyperglycaemia with an insulin bolus protocol might be useful in brain FDG PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchert, R.; Brenner, W.; Apostolova, I.; Mester, J.; Clausen, M. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Santer, R. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf (Germany). Center for Gynaecology, Obstetrics and Paediatrics; Silverman, D.H.S. [David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology

    2009-07-01

    FDG PET in hyperglycaemic subjects often suffers from limited statistical image quality, which may hamper visual and quantitative evaluation. In our study the following insulin bolus protocol is proposed for acute correction of hyperglycaemia (> 7.0 mmol/l) in brain FDG PET. (i) Intravenous bolus injection of short-acting insulin, one I.E. for each 0.6 mmol/l blood glucose above 7.0. (ii) If 20 min after insulin administration plasma glucose is {<=} 7.0 mmol/l, proceed to (iii). If insulin has not taken sufficient effect step back to (i). Compute insulin dose with the updated blood glucose level. (iii) Wait further 20 min before injection of FDG. (iv) Continuous supervision of the patient during the whole scanning procedure. The potential of this protocol for improvement of image quality in brain FDG PET in hyperglycaemic subjects was evaluated by computer simulations within the Sokoloff model. A plausibility check of the prediction of the computer simulations on the magnitude of the effect that might be achieved by correction of hyperglycaemia was performed by retrospective evaluation of the relation between blood glucose level and brain FDG uptake in 89 subjects in whom FDG PET had been performed for diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. The computer simulations suggested that acute correction of hyperglycaemia according to the proposed bolus insulin protocol might increase the FDG uptake of the brain by up to 80%. The magnitude of this effect was confirmed by the patient data. The proposed management protocol for acute correction of hyperglycaemia with insulin has the potential to significantly improve the statistical quality of brain FDG PET images. This should be confirmed in a prospective study in patients. (orig.)

  11. Symptoms of epilepsy and organic brain dysfunctions in patients with acute, brief depression combined with other fluctuating psychiatric symptoms: a controlled study from an acute psychiatric department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linaker Olav M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In psychiatric acute departments some patients present with brief depressive periods accompanied with fluctuating arrays of other psychiatric symptoms like psychosis, panic or mania. For the purpose of the present study we call this condition Acute Unstable Depressive Syndrome (AUDS. The aims of the present study were to compare clinical signs of organic brain dysfunctions and epilepsy in patients with AUDS and Major Depressive Episode (MDE. Methods Out of 1038 consecutive patients admitted to a psychiatric acute ward, 16 patients with AUDS and 16 age- and gender-matched MDE patients were included in the study. Using standardized instruments and methods we recorded clinical data, EEG and MRI. Results A history of epileptic seizures and pathologic EEG activity was more common in the AUDS group than in the MDE group (seizures, n = 6 vs. 0, p = 0.018; pathologic EEG activity, n = 8 vs. 1, p = 0.015. Five patients in the AUDS group were diagnosed as having epilepsy, whereas none of those with MDE had epilepsy (p = 0.043. There were no differences between the groups regarding pathological findings in neurological bedside examination and cerebral MRI investigation. Conclusion Compared to patients admitted with mood symptoms fulfilling DSM 4 criteria of a major depressive disorder, short-lasting atypical depressive symptoms seem to be associated with a high frequency of epileptic and pathologic EEG activity in patients admitted to psychiatric acute departments. Trial registration NCT00201474

  12. The impact of physical therapy in patients with severe traumatic brain injury during acute and post-acute rehabilitation according to coma duration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lendraitienė, Eglė; Petruševičienė, Daiva; Savickas, Raimondas; Žemaitienė, Ieva; Mingaila, Sigitas

    2016-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of study was to evaluate the impact of physical therapy on the recovery of motor and mental status in patients who sustained a severe traumatic brain injury, according to coma duration in acute and post-acute rehabilitation. [Subjects and Methods] The study population comprised patients with levels of consciousness ranging from 3 to 8 according to Glasgow Coma Scale score. The patients were divided into 2 groups based on coma duration as follows: group 1, those who were in a coma up to 1 week, and group 2, those who were in a coma for more than 2 weeks. The recovery of the patients' motor function was evaluated according to the Motor Assessment Scale and the recovery of mental status according to the Mini-Mental State Examination. [Results] The evaluation of motor and mental status recovery revealed that the patients who were in a coma up to 1 week recovered significantly better after physical therapy during the acute rehabilitation than those who were in a coma for longer than 2 weeks. [Conclusion] The recovery of motor and mental status of the patients in acute rehabilitation was significantly better for those in a coma for a shorter period.

  13. Discrete frequency slice wavelet transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhonghong; Tao, Ting; Jiang, Zhongwei; Wang, Haibin

    2017-11-01

    This paper introduces a new kind of Time-Frequency Representation (TFR) method called Discrete Frequency Slice Wavelet Transform (DFSWT). It is an improved version of Frequency Slice Wavelet Transform (FSWT). The previous researches on FSWT show that it is a new efficient TFR in an easy way without strict limitation as traditional wavelet theory. DFSWT as well as FSWT are defined directly in frequency domain, and still keep its properties in time-frequency domain as FSWT decomposition, reconstruction and filter design, etc. However, the original signal is decomposed and reconstructed on a Chosen Frequency Domains (CFD) as need of application. CFD means that the decomposition and reconstruction are not completed on all frequency components. At first, it is important to discuss the necessary condition of CFD to reconstruct the original signal. And then based on norm l2, an optimization algorithm is introduced to reconstruct the original signal even accurately. Finally, for a test example, the TFR analysis of a real life signal is shown. Some conclusions are drawn that the concept of CFD is very useful to application, and the DFSWT can become a simple and easy tool of TFR method, and also provide a new idea of low speed sampling of high frequency signal in applications.

  14. Brain temperature measured by {sup 1}H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy in acute and subacute carbon monoxide poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Shunrou; Nishimoto, Hideaki; Murakami, Toshiyuki; Ogawa, Akira; Ogasawara, Kuniaki [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Morioka, Iwate (Japan); Yoshioka, Yoshichika [Osaka University, Laboratory of Biofunctional Imaging, WPI Immunology Frontier Research Center, Osaka (Japan); Matsuda, Tsuyoshi [MR Applications and Workflow Asia Pacific, GE Healthcare Japan, Tokyo (Japan); Beppu, Takaaki [Iwate Medical University, Department of Neurosurgery, Morioka, Iwate (Japan); Iwate Medical University, Department of Hyperbaric Medicine, Iwate (Japan)

    2016-01-15

    Brain temperature (BT) is associated with the balance between cerebral blood flow and metabolism according to the ''heat-removal'' theory. The present study investigated whether BT is abnormally altered in acute and subacute CO-poisoned patients by using {sup 1}H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Eight adult CO-poisoned patients underwent 3-T magnetic resonance imaging in the acute and subacute phases after CO exposure. MRS was performed on deep cerebral white matter in the centrum semiovale, and MRS-based BT was estimated by the chemical shift difference between water and the N-acetyl aspartate signal. We defined the mean BT + 1.96 standard deviations of the BT in 15 healthy controls as the cutoff value for abnormal BT increases (p < 0.05) in CO-poisoned patients. BT of CO-poisoned patients in both the acute and subacute phases was significantly higher than that of the healthy control group. However, BT in the subacute phase was significantly lower than in the acute phase. On the other hand, no significant difference in body temperature was observed between acute and subacute CO-poisoned patients. BT weakly correlated with body temperature, but this correlation was not statistically significant (rho = 0.304, p = 0.2909). The present results suggest that BT in CO-poisoned patients is abnormally high in the acute phase and remains abnormal in the subacute phase. BT alteration in these patients may be associated with brain perfusion and metabolism rather than other factors such as systemic inflammation and body temperature. (orig.)

  15. Brain activity monitoring by compressed spectral array during deep hypothermic circulatory arrest in acute aortic dissection surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanowicz, Tomasz K; Budniak, Wiktor; Buczkowski, Piotr; Perek, Bartłomiej; Walczak, Maciej; Tomczyk, Jadwiga; Katarzyński, Sławomir; Jemielity, Marek

    2014-12-01

    Monitoring the central nervous system during aortic dissection repair may improve the understanding of the intraoperative changes related to its bioactivity. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of deep hypothermia on intraoperative brain bioactivity measured by the compressed spectral array (CSA) method and to assess the influence of the operations on postoperative cognitive function. The study enrolled 40 patients (31 men and 9 women) at the mean age of 60.2 ± 8.6 years, diagnosed with acute aortic dissection. They underwent emergency operations in deep hypothermic circulatory arrest (DHCA). During the operations, brain bioactivity was monitored with the compressed spectral array method. There were no intraoperative deaths. Electrocerebral silence during DHCA was observed in 31 patients (74%). The lowest activity was observed during DHCA: it was 0.01 ± 0.05 nW in the left hemisphere and 0.01 ± 0.03 nW in the right hemisphere. The postoperative results of neurological tests deteriorated statistically significantly (26.9 ± 1.7 points vs. 22.0 ± 1.7 points; p < 0.001), especially among patients who exhibited brain activity during DHCA. The compressed spectral array method is clinically useful in monitoring brain bioactivity during emergency operations of acute aortic dissections. Electrocerebral silence occurs in 75% of patients during DHCA. The cognitive function of patients deteriorates significantly after operations with DHCA.

  16. Altered brain concentrations of citalopram and escitalopram in P-glycoprotein deficient mice after acute and chronic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Louise; Carlsson, Björn; Hiemke, Christoph; Ahlner, Johan; Bengtsson, Finn; Schmitt, Ulrich; Kugelberg, Fredrik C

    2013-11-01

    According to both in vitro and in vivo data P-glycoprotein (P-gp) may restrict the uptake of several antidepressants into the brain, thus contributing to the poor success rate of current antidepressant therapies. The therapeutic activity of citalopram resides in the S-enantiomer, whereas the R-enantiomer is practically devoid of serotonin reuptake potency. To date, no in vivo data are available that address whether the enantiomers of citalopram and its metabolites are substrates of P-gp. P-gp knockout (abcb1ab (-/-)) and wild-type (abcb1ab (+/+)) mice underwent acute (single-dose) and chronic (two daily doses for 10 days) treatment with citalopram (10mg/kg) or escitalopram (5mg/kg) Serum and brain samples were collected 1-6h after the first or last i.p. injection for subsequent drug analysis by an enantioselective HPLC method. In brain, 3-fold higher concentrations of S- and R-citalopram, and its metabolites, were found in abcb1ab (-/-) mice than in abcb1ab (+/+) mice after both acute and chronic citalopram treatments. After escitalopram treatment, the S-citalopram brain concentration was 3-5 times higher in the knockout mice than in controls. The results provide novel evidence that the enantiomers of citalopram are substrates of P-gp. Possible clinical and toxicological implications of this finding need to be further elucidated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  17. THE RAPID PRODUCTION OF ACUTE DISSEMINATED ENCEPHALOMYELITIS IN RHESUS MONKEYS BY INJECTION OF HETEROLOGOUS AND HOMOLOGOUS BRAIN TISSUE WITH ADJUVANTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabat, Elvin A.; Wolf, Abner; Bezer, Ada E.

    1947-01-01

    1. A picture resembling acute disseminated encephalomyelitis in the human being has been regularly and rapidly produced in rhesus monkeys by injection of emulsions of adult rabbit and monkey brain administered with adjuvants. 2. No lesions of the central nervous system resulted from injection of similar emulsions of fetal rabbit brain or adult rabbit lung. 3. A description of the gross and histological findings in the central nervous system is given and compared with features of human demyelinating disease. 4. The experimental findings are in accord with the hypothesis that antibody to the injected brain emulsion reacts with the tissues of the nervous system of the animal to produce the pathological changes. PMID:19871595

  18. Acute deep brain stimulation changes in regional cerebral blood flow in obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougherty, Darin D; Chou, Tina; Corse, Andrew K; Arulpragasam, Amanda R; Widge, Alik S; Cusin, Cristina; Evans, Karleyton C; Greenberg, Benjamin D; Haber, Suzanne N; Deckersbach, Thilo

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a reversible, nonlesion-based treatment for patients with intractable obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The first studies on DBS for OCD stimulating the ventral capsule/ventral striatum (VC/VS) yielded encouraging results for this neuroanatomical site's therapeutic efficacy. This investigation was conducted to better understand which regions of the cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical network were acutely affected by VC/VS DBS for OCD. Furthermore, the objective was to identify which brain regions demonstrated changes in perfusion, as stimulation was applied across a dorsoventral lead axis that corresponded to different anatomical locations in the VC/VS. METHODS Six patients receiving VC/VS DBS for OCD underwent oxygen-15 positron emission tomography (15O-PET) scanning. Monopolar DBS was delivered at each of the 4 different electrodes on the stimulating lead in the VC/VS. The data were analyzed using SPM5. Paired t-tests were run in SPSS to identify significant changes in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) between stimulation conditions. Pearson's r correlations were run between these significant changes in rCBF and changes in OCD and depressive symptom severity. RESULTS Perfusion in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) significantly increased when monopolar DBS was turned on at the most ventral DBS contact, and this increase in dACC activity was correlated with reductions in depressive symptom severity (r(5) = -0.994, p = 0.001). Perfusion in the thalamus, striatum, and globus pallidus significantly increased when DBS was turned on at the most dorsal contact. CONCLUSIONS DBS of the VC/VS appears to modulate activity in the regions implicated in the pathophysiology of OCD. Different regions in the cortico-striatal-thalamic-cortical circuit showed increased perfusion based on whether the stimulation was more ventral or dorsal along the lead axis in the VC/VS. Evidence was found that DBS at the most ventral site was

  19. Ethanol induces MAP2 changes in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noraberg, J; Zimmer, J

    1998-01-01

    Microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and neuron-specific protein (NeuN) immunostains were used to demonstrate neurotoxic effects in mature hippocampal slice cultures exposed to ethanol (50, 100, 200 mM) for 4 weeks. At the low dose the density of MAP2 immunostaining in the dentate molecular...... layer was 118% of the control cultures, with no detectable changes in CA1 and CA3. At 100 mM no changes were detected, while 200 mM ethanol significantly reduced the MAP2 density in both dentate (19%) and hippocampal dendritic fields (CA3, 52%; CA1, 55%). At this dose NeuN staining showed considerable...... loss of CA3 pyramidal cells and moderate loss of dentate granule cells, as seen in vivo. The results indicate that brain slice cultures combined with immunostaining for cytoskeleton and neuronal markers can be used for studies of ethanol and organic solvent neurotoxicity....

  20. Acute Effects of Viral Exposure on P-Glycoprotein Function in the Mouse Fetal Blood-Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrrico Bloise

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Viral infection during pregnancy is known to affect the fetal brain. The toll-like receptor (TLR-3 is a pattern recognition receptor activated by viruses known to elicit adverse fetal neurological outcomes. The P-glycoprotein (P-gp efflux transporter protects the developing fetus by limiting the transfer of substrates across both the placenta and the fetal blood-brain barrier (BBB. As such, inhibition of P-gp at these blood-barrier sites may result in increased exposure of the developing fetus to environmental toxins and xenobiotics present in the maternal circulation. We hypothesized that viral exposure during pregnancy would impair P-gp function in the placenta and in the developing BBB. Here we investigated whether the TLR-3 ligand, polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (PolyI:C, increased accumulation of one P-gp substrate in the fetus and in the developing fetal brain. Methods: Pregnant C57BL/6 mice (GD15.5 were injected (i.p. with PolyI:C (5 mg/kg or 10 mg/kg or vehicle (saline. [3H]digoxin (P-gp substrate was injected (i.v. 3 or 23h post-treatment and animals were euthanized 1h later. Maternal plasma, ‘fetal-units’ (fetal membranes, amniotic fluid and whole fetus, and fetal brains were collected. Results: PolyI:C exposure (4h significantly elevated maternal plasma IL-6 (P<0.001 and increased [3H]digoxin accumulation in the fetal brain (P<0.05. In contrast, 24h after PolyI:C exposure, no effect on IL-6 or fetal brain accumulation of P-gp substrate was observed. Conclusion: Viral infection modeled by PolyI:C causes acute increases in fetal brain accumulation of P-gp substrates and by doing so, may increase fetal brain exposure to xenobiotics and environmental toxins present in the maternal circulation.

  1. Changes in Glutamate/NMDA Receptor Subunit 1 Expression in Rat Brain after Acute and Subacute Exposure to Methamphetamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walailuk Kerdsan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (METH is a psychostimulant drug of abuse that produces long-term behavioral changes including behavioral sensitization, tolerance, and dependence. METH has been reported to induce neurotoxic effects in several areas of the brain via the dopaminergic system. Changes of dopamine function can induce malfunction of the glutamatergic system. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to examine the effects of METH administration on the expression of glutamate N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 1 (NMDAR1 in frontal cortex, striatum, and hippocampal formation after acute and subacute exposure to METH by western blotting. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intraperitoneally with a single dose of 8 mg/kg METH, 4 mg/kg/day METH for 14 days and saline in acute, subacute, and control groups, respectively. A significant increase in NMDAR1 immunoreactive protein was found in frontal cortex in the subacute group (P=.036 but not in the acute group (P=.580. Moreover, a significant increase in NMDAR1 was also observed in striatum in both acute (P=.025 and subacute groups (P=.023. However, no significant differences in NMDAR1 in hippocampal formation were observed in either acute or subacute group. The results suggest that an upregulation of NMDA receptor expression may be a consequence of glutamatergic dysfunction induced by METH.

  2. Findings of chronic sinusitis on brain computed tomography are not associated with acute headaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Katherine E; Camacho, Marc A; Gautam, Shiva; Levenson, Robin B; Edlow, Jonathan A

    2014-06-01

    Headache is a common complaint in emergency department (ED) patients. Nearly 15% of ED headache patients will have brain computed tomography (CT) done. One frequent finding on these scans is "chronic sinusitis." Assuming that "chronic sinusitis" is the cause of the patient's headache is a potential source of mis-diagnosis. We hypothesized that CT findings of chronic sinusitis occur with equal frequency in patients with atraumatic headache as in control patients with minor head injury. This is a retrospective, single-center medical record review of consecutive discharged patients who received noncontrast head CT scans in an urban ED for either minor closed head injury or atraumatic headache. Each patient's head CT radiologic report was reviewed for findings of sinusitis and classified as chronic sinusitis, indeterminate for sinusitis, air-fluid levels, or no findings of sinusitis. We enrolled 500 patients (234 in the atraumatic headache group, 266 in the minor head injury group). The two groups were similar except that more women were enrolled in the atraumatic headache group. CT findings of chronic sinusitis in the atraumatic headache group (22.2%) and the minor head injury group (17.7%; difference 4.5%; 95% confidence interval of -2.5-11.6%). Prevalence of CT findings of sinusitis in ED patients with atraumatic headaches and mild head injury are similar. This strongly suggests that CT findings of chronic sinusitis in patients with atraumatic headache may be incidental, and are rarely the cause of a patient's acute headache. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Alteration of Plasma Brain Natriuretic Peptide Level After Acute Moderate Exercise in Professional Athletes

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    Homa Sheikhani

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiac fatigue or myocardial damage following exercise until complete exhaustion can increase blood levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP in athletes. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of resistance and acute moderate aerobic exercise on alterations in BNP levels in professional athletes. Materials and Methods: Forty professional athletes who had at least 3 years of a championship background in track and field (aerobic group or body building (resistance group volunteered to participate in the present study. Track and field athletes (n = 20 were requested to run 8 km at 60% to 70% of maximum heart rate. Body building athletes (n = 20 performed a resistance training session of 5 exercises in 3 sets of 10 repetitions at 75% of 1 RM (bench press, seated row, leg extension, leg curl, and leg press. Before and immediately after the exercise, plasma BNP levels of both groups of athletes were measured by PATHFASTTM NT-proBNP assay, an immunochemiluminescent assay using two polyclonal antibodies in sandwich test format, on a PATHFASTTM automated analyzer. Results: Plasma BNP levels immediately following exercise increased significantly as compared with baseline values. Plasma BNP concentrations in the aerobic group were significantly higher than in the resistance group before and after exercise. Moreover, the increase in mean BNP concentrations in aerobic athletes was 7 times more than in resistance athletes. Conclusions: BNP levels in athlete who performed distance exercises increased significantly compared with resistance training. Possibly exercise program type, intensity of exercise, volume of exercise program, and field sport can be factors of changes in BNP levels

  4. Cognitive Training for Post-Acute Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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    Harry Hallock

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To quantitatively aggregate effects of cognitive training (CT on cognitive and functional outcome measures in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI more than 12-months post-injury.Design: We systematically searched six databases for non-randomized and randomized controlled trials (RCTs of CT in TBI patients at least 12-months post-injury reporting cognitive and/or functional outcomes. Main Measures: Efficacy was measured as standardized mean difference (Hedges’ g of post-training change. We investigated heterogeneity across studies using subgroup analyses and meta-regressions. Results: Fourteen studies encompassing 575 patients were included. The effect of CT on overall cognition was small and statistically significant (g=0.22, 95%CI 0.05 to 0.38; p=0.01, with low heterogeneity (I2=11.71% and no evidence of publication bias. A moderate effect size was found for overall functional outcomes (g=0.32, 95%CI 0.08 to 0.57, p=0.01 with low heterogeneity (I2=14.27% and possible publication bias. Statistically significant effects were also found only for executive function (g=0.20, 95%CI 0.02 to 0.39, p=0.03 and verbal memory (g=0.32, 95%CI 0.14 to 0.50, p<0.01. Conclusions: Despite limited studies in this field, this meta-analysis indicates that CT is modestly effective in improving cognitive and functional outcomes in patients with post-acute TBI and should therefore play a more significant role in TBI rehabilitation.

  5. Slice of LHC dipole wiring

    CERN Multimedia

    Dipole model slice made in 1994 by Ansaldo. The high magnetic fields needed for guiding particles around the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) ring are created by passing 12’500 amps of current through coils of superconducting wiring. At very low temperatures, superconductors have no electrical resistance and therefore no power loss. The LHC is the largest superconducting installation ever built. The magnetic field must also be extremely uniform. This means the current flowing in the coils has to be very precisely controlled. Indeed, nowhere before has such precision been achieved at such high currents. 50’000 tonnes of steel sheets are used to make the magnet yokes that keep the wiring firmly in place. The yokes constitute approximately 80% of the accelerator's weight and, placed side by side, stretch over 20 km!

  6. Brief report: changes in brain function during acute cannabis intoxication: preliminary findings suggest a mechanism for cannabis-induced violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Richard C; Menkes, David B

    2007-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that cannabis use may be associated with antisocial and violent behaviour, raising the question: What brain mechanisms mediate the disinhibiting effects of cannabis on behaviour? To examine whether an electrocortical measure of affective impulsivity, Go/No Go contingent negative variation, is affected by acute cannabis intoxication. Slow brain potentials were recorded in a Go/No Go noise avoidance task from five habitual cannabis users before, during and after they smoked a cannabis reefer containing 11 mg D-9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Slow brain potentials developed normally in both Go and No Go conditions before and during cannabis smoking but were severely disrupted 20-40 minutes later, coincident with peak intoxication. Cannabis effects on Go/No Go brain activity resembled those reported to occur in patients with lateral prefrontal cortex lesions. Our findings are preliminary, calling for larger-scale studies, to confirm the present findings and to investigate whether brain responses to cannabis intoxication differentiate those who are predisposed to suffer adverse consequences of cannabis use from those who are not.

  7. Acute symptomatic peri-lead edema 33 hours after deep brain stimulation surgery: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoen, Nathan B; Jermakowicz, Walter J; Luca, Corneliu C; Jagid, Jonathan R

    2017-04-14

    Symptomatic peri-lead edema is a rare complication of deep brain stimulation that has been reported to develop 4 to 120 days postoperatively. Here we report the case of a 63-year-old Hispanic man with an 8-year history of Parkinson's disease who underwent bilateral placement of subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation leads and presented with acute, symptomatic, unilateral, peri-lead edema just 33 hours after surgery. We document a thorough radiographic time course showing the evolution of these peri-lead changes and their regression with steroid therapy, and discuss the therapeutic implications of these findings. We propose that the unilateral peri-lead edema after bilateral deep brain stimulation is the result of severe microtrauma with blood-brain barrier disruption. Knowledge of such early manifestation of peri-lead edema after deep brain stimulation is critical for ruling out stroke and infection and preventing unnecessary diagnostic testing or hardware removal in this rare patient population.

  8. Inflammatory responses are not sufficient to cause delayed neuronal death in ATP-induced acute brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hey-Kyeong Jeong

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Brain inflammation is accompanied by brain injury. However, it is controversial whether inflammatory responses are harmful or beneficial to neurons. Because many studies have been performed using cultured microglia and neurons, it has not been possible to assess the influence of multiple cell types and diverse factors that dynamically and continuously change in vivo. Furthermore, behavior of microglia and other inflammatory cells could have been overlooked since most studies have focused on neuronal death. Therefore, it is essential to analyze the precise roles of microglia and brain inflammation in the injured brain, and determine their contribution to neuronal damage in vivo from the onset of injury. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Acute neuronal damage was induced by stereotaxic injection of ATP into the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc and the cortex of the rat brain. Inflammatory responses and their effects on neuronal damage were investigated by immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, quantitative RT-PCR, and stereological counting, etc. ATP acutely caused death of microglia as well as neurons in a similar area within 3 h. We defined as the core region the area where both TH(+ and Iba-1(+ cells acutely died, and as the penumbra the area surrounding the core where Iba-1(+ cells showed activated morphology. In the penumbra region, morphologically activated microglia arranged around the injury sites. Monocytes filled the damaged core after neurons and microglia died. Interestingly, neither activated microglia nor monocytes expressed iNOS, a major neurotoxic inflammatory mediator. Monocytes rather expressed CD68, a marker of phagocytic activity. Importantly, the total number of dopaminergic neurons in the SNpc at 3 h (∼80% of that in the contralateral side did not decrease further at 7 d. Similarly, in the cortex, ATP-induced neuron-damage area detected at 3 h did not increase for up to 7 d. CONCLUSIONS: Different cellular

  9. Increases in Brain 1H-MR Glutamine and Glutamate Signals Following Acute Exhaustive Endurance Exercise in the Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świątkiewicz, Maciej; Fiedorowicz, Michał; Orzeł, Jarosław; Wełniak-Kamińska, Marlena; Bogorodzki, Piotr; Langfort, Józef; Grieb, Paweł

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in ultra-high magnetic field can be used for non-invasive quantitative assessment of brain glutamate (Glu) and glutamine (Gln) in vivo. Glu, the main excitatory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, is efficiently recycled between synapses and presynaptic terminals through Glu-Gln cycle which involves glutamine synthase confined to astrocytes, and uses 60-80% of energy in the resting human and rat brain. During voluntary or involuntary exercise many brain areas are significantly activated, which certainly intensifies Glu-Gln cycle. However, studies on the effects of exercise on 1H-MRS Glu and/or Gln signals from the brain provided divergent results. The present study on rats was performed to determine changes in 1H-MRS signals from three brain regions engaged in motor activity consequential to forced acute exercise to exhaustion. Method: After habituation to treadmill running, rats were subjected to acute treadmill exercise continued to exhaustion. Each animal participating in the study was subject to two identical imaging sessions performed under light isoflurane anesthesia, prior to, and following the exercise bout. In control experiments, two imaging sessions separated by the period of rest instead of exercise were performed. 1H-NMR spectra were recorded from the cerebellum, striatum, and hippocampus using a 7T small animal MR scanner. Results: Following exhaustive exercise statistically significant increases in the Gln and Glx signals were found in all three locations, whereas increases in the Glu signal were found in the cerebellum and hippocampus. In control experiments, no changes in 1H-MRS signals were found. Conclusion: Increase in glutamine signals from the brain areas engaged in motor activity may reflect a disequilibrium caused by increased turnover in the glutamate-glutamine cycle and a delay in the return of glutamine from astrocytes to neurons. Increased turnover of Glu-Gln cycle

  10. Novel Metal Artifact Reduction Techniques with Use of Slice-Encoding Metal Artifact Correction and View-Angle Tilting MR Imaging for Improved Visualization of Brain Tissue near Intracranial Aneurysm Clips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, B; Wostrack, M; Ringel, F; Ryang, Y-M; Förschler, A; Waldt, S; Zimmer, C; Nittka, M; Preibisch, C

    2016-03-01

    The MR image quality after intracranial aneurysm clipping is often impaired because of artifacts induced by metal implants. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the benefit of a new WARP sequence with slice-encoding metal artifact correction (SEMAC) and view-angle tilting (VAT) MR imaging as novel artifact reduction techniques. A new WARP TSE (a work-in-progress software package provided by Siemens Healthcare) sequence was implemented for cranial applications based on a turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence. T1- and T2-weighted images with standard and WARP TSE sequences were acquired from 6 patients with 11 clipping sites, and the images were compared based on artifact size and general image quality. T2- and T1-weighted WARP TSE sequences resulted in a highly significant reduction of metal artifacts compared with standard sequences (T2w- WARP TSE: 89.8 ± 1.4 %; T1w- WARP TSE: 84.9 ± 2.9 %; p < 0.001) without a substantial loss of image quality. The use of a new WARP TSE sequence after aneurysm clipping is highly beneficial for increasing the diagnostic MR image quality due to a striking reduction of metal artifacts.

  11. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) in Traumatic Brain Injury-Related Mortality: Interrelationships Between Genetics and Acute Systemic and Central Nervous System BDNF Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Failla, Michelle D; Conley, Yvette P; Wagner, Amy K

    2016-01-01

    Older adults have higher mortality rates after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) compared to younger adults. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling is altered in aging and is important to TBI given its role in neuronal survival/plasticity and autonomic function. Following experimental TBI, acute BDNF administration has not been efficacious. Clinically, genetic variation in BDNF (reduced signaling alleles: rs6265, Met-carriers; rs7124442, C-carriers) can be protective against acute mortality. Postacutely, these genotypes carry lower mortality risk in older adults and greater mortality risk among younger adults. Investigate BDNF levels in mortality/outcome following severe TBI in the context of age and genetic risk. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum BDNF were assessed prospectively during the first week following severe TBI (n = 203) and in controls (n = 10). Age, BDNF genotype, and BDNF levels were assessed as mortality/outcome predictors. CSF BDNF levels tended to be higher post-TBI (P = .061) versus controls and were associated with time until death (P = .042). In contrast, serum BDNF levels were reduced post-TBI versus controls (P BDNF serum and gene * age interactions were mortality predictors post-TBI in the same multivariate model. CSF and serum BDNF tended to be negatively correlated post-TBI (P = .07). BDNF levels predicted mortality, in addition to gene * age interactions, suggesting levels capture additional mortality risk. Higher CSF BDNF post-TBI may be detrimental due to injury and age-related increases in pro-apoptotic BDNF target receptors. Negative CSF and serum BDNF correlations post-TBI suggest blood-brain barrier transit alterations. Understanding BDNF signaling in neuronal survival, plasticity, and autonomic function may inform treatment. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF as a potential mechanism of the effects of acute exercise on cognitive performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron T. Piepmeier

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The literature shows that improvements in cognitive performance may be observed following an acute bout of exercise. However, evidence in support of the biological mechanisms of this effect is still limited. Findings from both rodent and human studies suggest brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF as a potential mechanism of the effect of acute exercise on memory. The molecular properties of BDNF allow this protein to be assessed in the periphery (pBDNF (i.e., blood serum, blood plasma, making measurements of acute exercise-induced changes in BDNF concentration relatively accessible. Studies exploring the acute exercise–pBDNF–cognitive performance relationship have had mixed findings, but this may be more reflective of methodological differences between studies than it is a statement about the role of BDNF. For example, significant associations have been observed between acute exercise-induced changes in pBDNF concentration and cognitive performance in studies assessing memory, and non-significant associations have been found in studies assessing non-memory cognitive domains. Three suggestions are made for future research aimed at understanding the role of BDNF as a biological mechanism of this relationship: 1 Assessments of cognitive performance may benefit from a focus on various types of memory (e.g., relational, spatial, long-term; 2 More fine-grained measurements of pBDNF will allow for the assessment of concentrations of specific isoforms of the BDNF protein (i.e., immature, mature; 3 Statistical techniques designed to test the mediating role of pBDNF in the acute exercise-cognitive performance relationship should be utilized in order to make causal inferences.

  13. Abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging seen acutely following mild traumatic brain injury: correlation with neuropsychological tests and delayed recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, David G.; Jackson, Alan [Department of Neuroradiology, Hope Hospital, M6 8HD, Salford (United Kingdom); Mason, Damon L.; Berry, Elizabeth [Department of Behavioural Medicine, Hope Hospital, M6 8HD, Salford (United Kingdom); Hollis, Sally [Medical Statistics Unit, Lancaster University, Lancaster (United Kingdom); Yates, David W. [Department of Emergency Medicine, Hope Hospital, M6 8HD, Salford (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is a common reason for hospital attendance and is associated with significant delayed morbidity. We studied a series of 80 persons with MTBI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuropsychological testing were used in the acute phase and a questionnaire for post-concussion syndrome (PCS) and return to work status at 6 months. In 26 subjects abnormalities were seen on MRI, of which 5 were definitely traumatic. There was weak correlation with abnormal neuropsychological tests for attention in the acute period. There was no significant correlation with a questionnaire for PCS and return to work status. Although non-specific abnormalities are frequently seen, standard MRI techniques are not helpful in identifying patients with MTBI who are likely to have delayed recovery. (orig.)

  14. Elevation of brain-enriched miRNAs in cerebrospinal fluid of patients with acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Sofie Solvsten; Nygaard, Ann-Britt; Carlsen, Anting Liu

    2017-01-01

    ) from patients with acute ischemic stroke (n = 21) and controls (n = 21) was collected by lumbar puncture. miRNA analysis was performed with three different methods: 1) Trizol RNA extraction followed by Illumina Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) on all small RNAs, 2) Exiqon RNA extraction protocol and miRNA......BackgroundThe purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of cerebrospinal fluid miRNAs as diagnostic biomarkers of acute ischemic stroke using three different profiling techniques in order to identify and bypass any influence from technical variation. MethodsCerebrospinal fluid (CSF...... qPCR assays, and 3) validation of 24 selected miRNAs with Norgen Biotek RNA extraction protocol and Applied Biosystems qPCR assays. ResultsNGS detected 71 frequently expressed miRNAs in CSF of which brain-enriched miR-9-5p and miR-128-3p were significantly higher in CSF of stroke patients compared...

  15. Postmortem changes in lungs in severe closed traumatic brain injury complicated by acute respiratory failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Tumanskiy

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available V.А. Tumanskіy, S.І. Ternishniy, L.M. Tumanskaya Pathological changes in the lungs were studied in the work of 42 patiens who died from severe closed intracranial injury (SCII. It was complicated with acute respiratory insufficient (ARI. The most modified subpleural areas were selected from every lobe of the lungs for pathological studies. Prepared histological sections were stained by means of hemotoxylin and eosin and by Van Giеson for light microscopy. The results of the investigation have shown absence of the significant difference of pathological changes in the lungs of patients who died from ARI because of severe brain injury and traumatic intracranial hemorrhage. Pathognomic pathological changes in the lungs as a result of acute lung injury syndrome (ALIS were found in deceased patients on the third day since the SCII (n=8. There was a significant bilateral interstitial edema and mild alveolar edema with the presence of red and blood cells in the alveoli, vascular plethora of the septum interalveolar and stasis of blood in the capillaries, the slight pericapillary leukocyte infiltration, subpleural hemorrhage and laminar pulmonary atelectasis. In deceased patients on 4-6 days after SCII that was complicated with ARI (n=14, morphological changes had been detected in the lungs. It was pathognomic for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS with local pneumonic to be layered. A significant interstitial pulmonary edema was observed in the respiratory part of the lungs. The edema has spread from the walls of the alveoli into the interstitial spaces of the bronchioles and blood vessels, and also less marked serous-hemorrhagic alveolar edema with presence of the fibrin in the alveoli and macrophages. The ways of intrapleural lymphatic drainage were dilatated. Histopathological changes in the lungs of those who died on the 7-15th days after severe closed craniocerebral injury with ARI to be complicated (n=12 have been indicative of two

  16. The role of virtual motor rehabilitation: a quantitative analysis between acute and chronic patients with acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albiol-Pérez, Sergio; Gil-Gómez, José-Antonio; Llorens, Roberto; Alcañiz, Mariano; Font, Carolina Colomer

    2014-01-01

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) is one of the main problems of disability and death in the world. Its incidence and survival rate are increasing annually. Thus, the number of chronic ABI patients is gradually growing. Traditionally, rehabilitation programs are applied to postacute and acute patients, but recent publications determine that chronic patients may benefit from rehabilitation. Also, in the last few years, the potential of virtual rehabilitation (VR) systems has been demonstrated. However, until now, no previous studies have been carried out to compare the evolution of chronic patients with acute patients in a VR program. To perform this study, we developed a VR system for ABI patients. The system, vestibular virtual rehabilitation (V2R), was designed with clinical specialists. V2R has been tested with 21 people ranging in age from 18 to 80 years old that were classified in two groups: chronic patients and acute patients. The results demonstrate a similar recovery for chronic and acute patients during the intervention period. Also, the results showed that chronic patients stop their improvement when they finish their training. This conclusion encourages us to direct our developments toward VR systems that can be easily integrated at home, allowing chronic patients to have a permanent VR training program.

  17. DIFFERENT CIRCULATING BRAIN-DERIVED NEUROTROPHIC FACTOR RESPONSES TO ACUTE EXERCISE BETWEEN PHYSICALLY ACTIVE AND SEDENTARY SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Nofuji

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Although circulating brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF level is affected by both acute and chronic physical activity, the interaction of acute and chronic physical activity was still unclear. In this study, we compared the serum and plasma BDNF responses to maximal and submaximal acute exercises between physically active and sedentary subjects. Eight active and 8 sedentary female subjects participated in the present study. Both groups performed 3 exercise tests with different intensities, i.e. 100% (maximal, 60% (moderate and 40% (low of their peak oxygen uptake. In each exercise test, blood samples were taken at the baseline and immediately, 30 and 60 min after the test. The serum BDNF concentration was found to significantly increase immediately after maximal and moderate exercise tests in both groups. In maximal exercise test, the pattern of change in the serum BDNF concentration was different between the groups. While the serum BDNF level for the sedentary group returned to the baseline level during the recovery phase, the BDNF levels for the active group decreased below the baseline level after the maximal exercise test. No group differences were observed in the pattern of plasma BDNF change for all exercise tests. These findings suggest that regular exercise facilitates the utilization of circulating BDNF during and/or after acute exercise with maximal intensity

  18. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor in TBI-related mortality: Interrelationships between Genetics and Acute Systemic and CNS BDNF Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Failla, Michelle D.; Conley, Yvette P.; Wagner, Amy K.

    2015-01-01

    Background Older adults have higher mortality rates after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) compared to younger adults. Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling is altered in aging and is important to TBI given its role in neuronal survival/plasticity and autonomic function. Following experimental TBI, acute BDNF administration has not been efficacious. Clinically, genetic variation in BDNF (reduced signaling alleles: rs6265, Met-carriers; rs7124442, C-carriers) were protective in acute mortality. Post-acutely, these genotypes carried lower mortality risk in older adults, and greater mortality risk among younger adults. Objective Investigate BDNF levels in mortality/outcome following severe TBI in the context of age and genetic risk. Methods CSF and serum BDNF were assessed prospectively during the first week following severe TBI (n=203), and in controls (n=10). Age, BDNF genotype, and BDNF levels were assessed as mortality/outcome predictors. Results CSF BDNF levels tended to be higher post-TBI (p=0.061) versus controls and were associated with time until death (p=0.042). In contrast, serum BDNF levels were reduced post-TBI versus controls (pBDNF serum and gene*age interactions were mortality predictors post-TBI in the same multivariate model. CSF and serum BDNF tended to be negatively correlated post-TBI (p=0.07). Conclusions BDNF levels predicted mortality, in addition to gene*age interactions, suggesting levels capture additional mortality risk. Higher CSF BDNF post-TBI may be detrimental due to injury and age-related increases in pro-apoptotic BDNF target receptors. Negative CSF and serum BDNF correlations post-TBI suggest blood-brain barrier transit alterations. Understanding BDNF signaling in neuronal survival, plasticity, and autonomic function may inform treatment. PMID:25979196

  19. [Histopathological and autoradiographical studies of experimental brain tumors after continuous local chemotherapy--acute stage in rat models].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, T; Teramoto, A; Aihara, K

    1997-04-01

    Continuous local chemotherapy has been evaluated as being an effective administration method and as a possible adjuvant therapy in the sensitivity aspect of the cell cycle for malignant glioma. However, neurotoxicity of anti-cancer agents in the normal brain and non-effective methods for the deeper part of the tumor seem to be the most serious problems. This study was initiated to evaluate histological findings, the uptake distribution, and neurotoxicity of the continuous local administration of isotope labeled anti-cancer agents in the brain tumor of rats. The experimental brain tumor of rats and the method of continuous local chemotherapy were as follows. The tumor was produced by intracerebral inoculation of cultured cells derived from rat brain tumor induced by Rous sarcoma virus (Kumanishi et al. strain). One week later Fluorouracil (5-6-3H) (17.7 Ci/m mol) and methotrexate (L-glutamyl 3-4-3H) (41.0 Ci/m mol) were administered into the brain tumors of rats utilizing a mini osmotic pump (Alzet Model 2001), respectively. We used five rats of various groups. The rats were sacrificed at various time intervals (6 hrs, 12 hrs, 24 hrs, 48 hrs, 72 hrs and 7 days). The tumor tissues for light microscopic autoradiography were fixed in 10% formalin for 24 hours. Sections for the light microscopic autoradiography were cut at 4 mu thick and coated with Sakura NR-M2 drips. Following exposure for one week at 4 degrees C, the sections were stained with Konidol X. Six hours after administration, slight radioactivity was distributed in the subarachnoid space and subpial brain tissue in the vicinity of the inserted tube. Twenty-four hours after administration, high radioactivity was clearly present in many tumor cells and phagocytes at the tube tip, but no radioactivity was observed in the deeper part of the tumor or normal brain tissue. In the vicinity of necrosis foci, acute toxic inflammation was also observed. In conclusion, this experimental study shows that these anti

  20. Brain and skin do not contribute to the systemic rise in erythropoietin during acute hypoxia in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Nordsborg, Nikolai; Taudorf, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) preserves arterial oxygen content by controlling red blood cell and plasma volumes. Synthesis of EPO was long thought to relate inversely to renal oxygenation, but in knockout mice, brain and skin have been identified as essential for the acute hypoxic EPO response. Whether...... hypoxia with or without breathing oxygen-enriched air to ensure systemic normoxemia. With 9 h of hypoxia, arterial EPO increased (from 6.0±2.2 to 22.0±6.0 mU/ml, n=11, P...

  1. Preparation of osmotic dehydrated ripe banana slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavan, U D; Prabhukhanolkar, A E; Pawar, V D

    2010-08-01

    Process for preparation of ripe banana slices using osmotic dehydration was standardized. Fully ripe banana fruits were peeled and slices of 8 mm thickness were prepared. The slices were divided into 5 lots and pretreated with sulphur fumigation @ 2 g/kg of slices for 2 h then each lot was soaked in 60 (0)Brix sugar syrup containing 0.1% KMS + 0.1 % citrate, 0.1% KMS + 0.1% citrate + 0.2%, 0.4% and 0.8% ascorbic acid and control respectively. After 16 h soaking, quick washing, blotting and then cabinet drying at 55 °C for 10 h up to 18% moisture content was done. The dried products were packed in 200 gauge polypropylene bags and stored at ambient condition for 6 months. The chemical, microbial and organoleptic changes were monitored for 6 months. The osmo-dried banana slices prepared with sulphur fumigation @ 2 g /kg slices for 2 h followed by soaking in 60(0)Brix sugar syrup containing 0.1% KMS + 0.1% citrate + 0.2% ascorbic acid were found better with respect to colour and appearance, flavour, texture, taste and overall acceptability with non-stickiness of the product. Storage study showed that there was marginal decrease in moisture content and organoleptic quality and increase in TSS, total sugars and reducing sugars content of osmodried banana slices. The products were found microbiologically safe and sensorily acceptable up to 6 months storage at ambient condition.

  2. [Effect of acute hypoxia with hypercapnia on the content of monoamines in symmetrical brain structures of the BALB/c male mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpova, I V; Mikheev, V V; Marysheva, V V; Bychkov, E R; Shabanov, P D

    2014-01-01

    The changes in activity of monoaminergic systems of both the right and the left brain hemispheres of the BALB/c male mice after an acute hypoxia with hypercapnia were studied. The concentrations of dopamine, serotonin and their metabolites dihydroxyphenylacetic, homovanilic and 5-hydroxyindolacetic acids were measured by HPLC in the brain cortex, hippocampus and striatum of the right and the left hemispheres. The more high concentration of serotonin was revealed only in the cortex of the left hemisphere in control mice without hypoxia with hypercapnia. The asymmetry in dopamine level was not registered in all structures studied. Acute hypoxia with hypercapnia decreased the dopamine level in the striatum and the serotonin level both in the hippocampus and the brain cortex. The dopamine metabolites level was reduced in the striatum and in the brain cortex of hypoxed mice: both metabolites in the right brain cortex and only dihydroxyphenylacetic acid in the left br ain cortex. Serotonin metabolism was decreased in all brain structures studied after hypoxia with hypercapnia in mice. Therefore, serotoninergic system of the brain is more sensitive to acute hypoxia with hypercapnia than dopaminergic system.

  3. A review of chronic and acute physical activity participation on neuroelectric measures of brain health and cognition during childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillman, Charles H; Kamijo, Keita; Scudder, Mark

    2011-06-01

    A growing body of research has detailed the beneficial relation of chronic participation in--and acute responses to--physical activity on aspects of cognition that underlie scholastic achievement. Here, we review the relevant neuroelectric findings on this beneficial relation in children, providing support for the influence of physical activity on specific cognitive processes that comprise academic performance. A review of studies examining physical activity and neuroelectric concomitants of cognition during childhood is described. When applicable, research involving adult populations is also described to better inform on this relationship in children. Collectively, the data support a beneficial relation of chronic and acute participation in physical activity to brain health and cognition. The results suggest more effective allocation of cognitive processes involved in stimulus engagement and action monitoring during tasks requiring variable amounts of cognitive control in children. Physical activity may influence brain health and cognition in children, leading to enhanced scholastic performance and greater overall effective functioning across the lifespan. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of an acute and a sub-chronic 900 MHz GSM exposure on brain activity and behaviors of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsa Brillaud; Aleksandra Piotrowski; Anthony Lecomte; Franck Robidel; Rene de Seze [Toxicology Unit, INERIS, Verneuil en Halatte (France)

    2006-07-01

    Radio frequencies are suspected to produce health effects. Concerning the mobile phone technology, according to position during use (close to the head), possible effects of radio frequencies on the central nervous system have to be evaluated. Previous works showed contradictory results, possibly due to experimental design diversity. In the framework of R.A.M.P. 2001 project, we evaluated possible effect of a 900 MHz GSM exposure on the central nervous system of rat at a structural, a functional and a behavioral level after acute or sub-chronic exposures. Rats were exposed using a loop antenna system to different S.A.R. levels and durations, according to results of the French C.O.M.O.B.I.O. 2001 project. A functional effect was found (modification of the cerebral activity and increase of the glia surface) after an acute exposure, even at a low level of brain averaged S.A.R. (1.5 W/kg). No cumulative effect was observed after a sub-chronic exposure (same amplitude of the effect). No structural or behavioral consequence was noted. We do not conclude on the neurotoxicity of the 900 MHz GSM exposure on the rat brain. Our results do not indicate any health risk. (authors)

  5. Amiodarone biokinetics, the formation of its major oxidative metabolite and neurotoxicity after acute and repeated exposure of brain cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomponio, Giuliana; Zurich, Marie-Gabrielle; Schultz, Luise; Weiss, Dieter G; Romanelli, Luca; Gramowski-Voss, Alexandra; Di Consiglio, Emma; Testai, Emanuela

    2015-12-25

    The difficulty in mimicking nervous system complexity and cell-cell interactions as well as the lack of kinetics information has limited the use of in vitro neurotoxicity data. Here, we assessed the biokinetic profile as well as the neurotoxicity of Amiodarone after acute and repeated exposure in two advanced rodent brain cell culture models, consisting of both neurons and glial cells organized in 2 or 3 dimensions to mimic the brain histiotypic structure and function. A strategy was applied to evidence the abiotic processes possibly affecting Amiodarone in vitro bioavailability, showing its ability to adsorb to the plastic devices. At clinically relevant Amiodarone concentrations, known to induce neurotoxicity in some patients during therapeutic treatment, a complete uptake was observed in both models in 24 h, after single exposure. After repeated treatments, bioaccumulation was observed, especially in the 3D cell model, together with a greater alteration of neurotoxicity markers. After 14 days, Amiodarone major oxidative metabolite (mono-N-desethylamiodarone) was detected at limited levels, indicating the presence of active drug metabolism enzymes (i.e. cytochrome P450) in both models. The assessment of biokinetics provides useful information on the relevance of in vitro toxicity data and should be considered in the design of an Integrated Testing Strategy aimed to identify specific neurotoxic alerts, and to improve the neurotoxicity assay predictivity for human acute and repeated exposure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Acute brain trauma, lung injury, and pneumonia: more than just altered mental status and decreased airway protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Parker J; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Bosarge, Patrick L; Wagener, Brant M

    2017-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Even when patients survive the initial insult, there is significant morbidity and mortality secondary to subsequent pulmonary edema, acute lung injury (ALI), and nosocomial pneumonia. Whereas the relationship between TBI and secondary pulmonary complications is recognized, little is known about the mechanistic interplay of the two phenomena. Changes in mental status secondary to acute brain injury certainly impair airway- and lung-protective mechanisms. However, clinical and translational evidence suggests that more specific neuronal and cellular mechanisms contribute to impaired systemic and lung immunity that increases the risk of TBI-mediated lung injury and infection. To better understand the cellular mechanisms of that immune impairment, we review here the current clinical data that support TBI-induced impairment of systemic and lung immunity. Furthermore, we also review the animal models that attempt to reproduce human TBI. Additionally, we examine the possible role of damage-associated molecular patterns, the chlolinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, and sex dimorphism in post-TBI ALI. In the last part of the review, we discuss current treatments and future pharmacological therapies, including fever control, tracheostomy, and corticosteroids, aimed to prevent and treat pulmonary edema, ALI, and nosocomial pneumonia after TBI. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  7. Assessing Metabolism and Injury in Acute Human Traumatic Brain Injury with Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Current and Future Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew G. Stovell

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI triggers a series of complex pathophysiological processes. These include abnormalities in brain energy metabolism; consequent to reduced tissue pO2 arising from ischemia or abnormal tissue oxygen diffusion, or due to a failure of mitochondrial function. In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS allows non-invasive interrogation of brain tissue metabolism in patients with acute brain injury. Nuclei with “spin,” e.g., 1H, 31P, and 13C, are detectable using MRS and are found in metabolites at various stages of energy metabolism, possessing unique signatures due to their chemical shift or spin–spin interactions (J-coupling. The most commonly used clinical MRS technique, 1H MRS, uses the great abundance of hydrogen atoms within molecules in brain tissue. Spectra acquired with longer echo-times include N-acetylaspartate (NAA, creatine, and choline. NAA, a marker of neuronal mitochondrial activity related to adenosine triphosphate (ATP, is reported to be lower in patients with TBI than healthy controls, and the ratio of NAA/creatine at early time points may correlate with clinical outcome. 1H MRS acquired with shorter echo times produces a more complex spectrum, allowing detection of a wider range of metabolites.31 P MRS detects high-energy phosphate species, which are the end products of cellular respiration: ATP and phosphocreatine (PCr. ATP is the principal form of chemical energy in living organisms, and PCr is regarded as a readily mobilized reserve for its replenishment during periods of high utilization. The ratios of high-energy phosphates are thought to represent a balance between energy generation, reserve and use in the brain. In addition, the chemical shift difference between inorganic phosphate and PCr enables calculation of intracellular pH.13 C MRS detects the 13C isotope of carbon in brain metabolites. As the natural abundance of 13C is low (1.1%, 13C MRS is typically performed following

  8. Acute Methanol Poisoning: Prevalence and Predisposing Factors of Haemorrhagic and Non-Haemorrhagic Brain Lesions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zakharov, S.; Kotíková, K.; Vaněčková, M.; Seidl, Z.; Nurieva, O.; Navrátil, Tomáš; Caganová, B.; Pelclová, D.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 2 (2016), s. 228-238 ISSN 1742-7835 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : ACUTE OPTIC NEUROPATHY * FORMATE CONCENTRATIONS * PROGNOSTIC-FACTORS Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 3.176, year: 2016

  9. Acute pharmacologically induced shifts in serotonin availability abolish emotion-selective responses to negative face emotions in distinct brain networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Cheryl L; Siebner, Hartwig R; Hornboll, Bettina; Macoveanu, Julian; Paulson, Olaf B; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2013-05-01

    Pharmacological manipulation of serotonin availability can alter the processing of facial expressions of emotion. Using a within-subject design, we measured the effect of serotonin on the brain's response to aversive face emotions with functional MRI while 20 participants judged the gender of neutral, fearful and angry faces. In three separate and counterbalanced sessions, participants received citalopram (CIT) to raise serotonin levels, underwent acute tryptophan depletion (ATD) to lower serotonin, or were studied without pharmacological challenge (Control). An analysis designed to identify distributed brain responses identified two brain networks with modulations of activity related to face emotion and serotonin level. The first network included the left amygdala, bilateral striatum, and fusiform gyri. During the Control session this network responded only to fearful faces; increasing serotonin decreased this response to fear, whereas reducing serotonin enhanced the response of this network to angry faces. The second network involved bilateral amygdala and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex, and these regions also showed increased activity to fear during the Control session. Both drug challenges enhanced the neural response of this set of regions to angry faces, relative to Control, and CIT also enhanced activity for neutral faces. The net effect of these changes in both networks was to abolish the selective response to fearful expressions. These results suggest that a normal level of serotonin is critical for maintaining a differentiated brain response to threatening face emotions. Lower serotonin leads to a broadening of a normally fear-specific response to anger, and higher levels reduce the differentiated brain response to aversive face emotions. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of Acute Systemic Hypoxia and Hypercapnia on Brain Damage in a Rat Model of Hypoxia-Ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanchao Yang

    Full Text Available Therapeutic hypercapnia has the potential for neuroprotection after global cerebral ischemia. Here we further investigated the effects of different degrees of acute systemic hypoxia in combination with hypercapnia on brain damage in a rat model of hypoxia and ischemia. Adult wistar rats underwent unilateral common carotid artery (CCA ligation for 60 min followed by ventilation with normoxic or systemic hypoxic gas containing 11%O2,13%O2,15%O2 and 18%O2 (targeted to PaO2 30-39 mmHg, 40-49 mmHg, 50-59 mmHg, and 60-69 mmHg, respectively or systemic hypoxic gas containing 8% carbon dioxide (targeted to PaCO2 60-80 mmHg for 180 min. The mean artery pressure (MAP, blood gas, and cerebral blood flow (CBF were evaluated. The cortical vascular permeability and brain edema were examined. The ipsilateral cortex damage and the percentage of hippocampal apoptotic neurons were evaluated by Nissl staining and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL assay as well as flow cytometry, respectively. Immunofluorescence and western blotting were performed to determine aquaporin-4 (AQP4 expression. In rats treated with severe hypoxia (PaO2 50 mmHg, hypercapnia protected against these pathophysiological changes. Moreover, hypercapnia treatment significantly reduced brain damage in the ischemic ipsilateral cortex and decreased the percentage of apoptotic neurons in the hippocampus after the CCA ligated rats were exposed to mild or moderate hypoxemia (PaO2 > 50 mmHg; especially under mild hypoxemia (PaO2 > 60 mmHg, hypercapnia significantly attenuated the expression of AQP4 protein with brain edema (p < 0.05. Hypercapnia exerts beneficial effects under mild to moderate hypoxemia and augments detrimental effects under severe hypoxemia on brain damage in a rat model of hypoxia-ischemia.

  11. A device for long-term perfusion, imaging, and electrical interfacing of brain tissue in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel J Killian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Distributed microelectrode array (MEA recordings from consistent, viable, ≥ 500 µm thick tissue preparations over time periods from days to weeks may aid in studying a wide range of problems in neurobiology that require in vivo-like organotypic morphology. Existing tools for electrically interfacing with organotypic slices do not address necrosis that inevitably occurs within thick slices with limited diffusion of nutrients and gas, and limited removal of waste. We developed an integrated device that enables long-term maintenance of thick, functionally active, brain tissue models using interstitial perfusion and distributed recordings from thick sections of explanted tissue on a perforated multi-electrode array. This novel device allows for automated culturing, in situ imaging, and extracellular multi-electrode interfacing with brain slices, 3 D cell cultures, and potentially other tissue culture models. The device is economical, easy to assemble, and integrable with standard electrophysiology tools. We found that convective perfusion through the culture thickness provided a functional benefit to the preparations as firing rates were generally higher in perfused cultures compared to their respective unperfused controls. This work is a step towards the development of integrated tools for days-long experiments with more consistent, healthier, thicker, and functionally more active tissue cultures with built-in distributed electrophysiological recording and stimulation functionality. The results may be useful for the study of normal processes, pathological conditions, and drug screening strategies currently hindered by the limitations of acute (a few hours long brain slice preparations.

  12. Effects of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide on renal function in patients with acute heart failure following myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanbo; Gu, Xinshun; Fan, Weize; Fan, Yanming; Li, Wei; Fu, Xianghua

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the effect of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide (rhBNP) on renal function in patients with acute heart failure (AHF) following acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Consecutive patients with AHF following AMI were enrolled in this clinical trial. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to receive rhBNP (rhBNP group) or nitroglycerin (NIT group). Patients in the rhBNP group received rhBNP 0.15 μg /kg bolus injection after randomization followed by an adjusted-dose (0.0075-0.020 μg/kg/min) for 72 hours, while patients in NIT received infusion of nitroglycerin with an adjusted-dose (10-100 μg/kg/min) for 72 hours in NIT group. Standard clinical and laboratory data were collected. The levels of serum creatinine (SCr), urea, β-2 microglobulin and cystatin C were measured at baseline and repeated at the end of the 24, 48 and 72 hours after infusion. The primary end point was the incidence of acute renal dysfunction, which was defined as an increase in SCr > 0.5 mg/dl (> 44.2 μmol/L) or 25% above baseline SCr value. The occurrence of major adverse cardiac event (MACE) was followed up for 1 month. Of the 50 patients enrolled, 26 were randomly assigned to rhBNP and 24 to nitroglycerin (NIT). There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups (all P > 0.05). The baseline concentrations of SCr, urea, β-2 microglobulin and cystatin C at admission were similar in the two groups. However, the concentrations of SCr and urea were significantly higher in rhBNP group than those in NIT group at hour 24 and 48 after treatments (all P acute renal dysfuntion in rhBNP group was higher (9/26 vs. 2/24, P = 0.040). The results of multiple logistic regression found that the use of rhBNP was an independent predictor of acute renal dysfunction in patients with AHF following AMI (OR, 0.162; 95% CI, 0.029 to 0.909; P = 0.039). the incidence of acute renal dysfuntion in rhBNP group was higher, and the use of rhBNP was an

  13. Acute cold exposure and rewarming enhanced spatial memory and activated the MAPK cascades in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Gang; Chen, Yaoming; Zhang, Xueping; Cai, Tongjian; Liu, Mingchao; Zhao, Fang; Luo, Wenjing; Chen, Jingyuan

    2008-11-06

    Cold is a common stressor that is likely to occur in everyday occupational or leisure time activities. Although there is substantial literature on the effects of stress on memory from behavioral and pharmacologic perspectives, the effects of cold stress on learning and memory were little addressed. The aims of the present work were to investigate the effects of acute cold exposure on Y-maze learning and the activation of cerebral MAPK cascades of rats. We found that the 2-hour cold exposure (-15 degrees C) and a subsequent 30-min rewarming significantly increased the performance of the rats in the Y-maze test. Serum corticosterone (CORT) level was increased after the cold exposure. After a transient reduction following the cold exposure, the P-ERK levels in the hippocampus and PFC drastically increased 30 min later. The levels of P-JNK increased gradually after the cold exposure in all the three brain regions we investigated, but the level of P-p38 only increased in the PFC. The levels of GABAA receptor alpha1 subunit remained unchanged after the cold exposure. Furthermore, the performance of rats treated with cold plus muscimol or bicuculline in the Y-maze test was similar to that of the rats treated with those GABAergic agents alone. These results demonstrated that acute cold exposure and the subsequent rewarming could result in enhanced performance of spatial learning and memory, and the activation of MAPKs in the brain. However, GABAA receptor may not be involved in the acute cold exposure-induced enhancement of memory.

  14. Physical exercise and acute restraint stress differentially modulate hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcripts and epigenetic mechanisms in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieraci, Alessandro; Mallei, Alessandra; Musazzi, Laura; Popoli, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Physical exercise and stressful experiences have been shown to exert opposite effects on behavioral functions and brain plasticity, partly by involving the action of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Although epigenetic modifications are known to play a pivotal role in the regulation of the different BDNF transcripts, it is poorly understood whether epigenetic mechanisms are also implied in the BDNF modulation induced by physical exercise and stress. Here, we show that total BDNF mRNA levels and BDNF transcripts 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 were reduced immediately after acute restraint stress (RS) in the hippocampus of mice, and returned to control levels 24 h after the stress session. On the contrary, exercise increased BDNF mRNA expression and counteracted the stress-induced decrease of BDNF transcripts. Physical exercise-induced up-regulation of BDNF transcripts was accounted for by increase in histone H3 acetylated levels at specific BDNF promoters, whereas the histone H3 trimethylated lysine 27 and dimethylated lysine 9 levels were unaffected. Acute RS did not change the levels of acetylated and methylated histone H3 at the BDNF promoters. Furthermore, we found that physical exercise and RS were able to differentially modulate the histone deacetylases mRNA levels. Finally, we report that a single treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors, prior to acute stress exposure, prevented the down-regulation of total BDNF and BDNF transcripts 1, 2, 3, and 6, partially reproducing the effect of physical exercise. Overall, these results suggest that physical exercise and stress are able to differentially modulate the expression of BDNF transcripts by possible different epigenetic mechanisms. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. 256-slice wide-detector computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    This article provides opinions and predictions about an emerging technology-256-slice wide-detector computed tomography-to help healthcare facilities decide whether the technology is worth tracking and when it might be ready for adoption. We believe 256-slice CT is worth monitoring based on its predicted clinical and business impact. We consider it unlikely, however, that more than a few select facilities will begin adopting this technology within the next three years.

  16. Contribution of Nitric Oxide Synthase (NOS) Activity in Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption and Edema after Acute Ischemia/ Reperfusion in Aortic Coarctation-Induced Hypertensive Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammadi, Mohammad Taghi; Shid Moosavi, Seyed Mostafa; Dehghani, Gholam Abbas

    2011-01-01

    Background: Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity is increased during hypertension and cerebral ischemia. NOS inactivation reduces stroke-induced cerebral injuries, but little is known about its role in blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and cerebral edema formation during stroke in acute hypertension. Here, we investigated the role of NOS inhibition in progression of edema formation and BBB disruptions provoked by ischemia/reperfusion injuries in acute hypertensive rats. Methods: Rats were ...

  17. Morphological changes in the brain of acutely ill and weight-recovered patients with anorexia nervosa. A meta-analysis and qualitative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Jochen; Bühren, Katharina; von Polier, Georg G; Heussen, Nicole; Herpertz-Dahlmann, Beate; Konrad, Kerstin

    2014-01-01

    Acute anorexia nervosa (AN) leads to reduced gray (GM) and white matter (WM) volume in the brain, which however improves again upon restoration of weight. Yet little is known about the extent and clinical correlates of these brain changes, nor do we know much about the time-course and completeness of their recovery. We conducted a meta-analysis and a qualitative review of all magnetic resonance imaging studies involving volume analyses of the brain in both acute and recovered AN. We identified structural neuroimaging studies with a total of 214 acute AN patients and 177 weight-recovered AN patients. In acute AN, GM was reduced by 5.6% and WM by 3.8% compared to healthy controls (HC). Short-term weight recovery 2-5 months after admission resulted in restitution of about half of the GM aberrations and almost full WM recovery. After 2-8 years of remission GM and WM were nearly normalized, and differences to HC (GM: -1.0%, WM: -0.7%) were no longer significant, although small residual changes could not be ruled out. In the qualitative review some studies found GM volume loss to be associated with cognitive deficits and clinical prognosis. GM and WM were strongly reduced in acute AN. The completeness of brain volume rehabilitation remained equivocal.

  18. Acute and long-term pituitary insufficiency in traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, M; Juul, A; Struck, J

    2007-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury (TBI), describe the time-course and assess the association with trauma-related parameters and early post-traumatic hormone alterations.......To assess the prevalence of hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury (TBI), describe the time-course and assess the association with trauma-related parameters and early post-traumatic hormone alterations....

  19. Evaluation of slice accelerations using multiband echo planar imaging at 3 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junqian; Moeller, Steen; Auerbach, Edward J; Strupp, John; Smith, Stephen M; Feinberg, David A; Yacoub, Essa; Uğurbil, Kâmil

    2013-12-01

    We evaluate residual aliasing among simultaneously excited and acquired slices in slice accelerated multiband (MB) echo planar imaging (EPI). No in-plane accelerations were used in order to maximize and evaluate achievable slice acceleration factors at 3 T. We propose a novel leakage (L-) factor to quantify the effects of signal leakage between simultaneously acquired slices. With a standard 32-channel receiver coil at 3 T, we demonstrate that slice acceleration factors of up to eight (MB=8) with blipped controlled aliasing in parallel imaging (CAIPI), in the absence of in-plane accelerations, can be used routinely with acceptable image quality and integrity for whole brain imaging. Spectral analyses of single-shot fMRI time series demonstrate that temporal fluctuations due to both neuronal and physiological sources were distinguishable and comparable up to slice-acceleration factors of nine (MB=9). The increased temporal efficiency could be employed to achieve, within a given acquisition period, higher spatial resolution, increased fMRI statistical power, multiple TEs, faster sampling of temporal events in a resting state fMRI time series, increased sampling of q-space in diffusion imaging, or more quiet time during a scan. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. How healthcare provider talk with parents of children following severe traumatic brain injury is perceived in early acute care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscigno, Cecelia I; Savage, Teresa A; Grant, Gerald; Philipsen, Gerry

    2013-08-01

    Healthcare provider talk with parents in early acute care following children's severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects parents' orientations to these locales, but this connection has been minimally studied. This lack of attention to this topic in previous research may reflect providers' and researchers' views that these locales are generally neutral or supportive to parents' subsequent needs. This secondary analysis used data from a larger descriptive phenomenological study (2005-2007) with parents of children following moderate to severe TBI recruited from across the United States. Parents of children with severe TBI consistently had strong negative responses to the early acute care talk processes they experienced with providers, while parents of children with moderate TBI did not. Transcript data were independently coded using discourse analysis in the framework of ethnography of speaking. The purpose was to understand the linguistic and paralinguistic talk factors parents used in their meta-communications that could give a preliminary understanding of their cultural expectations for early acute care talk in these settings. Final participants included 27 parents of children with severe TBI from 23 families. We found the human constructed talk factors that parents reacted to were: a) access to the child, which is where information was; b) regular discussions with key personnel; c) updated information that is explained; d) differing expectations for talk in this context; and, e) perceived parental involvement in decisions. We found that the organization and nature of providers' talk with parents was perceived by parents to positively or negatively shape their early acute care identities in these locales, which influenced how they viewed these locales as places that either supported them and decreased their workload or discounted them and increased their workload for getting what they needed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Characteristics of antiischemic and nootropic properties of ademol in a rat model of acute brain ischemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodakivs'kyĭ, O A

    2013-01-01

    In experiments with the rat model of acute disorder of encephalic circulation (bilateral carotid occlusion) it was found that introduction of derivate of adamantan 1-adamantiloxy-3-morfolino-2 propanol (under conventional name ademol) in the dose 2 mg/kg intraabdominal in treatment regimen (in an hour after reconstruction of insult and further 1 time every 24 hours during 21 days) was accompanied by a recovery of mnemotropic properties and is more effective than cytikolin, resulting in a decreased lethality and neurological deficiency in acute and recovery periods of insults. The data received proved the usefulness of development of ademol based cerebroprotective remedy.

  2. Rat brain and serum lithium concentrations after acute injections of lithium carbonate and orotate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kling, M A; Manowitz, P; Pollack, I W

    1978-06-01

    Eight hours after intraperitoneal injections of 1.0, 2.0, and 4.0m equiv Li kg-1, the serum and brain lithium concentrations of rats were significantly greater after lithium orotate than after lithium carbonate. While little serum lithium remained at 24 h after injection of 2.0 m equiv kg-1 lithium carbonate, two-thirds of the 2 h serum lithium concentration was present 24h after lithium orotate. Furthermore, the 24 h brain concentration of lithium after lithium orotate was approximately three times greater than that after lithium carbonate. These data suggest the possibility that lower doses of lithium orotate than lithium carbonate may achieve therapeutic brain lithium concentrations and relatively stable serum concentrations.

  3. TOXICITY PATHWAY ANALYSIS IN AGING BROWN NORWAY RAT BRAIN FOLLOWING ACUTE TOLUENE EXPOSURE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of aging on susceptibility to environmental stressors is poorly understood. To investigate the contribution of different life stages on response to toxicants, we examined the effects of acute exposure by oral gavage of the volatile organic solvent toluene (0.00, 0.3...

  4. Can brain natriuretic peptide predict the outcome in patients with acute pulmonary embolism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadan Nafie

    2012-10-01

    Conclusion: An elevated plasma level of BNP is a prognostic factor for short-term mortality and overall short-term complicated clinical outcome, and it is a powerful indicator of RVD in patients with acute PE in the absence of left ventricular dysfunction (LVD.

  5. Neuroprotective effects of anticonvulsants in rat hippocampal slice cultures exposed to oxygen/glucose deprivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rekling, Jens C

    2003-01-01

    Some anticonvulsants show neuroprotective effects, and may be of use in reducing neuronal death resulting from stroke or traumatic brain injury. Here I report that a broad range of anticonvulsants protect cells in hippocampal slice cultures from death induced by oxygen/glucose deprivation (OGD......). Hippocampal slice cultures were submitted to 1 h OGD and the resulting cell death was quantified 24 h later using a novel automated fluorescent scanning method. The classical anticonvulsants phenobarbital, phenytoin, ethosuximide, chlordiazepoxide and midazolam all significantly and dose-dependently reduced...

  6. Association between eye position on brain scan and hospital mortality in acute intracerebral hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frusch, K.J.; Houben, R.; Schreuder, F.H.B.M.; Postma, A.A.; Staals, J.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Conjugate eye deviation (CED) and horizontal skew deviation are often seen in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), but its prognostic significance is unclear. In this study, the association between brain scan assessed eye position and hospital mortality in patients

  7. Pathophysiological Concepts in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury : Diffusion Tensor Imaging Related to Acute Perfusion CT Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metting, Zwany; Cerliani, Leonardo; Rodiger, Lars A.; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2013-01-01

    Background: A subgroup of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) experiences residual symptoms interfering with their return to work. The pathophysiological substrate of the suboptimal outcome in these patients is a source of debate. Objective: To provide greater insight into the

  8. Clinically significant changes in the emotional condition of relatives of patients with severe traumatic brain injury during sub-acute rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Anne; Kristensen, Karin Spangsberg; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate clinically significant change in the emotional condition of relatives of patients with severe traumatic brain injury during sub-acute rehabilitation. Methods: Participants were 62 pairs of relatives and patients. Relatives completed the anxiety and depression scales from...

  9. Clinical aspects of acute inflammatory diseases of the brain; Klinisch-neurologische Aspekte akut-entzuendlicher Hirnerkrankungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Block, F.; Nolden-Koch, M. [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Neurologische Klinik

    2000-11-01

    Despite the progress, which has been made in diagnosis and therapy of encephalitis and bacterial meningitis, these acute inflammatory diseases of the brain still display a certain amount of morbidity and mortality. History, physical examination, analysis of serum and cerebrospinal fluid and radiological examination are the mainstay for the diagnosis of these diseases. With respect to the acute inflammatory diseases of the brain computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging fulfil three purposes: 1. They can be used to clarify the diagnosis and to rule out other diseases. 2. They can identify the focus from which a bacterial meningitis can evolve. 3. Complications like edema, cerebral vasculitis, septic sinus thrombosis, hydrocephalus or abscess can be visualized. If the diagnosis is made early, the possible complications are recognized in good time and the appropriate therapy is started immediately, then morbidity and mortality can be kept at a minimum. (orig.) [German] Die bakterielle Meningitis und die Enzephalitis sind akut-entzuendliche Hirnerkrankungen, die trotz aller Fortschritte in der Diagnostik und Therapie mit einer nicht unerheblichen Morbiditaet und Mortalitaet behaftet sind. Die Anamnese, die koerperliche Untersuchung, die laborchemische Diagnostik von Blut und Liquor und die Bildgebung sind die wesentlichen Saeulen in der Diagnostik akut-entzuendlicher Hirnerkrankungen. Die Bildgebung, die mittels Computertomographie bzw. Kernspintomographie erfolgt, hat in diesem Zusammenhang 3 Aufgaben: 1. Sie kann dazu beitragen, die Diagnose zu sichern bzw. differentialdiagnostisch in Erwaegung zu ziehende Erkrankungen auszuschliessen oder nachzuweisen. 2. Sie kann bei der bakteriellen Meningitis entzuendliche Foci im Bereich der Nasennebenhoehlen, des Mastoids oder des Mittelohrs erkennen, die sofort operativ saniert werden muessen. 3. Komplikationen akut-entzuendlicher Hirnerkrankungen koennen bei entsprechendem klinischem Verdacht mittels Bildgebung

  10. New experimental model of acute aqueductal blockage in cats: effects on cerebrospinal fluid pressure and the size of brain ventricles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klarica, M; Oresković, D; Bozić, B; Vukić, M; Butković, V; Bulat, M

    2009-02-18

    It is generally assumed that cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) is secreted in the brain ventricles, and so after an acute blockage of the aqueduct of Sylvius an increase in the ventricular CSF pressure and dilation of isolated ventricles may be expected. We have tested this hypothesis in cats. After blocking the aqueduct, we measured the CSF pressure in both isolated ventricles and the cisterna magna, and performed radiographic monitoring of the cross-sectional area of the lateral ventricle. The complete aqueductal blockage was achieved by implanting a plastic cannula into the aqueduct of Sylvius through a small tunnel in the vermis of the cerebellum in the chloralose-anesthetized cats. After the reconstitution of the occipital bone, the CSF pressure was measured in the isolated ventricles via a plastic cannula implanted in the aqueduct of Sylvius and in the cisterna magna via a stainless steel cannula. During the following 2 h, the CSF pressures in the isolated ventricles and cisterna magna were identical to those in control conditions. We also monitored the ventricular cross-sectional area by means of radiography for 2 h after the aqueductal blockage and failed to observe any significant changes. When mock CSF was infused into isolated ventricles to imitate the CSF secretion, the gradient of pressure between the ventricle and cisterna magna developed, and disappeared as soon as the infusion was terminated. However, when mock CSF was infused into the cisterna magna at various rates, the resulting increased subarachnoid CSF pressure was accurately transmitted across the brain parenchyma into the CSF of isolated ventricles. The lack of the increase in the CSF pressure and ventricular dilation during 2 h of aqueductal blockage suggests that aqueductal obstruction by itself does not lead to development of hypertensive acute hydrocephalus in cats.

  11. The accuracy of transcranial Doppler in excluding intracranial hypertension following acute brain injury: a multicenter prospective pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasulo, Frank A; Bertuetti, Rita; Robba, Chiara; Lusenti, Francesco; Cantoni, Alfredo; Bernini, Marta; Girardini, Alan; Calza, Stefano; Piva, Simone; Fagoni, Nazzareno; Latronico, Nicola

    2017-02-27

    Untimely diagnosis of intracranial hypertension may lead to delays in therapy and worsening of outcome. Transcranial Doppler (TCD) detects variations in cerebral blood flow velocity which may correlate with intracranial pressure (ICP). We investigated if intracranial hypertension can be accurately excluded through use of TCD. This was a multicenter prospective pilot study in patients with acute brain injury requiring invasive ICP (ICPi) monitoring. ICP estimated with TCD (ICPtcd) was compared with ICPi in three separate time frames: immediately before ICPi placement, immediately after ICPi placement, and 3 hours following ICPi positioning. Sensitivity and specificity, and concordance correlation coefficient between ICPi and ICPtcd were calculated. Receiver operating curve (ROC) and the area under the curve (AUC) analyses were estimated after measurement averaging over time. A total of 38 patients were enrolled, and of these 12 (31.6%) had at least one episode of intracranial hypertension. One hundred fourteen paired measurements of ICPi and ICPtcd were gathered for analysis. With dichotomized ICPi (≤20 mmHg vs >20 mmHg), the sensitivity of ICPtcd was 100%; all measurements with high ICPi (>20 mmHg) also had a high ICPtcd values. Bland-Altman plot showed an overestimation of 6.2 mmHg (95% CI 5.08-7.30 mmHg) for ICPtcd compared to ICPi. AUC was 96.0% (95% CI 89.8-100%) and the estimated best threshold was at ICPi of 24.8 mmHg corresponding to a sensitivity 100% and a specificity of 91.2%. This study provides preliminary evidence that ICPtcd may accurately exclude intracranial hypertension in patients with acute brain injury. Future studies with adequate power are needed to confirm this result.

  12. Dialysis Disequilibrium Syndrome: Brain death following hemodialysis for metabolic acidosis and acute renal failure – A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagshaw Sean M

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dialysis disequilibrium syndrome (DDS is the clinical phenomenon of acute neurologic symptoms attributed to cerebral edema that occurs during or following intermittent hemodialysis (HD. We describe a case of DDS-induced cerebral edema that resulted in irreversible brain injury and death following acute HD and review the relevant literature of the association of DDS and HD. Case Presentation A 22-year-old male with obstructive uropathy presented to hospital with severe sepsis syndrome secondary to pneumonia. Laboratory investigations included a pH of 6.95, PaCO2 10 mmHg, HCO3 2 mmol/L, serum sodium 132 mmol/L, serum osmolality 330 mosmol/kg, and urea 130 mg/dL (46.7 mmol/L. Diagnostic imaging demonstrated multifocal pneumonia, bilateral hydronephrosis and bladder wall thickening. During HD the patient became progressively obtunded. Repeat laboratory investigations showed pH 7.36, HCO3 19 mmol/L, potassium 1.8 mmol/L, and urea 38.4 mg/dL (13.7 mmol/L (urea-reduction-ratio 71%. Following HD, spontaneous movements were absent with no pupillary or brainstem reflexes. Head CT-scan showed diffuse cerebral edema with effacement of basal cisterns and generalized loss of gray-white differentiation. Brain death was declared. Conclusions Death is a rare consequence of DDS in adults following HD. Several features may have predisposed this patient to DDS including: central nervous system adaptations from chronic kidney disease with efficient serum urea removal and correction of serum hyperosmolality; severe cerebral intracellular acidosis; relative hypercapnea; and post-HD hemodynamic instability with compounded cerebral ischemia.

  13. Inducing rat brain CYP2D with nicotine increases the rate of codeine tolerance; predicting the rate of tolerance from acute analgesic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Douglas M; Tyndale, Rachel F

    2017-12-01

    Repeated opioid administration produces analgesic tolerance, which may lead to dose escalation. Brain CYP2D metabolizes codeine to morphine, a bioactivation step required for codeine analgesia. Higher brain, but not liver, CYP2D is found in smokers and nicotine induces rat brain, but not liver, CYP2D expression and activity. Nicotine induction of rat brain CYP2D increases acute codeine conversion to morphine, and analgesia, however the role of brain CYP2D on the effects of repeated codeine exposure and tolerance is unknown. Rats were pretreated with nicotine (brain CYP2D inducer; 1mg/kg subcutaneously) or vehicle (saline; 1ml/kg subcutaneously). Codeine (40-60mg/kg oral-gavage) or morphine (20-30mg/kg oral-gavage) was administered daily and analgesia was assessed daily using the tail-flick reflex assay. Nicotine (versus saline) pretreatment increased acute codeine analgesia (1.32-fold change in AUC0-60min; pcodeine administration (time to negligible analgesia). Inducing brain CYP2D with nicotine did not alter acute morphine analgesia (1.03-fold; p>0.8), or the rate of morphine tolerance (8.1%/day versus 7.6%; p>0.9). The rate of both codeine and morphine tolerance (loss in peak analgesia from day 1 to day 4) correlated with initial analgesic response on day 1 (R=0.97, p<001). Increasing brain CYP2D altered initial analgesia and subsequent rate of tolerance. Variation in an individual's initial response to analgesic (e.g. high initial dose, smoking) may affect the rate of tolerance, and thereby the risk for dose escalation and/or opioid dependence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A new threshold of apparent diffusion coefficient values in white matter after successful tissue plasminogen activator treatment for acute brain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Atsushi; Shimizu, Yusaku; Koyama, Junichi; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2017-06-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is effective for the treatment of acute brain ischemia, but may trigger fatal brain edema or hemorrhage if the brain ischemia results in a large infarct. Herein, we attempted to predict the extent of infarcts by determining the optimal threshold of ADC values on DWI that predictively distinguishes between infarct and reversible areas, and by reconstructing color-coded images based on this threshold. The study subjects consisted of 36 patients with acute brain ischemia in whom MRA had confirmed reopening of the occluded arteries in a short time (mean: 99min) after tPA treatment. We measured the apparetnt diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in several small regions of interest over the white matter within high-intensity areas on the initial diffusion weighted image (DWI); then, by comparing the findings to the follow-up images, we obtained the optimal threshold of ADC values using receiver-operating characteristic analysis. The threshold obtained (583×10 -6 m 2 /s) was lower than those previously reported; this threshold could distinguish between infarct and reversible areas with considerable accuracy (sensitivity: 0.87, specificity: 0.94). The threshold obtained and the reconstructed images were predictive of the final radiological result of tPA treatment, and this threshold may be helpful in determining the appropriate management of patients with acute brain ischemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Interactive Slice of the CMS detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Davis, Siona Ruth

    2016-01-01

    This slice shows a colorful cross-section of the CMS detector with all parts of the detector labelled. Viewers are invited to click on buttons associated with five types of particles to see what happens when each type interacts with the sections of the detector. The five types of particles users can select to send through the slice are muons, electrons, neutral hadrons, charged hadrons and photons. Supplementary information on each type of particles is given. Useful for inclusion into general talks on CMS etc. *Animated CMS "slice" for Powerpoint (Mac & PC) Original version - 2004 Updated version - July 2010 *Six slides required - first is a set of buttons; others are for each particle type (muon, electron, charged/neutral hadron, photon) Recommend putting slide 1 anywhere in your presentation and the rest at the end

  16. Leukoencephalopathy and long-term neurobehavioural, neurocognitive, and brain imaging outcomes in survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treated with chemotherapy: a longitudinal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Yin Ting; Sabin, Noah D; Reddick, Wilburn E; Bhojwani, Deepa; Liu, Wei; Brinkman, Tara M; Glass, John O; Hwang, Scott N; Srivastava, Deokumar; Pui, Ching-Hon; Robison, Leslie L; Hudson, Melissa M; Krull, Kevin R

    2016-10-01

    Leukoencephalopathy is observed in some children undergoing chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, although its effects on long-term outcomes is unknown. This study examines the associations between acute leukoencephalopathy and neurobehavioural, neurocognitive, and brain white matter imaging outcomes in long-term survivors of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia treated with chemotherapy without cranial radiation. In this longitudinal analysis, we used data of children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia at St Jude Children's Research Hospital (Memphis, TN, USA) who had been treated between June 1, 2000, and Oct 31, 2010. Eligible patients were diagnosed with non-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, aged at least 8 years, and survivors with at least 5 years since their initial diagnosis. Brain MRIs obtained during active therapy were systematically coded for leukoencephalopathy using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Event version 4. At least 5 years after their diagnosis, survivors completed neurocognitive testing, another brain MRI, and their parents completed neurobehavioural ratings of their child (Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function [BRIEF]). Follow-up MRI included diffusion tensor imaging to assess white matter integrity, with indices of fractional anisotropy, axial diffusivity, and radial diffusivity from frontal lobes, parietal lobes, and in the frontostriatal tract. The neuroradiologist, who assessed abnormal MRIs, was masked to both group assignment of survivors and the neurobehavioural and neurocognitive outcomes. The primary outcomes were neurobehavioural function, assessed from completed BRIEF, and neurocognitive performance, measured by direct neurocognitive tests (Delis-Kaplan Executive Function System, Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-IV/Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III, Rey-Osterrieth Complex Figure Test, and Lafayette Grooved Pegboard Test). This study had completed enrolment in October, 2014, and is

  17. Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES, an acute neurological syndrome due to reversible multifactorial brain edema: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Cicognani

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The essential features of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome (PRES are headache, mental changes, seizures, visual symptoms and often arterial hypertension. Brain RMN typically shows cortico-sottocortical parieto-occipital edema, with a bilateral and symmetric distribution. PRES develops in clinical conditions as hypertensive encephalopathy, preeclampsia/ eclampsia, autoimmune diseases, after transplantation, infections and as an adverse effect of immunosuppressive drugs or chemotherapy. It usually completely reverses with treatment, although permanent sequelae are possible in case of delayed or missed diagnosis. Case report: We describe the case of a transsexual (M!F and tetraplegic patient, admitted for neck and low back pain. She suddenly developed headache, confusion, seizures and severe hypertension with normal blood tests. RMN showed multiple cortico-sottocortical areas of vasogenic and citotoxic edema in temporo-occipital, parietal, frontal, and cerebellar regions. Soon after the beginning of the antihypertensive therapy, clinical recovery was observed, as well as the disappearance of edema at RMN. Discussion and conclusions: Although PRES is usually associated with definite pathological conditions, it is not always the case, as was for the patient here described, who had no predisposing factors in her past clinical history, and presented hypertension only in the acute phase of the syndrome. Since, moreover, PRES usually presents with acute non specific features and it can be misdiagnosed with other serious diseases, the clinician will be helped by the knowledge of this syndrome to promptly start diagnostic workup and treatments, and avoid permanent neurological deficits.

  18. Serial measurements of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide after acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J K; Mickley, H; Bak, S

    2006-01-01

    consecutive patients with acute ischemic stroke. RESULTS: NT-proBNP peaked the day after onset of symptoms (p = 0.007) followed by a decrease until day 5 (p = 0.001, ANOVA). At 6-month follow-up the difference in the level of NT-proBNP was unchanged compared to day 5 (p = 0.42). NT-proBNP levels > or =615 pg...

  19. Acute effects of alcohol on brain perfusion monitored with arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marxen, Michael; Gan, Gabriela; Schwarz, Daniel; Mennigen, Eva; Pilhatsch, Maximilian; Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Guenther, Matthias; Smolka, Michael N

    2014-03-01

    While a number of studies have established that moderate doses of alcohol increase brain perfusion, the time course of such an increase as a function of breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) has not yet been investigated, and studies differ about regional effects. Using arterial spin labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance imaging, we investigated (1) the time course of the perfusion increase during a 15-minute linear increase of BrAC up to 0.6 g/kg followed by a steady exposure of 100 minutes, (2) the regional distribution, (3) a potential gender effect, and (4) the temporal stability of perfusion effects. In 48 young adults who participated in the Dresden longitudinal study on alcohol effects in young adults, we observed (1) a 7% increase of global perfusion as compared with placebo and that perfusion and BrAC are tightly coupled in time, (2) that the increase reaches significance in most regions of the brain, (3) that the effect is stronger in women than in men, and (4) that an acute tolerance effect is not observable on the time scale of 2 hours. Larger studies are needed to investigate the origin and the consequences of the effect, as well as the correlates of inter-subject variations.

  20. [Asthenic syndrome in clinical course of acute period of brain concussion during complex treatment using nootropic agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkachov, A V

    2008-01-01

    The comparative analysis of a complex examination of 108 persons aged from 16 till 60 years in acute period of closed craniocerebral injury (CCCT) has been done. Every participants have been divided into 2 groups depending on a nootrop medication they receive in a complex treatment. A control group consisted of 30 practically healthy people. Objective examination by means of tests was done on the 1-st, 10-th that 30-th day of treatment. Patients of 1-st (37 persons) group received piracetam in complex treatment and patients of the 2-nd group (71 persons) pramistar. Patients of the first group received a base treatment (analgetics, tranquilizers, vitamins of group B, magnesium sulfate, diuretic preparations) as well as piracetam at dosage 0.2, two tablets three times per day. The Patients of the 2-nd group received a base treatment as well as pramistar at dosage 0.6, one tablet 2 times per day. Specially developed multiaspects scales and questionnaires, MRT of the brain and EEG have been used for objectification of patient, complaints. During a complex clinico-neuropsychological examination it was found that all cases of concussion of the brain are accompanied by those or other asthenic disorders.

  1. Early life low intensity stress experience modifies acute stress effects on juvenile brain cell proliferation of European sea bass (D. Labrax).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokos, S; Pavlidis, M; Yiotis, T; Tsalafouta, A; Papandroulakis, N; Dermon, C R

    2017-01-15

    Early life adversity may be critical for the brain structural plasticity that in turn would influence juvenile behaviour. To address this, we questioned whether early life environment has an impact on stress responses latter in life, using European sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax, as a model organism. Unpredictable chronic low intensity stress (UCLIS), using a variety of moderate intensity stressors, was applied during two early ontogenetic stages, flexion or formation all fins. At juvenile stage, fish were exposed to acute stress and plasma cortisol, brain mRNA expression of corticosteroid receptors' genes (gr1, gr2, mr) and brain cell proliferation (using BrdU immunohistochemistry) were determined in experimental and matched controls. UCLIS treatment specifically decreased brain gr1 expression in juveniles, but had no effect on the juvenile brain cell proliferation pattern within the major neurogenic zones studied of dorsal (Dm, Dld) and ventral (Vv) telencephalic, preoptic (NPO) areas, periventricular tectum gray zone (PGZ) and valvula cerebellum (VCe). In contrast, exposure to acute stress induced significant plasma cortisol rise, decreases of cerebral cell proliferation in juveniles, not previously exposed to UCLIS, but no effect detected on the expression levels of gr1, gr2 and mr in all groups of different early life history. Interestingly, juveniles with UCLIS history showed modified responses to acute stress, attenuating acute stress-induced cell proliferation decreases, indicating a long-lasting effect of early life treatment. Taken together, early life mild stress experience influences an acute stress plasticity end-point, cerebral cell proliferation, independently of the stress-axis activation, possibly leading to more effective coping styles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Holographic entanglement entropy on generic time slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuki, Yuya; Takayanagi, Tadashi; Umemoto, Koji

    2017-06-01

    We study the holographic entanglement entropy and mutual information for Lorentz boosted subsystems. In holographic CFTs at zero and finite temperature, we find that the mutual information gets divergent in a universal way when the end points of two subsystems are light-like separated. In Lifshitz and hyperscaling violating geometries dual to non-relativistic theories, we show that the holographic entanglement entropy is not well-defined for Lorentz boosted subsystems in general. This strongly suggests that in non-relativistic theories, we cannot make a real space factorization of the Hilbert space on a generic time slice except the constant time slice, as opposed to relativistic field theories.

  3. Slice through an LHC bending magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Slice through an LHC superconducting dipole (bending) magnet. The slice includes a cut through the magnet wiring (niobium titanium), the beampipe and the steel magnet yokes. Particle beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have the same energy as a high-speed train, squeezed ready for collision into a space narrower than a human hair. Huge forces are needed to control them. Dipole magnets (2 poles) are used to bend the paths of the protons around the 27 km ring. Quadrupole magnets (4 poles) focus the proton beams and squeeze them so that more particles collide when the beams’ paths cross. There are 1232 15m long dipole magnets in the LHC.

  4. Effects of Administration of Perinatal Bupropion on the Population Spike Amplitude in Neonatal Rat Hippocampal Slice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soomaayeh Heysieat-talab

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sBupropion is an atypical antidepressant that is widely used in smoke cessation under FDA approval. The study of synaptic effects of bupropion can help to finding out its mechanism(s for stopping nicotine dependence. In this study the effects of perinatal bupropion on the population spike (PS amplitude of neonates were investigated. Materials and Methods Hippocampal slices were prepared from 18-25 days old rat pups. The experimental groups included control and bupropion-treated. Bupropion (40 mg/Kg, i.p. was applied daily in perinatal period as pre-treatment. Due to the studying acute effects, bupropion was also added to the perfusion medium (10, 50, 200 μM for 30 min. The evoked PS was recorded from pyramidal layer of CA1 area, following stimulation of Schaffer collaterals. ResultsA concentration of 10 μM bupropion had no significant effects on the PS amplitude. The 50 μM concentration of bupropion reduced the amplitude of responses in 50% of the studied cases. At a concentration of 200 μM, the recorded PS amplitudes were reduced in all slices (n= 22. Amplitude was completely abolished in 8 out of the 22 slices. The decrease of the PS amplitude was found to be more in the non-pre-treated slices than in the pre-treated slices when both were perfused with 200 μM bupropion.Conclusion The results showed the perinatal exposure to bupropion and its acute effects while indicating that at concentrations of 50 and 200 μM bupropion reduced the PS amplitude. It was also found that there was evidence of synaptic adaptation in comparison of bupropion-treated and non-treated slices whereas they were both perfused with 200 µM.

  5. Protective Ventilation of Preterm Lambs Exposed to Acute Chorioamnionitis Does Not Reduce Ventilation-Induced Lung or Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Samantha K.; Moss, Timothy J. M.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Crossley, Kelly J.; Gill, Andrew W.; Kluckow, Martin; Zahra, Valerie; Wong, Flora Y.; Pichler, Gerhard; Galinsky, Robert; Miller, Suzanne L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The onset of mechanical ventilation is a critical time for the initiation of cerebral white matter (WM) injury in preterm neonates, particularly if they are inadvertently exposed to high tidal volumes (VT) in the delivery room. Protective ventilation strategies at birth reduce ventilation-induced lung and brain inflammation and injury, however its efficacy in a compromised newborn is not known. Chorioamnionitis is a common antecedent of preterm birth, and increases the risk and severity of WM injury. We investigated the effects of high VT ventilation, after chorioamnionitis, on preterm lung and WM inflammation and injury, and whether a protective ventilation strategy could mitigate the response. Methods Pregnant ewes (n = 18) received intra-amniotic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) 2 days before delivery, instrumentation and ventilation at 127±1 days gestation. Lambs were either immediately euthanased and used as unventilated controls (LPSUVC; n = 6), or were ventilated using an injurious high VT strategy (LPSINJ; n = 5) or a protective ventilation strategy (LPSPROT; n = 7) for a total of 90 min. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate and cerebral haemodynamics and oxygenation were measured continuously. Lungs and brains underwent molecular and histological assessment of inflammation and injury. Results LPSINJ lambs had poorer oxygenation than LPSPROT lambs. Ventilation requirements and cardiopulmonary and systemic haemodynamics were not different between ventilation strategies. Compared to unventilated lambs, LPSINJ and LPSPROT lambs had increases in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression within the lungs and brain, and increased astrogliosis (p<0.02) and cell death (p<0.05) in the WM, which were equivalent in magnitude between groups. Conclusions Ventilation after acute chorioamnionitis, irrespective of strategy used, increases haemodynamic instability and lung and cerebral inflammation and injury. Mechanical ventilation is a potential contributor

  6. Protective ventilation of preterm lambs exposed to acute chorioamnionitis does not reduce ventilation-induced lung or brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha K Barton

    Full Text Available The onset of mechanical ventilation is a critical time for the initiation of cerebral white matter (WM injury in preterm neonates, particularly if they are inadvertently exposed to high tidal volumes (VT in the delivery room. Protective ventilation strategies at birth reduce ventilation-induced lung and brain inflammation and injury, however its efficacy in a compromised newborn is not known. Chorioamnionitis is a common antecedent of preterm birth, and increases the risk and severity of WM injury. We investigated the effects of high VT ventilation, after chorioamnionitis, on preterm lung and WM inflammation and injury, and whether a protective ventilation strategy could mitigate the response.Pregnant ewes (n = 18 received intra-amniotic lipopolysaccharide (LPS 2 days before delivery, instrumentation and ventilation at 127±1 days gestation. Lambs were either immediately euthanased and used as unventilated controls (LPSUVC; n = 6, or were ventilated using an injurious high VT strategy (LPSINJ; n = 5 or a protective ventilation strategy (LPSPROT; n = 7 for a total of 90 min. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate and cerebral haemodynamics and oxygenation were measured continuously. Lungs and brains underwent molecular and histological assessment of inflammation and injury.LPSINJ lambs had poorer oxygenation than LPSPROT lambs. Ventilation requirements and cardiopulmonary and systemic haemodynamics were not different between ventilation strategies. Compared to unventilated lambs, LPSINJ and LPSPROT lambs had increases in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression within the lungs and brain, and increased astrogliosis (p<0.02 and cell death (p<0.05 in the WM, which were equivalent in magnitude between groups.Ventilation after acute chorioamnionitis, irrespective of strategy used, increases haemodynamic instability and lung and cerebral inflammation and injury. Mechanical ventilation is a potential contributor to WM injury in infants exposed

  7. Cavernous malformations of the brain after treatment for acute lymphocytic leukemia: presentation and long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singla, Amit; Brace O'Neill, Jill E; Smith, Edward; Scott, R Michael

    2013-02-01

    The authors undertook this study to determine the clinical course and long-term outcomes in pediatric patients who developed cavernous malformations of the brain following treatment for acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). They reviewed the senior author's database of surgically treated cavernous malformations of the brain to identify those patients whose cavernous malformations developed after cranial radiation during treatment for ALL. The medical records of these patients were reviewed to determine their clinical presentation, radiological findings, and outcome at long-term follow-up. Five patients fulfilled the specified criteria over a 23-year period. At the time of ALL diagnosis, they were all 4-5 years old. The cerebral cavernous malformations developed 2-8 years after cranial radiation, and 4 of the 5 patients presented with neurological symptoms, which ranged from focal deficits to seizures. Two patients required a second craniotomy, one from lesion recurrence possibly due to incomplete resection, and another for a second cavernous malformation, which developed at another site 6 years after the initial malformation was excised. Long-term follow-up of 2, 10, 11, 11, and 17 years has revealed no additional lesion development or recurrence. Symptomatic cavernous malformations of the brain may develop several years after chemotherapy and cranial radiation treatment for ALL, and the clinical course of these cavernous malformations may be more aggressive than that of the typical post-radiation lesions seen in other conditions. Long-term clinical and imaging monitoring is recommended for children who have undergone treatment for ALL. Craniotomy for excision of the malformations appears to convey long-term protection from repeat hemorrhage and accumulating neurological deficits.

  8. Prevention of pressure ulcers in patients undergoing sub-acute rehabilitation after severe brain injury: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Marianne Brostrup; Wolffbrandt, Mia Moth; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2018-01-09

    The aim of this study was to uncover efforts made by healthcare professionals to prevent pressure ulcers (PUs) in patients with severe brain injury undergoing treatment at a sub-acute rehabilitation department. PUs is a major burden for patients and also generate considerable healthcare costs. PUs are, nevertheless, prevalent in both secondary and primary care. In this qualitative study, we performed 24-hour observation on four patients undergoing rehabilitation for severe brain injury. An observation guide was developed inspired by the Braden Scale and Spradley's theory and methods. Observations were analysed using content analysis. Patricia Benner's aspects of clinical grasp were employed in the interpretation of the observations. One overarching theme was identified: "Professionalism expressed by preventing intervention, involving the patient, employing clinical grasp and professional pride". Seven subcategories were summed up into the following three categories: Organisation of clinical practice, Professional assessment and Interactions with the patient. The healthcare professionals' actions to prevent PUs consisted of attaining the necessary knowledge about PU care and performing the activities. However, our observations revealed one important additional aspect; a very distinct impression that the healthcare professionals were committed to learning about the patients' former life and actively used this knowledge in their planning and provision of daily patient care. We believe this commitment has a very positive effect on prevention of PUs. Professional knowledge about prevention of PU is a necessary requisite, but is not sufficient to ensure effective treatment. To transfer knowledge into practice, we recommend that patients' rehabilitation days be planned in such a manner that activities, mobilisation and training are conducted throughout the day and evening. We also recommend that professional staff are encouraged to seek information about the former life

  9. The Association Between Ventriculo-Peritoneal Shunt and Acute Appendicitis in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: A 14-Year, Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sher-Wei; Ao, Kam-Hou; Ho, Chung-Han; Tseng, Chien-Jen; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chio, Chung-Ching; Kuo, Jinn-Rung

    2017-07-01

    The association between preexisting ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt and the risk of new-onset acute appendicitis in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) is not well established. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationships between VP shunt and acute appendicitis in patients with TBI. A longitudinal cohort study matched by a propensity score in patients with TBI with (4781 patients) or without (9562 patients) VP shunt was conducted using the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan between January 1993 and December 2013. The main outcome studied was diagnosis of acute appendicitis. The cumulative probability of acute appendicitis was not different between these 2 groups (P = 0.6244). A Cox model showed central nervous system (CNS) infection to be an independent predictor of acute appendicitis with an adjusted hazard ratio of 2.98. Patients with TBI with both a VP shunt and a CNS infection had a greater risk of developing new-onset acute appendicitis (hazard ratio 4.25; 95% confidence interval 1.84-9.81) compared patients with TBI without a VP shunt or CNS infection. We concluded that VP shunt is not a risk factor in the development of appendicitis in patients with TBI. Patients with TBI with a shunt and a CNS infection may have a greater risk of developing acute appendicitis. Therefore, care in avoiding CNS infection is a key for the prevention acute appendicitis in this patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Multimodal Approach to Testing the Acute Effects of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    traumatic brain injury (mTBI) patients and five orthopedic controls, using power spectral density (PSD) analysis. We first estimated intracranial...because patients typically lack apparent external injuries and clear pathological findings in conventional computed tomography and magnetic...METHODS A. Subjects Six mTBI subjects (4 male, 2 female, average age 28.3±7.3) and five orthopedic controls (3 male, 2 female, average age 29.4±7.4

  11. [Evaluation of the community integration of persons with lateralised post-acute acquired brain injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-Hoyas, E; Pedrero-Perez, E J; Aguila-Maturana, A M; Gonzalez-Alted, C

    2013-08-16

    INTRODUCTION. Hemispheric specialization is a topic of interest that has motivated an enormous amount of research in recent decades. After a unilateral brain injury, the consequences can affect various areas of specialization, leading, depending on the location of the injury, impairment in quality of life and community integration. PATIENTS AND METHODS. Cross-sectional study with a sample of 58 patients, 28 traumatic brain injury (TBI) and 30 cerebrovascular accidents, both lateralized. The level of integration in the community is measured by the Community Integration Questionnaire. RESULTS. There were three groups analyzed by considering unilateral injury (full sample, stroke sample, and TBI sample). Results showed a significantly high community integration of people with right hemisphere injury. However, to measure the level of community integration between TBI and stroke, the results showed no significant differences. CONCLUSION. According to the results of the study people with brain injury in the right hemisphere have a better community integration than people with lesions in the left hemisphere regardless of the origin of the lesions (vascular or traumatic). We discussed the reasons that may motivate the differences and clinical implications.

  12. Acute exercise does not modify brain activity and memory performance in APP/PS1 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki Stein, Angelica; Munive, Victor; Fernandez, Ana M; Nuñez, Angel; Torres Aleman, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    Age is the main risk factor for Alzheimer´s disease (AD). With an increasingly aging population, development of affordable screening techniques to determine cognitive status will help identify population-at-risk for further follow-up. Because physical exercise is known to modulate cognitive performance, we used it as a functional test of cognitive health. Mice were submitted to treadmill running at moderate speed for 30 min, and their brain activity was monitored before and after exercise using electrocorticogram (ECG) recordings. After exercise, normal, but not APP/PS1 mice, a well established AD model, showed significantly increased ECG theta rhythm. At the same time normal, but not AD mice, showed significantly enhanced performance in a spatial memory test after exercise. Therefore, we postulate that a running bout coupled to pre- and post-exercise brain activity recordings will help identify individuals with cognitive alterations, by determining the presence or absence of exercise-specific changes in brain activity. Work in humans using a bout of moderate exercise plus electroencephalography, a clinically affordable procedure, is warranted.

  13. Excitotoxic effects of non-NMDA receptor agonists in organotypic corticostriatal slice cultures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, B W; Noraberg, J; Jakobsen, B

    1999-01-01

    in corticostriatal slice cultures. The purpose was to examine the feasibility of these cultures for excitotoxic studies, and to demonstrate possible differential excitotoxic effects of KA and AMPA on striatal and cortical neurons. Slices of dorsolateral striatum with overlying neocortex were obtained from neonatal...... of the cytosolic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) into the culture medium and loss of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) activity in the tissue. Histological sections were also stained by the fluorescent dye Fluoro-Jade (FJ), for degenerating neurons and by immunocytochemical staining for gamma-aminobutyric acid...... density of Fluoro-Jade staining, (3) loss of GAD-activity in tissue homogenates, and (4) loss of GABA-immunostained neurons. We conclude that both differences between compounds (AMPA vs. KA) and brain areas (striatum vs. cortex) can be demonstrated in corticostriatal slice cultures, which in conjunction...

  14. Silicon ingot casting: Heat exchanger method. Multi-wire slicing: Fixed abrasive slicing technique, phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, F.; Khattak, C. P.

    1979-01-01

    In the area of ingot casting the proof of concept of heat exchanger method (HEM) was established. It was also established that HEM cast silicon yielded solar cell performance comparable to Czochralski grown material. Solar cells with conversion efficiencies of up to 15% were fabricated. It was shown that square cross-section ingots can be cast. In the area of crystal slicing, it was established that silicon can be sliced efficiently with the fixed abrasive slicing technique approach. This concept was carried forward to 10 cm diameter workpiece.

  15. Adaptive slices for acquisition of anisotropic BRDF

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vávra, Radomír; Filip, Jiří

    (2018) ISSN 2096-0433 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA17-18407S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : anisotropic BRDF * slice * sampling Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http:// library .utia.cas.cz/separaty/2018/RO/vavra-0486116.pdf

  16. Thin-Slice Perception Develops Slowly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balas, Benjamin; Kanwisher, Nancy; Saxe, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Body language and facial gesture provide sufficient visual information to support high-level social inferences from "thin slices" of behavior. Given short movies of nonverbal behavior, adults make reliable judgments in a large number of tasks. Here we find that the high precision of adults' nonverbal social perception depends on the slow…

  17. Detecting Psychopathy from Thin Slices of Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Katherine A.; Lilienfeld, Scott O.; Patrick, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    This study is the first to demonstrate that features of psychopathy can be reliably and validly detected by lay raters from "thin slices" (i.e., small samples) of behavior. Brief excerpts (5 s, 10 s, and 20 s) from interviews with 96 maximum-security inmates were presented in video or audio form or in both modalities combined. Forty raters used…

  18. nem_slice ver. 3.34

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-06-08

    Nem_slice reads in a finite element model description of the geometry of a problem from an ExodusII file and generates either a nodal or elemental graph of the problem. It then calls Chaco to load balance the graph and then outputs a NemesisI load-balance file.

  19. Ultrastructural mitochondria changes in perihematomal brain and neuroprotective effects of Huperzine A after acute intracerebral hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu H

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Haiying Lu,1,* Mei Jiang,2,* Lei Lu,3 Guo Zheng,1 Qiang Dong3 1Department of Neurology, Nanjing Children’s Hospital, Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, 2Department of Neurology, Shanghai Pudong New Area Gongli Hospital, Shanghai, 3Department of Neurology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Aim: The purpose of the study was to observe the ultrastructural changes of neuronal mitochondria in perihematomal brain tissue and assess the therapeutic potential of Huperzine A (HA, a mitochondrial protector following intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH. Methods: Brain hemorrhage was induced in adult Sprague Dawley rats by injecting autologous blood into the striatum and then removing the brains 3, 6, 12, 24, or 48 hours later to analyze mitochondrial ultrastructure in a blinded manner. Parallel groups of ICH rats were treated with HA or saline immediately after ICH. Perihematomal apoptosis was determined by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL, caspase-3 activation and cytochrome C translocation were tracked by immunoblots, and neurobehavioral test results were compared between the groups. Results: Mitochondria in perihematomal neurons demonstrated dramatic changes including mitochondrial swelling, intracristal dilation, and decreased matrix density. HA treatment decreased mitochondrial injury and apoptosis, inhibited caspase-3 activation and cytochrome C translocation, and improved behavioral recovery. Conclusion: These data show that ICH induces dramatic mitochondrial damage, and HA exhibits protective effects possibly through ameliorating mitochondrial injury and apoptosis. Collectively, these findings suggest a new direction for novel therapeutics. Keywords: apoptosis, intracerebral hemorrhage, mitochondria, huperzine A, neuroprotection

  20. Histone deacetylases exert class specific roles in conditioning the brain and heart against acute ischemic injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sverre Erik Aune

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury comprises a significant portion of morbidity and mortality from heart and brain diseases worldwide. This enduring clinical problem has inspired myriad reports in the scientific literature of experimental interventions seeking to elucidate the pathology of IR injury. Elective cardiac surgery presents perhaps the most viable scenario for protecting the heart and brain from IR injury, due to the opportunity to condition the organs prior to insult. The physiological parameters for the preconditioning of vital organs prior to insult through mechanical and pharmacologic maneuvers have been heavily examined. These investigations have revealed new insights into how preconditioning alters cellular responses to IR injury. However, the promise of preconditioning remains unfulfilled at the clinical level, and research seeking to implicate cell signals essential to this protection continues. Recent discoveries in molecular biology have revealed that gene expression can be controlled through posttranslational modifications, without altering the chemical structure of the genetic code. In this scenario, gene expression is repressed by enzymes that cause chromatin compaction through catalytic removal of acetyl moieties from lysine residues on histones. These enzymes, called histone deacetylases (HDACs, can be inhibited pharmacologically, leading to the de-repression of protective genes. The discovery that HDACs can also alter the function of non-histone proteins through posttranslational deacetylation has expanded the potential impact of HDAC inhibitors for the treatment of human disease. HDAC inhibitors have been applied in a very small number of experimental models of IR. However, the scientific literature contains an increasing number of reports demonstrating that HDACs converge on preconditioning signals in the cell. This review will describe the influence of HDACs on major preconditioning signaling pathways in the heart and

  1. Effects of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate on morphological and functional neuronal integrity in rat hippocampal slices during energy deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Y; Benz, A M; Katsuki, H; Matsukawa, M; Clifford, D B; Zorumski, C F

    2003-01-01

    D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, a high energy glycolytic intermediate, attenuates ischemic damage in a variety of tissues, including brain. To determine whether D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate serves as an alternate energy substrate in the CNS, rat hippocampal slices were treated with D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate during glucose deprivation. Unlike pyruvate, an endproduct of glycolysis, 10 mM D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate did not preserve synaptic transmission or morphological integrity of CA1 pyramidal neurons during glucose deprivation. Moreover, during glucose deprivation, 10-mM D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate failed to maintain adenosine triphosphate levels in slices. D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, however, attenuated acute neuronal degeneration produced by 200 microM iodoacetate, an inhibitor of glycolysis downstream of D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate. Because (5S, 10R)-(+)-5-methyl-10, 11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo [a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine, an antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, exhibited similar protection against iodoacetate damage, we examined whether (5S, 10R)-(+)-5-methyl-10, 11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo [a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine and D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate share a common neuroprotective mechanism. Indeed, D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate diminished N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated synaptic responses and partially attenuated neuronal degeneration induced by 100-microM N-methyl-D-aspartate. Taken together, these results indicate that D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate is unlikely to serve as an energy substrate in the hippocampus, and that neuroprotective effects of D-fructose-1,6-bisphosphate are mediated by mechanisms other than anaerobic energy supply. Copyright 2003 IBRO

  2. The adenosine generating enzymes CD39/CD73 control microglial processes ramification in the mouse brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyash, Marina; Zabiegalov, Oleksandr; Wendt, Stefan; Matyash, Vitali

    2017-01-01

    Microglial cells invade the brain as amoeboid precursors and acquire a highly ramified morphology in the postnatal brain. Microglia express all essential purinergic elements such as receptors, nucleoside transporters and ecto-enzymes, including CD39 (NTPDase1) and CD73 (5'-nucleotidase), which sequentially degrade extracellular ATP to adenosine. Here, we show that constitutive deletion of CD39 and CD73 or both caused an inhibition of the microglia ramified phenotype in the brain with a reduction in the length of processes, branching frequency and number of intersections with Sholl spheres. In vitro, unlike wild-type microglia, cd39-/- and cd73-/- microglial cells were less complex and did not respond to ATP with the transformation into a more ramified phenotype. In acute brain slices, wild-type microglia retracted approximately 50% of their processes within 15 min after slicing of the brain, and this phenomenon was augmented in cd39-/- mice; moreover, the elongation of microglial processes towards the source of ATP or towards a laser lesion was observed only in wild-type but not in cd39-/- microglia. An elevation of extracellular adenosine 1) by the inhibition of adenosine transport with dipyridamole, 2) by application of exogenous adenosine or 3) by degradation of endogenous ATP/ADP with apyrase enhanced spontaneous and ATP-induced ramification of cd39-/- microglia in acute brain slices and facilitated the transformation of cd39-/- and cd73-/- microglia into a ramified process-bearing phenotype in vitro. These data indicate that under normal physiological conditions, CD39 and CD73 nucleotidases together with equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1) control the fate of extracellular adenosine and thereby the ramification of microglial processes. PMID:28376099

  3. The adenosine generating enzymes CD39/CD73 control microglial processes ramification in the mouse brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Matyash

    Full Text Available Microglial cells invade the brain as amoeboid precursors and acquire a highly ramified morphology in the postnatal brain. Microglia express all essential purinergic elements such as receptors, nucleoside transporters and ecto-enzymes, including CD39 (NTPDase1 and CD73 (5'-nucleotidase, which sequentially degrade extracellular ATP to adenosine. Here, we show that constitutive deletion of CD39 and CD73 or both caused an inhibition of the microglia ramified phenotype in the brain with a reduction in the length of processes, branching frequency and number of intersections with Sholl spheres. In vitro, unlike wild-type microglia, cd39-/- and cd73-/- microglial cells were less complex and did not respond to ATP with the transformation into a more ramified phenotype. In acute brain slices, wild-type microglia retracted approximately 50% of their processes within 15 min after slicing of the brain, and this phenomenon was augmented in cd39-/- mice; moreover, the elongation of microglial processes towards the source of ATP or towards a laser lesion was observed only in wild-type but not in cd39-/- microglia. An elevation of extracellular adenosine 1 by the inhibition of adenosine transport with dipyridamole, 2 by application of exogenous adenosine or 3 by degradation of endogenous ATP/ADP with apyrase enhanced spontaneous and ATP-induced ramification of cd39-/- microglia in acute brain slices and facilitated the transformation of cd39-/- and cd73-/- microglia into a ramified process-bearing phenotype in vitro. These data indicate that under normal physiological conditions, CD39 and CD73 nucleotidases together with equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 (ENT1 control the fate of extracellular adenosine and thereby the ramification of microglial processes.

  4. Acute effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic field emitted by mobile phone on brain function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Sumich, Alexander; Wang, Grace Y

    2017-07-01

    Due to its attributes, characteristics, and technological resources, the mobile phone (MP) has become one of the most commonly used communication devices. Historically, ample evidence has ruled out the substantial short-term impact of radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) emitted by MP on human cognitive performance. However, more recent evidence suggests potential harmful effects associated with MP EMF exposure. The aim of this review is to readdress the question of whether the effect of MP EMF exposure on brain function should be reopened. We strengthen our argument focusing on recent neuroimaging and electroencephalography studies, in order to present a more specific analysis of effects of MP EMF exposure on neurocognitive function. Several studies indicate an increase in cortical excitability and/or efficiency with EMF exposure, which appears to be more prominent in fronto-temporal regions and has been associated with faster reaction time. Cortical excitability might also underpin disruption to sleep. However, several inconsistent findings exist, and conclusions regarding adverse effects of EMF exposure are currently limited. It also should be noted that the crucial scientific question of the effect of longer-term MP EMF exposure on brain function remains unanswered and essentially unaddressed. Bioelectromagnetics. 38:329-338, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Acute central ghrelin and GH secretagogues induce feeding and activate brain appetite centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Catherine B; Snape, Amelie C; Baudoin, Florence M-H; Luckman, Simon M

    2002-01-01

    Ghrelin was recently identified as the endogenous ligand for the GH secretagogue (GHS) receptor. Like the synthetic GHSs [e.g. GH-releasing peptide-6 (GHRP-6)], ghrelin stimulates feeding and increases body weight in rats. The aim of this study was to identify brain regions that are activated by GHSs and determine whether the responses observed were secondary to food intake. In addition, possible mediators of GHS actions were examined. Intracerebroventricular (icv) injection of ghrelin or GHRP-6 into rats significantly stimulated food intake and transiently reduced core body temperature. The effect of both ghrelin and GHRP-6 on food intake was blocked by preadministration of a Y1 NPY receptor antagonist (BIBO3304). Using c-Fos immunohistochemistry, we demonstrated that icv ghrelin or GHRP-6 activated several hypothalamic brain regions, including the arcuate nucleus, paraventricular nucleus, dorsomedial nucleus, lateral hypothalamus, and two regions of the brainstem, the nucleus of the tractus solitarius and the area postrema. The cell activation induced by GHRP-6 was independent of food intake, as the same pattern and extent of c-Fos expression were observed in animals that were denied access to food following treatment. Finally, double immunohistochemistry indicated that orexin-containing, but not melanin-concentrating hormone-containing, neurons in the lateral hypothalamus were activated significantly by central administration of GHRP-6.

  6. Adenosine A2A Receptors Modulate Acute Injury and Neuroinflammation in Brain Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicita Pedata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular concentration of adenosine in the brain increases dramatically during ischemia. Adenosine A2A receptor is expressed in neurons and glial cells and in inflammatory cells (lymphocytes and granulocytes. Recently, adenosine A2A receptor emerged as a potential therapeutic attractive target in ischemia. Ischemia is a multifactorial pathology characterized by different events evolving in the time. After ischemia the early massive increase of extracellular glutamate is followed by activation of resident immune cells, that is, microglia, and production or activation of inflammation mediators. Proinflammatory cytokines, which upregulate cell adhesion molecules, exert an important role in promoting recruitment of leukocytes that in turn promote expansion of the inflammatory response in ischemic tissue. Protracted neuroinflammation is now recognized as the predominant mechanism of secondary brain injury progression. A2A receptors present on central cells and on blood cells account for important effects depending on the time-related evolution of the pathological condition. Evidence suggests that A2A receptor antagonists provide early protection via centrally mediated control of excessive excitotoxicity, while A2A receptor agonists provide protracted protection by controlling massive blood cell infiltration in the hours and days after ischemia. Focus on inflammatory responses provides for adenosine A2A receptor agonists a wide therapeutic time-window of hours and even days after stroke.

  7. Acute Effects of Modafinil on Brain Resting State Networks in Young Healthy Subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieramico, Valentina; Ferretti, Antonio; Macchia, Antonella; Tommasi, Marco; Saggino, Aristide; Ciavardelli, Domenico; Manna, Antonietta; Navarra, Riccardo; Cieri, Filippo; Stuppia, Liborio; Tartaro, Armando; Sensi, Stefano L.

    2013-01-01

    Background There is growing debate on the use of drugs that promote cognitive enhancement. Amphetamine-like drugs have been employed as cognitive enhancers, but they show important side effects and induce addiction. In this study, we investigated the use of modafinil which appears to have less side effects compared to other amphetamine-like drugs. We analyzed effects on cognitive performances and brain resting state network activity of 26 healthy young subjects. Methodology A single dose (100 mg) of modafinil was administered in a double-blind and placebo-controlled study. Both groups were tested for neuropsychological performances with the Raven’s Advanced Progressive Matrices II set (APM) before and three hours after administration of drug or placebo. Resting state functional magnetic resonance (rs-FMRI) was also used, before and after three hours, to investigate changes in the activity of resting state brain networks. Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) was employed to evaluate differences in structural connectivity between the two groups. Protocol ID: Modrest_2011; NCT01684306; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01684306. Principal Findings Results indicate that a single dose of modafinil improves cognitive performance as assessed by APM. Rs-fMRI showed that the drug produces a statistically significant increased activation of Frontal Parietal Control (FPC; pmodafinil has cognitive enhancing properties and provide functional connectivity data to support these effects. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01684306 http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01684306. PMID:23935959

  8. Acute, transient hemorrhagic hypotension does not aggravate structural damage or neurologic motor deficits but delays the long-term cognitive recovery following mild to moderate traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Christian; Stover, John F.; Thompson, Hilaire J.; Hoover, Rachel C.; Morales, Diego M.; Schouten, Joost W.; McMillan, Asenia; Soltesz, Kristie; Motta, Melissa; Spangler, Zachery; Neugebauer, Edmund; McIntosh, Tracy K.

    2008-01-01

    . Conclusions A single, acute hypotensive event lasting 30 mins did not aggravate the short- and long-term structural and motor deficits but delayed the speed of recovery of cognitive function associated with experimental traumatic brain injury. PMID:16424733

  9. Detection of pulmonary embolism using 64-slice multidetector-row computed tomography: accuracy and reproducibility on different image reconstruction parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jung Im; Ahn, Myeong Im; Park, Seog Hee (Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ. of Korea (Korea, Republic of)), email: jijung@catholic.ac.kr; Kim, Ki Jun (Deparment of Radiology, Incheon St Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ. of Korea (Korea, Republic of)); Kim, Hyo Rim (Deparment of Radiology, Yeouido St Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ. of Korea (Korea, Republic of)); Park, Hyun Jin (Dept. of Radiology, St Vincent Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ. of Korea (Korea, Republic of)); Jung, SeungHee; Lim, Hyeon Woo (Deparment of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic Univ. of Korea (Korea, Republic of))

    2011-05-15

    Background Direct comparison of different image reconstruction parameters to detect pulmonary embolism (PE) using 64-slice multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) is absent and the most accurate image reconstruction parameters have not yet been proven. Purpose To compare different image reconstruction parameters for detecting PE using 64-slice MDCT in patients suspected of having an acute PE. Material and Methods Forty patients who underwent pulmonary CT angiography with 64-slice MDCT for a suspected PE were included. Different image reconstruction parameters were used for each patient: axial and coronal images with slice thicknesses of 0.625 mm, 1.3 mm, and 2.5 mm and axial maximum intensity projection (MIP) images with slab thicknesses of 1.3 mm, 2.5 mm, and 5 mm. Four experienced radiologists reviewed the images. The diagnosis of a PE was based on consensus review of axial 0.625 mm slice thickness images by two chest radiologists with allowing multiplanar reconstruction. Accuracy and reproducibility (kappa value) were evaluated. Results In 15 of 40 patients, a PE was diagnosed. For detecting lobar PEs, axial images with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm and all coronal re-formatted images showed comparable results to axial images with a slice thickness of 0.625 mm. For detecting segmental PEs, axial images with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm and coronal images with a slice thickness of 0.625 mm re-formatted images showed comparable results to axial images of a slice thickness of 0.625 mm. For detecting subsegmental PEs, axial images with a slice thickness of 0.625 mm showed the highest sensitivity. Better reproducibility was obtained when the thinner slice thickness reconstructions were in axial and coronal images. However, reproducibility of MIP images with slab thicknesses of 2.5 mm and 5 mm was similar for detecting segmental and subsegmental PEs. Conclusion Thin-slice reconstruction of less than 1 mm is mandatory for visualization of PE at the subsegmental

  10. In Vitro Manganese Exposure Disrupts MAPK Signaling Pathways in Striatal and Hippocampal Slices from Immature Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanara Vieira Peres

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms mediating manganese (Mn-induced neurotoxicity, particularly in the immature central nervous system, have yet to be completely understood. In this study, we investigated whether mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH could represent potential targets of Mn in striatal and hippocampal slices obtained from immature rats (14 days old. The aim of this study was to evaluate if the MAPK pathways are modulated after subtoxic Mn exposure, which do not significantly affect cell viability. The concentrations of manganese chloride (MnCl2; 10–1,000 μM caused no change in cell viability in slices exposed for 3 or 6 hours. However, Mn exposure significantly increased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK 1/2, as well as c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK 1/2/3 phosphorylation at both 3 and 6 hours incubations, in both brain structures. Furthermore, Mn exposure did not change the total content or phosphorylation of TH at the serine 40 site in striatal slices. Thus, Mn at concentrations that do not disrupt cell viability causes activation of MAPKs (ERK1/2 and JNK1/2/3 in immature hippocampal and striatal slices. These findings suggest that altered intracellular MAPKs signaling pathways may represent an early event concerning the effects of Mn in the immature brain.

  11. Prognostic value of interleukin-1 beta levels after acute brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşçi, Alptekin; Okay, Onder; Gezici, Ali Riza; Ergün, Rüçhan; Ergüngör, Fikret

    2003-12-01

    Traumatic injury to central nervous system results in the production of inflammatory cytokines via intrinsic mechanisms by neurons, astrocytes and microglia, and extrinsic mechanisms by infiltrating macrophages, lymphocytes and other leukocytes. Interleukin-1 beta is the key mediator of the acute inflammatory host response. While this response is necessary for resolution of the pathologic event, the toxic nature of many of its products can cause significant tissue damage. We analyzed serum interleukin-1 beta levels by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 48 patients with solitary head injury who were transported to our clinic immediately after trauma. We categorized the patients according to their initial Glasgow coma scores in three groups, and compared their serum interleukin-1 beta values both with their Glasgow coma initial and outcome scores. This study helped to provide quantitative data to estimate clinical impressions and prognosis after head injury.

  12. Altered intrinsic brain activities in patients with acute eye pain using amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation: a resting-state fMRI study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Z

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Zhi-Ming Pan,1 Hai-Jun Li,1 Jing Bao,1 Nan Jiang,1 Qing Yuan,1 Shelby Freeberg,2 Pei-Wen Zhu,1 Lei Ye,1 Ming-Yang Ma,1 Xin Huang,1 Yi Shao1 1Department of Ophthalmology and Radiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanchang University, Nanchang, Jiangxi, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Ophthalmology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Objective: Many previous studies have reported that pain symptoms can lead to significant brain function and anatomical changes, whereas the intrinsic brain activity changes in acute eye pain (EP patients remain unknown. Using the amplitude of low-frequency fluctuation (ALFF method, this study aimed to evaluate the spontaneous brain activity alterations and their relationships with clinical features in acute EP patients.Participants and methods: A total of 20 patients with EP (15 males and 5 females and 20 healthy controls (HCs; 15 males and 5 females closely matched in age, sex, and education underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging scans. The ALFF method was applied to assess spontaneous brain activity changes. The ALFF values of the EP patients were distinguished from those of the HCs using a receiver operating characteristic curve. Pearson’s correlation analysis was used to investigate the relationships between the mean ALFF signal values from many brain regions and the clinical features in EP patients.Results: Compared with the HCs, acute EP patients had significantly lower ALFF in the left and right precentral/postcentral gyrus and left precuneus. In contrast, acute EP patients showed higher ALFF values in the right and left parahippocampal gyri and left caudate. However, no relationship was observed between the mean ALFF signal values from the different areas and clinical manifestations in the acute EP patients.Conclusion: We demonstrated that acute EP patients showed abnormal intrinsic brain activities in the precentral/postcentral gyrus and limbic system

  13. Cognitive activity limitations one year post-trauma in patients admitted to sub-acute rehabilitation after severe traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Jens Bak; Norup, Anne; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    -acute rehabilitation in the Eastern part of Denmark during a 5-year period from 2005 to 2009. Methods: Level of consciousness was assessed consecutively during rehabilitation and at 1 year post-trauma. Severity of traumatic brain injury was classified according to duration of post-traumatic amnesia. The cognitive...... of consciousness during the first year post-trauma. At follow-up 33-58% of patients had achieved functional independence within the cognitive domains on the Cog-FIM. Socio-economic status, duration of acute care and post-traumatic amnesia were significant predictors of outcome. Conclusion: Substantial recovery...

  14. Alterations in brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the mouse hippocampus following acute but not repeated benzodiazepine treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licata, Stephanie C; Shinday, Nina M; Huizenga, Megan N; Darnell, Shayna B; Sangrey, Gavin R; Rudolph, Uwe; Rowlett, James K; Sadri-Vakili, Ghazaleh

    2013-01-01

    Benzodiazepines (BZs) are safe drugs for treating anxiety, sleep, and seizure disorders, but their use also results in unwanted effects including memory impairment, abuse, and dependence. The present study aimed to reveal the molecular mechanisms that may contribute to the effects of BZs in the hippocampus (HIP), an area involved in drug-related plasticity, by investigating the regulation of immediate early genes following BZ administration. Previous studies have demonstrated that both brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and c-Fos contribute to memory- and abuse-related processes that occur within the HIP, and their expression is altered in response to BZ exposure. In the current study, mice received acute or repeated administration of BZs and HIP tissue was analyzed for alterations in BDNF and c-Fos expression. Although no significant changes in BDNF or c-Fos were observed in response to twice-daily intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of diazepam (10 mg/kg + 5 mg/kg) or zolpidem (ZP; 2.5 mg/kg + 2.5 mg/kg), acute i.p. administration of both triazolam (0.03 mg/kg) and ZP (1.0 mg/kg) decreased BDNF protein levels within the HIP relative to vehicle, without any effect on c-Fos. ZP specifically reduced exon IV-containing BDNF transcripts with a concomitant increase in the association of methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2) with BDNF promoter IV, suggesting that MeCP2 activity at this promoter may represent a ZP-specific mechanism for reducing BDNF expression. ZP also increased the association of phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (pCREB) with BDNF promoter I. Future work should examine the interaction between ZP and DNA as the cause for altered gene expression in the HIP, given that BZs can enter the nucleus and intercalate into DNA directly.

  15. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor plasma levels are increased in older women after an acute episode of low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diz, Juliano Bergamaschine Mata; de Souza Moreira, Bruno; Felício, Diogo Carvalho; Teixeira, Luiza Faria; de Jesus-Moraleida, Fabianna Resende; de Queiroz, Bárbara Zille; Pereira, Daniele Sirineu; Pereira, Leani Souza Máximo

    2017-07-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a growing public health problem in old age, and it is associated with disabling pain and depressive disorders. We compared brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plasma levels, a key neurotrophin in pain modulation, between older women after an acute episode of LBP and age-matched pain-free controls, and investigated potential differences in BDNF levels between controls and LBP subgroups based on pain severity, presence of depressive symptoms and use of analgesic and antidepressant drugs. A total of 221 participants (154 with LBP and 67 pain-free) were studied. A comprehensive assessment of sociodemographic and clinical variables was conducted including pain severity (11-point NRS), depressive symptoms (GDS-15), age, body mass index, physical activity and total number of comorbidities and medications in use. BDNF levels in LBP group were significantly higher than controls (7515.9±3021.2; Md=7116.0 vs 6331.8±3364.0; Md=5897.5pg/mL, P=0.005). LBP subgroups exhibited higher BDNF levels than controls, regardless of pain severity, presence of depressive symptoms and use of analgesic drugs. BDNF levels were significantly higher in LBP subgroup without use of antidepressant drugs compared to both controls and LBP subgroup with use of antidepressant drugs. This study provides evidence that older women with acute low back pain exhibit higher BDNF plasma levels compared to pain-free controls. Subgroup comparisons suggest that use of pain-relief drugs may influence BDNF levels. The study results offer a novel target for research on mechanisms of back pain in older adults. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Alterations in brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the mouse hippocampus following acute but not repeated benzodiazepine treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie C Licata

    Full Text Available Benzodiazepines (BZs are safe drugs for treating anxiety, sleep, and seizure disorders, but their use also results in unwanted effects including memory impairment, abuse, and dependence. The present study aimed to reveal the molecular mechanisms that may contribute to the effects of BZs in the hippocampus (HIP, an area involved in drug-related plasticity, by investigating the regulation of immediate early genes following BZ administration. Previous studies have demonstrated that both brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and c-Fos contribute to memory- and abuse-related processes that occur within the HIP, and their expression is altered in response to BZ exposure. In the current study, mice received acute or repeated administration of BZs and HIP tissue was analyzed for alterations in BDNF and c-Fos expression. Although no significant changes in BDNF or c-Fos were observed in response to twice-daily intraperitoneal (i.p. injections of diazepam (10 mg/kg + 5 mg/kg or zolpidem (ZP; 2.5 mg/kg + 2.5 mg/kg, acute i.p. administration of both triazolam (0.03 mg/kg and ZP (1.0 mg/kg decreased BDNF protein levels within the HIP relative to vehicle, without any effect on c-Fos. ZP specifically reduced exon IV-containing BDNF transcripts with a concomitant increase in the association of methyl-CpG binding protein 2 (MeCP2 with BDNF promoter IV, suggesting that MeCP2 activity at this promoter may represent a ZP-specific mechanism for reducing BDNF expression. ZP also increased the association of phosphorylated cAMP response element binding protein (pCREB with BDNF promoter I. Future work should examine the interaction between ZP and DNA as the cause for altered gene expression in the HIP, given that BZs can enter the nucleus and intercalate into DNA directly.

  17. Striatal dopamine dynamics in mice following acute and repeated toluene exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apawu, Aaron K; Mathews, Tiffany A; Bowen, Scott E

    2015-01-01

    The abused inhalant toluene has potent behavioral effects, but only recently has progress been made in understanding the neurochemical actions that mediate the action of toluene in the brain. Available evidence suggests that toluene inhalation alters dopamine (DA) neurotransmission, but toluene's mechanism of action is unknown. The present study evaluated the effect of acute and repeated toluene inhalation (0, 2,000, or 4,000 ppm) on locomotor activity as well as striatal DA release and uptake using slice fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Acutely, 2,000 and 4,000 ppm toluene increased locomotor activity, while neurochemically only 4,000 ppm toluene potentiated electrically evoked DA release across the caudate-putamen and the nucleus accumbens. Repeated administration of toluene resulted in sensitization to toluene's locomotor activity effects. Brain slices obtained from mice repeatedly exposed to toluene demonstrated no difference in stimulated DA release in the caudate-putamen as compared to control animals. Repeated exposure to 2,000 and 4,000 ppm toluene caused a concentration-dependent decrease of 25-50 % in evoked DA release in the nucleus accumbens core and shell relative to air-exposed mice. These voltammetric neurochemical findings following repeated toluene exposure suggest that there may be a compensatory downregulation of the DA system. Acute or repeated toluene exposure had no effect on the DA uptake kinetics. Taken together, these results demonstrate that acute toluene inhalation potentiates DA release, while repeated toluene exposure attenuates DA release in the nucleus accumbens only.

  18. [Retinal and brain infarctions secondary to acute carotid thrombosis in ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Querol, L; Martínez-Corral, M; Martí, E; Martí-Fábregas, J

    2008-06-01

    Ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome (OHSS) is an uncommon but potentially life-threatening iatrogenic condition that may appear following ovulation induction in the course of some fertility treatments. This may lead to further complications, some of which may be severe, such as thromboembolic events. Though rarely, it can therefore be a potential cause of stroke. We report the case of a 34-year old woman under ovulation induction treatment who developed retinal and brain infarctions secondary to internal carotid occlusion. Oral anticoagulation was administered and recovery was good in spite of the persistence of carotid occlusion in follow-up magnetic ressonance imaging- angiographies. This is the first case of carotid occlusion following an OHSS reported in Spain and the eighth one published in the literature. Current literature on cerebrovascular complications in OHSS is also briefly reviewed.

  19. Magnetic resonance microscopy defines ethanol-induced brain abnormalities in prenatal mice: effects of acute insult on gestational day 7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Elizabeth A; O'Leary-Moore, Shonagh K; Khan, Amber A; Parnell, Scott E; Ament, Jacob J; Dehart, Deborah B; Johnson, Brice W; Allan Johnson, G; Styner, Martin A; Sulik, Kathleen K

    2010-01-01

    This magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM)-based report is the second in a series designed to illustrate the spectrum of craniofacial and central nervous system (CNS) dysmorphia resulting from single- and multiple-day maternal ethanol treatment. The study described in this report examined the consequences of ethanol exposure on gestational day (GD) 7 in mice, a time in development when gastrulation and neural plate development begins; corresponding to the mid- to late third week postfertilization in humans. Acute GD 7 ethanol exposure in mice has previously been shown to result in CNS defects consistent with holoprosencephaly (HPE) and craniofacial anomalies typical of those in Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS). MRM has facilitated further definition of the range of GD 7 ethanol-induced defects. C57Bl/6J female mice were intraperitoneally (i.p.) administered vehicle or 2 injections of 2.9 g/kg ethanol on day 7 of pregnancy. Stage-matched control and ethanol-exposed GD 17 fetuses selected for imaging were immersion fixed in a Bouins/Prohance solution. MRM was conducted at either 7.0 Tesla (T) or 9.4 T. Resulting 29 microm isotropic spatial resolution scans were segmented and reconstructed to provide 3D images. Linear and volumetric brain measures, as well as morphological features, were compared for control and ethanol-exposed fetuses. Following MRM, selected specimens were processed for routine histology and light microscopic examination. Gestational day 7 ethanol exposure resulted in a spectrum of median facial and forebrain deficiencies, as expected. This range of abnormalities falls within the HPE spectrum; a spectrum for which facial dysmorphology is consistent with and typically is predictive of that of the forebrain. In addition, other defects including median facial cleft, cleft palate, micrognathia, pituitary agenesis, and third ventricular dilatation were identified. MRM analyses also revealed cerebral cortical dysplasia/heterotopias resulting from this acute

  20. Proteins of the Hageman Factor System in an Inflammatory Reaction in the Acute Period of Severe Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Borshchikova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the time course of changes and an association of contact factors and their inhibitors with the global values of hemocoagulation, fibrinolysis, and inflammatory reactants in acute severe brain injury (SBI in order to deepen notions of Hageman factor system functioning. Subjects and methods. One hundred and thirteen patients with SBI were examined on 1 to 21 days of injury. The level of unconsciousness averaged a Glasgow coma score of 6.8±0.25. A control group included 23 healthy individuals. The investigators determined the activity of contact factors (prekallikrein, high-molecular-weight kininogen, factors XII, XI and their inhibitors (total activity of the protein C system, the activity and quantity of antithrombin III, C1 esterase inhibitor, a^antitrypsin, fl^-antiplasmin, fl^-macroglobulin, hemostatic parameters (blood fibrinolytic activity by an euglobulin test; factor XII-kallikrein-dependent fibrinolysis, treptokinase induced fibrinolysis by calculating the plasminogen reserve index, activated partial thromboplastin time, fibrinogen, D-dimer, and soluble fibrin monomer complexes, and inflammatory reactants (C-reactive protein, IL10, IL2, IL4, IL5, IL6, IL8, IL10, IL12p70, TNF-a, and IFN-y. Results. The acute period of SBI was marked by significant deficiency and imbalance of contact factors and their physiological inhibitors. In SBI, prekallikrein rather than factor XII plays a central role in the function of the contact factor system due to inflammatory inhibition of Hageman factor synthesis, which disturbs its key role in the reactions of contact activation of homeostatic proteolytic systems. Out of the considered systems, the activation of which is associated with contact factors, the function of the internal mechanism of fibrinolysis is largely changed; at the same time the internal hemocoagulation activation pathway remains virtually intact. When an inflammatory reaction develops after SBI, normal Hageman factor

  1. Closed-loop regulation of arterial pressure after acute brain death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltesz, Kristian; Sjöberg, Trygve; Jansson, Tomas; Johansson, Rolf; Robertsson, Anders; Paskevicius, Audrius; Liao, Quiming; Qin, Guangqi; Steen, Stig

    2017-06-10

    The purpose of this concept study was to investigate the possibility of automatic mean arterial pressure (MAP) regulation in a porcine heart-beating brain death (BD) model. Hemodynamic stability of BD donors is necessary for maintaining acceptable quality of donated organs for transplantation. Manual stabilization is challenging, due to the lack of vasomotor function in BD donors. Closed-loop stabilization therefore has the potential of increasing availability of acceptable donor organs, and serves to indicate feasibility within less demanding patient groups. A dynamic model of nitroglycerine pharmacology, suitable for controller synthesis, was identified from an experiment involving an anesthetized pig, using a gradient-based output error method. The model was used to synthesize a robust PID controller for hypertension prevention, evaluated in a second experiment, on a second, brain dead, pig. Hypotension was simultaneously prevented using closed-loop controlled infusion of noradrenaline, by means of a previously published controller. A linear model of low order, with variable (uncertain) gain, was sufficient to describe the dynamics to be controlled. The robustly tuned PID controller utilized in the second experiment kept the MAP within a user-defined range. The system was able to prevent hypertension, exceeding a reference of 100 mmHg by more than 10%, during 98% of a 12 h experiment. This early work demonstrates feasibility of the investigated modelling and control synthesis approach, for the purpose of maintaining normotension in a porcine BD model. There remains a need to characterize individual variability, in order to ensure robust performance over the expected population.

  2. FLAIR lesion segmentation: Application in patients with brain tumors and acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artzi, Moran, E-mail: artzimy@gmail.com [The Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Aizenstein, Orna, E-mail: ornaaize@gmail.com [The Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Jonas-Kimchi, Tali, E-mail: talijk@tlvmc.gov.il [Radiology Department, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Myers, Vicki, E-mail: vicki_myers@hotmail.com [The Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Hallevi, Hen, E-mail: hen.hallevi@gmail.com [Neurology Department, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Ben Bashat, Dafna, E-mail: dafnab@tlvmc.gov.il [The Functional Brain Center, The Wohl Institute for Advanced Imaging, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2013-09-15

    Background: Lesion size in fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) images is an important clinical parameter for patient assessment and follow-up. Although manual delineation of lesion areas considered as ground truth, it is time-consuming, highly user-dependent and difficult to perform in areas of indistinct borders. In this study, an automatic methodology for FLAIR lesion segmentation is proposed, and its application in patients with brain tumors undergoing therapy; and in patients following stroke is demonstrated. Materials and methods: FLAIR lesion segmentation was performed in 57 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets obtained from 44 patients: 28 patients with primary brain tumors; 5 patients with recurrent-progressive glioblastoma (rGB) who were scanned longitudinally during anti-angiogenic therapy (18 MRI scans); and 11 patients following ischemic stroke. Results: FLAIR lesion segmentation was obtained in all patients. When compared to manual delineation, a high visual similarity was observed, with an absolute relative volume difference of 16.80% and 20.96% and a volumetric overlap error of 24.87% and 27.50% obtained for two raters: accepted values for automatic methods. Quantitative measurements of the segmented lesion volumes were in line with qualitative radiological assessment in four patients who received anti-anogiogenic drugs. In stroke patients the proposed methodology enabled identification of the ischemic lesion and differentiation from other FLAIR hyperintense areas, such as pre-existing disease. Conclusion: This study proposed a replicable methodology for FLAIR lesion detection and quantification and for discrimination between lesion of interest and pre-existing disease. Results from this study show the wide clinical applications of this methodology in research and clinical practice.

  3. Acute effects of modafinil on brain resting state networks in young healthy subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Esposito

    Full Text Available There is growing debate on the use of drugs that promote cognitive enhancement. Amphetamine-like drugs have been employed as cognitive enhancers, but they show important side effects and induce addiction. In this study, we investigated the use of modafinil which appears to have less side effects compared to other amphetamine-like drugs. We analyzed effects on cognitive performances and brain resting state network activity of 26 healthy young subjects.A single dose (100 mg of modafinil was administered in a double-blind and placebo-controlled study. Both groups were tested for neuropsychological performances with the Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices II set (APM before and three hours after administration of drug or placebo. Resting state functional magnetic resonance (rs-FMRI was also used, before and after three hours, to investigate changes in the activity of resting state brain networks. Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI was employed to evaluate differences in structural connectivity between the two groups. Protocol ID: Modrest_2011; NCT01684306; http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01684306.Results indicate that a single dose of modafinil improves cognitive performance as assessed by APM. Rs-fMRI showed that the drug produces a statistically significant increased activation of Frontal Parietal Control (FPC; p<0.04 and Dorsal Attention (DAN; p<0.04 networks. No modifications in structural connectivity were observed.Overall, our findings support the notion that modafinil has cognitive enhancing properties and provide functional connectivity data to support these effects.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01684306 http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01684306.

  4. FLAIR lesion segmentation: application in patients with brain tumors and acute ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artzi, Moran; Aizenstein, Orna; Jonas-Kimchi, Tali; Myers, Vicki; Hallevi, Hen; Ben Bashat, Dafna

    2013-09-01

    Lesion size in fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) images is an important clinical parameter for patient assessment and follow-up. Although manual delineation of lesion areas considered as ground truth, it is time-consuming, highly user-dependent and difficult to perform in areas of indistinct borders. In this study, an automatic methodology for FLAIR lesion segmentation is proposed, and its application in patients with brain tumors undergoing therapy; and in patients following stroke is demonstrated. FLAIR lesion segmentation was performed in 57 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data sets obtained from 44 patients: 28 patients with primary brain tumors; 5 patients with recurrent-progressive glioblastoma (rGB) who were scanned longitudinally during anti-angiogenic therapy (18 MRI scans); and 11 patients following ischemic stroke. FLAIR lesion segmentation was obtained in all patients. When compared to manual delineation, a high visual similarity was observed, with an absolute relative volume difference of 16.80% and 20.96% and a volumetric overlap error of 24.87% and 27.50% obtained for two raters: accepted values for automatic methods. Quantitative measurements of the segmented lesion volumes were in line with qualitative radiological assessment in four patients who received anti-anogiogenic drugs. In stroke patients the proposed methodology enabled identification of the ischemic lesion and differentiation from other FLAIR hyperintense areas, such as pre-existing disease. This study proposed a replicable methodology for FLAIR lesion detection and quantification and for discrimination between lesion of interest and pre-existing disease. Results from this study show the wide clinical applications of this methodology in research and clinical practice. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  5. Cerebral hemodynamic changes of mild traumatic brain injury at the acute stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardik Doshi

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI is a significant public health care burden in the United States. However, we lack a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology following mTBI and its relation to symptoms and recovery. With advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we can investigate brain perfusion and oxygenation in regions known to be implicated in symptoms, including cortical gray matter and subcortical structures. In this study, we assessed 14 mTBI patients and 18 controls with susceptibility weighted imaging and mapping (SWIM for blood oxygenation quantification. In addition to SWIM, 7 patients and 12 controls had cerebral perfusion measured with arterial spin labeling (ASL. We found increases in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF in the left striatum, and in frontal and occipital lobes in patients as compared to controls (p = 0.01, 0.03, 0.03 respectively. We also found decreases in venous susceptibility, indicating increases in venous oxygenation, in the left thalamostriate vein and right basal vein of Rosenthal (p = 0.04 in both. mTBI patients had significantly lower delayed recall scores on the standardized assessment of concussion, but neither susceptibility nor CBF measures were found to correlate with symptoms as assessed by neuropsychological testing. The increased CBF combined with increased venous oxygenation suggests an increase in cerebral blood flow that exceeds the oxygen demand of the tissue, in contrast to the regional hypoxia seen in more severe TBI. This may represent a neuroprotective response following mTBI, which warrants further investigation.

  6. Behavioral, neurochemical and molecular changes after acute deep brain stimulation of the infralimbic prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Sánchez, Laura; Linge, Raquel; Campa, Leticia; Valdizán, Elsa M; Pazos, Ángel; Díaz, Álvaro; Adell, Albert

    2016-09-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a treatment that has shown some efficacy in treatment-resistant depression. In particular, DBS of the subcallosal cingulate gyrus (Brodmann's area 25, Cg25) has been successfully applied to treat refractory depression. In the rat, we have demonstrated that DBS applied to infralimbic (IL) cortex elevates the levels of glutamate and monoamines in the prefrontal cortex, and requires the stimulation of cortical α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) glutamate receptors for its antidepressant-like effects. However, the molecular targets of IL DBS are not fully known. To gain insight into these pathways, we have investigated whether IL DBS is able to reverse the behavioral, biochemical and molecular changes exhibited by the olfactory bulbectomized (OBX) rat. Our results revealed that 1 h IL DBS diminished hyperlocomotion, hyperemotionality and anhedonia, and increased social interaction shown by the OBX rats. Further, IL DBS increased prefrontal efflux of glutamate and serotonin in both sham-operated and OBX rats. With regard to molecular targets, IL DBS increases the synthesis of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the GluA1 AMPA receptor subunit, and stimulates the Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) as well as the AMPA receptor/c-AMP response element binding (CREB) pathways. Temsirolimus, a known in vivo mTOR blocker, suppressed the antidepressant-like effect of IL DBS in naïve rats in the forced swim test, thus demonstrating for the first time that mTOR signaling is required for the antidepressant-like effects of IL DBS, which is in line with the antidepressant response of other rapid-acting antidepressant drugs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Usefulness of {sup 99m}Tc-ECD brain SPECT in acute onset pediatric CNS diseases. In comparison with CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashimoto, Teisuke; Chikatsu, Hiroko; Nishiyama, Hiromune; Endo, Hiroko; Kono, Tatsuo; Iimura, Fumitoshi; Kuwashima, Shigeko; Saiki, Natoru; Fujioka, Mutsuhisa [Dokkyo Univ., Mibu, Tochigi (Japan). School of Medicine

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the usefulness of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) measured by {sup 99m}Tc-L, L-ethyl cysteinate dimer (ECD) brain SPECT in the acute onset type of pediatric central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Thirteen children (7 girls, 6 boys, 4 month-12 years of age) who were diagnosed with 9 cases of viral encephalitis, two cases of febrile convulsion and one each of migraine and metabolic disorder underwent {sup 99m}Tc-ECD brain SPECT, CT and/or MRI within one week interval. The incidence of abnormal findings in the 13 patients was 96.4% (30/31) on {sup 99m}Tc-ECD brain SPECT, 17.6% (3/17) on CT and 63.6% (14/22) on MRI. The positive detection rate of {sup 99m}Tc-ECD brain SPECT was statistically (P<0.01 by a {chi}{sup 2} and/or Fisher's exact probability test) higher than those of CT and MRI. And the changes in rCBF were demonstrated. {sup 99m}Tc-ECD brain SPECT is a useful examination for the diagnosis and follow up management in patients with the acute onset type of pediatric CNS diseases. (author)

  8. Is the contribution of alcohol to fatal traumatic brain injuries being underestimated in the acute hospital setting?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, O

    2011-04-05

    Alcohol consumption in Ireland has nearly doubled during the period 1989-2001. To evaluate the relationship of alcohol to fatal head injuries in the acute hospital setting we created a data base of all fatal traumatic brain injuries in the Department of Neuropathology at Beaumont Hospital over a ten year period (1997-2006 inclusive). 498 cases were identified (351 males: 147 females). Fatalities were highest in males aged 19-25 years (N=101) and 51-70 years (N=109). Falls (N=210) and road traffic accidents (N=183) were the commonest modes of presentation. 36\\/210 (17%) falls had positive blood alcohol testing, 9\\/210 (4.3%) had documentation of alcohol in notes but no testing, 35\\/210 (16.7%) tested negative for alcohol and 130\\/210 (61.9%) were not tested. The RTA group (N=183) comprised drivers (n=79), passengers (n=47) and pedestrians (n=57). 65\\/79 (82.2%) of drivers were males aged 19-25 years. Blood alcohol was only available in 27\\/79 (34.1%) drivers and was positive in 13\\/27 (48.1%). 14\\/75 (18.7%) pedestrians were tested for alcohol, 4\\/14 (28.6%) were positive. Overall 142\\/183 (77.6%) of the RTA group were not tested. The contribution of alcohol to fatal traumatic brain injuries is probably being underestimated due to omission of blood alcohol concentration testing on admission to hospital. Absence of national guidelines on blood alcohol testing in the emergency department compounds the problem.

  9. Neurosurgical Treatment Variation of Traumatic Brain Injury: Evaluation of Acute Subdural Hematoma Management in Belgium and The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Essen, Thomas A; de Ruiter, Godard C W; Kho, Kuan H; Peul, Wilco C

    2017-02-15

    Several recent global traumatic brain injury (TBI) initiatives rely on practice variation in diagnostic and treatment methods to answer effectiveness questions. One of these scientific dilemmas, the surgical management of the traumatic acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) might be variable among countries, among centers within countries, and even among neurosurgeons within a center, and hence be amenable for a comparative effectiveness study. The aim of our questionnaire, therefore, was to explore variations in treatment for ASDH among neurosurgeons in similar centers in a densely populated geographical area. An online questionnaire, involving treatment decisions on six case vignettes of ASDH, was sent to 93 neurosurgeons in The Netherlands and Belgium. Clinical and radiological variables differed per case. Sixty neurosurgeons filled out the questionnaire (response rate 65%). For case vignettes with severe TBI and an ASDH, there was a modest variation in the decision to evacuate the hematoma and a large variation in the decision to combine the evacuation with a decompressive craniectomy. The main reasons for operating were "neurological condition" and "mass effect." For ASDH and mild/moderate TBI, there was large variation in the decision of whether to operate or not, whereas "hematoma size" was the predominant motivation for surgery. Significant inter-center variation for the decision to evacuate the hematoma was observed (p = 0.01). Most pronounced was that 1 out of 7 (14%) neurosurgeons in one region chose a surgical strategy compared with 9 out of 10 (90%) in another region for the same scenario. In conclusion, variation exists in the neurosurgical management of TBI within an otherwise homogeneous setting. This variation supports the methodology of the international Collaborative European NeuroTrauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury (CENTER-TBI) initiative, and shaped the Dutch Neurotraumatology Quality Registry (Net-QuRe) initiative.

  10. Acute stress evokes sexually dimorphic, stressor-specific patterns of neural activation across multiple limbic brain regions in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, Ankit; Chaudhari, Karina; Vaidya, Vidita A

    2018-03-01

    Stress enhances the risk for psychiatric disorders such as anxiety and depression. Stress responses vary across sex and may underlie the heightened vulnerability to psychopathology in females. Here, we examined the influence of acute immobilization stress (AIS) and a two-day short-term forced swim stress (FS) on neural activation in multiple cortical and subcortical brain regions, implicated as targets of stress and in the regulation of neuroendocrine stress responses, in male and female rats using Fos as a neural activity marker. AIS evoked a sex-dependent pattern of neural activation within the cingulate and infralimbic subdivisions of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC), lateral septum (LS), habenula, and hippocampal subfields. The degree of neural activation in the mPFC, LS, and habenula was higher in males. Female rats exhibited reduced Fos positive cell numbers in the dentate gyrus hippocampal subfield, an effect not observed in males. We addressed whether the sexually dimorphic neural activation pattern noted following AIS was also observed with the short-term stress of FS. In the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus and the amygdala, FS similar to AIS resulted in robust increases in neural activation in both sexes. The pattern of neural activation evoked by FS was distinct across sexes, with a heightened neural activation noted in the prelimbic mPFC subdivision and hippocampal subfields in females and differed from the pattern noted with AIS. This indicates that the sex differences in neural activation patterns observed within stress-responsive brain regions are dependent on the nature of stressor experience.

  11. Age and Diet Affect Genetically Separable Secondary Injuries that Cause Acute Mortality Following Traumatic Brain Injury in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeccah J. Katzenberger

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Outcomes of traumatic brain injury (TBI vary because of differences in primary and secondary injuries. Primary injuries occur at the time of a traumatic event, whereas secondary injuries occur later as a result of cellular and molecular events activated in the brain and other tissues by primary injuries. We used a Drosophila melanogaster TBI model to investigate secondary injuries that cause acute mortality. By analyzing mortality percentage within 24 hr of primary injuries, we previously found that age at the time of primary injuries and diet afterward affect the severity of secondary injuries. Here, we show that secondary injuries peaked in activity 1–8 hr after primary injuries. Additionally, we demonstrate that age and diet activated distinct secondary injuries in a genotype-specific manner, and that concurrent activation of age- and diet-regulated secondary injuries synergistically increased mortality. To identify genes involved in secondary injuries that cause mortality, we compared genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of uninjured and injured flies under age and diet conditions that had different mortalities. During the peak period of secondary injuries, innate immune response genes were the predominant class of genes that changed expression. Furthermore, age and diet affected the magnitude of the change in expression of some innate immune response genes, suggesting roles for these genes in inhibiting secondary injuries that cause mortality. Our results indicate that the complexity of TBI outcomes is due in part to distinct, genetically controlled, age- and diet-regulated mechanisms that promote secondary injuries and that involve a subset of innate immune response genes.

  12. Age and Diet Affect Genetically Separable Secondary Injuries that Cause Acute Mortality Following Traumatic Brain Injury in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenberger, Rebeccah J; Ganetzky, Barry; Wassarman, David A

    2016-12-07

    Outcomes of traumatic brain injury (TBI) vary because of differences in primary and secondary injuries. Primary injuries occur at the time of a traumatic event, whereas secondary injuries occur later as a result of cellular and molecular events activated in the brain and other tissues by primary injuries. We used a Drosophila melanogaster TBI model to investigate secondary injuries that cause acute mortality. By analyzing mortality percentage within 24 hr of primary injuries, we previously found that age at the time of primary injuries and diet afterward affect the severity of secondary injuries. Here, we show that secondary injuries peaked in activity 1-8 hr after primary injuries. Additionally, we demonstrate that age and diet activated distinct secondary injuries in a genotype-specific manner, and that concurrent activation of age- and diet-regulated secondary injuries synergistically increased mortality. To identify genes involved in secondary injuries that cause mortality, we compared genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of uninjured and injured flies under age and diet conditions that had different mortalities. During the peak period of secondary injuries, innate immune response genes were the predominant class of genes that changed expression. Furthermore, age and diet affected the magnitude of the change in expression of some innate immune response genes, suggesting roles for these genes in inhibiting secondary injuries that cause mortality. Our results indicate that the complexity of TBI outcomes is due in part to distinct, genetically controlled, age- and diet-regulated mechanisms that promote secondary injuries and that involve a subset of innate immune response genes. Copyright © 2016 Katzenberger et al.

  13. The Effect of Paracetamol on Core Body Temperature in Acute Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomised, Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Manoj K; Taylor, Colman; Billot, Laurent; Bompoint, Severine; Gowardman, John; Roberts, Jason A; Lipman, Jeffery; Myburgh, John

    2015-01-01

    Strategies to prevent pyrexia in patients with acute neurological injury may reduce secondary neuronal damage. The aim of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of the routine administration of 6 grams/day of intravenous paracetamol in reducing body temperature following severe traumatic brain injury, compared to placebo. A multicentre, randomised, blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in adult patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Patients were randomised to receive an intravenous infusion of either 1g of paracetamol or 0.9% sodium chloride (saline) every 4 hours for 72 hours. The primary outcome was the mean difference in core temperature during the study intervention period. Forty-one patients were included in this study: 21 were allocated to paracetamol and 20 to saline. The median (interquartile range) number of doses of study drug was 18 (17-18) in the paracetamol group and 18 (16-18) in the saline group (P = 0.85). From randomisation until 4 hours after the last dose of study treatment, there were 2798 temperature measurements (median 73 [67-76] per patient). The mean ± standard deviation temperature was 37.4±0.5°C in the paracetamol group and 37.7±0.4°C in the saline group (absolute difference -0.3°C; 95% confidence interval -0.6 to 0.0; P = 0.09). There were no significant differences in the use of physical cooling, or episodes of hypotension or hepatic abnormalities, between the two groups. The routine administration of 6g/day of intravenous paracetamol did not significantly reduce core body temperature in patients with TBI. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12609000444280.

  14. The Effect of Paracetamol on Core Body Temperature in Acute Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomised, Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manoj K Saxena

    Full Text Available Strategies to prevent pyrexia in patients with acute neurological injury may reduce secondary neuronal damage. The aim of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of the routine administration of 6 grams/day of intravenous paracetamol in reducing body temperature following severe traumatic brain injury, compared to placebo.A multicentre, randomised, blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in adult patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI. Patients were randomised to receive an intravenous infusion of either 1g of paracetamol or 0.9% sodium chloride (saline every 4 hours for 72 hours. The primary outcome was the mean difference in core temperature during the study intervention period.Forty-one patients were included in this study: 21 were allocated to paracetamol and 20 to saline. The median (interquartile range number of doses of study drug was 18 (17-18 in the paracetamol group and 18 (16-18 in the saline group (P = 0.85. From randomisation until 4 hours after the last dose of study treatment, there were 2798 temperature measurements (median 73 [67-76] per patient. The mean ± standard deviation temperature was 37.4±0.5°C in the paracetamol group and 37.7±0.4°C in the saline group (absolute difference -0.3°C; 95% confidence interval -0.6 to 0.0; P = 0.09. There were no significant differences in the use of physical cooling, or episodes of hypotension or hepatic abnormalities, between the two groups.The routine administration of 6g/day of intravenous paracetamol did not significantly reduce core body temperature in patients with TBI.Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12609000444280.

  15. Influence of perinatal trans fat on behavioral responses and brain oxidative status of adolescent rats acutely exposed to stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pase, C S; Roversi, Kr; Trevizol, F; Roversi, K; Kuhn, F T; Schuster, A J; Vey, L T; Dias, V T; Barcelos, R C S; Piccolo, J; Emanuelli, T; Bürger, M E

    2013-09-05

    Because consumption of processed foods has increased in the last decades and so far its potential influence on emotionality and susceptibility to stress is unknown, we studied the influence of different fatty acids (FA) on behavioral and biochemical parameters after acute restrain stress (AS) exposure. Two sequential generations of female rats were supplemented with soybean oil (control group; C-SO), fish oil (FO) and hydrogenated vegetable fat (HVF) from pregnancy and during lactation. At 41days of age, half the animals of each supplemented group were exposed to AS and observed in open field and elevated plus maze task, followed by euthanasia for biochemical assessments. The HVF-supplemented group showed higher anxiety-like symptoms per se, while the C-SO and FO groups did not show these behaviors. Among groups exposed to AS, HVF showed locomotor restlessness in the open field, while both C-SO and HVF groups showed anxiety-like symptoms in the elevated plus maze, but this was not observed in the FO group. Biochemical evaluations showed higher lipoperoxidation levels and lower cell viability in cortex in the HVF group. In addition, HVF-treated rats showed reduced catalase activity in striatum and hippocampus, as well as increased generation of reactive species in striatum, while FO was associated with increased cell viability in the hippocampus. Among groups exposed to AS, HVF increased reactive species generation in the brain, decreased cell viability in the cortex and striatum, and decreased catalase activity in the striatum and hippocampus. Taken together, our findings show that the type of FA provided during development and growth over two generations is able to modify the brain oxidative status, which was particularly adversely affected by trans fat. In addition, the harmful influence of chronic consumption of trans fats as observed in this study can enhance emotionality and anxiety parameters resulting from stressful situations of everyday life, which can

  16. Derivation of injury-responsive dendritic cells for acute brain targeting and therapeutic protein delivery in the stroke-injured rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C Manley

    Full Text Available Research with experimental stroke models has identified a wide range of therapeutic proteins that can prevent the brain damage caused by this form of acute neurological injury. Despite this, we do not yet have safe and effective ways to deliver therapeutic proteins to the injured brain, and this remains a major obstacle for clinical translation. Current targeted strategies typically involve invasive neurosurgery, whereas systemic approaches produce the undesirable outcome of non-specific protein delivery to the entire brain, rather than solely to the injury site. As a potential way to address this, we developed a protein delivery system modeled after the endogenous immune cell response to brain injury. Using ex-vivo-engineered dendritic cells (DCs, we find that these cells can transiently home to brain injury in a rat model of stroke with both temporal and spatial selectivity. We present a standardized method to derive injury-responsive DCs from bone marrow and show that injury targeting is dependent on culture conditions that maintain an immature DC phenotype. Further, we find evidence that when loaded with therapeutic cargo, cultured DCs can suppress initial neuron death caused by an ischemic injury. These results demonstrate a non-invasive method to target ischemic brain injury and may ultimately provide a way to selectively deliver therapeutic compounds to the injured brain.

  17. Effects of acute aerobic exercise on a task-switching protocol and brain-derived neurotrophic factor concentrations in young adults with different levels of cardiorespiratory fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chia-Liang; Pan, Chien-Yu; Chen, Fu-Chen; Wang, Chun-Hao; Chou, Feng-Ying

    2016-07-01

    What is the central question of this study? Neurocognitive functions can be enhanced by acute aerobic exercise, which could be associated with changes in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentrations. We aimed to explore acute exercise-induced changes in BDNF concentrations, neuropsychological and neurophysiological performances when individuals with different levels of cardiorespiratory fitness performed a cognitive task. What is the main finding and its importance? Only young adults with higher cardiorespiratory fitness could attain switching cost and neurophysiological benefits via acute aerobic exercise. The mechanisms might be fitness dependent. Although acute aerobic exercise could enhance serum BDNF concentrations, changes in peripheral BDNF concentrations could not be the potential factor involved in the beneficial effects on neurocognitive performance. This study investigated the effects of acute aerobic exercise on neuropsychological and neurophysiological performances in young adults with different cardiorespiratory fitness levels when performing a task-switching protocol and explored the potential associations between acute aerobic exercise-induced changes in serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) concentrations and various neurocognitive outcomes. Sixty young adults were categorized into one control group (i.e. non-exercise-intervention; n = 20) and two exercise-intervention (EI) groups [i.e. higher (EIH , n = 20) and lower (EIL , n = 20) cardiorespiratory fitness] according to their maximal oxygen consumption. At baseline and after either an acute bout of 30 min of moderate-intensity aerobic exercise or a control period, the neuropsychological and neurophysiological performances and serum BDNF concentrations were measured when the participants performed a task-switching protocol involving executive control and greater demands on working memory. The results revealed that although acute aerobic exercise decreased reaction

  18. CENTRAL ASSESSMENT OF COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY BRAIN SCANS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lesley Ann Cala

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Development of multislice CT (MSCT scanners since 1998 has resulted in submillimetre thick slices being able to be acquired, without increasing the radiation dose to the patient. Although the incident x-ray beam is widened in the slice thickness direction (Z-direction, the emergent x-rays fall upon multiple rows of small detectors. This means data can be collected simultaneously for more than one slice per rotation of the x-ray tube. For example, the dose received by the patient will be the same for four thin slices of 2.5 mm, as for one slice of 10 mm thickness. A 64-slice MSCT can create 0.625 mm thick slices. This leads to high diagnostic value in the detection of small abnormalities in stroke patients and in the reconstruction of data from CT angiography (CTA of the brain.

  19. Chronic and acute ammonia toxicity in mudskippers, Periophthalmodon schlosseri and Boleophthalmus boddaerti: brain ammonia and glutamine contents, and effects of methionine sulfoximine and MK801.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Yuen K; Leong, Mavis W F; Sim, Mei Y; Goh, Gillian S; Wong, Wai P; Chew, Shit F

    2005-05-01

    The objective of this study was to elucidate if chronic and acute ammonia intoxication in mudskippers, Periophthalmodon schlosseri and Boleophthalmus boddaerti, were associated with high levels of ammonia and/or glutamine in their brains, and if acute ammonia intoxication could be prevented by the administration of methionine sulfoximine [MSO; an inhibitor of glutamine synthetase (GS)] or MK801 [an antagonist of N-methyl D-aspartate type glutamate (NMDA) receptors]. For P. schlosseri and B. boddaerti exposed to sublethal concentrations (100 and 8 mmol l(-1) NH4Cl, respectively, at pH 7.0) of environmental ammonia for 4 days, brain ammonia contents increased drastically during the first 24 h, and they reached 18 and 14.5 micromol g(-1), respectively, at hour 96. Simultaneously, there were increases in brain glutamine contents, but brain glutamate contents were unchanged. Because glutamine accumulated to exceptionally high levels in brains of P. schlosseri (29.8 micromol g(-1)) and B. boddaerti (12.1 micromol g(-1)) without causing death, it can be concluded that these two mudskippers could ameliorate those problems associated with glutamine synthesis and accumulation as observed in patients suffering from hyperammonemia. P. schlosseri and B. boddaerti could tolerate high doses of ammonium acetate (CH3COONH4) injected into their peritoneal cavities, with 24 h LC50 of 15.6 and 12.3 micromol g(-1) fish, respectively. After the injection with a sublethal dose of CH3COONH4 (8 micromol g(-1) fish), there were significant increases in ammonia (5.11 and 8.36 micromol g(-1), respectively) and glutamine (4.22 and 3.54 micromol g(-1), respectively) levels in their brains at hour 0.5, but these levels returned to normal at hour 24. By contrast, for P. schlosseri and B. boddaerti that succumbed within 15-50 min to a dose of CH3COONH4 (15 and 12 micromol g(-1) fish, respectively) close to the LC50 values, the ammonia contents in the brains reached much higher levels (12.8 and 14

  20. Three-dimensional electrode array for brain slice culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vazquez Rodriguez, Patricia

    , eftersom dyrkninger af hjerneskiver in vitro beholder funktionaliteten af netværkerne i den levende hjerne. Elektroder var designet og fabrikeret med det formal at optimere MEA præstationen ved stimulering af og måling fra hjerneskiver in vitro. Meget af arbejdet beskrevet her beskæftiger sig med studiet...

  1. Preliminary Study of Realistic Blast Impact on Cultured Brain Slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    separation of hippocampi in ice-cold holding buffer containing 124-mM sodium chloride (NaCl), 3-mM potassium chloride (KCl), 2-mM calcium chloride...CaCl2), 4-mM magnesium sulfate (MgSO4), 1.25-mM monopotassium phosphate (KH2PO4), 26-mM sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3), 10-mM D-glucose, and 2-mM...ice-cold buffer containing 0.32-M sucrose , 5-mM HEPES (pH 7.5), 1-mM ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), 1-mM ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid

  2. Acute effects of nimodipine on cerebral vasculature and brain metabolism in high grade subarachnoid hemorrhage patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, H Alex; Ko, Sang-Bae; Chen, Huahiou; Gilmore, Emily; Carpenter, Amanda M; Lee, Danielle; Claassen, Jan; Mayer, Stephan A; Schmidt, J Michael; Lee, Kiwon; Connelly, E Sander; Paik, Myunghee; Badjatia, Neeraj

    2012-06-01

    Nimodipine is the only medication shown to improve outcomes after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Preliminary theories regarding the mechanism by which it prevents vasospasm have been challenged. The acute physiologic and metabolic effects of oral Nimodipine have not been examined in patients with poor-grade SAH. This is an observational study performed in 16 poor-grade SAH patients undergoing multimodality monitoring who received oral Nimodipine as part of routine clinical care. A total of 663 doses of Nimodipine were observed. Changes in physiologic measurements including MAP, CPP, ICP, P(bt)O(2), and CBF were examined. Administration of oral Nimodipine was associated with a 1.33 mmHg decrease in MAP (P Nimodipine was associated with MAP decreases, P(bt)O(2) (1.03 mmHg; P Nimodipine was associated with a decrease in MAP and CPP. When Nimodipine administration was associated with a decrease in MAP, there were concomitant drops in P(bt)O(2) and CBF. These findings suggest that MAP support after oral Nimodipine may be important to maintain adequate CBF in patients with poor-grade subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  3. Acute human brain responses to intracortical microelectrode arrays: Challenges and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo eFernandez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The emerging field of neuroprosthetics is focused on the development of new therapeutic interventions that will be able to restore some lost neural function by selective electrical stimulation or by harnessing activity recorded from populations of neurons. As more and more patients benefit from these approaches, the interest in neural interfaces has grown significantly and a new generation of penetrating microelectrode arrays are providing unprecedented access to the neurons of the CNS. These microelectrodes have active tip dimensions that are similar in size to neurons and because they penetrate the nervous system, they provide selective access to these cells (within a few microns. However, the very long-term viability of chronically implanted microelectrodes and the capability of recording the same spiking activity over long time periods still remain to be established and confirmed in human studies. Here we review the main responses to acute implantation of microelectrode arrays, and emphasize that it will become essential to control the neural tissue damage induced by these intracortical microelectrodes in order to achieve the high clinical potentials accompanying this technology.

  4. Development and evaluation of a machine for slicing African oil ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A manually operated machine for slicing African oil bean seeds was designed and fabricated as replacement of the traditional hand slicing technique, and to address the drudgery, time consuming and injuries associated with hand slicing. Geometric characteristics and physical dimensions of the beans were used as ...

  5. Development of a bread slicing machine from locally sourced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents the development of a bread slicing machine which is a mechanical device that is used for slicing bread instead of the crude cumbersome and unhygienic method of manual slicing of bread. In an attempt to facilitate the final processing of bread which is a common daily food requirement of most Nigerians ...

  6. Slice through an LHC focusing magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Slice through an LHC superconducting quadrupole (focusing) magnet. The slice includes a cut through the magnet wiring (niobium titanium), the beampipe and the steel magnet yokes. Particle beams in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) have the same energy as a high-speed train, squeezed ready for collision into a space narrower than a human hair. Huge forces are needed to control them. Dipole magnets (2 poles) are used to bend the paths of the protons around the 27 km ring. Quadrupole magnets (4 poles) focus the proton beams and squeeze them so that more particles collide when the beams’ paths cross. Bringing beams into collision requires a precision comparable to making two knitting needles collide, launched from either side of the Atlantic Ocean.

  7. Protection of Brain Injury by Amniotic Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Secreted Metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pischiutta, Francesca; Brunelli, Laura; Romele, Pietro; Silini, Antonietta; Sammali, Eliana; Paracchini, Lara; Marchini, Sergio; Talamini, Laura; Bigini, Paolo; Boncoraglio, Giorgio B; Pastorelli, Roberta; De Simoni, Maria-Grazia; Parolini, Ornella; Zanier, Elisa R

    2016-11-01

    To define the features of human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cell secretome and its protective properties in experimental models of acute brain injury. Prospective experimental study. Laboratory research. C57Bl/6 mice. Mice subjected to sham or traumatic brain injury by controlled cortical impact received human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells or phosphate-buffered saline infused intracerebroventricularly or intravenously 24 hours after injury. Organotypic cortical brain slices exposed to ischemic injury by oxygen-glucose deprivation were treated with human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells or with their secretome (conditioned medium) in a transwell system. Traumatic brain injured mice receiving human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells intravenously or intracerebroventricularly showed early and lasting functional and anatomical brain protection. cortical slices injured by oxigen-glucose deprivation and treated with human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells or conditioned medium showed comparable protective effects (neuronal rescue, promotion of M2 microglia polarization, induction of trophic factors) indicating that the exposure of human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cells to the injured tissue is not necessary for the release of bioactive factors. Using sequential size-exclusion and gel-filtration chromatography, we identified a conditioned medium subfraction, which specifically displays these highly protective properties and we found that this fraction was rich in bioactive molecules with molecular weight smaller than 700 Da. Quantitative RNA analysis and mass spectrometry-based peptidomics showed that the active factors are not proteins or RNAs. The metabolomic profiling of six metabolic classes identified a list of molecules whose abundance was selectively elevated in the active conditioned medium fraction. Human amniotic mesenchymal stromal cell-secreted factors protect the brain after acute injury. Importantly, a fraction rich in metabolites, and

  8. MR spectroscopy-based brain metabolite profiling in propionic acidaemia: metabolic changes in the basal ganglia during acute decompensation and effect of liver transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKiernan Patrick J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Propionic acidaemia (PA results from deficiency of Propionyl CoA carboxylase, the commonest form presenting in the neonatal period. Despite best current management, PA is associated with severe neurological sequelae, in particular movement disorders resulting from basal ganglia infarction, although the pathogenesis remains poorly understood. The role of liver transplantation remains controversial but may confer some neuro-protection. The present study utilises quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS to investigate brain metabolite alterations in propionic acidaemia during metabolic stability and acute encephalopathic episodes. Methods Quantitative MRS was used to evaluate brain metabolites in eight children with neonatal onset propionic acidaemia, with six elective studies acquired during metabolic stability and five studies during acute encephalopathic episodes. MRS studies were acquired concurrently with clinically indicated MR imaging studies at 1.5 Tesla. LCModel software was used to provide metabolite quantification. Comparison was made with a dataset of MRS metabolite concentrations from a cohort of children with normal appearing MR imaging. Results MRI findings confirm the vulnerability of basal ganglia to infarction during acute encephalopathy. We identified statistically significant decreases in basal ganglia glutamate+glutamine and N-Acetylaspartate, and increase in lactate, during encephalopathic episodes. In white matter lactate was significantly elevated but other metabolites not significantly altered. Metabolite data from two children who had received liver transplantation were not significantly different from the comparator group. Conclusions The metabolite alterations seen in propionic acidaemia in the basal ganglia during acute encephalopathy reflect loss of viable neurons, and a switch to anaerobic respiration. The decrease in glutamine + glutamate supports the hypothesis that they are consumed to

  9. Acute treatment with pentobarbital alters the kinetics of in vivo receptor binding in the mouse brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakiyama, Yojiro [Division of Clinical Research, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chibashi 263-8555 (Japan)]. E-mail: yojiro.sakiyama@pfizer.com; Saito, Masao [Department of Medical Science, Institute of Medical Electronics, University of Tokyo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Inoue, Osamu [Department of Medical Physics, School of Allied Health Science, Faculty of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2006-05-15

    The effect of pentobarbital, a sedative-hypnotic barbiturate, on the in vivo binding of benzodiazepine receptors in the mouse brain was investigated. Dose-related changes in the apparent binding of [{sup 3}H]Ro15-1788 ([{sup 3}H]flumazenil) in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum and pons-medulla were observed by pretreatment with pentobarbital. For quantification of the kinetic properties of the in vivo binding of [{sup 3}H]Ro15-1788, time courses of radioactivity following its injection were examined, and kinetic analysis was performed using the compartment model. The time courses of radioactivity following injection of [{sup 3}H]Ro15-1788 with 3 mg/kg Ro15-1788 were used as input function. In all regions studied, rate constants between input compartment and specific binding compartment were significantly decreased by pentobarbital. However, no significant alterations in the binding potential (BP=K {sub 3}/K {sub 4}) of benzodiazepine receptors by pentobarbital were observed in any of the regions. A saturation experiment indicated that the decrease in the input rate constant (K {sub 3}), which includes both the association rate constant (k {sub on}) and the number of binding sites available (B {sub max}), was mainly due to decrease in k {sub on}. These results suggest that apparent increases in binding at 20 min after tracer injection were due to the decrease in the association and dissociation rates of binding in vivo.

  10. Acute Lesioning and Rapid Repair of Hypothalamic Neurons outside the Blood-Brain Barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernie Yulyaningsih

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurons expressing agouti-related protein (AgRP are essential for feeding. The majority of these neurons are located outside the blood-brain barrier (BBB, allowing them to directly sense circulating metabolic factors. Here, we show that, in adult mice, AgRP neurons outside the BBB (AgRPOBBB were rapidly ablated by peripheral administration of monosodium glutamate (MSG, whereas AgRP neurons inside the BBB and most proopiomelanocortin (POMC neurons were spared. MSG treatment induced proliferation of tanycytes, the putative hypothalamic neural progenitor cells, but the newly proliferated tanycytes did not become neurons. Intriguingly, AgRPOBBB neuronal number increased within a week after MSG treatment, and newly emerging AgRP neurons were derived from post-mitotic cells, including some from the Pomc-expressing cell lineage. Our study reveals that the lack of protection by the BBB renders AgRPOBBB vulnerable to lesioning by circulating toxins but that the rapid re-emergence of AgRPOBBB is part of a reparative process to maintain energy balance.

  11. Noninvasive screening for intracranial hypertension in children with acute, severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Nicole F; Maa, Tensing; Reuter-Rice, Karin

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between transcranial Doppler (TCD) derived pulsatility index (PI), end diastolic flow velocity (Vd), and intracranial pressure (ICP). The subjects in this study were 36 children admitted after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) (postresuscitation Glasgow Coma Scale ≤ 8) undergoing invasive ICP monitoring. Subjects underwent a total of 148 TCD studies. TCD measurements of systolic flow velocity (Vs), Vd, and mean flow velocity (Vm) were performed on the middle cerebral artery (MCA) ipsilateral to the ICP monitor. The PI was calculated by the TCD software (Vs-Vd/Vm). ICP registrations were made in parallel with TCD measurements. Using a PI threshold of 1.3, postinjury Day 0-1 PI had 100% sensitivity and 82% specificity at predicting an ICP ≥ 20 mm Hg (n = 8). During this time frame, a moderately strong relationship was observed between the MCA PI and actual ICP (r = 0.611, p = 0.01). When using a threshold of 1.3 has good sensitivity and specificity at predicting an ICP ≥ 20 mm Hg. In those children with TBI who initially do not meet clear criteria for invasive ICP monitoring but who are at risk for development of intracranial hypertension, TCD may be used as a noninvasive tool to screen for the development of elevated ICP in the first 24 hours following injury.

  12. Service utilisation in a public post-acute rehabilitation unit following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ta'eed, Gillian; Skilbeck, Clive; Slatyer, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes disability in a proportion of survivors across the spectrum of injury severity. Previous research suggests physical changes are the primary focus of rehabilitation, although cognitive, emotional and behavioural difficulties cause greater concern in the long-term. There is little information about services accessed by those with mild injuries, who often have no physical disabilities. This study investigated factors determining service utilisation in a population-based sample which included 52% mild injuries (PTA ≤ 24 hours). Chi-squares and t-tests were used to examine the impact of demographic, clinical, psychological and physical variables on referral of 175 TBI patients to clinical disciplines in a public, community-based rehabilitation facility in Hobart, Tasmania. Increased service intensity (total disciplines referred to), was associated with greater injury severity (p = .006) and previous TBI (p = .041). Less traditional rehabilitation services (nursing, psychology) received more referrals than traditional disciplines (physiotherapy, occupational therapy, social work). Referral to physiotherapy and occupational therapy was associated with greater injury severity, functional dependence, hospitalisation and older age. Referral to nursing, psychology and social work was associated with more post-concussion symptoms, younger age, anxiety, depression and assault-related injury. The large number of referrals to psychology strengthens the case for including it as a core rehabilitation discipline.

  13. 3D movement correction of CT brain perfusion image data of patients with acute ischemic stroke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fahmi, Fahmi [Academic Medical Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University of Sumatera Utara, Department of Electrical Engineering, Medan (Indonesia); Marquering, Henk A.; Streekstra, Geert J. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Borst, Jordi; Beenen, Ludo F.M.; Majoie, Charles B.L. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Niesten, Joris M.; Velthuis, Birgitta K. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology, Utrecht (Netherlands); VanBavel, Ed [Academic Medical Center, Department of Biomedical Engineering and Physics, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Collaboration: on behalf of the DUST study

    2014-06-15

    Head movement during CT brain perfusion (CTP) acquisition can deteriorate the accuracy of CTP analysis. Most CTP software packages can only correct in-plane movement and are limited to small ranges. The purpose of this study is to validate a novel 3D correction method for head movement during CTP acquisition. Thirty-five CTP datasets that were classified as defective due to head movement were included in this study. All CTP time frames were registered with non-contrast CT data using a 3D rigid registration method. Location and appearance of ischemic area in summary maps derived from original and registered CTP datasets were qualitative compared with follow-up non-contrast CT. A quality score (QS) of 0 to 3 was used to express the degree of agreement. Furthermore, experts compared the quality of both summary maps and assigned the improvement score (IS) of the CTP analysis, ranging from -2 (much worse) to 2 (much better). Summary maps generated from corrected CTP significantly agreed better with appearance of infarct on follow-up CT with mean QS 2.3 versus mean QS 1.8 for summary maps from original CTP (P = 0.024). In comparison to original CTP data, correction resulted in a quality improvement with average IS 0.8: 17 % worsened (IS = -2, -1), 20 % remained unchanged (IS = 0), and 63 % improved (IS = +1, +2). The proposed 3D movement correction improves the summary map quality for CTP datasets with severe head movement. (orig.)

  14. The course and impact of family optimism in the post-acute period after acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Gerard A; Hough, Andrea; Meader, Laura M; Brennan, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the course and impact of family optimism in the post-acute stage of acquired brain injury. At Time 1, 30 family relatives of in-patients in rehabilitation units and 30 relatives of patients recently discharged from such units completed questionnaires relating to their emotional health, engagement in the rehabilitation process and expectations about the future consequences and controllability of the injury. At Time 2 (12-18 months later), 23 of the original sample completed questionnaires about their emotional health and actual consequences and controllability of the injury. At Time 1, optimism about future consequences and controllability was associated with greater engagement in the rehabilitation process and better emotional health. The two groups did not differ on any of the measures, which did not support the expectation that the patient's discharge home would trigger a loss of optimism and emotional upset for the family. At Time 2, the actual consequences were worse than had been expected at Time 1 and greater disappointment was associated with a greater decline in emotional wellbeing. Family expectations about recovery are linked with important variables such as emotional wellbeing and engagement in the rehabilitation process and need careful management by clinicians.

  15. Influence of acute ethanol intoxication on neuronal apoptosis and Bcl-2 protein expression after severe traumatic brain injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Min; Liu, Wei-Guo; Wen, Liang; Du, Hang-Gen; Yin, Li-Chun; Chen, Li

    2013-01-01

    To study the influence and mechanism of acute ethanol intoxication (AEI) on rat neuronal apoptosis after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Ninety-six Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into four groups: normal control, AEI-only, TBI-only and TBI+AEI (n equal to 24 for each). Severe TBI model was developed according to Feeney's method. Rats in TBI+AEI group were firstly subjected to AEI, and then suffered head trauma. In each group, animals were sacrificed at 6 h, 24 h, 72 h, and 168 h after TBI. The level of neuronal apoptosis and the expression of Bcl-2 protein were determined by TUNEL assay and immunohistochemical method, respectively. Apoptotic cells mainly distributed in the cortex and white matter around the damaged area. Neuronal apoptosis significantly increased at 6 h after trauma and peaked at 72 h. Both the level of neuronal apoptosis and expression of Bcl-2 protein in TBI-only group and TBI+AEI group were higher than those in control group (P less than 0.05). Compared with TBI-only group, the two indexes were much higher in TBI+AEI group at all time points (P less than 0.05). Our findings suggest that AEI can increase neuronal apoptosis after severe TBI.

  16. Breastfeeding and nutrition to 2 years of age and risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia and brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenop, Kathryn R; Bailey, Helen D; Miller, Margaret; Scott, Rodney J; Attia, John; Ashton, Lesley J; Downie, Peter; Armstrong, Bruce K; Milne, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and childhood brain tumors (CBT) are 2 of the most common forms of childhood cancer, but little is known of their etiology. In 2 nationwide case-control studies we investigated whether breastfeeding, age of food introduction, or early diet are associated with the risk of these cancers. Cases aged 0-14 years were identified from Australian pediatric oncology units between 2003 and 2007 (ALL) and 2005 and 2010 (CBT) and population-based controls through nationwide random-digit dialing. Mothers completed questionnaires giving details of infant feeding up to the age of 2 yr. Data from 322 ALL cases, 679 ALL controls, 299 CBT cases, and 733 CBT controls were analysed using unconditional logistic regression. Breastfeeding was associated with a reduced risk of ALL [odds ratio (OR) = 0.52, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.32, 0.84), regardless of duration. Introduction of artificial formula within 14 days of birth was positively associated with ALL (OR = 1.57, 95% CI: 1.03, 2.37), as was exclusive formula feeding to 6 mo (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 1.07, 3.05). No associations were seen between breastfeeding or formula use and risk of CBT. Our results suggest that breastfeeding and delayed introduction of artificial formula may reduce the risk of ALL but not CBT.

  17. Influence of acute ethanol intoxication on neuronal apoptosis and Bcl-2 protein expression after severe traumatic brain injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HE Min

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To study the influence and mechanism of acute ethanol intoxication (AEI on rat neu-ronal apoptosis after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI. Methods: Ninety-six Sprague-Dawley rats were ran-domly divided into four groups: normal control, AEI-only, TBI-only and TBI+AEI (n=24 for each. Severe TBI model was developed according to Feeney’s method. Rats in TBI+AEI group were firstly subjected to AEI, and then suf-fered head trauma. In each group, animals were sacrificed at 6 h, 24 h, 72 h, and 168 h after TBI. The level of neuronal apoptosis and the expression of Bcl-2 protein were deter-mined by TUNEL assay and immunohistochemical method, respectively. Results: Apoptotic cells mainly distributed in the cortex and white matter around the damaged area. Neuronal apoptosis significantly increased at 6 h after trauma and peaked at 72 h. Both the level of neuronal apoptosis and expression of Bcl-2 protein in TBI-only group and TBI+AEI group were higher than those in control group (P<0.05. Compared with TBI-only group, the two indexes were much higher in TBI+AEI group at all time points (P<0.05. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that AEI can increase neuronal apoptosis after severe TBI. Key words: Craniocerebral trauma; Apoptosis; Alcoholism

  18. Social communication assessment during post-traumatic amnesia and the post-acute period after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Joanne; Ferguson, Alison; Spencer, Elizabeth; Togher, Leanne

    2017-01-01

    Social communication impairment is a persisting and debilitating consequence of traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, there has been little empirical speech-language pathology (SLP) study focusing on the early stage of recovery after TBI, including during post-traumatic amnesia (PTA). This research reports on social communication presentation and recovery during late PTA and the post-acute period, assessed with standardized measures. Using mixed-methods case study research, four participants with severe TBI were assessed with social communication assessment measures over the later stages of PTA and/or at PTA emergence, and at follow-up three months later. Assessment tools included the Measure of Cognitive Linguistic Abilities Family Questionnaire, the La Trobe Communication Questionnaire and The Profile of Pragmatic Impairment in Communication and included patient and friend/family perspectives. It was possible to identify a profile of social communication disorder on SLP measures for participants during PTA that persisted at follow-up, but with decreased severity. Self and friend/family member ratings of social communication indicated an increased awareness of social difficulty at three months after PTA emergence. Findings provided information about presentation and course of recovery of social communication ability for participants in the early stage of rehabilitation after TBI. These findings have implications for timing and methods of SLP assessment during PTA.

  19. Slice of a LEP bending magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    This is a slice of a LEP dipole bending magnet, made as a concrete and iron sandwich. The bending field needed in LEP is small (about 1000 Gauss), equivalent to two of the magnets people stick on fridge doors. Because it is very difficult to keep a low field steady, a high field was used in iron plates embedded in concrete. A CERN breakthrough in magnet design, LEP dipoles can be tuned easily and are cheaper than conventional magnets.

  20. Effect of Resveratrol Administration on the Element Metabolism in the Blood and Brain Tissues of Rats Subjected to Acute Swimming Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltaci, Abdulkerim Kasim; Arslangil, Dilek; Mogulkoc, Rasim; Patlar, Suleyman

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine how resveratrol administration affects the element metabolism in the blood and brain cortex tissues of rats subjected to an acute swimming exercise. The study was carried out on Wistar-Albino-type adult male rats supplied by the Center. Group 1 is the control group. Group 2 is the swimming control group. Group 3 is the resveratrol (10 mg/kg/day) + swimming group. Group 4 is the resveratrol (10 mg/kg/day) group. Blood and brain cortex tissues were analyzed for some elements. The acute swimming exercise led to increases in the rats' serum iron, selenium, lead, cobalt, and boron levels, while the resveratrol-swimming group has increases in copper, phosphorus, and calcium values. The brain cortex tissue of the resveratrol-swimming group had significantly higher molybdenum levels than others. The results obtained in the study indicate that acute swimming exercise altered the distribution of elements in the serum to a considerable extent; however, resveratrol's affect is limited. Especially, resveratrol supplementation may have a regulatory affect on serum iron and magnesium levels.

  1. Acute Traumatic Endotheliopathy in Isolated Severe Brain Injury and Its Impact on Clinical Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venencia Albert

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Study design: Prospective observational cohort. Objective: To investigate the difference in plasma levels of syndecan-1 (due to glycocalyx degradation and soluble thrombomodulin (due to endothelial damage in isolated severe traumatic brain injury (TBI patients with/without early coagulopathy. A secondary objective was to compare the effects of the degree of TBI endotheliopathy on hospital mortality among patients with TBI-associated coagulopathy (TBI-AC. Methods: Data was prospectively collected on isolated severe TBI (sTBI patients with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS ≤8 less than 12 h after injury admitted to a level I trauma centre. Isolated sTBI patients with samples withdrawn prior to blood transfusion were stratified by conventional coagulation tests as coagulopathic (prothrombin time (PT ≥ 16.7 s, international normalized ratio (INR ≥ 1.27, and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT ≥ 28.8 s and non-coagulopathic. Twenty healthy controls were also included. Plasma levels of thrombomodulin and syndecan-1 were estimated by ELISA. With receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC analysis, we defined endotheliopathy as a syndecan-1 cut-off level that maximized the sum of sensitivity and specificity for predicting TBI-AC. Results: Inclusion criteria were met in 120 cases, with subjects aged 35.5 ± 12.6 years (88.3% males. TBI-AC was identified in 50 (41.6% patients, independent of age, gender, and GCS, but there was an association with acidosis (60%; p = 0.01. Following isolated sTBI, we found insignificant changes in soluble thrombomodulin (sTM levels between patients with isolated TBI and controls, and sTM levels were lower in coagulopathic compared to non-coagulopathic patients. Elevations in plasma syndecan-1 (ng/mL levels were seen compared to control (31.1(21.5–30.6 vs. 24.8(18.5–30.6; p = 0.08. Syndecan-1(ng/mL levels were significantly elevated in coagulopathic compared to non-coagulopathic patients (33.7(21.6–109.5 vs. 29

  2. Eating Behavior and BMI in Adolescent Survivors of Brain Tumor and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Jennifer A.; Stancel, Heather H.; Klesges, Lisa M.; Tyc, Vida L.; Hinds, Pamela S.; Wu, Shengjie; Hudson, Melissa M.; Kahalley, Lisa S.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Elevated BMI has been reported in pediatric cancer survivors. It is unclear whether this is related to altered energy intake (via disordered eating), decreased energy expenditure (via limited exercise), or treatment-related direct/indirect changes. The aims of this study are to describe the occurrence of overweight and obesity, exercise frequency, and the extent of disordered eating patterns in this sample of survivors, and to examine relationships among BMI, eating patterns, exercise frequency and demographic and disease and treatment-related variables to identify those survivors most at risk for overweight/obesity. Methods This cross-sectional study recruited 98 cancer survivors (50 ALL, 48 Brain Tumor), aged 12-17 years and >12 months post-treatment from a large pediatric oncology hospital. Survivors completed health behavior measures assessing disordered eating patterns and physical activity. Clinical variables were obtained through medical record review. Univariate analyses were conducted to make comparisons on health behaviors by diagnosis, gender, treatment history, and BMI category. Results Fifty-two percent of ALL survivors and 41.7% of BT survivors were classified as overweight/obese. Overweight/obesity status was associated with higher Cognitive Restraint (OR=1.0, 95%CI:1.0-1.1). Only 12% of ALL survivors and 8.3% of BT survivors met CDC guidelines for physical activity. Males reported more physical activity (t(96)=2.2, psurvivors may attempt to purposefully restrict their food intake and rely less on physiological cues to regulate consumption. Survivors should be screened at follow-up for weight-related concerns. PMID:24451908

  3. Cerebrolysin Asian Pacific trial in acute brain injury and neurorecovery: design and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Wai; Vos, Pieter; Muresanu, Dafin; Vester, Johannes; von Wild, Klaus; Hömberg, Volker; Wang, Ernest; Lee, Tatia M C; Matula, Christian

    2015-04-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of injury-related death. In the United States alone, an estimated 1.7 million people sustain a TBI each year, and approximately 5.3 million people live with a TBI-related disability. The direct medical costs and indirect costs such as lost productivity of TBIs totaled an estimated $76.5 billion in the U.S. in the year 2000. Improving the limited treatment options for this condition remains challenging. However, recent reports from interdisciplinary working groups (consisting primarily of neurologists, neurosurgeons, neuropsychologists, and biostatisticians) have stated that to improve TBI treatment, important methodological lessons from the past must be taken into account in future clinical research. An evaluation of the neuroprotection intervention studies conducted over the last 30 years has indicated that a limited understanding of the underlying biological concepts and methodological design flaws are the major reasons for the failure of pharmacological agents to demonstrate efficacy. Cerebrolysin is a parenterally-administered neuro-peptide preparation that acts in a manner similar to endogenous neurotrophic factors. Cerebrolysin has a favorable adverse effect profile, and several meta-analyses have suggested that Cerebrolysin is beneficial as a dementia treatment. CAPTAIN is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, multi-center, multinational trial of the effects of Cerebrolysin on neuroprotection and neurorecovery after TBI using a multidimensional ensemble of outcome scales. The CAPTAIN trial will be the first TBI trial with a 'true' multidimensional approach based on full outcome scales, while avoiding prior weaknesses, such as loss of information through "dichotomization," or unrealistic assumptions such as "normal distribution."

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of whole-brain CT perfusion in the detection of acute infratentorial infarctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bollwein, Christine; Sommer, Wieland H.; Thierfelder, Kolja M.; Reiser, Maximilian F. [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital of Munich, Institute for Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Plate, Annika; Straube, Andreas; Baumgarten, Louisa von [Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital of Munich, Department of Neurology, Munich (Germany); Janssen, Hendrik [South Nuremberg Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Nuremberg (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    Although the diagnostic performance of whole-brain computed tomographic perfusion (WB-CTP) in the detection of supratentorial infarctions is well established, its value in the detection of infratentorial strokes remains less well defined. We examined its diagnostic accuracy in the detection of infratentorial infarctions and compared it to nonenhanced computed tomography (NECT), aiming to identify factors influencing its detection rate. Out of a cohort of 1380 patients who underwent WB-CTP due to suspected stroke, we retrospectively included all patients with MRI-confirmed infratentorial strokes and compared it to control patients without infratentorial strokes. Two blinded readers evaluated NECT and four different CTP maps independently for the presence and location of infratentorial ischemic perfusion deficits. The study was designed as a retrospective case-control study and included 280 patients (cases/controls = 1/3). WB-CTP revealed a greater diagnostic sensitivity than NECT (41.4 vs. 17.1 %, P = 0.003). The specificity, however, was comparable (93.3 vs. 95.0 %). Mean transit time (MTT) and time to drain (TTD) were the most sensitive (41.4 and 40.0 %) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) the most specific (99.5 %) perfusion maps. Infarctions detected using WB-CTP were significantly larger than those not detected (15.0 vs. 2.2 ml; P = 0.0007); infarct location, however, did not influence the detection rate. The detection of infratentorial infarctions can be improved by assessing WB-CTP as part of the multimodal stroke workup. However, it remains a diagnostic challenge, especially small volume infarctions in the brainstem are likely to be missed. (orig.)

  5. Dynamic glucocorticoid-dependent regulation of Sgk1 expression in oligodendrocytes of adult male rat brain by acute stress and time of day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Laura R; Chun, Lauren E; Woodruff, Elizabeth R; Christensen, Jennifer A; Hartsock, Matthew J; Spencer, Robert L

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies support plasticity in adult brain white matter structure and myelination in response to various experiential factors. One possible contributor to this plasticity may be activity-dependent modulation of serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinase 1 (Sgk1) expression in oligodendrocytes. We examined whether Sgk1 expression in adult rat brain white matter is increased by acute stress-induced elevations in endogenous corticosterone and whether it fluctuates with diurnal variations in corticosterone. We observed rapid increases (within 30 min) in Sgk1 mRNA in the corpus callosum in response to acute stress, as well as large increases at the beginning of the rat's active period (the time of peak corticosterone secretion). These increases were absent in adrenalectomized rats. Corticosterone treatment of adrenalectomized rats also rapidly increased corpus callosum Sgk1 mRNA. The majority of Sgk1 mRNA in corpus callosum was co-localized with myelin basic protein mRNA, suggesting that mature oligodendrocytes respond dynamically to acute stress and circadian rhythms. The regulation of Sgk1 expression by acute stress and time of day was selective for white matter, with limited alteration of Sgk1 expression by these factors in hippocampus and somatosensory cortex. These results indicate a unique sensitivity of oligodendrocyte Sgk1 expression to activity-dependent fluctuations in corticosterone hormone secretion, and raises the prospect that hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation or glucocorticoid pharmacotherapy may compromise the normal activity-dependent interactions between oligodendrocytes and neurons.

  6. Boussignac CPAP system for brain death confirmation with apneic test in case of acute lung injury/adult respiratory distress syndrome – series of cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieczorek A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Andrzej Wieczorek,1 Tomasz Gaszynski2 1Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland; 2Department of Emergency Medicine and Disaster Medicine, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland Introduction: There are some patients with severe respiratory disturbances like adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS and suspicion of brain death, for whom typical performance of the apneic test is difficult to complete because of quick desaturation and rapid deterioration without effective ventilation. To avoid failure of brain death confirmation and possible loss of organ donation another approach to apneic test is needed. We present two cases of patients with clinical symptoms of brain death, with lung pathology (acute lung injury, ARDS, lung embolism and lung infection, in whom apneic tests for recognizing brain death were difficult to perform. During typical performance of apneic test involving the use of oxygen catheter for apneic oxygenation we observed severe desaturation with growing hypotension and hemodynamic destabilization. But with the use of Boussignac CPAP system all necessary tests were successfully completed, confirming the patient’s brain death, which gave us the opportunity to perform procedures for organ donation. The main reason of apneic test difficulties was severe gas exchange disturbances secondary to ARDS. Thus lack of positive end expiratory pressure during classical performance of apneic test leads to quick desaturation and rapid hemodynamic deterioration, limiting the observation period below dedicated at least 10-minute interval.  Conclusion: The Boussignac CPAP system may be an effective tool for performing transparent apneic test in case of serious respiratory disturbances, especially in the form of acute lung injury or ARDS. Keywords: brain death, organ donor, ARDS, ALI, Boussignac CPAP

  7. Effect of acute and chronic treatment with risperidone on the serotonin and dopamine receptors in the rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Young; Moon, Dae Hyuk; Son, Hye Kyung; Kim, Chang Yoon; Lee, Chul; Lee, Hee Kyung [College of Medicine, Ulsan Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of antipsychotic drugs is generally attributed to their ability to block dopamine D{sub 2} receptors. Classical D{sub 2} antagonists are not effective to treat negative symptoms and produce extrapyramidal side effects. On the other hand, atypical antipsychotic agents ameliorate negative symptoms without producing extrapyramidal side effects, and it is reported to be associated with blockade of serotonin 5-HT{sub 2} receptors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of risperidone on neuroreceptors in the rat brain by quantitative autoradiography method. In acute treatment group, risperidone was injected into peritoneal cavity of male Wistar rats with dose of 0, 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0mg/kg in each group (5/group), and they were decapitated after 2 hours. In chronic treatment group, risperidone was injected with dose of 0, 0.1, and 1m/kg (I.P.) for 21 ays and decapitated after 24 hours following last treatment. The effect of risperodone on the binding of [{sup 3}H) spiperone to 5-HT{sub 2} and D{sub 2} receptors were analysed in 4 discrete regions of the striatum, nucleus accumbens, and frontal cortex by quantitative autoradiography. Acute treatment with risperidone reduced cortical 5-HT{sub 2} specific [{sup 3}H]spiperone binding to 32% of vehicle-treated control. Subcortical 5-HR{sub 2} specific [{sup 3}H]spiperone binding was not affected at all dose groups whereas a significant reduction (57%) in D{sub 2} specific [{sup 3}H]spiperone binding was observed in risperidone treated group at doses of 1-2mg/kg. Chronic treatment with risperidone produced a decrease in the maximal number of cortical 5-HT{sub 2} receptors to 51% and 46% of control in 0.1mg/kg and 1mg/kg treated group respectively. In conclusion, risperidone is a cortical serotonin receptor antagonist with relatively weak antagonistic action on dopamine receptors. These effects on neuroreceptors may explain the therapeutic effect of risperidone as a atypical

  8. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide and high-sensitivity troponin in the evaluation of acute chest pain of uncertain etiology. A PITAGORAS substudy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchis, Juan; Bardají, Alfredo; Bosch, Xavier; Loma-Osorio, Pablo; Marín, Francisco; Sánchez, Pedro L; Calvo, Francisco; Avanzas, Pablo; Hernández, Carolina; Serrano, Silvia; Carratalá, Arturo; Barrabés, José A

    2013-07-01

    High-sensitivity troponin assays have improved the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome in patients presenting with chest pain and normal troponin levels as measured by conventional assays. Our aim was to investigate whether N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide provides additional information to troponin determination in these patients. A total of 398 patients, included in the PITAGORAS study, presenting to the emergency department with chest pain and normal troponin levels as measured by conventional assay in 2 serial samples (on arrival and 6 h to 8h later) were studied. The samples were also analyzed in a central laboratory for high-sensitivity troponin T (both samples) and for N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (second sample). The endpoints were diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome and the composite endpoint of in-hospital revascularization or a 30-day cardiac event. Acute coronary syndrome was adjudicated to 79 patients (20%) and the composite endpoint to 59 (15%). When the N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide quartile increased, the diagnosis of acute coronary syndrome also increased (12%, 16%, 23% and 29%; P=.01), as did the risk of the composite endpoint (6%, 13%, 16% and 24%; P=.004). N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide elevation (>125ng/L) was associated with both endpoints (relative risk= 2.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-3.3; P=.02; relative risk=2.4; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-4.2; P=.004). However, in the multivariable models adjusted by clinical and electrocardiographic data, a predictive value was found for high-sensitivity T troponin but not for N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide. In low-risk patients with chest pain of uncertain etiology evaluated using high-sensitivity T troponin, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide does not contribute additional predictive value to diagnosis or the prediction of short-term outcomes. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights

  9. Circadian time-dependent antioxidant and inflammatory responses to acute cadmium exposure in the brain of zebrafish

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jia-Lang, E-mail: zhengjialang@aliyun.com; Yuan, Shuang-Shuang; Wu, Chang-Wen; Lv, Zhen-Ming; Zhu, Ai-Yi

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Gene changed at mRNA, protein and activity levels between exposure time points. • ROS mediated antioxidant and inflammatory responses by Nrf2 and NF-κB. • The effect of time of day on Cd-induced toxicity should not be neglected in fish. - Abstract: Up to date, little information is available on effects of circadian rhythm on metal-induced toxicity in fish. In this study, zebrafish were acutely exposed to 0.97 mg L{sup −1} cadmium for 12 h either at ZT0 (the light intensity began to reached maximum) or at ZT12 (light intensity began to reached minimum) to evaluate the temporal sensitivity of oxidative stress and inflammatory responses in the brain of zebrafish. Profiles of responses of some genes at mRNA, protein and activity levels were different between ZT0 and ZT12 in the normal water. Exposure to Cd induced contrary antioxidant responses and similar inflammatory responses between ZT0 and ZT12. However, the number of inflammatory genes which were up-regulated was significantly greater at ZT12 than at ZT0. And, the up-regulated inflammatory genes were more responsive at ZT12 than at ZT0. At ZT12, antioxidant genes were down-regulated at mRNA, protein and activity levels. Contrarily, antioxidant genes were not affected at mRNA levels but activated at the protein and/or activity levels at ZT0. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) sharply increased and remained relatively stable when fish were exposed to Cd at ZT12 and ZT0, respectively. Positive correlations between ROS levels and mRNA levels of nuclear transcription factor κB (NF-κB) and between mRNA levels of NF-κB and its target genes were observed, suggesting that ROS may play an essential role in regulating the magnitude of inflammatory responses. Taken together, oxidative stress and immunotoxicity in the brain were more serious when fish were exposed to Cd in the evening than in the morning, highlighting the importance of circadian rhythm in Cd-induced neurotoxicity in fish.

  10. Slice accelerated diffusion-weighted imaging at ultra-high field strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichner, Cornelius; Setsompop, Kawin; Koopmans, Peter J; Lützkendorf, Ralf; Norris, David G; Turner, Robert; Wald, Lawrence L; Heidemann, Robin M

    2014-04-01

    Diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (dMRI) data with very high isotropic resolution can be obtained at 7T. However, for extensive brain coverage, a large number of slices is required, resulting in long acquisition times (TAs). Recording multiple slices simultaneously (SMS) promises to reduce the TA. A combination of zoomed and parallel imaging is used to achieve high isotropic resolution dMRI data with a low level of distortions at 7T. The blipped-CAIPI (controlled aliasing in parallel imaging) approach is used to acquire several slices simultaneously. Due to their high radiofrequency (RF) power deposition and ensuing specific absorption rate (SAR) constraints, the commonly used multiband (MB) RF pulses for SMS imaging are inefficient at 7T and entail long repetition times, counteracting the usefulness of SMS acquisitions. To address this issue, low SAR multislice Power Independent of Number of Slices RF pulses are employed. In vivo dMRI results with and without SMS acceleration are presented at different isotropic spatial resolutions at ultra high field strength. The datasets are recorded at a high angular resolution to detect fiber crossings. From the results and compared with earlier studies at these resolutions, it can be seen that scan time is significantly reduced, while image quality is preserved. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Boron-containing acids: preliminary evaluation of acute toxicity and access to the brain determined by Raman scattering spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Ursúa, Marvin A; Farfán-García, Eunice D; López-Cabrera, Yessica; Querejeta, Enrique; Trujillo-Ferrara, José G

    2014-01-01

    Boron-containing compounds (BCCs), particularly boron containing acids (BCAs), have become attractive moieties or molecules in drug development. It has been suggested that when functional groups with boron atoms are added to well-known drugs, the latter are conferred with greater potency and efficacy in relation to their target receptors. However, the use of BCAs in drug development is limited due to the lack of a toxicological profile. Consequently, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the acute toxicity of boric and boronic acids. Thus, a determination was made of the lethal dose (LD50) of test compounds in male CD1 mice, as well as the effective dose required to negatively affect spontaneous motor activity and to produce notable behavioral abnormalities. After treatment of animals at different doses, macroscopic observations were made from a necropsy, and Raman scattering spectroscopic studies were carried out on brain tissue samples. In general, the results show that most of the tested BCAs have very low toxicity, evidenced by the high doses required to induce notable toxic effects (greater than 100 mg/kg of body weight for all compounds, except for 3-thyenilboronic acid). Such toxic effects, presumably mediated by action on the CNS, include eye damage, gastrointestinal effects (e.g., gastric-gut dilatation and fecal retention), sedation, hypnosis and/or trembling. This preliminary toxicological profile suggests that BCAs can be considered potential therapeutic agents or moieties to be added to other compounds in the development of new drugs. Future studies are required to explore possible chronic toxicity of BCCs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Effect of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide-assisted interventional treatment on prognosis of acute myocardial infarction patients complicated with cardiogenic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Zhou Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze the effect of recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide-assisted interventional treatment on prognosis of acute myocardial infarction patients complicated with cardiogenic shock. Methods: A total of 112 cases of inpatients treated in Cardiology Department of our hospital from March 2013 to March 2015 were selected, all of whom had acute myocardial infarction within 12 hours of onset and received direct PCI treatment. They were divided into observation group and control group according to random number table, each group with 56 cases, control group received conventional interventional treatment and observation group received recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide-assisted interventional treatment. Then differences of regional myocardial deformability, myocardial enzyme spectrum indicators, brain natriuretic peptide and inflammatory factors, blood sugar and stress hormones as well as myocardial infarction prognosis-associated indexes, etc, between two groups after treatment were compared. Results: After treatment, LVEF, SRs, SRe and Sra levels of observation group were higher than those of control group, WMSI level was lower than that of control group; serum myocardial enzyme spectrum indicators CK, CK-MB, AST and LDH values were lower than those of control group; serum BNP, CRP, TNF-α and IL-6 levels were lower than those of control group; serum cortisol, growth hormone and glucagon levels were lower than those of control group, insulin level was higher than that of control group; FT3 and IGF-1 levels were higher than those of control group, sPLA2 and Hcy levels were lower than those of control group. Conclusion: Recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide-assisted interventional treatment for acute myocardial infarction patients complicated with cardiogenic shock can reduce myocardial function injury, protect normal myocardial function and optimize patients’ long-term prognosis; it has active clinical significance.

  13. Body composition estimation from selected slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lacoste Jeanson, Alizé; Dupej, Ján; Villa, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    tissue areas measured in selected CT scan slices. Methods We present a new semi-automatic approach to defining the density cutoff between adipose tissue (AT) and lean tissue (LT) in such material. An intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to validate the method. The equations for estimating......Background Estimating volumes and masses of total body components is important for the study and treatment monitoring of nutrition and nutrition-related disorders, cancer, joint replacement, energy-expenditure and exercise physiology. While several equations have been offered for estimating total...

  14. Cannabidiol inhibits synaptic transmission in rat hippocampal cultures and slices via multiple receptor pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledgerwood, CJ; Greenwood, SM; Brett, RR; Pratt, JA; Bushell, TJ

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Cannabidiol (CBD) has emerged as an interesting compound with therapeutic potential in several CNS disorders. However, whether it can modulate synaptic activity in the CNS remains unclear. Here, we have investigated whether CBD modulates synaptic transmission in rat hippocampal cultures and acute slices. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effect of CBD on synaptic transmission was examined in rat hippocampal cultures and acute slices using whole cell patch clamp and standard extracellular recordings respectively. KEY RESULTS Cannabidiol decreased synaptic activity in hippocampal cultures in a concentration-dependent and Pertussis toxin-sensitive manner. The effects of CBD in culture were significantly reduced in the presence of the cannabinoid receptor (CB1) inverse agonist, LY320135 but were unaffected by the 5-HT1A receptor antagonist, WAY100135. In hippocampal slices, CBD inhibited basal synaptic transmission, an effect that was abolished by the proposed CB1 receptor antagonist, AM251, in addition to LY320135 and WAY100135. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Cannabidiol reduces synaptic transmission in hippocampal in vitro preparations and we propose a role for both 5-HT1A and CB1 receptors in these CBD-mediated effects. These data offer some mechanistic insights into the effects of CBD and emphasize that further investigations into the actions of CBD in the CNS are required in order to elucidate the full therapeutic potential of CBD. PMID:20825410

  15. Bacterial cytolysin during meningitis disrupts the regulation of glutamate in the brain, leading to synaptic damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Wippel

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcal meningitis is a common bacterial infection of the brain. The cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin represents a key factor, determining the neuropathogenic potential of the pneumococci. Here, we demonstrate selective synaptic loss within the superficial layers of the frontal neocortex of post-mortem brain samples from individuals with pneumococcal meningitis. A similar effect was observed in mice with pneumococcal meningitis only when the bacteria expressed the pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin. Exposure of acute mouse brain slices to only pore-competent pneumolysin at disease-relevant, non-lytic concentrations caused permanent dendritic swelling, dendritic spine elimination and synaptic loss. The NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists MK801 and D-AP5 reduced this pathology. Pneumolysin increased glutamate levels within the mouse brain slices. In mouse astrocytes, pneumolysin initiated the release of glutamate in a calcium-dependent manner. We propose that pneumolysin plays a significant synapto- and dendritotoxic role in pneumococcal meningitis by initiating glutamate release from astrocytes, leading to subsequent glutamate-dependent synaptic damage. We outline for the first time the occurrence of synaptic pathology in pneumococcal meningitis and demonstrate that a bacterial cytolysin can dysregulate the control of glutamate in the brain, inducing excitotoxic damage.

  16. Nonneurogenic hypoxia sensitivity in rat adrenal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Y; Mochizuki-Oda, N; Yamada, H; Kurokawa, K; Watanabe, Y

    2001-11-23

    A change in the intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) level induced by hypoxia was detected in rat adrenal slices by use of fura-2/AM. After hypoxic stress, an increase in [Ca(2+)](i) was observed only in the adrenal medulla. This increase was inhibited by nifedipine, but not modified by the cholinergic receptor blockers. The hypoxia-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) was observed in all postnatal developmental stages to a similar extent, whereas the nicotine and high K(+) sensitivities increased along with postnatal development. A 10 nM ryanodine enhanced the hypoxia-induced [Ca(2+)](i) increase in adult but not in neonatal rat slices. These results suggest the existence of an oxygen-sensing mechanism in adult rat adrenals even after sympathetic innervation. Hypoxic responses seemed to be similar both in neonate and in adult rat adrenals and were triggered by the influx of Ca(2+) via L-type voltage-sensitive Ca(2+) channels. However, the sustained [Ca(2+)](i) increase caused by hypoxia might depend on postnatal development and be triggered by Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR). Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  17. Thin-Slice Measurement of Wisdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chao S; Ferrari, Michel; Wang, Qiandong; Woodruff, Earl

    2017-01-01

    Objective Measurement of Wisdom within a short period of time is vital for both the public interest (e.g., understanding a presidential election) and research (e.g., testing factors that facilitate wisdom development). A measurement of emotion associated with wisdom would be especially informative; therefore, a novel Thin-Slice measurement of wisdom was developed based on the Berlin Paradigm. For about 2 min, participants imagined the lens of a camera as the eyes of their friend/teacher whom they advised about a life dilemma. Verbal response and facial expression were both recorded by a camera: verbal responses were then rated on both the Berlin Wisdom criteria and newly developed Chinese wisdom criteria; facial expressions were analyzed by the software iMotion FACET module. Results showed acceptable inter-rater and inter-item reliability for this novel paradigm. Moreover, both wisdom ratings were not significantly correlated with Social desirability, and the Berlin wisdom rating was significantly negatively correlated with Neuroticism; feeling of surprise was significantly positively correlated with both wisdom criteria ratings. Our results provide the first evidence of this Thin-slice Wisdom Paradigm's reliability, its immunity to social desirability, and its validity for assessing candidates' wisdom within a short timeframe. Although still awaiting further development, this novel Paradigm contributes to an emerging Universal Wisdom Paradigm applicable across cultures.

  18. Changes in brain G proteins and colonic sympathetic neural signaling in chronic-acute combined stress rat model of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ning; Lv, Hong; Li, Ji; Yang, Ning; Xue, Hong; Zhu, Jinxia; Qian, Jiaming

    2008-12-01

    The role of the brain-gut axis interaction in the pathogenesis of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is not well understood. To examine this possibility, a novel rat model of IBS subjected to both chronic and acute stress (CAS) was established. G proteins play a crucial role in the pathophysiology of depression. The alpha 2A adrenoceptor (alpha(2A)-AR) and the norepinephrine reuptake transporter (NET) determine the sympathetic signal activity. It is conceivable that stress may induce brain G proteins, colonic alpha(2A)-ARs, and NET abnormal expression, which may be responsible for the abnormalities in IBS. Colonic motility, visceral sensation, and secretion were assessed by counting fecal pellets, abdominal muscle contractions in response to colorectal balloon distension (CRD), and short-circuit current study, respectively. Western blot analysis was used to investigate the expression of G proteins, alpha(2A)-ARs, and NET. Compared with control animals, the colonic epithelial secretion, fecal pellets, and numbers of abdominal muscle contraction induced by CRD were significantly higher in both acute stress only (AS) and CAS rats. However, the G proteins, alpha(2A)-AR, and NET expression changed differently in AS and CAS rats. We showed that exposure to either AS or CAS would cause the increase of secretion, motility, and sensation, but the change of protein expression in brain-gut axis was different. It may be responsible for the pathogenesis of IBS.

  19. Automated template-based brain localization and extraction for fetal brain MRI reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tourbier, Sébastien; Velasco-Annis, Clemente; Taimouri, Vahid; Hagmann, Patric; Meuli, Reto; Warfield, Simon K; Bach Cuadra, Meritxell; Gholipour, Ali

    2017-07-15

    Most fetal brain MRI reconstruction algorithms rely only on brain tissue-relevant voxels of low-resolution (LR) images to enhance the quality of inter-slice motion correction and image reconstruction. Consequently the fetal brain needs to be localized and extracted as a first step, which is usually a laborious and time consuming manual or semi-automatic task. We have proposed in this work to use age-matched template images as prior knowledge to automatize brain localization and extraction. This has been achieved through a novel automatic brain localization and extraction method based on robust template-to-slice block matching and deformable slice-to-template registration. Our template-based approach has also enabled the reconstruction of fetal brain images in standard radiological anatomical planes in a common coordinate space. We have integrated this approach into our new reconstruction pipeline that involves intensity normalization, inter-slice motion correction, and super-resolution (SR) reconstruction. To this end we have adopted a novel approach based on projection of every slice of the LR brain masks into the template space using a fusion strategy. This has enabled the refinement of brain masks in the LR images at each motion correction iteration. The overall brain localization and extraction algorithm has shown to produce brain masks that are very close to manually drawn brain masks, showing an average Dice overlap measure of 94.5%. We have also demonstrated that adopting a slice-to-template registration and propagation of the brain mask slice-by-slice leads to a significant improvement in brain extraction performance compared to global rigid brain extraction and consequently in the quality of the final reconstructed images. Ratings performed by two expert observers show that the proposed pipeline can achieve similar reconstruction quality to reference reconstruction based on manual slice-by-slice brain extraction. The proposed brain mask refinement and

  20. Finite slice analysis (FINA) of sliced and velocity mapped images on a Cartesian grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. O. F.; Amarasinghe, C.; Foley, C. D.; Rombes, N.; Gao, Z.; Vogels, S. N.; van de Meerakker, S. Y. T.; Suits, A. G.

    2017-08-01

    Although time-sliced imaging yields improved signal-to-noise and resolution compared with unsliced velocity mapped ion images, for finite slice widths as encountered in real experiments there is a loss of resolution and recovered intensities for the slow fragments. Recently, we reported a new approach that permits correction of these effects for an arbitrarily sliced distribution of a 3D charged particle cloud. This finite slice analysis (FinA) method utilizes basis functions that model the out-of-plane contribution of a given velocity component to the image for sequential subtraction in a spherical polar coordinate system. However, the original approach suffers from a slow processing time due to the weighting procedure needed to accurately model the out-of-plane projection of an anisotropic angular distribution. To overcome this issue we present a variant of the method in which the FinA approach is performed in a cylindrical coordinate system (Cartesian in the image plane) rather than a spherical polar coordinate system. Dubbed C-FinA, we show how this method is applied in much the same manner. We compare this variant to the polar FinA method and find that the processing time (of a 510 × 510 pixel image) in its most extreme case improves by a factor of 100. We also show that although the resulting velocity resolution is not quite as high as the polar version, this new approach shows superior resolution for fine structure in the differential cross sections. We demonstrate the method on a range of experimental and synthetic data at different effective slice widths.

  1. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate does not preserve ATP in hypoxic-ischemic neonatal cerebrocortical slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Hirai, Kiyoshi; Litt, Lawrence

    2008-10-31

    Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), an endogenous intracellular metabolite in glycolysis, was found in many preclinical studies to be neuroprotective during hypoxia-ischemia (HI) when administered exogenously. We looked for HI neuroprotection from FBP in a neonatal rat brain slice model, using 14.1 T (1)H/(31)P/(13)C NMR spectroscopy of perchloric acid slice extracts to ask: 1) if FBP preserves high energy phosphates during HI; and 2) if exogenous [1-(13)C]FBP enters cells and is glycolytically metabolized to [3-(13)C]lactate. We also asked: 3) if substantial superoxide production occurs during and after HI, thinking such might be treatable by exogenous FBP's antioxidant effects. Superfused P7 rat cerebrocortical slices (350 mum) were treated with 2 mM FBP before and during 30 min of HI, and then given 4 h of recovery with an FBP-free oxygenated superfusate. Slices were removed before HI, at the end of HI, and at 1 and 4 h after HI. FBP did not improve high energy phosphate levels or change (1)H metabolite profiles. Large increases in [3-(13)C]lactate were seen with (13)C NMR, but the lactate fractional enrichment was always (1.1+/-0.5)%, implying that all of lactate's (13)C was natural abundance (13)C, that none was from metabolism of (13)C-FBP. FBP had no effect on the fluorescence of ethidium produced from superoxide oxidation of hydroethidine. Compared to control slices, ethidium fluorescence was 25% higher during HI and 50% higher at the end of recovery. Exogenous FBP did not provide protection or enter glycolysis. Its use as an antioxidant might be worth studying at higher FBP concentrations.

  2. [Design and accuracy analysis of upper slicing system of MSCT].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Rongjian

    2013-05-01

    The upper slicing system is the main components of the optical system in MSCT. This paper focuses on the design of upper slicing system and its accuracy analysis to improve the accuracy of imaging. The error of slice thickness and ray center by bearings, screw and control system were analyzed and tested. In fact, the accumulated error measured is less than 1 microm, absolute error measured is less than 10 microm. Improving the accuracy of the upper slicing system contributes to the appropriate treatment methods and success rate of treatment.

  3. A randomized placebo-controlled trial of progesterone with or without hypothermia in patients with acute severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sumit; Raheja, Amol; Samson, Neha; Goyal, Keshav; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Selvi, Arul; Sharma, Pushpa; Sharma, Bhawani Shankar

    2017-01-01

    Among newer neuroprotectant modalities, hypothermia and progesterone have shown a beneficial role in preliminary studies enrolling patients with severe traumatic brain injury (sTBI). The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of progesterone with or without prophylactic hypothermia in acute sTBI patients. This is a prospective, outcome assessor, statistician blinded, randomized, and placebo-controlled phase II trial of progesterone with or without hypothermia (factorial design). All adult patients (18-65 years) with acute sTBI (Glasgow coma score of 4-8) and presenting to trauma center within 8 h after injury were included in the trial. Computer-generated randomization was done after exclusion; sequentially numbered, opaque, sealed envelope technique was used for allocation concealment. The enrollment duration was from January 2012 to October 2014. The primary endpoint was dichotomized Glasgow outcome score (GOS) [poor recovery = GOS 1-3; good recovery = GOS 4-5], and secondary endpoints were functional independence measure (FIM) score and mortality rate at 6 and 12 months follow-up after recruitment. A total of 107 patients were randomized into four groups (placebo [n = 27], progesterone [n = 26], hypothermia alone [n = 27], and progesterone + hypothermia [n = 27]). The study groups were comparable in baseline parameters except for a higher incidence of decompressive craniectomy in the placebo group (P = 0.001). The analysis of GOS at 6 months revealed statistically significant better outcome in the hypothermia group (82%; P = 0.01) and a weaker evidence for progesterone group (74%; P = 0.07) as compared with the placebo group (44%). However, the outcome benefit was marginal at 1-year follow-up for the hypothermia group (82% vs. 58%, P = 0.17). The adjusted odds ratio of poor recovery at 6 months in the hypothermia group was 0.21 (confidence interval = 0.05-0.84, P = 0.03), as compared with the placebo group. Although mean FIM scores at 6 and

  4. Brain hypoxia mapping in acute stroke: Back-to-back T2' MR versus18F-fluoromisonidazole PET in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen-Kondering, Ulf; Manavaki, Roido; Ejaz, Sohail; Sawiak, Stephen J; Carpenter, T Adrian; Fryer, Tim D; Aigbirhio, Franklin I; Williamson, David J; Baron, Jean-Claude

    2017-10-01

    Background Mapping the hypoxic brain in acute ischemic stroke has considerable potential for both diagnosis and treatment monitoring. PET using 18 F-fluoro-misonidazole (FMISO) is the reference method; however, it lacks clinical accessibility and involves radiation exposure. MR-based T2' mapping may identify tissue hypoxia and holds clinical potential. However, its validation against FMISO imaging is lacking. Here we implemented back-to-back FMISO-PET and T2' MR in rodents subjected to acute middle cerebral artery occlusion. For direct clinical relevance, regions of interest delineating reduced T2' signal areas were manually drawn. Methods Wistar rats were subjected to filament middle cerebral artery occlusion, immediately followed by intravenous FMISO injection. Multi-echo T2 and T2* sequences were acquired twice during FMISO brain uptake, interleaved with diffusion-weighted imaging. Perfusion-weighted MR was also acquired whenever feasible. Immediately following MR, PET data reflecting the history of FMISO brain uptake during MR acquisition were acquired. T2' maps were generated voxel-wise from T2 and T2*. Two raters independently drew T2' lesion regions of interest. FMISO uptake and perfusion data were obtained within T2' consensus regions of interest, and their overlap with the automatically generated FMISO lesion and apparent diffusion coefficient lesion regions of interest was computed. Results As predicted, consensus T2' lesion regions of interest exhibited high FMISO uptake as well as substantial overlap with the FMISO lesion and significant hypoperfusion, but only small overlap with the apparent diffusion coefficient lesion. Overlap of the T2' lesion regions of interest between the two raters was ∼50%. Conclusions This study provides formal validation of T2' to map non-core hypoxic tissue in acute stroke. T2' lesion delineation reproducibility was suboptimal, reflecting unclear lesion borders.

  5. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide can be an adjunctive diagnostic marker of hyper-acute phase of Kawasaki disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuksool; Lee, Jin Hee; Jung, Jae Yun; Kwak, Young Ho; Kim, Do Kyun; Jung, Jin Hee; Chang, Ikwan; Kim, Kyuseok

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) level could be a useful marker for Kawasaki disease in the pediatric emergency department (PED) and in the presence of fever duration of 4 days or less (hyper-acute phase of Kawasaki disease). Medical records of patients who were 1 month to 15 years old of age and presented at the PED with suspected Kawasaki disease from January 1, 2010, to December 31, 2014, were collected retrospectively. Two hundred thirty-nine patients with a history of fever for 4 days or less were diagnosed with Kawasaki disease, as well as 111 patients with other febrile diseases, and were enrolled. The NT-proBNP level was significantly higher in patients with Kawasaki disease (Kawasaki disease vs. other febrile disease group, 444.8 (189.7-951.5) vs. 153.4 (68.9-287.6) pg/mL; p marker for hyper-acute phase of Kawasaki disease in the PED. What is Known: • N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide level has been reported as a useful marker for diagnosis in patients with the acute phase of Kawasaki disease. • But, in the cases of less than 5 days of fever, the appropriate level of NT-proBNP for differentiating Kawasaki disease in PED has not been yet evaluated. What is New: • NT-proBNP might be an adjunctive laboratory marker for hyper-acute phase of Kawasaki disease.

  6. Basal serum levels and reactivity of nerve growth factor and brain-derived neurotrophic factor to standardized acute exercise in multiple sclerosis and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Stefan M; Schulz, Karl-Heinz; Hartmann, Sten; Mladek, Mila; Lang, Undine E; Hellweg, Rainer; Reer, Rüdiger; Braumann, Klaus-Michael; Heesen, Christoph

    2003-05-01

    Neurotrophins like brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and nerve growth factor (NGF) are thought to play an important role in neuronal repair and plasticity. Recent experimental evidence suggests neuroprotective effects of these proteins in multiple sclerosis (MS). We investigated the response of serum NGF and BDNF concentrations to standardized acute exercise in MS patients and controls. Basal NGF levels were significantly elevated in MS. Thirty minutes of moderate exercise significantly induced BDNF production in MS patients and controls, but no differential effects were seen. We conclude that moderate exercise can be used to induce neutrophin production in humans. This may mediate beneficial effects of physical exercise in MS reported recently.

  7. Multiple-slice magnetic resonance imaging can detect visceral adipose tissue reduction more accurately than single-slice imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, R; Sasai, H; Matsuo, T; Tsujimoto, T; Eto, M; Saotome, K; Tanaka, K

    2012-12-01

    Imaging methods by magnetic resonance imaging are being increasingly used to quantify visceral adipose tissue (VAT), but there is no clear consensus as to a standardized protocol. We compared the ability of two commonly used imaging protocols (multiple slice versus single slice) to detect changes in VAT with diet or exercise. We utilized data from the participants who completed our diet (n=22) or exercise (n=35) based weight-loss interventions. The intervention mainly comprised of weekly dietary modification sessions or aerobic exercise sessions over 12 weeks. Multiple-slice images obtained from T9 to S1 and a single-slice image at L4-L5 were compared using the effect size of the VAT change. In addition, we calculated the sample size needed to compare the two imaging protocols' ability to detect significant changes in VAT. VAT and subcutaneous adipose tissue volumes and areas, and other anthropometry decreased significantly after both the diet and exercise interventions. For VAT, a single-slice image had a lower effect size (diet: 1.23; exercise: 0.49) than the multiple-slice images (diet: 1.81; exercise: 0.90). The sample size required for multiple slice was substantially lower than for the single-slice with both weight-loss interventions. The different image protocols may lead to different results in relative VAT changes. Furthermore, single-slice imaging required a substantially larger sample size than multiple-slice imaging, and for researchers to detect smaller changes in VAT with single-slice imaging, a larger sample size would be needed. Thus, multiple-slice imaging has advantages for assessing VAT change in future clinical research.

  8. Slicing AADL Specifications for Model Checking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odenbrett, Maximilian; Nguyen, Viet Yen; Noll, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    To combat the state-space explosion problem in model checking larger systems, abstraction techniques can be employed. Here, methods that operate on the system specification before constructing its state space are preferable to those that try to minimize the resulting transition system as they generally reduce peak memory requirements. We sketch a slicing algorithm for system specifications written in (a variant of) the Architecture Analysis and Design Language (AADL). Given a specification and a property to be verified, it automatically removes those parts of the specification that are irrelevant for model checking the property, thus reducing the size of the corresponding transition system. The applicability and effectiveness of our approach is demonstrated by analyzing the state-space reduction for an example, employing a translator from AADL to Promela, the input language of the SPIN model checker.

  9. Multiple single-unit long-term tracking on organotypic hippocampal slices using high-density microelectrode arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Gong

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel system to cultivate and record from organotypic brain slices directly on high-density microelectrode arrays (HD-MEA was developed. This system allows for continuous recording of electrical activity of specific individual neurons at high spatial resolution while monitoring at the same time, neuronal network activity. For the first time, the electrical activity patterns of single neurons and the corresponding neuronal network in an organotypic hippocampal slice culture were studied during several consecutive weeks at daily intervals. An unsupervised iterative spike-sorting algorithm, based on PCA and k-means clustering, was developed to assign the activities to the single units. Spike-triggered average extracellular waveforms of an action potential recorded across neighboring electrodes, termed ‘footprints’ of single-units were generated and tracked over weeks. The developed system offers the potential to study chronic impacts of drugs or genetic modifications on individual neurons in slice preparations over extended times.

  10. Finite slice analysis (FINA)-A general reconstruction method for velocity mapped and time-sliced ion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J O F; Amarasinghe, C; Foley, C D; Suits, A G

    2017-07-07

    Since the advent of ion imaging, one of the key issues in the field has been creating methods to reconstruct the initial 3D distribution of particles from its 2D projection. This has led to the development of a number of different numerical methods and fitting techniques to solve this fundamental issue in imaging. In recent years, slice-imaging methods have been developed that permit direct recording of the 3D distribution, i.e., a thin slice of the recoiling fragment distribution. However, in practice, most slice imaging experiments achieve a velocity slice width of around 10%-25% around the center of the distribution. This still carries significant out-of-plane elements that can blur the spectrum, lose fine resolution, and underestimate the contribution from slow recoiling products. To overcome these limitations, we developed a new numerical method to remove these out-of-plane elements from a sliced image. The finite sliced analysis method models the off-axis elements of the 3D particle distribution through the use of radial basis functions. Once applied, the method reconstructs the underlying central slice of the 3D particle distribution. The approach may be applied to arbitrarily sliced or unsliced data and has the further advantage that it neither requires nor enforces full cylindrical symmetry of the data. We demonstrate this reconstruction approach with a broad range of synthetic and experimental data that, at the same time, allows us to examine the impact of finite slicing on the recovered distributions in detail.

  11. Metabolic therapy for temporal lobe epilepsy in a dish: investigating mechanisms of ketogenic diet using electrophysiological recordings in hippocampal slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahito Kawamura

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampus is prone to epileptic seizures and is a key brain region and experimental platform for investigating mechanisms associated with the abnormal neuronal excitability that characterizes a seizure. Accordingly, the hippocampal slice is a common in vitro model to study treatments that may prevent or reduce seizure activity. The ketogenic diet is a metabolic therapy used to treat epilepsy in adults and children for nearly 100 years; it can reduce or eliminate even severe or refractory seizures. New insights into its underlying mechanisms have been revealed by diverse types of electrophysiological recordings in hippocampal slices. Here we review these reports and their relevant mechanistic findings. We acknowledge that a major difficulty in using hippocampal slices is the inability to reproduce precisely the in vivo condition of ketogenic diet feeding in any in vitro preparation, and progress has been made in this in vivo/in vitro transition. Thus far at least three different approaches are reported to reproduce relevant diet effects in the hippocampal slices: (1 direct application of ketone bodies, (2 mimicking the ketogenic diet condition during a whole-cell patch-clamp technique, and (3 reduced glucose incubation of hippocampal slices from ketogenic diet–fed animals. Significant results have been found with each of these methods and provide options for further study into short- and long-term mechanisms including ATP-sensitive potassium channels, vesicular glutamate transporter, pannexin channels and adenosine receptors underlying ketogenic diet and other forms of metabolic therapy.

  12. Metabolic Therapy for Temporal Lobe Epilepsy in a Dish: Investigating Mechanisms of Ketogenic Diet using Electrophysiological Recordings in Hippocampal Slices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Masahito Jr.; Ruskin, David N.; Masino, Susan A.

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is prone to epileptic seizures and is a key brain region and experimental platform for investigating mechanisms associated with the abnormal neuronal excitability that characterizes a seizure. Accordingly, the hippocampal slice is a common in vitro model to study treatments that may prevent or reduce seizure activity. The ketogenic diet is a metabolic therapy used to treat epilepsy in adults and children for nearly 100 years; it can reduce or eliminate even severe or refractory seizures. New insights into its underlying mechanisms have been revealed by diverse types of electrophysiological recordings in hippocampal slices. Here we review these reports and their relevant mechanistic findings. We acknowledge that a major difficulty in using hippocampal slices is the inability to reproduce precisely the in vivo condition of ketogenic diet feeding in any in vitro preparation, and progress has been made in this in vivo/in vitro transition. Thus far at least three different approaches are reported to reproduce relevant diet effects in the hippocampal slices: (1) direct application of ketone bodies; (2) mimicking the ketogenic diet condition during a whole-cell patch-clamp technique; and (3) reduced glucose incubation of hippocampal slices from ketogenic diet–fed animals. Significant results have been found with each of these methods and provide options for further study into short- and long-term mechanisms including Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels, vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT), pannexin channels and adenosine receptors underlying ketogenic diet and other forms of metabolic therapy. PMID:27847463

  13. Parent Perceptions of How Nurse Encounters Can Provide Caring Support for the Family in Early Acute Care Following Children’s Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roscigno, Cecelia I.

    2016-01-01

    Objective A child’s severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) creates a family crisis requiring extensive cultural, informational, psychological, and environmental support. Nurses need to understand parents’ expectations of caring in early acute care so they can tailor their attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors appropriately to accommodate the family’s needs. Methods In a previous qualitative study of 42 parents or caregivers from 37 families of children with moderate to severe TBI, parents of children with severe TBI (n = 25) described their appraisals of nurse caring and uncaring behaviors in early acute care. Swanson’s theory of caring was used to categorize parents’ descriptions in order to inform nursing early acute care practices and family-centered care. Results Caring nurse encounters included: (a) involving parents in the care of their child and reflecting on all socio-cultural factors shaping family resources and responses (knowing); (b) respecting that family grief can be co-mingled with resilience, and that parents are typically competent to be involved in decision-making (maintaining belief); (d) actively listening and engaging parents in order to fully understand family values and needs (being with); (e) decreasing parents’ workload to get information, emotional support, and providing a safe cultural, psychological, and physical environment for the family (doing for), and; (f) providing anticipatory guidance to navigate the early acute care system and giving assistance to learn and adjust to their situation (enabling). Conclusion Application of Swanson’s caring theory is prescriptive in helping individual nurses and early acute care systems to meet important family needs following children’s severe TBI. PMID:26871242

  14. Color changes and acrylamide formation in fried potato slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedreschi, Franco; Moyano, Pedro; Kaack, Karl

    2005-01-01

    at 85degreesC for 3.5 min. Unblanched slices were used as the control. Control and blanched potato slices (Panda variety, diameter: 37 mm, width: 2.2 mm) were fried at 120, 150 and 180degreesC until reaching moisture contents of similar to1.8% (total basis) and their acrylamide content and final color...

  15. Microcystin-LR acute exposure does not alter in vitro and in vivo ATP, ADP and AMP hydrolysis in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio brain membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Wilges Kist

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Microcystins (MCs are toxins produced by cyanobacteria during the blooms that could accumulate in aquatic animals and be relocated to higher trophic levels. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP acts as an excitatory neurotransmitter and/or a neuromodulator in the extracellular space playing important roles in physiological and pathological conditions. The aim of this study was, therefore, to evaluate the acute effects of different concentrations of MC-LR on nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases and 5’-nucleotidade in adult zebrafish (Danio rerio brain membranes. The results have shown no significant changes in ATP, adenosine diphosphate (ADP and adenosine monophosphate (AMP hydrolysis in zebrafish brain membranes. MC-LR in vitro also did not alter ATP, ADP and AMP hydrolysis in the concentrations tested. These findings show that acute exposure to MC-LR did not modulate ectonucleotidase activity in the conditions tested. However, additional studies including chronic exposure should be performed in order to achieve a better understanding about MC-LR toxicity mechanisms in the central nervous system.

  16. Acetic acid pretreatment improves the hardness of cooked potato slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenlin; Shehzad, Hussain; Yan, Shoulei; Li, Jie; Wang, Qingzhang

    2017-08-01

    The effects of acetic acid pretreatment on the texture of cooked potato slices were investigated in this work. Potato slices were pretreated with acetic acid immersion (AAI), distilled water immersion (DWI), or no immersion (NI). Subsequently, the cell wall material of the pretreated samples was isolated and fractioned to evaluate changes in the monosaccharide content and molar mass (MM), and the hardness and microscopic structure of the potato slices in different pretreatments before and after cooking were determined. The results showed that the highest firmness was obtained with more intact structure of the cell wall for cooked potato slices with AAI pretreatment. Furthermore, the MM and sugar ratio demonstrated that the AAI pretreated potato slices contained a higher content of the small molecular polysaccharides of cell walls, especially in the hemicellulose fraction. This work may provide a reference for potato processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Substantial and reversible brain gray matter reduction but no acute brain lesions in ultramarathon runners: experience from the TransEurope-FootRace Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freund Wolfgang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the extremely challenging 4,487 km ultramarathon TransEurope-FootRace 2009, runners showed considerable reduction of body weight. The effects of this endurance run on brain volume changes but also possible formation of brain edema or new lesions were explored by repeated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI studies. Methods A total of 15 runners signed an informed consent to participate in this study of planned brain scans before, twice during, and about 8 months after the race. Because of dropouts, global gray matter volume analysis could only be performed in ten runners covering three timepoints, and in seven runners who also had a follow-up scan. Scanning was performed on three identical 1.5 T Siemens MAGNETOM Avanto scanners, two of them located at our university. The third MRI scanner with identical sequence parameters was a mobile MRI unit escorting the runners. Volumetric 3D datasets were acquired using a magnetization prepared rapid acquisition gradient echo (MPRAGE sequence. Additionally, diffusion-weighted (DWI and fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR imaging was performed. Results Average global gray matter volume as well as body weight significantly decreased by 6% during the race. After 8 months, gray matter volume returned to baseline as well as body weight. No new brain lesions were detected by DWI or FLAIR imaging. Conclusions Physiological brain volume reduction during aging is less than 0.2% per year. Therefore a volume reduction of about 6% during the 2 months of extreme running appears to be substantial. The reconstitution in global volume measures after 8 months shows the process to be reversible. As possible mechanisms we discuss loss of protein, hypercortisolism and hyponatremia to account for both substantiality and reversibility of gray matter volume reductions. Reversible brain volume reduction during an ultramarathon suggests that extreme running might serve as a model to investigate

  18. Traqueostomia precoce versus traqueostomia tardia em pacientes com lesão cerebral aguda grave Early versus late tracheostomy in patients with acute severe brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno do Valle Pinheiro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar os efeitos da traqueostomia precoce e da traqueostomia tardia em pacientes com lesão cerebral aguda grave. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo com 28 pacientes admitidos na UTI do Hospital Universitário da Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora com diagnóstico de lesão cerebral aguda grave e apresentando escore na escala de coma de Glasgow (ECG OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of early tracheostomy and of late tracheostomy in patients with acute severe brain injury. METHODS: A retrospective study involving 28 patients admitted to the ICU of the Federal University of Juiz de Fora University Hospital in Juiz de Fora, Brazil, diagnosed with acute severe brain injury and presenting with a Glasgow coma scale (GCS score < 8 within the first 48 h of hospitalization. The patients were divided into two groups: early tracheostomy (ET, performed within the first 8 days after admission; and late tracheostomy (LT, performed after postadmission day 8. At admission, we collected demographic data and determined the following scores: Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II, GCS and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the groups (ET vs. LT regarding the demographic data or the scores: APACHE II (26 ± 6 vs. 28 ± 8; p = 0.37, SOFA (6.3 ± 2.7 vs. 7.2 ± 3.0; p = 0.43 and GCS (5.4 ± 1.7 vs. 5.5 ± 1.7; p = 0.87. The 28-day mortality rate was lower in the ET group (9% vs. 47%; p = 0.04. Nosocomial pneumonia occurring within the first 7 days was less common in the ET group, although the difference was not significant (0% vs. 23%; p = 0.13. There were no differences regarding the occurrence of late pneumonia or in the duration of mechanical ventilation between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of these findings, early tracheostomy should be considered in patients with acute severe brain injury.

  19. Single-subject statistical mapping of acute brain hypoxia in the rat following middle cerebral artery occlusion: a microPET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takasawa, Masashi; Beech, John S; Fryer, Tim D; Jones, P Simon; Ahmed, Tahir; Smith, Rob; Aigbirhio, Franklin I; Baron, Jean-Claude

    2011-06-01

    No study so far has attempted to map the 3D topography of brain hypoxia in the individual rat in vivo following middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). In a previous microPET study, we reported that (18)F-fluoromisonidazole ((18)F-MISO) trapping in the brain after MCAo was specific for the hypoxic viable tissue. Here, we used (18)F-MISO microPET to map the 3D topography of brain hypoxia in the acute stage of permanent distal MCAo in individual spontaneously hypertensive rats. Normal rats were also studied. (18)F-MISO was intravenously injected approximately 1 h after clip placement and PET data were acquired for 2 hours. Animals were sacrificed and the brains harvested 48 h later for infarct mapping using standard histopathology. As expected, continuous (18)F-MISO trapping was found over the affected relative to unaffected and control MCA cortex. Using single-subject voxel-based statistical mapping, tracer accumulation 90-120 min after injection was consistently significantly higher in the anterior MCA cortex (proximal relative to clip site) and gradually decreased towards posterior areas, a pattern consistent with the classic penumbra concept. The data also suggested that (i) a portion of the significant (18)F-MISO trapping area may sit outside the contours of the final infarct despite the permanent MCAo, suggesting that (18)F-MISO may be a marker not only of severe (penumbral) but also of milder (oligemic) hypoxia, and (ii) small portions of the final infarct may not exhibit early tracer trapping, suggesting that by the time the tracer was administered this tissue had already progressed to irreversible damage. This study shows the feasibility of single-subject mapping of brain hypoxia following MCAo in the rat, which has potential applications in pathophysiological investigations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A study of neurotoxic biomarkers, c-fos and GFAP after acute exposure to GSM radiation at 900 MHz in the picrotoxin model of rat brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo-Quintás, M; Martínez-Silva, I; Cadarso-Suárez, C; Alvarez-Figueiras, M; Ares-Pena, F J; López-Martín, E

    2011-08-01

    The acute effects of microwave exposure from the Global System for Mobile Communication (GSM) were studied in rats, using 900MHz radiation at an intensity similar to mobile phone emissions. Acute subconvulsive doses of picrotoxin were then administered to the rats and an experimental model of seizure-proneness was created from the data. Seventy-two adult male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent immunochemical testing of relevant anatomical areas to measure induction of the c-fos neuronal marker after 90min and 24h, and of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) 72h after acute exposure to a 900MHz electromagnetic field (EMF). The experimental set-up facilitated measurement of absorbed power, from which the average specific absorption rate was calculated using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) 2h after exposure to EMF radiation at 1.45W/kg in picrotoxin-treated rats and 1.38W/kg in untreated rats. Ninety minutes after radiation high levels of c-fos expression were recorded in the neocortex and paleocortex along with low hippocampus activation in picrotoxin treated animals. Most brain areas, except the limbic cortical region, showed important increases in neuronal activation 24h after picrotoxin and radiation. Three days after picrotoxin treatment, radiation effects were still apparent in th