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Sample records for acute brain injury

  1. Interleukin-1 and acute brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie N Murray

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Inflammation is the key host-defense response to infection and injury, yet also a major contributor to a diverse range of diseases, both peripheral and central in origin. Brain injury as a result of stroke or trauma is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide, yet there are no effective treatments, resulting in enormous social and economic costs. Increasing evidence, both preclinical and clinical, highlights inflammation as an important factor in stroke, both in determining outcome and as a contributor to risk. A number of inflammatory mediators have been proposed as key targets for intervention to reduce the burden of stroke, several reaching clinical trial, but as yet yielding no success. Many factors could explain these failures, including the lack of robust preclinical evidence and poorly designed clinical trials, in addition to the complex nature of the clinical condition. Lack of consideration in preclinical studies of associated co-morbidities prevalent in the clinical stroke population is now seen as an important omission in previous work. These co-morbidities (atherosclerosis, hypertension, diabetes, infection have a strong inflammatory component, supporting the need for greater understanding of how inflammation contributes to acute brain injury. Interleukin (IL-1 is the prototypical pro-inflammatory cytokine, first identified many years ago as the endogenous pyrogen. Research over the last 20 years or so reveals that IL-1 is an important mediator of neuronal injury and blocking the actions of IL-1 is beneficial in a number of experimental models of brain damage. Mechanisms underlying the actions of IL-1 in brain injury remain unclear, though increasing evidence indicates the cerebrovasculature as a key target. Recent literature supporting this and other aspects of how IL-1 and systemic inflammation in general contribute to acute brain injury are discussed in this review.

  2. Nonlinear Dynamic Theory of Acute Cell Injuries and Brain Ischemia

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    Taha, Doaa; Anggraini, Fika; Degracia, Donald; Huang, Zhi-Feng

    2015-03-01

    Cerebral ischemia in the form of stroke and cardiac arrest brain damage affect over 1 million people per year in the USA alone. In spite of close to 200 clinical trials and decades of research, there are no treatments to stop post-ischemic neuron death. We have argued that a major weakness of current brain ischemia research is lack of a deductive theoretical framework of acute cell injury to guide empirical studies. A previously published autonomous model based on the concept of nonlinear dynamic network was shown to capture important facets of cell injury, linking the concept of therapeutic to bistable dynamics. Here we present an improved, non-autonomous formulation of the nonlinear dynamic model of cell injury that allows multiple acute injuries over time, thereby allowing simulations of both therapeutic treatment and preconditioning. Our results are connected to the experimental data of gene expression and proteomics of neuron cells. Importantly, this new model may be construed as a novel approach to pharmacodynamics of acute cell injury. The model makes explicit that any pro-survival therapy is always a form of sub-lethal injury. This insight is expected to widely influence treatment of acute injury conditions that have defied successful treatment to date. This work is supported by NIH NINDS (NS081347) and Wayne State University President's Research Enhancement Award.

  3. Anti-oxidative aspect of inhaled anesthetic gases against acute brain injury

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    Tuo Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute brain injury is a critical and emergent condition in clinical settings, which needs to be addressed urgently. Commonly acute brain injuries include traumatic brain injury, ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. Oxidative stress is a key contributor to the subsequent injuries and impedes the reparative process after acute brain injury; therefore, facilitating an anti-oxidative approach is important in the care of those diseases. Readiness to deliver and permeability to blood brain barrier are essential for the use of this purpose. Inhaled anesthetic gases are a group of such agents. In this article, we discuss the anti-oxidative roles of anesthetic gases against acute brain injury.

  4. Acute respiratory distress syndrome assessment after traumatic brain injury

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    Shahrooz Kazemi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS is one of the most important complications associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI. ARDS is caused by inflammation of the lungs and hypoxic damage with lung physiology abnormalities associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Aim of this study is to determine the epidemiology of ARDS and the prevalence of risk factors. Methods: This prospective study performed on patients with acute traumatic head injury hospitalization in the intensive care unit of the Shohaday-e Haftom-e-Tir Hospital (September 2012 to September 2013 done. About 12 months, the data were evaluated. Information including age, sex, education, employment, drug and alcohol addiction, were collected and analyzed. The inclusion criteria were head traumatic patients and exclusion was the patients with chest trauma. Questionnaire was designed with doctors supervision of neurosurgery. Then the collected data were analysis. Results: In this study, the incidence of ARDS was 23.8% and prevalence of metabolic acidosis was 31.4%. Most injury with metabolic acidosis was Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH 48 (60% and Subdural hemorrhage (SDH was Next Level with 39 (48% Correlation between Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS and Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS were significantly decreased (P< 0.0001. The level of consciousness in patients with skull fractures significantly lower than those without fractures (P= 0.009 [(2.3±4.6 vs (4.02±7.07]. Prevalence of metabolic acidosis during hospitalization was 80 patients (31.4%. Conclusion: Acute respiratory distress syndrome is a common complication of traumatic brain injury. Management and treatment is essential to reduce the mortality. In this study it was found the age of patients with ARDS was higher than patients without complications. ARDS risk factor for high blood pressure was higher in men. Most victims were pedestrians. The most common injury associated with ARDS was SDH. Our analysis

  5. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Severe Brain Injury

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    Yu. A. Churlyaev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in victims with isolated severe brain injury (SBI. Subject and methods. 171 studies were performed in 16 victims with SBI. Their general condition was rated as very critical. The patients were divided into three groups: 1 non-ARDS; 2 Stage 1 ARDS; and 3 Stage 2 ARDS. The indicators of Stages 1 and 2 were assessed in accordance with the classification proposed by V. V. Moroz and A. M. Golubev. Intracranial pressure (ICP, extravascular lung water index, pulmonary vascular permeability, central hemodynamics, oxygenation index, lung anastomosis, the X-ray pattern of the lung and brain (computed tomography, and its function were monitored. Results. The hemispheric cortical level of injury of the brain with function compensation of its stem was predominantly determined in the controls; subcompensation and decompensation were ascertained in the ARDS groups. According to the proposed classification, these patients developed Stages 1 and 2 ARDS. When ARDS developed, there were rises in the level of extravascular lung fluid and pulmonary vascular permeability, a reduction in the oxygenation index (it was 6—12 hours later as compared with them, increases in a lung shunt and ICP; X-ray study revealed bilateral infiltrates in the absence of heart failure in Stage 2 ARDS. The correlation was positive between ICP and extravascular lung water index, and lung vascular permeability index (r>0.4;p<0.05. Conclusion. The studies have indicated that the classification proposed by V. V. Moroz and A. M. Golubev enables an early diagnosis of ARDS. One of its causes is severe brainstem injury that results in increased extravascular fluid in the lung due to its enhanced vascular permeability. The ICP value is a determinant in the diagnosis of secondary brain injuries. Key words: acute respiratory distress syndrome, extravascu-lar lung fluid, pulmonary vascular permeability, brain injury

  6. Acute assessment of brain injuries in ground-level falls.

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    Pöyry, Tiina; Luoto, Teemu M; Kataja, Anneli; Brander, Antti; Tenovuo, Olli; Iverson, Grant L; Öhman, Juha

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize traumatic brain injuries (TBI) sustained in ground-level falls (GLFs). The focus was on factors associated with acute computed tomographic (CT) findings. The sample included 575 subjects examined and treated at the Tampere University Hospital emergency department (ED). Retrospective data collection consisted of subject- and injury-related data and clinical information from the emergency department. All CT scans were analyzed and systematically coded. Ground-level falls were the mechanism of injury in 48.3% (n = 278) of the subjects. In the GLF group, independent risk factors for acute traumatic CT findings were long-term alcohol abuse, older age, being found on the ground, and left temporoparietal and occipital location of direct head impact. There were no significant differences in the incidence of any intracranial traumatic lesion type between those with GLFs and other causes of TBI. None of the classic clinical TBI severity markers studied were associated with acute traumatic CT findings in patients with GLFs. Older age and long-term alcohol abuse increase the likelihood of acute intracranial CT abnormalities. The pattern of intracranial traumatic CT findings does not differ from other causes of TBI. Clinical signs and indices of TBI severity did not predict traumatic CT findings.

  7. Clinical application of magnetic resonance in acute traumatic brain injury

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    Morais, Dionei F.; Gaia, Felipe F.P. [Hospital de Base de Sao Jose do Rio Preto, SP (Brazil). Servico de Neurocirurgia]. E-mail: centro@cerebroecoluna.com.br; Spotti, Antonio R.; Tognola, Waldir A. [Faculdade de Medicina de Sao Jose do Rio Preto (FAMERP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Ciencias Neurologicas; Andrade, Almir F. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Hospital das Clinicas. Dept. de Neurocirurgia da Emergencia

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical applications of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI): to identify the type, quantity, severity; and improvement clinical-radiological correlation. Method: Assessment of 55 patients who were imaged using CT and MRI, 34 (61.8%) males and 21 (38.2%) females, with acute (0 to 5 days) and closed TBI. Results: Statistical significant differences (McNemar test): occurred fractures were detected by CT in 29.1% and by MRI in 3.6% of the patients; subdural hematoma by CT in 10.9% and MRI in 36.4 %; diffuse axonal injury (DAI) by CT in 1.8% and MRI in 50.9%; cortical contusions by CT in 9.1% and MRI in 41.8%; subarachnoid hemorrhage by CT in 18.2% and MRI in 41.8%. Conclusion: MRI was superior to the CT in the identification of DAI, subarachnoid hemorrhage, cortical contusions, and acute subdural hematoma; however it was inferior in diagnosing fractures. The detection of DAI was associated with the severity of acute TBI. (author)

  8. Acute Blast Injury Reduces Brain Abeta in Two Rodent Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    Traumatic brain injury: football , warfare, and long- term effects. N. Engl. J. Med. 363, 1293–1296. Elder, G. A., Dorr, N. P., De Gasperi, R., Gama Sosa, M. A...al. (2012). Intranasal administration of nerve growth fac - tor ameliorate beta-amyloid deposi- tion after traumatic brain injury in rats. Brain Res

  9. Systemic inflammatory response following acute traumatic brain injury.

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    Lu, Jia; Goh, Samantha Jianli; Tng, Priscilla Ying Lei; Deng, Yi Yu; Ling, Eng-Ang; Moochhala, Shabbir

    2009-01-01

    The early, delayed, and systemic effects of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) are the result of inflammatory mediators which initiate systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), subsequent complement deficits and coagulopathy. Once SIRS is triggered by acute inflammation, it can detrimentally self-propagate. Systemic inflammation causes tissue damage leading to further inflammation and damage, leaving the body in a vicious cycle of hyperinflammation. Therefore, important inflammatory mediators like interleukin (IL)-1 beta, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF) alpha, are targeted in compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) in an attempt to control the development of SIRS. The hypothalamus-pituitary (HPA)-axis and sympathetic nervous system (SNS) efferent limbs in CARS provide negative feedback for the production of inflammatory mediators. However, in the case of acute TBI, the activation of CARS often leads to the complication of immunosuppression which may result in multi-organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) and mortality. In light of this, the activation of the SIRS following acute TBI does not bode well. If left uncontrolled, multiple systems will be implicated making it difficult to remedy.

  10. Diagnostic value of low-field MRI for acute poisoning brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Lianrong; He Qinyi

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the value of low-field MIR in diagnosis of acute CO poisoning brain injury. Methods: The brain MIR and clinical data of 110 patients with acute CO poisoning brain injury confirmed by clinical examination were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Long T1 and T2 signal intensity was showed on MRI in cerebral hemispheres and globus pallidus symmetrically. There were three basic types of MIR manifestations, white matter of brain type, globus pallidus type and brain mixed type. Conclusions: MRI could be used for confirming the degree and range of acute CO poisoning brain injury. It has important clinical value in the diagnosis, staging and prognosis of patients with acute CO poisoning brain injury. (authors)

  11. Aspiration-Induced Acute Lung Injury in Victims with Isolated Severe Brain Injury

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    Yu. A. Gorodovikova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the time and development rate of acute lung injury (ALI in severe brain injury (SBI complicated by aspiration of gastric contents or blood. Subjects and methods. Twenty-nine patients aged 19 to 70 years, who had isolated SBI, of whom there were 24 males and 5 females, were examined. The patients were divided into 2 groups: those with aspiration of gastric contents (n=9 or blood (n=10. A control group included 10 patients with SBI without aspiration. A PiCCO plus device was used to determine pulmonary extravascular fluid. ALI was diagnosed in accordance with the recommendations of the Research Institute of General Reanimatology, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences. Results. SBI patients with aspiration of gastric contents or blood were found to have significantly increased pulmonary extravascular water (p<0.01 and a lower oxygenation index (<300, which correlated with each other. ALI was recorded in the first hours after injury in about 50% of cases in both patients with gastric contents aspiration and those with blood aspiration. Conclusion. In patients with SBI complicated by aspiration of gastric contents or blood, pulmonary extravascular fluid accumulation concurrent with other signs of injury may be regarded as a criterion for acute lung injury. Key words: severe brain injury, aspiration, acute lung lesion.

  12. Capillaries in the Brain Microcirculatory Bed in the Acute Period of Experimental Brain Injury

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    V. Ye. Klimenko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to provide a morphochemical evaluation of the capillaries in the brain microcirculatory bed of experimental animals in the acute period of brain injury (BI. Materials and methods. An experiment was carried out on 40 sexually mature Wister rats. Gradual BI was inflicted by a falling load blow on the right parietotemporal region, as described by T. F. Sokolova (1986. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was made in the animals an hour after injury infliction to define the extent of the damage and its site. Morphological studies of the brain were conducted 24 and 72 hours and 7 days after the injury. The capillaries were identified by the injection technique (Indian ink imbedding. The NO-producing function of endotheliocytes was evaluated using the NADPH-diaphorase histochemical technique. To study microcirculatory changes, the similar brain portions ipsilateral to the site of injury and in the intact hemisphere were compared in each animal. The changes in the diameter of capillaries, the volume density of the microcirculatory bed, the exchange surface area and activity of NADPH diaphorase in the capillary wall were analyzed. The findings were processed by the variation statistical method, by determining the arithmetic mean, the standard error of the arithmetic mean, and the test of significance. The findings give an insight into the mechanisms responsible for secondary ischemic lesions in the early period of brain injury. The NO-dependent capillary blood flow reduction leading to hypoxia may be one of the most important causes of secondary cerebral lesion. All changes in the dynamics of microvessels (their lumen and area are in line with the activity of the enzyme. Conclusion. In severe BI, changes in the brain microcirculatory bed, its capillary link in particular, are manifested not only with in a traumatic injury focus, but also involve the brain as a whole. Key words: brain, brain njury, capillaries, nitric oxide (NO.

  13. Exacerbation of Acute Traumatic Brain Injury by Circulating Extracellular Vesicles.

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    Hazelton, Isla; Yates, Abi; Dale, Ashley; Roodselaar, Jay; Akbar, Naveed; Ruitenberg, Marc J; Anthony, Daniel C; Couch, Yvonne

    2018-02-15

    Inflammatory lesions in the brain activate a systemic acute-phase response (APR), which is dependent on the release of extracellular vesicles (EVs) into the circulation. The resulting APR is responsible for regulating leukocyte mobilization and subsequent recruitment to the brain. Factors that either exacerbate or inhibit the APR will also exacerbate or inhibit central nervous system (CNS) inflammation as a consequence and have the potential to influence ongoing secondary damage. Here, we were interested to discover how the circulating EV population changes after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and how manipulation of the circulating EV pool impacts on the outcome of TBI. We found the number of circulating EVs increased rapidly post-TBI, and this was accompanied by an increase in CNS and hepatic leukocyte recruitment. In an adoptive transfer study, we then evaluated the outcomes of TBI after administering EVs derived from either in vitro macrophage or endothelial cell lines stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS), or from murine plasma from an LPS challenge using the air-pouch model. By manipulating the circulating EV population, we were able to demonstrate that each population of transferred EVs increased the APR. However, the characteristics of the response were dependent on the nature of the EVs; specifically, it was significantly increased when animals were challenged with macrophage-derived EVs, suggesting that the cellular origins of EVs may determine their function. Selectively targeting EVs from macrophage/monocyte populations is likely to be of value in reducing the impact of the systemic inflammatory response on the outcome of traumatic CNS injury.

  14. Early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tong, Wu-song; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Jun-fa; Guo, Yi-jun; Zeng, Jing-song; Yang, Wen-jin; Li, Gao-yi; He, Bin; Yu, Hui

    2011-01-01

    Since progressive hemorrhagic injury (PHI) was introduced in neurosurgical literatures, several studies have been performed, the results of which have influenced doctors but do not define guidelines for the best treatment of PHI. PHI may be confirmed by a serial computerized tomography (CT) scan, and it has been shown to be associated with a fivefold increase in the risk of clinical worsening and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality as well. So, early detection of PHI is practically important in a clinical situation. To analyze the early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) and explore their clinical significances, PHI was confirmed by comparing the first and repeated CT scans. Data were analyzed and compared including times from injury to the first CT and signs of the early CT scan. Logistic regression analysis was used to show the risk factors related to PHI. A cohort of 630 TBI patients was evaluated, and there were 189 (30%) patients who suffered from PHI. For patients with their first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, there were 116 (77.25%) cases who suffered from PHI. The differences between PHIs and non-PHIs were significant in the initial CT scans showing fracture, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), brain contusion, epidural hematoma (EDH), subdural hematoma (SDH), and multiple hematoma as well as the times from injury to the first CT scan (P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that early CT scans (EDH, SDH, SAH, fracture, and brain contusion) were predictors of PHI (P < 0.01). For patients with the first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, a follow-up CT scan should be performed promptly. If the initial CT scan shows SAH, brain contusion, and primary hematoma with brain swelling, an earlier and dynamic CT scan should be performed for detection of PHI as early as possible and the medical intervention would be enforced in time. (orig.)

  15. Early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury

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    Tong, Wu-song; Zheng, Ping; Xu, Jun-fa; Guo, Yi-jun; Zeng, Jing-song; Yang, Wen-jin; Li, Gao-yi; He, Bin; Yu, Hui [Pudong New Area People' s Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Shanghai (China)

    2011-05-15

    Since progressive hemorrhagic injury (PHI) was introduced in neurosurgical literatures, several studies have been performed, the results of which have influenced doctors but do not define guidelines for the best treatment of PHI. PHI may be confirmed by a serial computerized tomography (CT) scan, and it has been shown to be associated with a fivefold increase in the risk of clinical worsening and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality as well. So, early detection of PHI is practically important in a clinical situation. To analyze the early CT signs of progressive hemorrhagic injury following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) and explore their clinical significances, PHI was confirmed by comparing the first and repeated CT scans. Data were analyzed and compared including times from injury to the first CT and signs of the early CT scan. Logistic regression analysis was used to show the risk factors related to PHI. A cohort of 630 TBI patients was evaluated, and there were 189 (30%) patients who suffered from PHI. For patients with their first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, there were 116 (77.25%) cases who suffered from PHI. The differences between PHIs and non-PHIs were significant in the initial CT scans showing fracture, subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), brain contusion, epidural hematoma (EDH), subdural hematoma (SDH), and multiple hematoma as well as the times from injury to the first CT scan (P < 0.01). Logistic regression analysis showed that early CT scans (EDH, SDH, SAH, fracture, and brain contusion) were predictors of PHI (P < 0.01). For patients with the first CT scan obtained as early as 2 h post-injury, a follow-up CT scan should be performed promptly. If the initial CT scan shows SAH, brain contusion, and primary hematoma with brain swelling, an earlier and dynamic CT scan should be performed for detection of PHI as early as possible and the medical intervention would be enforced in time. (orig.)

  16. Venous System in Acute Brain Injury: Mechanisms of Pathophysiological Change and Function

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    Xu, Liang; Matei, Nathanael; Tang, Jiping; Feng, Hua; Zhang, JohnH

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral vascular injury is a major component of acute brain injury. Currently, neuroprotective strategies primarily focus on the recanalization of cerebral arteries and capillaries, and the protection of insulted neurons. Hitherto, the role of vein drainage in the pathophysiology of acute brain injury has been overlooked, due to an under appreciation of the magnitude of the impact of veins in circulation. In this review, we summarize the changes in the vein morphology and functions that are known, or likely to occur related to acute brain injury, and aim to advance the therapeutic management of acute brain injury by shifting the focus from reperfusion to another term: recirculation. Recent progress in the neurobiological understanding of the vascular neural network has demonstrated that cerebral venous systems are able to respond to acute brain injury by regulating the blood flow disharmony following brain edema, blood brain barrier disruption, ischemia, and hemorrhage. With the evidence presented in this review, future clinical management of acutely brain injured patients will expand to include the recirculation concept, establishing a harmony between arterial and venous systems, in addition to the established recanalization and reperfusion strategies. PMID:25783658

  17. Functional MRI for Assessment of the Default Mode Network in Acute Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kondziella, Daniel; Fisher, Patrick M.; Larsen, Vibeke Andrée

    2017-01-01

    Background: Assessment of the default mode network (DMN) using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) may improve assessment of the level of consciousness in chronic brain injury, and therefore, fMRI may also have prognostic value in acute brain injury. However, fMRI is much...

  18. The Role of Excitotoxic Programmed Necrosis in Acute Brain Injury

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    Denson G. Fujikawa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Excitotoxicity involves the excessive release of glutamate from presynaptic nerve terminals and from reversal of astrocytic glutamate uptake, when there is excessive neuronal depolarization. N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA receptors, a subtype of glutamate receptor, are activated in postsynaptic neurons, opening their receptor-operated cation channels to allow Ca2+ influx. The Ca2+ influx activates two enzymes, calpain I and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS. Calpain I activation produces mitochondrial release of cytochrome c (cyt c, truncated apoptosis-inducing factor (tAIF and endonuclease G (endoG, the lysosomal release of cathepsins B and D and DNase II, and inactivation of the plasma membrane Na+–Ca2+ exchanger, which add to the buildup of intracellular Ca2+. tAIF is involved in large-scale DNA cleavage and cyt c may be involved in chromatin condensation; endoG produces internucleosomal DNA cleavage. The nuclear actions of the other proteins have not been determined. nNOS forms nitric oxide (NO, which reacts with superoxide (O2− to form peroxynitrite (ONOO−. These free radicals damage cellular membranes, intracellular proteins and DNA. DNA damage activates poly(ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1, which produces poly(ADP-ribose (PAR polymers that exit nuclei and translocate to mitochondrial membranes, also releasing AIF. Poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase hydrolyzes PAR polymers into ADP-ribose molecules, which translocate to plasma membranes, activating melastatin-like transient receptor potential 2 (TRPM-2 channels, which open, allowing Ca2+ influx into neurons. NADPH oxidase (NOX1 transfers electrons across cellular membranes, producing O2−. The result of these processes is neuronal necrosis, which is a programmed cell death that is the basis of all acute neuronal injury in the adult brain.

  19. Effect of taurine on chronic and acute liver injury: Focus on blood and brain ammonia

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    Reza Heidari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyperammonemia is associated with chronic and acute liver injury. There is no promising therapeutic agent against ammonia-induced complications. Hence, finding therapeutic molecules with safe profile of administration has clinical value. The present study was conducted to evaluate the role of taurine (TA administration on plasma and brain ammonia and its consequent events in different models of chronic and acute liver injury and hyperammonemia. Bile duct ligated (BDL rats were used as a model of chronic liver injury. Thioacetamide and acetaminophen-induced acute liver failure were used as acute liver injury models. A high level of ammonia was detected in blood and brain of experimental groups. An increase in brain ammonia level coincided with a decreased total locomotor activity of animals and significant changes in the biochemistry of blood and also liver tissue. TA administration (500 and 1000 mg/kg, i.p, effectively alleviated liver injury and its consequent events including rise in plasma and brain ammonia and brain edema. The data suggested that TA is not only a useful and safe agent to preserve liver function, but also prevented hyperammonemia as a deleterious consequence of acute and chronic liver injury.

  20. Acute Alcohol Intoxication in Patients with Mild Traumatic Brain Injury : Characteristics, Recovery, and Outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheenen, Myrthe E.; de Koning, Myrthe E.; van der Horn, Harm; Roks, Gerwin; Yilmaz, Tansel; van der Naalt, Joukje; Spikman, Jacoba M.

    2016-01-01

    A substantial number of patients (30% to 50%) sustains a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) while they are under the influence of alcohol. An acute alcohol intoxication (AAI) at the time of injury has been subject of research in severe TBI, but little is known about the relation between AAI and

  1. Patients' and relatives' experience of difficulties following severe traumatic brain injury: the sub-acute stage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Sara; Schönberger, Michael; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2008-01-01

    ' and relatives' reports of patient difficulties, and (3) explore the role of injury severity, disability and other factors on subjective experience of difficulties. The primary measure was the European Brain Injury Questionnaire (EBIQ) administered to patients and to one of their close relatives at discharge......The present study aimed to (1) identify the difficulties most frequently reported by individuals with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) at the time of discharge from a sub-acute rehabilitation brain injury unit as well as difficulties reported by their relatives, (2) compare patients...... was low compared to other studies using the EBIQ. Furthermore, the effects of injury severity and general level of functioning had limited impact on the subjective experience of difficulties. Implications of these findings, specifically as they pertain to the sub-acute stage are discussed Udgivelsesdato...

  2. Systems biomarkers as acute diagnostics and chronic monitoring tools for traumatic brain injury

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    Wang, Kevin K. W.; Moghieb, Ahmed; Yang, Zhihui; Zhang, Zhiqun

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant biomedical problem among military personnel and civilians. There exists an urgent need to develop and refine biological measures of acute brain injury and chronic recovery after brain injury. Such measures "biomarkers" can assist clinicians in helping to define and refine the recovery process and developing treatment paradigms for the acutely injured to reduce secondary injury processes. Recent biomarker studies in the acute phase of TBI have highlighted the importance and feasibilities of identifying clinically useful biomarkers. However, much less is known about the subacute and chronic phases of TBI. We propose here that for a complex biological problem such as TBI, multiple biomarker types might be needed to harness the wide range of pathological and systemic perturbations following injuries, including acute neuronal death, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration and neuroregeneration to systemic responses. In terms of biomarker types, they range from brain-specific proteins, microRNA, genetic polymorphism, inflammatory cytokines and autoimmune markers and neuro-endocrine hormones. Furthermore, systems biology-driven biomarkers integration can help present a holistic approach to understanding scenarios and complexity pathways involved in brain injury.

  3. siRNA Treatment: “A Sword-in-the-Stone” for Acute Brain Injuries

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    Jerome Badaut

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ever since the discovery of small interfering ribonucleic acid (siRNA a little over a decade ago, it has been highly sought after for its potential as a therapeutic agent for many diseases. In this review, we discuss the promising possibility of siRNA to be used as a drug to treat acute brain injuries such as stroke and traumatic brain injury. First, we will give a brief and basic overview of the principle of RNA interference as an effective mechanism to decrease specific protein expression. Then, we will review recent in vivo studies describing siRNA research experiments/treatment options for acute brain diseases. Lastly, we will discuss the future of siRNA as a clinical therapeutic strategy against brain diseases and injuries, while addressing the current obstacles to effective brain delivery.

  4. Brain expression of the water channels Aquaporin-1 and -4 in mice with acute liver injury, hyperammonemia and brain edema

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eefsen, Martin; Jelnes, Peter; Schmidt, Lars E

    2010-01-01

    Cerebral edema is a feared complication to acute liver failure (ALF), but the pathogenesis is still poorly understood. The water channels Aquaporin-1 (Aqp1) and -4 (Aqp4) has been associated with brain edema formation in several neuropathological conditions, indicating a possible role of Aqp1 and....../or Aqp4 in ALF mediated brain edema. We induced acute liver injury and hyperammonemia in mice, to evaluate brain edema formation and the parallel expression of Aqp1 and Aqp4 in ALF. Liver injury and hyperammonemia were induced by +D-galactosamine (GLN) plus lipopolysaccharide (LPS) intraperitoneally...

  5. Novel Mechanism for Reducing Acute and Chronic Neurodegeneration After Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-14-1-0195 TITLE: Novel Mechanism for Reducing Acute and Chronic Neurodegeneration after Traumatic Brain Injury...Purpose: The purpose of this project is to develop a radically different strategy to reduce brain glutamate excitotoxicity and treat TBI. We will...objective of reducing blood levels of glutamate. This will produce a brain -to-blood gradient of glutamate which will enhance the removal of excess

  6. Psychological Characteristics in Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: An MMPI-2 Study.

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    Gass, Carlton S; Rogers, David; Kinne, Erica

    2017-01-01

    The psychological characteristics of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) have received limited research focus, despite empirical evidence of their relevance for subsequent psychological adjustment and early therapeutic intervention. This study addressed a wide range of psychological features in 47 individuals who were hospitalized as a result of acute mild TBI (mTBI). Participants were screened from amongst consecutive TBI admissions for moderate to severe brain injury, and for pre-injury neurological, psychiatric, or substance abuse histories. Clinical and content scale scores on the MMPI-2 were explored in relation to patient gender, age, level of education, and extent of cognitive complaints. The results revealed diverse psychosocial problem areas across the sample, the most common of which were somatic and cognitive complaints, compromised insight, and a naively optimistic self-perception. The mediating roles of injury severity and demographic variables are discussed. Clinical implications and specific recommendations are presented.

  7. Protective effect of grifolin against brain injury in an acute cerebral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the protective effects of grifolin against brain injury in an acute cerebral ischemia rat model. Methods: Rats were assigned to five groups: control, negative control, and grifolin (50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, p.o.) treated groups, which received the drug for 2 weeks. All the animals were sacrificed at the end of ...

  8. Preliminary evidence that ketamine inhibits spreading depolarizations in acute human brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakowitz, Oliver W; Kiening, Karl L; Krajewski, Kara L

    2009-01-01

    , they cause or augment damage in the ischemic brain. A fraction of spreading depolarizations is abolished by N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists. Summary of Case- In 2 patients with severe acute brain injury (traumatic and spontaneous intracranial hemorrhage), spreading depolarizations were inhibited...... by the noncompetitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist ketamine. This restored electrocorticographic activity. CONCLUSIONS: These anecdotal electrocorticographic findings suggest that ketamine has an inhibitory effect on spreading depolarizations in humans. This is of potential interest for future...

  9. Age and Diet Affect Genetically Separable Secondary Injuries that Cause Acute Mortality Following Traumatic Brain Injury in Drosophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeccah J. Katzenberger

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Outcomes of traumatic brain injury (TBI vary because of differences in primary and secondary injuries. Primary injuries occur at the time of a traumatic event, whereas secondary injuries occur later as a result of cellular and molecular events activated in the brain and other tissues by primary injuries. We used a Drosophila melanogaster TBI model to investigate secondary injuries that cause acute mortality. By analyzing mortality percentage within 24 hr of primary injuries, we previously found that age at the time of primary injuries and diet afterward affect the severity of secondary injuries. Here, we show that secondary injuries peaked in activity 1–8 hr after primary injuries. Additionally, we demonstrate that age and diet activated distinct secondary injuries in a genotype-specific manner, and that concurrent activation of age- and diet-regulated secondary injuries synergistically increased mortality. To identify genes involved in secondary injuries that cause mortality, we compared genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of uninjured and injured flies under age and diet conditions that had different mortalities. During the peak period of secondary injuries, innate immune response genes were the predominant class of genes that changed expression. Furthermore, age and diet affected the magnitude of the change in expression of some innate immune response genes, suggesting roles for these genes in inhibiting secondary injuries that cause mortality. Our results indicate that the complexity of TBI outcomes is due in part to distinct, genetically controlled, age- and diet-regulated mechanisms that promote secondary injuries and that involve a subset of innate immune response genes.

  10. Age and Diet Affect Genetically Separable Secondary Injuries that Cause Acute Mortality Following Traumatic Brain Injury in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzenberger, Rebeccah J; Ganetzky, Barry; Wassarman, David A

    2016-12-07

    Outcomes of traumatic brain injury (TBI) vary because of differences in primary and secondary injuries. Primary injuries occur at the time of a traumatic event, whereas secondary injuries occur later as a result of cellular and molecular events activated in the brain and other tissues by primary injuries. We used a Drosophila melanogaster TBI model to investigate secondary injuries that cause acute mortality. By analyzing mortality percentage within 24 hr of primary injuries, we previously found that age at the time of primary injuries and diet afterward affect the severity of secondary injuries. Here, we show that secondary injuries peaked in activity 1-8 hr after primary injuries. Additionally, we demonstrate that age and diet activated distinct secondary injuries in a genotype-specific manner, and that concurrent activation of age- and diet-regulated secondary injuries synergistically increased mortality. To identify genes involved in secondary injuries that cause mortality, we compared genome-wide mRNA expression profiles of uninjured and injured flies under age and diet conditions that had different mortalities. During the peak period of secondary injuries, innate immune response genes were the predominant class of genes that changed expression. Furthermore, age and diet affected the magnitude of the change in expression of some innate immune response genes, suggesting roles for these genes in inhibiting secondary injuries that cause mortality. Our results indicate that the complexity of TBI outcomes is due in part to distinct, genetically controlled, age- and diet-regulated mechanisms that promote secondary injuries and that involve a subset of innate immune response genes. Copyright © 2016 Katzenberger et al.

  11. Neurosensory Symptom Complexes after Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Hoffer

    Full Text Available Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI is a prominent public health issue. To date, subjective symptom complaints primarily dictate diagnostic and treatment approaches. As such, the description and qualification of these symptoms in the mTBI patient population is of great value. This manuscript describes the symptoms of mTBI patients as compared to controls in a larger study designed to examine the use of vestibular testing to diagnose mTBI. Five symptom clusters were identified: Post-Traumatic Headache/Migraine, Nausea, Emotional/Affective, Fatigue/Malaise, and Dizziness/Mild Cognitive Impairment. Our analysis indicates that individuals with mTBI have headache, dizziness, and cognitive dysfunction far out of proportion to those without mTBI. In addition, sleep disorders and emotional issues were significantly more common amongst mTBI patients than non-injured individuals. A simple set of questions inquiring about dizziness, headache, and cognitive issues may provide diagnostic accuracy. The consideration of other symptoms may be critical for providing prognostic value and treatment for best short-term outcomes or prevention of long-term complications.

  12. Acute white matter differences in the fornix following mild traumatic brain injury using diffusion tensor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yallampalli, Ragini; Wilde, Elisabeth A; Bigler, Erin D; McCauley, Stephen R; Hanten, Gerri; Troyanskaya, Maya; Hunter, Jill V; Chu, Zili; Li, Xiaoqi; Levin, Harvey S

    2013-04-01

    The integrity of the fornix using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in adolescent participants with acute mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) compared to a demographically matched control group was examined. Fractional anisotropy (FA) in the fornix was elevated in the mild traumatic brain injured group. Performance on the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM) was lower in the group with mTBI. A relation was found between lower performance on cognitive tasks and higher FA. The potential role of fornix injury as a basis of memory and processing speed deficits in mTBI is discussed. Copyright © 2010 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  13. Low-Dose Intramuscular Diclofenac Sodium for Fever Control in Acute Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picetti, Edoardo; Servadei, Franco; Reverberi, Cristiana; De Carlo, Francesca; Rossi, Ilaria; Antonini, Marta Velia; Caspani, Maria Luisa

    2016-11-01

    To evaluate the cerebral and hemodynamic effects of low-dose intramuscular diclofenac sodium (DCFS) administered for fever control in patients with acute brain injury in the intensive care unit. Inclusion criteria for this prospective clinical study were age ≥18 years; the ability to monitor intra-arterial blood pressure, core body temperature, and intracranial pressure; the placement of an indwelling jugular venous catheter for intermittent jugular venous oxygen saturation measurements; and a core body temperature ≥37.5°C. Exclusion criteria were hypovolemia, administration of drugs with hemodynamic effects during the study period, administration of antipyretics within 6 hours before the start of the study, acute heart failure, cerebral vasospasm, pregnancy, renal and gastric diseases, and allergy to DCFS. The study enrolled 30 patients with acute brain injury. Two We observed statistically significant decreases in core body temperature (P administration with respect to baseline (T0). The dosage of noradrenaline (norepinephrine) in subjects receiving treatment at the start of the study increased significantly from 0.14 μg/kg/minute ± 0.1 to 0.20 μg/kg/minute ± 0.1 (P = 0.0395). Low-dose intramuscular DCFS administration for fever control in patients with acute brain injury is effective but also exposes patients to potentially deleterious hypotensive episodes that must be diagnosed and treated expeditiously to prevent further damage to the injured brain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Oxidation-Reduction Potential as a Biomarker for Severity and Acute Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly B. Bjugstad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are few reliable markers for assessing traumatic brain injury (TBI. Elevated levels of oxidative stress have been observed in TBI patients. We hypothesized that oxidation-reduction potential (ORP could be a potent biomarker in TBI. Two types of ORP were measured in patient plasma samples: the static state of oxidative stress (sORP and capacity for induced oxidative stress (icORP. Differences in ORP values as a function of time after injury, severity, and hospital discharge were compared using ANOVAs with significance at p≤0.05. Logit regression analyses were used to predict acute outcome comparing ORP, Injury Severity Score (ISS, Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS, and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS. Antioxidant capacity (icORP on day 4 was prognostic for acute outcomes (p 7.25 μC. IcORP was a better predictor than ISS, AIS, or GCS scores. sORP increased in those with the highest ISS values (p<0.05. Based on these findings ORP is useful biomarker for severity and acute outcome in TBI patients. Changes in ORP values on day 4 after injury were the most prognostic, suggesting that patients’ response to brain injury over time is a factor that determines outcome.

  15. Acute Inflammatory Response in Rodent Brain and Blood Following a Blast Induced Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    dehydrated with 30% sucrose before storing at -80 °C. Thirty micron coronal sections were stained with a primary antibody against microglia ...strongly Iba-1 stained cells as compared to controls. These results indicate blast exposure induces activation of microglia in the hippocampus... Neuroinflammation after traumatic brain injury: Opportunities for therapeutic intervention. Brain, behaviour and Immunity 26: 1191-1201. Loane, D. J

  16. Investigating metacognition, cognition, and behavioral deficits of college students with acute traumatic brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Sarah; Davalos, Deana

    2016-07-01

    Executive dysfunction in college students who have had an acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) was investigated. The cognitive, behavioral, and metacognitive effects on college students who endorsed experiencing a brain injury were specifically explored. Participants were 121 college students who endorsed a mild TBI, and 121 college students with no history of a TBI were matched on sex and ethnicity to examine potential differences between groups. Participants completed the Dysexecutive Questionnaire (DEX). A Rasch analysis indicated that the TBI group had significantly higher total scores on the DEX than the control group. Moreover, when compared with the control group, the students with a TBI had higher scores on all 3 subcomponents of the DEX. These findings suggest that students who endorse brain injuries may experience more difficulty with specific facets of college. Thus, the importance of academic and personal resources available for students with a TBI is discussed.

  17. DIAGNOSTICS AND TREATMENT OF MILD AND MODERATE BRAIN INJURY IN CHILDREN WITH ACUTE CRANIOCEREBRAL TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.N. Shadrin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Authors present modern approach to the diagnostics and treatment of children with acute period of mild and moderate brain injury. It is necessary to provide timely diagnostics in children with craniocerebral trauma via neurovisualization: ultrasonic scan and computer tomography of brain (for a diagnostics of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes, duplex ultrasonic scan and magnetic resonance imaging (for a detection of traumatic dissections of main arteries of head. The article considers main aspects of treatment of children with craniocerebral injury, describes indications to pathogenetical therapy aimed to compensation of disorders in dynamics of cerebrospinal liquor, microcirculation and antioxidant status.Key words: children, cerebrospinal injury, diagnostics, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2010;9(2:90-93

  18. Cognitive Improvement after Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Measured with Functional Neuroimaging during the Acute Period.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn R Wylie

    Full Text Available Functional neuroimaging studies in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI have been largely limited to patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms, utilizing images obtained months to years after the actual head trauma. We sought to distinguish acute and delayed effects of mild traumatic brain injury on working memory functional brain activation patterns < 72 hours after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI and again one-week later. We hypothesized that clinical and fMRI measures of working memory would be abnormal in symptomatic mTBI patients assessed < 72 hours after injury, with most patients showing clinical recovery (i.e., improvement in these measures within 1 week after the initial assessment. We also hypothesized that increased memory workload at 1 week following injury would expose different cortical activation patterns in mTBI patients with persistent post-concussive symptoms, compared to those with full clinical recovery. We performed a prospective, cohort study of working memory in emergency department patients with isolated head injury and clinical diagnosis of concussion, compared to control subjects (both uninjured volunteers and emergency department patients with extremity injuries and no head trauma. The primary outcome of cognitive recovery was defined as resolution of reported cognitive impairment and quantified by scoring the subject's reported cognitive post-concussive symptoms at 1 week. Secondary outcomes included additional post-concussive symptoms and neurocognitive testing results. We enrolled 46 subjects: 27 with mild TBI and 19 controls. The time of initial neuroimaging was 48 (+22 S.D. hours after injury (time 1. At follow up (8.7, + 1.2 S.D., days after injury, time 2, 18 of mTBI subjects (64% reported moderate to complete cognitive recovery, 8 of whom fully recovered between initial and follow-up imaging. fMRI changes from time 1 to time 2 showed an increase in posterior cingulate activation in the mTBI subjects

  19. Association between Peripheral Oxidative Stress and White Matter Damage in Acute Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Ming Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative stress is believed to be one of the mechanisms involved in the neuronal damage after acute traumatic brain injury (TBI. However, the disease severity correlation between oxidative stress biomarker level and deep brain microstructural changes in acute TBI remains unknown. In present study, twenty-four patients with acute TBI and 24 healthy volunteers underwent DTI. The peripheral blood oxidative biomarkers, like serum thiol and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS concentrations, were also obtained. The DTI metrics of the deep brain regions, as well as the fractional anisotropy (FA and apparent diffusion coefficient, were measured and correlated with disease severity, serum thiol, and TBARS levels. We found that patients with TBI displayed lower FAs in deep brain regions with abundant WMs and further correlated with increased serum TBARS level. Our study has shown a level of anatomic detail to the relationship between white matter (WM damage and increased systemic oxidative stress in TBI which suggests common inflammatory processes that covary in both the peripheral and central reactions after TBI.

  20. Post-acute traumatic brain injury rehabilitation: effects on outcome measures and life care costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griesbach, Grace S; Kreber, Lisa A; Harrington, David; Ashley, Mark J

    2015-05-15

    Rehabilitation is the predominant post-acute treatment for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). We retrospectively evaluated the effectiveness of post-acute TBI rehabilitation by comparing outcome measures and life care cost with that of patients with cerebrovascular accident (CVA) who underwent a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program within the same facility. To better assess the effects of rehabilitation, we only included patients with no benefit limitations from the insurance carrier. Functional effectiveness was determined by comparing outcome scales, which included the Disability Rating Scale, Mayo Portland Inventory, Occupational Status Scale, Living Status Scale, and the Centre for Neuro Skills Scale. Cost-effectiveness was determined by having certified life care planners create separate cost projections from the admission and discharge patient files. This allowed us to compare cost projections with and without rehabilitation for each patient. Significant decreases in the cost projections, i.e., rehabilitation savings (RS), were found after rehabilitation for TBI. These RS were equivalent to those of patients with CVA. Likewise, equivalent improvements were found on all of the outcome scales for both brain injury groups. We also evaluated if the latency from TBI to admission in the rehabilitation program had an influence on outcome. Cost and functional effectiveness was more marked when rehabilitation was initiated within the first year after TBI. The effects of age of TBI were also evaluated. Although RS were most marked in younger patients, improvements in outcome measures were observed in all age groups after post-acute rehabilitation.

  1. Correlation of Computed Tomography findings with Glasgow Coma Scale in patients with acute traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SK Sah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To correlate Computed Tomography (CT findings with Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS in patients with acute traumatic brain injury attending in Chitwan Medical College teaching hospital Chitwan, Nepal. MATERIALS AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was performed among 50 patients of acute (less than24 hours cases of craniocerebral trauma over a period of four months. The patient’s level of consciousness (GCS was determined and a brain CT scan without contrast media was performed. A sixth generation General Electric (GE CT scan was utilized and 5mm and 10mm sections were obtained for infratentorial and supratentorial parts respectively. RESULT The age range of the patients was 1 to 75 years (mean age 35.6± 21.516 years and male: female ratio was 3.1:1. The most common causes of head injury were road traffic accident (RTA (60%, fall injury (20%, physical assault (12% and pedestrian injuries (8%. The distribution of patients in accordance with consciousness level was found to be 54% with mild TBI (GCS score 12 to 14, 28% with moderate TBI (GCS score 11 to 8 and 18% with severe TBI (GCS score less than 7. The presence of mixed lesions and midline shift regardless of the underlying lesion on CT scan was accompanied by lower GCS. CONCLUSION The presence of mixed lesions and midline shift regardless of the underlying lesion on CT scan were accompanied with lower GCS. Patients having single lesion had more GCS level than mixed level and mid line shift type of injury.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i2.12947 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol.10(2; 4-9

  2. Acute glucose and lactate metabolism are associated with cognitive recovery following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, Christina; Glenn, Thomas C; Hovda, David A; Vespa, Paul M; McArthur, David L; Van Horn, John D; Wright, Matthew J

    2018-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with acute cerebral metabolic crisis (ACMC). ACMC-related atrophy appears to be prominent in frontal and temporal lobes following moderate-to-severe TBI. This atrophy is correlated with poorer cognitive outcomes in TBI. The current study investigated ability of acute glucose and lactate metabolism to predict long-term recovery of frontal-temporal cognitive function in participants with moderate-to-severe TBI. Cerebral metabolic rate of glucose and lactate were measured by the Kety-Schmidt method on days 0-7 post-injury. Indices of frontal-temporal cognitive processing were calculated for six months post-injury; 12 months post-injury; and recovery (the difference between the six- and 12-month scores). Glucose and lactate metabolism were included in separate regression models, as they were highly intercorrelated. Also, glucose and lactate values were centered and averaged and included in a final regression model. Models for the prediction frontal-temporal cognition at six and 12 months post-injury were not significant. However, average glucose and lactate metabolism predicted recovery of frontal-temporal cognition, accounting for 23% and 22% of the variance, respectively. Also, maximum glucose metabolism, but not maximum lactate metabolism, was an inverse predictor in the recovery of frontal-temporal cognition, accounting for 23% of the variance. Finally, the average of glucose and lactate metabolism predicted frontal-temporal cognitive recovery, accounting for 22% of the variance. These data indicate that acute glucose and lactate metabolism both support cognitive recovery from TBI. Also, our data suggest that control of endogenous fuels and/or supplementation with exogenous fuels may have therapeutic potential for cognitive recovery from TBI. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Very early hypothermia induction in patients with severe brain injury (the National Acute Brain Injury Study: Hypothermia II): a randomised trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Guy L; Valadka, Alex; Zygun, David; Coffey, Christopher S; Drever, Pamala; Fourwinds, Sierra; Janis, L Scott; Wilde, Elizabeth; Taylor, Pauline; Harshman, Kathy; Conley, Adam; Puccio, Ava; Levin, Harvey S; McCauley, Stephen R; Bucholz, Richard D; Smith, Kenneth R; Schmidt, John H; Scott, James N; Yonas, Howard; Okonkwo, David O

    2011-02-01

    The inconsistent effect of hypothermia treatment on severe brain injury in previous trials might be because hypothermia was induced too late after injury. We aimed to assess whether very early induction of hypothermia improves outcome in patients with severe brain injury. The National Acute Brain Injury Study: Hypothermia II (NABIS: H II) was a randomised, multicentre clinical trial of patients with severe brain injury who were enrolled within 2·5 h of injury at six sites in the USA and Canada. Patients with non-penetrating brain injury who were 16-45 years old and were not responsive to instructions were randomly assigned (1:1) by a random number generator to hypothermia or normothermia. Patients randomly assigned to hypothermia were cooled to 35°C until their trauma assessment was completed. Patients who had none of a second set of exclusion criteria were either cooled to 33°C for 48 h and then gradually rewarmed or treated at normothermia, depending upon their initial treatment assignment. Investigators who assessed the outcome measures were masked to treatment allocation. The primary outcome was the Glasgow outcome scale score at 6 months. Analysis was by modified intention to treat. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00178711. Enrolment occurred from December, 2005, to June, 2009, when the trial was terminated for futility. Follow-up was from June, 2006, to December, 2009. 232 patients were initially randomised a mean of 1·6 h (SD 0·5) after injury: 119 to hypothermia and 113 to normothermia. 97 patients (52 in the hypothermia group and 45 in the normothermia group) did not meet any of the second set of exclusion criteria. The mean time to 35°C for the 52 patients in the hypothermia group was 2·6 h (SD 1·2) and to 33°C was 4·4 h (1·5). Outcome was poor (severe disability, vegetative state, or death) in 31 of 52 patients in the hypothermia group and 25 of 56 in the normothermia group (relative risk [RR] 1·08, 95% CI 0·76-1·53; p

  4. Altered spontaneous brain activity in patients with acute spinal cord injury revealed by resting-state functional MRI.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Zhu

    Full Text Available Previous neuroimaging studies have provided evidence of structural and functional reorganization of brain in patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI. However, it remains unknown whether the spontaneous brain activity changes in acute SCI. In this study, we investigated intrinsic brain activity in acute SCI patients using a regional homogeneity (ReHo analysis based on resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging.A total of 15 patients with acute SCI and 16 healthy controls participated in the study. The ReHo value was used to evaluate spontaneous brain activity, and voxel-wise comparisons of ReHo were performed to identify brain regions with altered spontaneous brain activity between groups. We also assessed the associations between ReHo and the clinical scores in brain regions showing changed spontaneous brain activity.Compared with the controls, the acute SCI patients showed decreased ReHo in the bilateral primary motor cortex/primary somatosensory cortex, bilateral supplementary motor area/dorsal lateral prefrontal cortex, right inferior frontal gyrus, bilateral dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and bilateral caudate; and increased ReHo in bilateral precuneus, the left inferior parietal lobe, the left brainstem/hippocampus, the left cingulate motor area, bilateral insula, bilateral thalamus and bilateral cerebellum. The average ReHo values of the left thalamus and right insula were negatively correlated with the international standards for the neurological classification of spinal cord injury motor scores.Our findings indicate that acute distant neuronal damage has an immediate impact on spontaneous brain activity. In acute SCI patients, the ReHo was prominently altered in brain regions involved in motor execution and cognitive control, default mode network, and which are associated with sensorimotor compensatory reorganization. Abnormal ReHo values in the left thalamus and right insula could serve as potential biomarkers for

  5. Connectomic and Surface-Based Morphometric Correlates of Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Acqua, Patrizia; Johannes, Sönke; Mica, Ladislav; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Glaab, Richard; Fandino, Javier; Schwendinger, Markus; Meier, Christoph; Ulbrich, Erika J.; Müller, Andreas; Jäncke, Lutz; Hänggi, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Reduced integrity of white matter (WM) pathways and subtle anomalies in gray matter (GM) morphology have been hypothesized as mechanisms in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). However, findings on structural brain changes in early stages after mTBI are inconsistent and findings related to early symptoms severity are rare. Fifty-one patients were assessed with multimodal neuroimaging and clinical methods exclusively within 7 days following mTBI and compared to 53 controls. Whole-brain connectivity based on diffusion tensor imaging was subjected to network-based statistics, whereas cortical surface area, thickness, and volume based on T1-weighted MRI scans were investigated using surface-based morphometric analysis. Reduced connectivity strength within a subnetwork of 59 edges located predominantly in bilateral frontal lobes was significantly associated with higher levels of self-reported symptoms. In addition, cortical surface area decreases were associated with stronger complaints in five clusters located in bilateral frontal and postcentral cortices, and in the right inferior temporal region. Alterations in WM and GM were localized in similar brain regions and moderately-to-strongly related to each other. Furthermore, the reduction of cortical surface area in the frontal regions was correlated with poorer attentive-executive performance in the mTBI group. Finally, group differences were detected in both the WM and GM, especially when focusing on a subgroup of patients with greater complaints, indicating the importance of classifying mTBI patients according to severity of symptoms. This study provides evidence that mTBI affects not only the integrity of WM networks by means of axonal damage but also the morphology of the cortex during the initial post-injury period. These anomalies might be greater in the acute period than previously believed and the involvement of frontal brain regions was consistently pronounced in both findings. The dysconnected subnetwork

  6. Connectomic and surface-based morphometric correlates of acute mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia eDall'Acqua

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Reduced integrity of white matter (WM pathways and subtle anomalies in gray matter (GM morphology have been hypothesized as mechanisms in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI. However, findings on structural brain changes in early stages after mTBI are inconsistent and findings related to early symptoms severity are rare.Fifty-one patients were assessed with multimodal neuroimaging and clinical methods exclusively within 7 days following mTBI and compared to 53 controls. Whole-brain connectivity based on diffusion tensor imaging was subjected to network-based statistics, whereas cortical surface area, thickness, and volume based on T1-weighted MRI scans were investigated using surface-based morphometric analysis. Reduced connectivity strength within a subnetwork of 59 edges located predominantly in bilateral frontal lobes was significantly associated with higher levels of self-reported symptoms. In addition, cortical surface area decreases were associated with stronger complaints in five clusters located in bilateral frontal and postcentral cortices, and in the right inferior temporal region. Alterations in WM and GM were localized in similar brain regions and moderately-to-strongly related to each other. Furthermore, the reduction of cortical surface area in the frontal regions was correlated with poorer attentive-executive performance in the mTBI group. Finally, group differences were detected in both the WM and GM, especially when focusing on a subgroup of patients with greater complaints, indicating the importance of classifying mTBI patients according to severity of symptoms. This study provides evidence that mTBI affects not only the integrity of WM networks by means of axonal damage but also the morphology of the cortex during the initial post-injury period. These anomalies might be greater in the acute period than previously believed and the involvement of frontal brain regions was consistently pronounced in both findings. The dysconnected

  7. Ankle passive and active movement training in children with acute brain injury using a wearable robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Xiong, Bo; Ren, Yupeng; Dvorkin, Assaf Y; Gaebler-Spira, Deboah; Sisung, Charles E; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2018-01-10

    To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a wearable robotic device in guiding isometric torque generation and passive-active movement training for ankle motor recovery in children with acute brain injury. Ten inpatient children with acute brain injury being treated in a rehabilitation hospital. Daily robot-guided ankle passive-active movement therapy for 15 sessions, including isometric torque generation under real-time feedback, stretch-ing, and active movement training with motivating games using a wearable ankle rehabilitation robot. Ankle biomechanical improvements induced by each training session including ankle range of motion (ROM), muscle strength, and clinical (Fugl-Meyer Lower-Extremity (FMLE), Pediatric Balance Scale (PBS)) and biomechanical (ankle ROM and muscle strength) outcomes over 15 training sessions. As training progressed, improvements in biomechanical performance measures followed logarithmic curves. Each training session increased median dorsiflexion active range of motion (AROM) 2.73° (standard deviation (SD) 1.14), dorsiflexion strength 0.87 Nm (SD 0.90), and plantarflexion strength 0.60 Nm (SD 1.19). After 15 training sessions the median FMLE score had increased from 14.0 (SD 10.11) to 23.0 (SD 11.4), PBS had increased from 33.0 (SD 19.99) to 50.0 (SD 23.13) (p < 0.05), median dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength had improved from 0.21 Nm (SD 4.45) to 4.0 Nm (SD 7.63) and 8.33 Nm (SD 10.18) to 18.45 Nm (SD 14.41), respectively, median dorsiflexion AROM had improved from -10.45° (SD 12.01) to 11.87° (SD 20.69), and median dorsiflexion PROM increased from 20.0° (SD 9.04) to 25.0° (SD 8.03). Isometric torque generation with real-time feedback, stretching and active movement training helped promote neuroplasticity and improve motor performance in children with acute brain injury.

  8. Ankle passive and active movement training in children with acute brain injury using a wearable robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Chen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of a wearable robotic device in guiding isometric torque generation and passive-active movement training for ankle motor recovery in children with acute brain injury. Participants/setting: Ten inpatient children with acute brain injury being treated in a rehabilitation hospital. Design: Daily robot-guided ankle passive-active movement therapy for 15 sessions, including isometric torque generation under real-time feedback, stretch-ing, and active movement training with motivating games using a wearable ankle rehabilitation robot. Main measures: Ankle biomechanical improvements induced by each training session including ankle range of motion (ROM, muscle strength, and clinical (Fugl-Meyer Lower-Extremity (FMLE, Pediatric Balance Scale (PBS and biomechanical (ankle ROM and muscle strength outcomes over 15 training sessions. Results: As training progressed, improvements in biomechanical performance measures followed logarithmic curves. Each training session increased median dorsiflexion active range of motion (AROM 2.73° (standard deviation (SD 1.14, dorsiflexion strength 0.87 Nm (SD 0.90, and plantarflexion strength 0.60 Nm (SD 1.19. After 15 training sessions the median FMLE score had increased from 14.0 (SD 10.11 to 23.0 (SD 11.4, PBS had increased from 33.0 (SD 19.99 to 50.0 (SD 23.13 (p < 0.05, median dorsiflexion and plantarflexion strength had improved from 0.21 Nm (SD 4.45 to 4.0 Nm (SD 7.63 and 8.33 Nm (SD 10.18 to 18.45 Nm (SD 14.41, respectively, median dorsiflexion AROM had improved from –10.45° (SD 12.01 to 11.87° (SD 20.69, and median dorsiflexion PROM increased from 20.0° (SD 9.04 to 25.0° (SD 8.03. Conclusion: Isometric torque generation with real-time feedback, stretching and active movement training helped promote neuroplasticity and improve motor performance in children with acute brain injury.

  9. Cortisol evaluation during the acute phase of traumatic brain injury-A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensalah, Meriem; Donaldson, Malcolm; Aribi, Yamina; Iabassen, Malek; Cherfi, Lyes; Nebbal, Mustapha; Medjaher, Meriem; Haffaf, ElMehdi; Abdennebi, Benaissa; Guenane, Kamel; Djermane, Adel; Kemali, Zahra; OuldKablia, Samia

    2018-05-01

    Biochemical diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency (AI) is difficult in the context of traumatic brain injury (TBI). To assess the frequency and predictive factors of AI in victims of TBI from Algiers. Between November 2009 and December 2013, TBI victims had a single 8-9 am serum cortisol measurement during the acute postinjury period (0-7 days). AI was defined according to basal cortisol levels of 83, 276 and 414 nmol/L. Variables studied were TBI severity according to Glasgow coma scale, duration of intubation and coma, pupillary status, hypotension, anaemia, brain imaging findings, diabetes insipidus and medication. Insulin tolerance test was performed during the recovery phase, defining AI as peak cortisol 414 nmol/L. Hydrocortisone replacement is advised in TBI patients with morning cortisol <276 nmol/L or those <414 nmol/L with additional risk factors for AI. As acute and subsequent AI are poorly correlated, patients with moderate/severe TBI require adrenal re-evaluation during the recovery phase. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Acute neuroprotective effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields after traumatic brain injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Li, Ling; Wang, Yan-Gang; Fei, Zhou; Zhong, Jun; Wei, Li-Zhou; Long, Qian-Fa; Liu, Wei-Ping

    2012-05-10

    Traumatic brain injury commonly has a result of a short window of opportunity between the period of initial brain injury and secondary brain injury, which provides protective strategies and can reduce damages of brain due to secondary brain injury. Previous studies have reported neuroprotective effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields. However, the effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on neural damage after traumatic brain injury have not been reported yet. The present study aims to investigate effects of extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields on neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were used for the model of lateral fluid percussion injury, which were placed in non-electromagnetic fields and 15 Hz (Hertz) electromagnetic fields with intensities of 1 G (Gauss), 3 G and 5 G. At various time points (ranging from 0.5 to 30 h) after lateral fluid percussion injury, rats were treated with kainic acid (administered by intraperitoneal injection) to induce apoptosis in hippocampal cells. The results were as follows: (1) the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α was dramatically decreased during the neuroprotective time window. (2) The kainic acid-induced apoptosis in the hippocampus was significantly decreased in rats exposed to electromagnetic fields. (3) Electromagnetic fields exposure shortened the escape time in water maze test. (4) Electromagnetic fields exposure accelerated the recovery of the blood-brain barrier after brain injury. These findings revealed that extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields significantly prolong the window of opportunity for brain protection and enhance the intensity of neuroprotection after traumatic brain injury. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Sleep Duration and Sleep Quality following Acute Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Propensity Score Analysis

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    Ting-Yun Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI has been widely studied and the effects of injury can be long term or even lifelong. This research aims to characterize the sleep problems of patients following acute mTBI. Methods. A total of 171 patients with mTBI within one month and 145 non-mTBI controls were recruited in this study. The questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI, was used to evaluate seven aspects of sleep problems. A propensity score method was used to generate a quasirandomized design to account for the background information, including gender, age, Beck’s Anxiety Index, Beck’s Depression Index, and Epworth Sleepiness Scale. The effect was evaluated via cumulative logit regression including propensity scores as a covariate. Results. Before adjustment, about 60% mTBI patients and over three quarters of control subjects had mild sleep disturbance while one third mTBI patients had moderate sleep disturbance. After adjusting by the propensity scores, the scores of sleep quality and duration were significant between mTBI and control groups. Conclusion. Our study supports that sleep problem is common in mTBI group. After adjusting the confounders by propensity score, sleep duration and subjective sleep quality are the most frequently reported problems in mTBI patients within one month after the injury.

  12. Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) happens when a bump, blow, jolt, or other head injury causes damage to the brain. Every year, millions of people in the U.S. suffer brain injuries. More than half are bad enough that ...

  13. Neuroinflammation and Neuroimmune Dysregulation After Acute Hypoxic-Ischemic Injury of Developing Brain

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    Utpal S Bhalala

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxic-ischemic injury to developing brain results from birth asphyxia in neonates and from cardiac arrest in infants and children. It is associated with varying degrees of neurologic sequelae, depending upon the severity and length of hypoxia-ischemia. Global hypoxia-ischemia triggers a series of cellular and biochemical pathways that lead to neuronal injury. One of the key cellular pathways of neuronal injury is inflammation. The inflammatory cascade comprises activation and migration of microglia—the so-called brain macrophages, infiltration of peripheral macrophages into the brain, and release of cytotoxic, proinflammatory cytokines. In this article, we review the inflammatory and immune mechanisms of secondary neuronal injury after global hypoxic-ischemic injury to developing brain. Specifically, we highlight the current literature on microglial activation in relation to neuronal injury, proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory/restorative pathways, the role of peripheral immune cells, and the potential use of immunomodulators as neuroprotective compounds.

  14. The relationship between neuron-specific enolase and prognosis of patients with acute traumatic brain injury

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    Yun-yang LIU

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the relationship between neuron-specific enolase (NSE levels in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients with acute traumatic brain injury (TBI and the prognosis of TBI patients.  Methods A total of 89 patients with acute TBI were divided into light, medium, heavy and severe TBI groups based on admission Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score. Serum NSE expression levels were detected in all cases and NSE levels in CSF were detected in 18 cases within 12 h after TBI. The expression levels of serum NSE in 20 normal people, except cases of lung disease and nervous system damage, were detected as a control group. Results Compared with the control group, serum NSE expression levels of patients in each TBI group were elevated (P < 0.05, for all, and the NSE levels in severe and heavy TBI groups were higher than that in medium and light groups (P < 0.05, for all. The serum NSE expression levels of patients with cerebral contusion were higher than that of patients with diffuse axonal injury (DAI, P = 0.025, subdural hematoma (P = 0.031 and epidural hematoma (P = 0.021. Serum NSE expression levels were negatively correlated with GCS score (rs = - 0.327, P = 0.024 and Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS score (rs = - 0.252, P = 0.049. The NSE expression levels of CSF in severe and heavy TBI patients were higher than that of serum (P = 0.039, 0.031.  Conclusions NSE expression changes can be evaluated as an auxiliary indicator in reflecting the degree of acute TBI, typing diagnosis and prognostic evaluation, and NSE levels of CSF is more sensitive than that of serum. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.03.013

  15. Early detection of consciousness in patients with acute severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlow, Brian L; Chatelle, Camille; Spencer, Camille A; Chu, Catherine J; Bodien, Yelena G; O'Connor, Kathryn L; Hirschberg, Ronald E; Hochberg, Leigh R; Giacino, Joseph T; Rosenthal, Eric S; Wu, Ona

    2017-09-01

    See Schiff (doi:10.1093/awx209) for a scientific commentary on this article. Patients with acute severe traumatic brain injury may recover consciousness before self-expression. Without behavioural evidence of consciousness at the bedside, clinicians may render an inaccurate prognosis, increasing the likelihood of withholding life-sustaining therapies or denying rehabilitative services. Task-based functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography techniques have revealed covert consciousness in the chronic setting, but these techniques have not been tested in the intensive care unit. We prospectively enrolled 16 patients admitted to the intensive care unit for acute severe traumatic brain injury to test two hypotheses: (i) in patients who lack behavioural evidence of language expression and comprehension, functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography detect command-following during a motor imagery task (i.e. cognitive motor dissociation) and association cortex responses during language and music stimuli (i.e. higher-order cortex motor dissociation); and (ii) early responses to these paradigms are associated with better 6-month outcomes on the Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended. Patients underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging on post-injury Day 9.2 ± 5.0 and electroencephalography on Day 9.8 ± 4.6. At the time of imaging, behavioural evaluation with the Coma Recovery Scale-Revised indicated coma (n = 2), vegetative state (n = 3), minimally conscious state without language (n = 3), minimally conscious state with language (n = 4) or post-traumatic confusional state (n = 4). Cognitive motor dissociation was identified in four patients, including three whose behavioural diagnosis suggested a vegetative state. Higher-order cortex motor dissociation was identified in two additional patients. Complete absence of responses to language, music and motor imagery was only observed in coma patients. In patients with behavioural evidence

  16. Treating reading comprehension deficits in sub-acute brain injury rehabilitation: Identifying clinical practice and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watter, Kerrin; Copley, Anna; Finch, Emma

    There is limited evidence for cognitive-communication reading comprehension (CCRC) interventions for adults following acquired brain injury (ABI), particularly during sub-acute rehabilitation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical practice of speech-language pathologists (SLPs) with CCRC deficits during sub-acute ABI rehabilitation and compare it to the best available evidence. An electronic survey was used to gather information from clinicians across Australia regarding clinical practice in the areas of assessment, intervention, treatment hierarchies and service delivery; survey questions were developed from an extensive review of the literature and expert clinician opinion. Survey findings were then compared with the literature in the form of a systematic review. Surveyed clinicians provided multiple interventions for CCRC rehabilitation, including impairment based (94.7%), activity based (94.7%) and reading strategy interventions (100.0%). Five strategies were used by >94% of SLPs (highlighting, identifying main points/wh- questioning, re-reading, summarising, reducing visual load). When compared with the literature, strong similarities were found for strategy-based interventions and individual service delivery, with broad similarities for functional and impairment-based interventions, and impairment based treatment hierarchies. Strong differences in assessment were identified. Strategy use reported in clinical practice (100.0% SLPs) was higher than in the literature. Further investigation into the effectiveness of specific reading strategies for people with ABI is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Loss of Microstructural Integrity in the Limbic-Subcortical Networks for Acute Symptomatic Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Yanan Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies reported discrepant white matter diffusivity in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI on the base of Glasgow Coma Scale, which are unreliable for some TBI severity indicators and the frequency of missing documentation in the medical record. In the present study, we adopted the Mayo classification system for TBI severity. In this system, the mTBI is also divided into two groups as “probable and symptomatic” TBI. We aimed to investigate altered microstructural integrity in symptomatic acute TBI (<1 week by using tract-based spatial statics (TBSS approach. A total of 12 patients and 13 healthy volunteers were involved and underwent MRI scans including conventional scan, and SWI and DTI. All the patients had no visible lesions by using conventional and SWI neuroimaging techniques, while showing widespread declines in the fractional anisotropy (FA of gray matter and white matter throughout the TBSS skeleton, particularly in the limbic-subcortical structures. By contrast, symptomatic TBI patients showed no significant enhanced changes in FA compared to the healthy controls. A better understanding of the acute changes occurring following symptomatic TBI may increase our understanding of neuroplasticity and continuing degenerative change, which, in turn, may facilitate advances in management and intervention.

  18. Acute and long-term pituitary insufficiency in traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, M; Juul, A; Struck, J

    2007-01-01

    To assess the prevalence of hypopituitarism following traumatic brain injury (TBI), describe the time-course and assess the association with trauma-related parameters and early post-traumatic hormone alterations....

  19. Diffusion-weighted MR imaging in animal modil with acute ischemic brain infarction : evaluation of reversible brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Woo Mok; Chang, Han Won; Cho, Inn Ho; Hah, Jung Sang; Sung, Eon Gi [Yeungnam Univ. College of Medicine, Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-04-01

    To determine whether the analysis of abnormally high signal intensities in ischemic tissue, as revealed by diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) can be used to evaluate reversible brain lesions in a cat model of acute ischemia. Ten cats were divided into two groups of five (Group I and Group II), and in all animals the middle cerebral artery was temporarily occluded. Group I underwent T2-DWI 30 minutes after occlusion, and Group II 120 minutes after occlusion. In both groups, DWI was performed one hour and 24 hours after reperfusion (at one hour, non-T2-weighted; at 24 hours, T2-weighted). Both occlusion and reperfusion were monitored by {sup 99m}TC-ECD brain perfusion SPECT. All animals were sacrificed 24 hours later and their brain tissue was stained with TTC. Signal intensity ratios (SIR, signifying average signal intensity within the region of interest divided by that in the contralateral, nonischemic, homologous region) of the two groups, as seen on DWI were compared. The percentage of hemispheric lesions occurring in the two groups was also compared. SIR after occlusion of the middle cerebral artery was 1.29 in Group I and 1.59 in Group II. Twenty-four hours after reperfusion, SIR in Group I was higher than in Group II (p<0.01). After occlusion and reperfusion, the percentage of hemispheric lesions in Group I was less than in Group II. For the latter, the percentage of these lesions revealed by TTC staining and T2-weighted imaging was 48% and 59%, respectively, findings distinctly different from those for Group I. In addition, in group I, infarction was revealed by neither TTC staining nor T2-weighted imaging (p<0.01). The use of DWI to evaluate signal intensity ratios can help determine whether or not brain injury after temporary cerebral ischemia is reversible.

  20. Cognitive Training for Post-Acute Traumatic Brain Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

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    Harry Hallock

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To quantitatively aggregate effects of cognitive training (CT on cognitive and functional outcome measures in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI more than 12-months post-injury.Design: We systematically searched six databases for non-randomized and randomized controlled trials (RCTs of CT in TBI patients at least 12-months post-injury reporting cognitive and/or functional outcomes. Main Measures: Efficacy was measured as standardized mean difference (Hedges’ g of post-training change. We investigated heterogeneity across studies using subgroup analyses and meta-regressions. Results: Fourteen studies encompassing 575 patients were included. The effect of CT on overall cognition was small and statistically significant (g=0.22, 95%CI 0.05 to 0.38; p=0.01, with low heterogeneity (I2=11.71% and no evidence of publication bias. A moderate effect size was found for overall functional outcomes (g=0.32, 95%CI 0.08 to 0.57, p=0.01 with low heterogeneity (I2=14.27% and possible publication bias. Statistically significant effects were also found only for executive function (g=0.20, 95%CI 0.02 to 0.39, p=0.03 and verbal memory (g=0.32, 95%CI 0.14 to 0.50, p<0.01. Conclusions: Despite limited studies in this field, this meta-analysis indicates that CT is modestly effective in improving cognitive and functional outcomes in patients with post-acute TBI and should therefore play a more significant role in TBI rehabilitation.

  1. Inhibitory effect of magnesium sulfate on reaction of lipid hyperoxidation after radiation-induced acute brain injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lili; Zhou Juying; Yu Zhiying; Qin Songbing; Xu Xiaoting; Li Li; Tu Yu

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To explore the protection of magnesium sulfate (MgSO 4 ) on radiation-induced acute brain injuries. Methods: 60 maturity Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: blank control group, experimental control group and experimental-therapeutic group. The whole brain of SD rats of experimental control group and experimental-therapeutic group was irradiated to a dose of 20 Gy using 6 MeV electron. MgSO 4 was injected intraperitoneally into the rats of experimental-therapeutic group before and after irradiation for five times. At different time points ranging from the 1 d, 7 d, 14 d, 30 d after irradiation, the brain tissue were taken. The xanthine oxidase and colorimetric examination were used to measure the superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malonyldialdehyde (MDA) respectively in the rat brain respectively. Results: Compared with blank control group, the SOD in brain of experimental control group decreased significantly (P 4 used in early stage can inhibit the lipid peroxidation after radiation-induced acute brain injuries and alleviate the damage induced by free radicals to brain tissue. (authors)

  2. Pituitary dysfunction in traumatic brain injury: Is evaluation in the acute phase worthwhile?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradip P Dalwadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Traumatic brain injury (TBI is an under-recognized cause of hypopituitarism. According to recent data, it could be more frequent than previously known. However, there is a scarcity of data in Indian population. Aims: The main aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of pituitary hormone deficiencies in the acute phase of TBI. The secondary objectives were to correlate the severity of trauma with basal hormone levels and to determine whether initial hormone deficiencies predict mortality. Subjects and Methods: Forty-nine TBI patients (41 men and 8 women were included in this study. Pituitary functions were evaluated within 24 h of admission. Results: Gonadotropin deficiency was found in 65.3% patient while 46.9% had low insulin-like growth factor-1, 12.24% had cortisol level <7 mcg/dl. Cortisol and prolactin level were positively correlated with the severity of TBI suggestive of stress response. Free triiodothyronine (fT3 and free thyroxine were significantly lower in patients with increasing severity of tuberculosis. Logistic regression analysis revealed that mortality after TBI was unrelated to the basal pituitary hormone levels except low T3 level, which was found to be positively related to mortality. Conclusions: Pituitary dysfunction is common after TBI and the most commonly affected axes are growth hormone and gonadotropin axis. Low fT3 correlates best with mortality. During the acute phase of TBI, at least an assessment of cortisol is vital as undetected cortisol deficiency can be life-threatening

  3. OCT imaging of acute vascular changes following mild traumatic brain injury in mice (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chico-Calero, Isabel; Shishkov, Milen; Welt, Jonathan; Blatter, Cedric; Vakoc, Benjamin J.

    2016-03-01

    While most people recover completely from mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBIs) and concussions, a subset develop lasting neurological disorders. Understanding the complex pathophysiology of these injuries is critical to developing improved prognostic and therapeutic approaches. Multiple studies have shown that the structure and perfusion of brain vessels are altered after mTBI. It is possible that these vascular injuries contribute to or trigger neurodegeneration. Intravital microscopy and mouse models of TBI offer a powerful platform to study the vascular component of mTBI. Because optical coherence tomography based angiography is based on perfusion contrast and is not significantly degraded by vessel leakage or blood brain barrier disruption, it is uniquely suited to studies of brain perfusion in the setting of trauma. However, existing TBI imaging models require surgical exposure of the brain at the time of injury which conflates TBI-related vascular changes with those caused by surgery. In this work, we describe a modified cranial window preparation based on a flexible, transparent polyurethane membrane. Impact injuries were delivered directly through this membrane, and imaging was performed immediately after injury without the need for additional surgical procedures. Using this model, we demonstrate that mTBI induces a transient cessation of flow in the capillaries and smaller vessels near the injury point. Reperfusion is observed in all animals within 3 hours of injury. This work describes new insight into the transient vascular changes induced by mTBI, and demonstrates more broadly the utility of the OCT/polyurethane window model platform in preclinical studies of mTBI.

  4. Acute Traumatic Coagulopathy Accompanying Isolated Traumatic Brain Injury is Associated with Worse Long-Term Functional and Cognitive Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmalik, Peter A; Boorman, David W; Tracy, Joseph; Jallo, Jack; Rincon, Fred

    2016-06-01

    Approximately one-third of patients with isolated traumatic brain injury (iTBI) present with acute traumatic coagulopathy (ATC). ATC is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Its effects on long-term functional and cognitive outcomes are not as well characterized. Data from the Citicoline Brain Injury Treatment Trial (COBRIT) were analyzed retrospectively. Exclusion criteria were renal failure or malignancy, and any extracranial injury severity score >3. ATC was defined as INR > 1.3, PTT > 38 s, or platelets  6), and the DRS (i.e., score < 2) at 180 days, for which ATC was found to be an independent predictor with binary logistic regression. ATC patients also performed significantly worse on several components of the CVLT-II at 180 days. ATC accompanying iTBI is associated with worse functional and cognitive outcomes at 180 days.

  5. Traumatic brain injury : from impact to rehabilitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halliday, J.; Absalom, A. R.

    Traumatic brain injury is a significant cause of mortality and morbidity in our society, particularly among the young. This review discusses the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury, and current management from the acute phase through to rehabilitation of the traumatic brain injury patient.

  6. Prognostic models for predicting posttraumatic seizures during acute hospitalization, and at 1 and 2 years following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Anne C; Wagner, Amy K; Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Brooks, Maria M; Zafonte, Ross D; Pugh, Mary Jo V; Fabio, Anthony; Hammond, Flora M; Dreer, Laura E; Bushnik, Tamara; Walker, William C; Brown, Allen W; Johnson-Greene, Doug; Shea, Timothy; Krellman, Jason W; Rosenthal, Joseph A

    2016-09-01

    Posttraumatic seizures (PTS) are well-recognized acute and chronic complications of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Risk factors have been identified, but considerable variability in who develops PTS remains. Existing PTS prognostic models are not widely adopted for clinical use and do not reflect current trends in injury, diagnosis, or care. We aimed to develop and internally validate preliminary prognostic regression models to predict PTS during acute care hospitalization, and at year 1 and year 2 postinjury. Prognostic models predicting PTS during acute care hospitalization and year 1 and year 2 post-injury were developed using a recent (2011-2014) cohort from the TBI Model Systems National Database. Potential PTS predictors were selected based on previous literature and biologic plausibility. Bivariable logistic regression identified variables with a p-value load, and pre-injury limitation in learning/remembering/concentrating as significant PTS predictors during acute hospitalization. Significant predictors of PTS at year 1 were subdural hematoma (SDH), contusion load, craniotomy, craniectomy, seizure during acute hospitalization, duration of posttraumatic amnesia, preinjury mental health treatment/psychiatric hospitalization, and preinjury incarceration. Year 2 significant predictors were similar to those of year 1: SDH, intraparenchymal fragment, craniotomy, craniectomy, seizure during acute hospitalization, and preinjury incarceration. Corrected concordance (C) statistics were 0.599, 0.747, and 0.716 for acute hospitalization, year 1, and year 2 models, respectively. The prognostic model for PTS during acute hospitalization did not discriminate well. Year 1 and year 2 models showed fair to good predictive validity for PTS. Cranial surgery, although medically necessary, requires ongoing research regarding potential benefits of increased monitoring for signs of epileptogenesis, PTS prophylaxis, and/or rehabilitation/social support. Future studies should

  7. Effects of normobaric versus hyperbaric oxygen on cell injury induced by oxygen and glucose deprivation in acute brain slices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Chazalviel

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Normobaric oxygen (NBO and hyperbaric oxygen (HBO are emerging as a possible co-treatment of acute ischemic stroke. Both have been shown to reduce infarct volume, to improve neurologic outcome, to promote endogenous tissue plasminogen activator-induced thrombolysis and cerebral blood flow, and to improve tissue oxygenation through oxygen diffusion in the ischemic areas, thereby questioning the interest of HBO compared to NBO. In the present study, in order to investigate and compare the oxygen diffusion effects of NBO and HBO on acute ischemic stroke independently of their effects at the vascular level, we used acute brain slices exposed to oxygen and glucose deprivation, an ex vivo model of brain ischemia that allows investigating the acute effects of NBO (partial pressure of oxygen (pO 2 = 1 atmospheres absolute (ATA = 0.1 MPa and HBO (pO 2 = 2.5 ATA = 0.25 MPa through tissue oxygenation on ischemia-induced cell injury as measured by the release of lactate dehydrogenase. We found that HBO, but not NBO, reduced oxygen and glucose deprivation-induced cell injury, indicating that passive tissue oxygenation (i.e. without vascular support of the brain parenchyma requires oxygen partial pressure higher than 1 ATA.

  8. [Evaluation of the community integration of persons with lateralised post-acute acquired brain injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-Hoyas, E; Pedrero-Perez, E J; Aguila-Maturana, A M; Gonzalez-Alted, C

    2013-08-16

    INTRODUCTION. Hemispheric specialization is a topic of interest that has motivated an enormous amount of research in recent decades. After a unilateral brain injury, the consequences can affect various areas of specialization, leading, depending on the location of the injury, impairment in quality of life and community integration. PATIENTS AND METHODS. Cross-sectional study with a sample of 58 patients, 28 traumatic brain injury (TBI) and 30 cerebrovascular accidents, both lateralized. The level of integration in the community is measured by the Community Integration Questionnaire. RESULTS. There were three groups analyzed by considering unilateral injury (full sample, stroke sample, and TBI sample). Results showed a significantly high community integration of people with right hemisphere injury. However, to measure the level of community integration between TBI and stroke, the results showed no significant differences. CONCLUSION. According to the results of the study people with brain injury in the right hemisphere have a better community integration than people with lesions in the left hemisphere regardless of the origin of the lesions (vascular or traumatic). We discussed the reasons that may motivate the differences and clinical implications.

  9. Amelioration of Acute Sequelae of Blast Induced Mild Traumatic Brain Injury by N-Acetyl Cysteine: A Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-23

    Sensory neuroprotection, mitochondrial preservation, and therapeutic potential of N-acetyl-cysteine after nerve injury . Neuroscience 125: 91–101. 11...929. 31. Lew HL, Jerger JF, Guillory SB, Henry JA (2007) Auditory dysfunction in traumatic brain injury . J Rehab Research, Development 44: 921–928. 32...Amelioration of Acute Sequelae of Blast Induced Mild Traumatic Brain Injury by N-Acetyl Cysteine: A Double- Blind, Placebo Controlled Study Michael E

  10. Protective ventilation of preterm lambs exposed to acute chorioamnionitis does not reduce ventilation-induced lung or brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha K Barton

    Full Text Available The onset of mechanical ventilation is a critical time for the initiation of cerebral white matter (WM injury in preterm neonates, particularly if they are inadvertently exposed to high tidal volumes (VT in the delivery room. Protective ventilation strategies at birth reduce ventilation-induced lung and brain inflammation and injury, however its efficacy in a compromised newborn is not known. Chorioamnionitis is a common antecedent of preterm birth, and increases the risk and severity of WM injury. We investigated the effects of high VT ventilation, after chorioamnionitis, on preterm lung and WM inflammation and injury, and whether a protective ventilation strategy could mitigate the response.Pregnant ewes (n = 18 received intra-amniotic lipopolysaccharide (LPS 2 days before delivery, instrumentation and ventilation at 127±1 days gestation. Lambs were either immediately euthanased and used as unventilated controls (LPSUVC; n = 6, or were ventilated using an injurious high VT strategy (LPSINJ; n = 5 or a protective ventilation strategy (LPSPROT; n = 7 for a total of 90 min. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate and cerebral haemodynamics and oxygenation were measured continuously. Lungs and brains underwent molecular and histological assessment of inflammation and injury.LPSINJ lambs had poorer oxygenation than LPSPROT lambs. Ventilation requirements and cardiopulmonary and systemic haemodynamics were not different between ventilation strategies. Compared to unventilated lambs, LPSINJ and LPSPROT lambs had increases in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression within the lungs and brain, and increased astrogliosis (p<0.02 and cell death (p<0.05 in the WM, which were equivalent in magnitude between groups.Ventilation after acute chorioamnionitis, irrespective of strategy used, increases haemodynamic instability and lung and cerebral inflammation and injury. Mechanical ventilation is a potential contributor to WM injury in infants exposed

  11. Protective Ventilation of Preterm Lambs Exposed to Acute Chorioamnionitis Does Not Reduce Ventilation-Induced Lung or Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Samantha K.; Moss, Timothy J. M.; Hooper, Stuart B.; Crossley, Kelly J.; Gill, Andrew W.; Kluckow, Martin; Zahra, Valerie; Wong, Flora Y.; Pichler, Gerhard; Galinsky, Robert; Miller, Suzanne L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The onset of mechanical ventilation is a critical time for the initiation of cerebral white matter (WM) injury in preterm neonates, particularly if they are inadvertently exposed to high tidal volumes (VT) in the delivery room. Protective ventilation strategies at birth reduce ventilation-induced lung and brain inflammation and injury, however its efficacy in a compromised newborn is not known. Chorioamnionitis is a common antecedent of preterm birth, and increases the risk and severity of WM injury. We investigated the effects of high VT ventilation, after chorioamnionitis, on preterm lung and WM inflammation and injury, and whether a protective ventilation strategy could mitigate the response. Methods Pregnant ewes (n = 18) received intra-amniotic lipopolysaccharide (LPS) 2 days before delivery, instrumentation and ventilation at 127±1 days gestation. Lambs were either immediately euthanased and used as unventilated controls (LPSUVC; n = 6), or were ventilated using an injurious high VT strategy (LPSINJ; n = 5) or a protective ventilation strategy (LPSPROT; n = 7) for a total of 90 min. Mean arterial pressure, heart rate and cerebral haemodynamics and oxygenation were measured continuously. Lungs and brains underwent molecular and histological assessment of inflammation and injury. Results LPSINJ lambs had poorer oxygenation than LPSPROT lambs. Ventilation requirements and cardiopulmonary and systemic haemodynamics were not different between ventilation strategies. Compared to unventilated lambs, LPSINJ and LPSPROT lambs had increases in pro-inflammatory cytokine expression within the lungs and brain, and increased astrogliosis (p<0.02) and cell death (p<0.05) in the WM, which were equivalent in magnitude between groups. Conclusions Ventilation after acute chorioamnionitis, irrespective of strategy used, increases haemodynamic instability and lung and cerebral inflammation and injury. Mechanical ventilation is a potential contributor

  12. Cerebral perfusion and neuropsychological follow up in mild traumatic brain injury : Acute versus chronic disturbances?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metting, Zwany; Spikman, Jacoba M.; Rodiger, Lars A.; van der Naalt, Joukje

    In a subgroup of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) residual symptoms, interfering with outcome and return to work, are found. With neuropsychological assessment cognitive deficits can be demonstrated although the pathological underpinnings of these cognitive deficits are not fully

  13. Pathophysiological Concepts in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury : Diffusion Tensor Imaging Related to Acute Perfusion CT Imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metting, Zwany; Cerliani, Leonardo; Rodiger, Lars A.; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2013-01-01

    Background: A subgroup of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) experiences residual symptoms interfering with their return to work. The pathophysiological substrate of the suboptimal outcome in these patients is a source of debate. Objective: To provide greater insight into the

  14. Hemodynamic and morphologic responses in mouse brain during acute head injury imaged by multispectral structured illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkov, Boris; Mathews, Marlon S.; Abookasis, David

    2015-03-01

    Multispectral imaging has received significant attention over the last decade as it integrates spectroscopy, imaging, tomography analysis concurrently to acquire both spatial and spectral information from biological tissue. In the present study, a multispectral setup based on projection of structured illumination at several near-infrared wavelengths and at different spatial frequencies is applied to quantitatively assess brain function before, during, and after the onset of traumatic brain injury in an intact mouse brain (n=5). For the production of head injury, we used the weight drop method where weight of a cylindrical metallic rod falling along a metal tube strikes the mouse's head. Structured light was projected onto the scalp surface and diffuse reflected light was recorded by a CCD camera positioned perpendicular to the mouse head. Following data analysis, we were able to concurrently show a series of hemodynamic and morphologic changes over time including higher deoxyhemoglobin, reduction in oxygen saturation, cell swelling, etc., in comparison with baseline measurements. Overall, results demonstrates the capability of multispectral imaging based structured illumination to detect and map of brain tissue optical and physiological properties following brain injury in a simple noninvasive and noncontact manner.

  15. Effect of MgSO4 on the contents of Ca2+ in brain cell and NO in brain tissue of rats with radiation-induced acute brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuan Wenjia; Cui Fengmei; Liu Ping; He Chao; Tu Yu; Wang Lili

    2009-01-01

    The work is to explore the protection of magnesium sulfate(MgSO 4 ) on radiation-induced acute brain injury. Thirty six mature Sprague-Dawley(SD) rats were randomly divided into 3 groups of control, experimental control and experimental therapy group. The whole brains of SD rats of experimental control and experimental therapy group were irradiated with a dose of 20 Gy using 6 MeV electron beam. MgSO 4 was injected into the abdomen of experimental therapy rats group 1 day before, immediately and continue for 5 days after irradiation respectively. The brain tissues were taken on 3, 10, 17 and 24 d after irradiation. Ca 2+ content in brain cell was measured by laser scanning confocal microscopy, and the NO content in brain tissue was detected by the method of nitric acid reductase. Compared with the blank control group, the contents of Ca 2+ in brain cell and NO in brain tissue of the experimental control group increase (P 4 used in early stage can inhibit the contents of Ca 2+ in brain cell and NO in brain tissue after radiation-induced acute brain injury. It means that MgSO 4 has a protective effect on radiation-induced acute brain injury. (authors)

  16. Acute brain trauma, lung injury, and pneumonia: more than just altered mental status and decreased airway protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Parker J; Pittet, Jean-Francois; Kerby, Jeffrey D; Bosarge, Patrick L; Wagener, Brant M

    2017-07-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. Even when patients survive the initial insult, there is significant morbidity and mortality secondary to subsequent pulmonary edema, acute lung injury (ALI), and nosocomial pneumonia. Whereas the relationship between TBI and secondary pulmonary complications is recognized, little is known about the mechanistic interplay of the two phenomena. Changes in mental status secondary to acute brain injury certainly impair airway- and lung-protective mechanisms. However, clinical and translational evidence suggests that more specific neuronal and cellular mechanisms contribute to impaired systemic and lung immunity that increases the risk of TBI-mediated lung injury and infection. To better understand the cellular mechanisms of that immune impairment, we review here the current clinical data that support TBI-induced impairment of systemic and lung immunity. Furthermore, we also review the animal models that attempt to reproduce human TBI. Additionally, we examine the possible role of damage-associated molecular patterns, the chlolinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, and sex dimorphism in post-TBI ALI. In the last part of the review, we discuss current treatments and future pharmacological therapies, including fever control, tracheostomy, and corticosteroids, aimed to prevent and treat pulmonary edema, ALI, and nosocomial pneumonia after TBI. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  17. Traumatic brain injury and post-acute decline: what role does environmental enrichment play? A scoping review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana eFrasca

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. While a number of studies provide evidence of neural and cognitive decline in traumatic brain injury (TBI survivors during the post-acute stages of injury, there is a dearth of research on the possible mechanisms underlying this decline. The purposes of this paper, therefore, are to (1 examine evidence that environmental enrichment (EE can influence long-term outcome following TBI, and (2 examine the nature of post-acute environments, whether they vary in degree of EE, and what impact these variations have on outcomes.Methods. We conducted a scoping review to identify studies on EE in animals and humans, and post-discharge experiences that relate to barriers to recovery.Results. Ninety-six articles that met inclusion criteria demonstrated the benefits of EE on brain and behaviour in healthy and brain-injured animals and humans. Nineteen papers on post-discharge experiences provided evidence that variables such as insurance coverage, financial and social support, home therapy, and transition from hospital to home, also play a vital role in regaining independence. Conclusion. There is evidence to suggest that lack of EE, whether from lack of resources or limited ability to engage in such environments, may play a role in post-recovery cognitive and neural decline. Maximizing EE in the post-acute stages of TBI may improve long-term outcomes for the individual, their family and society.

  18. Clinical significance of determination of serum NSE and plasma ET, IGF-II, CNP levels in patients with acute brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Bo

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of changes of plasma ET, IGF-II, CNP and serum NSE contents in patients with acute brain injury. Methods: Serum contents of neuron specific enolase (NSE) were measured with chemiluminescence immunoassay and plasma endothelin (ET), insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) were measured with radioimmunoassay in 30 patients with acute brain injury and 35 controls. Results: Serum contents of NSE and plasma IGF-II, CNP were not much different in patients with mild brain injury from those in controls (P >0.05), but plasma contents of ET were already significantly higher in patients with mild brain injury than those in controls(P < 0.01). The serum NSE and plasma ET levels in patients with moderate and severe brain injury were significantly higher than those in patients with mild brain injury and controls (P < 0.01). Decrease of plasma levels of IGF-II and CNP was not significant in patients with mild brain injury (vs controls). However, the plasma levels of IGF-II and CNP were significantly lower in patients with moderate and severe brain injury than those in patients with mild brain injury and controls (P <0.01). As a whole, the magnitude of changes of these parameters was proportional to the severity of the injury. Conclusion: Changes of serum NSE and plasma IGF-II, ET and CNP levels were closely related to the pathological process of brain injury. Determination of these parameters was of clinical importance for evaluation of the severity of injury and outcome prediction. (authors)

  19. Traumatic Brain Injury: Hope Through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a traumatic brain injury, marked by difficulty with perception, thinking, remembering, and concentration; during this acute stage, ... of nerve cells in the brain causing strange sensations, emotions, and behavior, or sometimes convulsions, muscle spasms, ...

  20. Alpha desynchronization/synchronization during working memory testing is compromised in acute mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakaki, Xianghong; Shoga, Michael; Li, Lianyang; Zouridakis, George; Tran, Thao; Fonteh, Alfred N; Dawlaty, Jessica; Goldweber, Robert; Pogoda, Janice M; Harrington, Michael G

    2018-01-01

    Diagnosing and monitoring recovery of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is challenging because of the lack of objective, quantitative measures. Diagnosis is based on description of injuries often not witnessed, subtle neurocognitive symptoms, and neuropsychological testing. Since working memory (WM) is at the center of cognitive functions impaired in mTBI, this study was designed to define objective quantitative electroencephalographic (qEEG) measures of WM processing that may correlate with cognitive changes associated with acute mTBI. First-time mTBI patients and mild peripheral (limb) trauma controls without head injury were recruited from the emergency department. WM was assessed by a continuous performance task (N-back). EEG recordings were obtained during N-back testing on three occasions: within five days, two weeks, and one month after injury. Compared with controls, mTBI patients showed abnormal induced and evoked alpha activity including event-related desynchronization (ERD) and synchronization (ERS). For induced alpha power, TBI patients had excessive frontal ERD on their first and third visit. For evoked alpha, mTBI patients had lower parietal ERD/ERS at the second and third visits. These exploratory qEEG findings offer new and non-invasive candidate measures to characterize the evolution of injury over the first month, with potential to provide much-needed objective measures of brain dysfunction to diagnose and monitor the consequences of mTBI.

  1. Novel Mechanism for Reducing Acute and Chronic Neurodegeneration After Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited The views , opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should...have sustained repeated mild or concussive brain injury and now suffer from long- lasting cognitive and physical symptoms. We have developed a radically...Sham-TBI group performed consistently near the maximum 120 seconds per trial over the 28 day testing period. TBI caused impairment of performance in

  2. Computed tomography vs magnetic resonance imaging for identifying acute lesions in pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttram, Sandra D W; Garcia-Filion, Pamela; Miller, Jeffrey; Youssfi, Mostafa; Brown, S Danielle; Dalton, Heidi J; Adelson, P David

    2015-02-01

    Pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Computed tomography (CT) is the modality of choice to screen for brain injuries. MRI may provide more clinically relevant information. The purpose of this study was to compare lesion detection between CT and MRI after TBI. Retrospective cohort of children (0-21 years) with TBI between 2008 and 2010 at a Level 1 pediatric trauma center with a head CT scan on day of injury and a brain MRI scan within 2 weeks of injury. Agreement between CT and MRI was determined by κ statistic and stratified by injury mechanism. One hundred five children were studied. Of these, 78% had mild TBI. The MRI scan was obtained a median of 1 day (interquartile range, 1-2) after CT. Overall, CT and MRI demonstrated poor agreement (κ=-0.083; P=.18). MRI detected a greater number of intraparenchymal lesions (n=36; 34%) compared with CT (n=16; 15%) (P<.001). Among patients with abusive head trauma, MRI detected intraparenchymal lesions in 16 (43%), compared with only 4 (11%) lesions with CT (P=.03). Of 8 subjects with a normal CT scan, 6 out of 8 had abnormal lesions on MRI. Compared with CT, MRI identified significantly more intraparenchymal lesions in pediatric TBI, particularly in children with abusive head trauma. The prognostic value of identification of intraparenchymal lesions by MRI is unknown but warrants additional inquiry. Risks and benefits from early MRI (including sedation, time, and lack of radiation exposure) compared with CT should be weighed by clinicians. Copyright © 2015 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  3. Vancomycin pharmacokinetic parameters in patients with acute brain injury undergoing controlled normothermia, therapeutic hypothermia, or pentobarbital infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbitzer, Kathryn A; Jordan, J Dedrick; Rhoney, Denise H

    2015-04-01

    Therapeutic strategies that cause an alteration in patient temperature, such as controlled normothermia (CN), therapeutic hypothermia (TH), and pentobarbital infusion (PI), are often used to manage complications caused by acute brain injury. The purpose of this study was to evaluate pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters of vancomycin in patients with acute brain injury undergoing temperature modulation. This was a retrospective cohort study of adult patients with acute brain injury admitted between May 2010 and March 2014 who underwent CN, TH, or PI and received vancomycin. Predicted PK parameters based on population data were compared with calculated PK parameters based on serum concentrations. Seventeen CN patients and 10 TH/PI patients met inclusion criteria. Traumatic brain injury and aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage accounted for the majority of admitting diagnoses. In the CN group, the median dose was 16.7 (15.5-18.4) mg/kg. The median calculated elimination rate constant [0.155 (0.108-0.17) vs. 0.103 (0.08-0.142) hr(-1); p = 0.04] was significantly higher than the predicted value. The median measured trough concentration [8.9 (7.7-11.1) vs. 17.1 (10.8-22.3) υg/mL; p = 0.004] was significantly lower than predicted. In the TH/PI group, the median dose was 15.4 (14.7-17.2) mg/kg. No significant differences were found between the median calculated and predicted elimination rate constant [0.107 (0.097-0.109) vs. 0.112 (0.102-0.127) hr(-1); p = 0.41] and median measured and predicted trough concentration [14.2 (12.7-17.1) vs. 13.1 (11-17.8) υg/mL; p = 0.71]. Patients who underwent TH/PI did not exhibit PK alterations when compared to predicted PK parameters based on population data, while patients who underwent CN experienced PK alterations favoring an increased elimination of vancomycin.

  4. Acute, transient hemorrhagic hypotension does not aggravate structural damage or neurologic motor deficits but delays the long-term cognitive recovery following mild to moderate traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schütz, Christian; Stover, John F.; Thompson, Hilaire J.; Hoover, Rachel C.; Morales, Diego M.; Schouten, Joost W.; McMillan, Asenia; Soltesz, Kristie; Motta, Melissa; Spangler, Zachery; Neugebauer, Edmund; McIntosh, Tracy K.

    2008-01-01

    . Conclusions A single, acute hypotensive event lasting 30 mins did not aggravate the short- and long-term structural and motor deficits but delayed the speed of recovery of cognitive function associated with experimental traumatic brain injury. PMID:16424733

  5. Abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging seen acutely following mild traumatic brain injury: correlation with neuropsychological tests and delayed recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, David G.; Jackson, Alan; Mason, Damon L.; Berry, Elizabeth; Hollis, Sally; Yates, David W.

    2004-01-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is a common reason for hospital attendance and is associated with significant delayed morbidity. We studied a series of 80 persons with MTBI. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and neuropsychological testing were used in the acute phase and a questionnaire for post-concussion syndrome (PCS) and return to work status at 6 months. In 26 subjects abnormalities were seen on MRI, of which 5 were definitely traumatic. There was weak correlation with abnormal neuropsychological tests for attention in the acute period. There was no significant correlation with a questionnaire for PCS and return to work status. Although non-specific abnormalities are frequently seen, standard MRI techniques are not helpful in identifying patients with MTBI who are likely to have delayed recovery. (orig.)

  6. Prevention of pressure ulcers in patients undergoing sub-acute rehabilitation after severe brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sachs, Marianne Brostrup; Wolffbrandt, Mia Moth; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2018-01-01

    that patients' rehabilitation days be planned in such a manner that activities, mobilisation and training are conducted throughout the day and evening. We also recommend that professional staff are encouraged to seek information about the former life of patients with severe brain injury. This article...... knowledge about PU care and performing the activities. However, our observations revealed one important additional aspect; a very distinct impression that the healthcare professionals were committed to learning about the patients' former life and actively used this knowledge in their planning and provision...

  7. [Therapeutic bloodletting at Jing-well points combine hypothermia attenuated acute cerebral edema after traumatic brain injury in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Xiao-mei; Cheng, Shi-xiang; Yang, Zhen; Zhang, Sai; Han, Wan-jun; Tu, Yue; Sun, Hong-tao

    2015-05-01

    To investigate the influence of therapeutic bloodletting at Jing-well points and hypothermia on acute cerebral edema after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in rats. Seventy-five SD rats were randomly divided into sham-operation group (Sham), TBI group (TBI), bloodletting group (BL), mild-induced hypothermia group (MIH), and bloodletting plus MIH group (BL + MIH) (n = 15). The model of TBI was established by electric controlled cortical impactor (eCCI). The rats of BL group were bloodletting at Jing-well points immediately after injury, twice daily. While the MIH group was settled on a hypothermia blanket promptly after TBI for 6 hours, so that the temperature dropped to 32 degrees. Each of measurement was performed after 48 hours. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate the dynamic impairment of cerebral edema after TBI (n = 3). In addition, mNSS score, measurements of wet and dry brain weight, and Evans Blue assay were performed to investigate the neurologic deficit, cerebral water content (n = 8), and blood-brain barrier permeability (BBB), (n = 4), respectively. MRI analysis showed that the cerebral edema, hematoma and midline shifting of rats in TBI group was more serious than other treatment group. Meanwhile compared with TBI group, the mNSS scores of every treatment group were meaningfully lower (all P cerebral edema and BBB dysfunction and exert neuroprotective effects after TBI. The results suggest that the combination of BL and MIH is more effective than other treatment being used alone.

  8. Investigating the acute and long-term effects of traumatic brain injury on the immune and fibrinolytic system

    OpenAIRE

    MARIA DAGLAS

    2018-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a serious condition that results in long-term disability in most patients. This thesis investigated the early and long-term effects of the immune and fibrinolytic response (blood clot breakdown), and the link between these two systems after brain injury in mice. A unique discovery was that the chronic immune response, over a period of 8 months, directly contributes to a worse outcome after brain injury. We also found gender-specific differences occurring at the early...

  9. Penetrating brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achyut Prashad Sharma

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In the past 20 years, there has been an increase in the incidence of head injuries caused by gunshot wounds.  Penetrating brain injury is a traumatic brain injury caused by high-velocity projectiles or low-velocity sharp objects. A wound in which the projectile breaches the cranium but does not exit is referred as a penetrating wound, and an injury in which the projectile passes entirely through the head, leaving both entrance  and exit wounds, is referred to as a perforating wound. A large number of these patients who survive their initial wounding will nevertheless expire shortly after admission to the hospital. Until the introduction of aseptic surgery in the last quarter of the nineteenth century, penetrating missile injuries of the brain were almost universally fatal. We have learned a great deal about gunshot wounds and their management from military experience gained during times of war, when a large number of firearm-related casualties are treated in a short period of time. Newly designed protective body armor has reduced the incidence of penetrating brain injuries significantly. Many of the victims in the vicinity of a cased explosive or an improvised explosive device will incur injuries by fragments. Blast injury is a common mechanism of traumatic brain injury among soldiers serving in war zone. Each war has had different lessons to teach. World War I for example, proved the efficacy of vigorous surgical intervention. During World War II, the importance of initial dural repair and antibiotic medication was first, debated, then acknowledged, and finally, universally accepted. The incidence of blast-induced traumatic brain injury has increased substantially in recent military conflicts. Blast-induced neurotrauma is the term given to describe an injury to the brain that occurs after exposure to a blast. Resent conflict has exposed military personnel to sophisticated explosive devices generating blast overpressure that results in

  10. Two-dimensional zymography differentiates gelatinase isoforms in stimulated microglial cells and in brain tissues of acute brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shanyan; Meng, Fanjun; Chen, Zhenzhou; Tomlinson, Brittany N; Wesley, Jennifer M; Sun, Grace Y; Whaley-Connell, Adam T; Sowers, James R; Cui, Jiankun; Gu, Zezong

    2015-01-01

    Excessive activation of gelatinases (MMP-2/-9) is a key cause of detrimental outcomes in neurodegenerative diseases. A single-dimension zymography has been widely used to determine gelatinase expression and activity, but this method is inadequate in resolving complex enzyme isoforms, because gelatinase expression and activity could be modified at transcriptional and posttranslational levels. In this study, we investigated gelatinase isoforms under in vitro and in vivo conditions using two-dimensional (2D) gelatin zymography electrophoresis, a protocol allowing separation of proteins based on isoelectric points (pI) and molecular weights. We observed organomercuric chemical 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate-induced activation of MMP-2 isoforms with variant pI values in the conditioned medium of human fibrosarcoma HT1080 cells. Studies with murine BV-2 microglial cells indicated a series of proform MMP-9 spots separated by variant pI values due to stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The MMP-9 pI values were shifted after treatment with alkaline phosphatase, suggesting presence of phosphorylated isoforms due to the proinflammatory stimulation. Similar MMP-9 isoforms with variant pI values in the same molecular weight were also found in mouse brains after ischemic and traumatic brain injuries. In contrast, there was no detectable pI differentiation of MMP-9 in the brains of chronic Zucker obese rats. These results demonstrated effective use of 2D zymography to separate modified MMP isoforms with variant pI values and to detect posttranslational modifications under different pathological conditions.

  11. Moderate traumatic brain injury causes acute dendritic and synaptic degeneration in the hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Gao

    Full Text Available Hippocampal injury-associated learning and memory deficits are frequent hallmarks of brain trauma and are the most enduring and devastating consequences following traumatic brain injury (TBI. Several reports, including our recent paper, showed that TBI brought on by a moderate level of controlled cortical impact (CCI induces immature newborn neuron death in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. In contrast, the majority of mature neurons are spared. Less research has been focused on these spared neurons, which may also be injured or compromised by TBI. Here we examined the dendrite morphologies, dendritic spines, and synaptic structures using a genetic approach in combination with immunohistochemistry and Golgi staining. We found that although most of the mature granular neurons were spared following TBI at a moderate level of impact, they exhibited dramatic dendritic beading and fragmentation, decreased number of dendritic branches, and a lower density of dendritic spines, particularly the mushroom-shaped mature spines. Further studies showed that the density of synapses in the molecular layer of the hippocampal dentate gyrus was significantly reduced. The electrophysiological activity of neurons was impaired as well. These results indicate that TBI not only induces cell death in immature granular neurons, it also causes significant dendritic and synaptic degeneration in pathohistology. TBI also impairs the function of the spared mature granular neurons in the hippocampal dentate gyrus. These observations point to a potential anatomic substrate to explain, in part, the development of posttraumatic memory deficits. They also indicate that dendritic damage in the hippocampal dentate gyrus may serve as a therapeutic target following TBI.

  12. Adenosine A2A Receptors Modulate Acute Injury and Neuroinflammation in Brain Ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicita Pedata

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The extracellular concentration of adenosine in the brain increases dramatically during ischemia. Adenosine A2A receptor is expressed in neurons and glial cells and in inflammatory cells (lymphocytes and granulocytes. Recently, adenosine A2A receptor emerged as a potential therapeutic attractive target in ischemia. Ischemia is a multifactorial pathology characterized by different events evolving in the time. After ischemia the early massive increase of extracellular glutamate is followed by activation of resident immune cells, that is, microglia, and production or activation of inflammation mediators. Proinflammatory cytokines, which upregulate cell adhesion molecules, exert an important role in promoting recruitment of leukocytes that in turn promote expansion of the inflammatory response in ischemic tissue. Protracted neuroinflammation is now recognized as the predominant mechanism of secondary brain injury progression. A2A receptors present on central cells and on blood cells account for important effects depending on the time-related evolution of the pathological condition. Evidence suggests that A2A receptor antagonists provide early protection via centrally mediated control of excessive excitotoxicity, while A2A receptor agonists provide protracted protection by controlling massive blood cell infiltration in the hours and days after ischemia. Focus on inflammatory responses provides for adenosine A2A receptor agonists a wide therapeutic time-window of hours and even days after stroke.

  13. The course and impact of family optimism in the post-acute period after acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Gerard A; Hough, Andrea; Meader, Laura M; Brennan, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the course and impact of family optimism in the post-acute stage of acquired brain injury. At Time 1, 30 family relatives of in-patients in rehabilitation units and 30 relatives of patients recently discharged from such units completed questionnaires relating to their emotional health, engagement in the rehabilitation process and expectations about the future consequences and controllability of the injury. At Time 2 (12-18 months later), 23 of the original sample completed questionnaires about their emotional health and actual consequences and controllability of the injury. At Time 1, optimism about future consequences and controllability was associated with greater engagement in the rehabilitation process and better emotional health. The two groups did not differ on any of the measures, which did not support the expectation that the patient's discharge home would trigger a loss of optimism and emotional upset for the family. At Time 2, the actual consequences were worse than had been expected at Time 1 and greater disappointment was associated with a greater decline in emotional wellbeing. Family expectations about recovery are linked with important variables such as emotional wellbeing and engagement in the rehabilitation process and need careful management by clinicians.

  14. Pediatric acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahlem, P.; van Aalderen, W. M. C.; Bos, A. P.

    2007-01-01

    Among ventilated children, the incidence of acute lung injury (ALI) was 9%; of that latter group 80% developed the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The population-based prevalence of pediatric ARDS was 5.5 cases/100.000 inhabitants. Underlying diseases in children were septic shock (34%),

  15. Early changes of serum insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) levels in patients with acute brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Cegang; Zhang Xinlu; Tao Jin; Xu Anding; Xu Shanshui; Huang Zhenpeng

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the early changes and clinical significance of serum Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) levels in patients with acute brain injury. Methods: Radioimmunoassay was used for measurement of the serum IGF-II concentration in 30 controls and 29 acute brain injury patients before and after treatment (within 1 day, at 3 and 7 days). Results: The serum IGF-II levels in brain injury patients at 1 day, 3 day 7 days after injury were 0.131 ± 0.047 ng/ml, 0.117 ± 0.046 ng/ml and 0.123 ±0.050 ng/ml respectively and were significantly lower than those in controls 0.44 ± 0.014 ng/ml, p<0.01. Differences among the values of the three days were not significant. Conclusion: IGF-II might play important role in the pathophysiological process of early acute brain injury

  16. Prediction of behavioural and cognitive deficits in patients with traumatic brain injury at an acute rehabilitation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Guise, E; LeBlanc, J; Feyz, M; Lamoureux, J; Greffou, S

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this study was to identify factors that would predict short-term neuropsychological outcome in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) hospitalized in an acute rehabilitation setting. Data was collected in the context of an acute early rehabilitation setting of a trauma centre. A brief neuropsychological assessment was carried out for 348 patients within a month following their trauma. Length of post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) was the best predictor of behavioural, memory and executive function variables within a month post TBI. The odds of being agitated, labile, irritable and disinhibited at one month post trauma were almost six times higher for those with PTA that lasted more than 7 days compared to those with a PTA of less than 24 hours. Also, the odds of having a higher mental manipulation score (less significant executive function impairment) were almost two times lower for those with frontal lesions, and three to six times lower for those with PTA of more than 24 hours. In addition, TBI severity, education and age were considered good predictors of some aspects of neuropsychological outcome. This model may help clinicians and administrators recognize the probable post-traumatic deficits as quickly as possible and to plan interventions as well as post-acute discharge orientation accordingly and early on.

  17. "THE EVALUATION OF THE POSSIBLE EFFECT OF POSITIVE END EXPIRATORY PRESSURE (PEEP) ON PHARMACOKINETICS OF PHENYTOIN IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE BRAIN INJURY UNDER MECHANICAL VENTILATION."

    OpenAIRE

    "Elham Hadidi; Mojtaba Mojtahedzadeh; Mohammad Reza Rouini; Behzad Eftekhar; Mohammad Abdollahi; Atabak Najafi; Mohammad R. Khajavi; Saeed Rezaee; Reza Ghaffari; Minoo Afshar"

    2005-01-01

    Positive ventilation has shown to have an influence on pharmacokinetic and disposition of some drugs.Beacause phenytoin with a narrow therapautic range, is the most commonly used drug for prophylaxis and treatment of early seizures after acute brain injuries, in the present study the effect of short term PEEP (5-10 cm H2O for at least 8 hours) on phenytoin serum concentration and pharmacokinetic parameters such as Vmax and clearance in brain injured patients under mechanical ventilation was e...

  18. Diagnosing dysautonomia after acute traumatic brain injury: evidence for overresponsiveness to afferent stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baguley, Ian J; Nott, Melissa T; Slewa-Younan, Shameran; Heriseanu, Roxana E; Perkes, Iain E

    2009-04-01

    To differentiate between traumatic brain injury (TBI) subjects with normal and elevated autonomic activity by quantifying cardiac responsivity to nociceptive stimuli and to determine the utility of heart rate variability (HRV) and event-related heart rate changes in diagnosing dysautonomia. Prospective cohort study. Intensive care unit in a tertiary metropolitan trauma center. Adults (N=27) with TBI recruited from 79 consecutive TBI admissions comprising 16 autonomically aroused and 11 control subjects matched by age, sex, and injury severity. None. Immediate: pattern of autonomic changes indexed by HRV and event-related heart rate after nociceptive stimuli. Six months: length of stay, Glasgow Coma Scale, and Disability Rating Scale. Heart rate changes (for both HRV and event-related heart rate) were associated with the diagnostic group and 6-month outcome when evaluated pre- and poststimulus but not when evaluated at rest. When assessed on day 7 postinjury, the comparison of HRV and heart rate parameters suggested an overresponsivity to nociceptive stimuli in dysautonomic subjects. These subjects showed a 2-fold increase in mean heart rate relative to subjects with sympathetic arousal of short duration (16% vs 8%), and a 6-fold increase over nonaroused control subjects. Data suggest that post-TBI sympathetic arousal is a spectrum disorder comprising, at one end, a short-duration syndrome and, at the other end, a dramatic, severe sympathetic and motor overactivity syndrome that continued for many months postinjury and associated with a significantly worse 6-month outcome. These findings suggest that it is not the presence of reactivity per se but rather the failure of processes to control for overreactivity that contributes to dysautonomic storming. This study provides empirical evidence that dysautonomic subjects show overresponsiveness to afferent stimuli. Findings from this study suggest an evidence-driven revision of diagnostic criteria and a simple clinical

  19. Is the contribution of alcohol to fatal traumatic brain injuries being underestimated in the acute hospital setting?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, O

    2011-04-05

    Alcohol consumption in Ireland has nearly doubled during the period 1989-2001. To evaluate the relationship of alcohol to fatal head injuries in the acute hospital setting we created a data base of all fatal traumatic brain injuries in the Department of Neuropathology at Beaumont Hospital over a ten year period (1997-2006 inclusive). 498 cases were identified (351 males: 147 females). Fatalities were highest in males aged 19-25 years (N=101) and 51-70 years (N=109). Falls (N=210) and road traffic accidents (N=183) were the commonest modes of presentation. 36\\/210 (17%) falls had positive blood alcohol testing, 9\\/210 (4.3%) had documentation of alcohol in notes but no testing, 35\\/210 (16.7%) tested negative for alcohol and 130\\/210 (61.9%) were not tested. The RTA group (N=183) comprised drivers (n=79), passengers (n=47) and pedestrians (n=57). 65\\/79 (82.2%) of drivers were males aged 19-25 years. Blood alcohol was only available in 27\\/79 (34.1%) drivers and was positive in 13\\/27 (48.1%). 14\\/75 (18.7%) pedestrians were tested for alcohol, 4\\/14 (28.6%) were positive. Overall 142\\/183 (77.6%) of the RTA group were not tested. The contribution of alcohol to fatal traumatic brain injuries is probably being underestimated due to omission of blood alcohol concentration testing on admission to hospital. Absence of national guidelines on blood alcohol testing in the emergency department compounds the problem.

  20. The Effect of Paracetamol on Core Body Temperature in Acute Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomised, Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Manoj K; Taylor, Colman; Billot, Laurent; Bompoint, Severine; Gowardman, John; Roberts, Jason A; Lipman, Jeffery; Myburgh, John

    2015-01-01

    Strategies to prevent pyrexia in patients with acute neurological injury may reduce secondary neuronal damage. The aim of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of the routine administration of 6 grams/day of intravenous paracetamol in reducing body temperature following severe traumatic brain injury, compared to placebo. A multicentre, randomised, blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial in adult patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). Patients were randomised to receive an intravenous infusion of either 1g of paracetamol or 0.9% sodium chloride (saline) every 4 hours for 72 hours. The primary outcome was the mean difference in core temperature during the study intervention period. Forty-one patients were included in this study: 21 were allocated to paracetamol and 20 to saline. The median (interquartile range) number of doses of study drug was 18 (17-18) in the paracetamol group and 18 (16-18) in the saline group (P = 0.85). From randomisation until 4 hours after the last dose of study treatment, there were 2798 temperature measurements (median 73 [67-76] per patient). The mean ± standard deviation temperature was 37.4±0.5°C in the paracetamol group and 37.7±0.4°C in the saline group (absolute difference -0.3°C; 95% confidence interval -0.6 to 0.0; P = 0.09). There were no significant differences in the use of physical cooling, or episodes of hypotension or hepatic abnormalities, between the two groups. The routine administration of 6g/day of intravenous paracetamol did not significantly reduce core body temperature in patients with TBI. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12609000444280.

  1. Cerebral hemodynamic changes of mild traumatic brain injury at the acute stage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardik Doshi

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI is a significant public health care burden in the United States. However, we lack a detailed understanding of the pathophysiology following mTBI and its relation to symptoms and recovery. With advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, we can investigate brain perfusion and oxygenation in regions known to be implicated in symptoms, including cortical gray matter and subcortical structures. In this study, we assessed 14 mTBI patients and 18 controls with susceptibility weighted imaging and mapping (SWIM for blood oxygenation quantification. In addition to SWIM, 7 patients and 12 controls had cerebral perfusion measured with arterial spin labeling (ASL. We found increases in regional cerebral blood flow (CBF in the left striatum, and in frontal and occipital lobes in patients as compared to controls (p = 0.01, 0.03, 0.03 respectively. We also found decreases in venous susceptibility, indicating increases in venous oxygenation, in the left thalamostriate vein and right basal vein of Rosenthal (p = 0.04 in both. mTBI patients had significantly lower delayed recall scores on the standardized assessment of concussion, but neither susceptibility nor CBF measures were found to correlate with symptoms as assessed by neuropsychological testing. The increased CBF combined with increased venous oxygenation suggests an increase in cerebral blood flow that exceeds the oxygen demand of the tissue, in contrast to the regional hypoxia seen in more severe TBI. This may represent a neuroprotective response following mTBI, which warrants further investigation.

  2. SECONDARY BRAIN INJURY

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    Ida Ayu Basmatika

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Secondary brain injury is a condision that occurs at some times after the primary impact and can be largely prevented and treated. Most brain injury ends with deadly consequences which is caused by secondary damage to the brain. Traumatic brain injured still represents the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in individuals under the age of 45 years in the world. The classification of secondary brain injured is divided into extracranial and intracranial causes. The cause of extracranial such as hipoxia, hypotensi, hyponatremia, hypertermia, hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. The cause of intracranial such as extradural, subdural, intraserebral, intraventrikular, dan subarachnoid hemorrhage. Beside that secondary injury can also be caused by edema and infection. Post-traumatic cerebral injured is characterized by direct tissue damage, impaired regulation of cerebral blood flow (cerebral blood flow / CBF, and disruption of metabolism. Manifestations of secondary brain injured include increased intracranial pressure, ischemic brain damage, cerebral hypoxia and hypercarbi, as well as disruption of cerebral autoregulation. The first priority is to stabilize the patient's cervical spine injury, relieve and maintain airway, ensure adequate ventilation (breathing, and making venous access for fluid resuscitation pathways (circulation and assessing the level of awareness and disability. This steps is crucial in patients with head injured to prevent hypoxia and hypotension, which is the main cause of secondary brain injury.

  3. Maxillofacial injuries and traumatic brain injury--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajandram, Rama Krsna; Syed Omar, Syed Nabil; Rashdi, Muhd Fazly Nizam; Abdul Jabar, Mohd Nazimi

    2014-04-01

    Maxillofacial injuries comprising hard tissue as well as soft tissue injuries can be associated with traumatic brain injuries due to the impact of forces transmitted through the head and neck. To date, the role of maxillofacial injury on brain injury has not been properly documented with some saying it has a protective function on the brain while others opposing this idea. This cross-sectional retrospective study evaluated all patients with maxillofacial injuries. The aim of the study was to analyze the occurrence and relationship of maxillofacial injuries with traumatic brain injuries. We retrospectively studied the hospital charts of all trauma patients seen at the accident and emergency department of UKM Medical Centre from November 2010 until November 2011. A detail analysis was then carried out on all patients who satisfied the inclusion and exclusion criteria. A total of 11294 patients were classified as trauma patients in which 176 patients had facial fractures and 292 did not have facial fractures. Middle face fractures was the most common pattern of facial fracture seen. Traumatic brain injury was present in 36.7% of maxillofacial cases. A significant association was found between facial fractures and traumatic brain injury (P maxillofacial injuries with or without facial fractures are at risk of acute or delayed traumatic brain injury. All patients should always have proper radiological investigations together with a proper observation and follow-up schedule. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Peripheral Inflammatory Markers and Antioxidant Response during the post-acute and chronic phase after Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

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    Federico Licastro

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a mechanical insult to the brain caused by external forces and associated with inflammation and oxidative stress. The patients may show different profiles of neurological recovery and a combination of oxidative damage and inflammatory processes can affect their courses. It is known that an over-expression of cytokines can be seen in peripheral blood in the early hours/days after the injury, but little is known about the weeks and months encompassing the post-acute and chronic phases. In addition, no information is available about the antioxidant responses mediated by the major enzymes that regulate ROS levels: superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, peroxidases, and GSH related enzymes. This study investigates the 6-month trends of inflammatory markers and antioxidant responses in 22 severe TBI patients with prolonged disorders of consciousness, consecutively recruited in a dedicated neuro-rehabilitation facility. Patients with a high degree of neurological impairment often show an uncertain outcome. In addition, the profiles of plasma activities were related to the neurological recovery after 12 months.Venous peripheral blood samples were taken blindly as soon as clinical signs and laboratory markers confirmed the absence of infections, 3 and 6 months later. The clinical and neuropsychological assessment continued up to 12 months. Nineteen patients completed the follow up. In the chronic phase, persistent high plasma levels of cytokines can interfere with cognitive functioning and higher post-acute levels of cytokines (IFN-g, TNF-a, IL1b, IL6 are associated with poorer cognitive recoveries 12 months later. Moreover, higher IFN- γ, higher TNF-α and lower glutathione peroxidase (GPx activity are associated with greater disability.The results add evidence of persistent inflammatory response, provide information about long-term imbalance of antioxidant activity and suggest that the over-production of cytokines and

  5. Pediatric acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodack, Marie I

    2010-10-01

    Although pediatric patients are sometimes included in studies about visual problems in patients with acquired brain injury (ABI), few studies deal solely with children. Unlike studies dealing with adult patients, in which mechanisms of brain injury are divided into cerebral vascular accident (CVA) and traumatic brain injury (TBI), studies on pediatric patients deal almost exclusively with traumatic brain injury, specifically caused by accidents. Here we report on the vision problems of 4 pediatric patients, ages 3 to 18 years, who were examined in the ophthalmology/optometry clinic at a children's hospital. All patients had an internally caused brain injury and after the initial insult manifested problems in at least one of the following areas: acuity, binocularity, motility (tracking or saccades), accommodation, visual fields, and visual perceptual skills. Pediatric patients can suffer from a variety of oculo-visual problems after the onset of head injury. These patients may or may not be symptomatic and can benefit from optometric intervention. Copyright © 2010 American Optometric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Trajectories of sleep changes during the acute phase of traumatic brain injury: A 7-day actigraphy study

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    Hsiao-Yean Chiu

    2013-09-01

    Conclusion: Poor sleep efficiency and longer sleep duration are common symptoms in acute TBI patients. Both head injury severity and age predicted the trajectories of daytime and 24-hour sleep duration during the acute phase of TBI, whereas gender predicted the trajectories of 24-hour sleep duration in the mild TBI subgroup.

  7. Protective effect of grifolin against brain injury in an acute cerebral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    end of the protocol, and tissue homogenates were prepared from isolated brain tissue. Glutathione ... Grifolin is a phenolic compound isolated from the Albatrellus ..... al. Resveratrol exerts its neuroprotective effect by modulating mitochondrial dysfunctions and associated cell death during cerebral ischemia. Brain Res 2009;.

  8. Radiation Injury to the Brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hits since January 2003 RADIATION INJURY TO THE BRAIN Radiation treatments affect all cells that are targeted. ... fractions, duration of therapy, and volume of [healthy brain] nervous tissue irradiated influence the likelihood of injury. ...

  9. Relatives´ strategies in sub-acute brain injury rehabilitation: the warrior, the observer and the hesitant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldager, Rikke; Willis, Karen; Larsen, Kristian

    2018-01-01

    traumatic brain injury, followed through in-patient rehabilitation varying from nine to twelve weeks. Analysis was undertaken using both an inductive and deductive approach. Findings: Drawing on Bourdieu’s concept of strategy, three relative positions were identified, the warrior, the observer...... to be involved. Aims and objective: We explored the experience of the rehabilitation process from the perspectives of relatives of patients with a traumatic brain injury. The aim of the study was, through a theoretical-empirical analysis, to identify relatives’ strategies and practices in the rehabilitation...... and the hesitant. These positions illustrate how different relative positions and their related dispositions influence the strategies used by relatives of patients with a severe traumatic brain injury evidenced in how they act, participate and relate to both the patient and the providers during the course...

  10. Clinically significant changes in the emotional condition of relatives of patients with severe traumatic brain injury during sub-acute rehabilitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Anne; Kristensen, Karin Spangsberg; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate clinically significant change in the emotional condition of relatives of patients with severe traumatic brain injury during sub-acute rehabilitation. Methods: Participants were 62 pairs of relatives and patients. Relatives completed the anxiety and depression scales from...... the Symptom Checklist-90-R (SCL-90-R) when the patients were admitted to sub-acute rehabilitation and at discharge. Improvement in emotional condition was investigated using the following criteria: (i) statistically reliable improvement; and (ii) clinically significant change (CSC). Results: At admission, 53...

  11. Cognitive activity limitations one year post-trauma in patients admitted to sub-acute rehabilitation after severe traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Jens Bak; Norup, Anne; Poulsen, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    -acute rehabilitation in the Eastern part of Denmark during a 5-year period from 2005 to 2009. Methods: Level of consciousness was assessed consecutively during rehabilitation and at 1 year post-trauma. Severity of traumatic brain injury was classified according to duration of post-traumatic amnesia. The cognitive...... of consciousness during the first year post-trauma. At follow-up 33-58% of patients had achieved functional independence within the cognitive domains on the Cog-FIM. Socio-economic status, duration of acute care and post-traumatic amnesia were significant predictors of outcome. Conclusion: Substantial recovery...

  12. Acute spinal cord injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Izunaga, H.; Sato, R.; Shinzato, I.; Korogi, Y.; Yamashita, Y.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on sequential MR images and neurologic findings that were correlated in 40 acute spinal cord injuries. Within 1 week after injury, frequent initial MR changes appeared isointense on both T1- and T2-weighted images and isointense on T1- and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. After 2 months, hypointensity appeared on T1-weighted images and hyperintensity persisted or appeared on T2-weighted images. Clinical improvements were observed in patients with isointensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images at the initial examination. A larger area of hyperintensity on subsequent T2-weighted images was correlated with no neurologic improvement. MR findings were good indicators of the spinal cord injury

  13. Multimodal Approach to Testing the Acute Effects of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (mTBI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society to be held in MiCo , Milano Conference Center, Milano, Italy during August 25-29, 2015. Authors Lianyang...adults and individuals with resolved mTBI. Compared to healthy controls, mTBI subjects showed reduced complexity in multiple brain areas (Luo et al...Methodological), 289-300. [2]   Boccaletti, S., Latora, V., Moreno, Y., Chavez, M., & Hwang, D. U. (2006). Complex networks: Structure and dynamics. Physics

  14. BPSD following traumatic brain injury

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    Renato Anghinah

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Annually, 700,000 people are hospitalized with brain injury acquired after traumatic brain injury (TBI in Brazil. Objective: We aim to review the basic concepts related to TBI, and the most common Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD findings in moderate and severe TBI survivors. We also discussed our strategies used to manage such patients in the post-acute period. Methods: Fifteen TBI outpatients followed at the Center for Cognitive Rehabilitation Post-TBI of the Clinicas Hospital of the University of São Paulo were submitted to a neurological, neuropsychological, speech and occupational therapy evaluation, including the Mini-Mental State Examination. Rehabilitation strategies will then be developed, together with the interdisciplinary team, for each patient individually. Where necessary, the pharmacological approach will be adopted. Results: Our study will discuss options of pharmacologic treatment choices for cognitive, behavioral, or affective disorders following TBI, providing relevant information related to a structured cognitive rehabilitation service and certainly will offer an alternative for patients and families afflicted by TBI. Conclusion: Traumatic brain injury can cause a variety of potentially disabling psychiatric symptoms and syndromes. Combined behavioral and pharmacological strategies, in the treatment of a set of highly challenging behavioral problems, appears to be essential for good patient recovery.

  15. BPSD following traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghinah, Renato; Freire, Fabio Rios; Coelho, Fernanda; Lacerda, Juliana Rhein; Schmidt, Magali Taino; Calado, Vanessa Tomé Gonçalves; Ianof, Jéssica Natuline; Machado, Sergio; Velasques, Bruna; Ribeiro, Pedro; Basile, Luis Fernando Hindi; Paiva, Wellingson Silva; Amorim, Robson Luis

    2013-01-01

    Annually, 700,000 people are hospitalized with brain injury acquired after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Brazil. OBJECTIVE We aim to review the basic concepts related to TBI, and the most common Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD) findings in moderate and severe TBI survivors. We also discussed our strategies used to manage such patients in the post-acute period. METHODS Fifteen TBI outpatients followed at the Center for Cognitive Rehabilitation Post-TBI of the Clinicas Hospital of the University of São Paulo were submitted to a neurological, neuropsychological, speech and occupational therapy evaluation, including the Mini-Mental State Examination. Rehabilitation strategies will then be developed, together with the interdisciplinary team, for each patient individually. Where necessary, the pharmacological approach will be adopted. RESULTS Our study will discuss options of pharmacologic treatment choices for cognitive, behavioral, or affective disorders following TBI, providing relevant information related to a structured cognitive rehabilitation service and certainly will offer an alternative for patients and families afflicted by TBI. CONCLUSION Traumatic brain injury can cause a variety of potentially disabling psychiatric symptoms and syndromes. Combined behavioral and pharmacological strategies, in the treatment of a set of highly challenging behavioral problems, appears to be essential for good patient recovery. PMID:29213850

  16. Functional resting-state fMRI connectivity correlates with serum levels of the S100B protein in the acute phase of traumatic brain injury

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    William Hedley Thompson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The S100B protein is an intra-cellular calcium-binding protein that mainly resides in astrocytes in the central nervous system. The serum level of S100B is used as biomarker for the severity of brain damage in traumatic brain injury (TBI patients. In this study we investigated the relationship between intrinsic resting-state brain connectivity, measured 1–22 days (mean 8 days after trauma, and serum levels of S100B in a patient cohort with mild-to-severe TBI in need of neuro-intensive care in the acute phase. In line with previous investigations, our results show that the peak level of S100B acquired during the acute phase of TBI was negatively correlated with behavioral measures (Glasgow Outcome Score, GOS of functional outcome assessed 6 to 12 months post injury. Using a multi-variate pattern analysis-informed seed-based correlation analysis, we show that the strength of resting-state brain connectivity in multiple resting-state networks was negatively correlated with the peak of serum levels of S100B. A negative correspondence between S100B peak levels recorded 12–36 h after trauma and intrinsic connectivity was found for brain regions located in the default mode, fronto-parietal, visual and motor resting-state networks. Our results suggest that resting-state brain connectivity measures acquired during the acute phase of TBI is concordant with results obtained from molecular biomarkers and that it may hold a capacity to predict long-term cognitive outcome in TBI patients.

  17. The Association Between Ventriculo-Peritoneal Shunt and Acute Appendicitis in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury: A 14-Year, Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sher-Wei; Ao, Kam-Hou; Ho, Chung-Han; Tseng, Chien-Jen; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Chio, Chung-Ching; Kuo, Jinn-Rung

    2017-07-01

    The association between preexisting ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt and the risk of new-onset acute appendicitis in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) is not well established. The aim of the present study was to determine the relationships between VP shunt and acute appendicitis in patients with TBI. A longitudinal cohort study matched by a propensity score in patients with TBI with (4781 patients) or without (9562 patients) VP shunt was conducted using the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan between January 1993 and December 2013. The main outcome studied was diagnosis of acute appendicitis. The cumulative probability of acute appendicitis was not different between these 2 groups (P = 0.6244). A Cox model showed central nervous system (CNS) infection to be an independent predictor of acute appendicitis with an adjusted hazard ratio of 2.98. Patients with TBI with both a VP shunt and a CNS infection had a greater risk of developing new-onset acute appendicitis (hazard ratio 4.25; 95% confidence interval 1.84-9.81) compared patients with TBI without a VP shunt or CNS infection. We concluded that VP shunt is not a risk factor in the development of appendicitis in patients with TBI. Patients with TBI with a shunt and a CNS infection may have a greater risk of developing acute appendicitis. Therefore, care in avoiding CNS infection is a key for the prevention acute appendicitis in this patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Prospective comparison of acute confusion severity with duration of post-traumatic amnesia in predicting employment outcome after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakase-Richardson, Risa; Yablon, Stuart A; Sherer, Mark

    2007-08-01

    Measurement of the duration of post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) is common practice, serving as an important index of the severity of traumatic brain injury (TBI) and a predictor of functional outcome. However, controversy exists regarding the nature of PTA; some studies indicate that it is a confusional state with symptoms that extend beyond disorientation and amnesia. To evaluate the contribution of the severity of acute confusion 1 month after TBI to prediction of employment at 1 year after injury, comparing it with PTA duration. Prospective study involving 171 participants with complete data, who met the study criteria, from 228 consecutive TBI Model System admissions. Outcome measures included weekly administration of the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98 (DelRS-R98) to measure the severity of acute confusion. Evaluations closest to 1 month after injury were used for study purposes. Duration of PTA was defined as the interval from injury until two consecutive Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test scores of > or = 76 were obtained within a period of 24-72 h. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression were used to predict employment status at 1 year after injury. Age, education and DelRS-R98 were significant predictors accounting for 34% of outcome variance. Individuals with greater confusion severity at 1 month after injury, older age and lower levels of education were less likely to be employed at 1 year after injury. Severity of confusion was more strongly associated with employment outcome (r(s) = -0.39) than was PTA duration (r(s) = -0.34). In addition to demographic indices, severity of acute confusion makes a unique contribution to predicting late outcome after TBI.

  19. PERSONALITY CHANGES IN BRAIN INJURY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Patricia Gracia; Mielke, Michelle M.; Rosenberg, Paul; Bergey, Alyssa; Rao, Vani

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is frequently complicated by alterations in mood and behaviour and changes in personality. We report mild personality changes post-TBI as a possible indicator of traumatic brain injury, but not of injury severity or psychiatric complications. PMID:21677207

  20. Neuropsychological support to relatives of patients with severe traumatic brain injury in the sub-acute phase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Anne; Kristensen, Karin Spangsberg; Siert, Lars

    2011-01-01

    Many studies have reported emotional distress in relatives of patients with brain injury, but few studies have investigated neuropsychological interventions for relatives. The present study assessed the amount of neuropsychological support as well as the actual number of sessions...... as characteristics related to the patient: Glasgow Coma Scale, Injury Severity Score, Early Functional Abilities, Functional Independence Measure, Rancho Los Amigos; and to the relative: symptoms of anxiety and depression (SCL-90-R), quality of life (SF-36) and amount and number of sessions of neuropsychological...

  1. Boussignac CPAP system for brain death confirmation with apneic test in case of acute lung injury/adult respiratory distress syndrome – series of cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wieczorek A

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Andrzej Wieczorek,1 Tomasz Gaszynski2 1Department of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland; 2Department of Emergency Medicine and Disaster Medicine, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland Introduction: There are some patients with severe respiratory disturbances like adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS and suspicion of brain death, for whom typical performance of the apneic test is difficult to complete because of quick desaturation and rapid deterioration without effective ventilation. To avoid failure of brain death confirmation and possible loss of organ donation another approach to apneic test is needed. We present two cases of patients with clinical symptoms of brain death, with lung pathology (acute lung injury, ARDS, lung embolism and lung infection, in whom apneic tests for recognizing brain death were difficult to perform. During typical performance of apneic test involving the use of oxygen catheter for apneic oxygenation we observed severe desaturation with growing hypotension and hemodynamic destabilization. But with the use of Boussignac CPAP system all necessary tests were successfully completed, confirming the patient’s brain death, which gave us the opportunity to perform procedures for organ donation. The main reason of apneic test difficulties was severe gas exchange disturbances secondary to ARDS. Thus lack of positive end expiratory pressure during classical performance of apneic test leads to quick desaturation and rapid hemodynamic deterioration, limiting the observation period below dedicated at least 10-minute interval.  Conclusion: The Boussignac CPAP system may be an effective tool for performing transparent apneic test in case of serious respiratory disturbances, especially in the form of acute lung injury or ARDS. Keywords: brain death, organ donor, ARDS, ALI, Boussignac CPAP

  2. An exploratory study of the association of acute posttraumatic stress, depression, and pain to cognitive functioning in mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Jessica S; Meares, Susanne; Batchelor, Jennifer; Bryant, Richard A

    2015-07-01

    Few studies have examined whether psychological distress and pain affect cognitive functioning in the acute to subacute phase (up to 30 days postinjury) following mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). The current study explored whether acute posttraumatic stress, depression, and pain were associated with performance on a task of selective and sustained attention completed under conditions of increasing cognitive demands (standard, auditory distraction, and dual-task), and on tests of working memory, memory, processing speed, reaction time (RT), and verbal fluency. At a mean of 2.87 days (SD = 2.32) postinjury, 50 adult mTBI participants, consecutive admissions to a Level 1 trauma hospital, completed neuropsychological tests and self-report measures of acute posttraumatic stress, depression, and pain. A series of canonical correlation analyses was used to explore the relationships of a common set of psychological variables to various sets of neuropsychological variables. Significant results were found on the task of selective and sustained attention. Strong relationships were found between psychological variables and speed (r(c) = .56, p = .02) and psychological variables and accuracy (r(c) = .68, p = .002). Pain and acute posttraumatic stress were associated with higher speed scores (reflecting more correctly marked targets) under standard conditions. Acute posttraumatic stress was associated with lower accuracy scores across all task conditions. Moderate but nonsignificant associations were found between psychological variables and most cognitive tasks. Acute posttraumatic stress and pain show strong associations with selective and sustained attention following mTBI. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Perioperative acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Calvert Stacey

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Acute kidney injury (AKI is a serious complication in the perioperative period, and is consistently associated with increased rates of mortality and morbidity. Two major consensus definitions have been developed in the last decade that allow for easier comparison of trial evidence. Risk factors have been identified in both cardiac and general surgery and there is an evolving role for novel biomarkers. Despite this, there has been no real change in outcomes and the mainstay of treatment remains preventive with no clear evidence supporting any therapeutic intervention as yet. This review focuses on definition, risk factors, the emerging role of biomarkers and subsequent management of AKI in the perioperative period, taking into account new and emerging strategies.

  4. An experimental study on acute brain radiation injury: Dynamic changes in proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the correlation with histopathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui, E-mail: lihui@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Li, Jian-peng, E-mail: lijp@sysucc.org.cn [Department of Radiology, Dongguan People' s Hospital, Dongguan City (China); Lin, Cheng-guang, E-mail: linchg@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Xue-wen, E-mail: liuxw@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Geng, Zhi-jun, E-mail: gengzhj@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Mo, Yun-xian, E-mail: moyx@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Zhang, Rong, E-mail: zhangr@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xie, Chuan-miao, E-mail: xchuanm@sysucc.org.cn [State Key Laboratory of Oncology in Southern China, Guangzhou (China); Medical Imaging and Minimally Invasive Interventional Center, Cancer Center, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou (China)

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate the correlation between the alterations of single-voxel {sup 1}H MRS and the histopathological characteristics of radiation brain injury following radiation. Materials and methods: Twenty-seven rabbits were randomized into nine groups to receive radiation with a single dose of 25 Gy. The observation time points included a pre-radiation and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, and 8 wk following radiation. Each treatment group underwent conventional MRI and single-voxel {sup 1}H MRS, N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), choline (Cho), and creatine (Cr) were observed over the region of interest, and the presence or absence of lactate (Lac) and lipid (Lip) was detected. Histological specimens of each group were obtained after image acquisition. Results: The values of Cho were significantly increased in the first 3 wk, and decreased over the following 5 wk after radiation. Levels of NAA showed a trend toward a decrease 5 wk after radiation. The levels of Cr were not changed between before and after radiation. The Cho/NAA metabolic ratio was significantly increased in weeks 6, 7, and 8 following irradiation, compared to pre-radiation values. Vascular and glial injury appeared on 2 wk after RT in the histology samples, until 4 wk after RT, necrosis of the oligodendrocytes, neuronal degeneration and demyelination could be observed. Conclusions: MRS is sensitive to detect metabolic changes following radiation, and can be used in the early diagnosis of radiation brain injury.

  5. The scavenging chemokine receptor ACKR2 has a significant impact on acute mortality rate and early lesion development after traumatic brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas M Woodcock

    Full Text Available The atypical chemokine receptor ACKR2 promotes resolution of acute inflammation by operating as a scavenger receptor for inflammatory CC chemokines in several experimental models of inflammatory disorders, however its role in the brain remains unclear. Based on our previous reports of increased expression of inflammatory chemokines and their corresponding receptors following traumatic brain injury (TBI, we hypothesised that ACKR2 modulates neuroinflammation following brain trauma and that its deletion exacerbates cellular inflammation and chemokine production. We demonstrate increased CCL2 and ACKR2 mRNA expression in post-mortem human brain, whereby ACKR2 mRNA levels correlated with later times post-TBI. This data is consistent with the transient upregulation of ACKR2 observed in mouse brain after closed head injury (CHI. As compared to WT animals, ACKR2-/- mice showed a higher mortality rate after CHI, while the neurological outcome in surviving mice was similar. At day 1 post-injury, ACKR2-/- mice displayed aggravated lesion volume and no differences in CCL2 expression and macrophage recruitment relative to WT mice. Reciprocal regulation of ACKR2 and CCL2 expression was explored in cultured astrocytes, which are recognized as the major source of CCL2 and also express ACKR2. ACKR2 mRNA increased as early as 2 hours after an inflammatory challenge in WT astrocytes. As expected, CCL2 expression also dramatically increased at 4 hours in WT astrocytes but was significantly lower in ACKR2-/- astrocytes, possibly indicating a co-regulation of CCL2 and ACKR2 in these cells. Conversely, in vivo, CCL2 mRNA/protein levels were increased similarly in ACKR2-/- and WT brains at 4 and 12 hours after CHI, in line with the lack of differences in cerebral macrophage recruitment and neurological recovery. In conclusion, ACKR2 is induced after TBI and has a significant impact on mortality and lesion development acutely following CHI, while its role in chemokine

  6. A quantitative immunohistochemical study on the time-dependent course of acute inflammatory cellular response to human brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausmann, R; Kaiser, A; Lang, C; Bohnert, M; Betz, P

    1999-01-01

    The time-dependent inflammatory cell reaction in human cortical contusions has been investigated during the first 30 weeks after blunt head injury. Immunohistochemical staining was carried out using CD 15 for granulocytes and LCA, CD 3 and UCHL-1 for mononuclear leucocytes. In order to provide reliable data for a forensic wound age estimation, the intensity of the cellular reaction was evaluated with a quantitative image analysis system. CD 15-labelled granulocytes were detectable earliest 10 min after brain injury, whereas significantly increased numbers of mononuclear leucocytes occurred in cortical contusions after a postinfliction interval of at least 1.1 days (LCA), 2 days (CD 3) or 3.7 days (UCHL-1), respectively.

  7. Traumatic Brain Injury and Aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurence

    1994-01-01

    Persons who have suffered traumatic injury to the brain may subsequently display aggressive behavior. Three main syndromes of aggression following traumatic brain injury are described: (1) episodic dyscontrol; (2) frontal lobe disinhibition; and (3) exacerbation of premorbid antisociality. The neuropsychological substrates of these syndromes are…

  8. Traumatic Brain Injury - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Traumatic Brain Injury URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/ ... W XYZ List of All Topics All Traumatic Brain Injury - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, ...

  9. Management of severe traumatic brain injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome using pumped extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, Tim; McGlone, Phillip; Chambers, Robert; Fennell, Jon

    2017-02-01

    The effects of a high carbon dioxide on cerebral perfusion and intracranial pressure are well known. We report the case of a man who presented after with a severe traumatic brain injury including intracranial and extradural haemorrhage. Neuroprotective ventilation was impossible without supramaximal tidal volumes due to a combination of chest trauma and severe bronchospasm. A pump driven Novalung iLA active® system was inserted to achieve both ARDSnet ventilation and a lowering of intracranial pressure. To our knowledge, this is the first time this system has been used to this effect. The patient went on to make a good recovery.

  10. Traqueostomia precoce versus traqueostomia tardia em pacientes com lesão cerebral aguda grave Early versus late tracheostomy in patients with acute severe brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno do Valle Pinheiro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Comparar os efeitos da traqueostomia precoce e da traqueostomia tardia em pacientes com lesão cerebral aguda grave. MÉTODOS: Estudo retrospectivo com 28 pacientes admitidos na UTI do Hospital Universitário da Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora com diagnóstico de lesão cerebral aguda grave e apresentando escore na escala de coma de Glasgow (ECG OBJECTIVE: To compare the effects of early tracheostomy and of late tracheostomy in patients with acute severe brain injury. METHODS: A retrospective study involving 28 patients admitted to the ICU of the Federal University of Juiz de Fora University Hospital in Juiz de Fora, Brazil, diagnosed with acute severe brain injury and presenting with a Glasgow coma scale (GCS score < 8 within the first 48 h of hospitalization. The patients were divided into two groups: early tracheostomy (ET, performed within the first 8 days after admission; and late tracheostomy (LT, performed after postadmission day 8. At admission, we collected demographic data and determined the following scores: Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II, GCS and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA. RESULTS: There were no significant differences between the groups (ET vs. LT regarding the demographic data or the scores: APACHE II (26 ± 6 vs. 28 ± 8; p = 0.37, SOFA (6.3 ± 2.7 vs. 7.2 ± 3.0; p = 0.43 and GCS (5.4 ± 1.7 vs. 5.5 ± 1.7; p = 0.87. The 28-day mortality rate was lower in the ET group (9% vs. 47%; p = 0.04. Nosocomial pneumonia occurring within the first 7 days was less common in the ET group, although the difference was not significant (0% vs. 23%; p = 0.13. There were no differences regarding the occurrence of late pneumonia or in the duration of mechanical ventilation between the groups. CONCLUSIONS: On the basis of these findings, early tracheostomy should be considered in patients with acute severe brain injury.

  11. Molecular Mechanisms of Neonatal Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Thornton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Fetal/neonatal brain injury is an important cause of neurological disability. Hypoxia-ischemia and excitotoxicity are considered important insults, and, in spite of their acute nature, brain injury develops over a protracted time period during the primary, secondary, and tertiary phases. The concept that most of the injury develops with a delay after the insult makes it possible to provide effective neuroprotective treatment after the insult. Indeed, hypothermia applied within 6 hours after birth in neonatal encephalopathy reduces neurological disability in clinical trials. In order to develop the next generation of treatment, we need to know more about the pathophysiological mechanism during the secondary and tertiary phases of injury. We review some of the critical molecular events related to mitochondrial dysfunction and apoptosis during the secondary phase and report some recent evidence that intervention may be feasible also days-weeks after the insult.

  12. "THE EVALUATION OF THE POSSIBLE EFFECT OF POSITIVE END EXPIRATORY PRESSURE (PEEP ON PHARMACOKINETICS OF PHENYTOIN IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE BRAIN INJURY UNDER MECHANICAL VENTILATION."

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Elham Hadidi

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Positive ventilation has shown to have an influence on pharmacokinetic and disposition of some drugs.Beacause phenytoin with a narrow therapautic range, is the most commonly used drug for prophylaxis and treatment of early seizures after acute brain injuries, in the present study the effect of short term PEEP (5-10 cm H2O for at least 8 hours on phenytoin serum concentration and pharmacokinetic parameters such as Vmax and clearance in brain injured patients under mechanical ventilation was examined. Ten patients with moderate to severe acute brain injury who were placed on mechanical ventilation with an initial PEEP level of 0-5 cm H2O were included in the study. Patients received phenytoin loading dose of 15 mg/kg followed by a maintenance daily dose of 3-7 mg/kg initiated within 12 hours of loading dose. Sampels were taken on two different occasions before and after PEEP elevation. Total phenytoin serum concentrations were determined by HPLC method. A time invarient Michaelis-Menten pharmacokinetic model was used to calculate Vmax and clearance for each patient.Derrived variables were calculated as follows: Vmax, 3.5-6.8 and 3.7-8.2 mg/kg/day; Clearance, 0.1-0.7 and 0.1-1.2 l/kg/day (before and after PEEP elevation, respectively. Our data have shown a wide range of variability (2.6-32.5 mg/l in phenytoin serum concentrations. There were no statistically significant differences in the measured total concentrations (p=0.721 and calculated Vmax and clearance (p=0.285before and after PEEP elevation. Administration of fluid and inotropic agents, limitation in application of higher levels of PEEP and drug interactions, shall be considered as possible explanations for these findings.

  13. Lesões cerebrais agudas e sua influência sobre a motilidade gastrintestinal Influence of acute brain injuries on gut motility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adson Freitas de Lucena

    2011-03-01

    hypertension, and correction of these gastric abnormalities can facilitate the recovery of patients with brain injuries. We conducted a literature review of both national and international health sciences medical journals and electronic libraries spanning the last twenty-eight years and focused on the brain, gut motility and gastric emptying functional axis either in experimental animal models of brain injury or patients with acute cerebral injuries. Decreased parasympathetic tonus is a potential cause of intracranial hypertension-related food intolerance. Changes in gastrointestinal transit after a brain injury follow a biphasic pattern: an initial phase of accelerated gastric emptying and a late stage of intestinal lethargy. Changes in the physiology underlying gut motility may be essential for homeostatic stabilization in hemodynamically unstable patients. Research studies are necessary to understand the difficult management of intensive care patients with intracranial hypertension secondary to subarachnoid hemorrhages resulting from traumatic brain injuries or rupture of a cerebral aneurysm. Increased intracranial pressure induces massive increases in sympathetic activity, which is responsible for many of the peripheral systemic and gastrointestinal symptoms. Brain injuries leading to significant increases in intracranial pressure result in delayed gastrointestinal emptying due to autonomic nervous system changes.

  14. Impaired Nongas Exchange Functions of the Lung and Their Role in the Development of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Severe Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu. A. Churlyaev

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was undertaken to examine the impact of the lung on the content of adrenaline, noradrenaline, serotonin, and lactic acid in systemic blood flow and to define their contribution to the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS in severe brain injury (SBI. Forty victims with severe brain injury were examined. A study group comprised 26 patients. On admission, the patients were found to have ARDSj, later on 12 patients of them were observed to have its progression and to develop pneumonia in its presence. A control group included 14 victims. There were no postoperative complications. During 7 days after brain injury, the time course of changes were determined in the mixed venous (pulmonary arterial and arterial (femoral arterial levels of adrenaline and noradrenaline by fluorometry and in those of serotonin and lactic acid by the fluorescence technique [8] and enzymatic assay, respectively. The performed studies have indicated that in SBI, a significant activation of the sympathicoadrenal system results in a noticeable humoral reaction, by increasing the concentration of biologically active substances in the blood flowing to the lung, which leads to a load and subsequent decompensation of nongas exchange functions of the lung in the inactivation of serotonin, noradrenaline, their absorption of lactate, which in the presence of neurodystrophic changes has a great impact on the development of ARDS in victims with SBI. In this case, the clinical, X-ray, and biochemical signs of the development of ARDS appear 12—36 hours after the detected nongas exchange dysfunctions are detectable.

  15. The adaptation process following acute onset disability: an interactive two-dimensional approach applied to acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brands, Ingrid M H; Wade, Derick T; Stapert, Sven Z; van Heugten, Caroline M

    2012-09-01

    To describe a new model of the adaptation process following acquired brain injury, based on the patient's goals, the patient's abilities and the emotional response to the changes and the possible discrepancy between goals and achievements. The process of adaptation after acquired brain injury is characterized by a continuous interaction of two processes: achieving maximal restoration of function and adjusting to the alterations and losses that occur in the various domains of functioning. Consequently, adaptation requires a balanced mix of restoration-oriented coping and loss-oriented coping. The commonly used framework to explain adaptation and coping, 'The Theory of Stress and Coping' of Lazarus and Folkman, does not capture this interactive duality. This model additionally considers theories concerned with self-regulation of behaviour, self-awareness and self-efficacy, and with the setting and achievement of goals. THE TWO-DIMENSIONAL MODEL: Our model proposes the simultaneous and continuous interaction of two pathways; goal pursuit (short term and long term) or revision as a result of success and failure in reducing distance between current state and expected future state and an affective response that is generated by the experienced goal-performance discrepancies. This affective response, in turn, influences the goals set. This two-dimensional representation covers the processes mentioned above: restoration of function and consideration of long-term limitations. We propose that adaptation centres on readjustment of long-term goals to new achievable but desired and important goals, and that this adjustment underlies re-establishing emotional stability. We discuss how the proposed model is related to actual rehabilitation practice.

  16. Traumatic Brain Injury Registry (TBI)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — As the number of Operation Enduring Freedom/Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) patients has grown, so has the need to track and monitor...

  17. Brain Injury Association of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... com/Godspeed-Story-Pag.. Read More... BIAA Applauds Trump Administration's Opioid Emergency Declaration; Calls for More Resources ... The Brain Injury Association of America salutes the Trump Administration for directing the Department of Health and ...

  18. Dysautonomia after pediatric brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Katherine A; Shoykhet, Michael; Jeong, Jong H; Tyler-Kabara, Elizabeth C; Henderson, Maryanne J; Bell, Michael J; Fink, Ericka L

    2012-08-01

    Dysautonomia after brain injury is a diagnosis based on fever, tachypnea, hypertension, tachycardia, diaphoresis, and/or dystonia. It occurs in 8 to 33% of adults with brain injury and is associated with poor outcome. We hypothesized that children with brain injury with dysautonomia have worse outcomes and prolonged rehabilitation, and sought to determine the prevalence of dysautonomia in children and to characterize its clinical features. We developed a database of children (n = 249, 154 males, 95 females; mean [SD] age 11 years 10 months [5 y 7 mo]) with traumatic brain injury, cardiac arrest, stroke, infection of the central nervous system, or brain neoplasm admitted for rehabilitation to The Children's Institute of Pittsburgh between 2002 and 2009. Dysautonomia diagnosis, injury type, clinical signs, length of stay, and Functional Independence Measure for Children (WeeFIM) testing were extracted from medical records, and analysed for differences between groups with and without dysautonomia. Dysautonomia occurred in 13% of children with brain injury (95% confidence interval 9.3-18.0%), occurring in 10% after traumatic brain injury and 31% after cardiac arrest. The combination of hypertension, diaphoresis, and dystonia best predicted a diagnosis of dysautonomia (area under the curve = 0.92). Children with dysautonomia had longer stays, worse WeeFIM scores, and improved less on the score's motor component (all p ≤ 0.001). Dysautonomia is common in children with brain injury and is associated with prolonged rehabilitation. Prospective study and standardized diagnostic approaches are needed to maximize outcomes. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  19. Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats Induces Lung Injury and Systemic Immune Suppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeij, Jan-Dirk; Aslami, Hamid; Fluiter, Kees; Roelofs, Joris J.; van den Bergh, Walter M.; Juffermans, Nicole P.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Van der Sluijs, Koen; van de Beek, Diederik; van Westerloo, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is frequently complicated by acute lung injury, which is predictive for poor outcome. However, it is unclear whether lung injury develops independently or as a result of mechanical ventilation after TBI. Further, TBI is strongly associated with the development of

  20. Computed tomography: ocular manifestations in acute head injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Acute head injuries are common in the population. Associated ocular injuries are occasionally encountered and these are of varying nature and outcome. Methods: We reviewed 98 brain computed tomographic results retrospectively. These are cases that were done between Jan. 2013- Jan. 2014. Statistical ...

  1. Plasma Anti-Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein Autoantibody Levels during the Acute and Chronic Phases of Traumatic Brain Injury: A Transforming Research and Clinical Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury Pilot Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, K.K.W. (Kevin K. W.); Yang, Z. (Zhihui); J.K. Yue (John); Zhang, Z. (Zhiqun); E.A. Winkler (Ethan A.); A.M. Puccio (Ava); R. Diaz-Arrastia (Ramon); H.F. Lingsma (Hester); E.L. Yuh (Esther); P. Mukherjee (Pratik); Valadka, A.B. (Alex B.); W.A. Gordon (Wayne A.); D. Okonkwo (David); G. Manley (Geoffrey); S.R. Cooper (Shelly); K. Dams-O'connor (Kristen); A.J. Hricik (Allison); T. Inoue (Tomoo); A.I.R. Maas (Andrew); D.K. Menon (David ); D.M. Schnyer (David); T.K. Sinha (Tuhin); M.J. Vassar (Mary)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe described recently a subacute serum autoantibody response toward glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and its breakdown products 5-10 days after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). Here, we expanded our anti-GFAP autoantibody (AutoAb[GFAP]) investigation to the multicenter

  2. Diagnosis of Acute Groin Injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serner, Andreas; Tol, Johannes L; Jomaah, Nabil

    2015-01-01

    ; Level of evidence, 3. METHODS: A total of 110 male athletes (mean age, 25.6 ± 4.7 years) with sports-related acute groin pain were prospectively included within 7 days of injury from August 2012 to April 2014. Standardized history taking, a clinical examination, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and...

  3. Brain injury with diabetes mellitus: evidence, mechanisms and treatment implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Sherifa A

    2017-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a risk for brain injury. Brain injury is associated with acute and chronic hyperglycaemia, insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hypoglycaemic events in diabetic patients. Hyperglycemia is a cause of cognitive deterioration, low intelligent quotient, neurodegeneration, brain aging, brain atrophy and dementia. Areas covered: The current review highlights the experimental, clinical, neuroimaging and neuropathological evidence of brain injury induced by diabetes and its associated metabolic derangements. It also highlights the mechanisms of diabetes-induced brain injury. It seems that the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia-induced brain injury is complex and includes combination of vascular disease, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, apoptosis, reduction of neurotrophic factors, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activation, neurotransmitters' changes, impairment of brain repair processes, impairment of brain glymphatic system, accumulation of amyloid β and tau phosphorylation and neurodegeneration. The potentials for prevention and treatment are also discussed. Expert commentary: We summarize the risks and the possible mechanisms of DM-induced brain injury and recommend strategies for neuroprotection and neurorestoration. Recently, a number of drugs and substances [in addition to insulin and its mimics] have shown promising potentials against diabetes-induced brain injury. These include: antioxidants, neuroinflammation inhibitors, anti-apoptotics, neurotrophic factors, AChE inhibitors, mitochondrial function modifiers and cell based therapies.

  4. Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not always visible on your skin. A skull fracture is when the skull cracks. Sometimes broken bones cut into your brain and cause bleeding or ... brain. They show if there is a skull fracture or bleeding, bruising, or blood ... skating, horse riding, and skiing and snowboarding avoid dangerous sports ...

  5. Missile injuries of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazmi, S.A.M.; Ashraf, A.T.; Qureshi, N.A.

    2001-01-01

    Data was analyzed relating to a consecutive series of 16 patients of penetrating brain injuries received at forward defense lines. Characteristics studied were the cause of injury, level of consciousness and various neurological deficits presented on initial examination, CT scan findings, the surgical procedures performed and the final outcome after one year of follow-up. One out of 16 patients, died due to severe associated injuries to abdominal viscera and major vessels. Meningitis occurred in one patient during the immediate postoperative period. All patients with motor weakness speech deficits and incontinence showed significant improvement. Hearing loss of one ear persisted in one patient. Two patients developed delayed onset seizures. It is concluded that, patients with penetrating brain injuries should be evacuated to the tertiary care neurosurgical centres as soon as possible. In operation only obviously necrotic brain and easily accessible metal and bone pieces should be removed. There is no need to explore the normal brain as it would only result in increased neurological deficits. The patients with such injuries should receive broad-spectrum antibiotics to prevent the infective complications. (author)

  6. Notch signaling inhibitor DAPT provides protection against acute craniocerebral injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Mei Zhang

    Full Text Available Notch signaling pathway is involved in many physiological and pathological processes. The γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT inhibits Notch signaling pathway and promotes nerve regeneration after cerebral ischemia. However, neuroprotective effects of DAPT against acute craniocerebral injury remain unclear. In this study, we established rat model of acute craniocerebral injury, and found that with the increase of damage grade, the expression of Notch and downstream protein Hes1 and Hes5 expression gradually increased. After the administration of DAPT, the expression of Notch, Hes1 and Hes5 was inhibited, apoptosis and oxidative stress decreased, neurological function and cognitive function improved. These results suggest that Notch signaling can be used as an indicator to assess the severity of post-traumatic brain injury. Notch inhibitor DAPT can reduce oxidative stress and apoptosis after acute craniocerebral injury, and is a potential drug for the treatment of acute craniocerebral injury.

  7. The neuroethics and neurolaw of brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Neil Krishan; Ford, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Neuroethics and neurolaw are fields of study that involve the interface of neuroscience with clinical and legal decision-making. The past two decades have seen increasing attention being paid to both fields, in large part because of the advances in neuroimaging techniques and improved ability to visualize and measure brain structure and function. Traumatic brain injury (TBI), along with its acute and chronic sequelae, has emerged as a focus of neuroethical issues, such as informed consent for treatment and research, diagnostic and prognostic uncertainties, and the subjectivity of interpretation of data. The law has also more frequently considered TBI in criminal settings for exculpation, mitigation and sentencing purposes and in tort and administrative law for personal injury, disability and worker's compensation cases. This article provides an overview of these topics with an emphasis on the current challenges that the neuroscience of TBI faces in the medicolegal arena. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... content Search form Search Basket Contact Us DVBIC Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center About DVBIC Leadership ... link is external) Read more DCoE news articles » Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center Crisis Intervention (24/ ...

  9. Family needs after brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Anne; Perrin, Paul B; Cuberos-Urbano, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to explore differences by country in the importance of family needs after traumatic brain injury (TBI), as well as differences in met/unmet needs. METHOD: Two hundred and seventy-one family members of an individual with TBI in Mexico, Colombia, Spain...

  10. MRI of perinatal brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Mary; Allsop, Joanna [Imperial College, Robert Steiner MR Unit, Perinatal Imaging, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Martinez Biarge, Miriam [La Paz University Hospital, Dept of Neonatology, Madrid (Spain); Counsell, Serena [Imperial College, Robert Steiner MR Unit, Neonatal Medicine, MRC Clinical Sciences Centre, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Cowan, Frances [Imperial College, Dept of Paediatrics, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    MRI is invaluable in assessing the neonatal brain following suspected perinatal injury. Good quality imaging requires adaptations to both the hardware and the sequences used for adults or older children. The perinatal and postnatal details often predict the pattern of lesions sustained and should be available to aid interpretation of the imaging findings. Perinatal lesions, the pattern of which can predict neurodevelopmental outcome, are at their most obvious on conventional imaging between 1 and 2 weeks from birth. Very early imaging during the first week may be useful to make management decisions in ventilated neonates but brain abnormalities may still be subtle using conventional sequences. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is very useful for the early identification of ischaemic tissue in the neonatal brain but may underestimate the final extent of injury, particularly basal ganglia and thalamic lesions. MR imaging is an excellent predictor of outcome following perinatal brain injury and can therefore be used as a biomarker in interventional trials designed to reduce injury and improve neurodevelopmental outcome. (orig.)

  11. MRI of perinatal brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford, Mary; Allsop, Joanna; Martinez Biarge, Miriam; Counsell, Serena; Cowan, Frances

    2010-01-01

    MRI is invaluable in assessing the neonatal brain following suspected perinatal injury. Good quality imaging requires adaptations to both the hardware and the sequences used for adults or older children. The perinatal and postnatal details often predict the pattern of lesions sustained and should be available to aid interpretation of the imaging findings. Perinatal lesions, the pattern of which can predict neurodevelopmental outcome, are at their most obvious on conventional imaging between 1 and 2 weeks from birth. Very early imaging during the first week may be useful to make management decisions in ventilated neonates but brain abnormalities may still be subtle using conventional sequences. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) is very useful for the early identification of ischaemic tissue in the neonatal brain but may underestimate the final extent of injury, particularly basal ganglia and thalamic lesions. MR imaging is an excellent predictor of outcome following perinatal brain injury and can therefore be used as a biomarker in interventional trials designed to reduce injury and improve neurodevelopmental outcome. (orig.)

  12. Hypopituitarism in Traumatic Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klose, Marianne; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2015-01-01

    While hypopituitarism after traumatic brain injury (TBI) was previously considered rare, it is now thought to be a major cause of treatable morbidity among TBI survivors. Consequently, recommendations for assessment of pituitary function and replacement in TBI were recently introduced. Given...

  13. Effect of an integrated reality orientation programme in acute care on post-traumatic amnesia in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Guise, E; Leblanc, J; Feyz, M; Thomas, H; Gosselin, N

    2005-04-01

    To assess the effect of an integrated reality orientation programme (North Star Project) in acute care on the duration of post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) of patients suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI). It was hypothesized that those patients having participated in this programme would show a shorter PTA than those patients that did not. Duration of PTA for 12 patients with TBI who were part of the North Star Project was compared with that of 26 patients matched for initial GCS and age for whom this approach was not available (control group). Length of PTA was shorter by 5 days for the North Star patients. This result was not statistically significant (p = 0.19) but is clinically relevant. No between-group difference was found for Glasgow Coma Scale. Consequences of shorter PTA would include increased and more appropriate patient interaction and earlier transfer to rehabilitation. The North Star project also allows the family to become more actively involved in the treatment of their loved one. Further study is required to evaluate this intervention strategy to improve orientation for the patient with TBI.

  14. Influence of Age on Cerebral Housekeeping Gene Expression for Normalization of Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction after Acute Brain Injury in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timaru-Kast, Ralph; Herbig, Elina L; Luh, Clara; Engelhard, Kristin; Thal, Serge C

    2015-11-15

    To prevent methodological errors of quantitative PCR (qPCR) normalization with reference genes is obligatory. Although known to influence gene expression, impact of age on housekeeping gene expression has not been determined after acute brain lesions such as traumatic brain injury (TBI). Therefore, expression of eight common control genes was investigated at 15 min, 24 h, and 72 h after experimental TBI in 2- and 21-month-old C57Bl6 mice. Expression of β2-microglobulin (B2M), β-actin (ActB), and porphobilinogen deaminase (PBGD) increased after TBI in both ages. β2M demonstrated age-dependent differences and highest inter- and intragroup variations. Expression of cyclophilin A, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), hypoxanthine ribosyltransferase (HPRT), S100B, and 18SrRNA remained stable. Cyclophilin A and HPRT demonstrated strongest inter- and intragroup stability. The data indicate that the expression of most but not all control genes is stable during aging. The correct choice of housekeeping genes is of key importance to ensure adequate normalization of qPCR data. With respect to insult and age, normalization strategies should consider cyclophilin A as a single normalizer. Normalization with two reference genes is recommended with cyclophilin A and HPRT in young mice and in mixed age studies and with cyclophilin A and GAPDH in old mice. In addition, the present study suggests not to use β2-microglobulin, β-actin or PBGD as single control genes because of strong regulation after CCI in 2- and 21-month-old mice.

  15. Pathophysiology of Acute Kidney Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basile, David P.; Anderson, Melissa D.; Sutton, Timothy A.

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is the leading cause of nephrology consultation and is associated with high mortality rates. The primary causes of AKI include ischemia, hypoxia or nephrotoxicity. An underlying feature is a rapid decline in GFR usually associated with decreases in renal blood flow. Inflammation represents an important additional component of AKI leading to the extension phase of injury, which may be associated with insensitivity to vasodilator therapy. It is suggested that targeting the extension phase represents an area potential of treatment with the greatest possible impact. The underlying basis of renal injury appears to be impaired energetics of the highly metabolically active nephron segments (i.e., proximal tubules and thick ascending limb) in the renal outer medulla, which can trigger conversion from transient hypoxia to intrinsic renal failure. Injury to kidney cells can be lethal or sublethal. Sublethal injury represents an important component in AKI, as it may profoundly influence GFR and renal blood flow. The nature of the recovery response is mediated by the degree to which sublethal cells can restore normal function and promote regeneration. The successful recovery from AKI depends on the degree to which these repair processes ensue and these may be compromised in elderly or CKD patients. Recent data suggest that AKI represents a potential link to CKD in surviving patients. Finally, earlier diagnosis of AKI represents an important area in treating patients with AKI that has spawned increased awareness of the potential that biomarkers of AKI may play in the future. PMID:23798302

  16. 'Spreading depression of Leão' and its emerging relevance to acute brain injury in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Martin; Strong, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    experiencing the visual (or sensorimotor) aura of migraine. In this review, we trace from their first description in rabbits through to their detection and study in migraine and the injured human brain, and from our personal perspectives, the evolution of understanding of the importance of spread of mass...... a powerful case for a fresh examination of neuroprotection strategies....

  17. Pediatric Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome : Consensus Recommendations From the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jouvet, Philippe; Thomas, Neal J.; Willson, Douglas F.; Erickson, Simon; Khemani, Robinder; Smith, Lincoln; Zimmerman, Jerry; Dahmer, Mary; Flori, Heidi; Quasney, Michael; Sapru, Anil; Cheifetz, Ira M.; Rimensberger, Peter C.; Kneyber, Martin; Tamburro, Robert F.; Curley, Martha A. Q.; Nadkarni, Vinay; Valentine, Stacey; Emeriaud, Guillaume; Newth, Christopher; Carroll, Christopher L.; Essouri, Sandrine; Dalton, Heidi; Macrae, Duncan; Lopez-Cruces, Yolanda; Quasney, Michael; Santschi, Miriam; Watson, R. Scott; Bembea, Melania

    Objective: To describe the final recommendations of the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference. Design: Consensus conference of experts in pediatric acute lung injury. Setting: Not applicable. Subjects: PICU patients with evidence of acute lung injury or acute respiratory distress

  18. Traumatic brain injury-induced sleep disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola-Saltzman M

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mari Viola-Saltzman, Camelia Musleh Department of Neurology, NorthShore University HealthSystem, Evanston, IL, USA Abstract: Sleep disturbances are frequently identified following traumatic brain injury, affecting 30%–70% of persons, and often occur after mild head injury. Insomnia, fatigue, and sleepiness are the most frequent sleep complaints after traumatic brain injury. Sleep apnea, narcolepsy, periodic limb movement disorder, and parasomnias may also occur after a head injury. In addition, depression, anxiety, and pain are common brain injury comorbidities with significant influence on sleep quality. Two types of traumatic brain injury that may negatively impact sleep are acceleration/deceleration injuries causing generalized brain damage and contact injuries causing focal brain damage. Polysomnography, multiple sleep latency testing, and/or actigraphy may be utilized to diagnose sleep disorders after a head injury. Depending on the disorder, treatment may include the use of medications, positive airway pressure, and/or behavioral modifications. Unfortunately, the treatment of sleep disorders associated with traumatic brain injury may not improve neuropsychological function or sleepiness. Keywords: traumatic brain injury, insomnia, hypersomnia, sleep apnea, periodic limb movement disorder, fatigue

  19. Post-concussive complaints after mild traumatic brain injury associated with altered brain networks during working memory performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Horn, Harm J.; Liemburg, Edith J.; Scheenen, Myrthe E.; de Koning, Myrthe E.; Spikman, Jacoba M.; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to investigate brain network function during working memory (WM) task performance in patients with uncomplicated mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) in the sub-acute phase post-injury. We were particularly interested in differences between patients with (PCC-present) and without

  20. Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) in Kids

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): Condition Information What is TBI? TBI ... external force that affects the functioning of the brain. It can be caused by a bump or ...

  1. Brain protection by magnesium ion against radioaction brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Meiyu; Wang Lili; Tu Yu

    2010-01-01

    Radiation brain injury is a serious complication among the radiotherapy of brain tumors. It is demonstrated that the protective action of magnesium ion in the brain injury from some experimental studies recent years, which is the prospective neuro protective agents overall merits. This article is summarized the causes and the variance of magnesium ion in the brain tissue afterwards the radioactive brain injury, additionally the defense mechanism of magnesium ion from the aspects of inflammation reduction, encephaledema alleviation, anti-apoptosis and improvement of nerve function. (authors)

  2. Volumetric Integral Phase-shift Spectroscopy for Noninvasive Detection of Hemispheric Bioimpedance Asymmetry in Acute Brain Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-18

    Stroke; Stroke, Acute; Ischemic Stroke; Hemorrhage; Clot (Blood); Brain; Subarachnoid Hemorrhage; Cerebral Infarction; Cerebral Hemorrhage; Cerebral Stroke; Intracerebral Hemorrhage; Intracerebral Injury

  3. Brain Imaging and Behavioral Outcome in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D.

    1996-01-01

    This review explores the cellular pathology associated with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its relation to neurobehavioral outcomes, the relationship of brain imaging findings to underlying pathology, brain imaging techniques, various image analysis procedures and how they relate to neuropsychological testing, and the importance of brain imaging…

  4. Quality of Life Following Brain Injury: Perspectives from Brain Injury Association of America State Affiliates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeneffe, Charles Edmund; Tucker, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Objective: to examine the perspectives of brain injury professionals concerning family members' feelings about the quality of life experienced by individuals with brain injuries. Participants: participating in the study were 28 individuals in leadership positions with the state affiliates of the Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA). Methods:…

  5. Therapeutic irradiation and brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheline, G.E.; Wara, W.M.; Smith, V.

    1980-01-01

    This is a review and reanalysis of the literature on adverse effects of therapeutic irradiation on the brain. Reactions have been grouped and considered according to time of appearance. The emphasis of the analysis is on delayed reactions, especially those that occur from a few months to several years after irradiation. All dose specifications were converted into equivalent megavoltage rads. The data were analyzed in terms of total dose, overall treatment time and number of treatment fractions. Also discussed were acute radiation reactions, early delayed radiation reactions, somnolence and leukoencephalopathy post-irradiation/chemotherapy and combined effects of radiation and chemotherapy

  6. Diuretics in acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigwekar, Sagar U; Waikar, Sushrut S

    2011-11-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common in hospitalized patients and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The incidence of AKI is increasing and despite clinical advances there has been little change in the outcomes associated with AKI. A variety of interventions, including loop diuretics, have been tested for the prevention and treatment of AKI; however, none to date have shown convincing benefits in clinical studies, and the management of AKI remains largely supportive. In this article, we review the pharmacology and experimental and clinical evidence for loop diuretics in the management of AKI. In addition, we also review evidence for other agents with diuretic and/or natriuretic properties such as thiazide diuretics, mannitol, fenoldopam, and natriuretic peptides in both the prevention and treatment of AKI. Implications for current clinical practice are outlined to guide clinical decisions in this field. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Staff-reported antecedents to aggression in a post-acute brain injury treatment programme: What are they and what implications do they have for treatment?

    OpenAIRE

    Giles, Gordon Muir; Scott, Karen; Manchester, David

    2013-01-01

    Research in psychiatric settings has found that staff attribute the majority of inpatient aggression to immediate environmental stressors. We sought to determine if staff working with persons with brain injury-related severe and chronic impairment make similar causal attributions. If immediate environmental stressors precipitate the majority of aggressive incidents in this client group, it is possible an increased focus on the management of factors that initiate client aggression may be helpf...

  8. Perfusion Computed Tomography in the Acute Phase of Mild Head Injury : Regional Dysfunction and Prognostic Value

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metting, Zwany; Rodiger, Lars A.; Stewart, Roy E.; Oudkerk, Matthijs; De Keyser, Jacques; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2009-01-01

    Objective: Traumatic brain injury is a major Cause of disability and death. Most patients sustain a mild head injury with a subgroup that experiences disabling symptoms interfering with return to work. Brain imaging in the acute phase is not predictive of outcome, as 20% of noncontrast computed

  9. Triple Peripheral Nerve Injury Accompanying to Traumatic Brain Injury: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ižlknur Can

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Secondary injuries especially extremity fractures may be seen concurrently with traumatic brain injury (TBI. Peripheral nerve damages may accompany to these fractures and may be missed out, especially in acute stage. In this case report; damage of radial, ulnar and median nerves which was developed secondarily to distal humerus fracture that could not be detected in acute stage, in a patient who had motor vehicle accident (MVA. 29-year-old male patient was admitted with weakness in the right upper extremity. 9 months ago, he had traumatic brain injury because of MVA, and fracture of distal humerus was detected in follow-ups. Upon the suspect of the peripheral nerve injury, the diagnosis was confirmed with ENMG. The patient responded well to the rehabilitation program treatment. In a TBI patient, it must be kept in mind that there might be a secondary trauma and therefore peripheral nerve lesions may accompany to TBI.

  10. Personality Disturbances Associated with Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigatano, George P.

    1992-01-01

    Reviews personality disturbances associated with traumatic brain injury. Attempts to clarify terms and review empirical findings. Notes that longitudinal prospective studies that use appropriate control groups are needed. Suggests future research may benefit by considering long-term effects of early agitation following traumatic brain injury and…

  11. Radiation-induced brain injury: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greene-Schloesser, Dana; Robbins, Mike E.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Shaw, Edward G.; Wheeler, Kenneth T.; Chan, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 100,000 primary and metastatic brain tumor patients/year in the US survive long enough (>6 months) to experience radiation-induced brain injury. Prior to 1970, the human brain was thought to be highly radioresistant; the acute CNS syndrome occurs after single doses >30 Gy; white matter necrosis occurs at fractionated doses >60 Gy. Although white matter necrosis is uncommon with modern techniques, functional deficits, including progressive impairments in memory, attention, and executive function have become important, because they have profound effects on quality of life. Preclinical studies have provided valuable insights into the pathogenesis of radiation-induced cognitive impairment. Given its central role in memory and neurogenesis, the majority of these studies have focused on the hippocampus. Irradiating pediatric and young adult rodent brains leads to several hippocampal changes including neuroinflammation and a marked reduction in neurogenesis. These data have been interpreted to suggest that shielding the hippocampus will prevent clinical radiation-induced cognitive impairment. However, this interpretation may be overly simplistic. Studies using older rodents, that more closely match the adult human brain tumor population, indicate that, unlike pediatric and young adult rats, older rats fail to show a radiation-induced decrease in neurogenesis or a loss of mature neurons. Nevertheless, older rats still exhibit cognitive impairment. This occurs in the absence of demyelination and/or white matter necrosis similar to what is observed clinically, suggesting that more subtle molecular, cellular and/or microanatomic modifications are involved in this radiation-induced brain injury. Given that radiation-induced cognitive impairment likely reflects damage to both hippocampal- and non-hippocampal-dependent domains, there is a critical need to investigate the microanatomic and functional effects of radiation in various brain regions as well as their

  12. Acute injuries of the axis vertebra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, J.T. (United General Hospital, Sedro Woolley, WA (USA)); Harris, J.H. (Texas Univ., Houston, TX (USA). Dept. of Radiology)

    1989-08-01

    A retrospective analysis of 165 patients admitted to Hermann Hospital with acute injuries of the axis vertebra revealed 68 (41%) dens fractures, 62 (38%) cases of traumatic spondylolisthesis ('hangman's' fracture), 21 (13%) extension teardrop fractures, 10 (6%) hyperextension dislocations, and 2 (1.0%) fractures each of the laminae and spinous processes. Of the axis injuries 31 (18%) were limited to the axis body alone. Of these, 21 (61%) were hyperextension teardrop fractures and 10 (32%) were hyperextension dislocations. Axis injuries were associated with acute injuries of other cervical vertebrae in 14 (8%) of the patients. (orig./GDG).

  13. Using external lumbar CSF drainage to treat communicating external hydrocephalus in adult patients after acute traumatic or non-traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manet, Romain; Payen, Jean-François; Guerin, Romain; Martinez, Orianne; Hautefeuille, Serge; Francony, Gilles; Gergelé, Laurent

    2017-10-01

    Despite various treatments to control intracranial pressure (ICP) after brain injury, patients may present a late onset of high ICP or a poor response to medications. External lumbar drainage (ELD) can be considered a therapeutic option if high ICP is due to communicating external hydrocephalus. We aimed at describing the efficacy and safety of ELD used in a cohort of traumatic or non-traumatic brain-injured patients. In this multicentre retrospective analysis, patients had a delayed onset of high ICP after the initial injury and/or a poor response to ICP treatments. ELD was considered in the presence of radiological signs of communicating external hydrocephalus. Changes in ICP values and side effects following the ELD procedure were reported. Thirty-three patients with a median age of 51 years (25-75th percentile: 34-61 years) were admitted after traumatic (n = 22) or non-traumatic (n = 11) brain injuries. Their initial Glasgow Coma Scale score was 8 (4-11). Eight patients underwent external ventricular drainage prior to ELD. Median time to ELD insertion was 5 days (4-8) after brain insult. In all patients, ELD was dramatically effective in lowering ICP: 25 mmHg (20-31) before versus 7 mmHg (3-10) after (p effects such as pupil changes or intracranial bleeding after the procedure. One patient developed an ELD-related infection. These findings indicate that ELD may be considered potentially effective in controlling ICP, remaining safe if a firm diagnosis of communicating external hydrocephalus has been made.

  14. Microparticles and acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVey, Mark; Tabuchi, Arata; Kuebler, Wolfgang M

    2012-09-01

    The pathophysiology of acute lung injury (ALI) and its most severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), is characterized by increased vascular and epithelial permeability, hypercoagulation and hypofibrinolysis, inflammation, and immune modulation. These detrimental changes are orchestrated by cross talk between a complex network of cells, mediators, and signaling pathways. A rapidly growing number of studies have reported the appearance of distinct populations of microparticles (MPs) in both the vascular and alveolar compartments in animal models of ALI/ARDS or respective patient populations, where they may serve as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers. MPs are small cytosolic vesicles with an intact lipid bilayer that can be released by a variety of vascular, parenchymal, or blood cells and that contain membrane and cytosolic proteins, organelles, lipids, and RNA supplied from and characteristic for their respective parental cells. Owing to this endowment, MPs can effectively interact with other cell types via fusion, receptor-mediated interaction, uptake, or mediator release, thereby acting as intrinsic stimulators, modulators, or even attenuators in a variety of disease processes. This review summarizes current knowledge on the formation and potential functional role of different MPs in inflammatory diseases with a specific focus on ALI/ARDS. ALI has been associated with the formation of MPs from such diverse cellular origins as platelets, neutrophils, monocytes, lymphocytes, red blood cells, and endothelial and epithelial cells. Because of their considerable heterogeneity in terms of origin and functional properties, MPs may contribute via both harmful and beneficial effects to the characteristic pathological features of ALI/ARDS. A better understanding of the formation, function, and relevance of MPs may give rise to new promising therapeutic strategies to modulate coagulation, inflammation, endothelial function, and permeability either through

  15. Icam-1 and acute pancreatitis complicated by acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, XiPing; Wu, Dijiong; Jiang, Xinge

    2009-01-08

    One of the most common complications of acute pancreatitis is acute lung injury, during which intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) plays an important role by participating in leukocyte adhesion and activation as well as by inducing the "cascade effect" of inflammatory mediators, pulmonary microcirculation dysfunction and even acute respiratory distress syndrome, multiple organ failure or death. Although it is generally believed that the modulatory mechanism of ICAM-1 during this process is associated with the activation of nuclear transcription factor kappa B which is mediated by IL-1, IL-6, IL-18 and oxygen free radical, etc., further studies are still required to clarify it. Since the upregulation of ICAM-1 expression in the lung during acute lung injury is one of main pathogeneses, the early detection of the ICAM-1 expression level may contribute to the prevention and treatment of acute lung injury. Moreover, reducing pulmonary ICAM-1 expression levels through treatment with anti-ICAM-1 monoclonal antibody (aICAM-1) and antagonists of the neurokinin 1 receptor, etc., should have a positive effect on protecting the lungs during acute pancreatitis. This review aims to further clarify the relationship between ICAM-1 and acute pancreatitis complicated by acute lung injury, and therefore provides a theoretical basis for the formulation of corresponding therapeutic measures in clinical practice for acute pancreatitis.

  16. Mild traumatic brain injury: Graph-model characterization of brain networks for episodic memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tsirka, V.; Simos, P.G.; Vakis, A.; Kanatsouli, K.; Vourkas, M.; Erimaki, S.; Pachou, E.; Stam, C.J.; Micheloyannis, S.

    2011-01-01

    Episodic memory is among the cognitive functions that can be affected in the acute phase following mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). The present study used EEG recordings to evaluate global synchronization and network organization of rhythmic activity during the encoding and recognition phases of

  17. Biomarkers of brain injury in the premature infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha V. Douglas-Escobar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The term encephalopathy of prematurity encompasses not only the acute brain injury (such as intraventricular hemorrhage but also complex disturbance on the infant’s subsequent brain development. In premature infants, the most frequent recognized source of brain injury is intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH and periventricular leukomalacia (PVL. Furthermore 20-25% infants with birth weigh less than 1,500 g will have IVH and that proportion increases to 45% if the birth weight is less than 500-750 g. In addition, nearly 60% of very low birth weight newborns will have hypoxic-ischemic injury. Therefore permanent lifetime neurodevelopmental disabilities are frequent in premature infants. Innovative approach to prevent or decrease brain injury in preterm infants requires discovery of biomarkers able to discriminate infants at risk for injury, monitor the progression of the injury and assess efficacy of neuroprotective clinical trials. In this article, we will review biomarkers studied in premature infants with IVH, Post-hemorrhagic ventricular dilation (PHVD and PVL including: S100b, Activin A, erythropoietin, chemokine CCL 18, GFAP and NFL will also be examined. Some of the most promising biomarkers for IVH are S100β and Activin. The concentrations of TGF-β1, MMP-9 and PAI-1 in cerebrospinal fluid could be used to discriminate patients that will require shunt after post-hemorrhagic ventricular dilation. Neonatal brain injury is frequent in premature infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care and we hope to contribute to the awareness and interest in clinical validation of established as well as novel neonatal brain injury biomarkers.

  18. Plasticity and injury in the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Michael V; Ishida, Akira; Ishida, Wako Nakajima; Matsushita, Hiroko Baber; Nishimura, Akira; Tsuji, Masahiro

    2009-01-01

    The child's brain is more malleable or plastic than that of adults and this accounts for the ability of children to learn new skills quickly or recovery from brain injuries. Several mechanisms contribute to this ability including overproduction and deletion of neurons and synapses, and activity-dependent stabilization of synapses. The molecular mechanisms for activity-dependent synaptic plasticity are being discovered and this is leading to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of several disorders including neurofibromatosis, tuberous sclerosis, Fragile X syndrome and Rett syndrome. Many of the same pathways involved in synaptic plasticity, such as glutamate-mediated excitation, can also mediate brain injury when the brain is exposed to stress or energy failure such as hypoxia-ischemia. Recent evidence indicates that cell death pathways activated by injury differ between males and females. This new information about the molecular pathways involved in brain plasticity and injury are leading to insights that will provide better therapies for pediatric neurological disorders.

  19. Gabapentin in the management of dysautonomia following severe traumatic brain injury: a case series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baguley, Ian J; Heriseanu, Roxana E; Gurka, Joseph A

    2007-01-01

    The pharmacological management of dysautonomia, otherwise known as autonomic storms, following acute neurological insults, is problematic and remains poorly researched. This paper presents six subjects with dysautonomia following extremely severe traumatic brain injury where gabapentin controlled...

  20. Chloroquine prevents acute kidney injury induced by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Creatinine, Chloroquine, Inflammatory reactions, Kidney injury, Lipopolysaccharide. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research is ... a reduction in oxygen uptake and myocardial contractility such as pathogen ..... evolution and outcome of acute kidney injury in critically ill adult patients. Br J Anaesth; 2015; 114: ...

  1. [Automobile driving after a brain injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosberg, A; Østen, P E; Schanke, A K

    2000-11-20

    Little is known about driving fitness after brain damage. The present study describes 62 brain injured patients, 36 with cerebral vascular accidents, 15 with traumatic brain injuries, and 11 with other neurological diseases, mean age 50 years, who after thorough assessment had been found fit enough for driving a car. 15 months later they were sent a questionnaire about their driving behaviour and skills. A higher number of traffic incidents were found after brain injury, but the difference was not significant. Patients with traumatic brain injury had a significantly higher number of traffic incidents post-injury than patients with stroke. A majority of those involved in incidents were young males with traumatic brain injury, who had deficits in cognitive executive functions. Patients with traumatic brain injuries seem to need special attention when assessed for driving. Time to follow-up is too short for the results to be conclusive for the whole material of brain-injured patients. Further studies should be conducted.

  2. Aluminium phosphide induced acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quaiser Saif

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium phosphide is one of the most common agricultural poisons being consumed in north India. Consumption of a fresh tablet is lethal as no antidote is available. Acute intoxication primarily presents with cardiovascular collapse due to myocardial toxicity. We report here a case of acute severe poisoning along with cardiovascular collapse and oliguria. The patient developed acute kidney injury during the illness (a rare entity in aluminium phosphide poisoning, which completely resolved following prompt conservative treatment.

  3. Diabetes Insipidus after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capatina, Cristina; Paluzzi, Alessandro; Mitchell, Rosalid; Karavitaki, Niki

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in many age groups. Neuroendocrine dysfunction has been recognized as a consequence of TBI and consists of both anterior and posterior pituitary insufficiency; water and electrolyte abnormalities (diabetes insipidus (DI) and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (SIADH)) are amongst the most challenging sequelae. The acute head trauma can lead (directly or indirectly) to dysfunction of the hypothalamic neurons secreting antidiuretic hormone (ADH) or of the posterior pituitary gland causing post-traumatic DI (PTDI). PTDI is usually diagnosed in the first days after the trauma presenting with hypotonic polyuria. Frequently, the poor general status of most patients prevents adequate fluid intake to compensate the losses and severe dehydration and hypernatremia occur. Management consists of careful monitoring of fluid balance and hormonal replacement. PTDI is associated with high mortality, particularly when presenting very early following the injury. In many surviving patients, the PTDI is transient, lasting a few days to a few weeks and in a minority of cases, it is permanent requiring management similar to that offered to patients with non-traumatic central DI. PMID:26239685

  4. Staff-reported antecedents to aggression in a post-acute brain injury treatment programme: what are they and what implications do they have for treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Gordon Muir; Scott, Karen; Manchester, David

    2013-01-01

    Research in psychiatric settings has found that staff attribute the majority of in-patient aggression to immediate environmental stressors. We sought to determine if staff working with persons with brain injury-related severe and chronic impairment make similar causal attributions. If immediate environmental stressors precipitate the majority of aggressive incidents in this client group, it is possible an increased focus on the management of factors that initiate client aggression may be helpful. The research was conducted in a low-demand treatment programme for individuals with chronic cognitive impairment due to acquired brain injury. Over a six-week period, 63 staff and a research assistant reported on 508 aggressive incidents. Staff views as to the causes of client aggression were elicited within 72 hours of observing an aggressive incident. Staff descriptions of causes were categorised using qualitative methods and analysed both qualitatively and quantitatively. Aggression towards staff was predominantly preceded by (a) actions that interrupted or redirected a client behaviour, (b) an activity demand, or (c) a physical intrusion. The majority of aggressive incidents appeared hostile/angry in nature and were not considered by staff to be pre-meditated. Common treatment approaches can be usefully augmented by a renewed focus on interventions aimed at reducing antecedents that provoke aggression. Possible approaches for achieving this are considered.

  5. Central diabetes insipidus in pediatric severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alharfi, Ibrahim M; Stewart, Tanya Charyk; Foster, Jennifer; Morrison, Gavin C; Fraser, Douglas D

    2013-02-01

    To determine the occurrence rate of central diabetes insipidus in pediatric patients with severe traumatic brain injury and to describe the clinical, injury, biochemical, imaging, and intervention variables associated with mortality. Retrospective chart and imaging review. Children's Hospital, level 1 trauma center. Severely injured (Injury Severity Score ≥ 12) pediatric trauma patients (>1 month and diabetes insipidus between January 2000 and December 2011. Of 818 severely injured trauma patients, 180 had severe traumatic brain injury with an overall mortality rate of 27.2%. Thirty-two of the severe traumatic brain injury patients developed acute central diabetes insipidus that responded to desamino-8-D-arginine vasopressin and/or vasopressin infusion, providing an occurrence rate of 18%. At the time of central diabetes insipidus diagnosis, median urine output and serum sodium were 6.8 ml/kg/hr (interquartile range = 5-11) and 154 mmol/L (interquartile range = 149-159), respectively. The mortality rate of central diabetes insipidus patients was 87.5%, with 71.4% declared brain dead after central diabetes insipidus diagnosis. Early central diabetes insipidus onset, within the first 2 days of severe traumatic brain injury, was strongly associated with mortality (p diabetes insipidus were more likely to have intracranial pressure monitoring (p = 0.03), have thiopental administered to induce coma (p = 0.04) and have received a decompressive craniectomy for elevated intracranial pressure (p = 0.04). The incidence of central diabetes insipidus in pediatric patients with severe traumatic brain injury is 18%. Mortality was associated with early central diabetes insipidus onset and cerebral edema on head computed tomography. Central diabetes insipidus nonsurvivors were less likely to have received intracranial pressure monitoring, thiopental coma and decompressive craniectomy.

  6. Traumatic brain injury and obesity induce persistent central insulin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karelina, Kate; Sarac, Benjamin; Freeman, Lindsey M; Gaier, Kristopher R; Weil, Zachary M

    2016-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced impairments in cerebral energy metabolism impede tissue repair and contribute to delayed functional recovery. Moreover, the transient alteration in brain glucose utilization corresponds to a period of increased vulnerability to the negative effects of a subsequent TBI. In order to better understand the factors contributing to TBI-induced central metabolic dysfunction, we examined the effect of single and repeated TBIs on brain insulin signalling. Here we show that TBI induced acute brain insulin resistance, which resolved within 7 days following a single injury but persisted until 28 days following repeated injuries. Obesity, which causes brain insulin resistance and neuroinflammation, exacerbated the consequences of TBI. Obese mice that underwent a TBI exhibited a prolonged reduction of Akt (also known as protein kinase B) signalling, exacerbated neuroinflammation (microglial activation), learning and memory deficits, and anxiety-like behaviours. Taken together, the transient changes in brain insulin sensitivity following TBI suggest a reduced capacity of the injured brain to respond to the neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory actions of insulin and Akt signalling, and thus may be a contributing factor for the damaging neuroinflammation and long-lasting deficits that occur following TBI. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Traumatic brain injury and forensic neuropsychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D; Brooks, Michael

    2009-01-01

    As part of a special issue of The Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation, forensic neuropsychology is reviewed as it applies to traumatic brain injury (TBI) and other types of acquired brain injury in which clinical neuropsychologists and rehabilitation psychologists may be asked to render professional opinions about the neurobehavioral effects and outcome of a brain injury. The article introduces and overviews the topic focusing on the process of forensic neuropsychological consultation and practice as it applies to patients with TBI or other types of acquired brain injury. The emphasis is on the application of scientist-practitioner standards as they apply to legal questions about the status of a TBI patient and how best that may be achieved. This article introduces each topic area covered in this special edition.

  8. Traumatic Brain Injury service (TBI) Service

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — This Service provides access to Tramatic Brain injury patient data consult notes. The service also provides one write service method writeNote. The Service supports...

  9. Dysautonomia after severe traumatic brain injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendricks, H.T.; Heeren, J.H.M.; Vos, P.E.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dysautonomia after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is characterized by episodes of increased heart rate, respiratory rate, temperature, blood pressure, muscle tone, decorticate or decerebrate posturing, and profuse sweating. This study addresses the incidence of dysautonomia after severe

  10. The neuropathology and neurobiology of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blennow, Kaj; Hardy, John; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2012-12-06

    The acute and long-term consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) have received increased attention in recent years. In this Review, we discuss the neuropathology and neural mechanisms associated with TBI, drawing on findings from sports-induced TBI in athletes, in whom acute TBI damages axons and elicits both regenerative and degenerative tissue responses in the brain and in whom repeated concussions may initiate a long-term neurodegenerative process called dementia pugilistica or chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). We also consider how the neuropathology and neurobiology of CTE in many ways resembles other neurodegenerative illnesses such as Alzheimer's disease, particularly with respect to mismetabolism and aggregation of tau, β-amyloid, and TDP-43. Finally, we explore how translational research in animal models of acceleration/deceleration types of injury relevant for concussion together with clinical studies employing imaging and biochemical markers may further elucidate the neurobiology of TBI and CTE. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Comparison of brain perfusion SPECT abnormalities with anatomical imaging in mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Asadi

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Trauma is the most common cause of morbidity and mortality in industrialized countries and also in Iran. Anatomical imaging (AI CT and MRI is helpful in the diagnosis of acute traumatic complications however it is not efficient in the diagnosis of disabling injury syndrome. In contrast, brain perfusion SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography can be more useful for evaluation of microvascular structure. This study was designed to compare these two diagnostic methods. Methods: A total of 50 patients who had been suffering from traumatic brain injury for more than 1 year, and were followed as mild traumatic brain injury group according to “the Brain Injury Interdisciplinary Special Interest Group of the Ameri can Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine” criteria, were examined by brain perfusion SPECT and AI. The common anatomical classification of the lobes of brain was used. Results: The male to female ratio was 3:2. The mean age was 32.32±11.8 years and mean post-traumatic time was 1.48±0.65 years. The most common symptoms were headache (60%, agusia (36% and anosmia (32%. Among 400 examined brain lobes in this study, brain perfusion SPECT revealed remarkable abnormality in 76 lobes (19%, but AI determined abnormalities in 38 lobes (9.5% therefore, SPECT was twice sensitive than AI in mild traumatic brain injury (P<0.001. The correlation between SPECT and AI findings was 84%. SPECT was more sensitive than AI in demonstrating brain abnormalities in frontal lobe it was more obvious in the male group however, there was no significant difference between more and less than 30 years old groups. Conclusion: According to the findings of this study, we recommend using brain perfusion SPECT for all patients with chronic complications of head trauma, particularly those who have signs and symptoms of hypofrontalism, even though with some abnormalities in AI.

  12. Spinal cord injury drives chronic brain changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jure

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Only a few studies have considered changes in brain structures other than sensory and motor cortex after spinal cord injury, although cognitive impairments have been reported in these patients. Spinal cord injury results in chronic brain neuroinflammation with consequent neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in rodents. Regarding the hippocampus, neurogenesis is reduced and reactive gliosis increased. These long-term abnormalities could explain behavioral impairments exhibited in humans patients suffering from spinal cord trauma.

  13. Update of Endocrine Dysfunction following Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kent Reifschneider

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injuries (TBI are common occurrences in childhood, often resulting in long term, life altering consequences. Research into endocrine sequelae following injury has gained attention; however, there are few studies in children. This paper reviews the pathophysiology and current literature documenting risk for endocrine dysfunction in children suffering from TBI. Primary injury following TBI often results in disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and antidiuretic hormone production and release, with implications for both acute management and survival. Secondary injuries, occurring hours to weeks after TBI, result in both temporary and permanent alterations in pituitary function. At five years after moderate to severe TBI, nearly 30% of children suffer from hypopituitarism. Growth hormone deficiency and disturbances in puberty are the most common; however, any part of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis can be affected. In addition, endocrine abnormalities can improve or worsen with time, having a significant impact on children’s quality of life both acutely and chronically. Since primary and secondary injuries from TBI commonly result in transient or permanent hypopituitarism, we conclude that survivors should undergo serial screening for possible endocrine disturbances. High indices of suspicion for life threatening endocrine deficiencies should be maintained during acute care. Additionally, survivors of TBI should undergo endocrine surveillance by 6–12 months after injury, and then yearly, to ensure early detection of deficiencies in hormonal production that can substantially influence growth, puberty and quality of life.

  14. Acute Kidney Injury in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li

    2016-10-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common disorder and is associated with a high morbidity and mortality worldwide. The diversity of the climate and of the socioeconomic and developmental status in Asia has a great influence on the etiology and presentation of AKI in different regions. In view of the International Society of Nephrology's 0by25 initiative, more and more attention has been paid to AKI in Asian countries. In this review, we summarize the recent achievements with regard to the prevalence and clinical patterns of AKI in Asian countries. Epidemiological studies have revealed the huge medical and economic burden of AKI in Eastern Asian countries, whereas the true epidemiological picture of AKI in the tropical areas is still not well understood. In high-income Asian regions, the presentation of AKI resembles that in other developed countries in Europe and North America. In low-income regions and tropical areas, infections, environmental toxins, and obstetric complications remain the major culprits in most cases of AKI. Preventive opportunities are missed because of failure to recognize the risk factors and early signs of AKI. Patients often present late for treatment or are recognized late by physicians, which leads to more severe kidney injury, multiorgan involvement, and increased mortality. There is significant undertreatment of AKI in many regions, and medical resources for renal replacement therapy are not universally available. More efforts should be made to increase public awareness, establish preventive approaches in communities, educate health-care practitioner entities to achieve better recognition, and form specialist renal teams to improve the treatment of AKI. The choice of renal replacement therapy should fit patients' needs, and peritoneal dialysis can be practiced more frequently in the treatment of AKI patients. (1) More than 90% of the patients recruited in AKI studies using KDIGO-equivalent criteria originate from North America, Europe, or

  15. MR imaging of acute cervical spine injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyu Hwa; Lee, Jung Hyung; Joo, Yang Goo [School of Medicine, Keimyung University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-15

    To describe magnetic resonance (MR) findings of the patients with acute cervical spinal injury and to assess the usefulness of the MR imagings. We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of 32 patients with acute cervical spinal injury. MR images were obtained with a 2.0 T superconductive MR imaging units (Spectro-20000, Gold-Star, Seoul), using spin-echo and gradient-echo technique. Most of patients were in their 3rd-4th decades and motor vehicle accident was the most frequent cause of acute cervical trauma. We assessed the MR findings with respect to the spinal cord, ligaments, paravertebral soft tissues, intervertebral disk, and bony spine. Spinal cord injury was the most common (65%), where cord swelling, edema, and/or hematoma were demonstrated most frequently at C5-6 level. Traumatic intervertebral disk herniations were the second most common (62.5%) and frequently occurred at the lower cervical levels, mostly at C5-6. Paravertebral soft tissue injury, vertebral body fracture, bone marrow edema and displacement were also well shown on MR images. MR imaging appears to be essential for the evaluation of traumatic disk herniations, spinal cord abnormalities, and injury of paravertebral soft tissue in the acute injury of the cervical spine.

  16. MR imaging of acute cervical spine injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyu Hwa; Lee, Jung Hyung; Joo, Yang Goo

    1995-01-01

    To describe magnetic resonance (MR) findings of the patients with acute cervical spinal injury and to assess the usefulness of the MR imagings. We retrospectively reviewed the MR images of 32 patients with acute cervical spinal injury. MR images were obtained with a 2.0 T superconductive MR imaging units (Spectro-20000, Gold-Star, Seoul), using spin-echo and gradient-echo technique. Most of patients were in their 3rd-4th decades and motor vehicle accident was the most frequent cause of acute cervical trauma. We assessed the MR findings with respect to the spinal cord, ligaments, paravertebral soft tissues, intervertebral disk, and bony spine. Spinal cord injury was the most common (65%), where cord swelling, edema, and/or hematoma were demonstrated most frequently at C5-6 level. Traumatic intervertebral disk herniations were the second most common (62.5%) and frequently occurred at the lower cervical levels, mostly at C5-6. Paravertebral soft tissue injury, vertebral body fracture, bone marrow edema and displacement were also well shown on MR images. MR imaging appears to be essential for the evaluation of traumatic disk herniations, spinal cord abnormalities, and injury of paravertebral soft tissue in the acute injury of the cervical spine

  17. Emotional distress and quality of life in relatives of patients with severe brain injury: the first month after injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Anne; Siert, Lars; Lykke Mortensen, Erik

    2010-01-01

    PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: To investigate emotional distress and quality of life in a sample of Danish relatives of patients with severe brain injury at admission to intensive rehabilitation in the sub-acute phase. RESEARCH DESIGN: Clinical convenience sample. METHODS AND PROCEDURES: Participants included...... 31 primary relatives of patients with severe brain injury. The participants were recruited at admission to Traumatic Brain Injury Unit, Copenhagen University Hospital, Glostrup. All relatives completed the depression and anxiety scales from SCL-90-R (Symptom Checklist) and the Role Emotional, Social...

  18. Effect of Early Versus Late Tracheostomy or Prolonged Intubation in Critically Ill Patients with Acute Brain Injury: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCredie, Victoria A; Alali, Aziz S; Scales, Damon C; Adhikari, Neill K J; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Cuthbertson, Brian H; Nathens, Avery B

    2017-02-01

    The optimal timing of tracheostomy placement in acutely brain-injured patients, who generally require endotracheal intubation for airway protection rather than respiratory failure, remains uncertain. We systematically reviewed trials comparing early tracheostomy to late tracheostomy or prolonged intubation in these patients. We searched 5 databases (from inception to April 2015) to identify randomized controlled trials comparing early tracheostomy (≤10 days of intubation) with late tracheostomy (>10 days) or prolonged intubation in acutely brain-injured patients. We contacted the principal authors of included trials to obtain subgroup data. Two reviewers extracted data and assessed risk of bias. Outcomes included long-term mortality (primary), short-term mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation, complications, and liberation from ventilation without a tracheostomy. Meta-analyses used random-effects models. Ten trials (503 patients) met selection criteria; overall study quality was moderate to good. Early tracheostomy reduced long-term mortality (risk ratio [RR] 0.57. 95 % confidence interval (CI), 0.36-0.90; p = 0.02; n = 135), although in a sensitivity analysis excluding one trial, with an unclear risk of bias, the significant finding was attenuated (RR 0.61, 95 % CI, 0.32-1.16; p = 0.13; n = 95). Early tracheostomy reduced duration of mechanical ventilation (mean difference [MD] -2.72 days, 95 % CI, -1.29 to -4.15; p = 0.0002; n = 412) and ICU length of stay (MD -2.55 days, 95 % CI, -0.50 to -4.59; p = 0.01; n = 326). However, early tracheostomy did not reduce short-term mortality (RR 1.25; 95 % CI, 0.68-2.30; p = 0.47 n = 301) and increased the probability of ever receiving a tracheostomy (RR 1.58, 95 % CI, 1.24-2.02; 0 tracheostomy in acutely brain-injured patients may reduce long-term mortality, duration of mechanical ventilation, and ICU length of stay. However, waiting longer leads to fewer tracheostomy procedures and

  19. Characteristics of acute groin injuries in the adductor muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serner, A.; Weir, A.; Tol, J. L.

    2018-01-01

    Acute adductor injuries account for the majority of acute groin injuries; however, little is known about specific injury characteristics, which could be important for the understanding of etiology and management of these injuries. The study aim was to describe acute adductor injuries in athletes...... using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Male athletes with acute groin pain and an MRI confirmed acute adductor muscle injury were prospectively included. MRI was performed within 7 days of injury using a standardized protocol and a reliable assessment approach. 156 athletes presented with acute groin...... pain of which 71 athletes were included, median age 27 years (range 18-37). There were 46 isolated muscle injuries and 25 athletes with multiple adductor injuries. In total, 111 acute adductor muscle injuries were recorded; 62 adductor longus, 18 adductor brevis, 17 pectineus, 9 obturator externus, 4...

  20. Dementia resulting from traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Ramalho

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Traumatic brain injury (TBI represents a significant public health problem in modern societies. It is primarily a consequence of traffic-related accidents and falls. Other recently recognized causes include sports injuries and indirect forces such as shock waves from battlefield explosions. TBI is an important cause of death and lifelong disability and represents the most well-established environmental risk factor for dementia. With the growing recognition that even mild head injury can lead to neurocognitive deficits, imaging of brain injury has assumed greater importance. However, there is no single imaging modality capable of characterizing TBI. Current advances, particularly in MR imaging, enable visualization and quantification of structural and functional brain changes not hitherto possible. In this review, we summarize data linking TBI with dementia, emphasizing the imaging techniques currently available in clinical practice along with some advances in medical knowledge.

  1. Stereotypic movement disorder after acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Cynthia M; Kennedy, Richard E; Hoye, Wayne; Yablon, Stuart A

    2002-05-01

    Stereotypic movement disorder (SMD) consists of repetitive, non-functional motor behaviour that interferes with daily living or causes injury to the person. It is most often described in patients with mental retardation. However, recent evidence indicates that this condition is common among otherwise normal individuals. This case study describes a patient with new-onset SMD occurring after subdural haematoma and brain injury. SMD has rarely been reported after acquired brain injury, and none have documented successful treatment. The current psychiatric literature regarding neurochemistry, neuroanatomy, and treatment of SMD are reviewed with particular application to one patient. Treatment options include serotonin re-uptake inhibitors, opioid antagonists and dopamine antagonists. SMD has been under-appreciated in intellectually normal individuals, and may also be unrecognized after brain injury. Further investigation is needed in this area, which may benefit other individuals with SMD as well.

  2. New biomarkers of acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruya Ozelsancak

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury is a clinical syndrome which is generally defined as an abrupt decline in glomerular filtration rate causing accumulation of nitrogenous products and rapid development of fluid, electrolyte and acid-base disorders. It is an important clinical problem increasing mortality in patient with several co-morbid conditions. The frequency of acute kidney injury occurrence varies from 5% on the inpatients wards to 30-50% in patients from intensive care units. Serial measurement of creatinine and urine volume do not make it possible to diagnose acute kidney injury at early stages. Serum creatinine may be influenced by age, weight, hydration status and become apparent only when the kidneys have lost 50% of their function. For that reasons we need new markers. Here, we are reviewing the most promising new acute kidney injury markers, neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin, cystatin-C, kidney injury molecule-1, liver fatty acid binding proteins and IL-18. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(2.000: 221-229

  3. Glibenclamide for the Treatment of Acute CNS Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Marc Simard

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available First introduced into clinical practice in 1969, glibenclamide (US adopted name, glyburide is known best for its use in the treatment of diabetes mellitus type 2, where it is used to promote the release of insulin by blocking pancreatic KATP [sulfonylurea receptor 1 (Sur1-Kir6.2] channels. During the last decade, glibenclamide has received renewed attention due to its pleiotropic protective effects in acute CNS injury. Acting via inhibition of the recently characterized Sur1-Trpm4 channel (formerly, the Sur1-regulated NCCa-ATP channel and, in some cases, via brain KATP channels, glibenclamide has been shown to be beneficial in several clinically relevant rodent models of ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, neonatal encephalopathy of prematurity, and metastatic brain tumor. Glibenclamide acts on microvessels to reduce edema formation and secondary hemorrhage, it inhibits necrotic cell death, it exerts potent anti-inflammatory effects and it promotes neurogenesis—all via inhibition of Sur1. Two clinical trials, one in TBI and one in stroke, currently are underway. These recent findings, which implicate Sur1 in a number of acute pathological conditions involving the CNS, present new opportunities to use glibenclamide, a well-known, safe pharmaceutical agent, for medical conditions that heretofore had few or no treatment options.

  4. Clinical usefulness of a biomarker-based diagnostic test for acute stroke: the Biomarker Rapid Assessment in Ischemic Injury (BRAIN) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laskowitz, Daniel T; Kasner, Scott E; Saver, Jeffrey; Remmel, Kerri S; Jauch, Edward C

    2009-01-01

    One of the significant limitations in the evaluation and management of patients with suspected acute cerebral ischemia is the absence of a widely available, rapid, and sensitive diagnostic test. The objective of the current study was to assess whether a test using a panel of biomarkers might provide useful diagnostic information in the early evaluation of stroke by differentiating patients with cerebral ischemia from other causes of acute neurological deficit. A total of 1146 patients presenting with neurological symptoms consistent with possible stroke were prospectively enrolled at 17 different sites. Timed blood samples were assayed for matrix metalloproteinase 9, brain natriuretic factor, d-dimer, and protein S100beta. A separate cohort of 343 patients was independently enrolled to validate the multiple biomarker model approach. A diagnostic tool incorporating the values of matrix metalloproteinase 9, brain natriuretic factor, d-dimer, and S-100beta into a composite score was sensitive for acute cerebral ischemia. The multivariate model demonstrated modest discriminative capabilities with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.76 for hemorrhagic stroke and 0.69 for all stroke (likelihood test P<0.001). When the threshold for the logistic model was set at the first quartile, this resulted in a sensitivity of 86% for detecting all stroke and a sensitivity of 94% for detecting hemorrhagic stroke. Moreover, results were reproducible in a separate cohort tested on a point-of-care platform. These results suggest that a biomarker panel may add valuable and time-sensitive diagnostic information in the early evaluation of stroke. Such an approach is feasible on a point-of-care platform. The rapid identification of patients with suspected stroke would expand the availability of time-limited treatment strategies. Although the diagnostic accuracy of the current panel is clearly imperfect, this study demonstrates the feasibility of incorporating a

  5. The Role of Posttraumatic Stress in Acute Postconcussive Symptoms following Blast Injury in Combat

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-21

    Cognitive Injuries, Their Consequences, and Services to Assist Re- covery. Santa Monica, Rand Corporation, 2008. 2 Hoge CW, McGurk D, Thomas JL, Cox AL ...J, Bryant RA, Baguley IJ, Chapman J, Gurka J, Dawson K, Capon L, Marosszeky JE: Mild trau- matic brain injury does not predict acute postconcussion

  6. CT diagnosis of acute spinal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohhama, Mitsuru; Niimiya, Hikosuke; Kimura, Ko; Yamazaki, Gyoji; Nasu, Yoshiro; Shioya, Akihide

    1982-01-01

    CT pictures of 22 acute spinal injuries with damage of the spinal cord were evaluated. In the cases of spinal cord damage with bone injury, changes in the vertebral canal were fully observed by CT. In some of spinal cord damages without bone injury, narrowing of the vertebral canal was demonstrated by CT combined with CT myelography and reconstruction. Evaluation of CT number showed a high density area in damaged spinal cord in some cases. CT was thus considered to be useful as an adjunct diagnostic aid. (Ueda, J.)

  7. 45 CFR 1308.16 - Eligibility criteria: Traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... child is classified as having traumatic brain injury whose brain injuries are caused by an external... adversely affect educational performance. The term includes children with open or closed head injuries, but does not include children with brain injuries that are congenital or degenerative or caused by birth...

  8. Increased cerebral blood volume and oxygen consumption in neonatal brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, P Ellen; Roche-Labarbe, Nadege; Surova, Andrea; Themelis, George; Selb, Juliette; Warren, Elizabeth K; Krishnamoorthy, Kalpathy S; Boas, David A; Franceschini, Maria Angela

    2009-01-01

    With the increasing interest in treatments for neonatal brain injury, bedside methods for detecting and assessing injury status and evolution are needed. We aimed to determine whether cerebral tissue oxygenation (StO2), cerebral blood volume (CBV), and estimates of relative cerebral oxygen consumption (rCMRO2) determined by bedside frequency-domain near-infrared spectroscopy (FD-NIRS) have the potential to distinguish neonates with brain injury from those with non-brain issues and healthy controls. We recruited 43 neonates ≤ 15 days old and > 33 weeks gestational age (GA): 14 with imaging evidence of brain injury, 29 without suspicion of brain injury (4 unstable, 6 stable, and 19 healthy). A multivariate analysis of variance with Newman–Keuls post hoc comparisons confirmed group similarity for GA and age at measurement. StO2 was significantly higher in brain injured compared with unstable neonates, but not statistically different from stable or healthy neonates. Brain-injured neonates were distinguished from all others by significant increases in CBV and rCMRO2. In conclusion, although NIRS measures of StO2 alone may be insensitive to evolving brain injury, increased CBV and rCMRO2 seem to be useful for detecting neonatal brain injury and suggest increased neuronal activity and metabolism occurs acutely in evolving brain injury. PMID:19675563

  9. Lipid Peroxidation in Brain Injury (Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Yelsky

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to study the general mechanisms responsible for the formation and stepwise development of the endogenous intoxication syndrome in the injury. Material and methods. One hundred and thirty animals with experimental brain injury (a blow upon the calvarium delivered by a free weight falling were examined to study the pro- and antioxidant systems, the enzymatic activity in the blood and brain tissue homogenates; the markers of endogenous intoxication, such as medium-weight molecules, were determined. According to the neurological deficit scale developed by A. Ya. Yevtushenko (1989, the animals were divided into 2 groups: 1 those with a good (compensated posttraumatic course and 2 those with a poor (decompensated one. A package of the applied statistical programs «STADIA.6.1/prof» and «STATISTIKA» was employed. Results. Brain injury was used as an example to show how the posttraumatic endogenous intoxication syndrome developed. The latter developed on the cascade principle with the stepwise involvement of the homeostatic systems and with the more aggravated injury. The syndrome is determined by the initiation of processes of lipid peroxidation with the accumulation of its products and by the exhausted spares of antioxidant systems. This leads to hyperenzymemia (the enhanced activity of cathepsin D, acid phosphatase in the brain tissues and blood and to the blood accumulation of toxic substances (medium-weight molecules (toxemia. Key words: posttraumatic endogenous intoxication syndrome, lipid peroxidation, brain injury.

  10. [Effects of eye-acupuncture therapy on the expression of AQP4 in brain tissue of rats with acute cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhe; Ma, Xian-De; Liu, Hui-Hui; Liu, Xu-Dong; Gao, Yuan; Guan, Hong-Quan; Wang, De-Shan

    2011-08-01

    To explore the mechanism of the eye-acupuncture for treatment of acute cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. Thirty-two healthy SD rats were randomly divided into a normal group, a sham operation group, a model group and an eye-acupuncture group, 8 rats in each group. The rat model of cerebral ischemia-reperfusion was established with thread occlusion method in the model group and the eye-acupuncture group. The eye-acupuncture group was treated by eye-acupuncture at "liver region", "upper energizer area", "lower energizer area" and "kidney region" for 20 min immediately after reperfusion and at 30 min before sampling. No treatment was done in the normal group and the sham operation group, and no thread occlusion was performed in the sham operation group. The Neurologic impairment was scored and the methods of immunohistochemistry staining, western-blotting and real-time fluorescent quantitation polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR) were taken to detect the expression of the aquaporin protein 4 (AQP4) and its mRNA in cerebral cortex after reperfusion for 3 hours. The neurologic impairment score of 1.50 +/- 0.54 in the eye-acupuncture group was significant lower than 2.63 +/- 0.92 in the model group (P eye-acupuncture group, with statistical significance compared to 150.88 +/- 15.82 and 0.94 +/- 0.04 in the model group (all P eye-acupuncture group and the normal group (both P eye-acupuncture therapy can relieve the cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury and the protective mechanism is related to the downregulation of the cerebral AQP4 expression.

  11. Acute subdural hematoma, Head injury, Functional reco

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kim

    Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, Kenyatta National Hospital, University of Nairobi,. Nairobi, Kenya. 2. Department of Human Anatomy, School of Medicine, University of Nairobi, Kenya. E-Mail Contact - KIBOI Julius Githinji : Mots-clés: Keywords: Acute subdural hematoma, Head injury, Functional recovery, ...

  12. Inflammatory sequences in acute pulmonary radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slauson, D.O.; Hahn, F.F.; Benjamin, S.A.; Chiffelle, T.L.; Jones, R.K.

    1976-01-01

    The histopathologic events in the developing acute pulmonary inflammatory reaction to inhaled particles of Yttrium 90 are detailed. In animals that died or were sacrificed during the first year after inhalation exposure, microscopic findings of acute inflammation predominated and included vascular congestion; stasis; focal hemorrhage; edema; various inflammatory cell infiltrates; cytolysis and desquamation of bronchiolar and alveolar epithelium followed by regeneration; vascular injury and repair; and the eventual development of pulmonary fibrosis. Accumulation of alveolar fibrin deposits was an additional characteristic, though not a constant feature of the early stages of radiation pneumonitis. In addition to the direct effects of radiation on pulmonary cell populations, the histopathologic findings were suggestive of diverse activation of various cellular and humoral mediation systems in their pathogenesis. The potential interrelationships of systems responsible for increased vascular permeability, coagulation and fibrinolysis, chemotaxis, and direct cellular injury were discussed and related to the pathogenesis of the microscopic findings characteristic of early pulmonary radiation injury

  13. Improved prediction of direction-dependent, acute axonal injury in piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlan, Lorre S; Smith, Colin; Margulies, Susan S

    2018-04-01

    To guide development of safety equipment that reduces sports-related head injuries, we sought to enhance predictive relationships between head movement and acute axonal injury severity. The severity of traumatic brain injury (TBI) is influenced by the magnitude and direction of head kinematics. Previous studies have demonstrated correlation between rotational head kinematics and symptom severity in the adult. More recent studies have demonstrated brain injury age- and direction-dependence, relating head kinematics to white matter tract-oriented strains. We have recently developed and assessed novel rotational head kinematic parameters as predictors of white matter damage in the female immature piglet. We show that many previously published rotational kinematic injury predictor metrics poorly predict acute axonal pathology induced by rapid, non-impact head rotations and that inclusion of cerebral moments of inertia (MOI) in rotational head injury metrics refines prediction of diffuse axonal injury following rapid head rotations for two immature age groups. Rotational Work (RotWork) was the best significant predictor of traumatic axonal injury in both newborn and pre-adolescent piglets following head rotations in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes. An improvement over current metrics, we find that RotWork, which incorporates head rotation rate, direction, and brain shape, significantly enhanced acute traumatic axonal injury prediction. For similar injury extent, the RotWork threshold is lower for the newborn piglet than the pre-adolescent. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Risk factors and outcomes associated with post-traumatic headache after mild traumatic brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yilmaz, Tansel; Roks, Gerwin; de Koning, Myrthe; Scheenen, Myrthe; van der Horn, Harm; Plas, Gerben; Hageman, Gerard; Schoonman, Guus; Spikman, Jacoba; van der Naalt, Joukje

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence and potential risk factors of acute and chronic post-traumatic headache (PTH) in patients with mild to moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a prospective longitudinal observational multicentre study. Acute PTH (aPTH) is defined by new or worsening of

  15. Service Use and Satisfaction Following Acquired Brain Injury: A Preliminary Analysis of Family Caregiver Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degeneffe, Charles Edmund; Green, Richard; Jones, Clair

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The study aimed to understand how use and satisfaction with services following discharge from an acquired brain injury (ABI) acute-care facility related to family caregiver outcomes. Methods: A correlational and descriptive study design was used. Nineteen primary family caregivers of persons recently discharged from an ABI acute-care…

  16. Managing traumatic brain injury secondary to explosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgess Paula

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Explosions and bombings are the most common deliberate cause of disasters with large numbers of casualties. Despite this fact, disaster medical response training has traditionally focused on the management of injuries following natural disasters and terrorist attacks with biological, chemical, and nuclear agents. The following article is a clinical primer for physicians regarding traumatic brain injury (TBI caused by explosions and bombings. The history, physics, and treatment of TBI are outlined.

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury and Sleep Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Viola-Saltzman, Mari; Watson, Nathaniel F.

    2012-01-01

    Sleep disturbance is common following traumatic brain injury (TBI), affecting 30–70% of individuals, many occurring after mild injuries. Insomnia, fatigue and sleepiness are the most frequent post-TBI sleep complaints with narcolepsy (with or without cataplexy), sleep apnea (obstructive and/or central), periodic limb movement disorder, and parasomnias occurring less commonly. In addition, depression, anxiety and pain are common TBI co-morbidities with substantial influence on sleep quality. T...

  18. Prehospital Care of Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TVSP Murthy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI occurs when a sudden trauma causes brain damage. Depending on the severity, outcome can be anything from complete recovery to permanent disability or death. Emergency medical services play a dominant role in provision of primary care at the site of injury. Since little can be done to reverse the initial brain damage due to trauma, attempts to prevent further brain damage and stabilize the patient before he can be brought to a specialized trauma care centre play a pivotal role in the final outcome. Recognition and early treatment of hypoten-sion, hypoxemia, and hypoglycemia, objective neurological assessment based on GCS and pupils, and safe transport to an optimal care centre are the key elements of prehospital care of a TBI patient.

  19. Brain SPECT in severs traumatic head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaulieu, F.; Eder, V.; Pottier, J.M.; Baulieu, J.L.; Fournier, P.; Legros, B.; Chiaroni, P.; Dalonneau, M.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work was to compare the results of the early brain scintigraphy in traumatic brain injury to the long term neuropsychological behavior. Twenty four patients had an ECD-Tc99m SPECT, within one month after the trauma; scintigraphic abnormalities were evaluated according to a semi-quantitative analysis. The neuropsychological clinical investigation was interpreted by a synthetic approach to evaluate abnormalities related to residual motor deficit, frontal behavior, memory and language disorders. Fourteen patients (58%) had sequela symptoms. SPECT revealed 80 abnormalities and CT scan only 31. Statistical analysis of uptake values showed significantly lower uptake in left basal ganglia and brain stem in patients with sequela memory disorders. We conclude that the brain perfusion scintigraphy is able to detect more lesions than CT and that it could really help to predict the neuropsychological behavior after severe head injury. Traumatology could become in the future a widely accepted indication of perfusion SPECT. (authors)

  20. Time dysperception perspective for acquired brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica ePiras

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Distortions of time perception are presented by a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. Here we survey timing abilities in clinical populations with acquired brain injuries in key cerebral areas recently implicated in human studies of timing. We purposely analyzed the complex relationship between cognitive and contextual factors involved in time estimation, as to characterize the correlation between timed and other cognitive behaviors in each group. We assume that interval timing is a solid construct to study cognitive dysfunctions following brain injury, as timing performance is a sensitive metric of information processing, while temporal cognition has the potential of influencing a wide range of cognitive processes. Moreover, temporal performance is a sensitive assay of damage to the underlying neural substrate after a brain insult. Further research in neurological and psychiatric patients will definitively answer the question of whether time distortions are manifestations of cognitive and behavioral symptoms of brain damage and definitively clarify their mechanisms.

  1. secondary injury in traumatic brain injury patients - a prospective study

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. Secondary insults of hypotension and hypoxia significantly impact on outcome in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). More than 4 hours' delay in evacuation of intracranial haematomas has been demonstrated to have an additional impact on outcome. The objective of this study was to document the ...

  2. Plasticity and Injury in the Developing Brain

    OpenAIRE

    JOHNSTON, Michael V.; ISHIDA, Akira; ISHIDA, Wako Nakajima; MATSUSHITA, Hiroko Baber; NISHIMURA, Akira; TSUJI, Masahiro

    2008-01-01

    The child’s brain is more malleable or plastic than that of adults and this accounts for the ability of children to learn new skills quickly or recovery from brain injuries. Several mechanisms contribute to this ability including overproduction and deletion of neurons and synapses, and activity-dependent stabilization of synapses. The molecular mechanisms for activity dependent synaptic plasticity are being discovered and this is leading to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of severa...

  3. Blast-induced Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    directly to the brain after craniotomy 154 or 240 kPa Unknown 2.8 or 20 kPa 40 kPa 1 or 10 MPa Redistribution of phosphorylated neurofilament H...m a: 1𔃻) .... !l ~ Blast-induced Mild Traumatic Brain Injury 767 colleagues55 compared neuropsychological test results in a group of primarily...patterns between blast and non-blast-injured subjects, thus providing no support at the neuropsychological level that blast is different. However

  4. Neuroinflammatory responses to traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paiva WS

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Wellingson Silva Paiva,1 Angelica Duarte Correia,2 Suely Kazue Marie2 1Division of Neurological Surgery, 2Laboratory of Medical Investigation 15, Department of Neurology, University of São Paulo Medical School, Sao Paulo, Brazil We read with great interest the recent study by Lozano et al1 published in the Neuropsychiatric Disease and Treatment. The recovery after traumatic brain injury (TBI is related to severity of the initial injury (primary injury and the presence of secondary injury.2 Evidences suggest that inflammation, oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, apoptosis, and neuroendocrine responses play an important role in the development of secondary brain injury.3 Therefore, an important part in the management of patients with TBI is trying to minimize the occurrence of deleterious secondary lesions. Lozano et al’s1 paper focused on the role of neuroinflammation in brain injury.Although some studies have described experimental drugs which may eventually have neuroprotective effects in patients with TBI,2–4 there is currently no approved pharmacological treatment for neuroinflammatory effects of the acute phase of the injury. The dissociation between experimental data with positive results and consecutive clinical trials with negative results leads to a dilemma for the treatment of patients with TBI. And, we agree with Lozano et al1 that further clarification of the neuroinflammatory mechanisms could be the basis for addressing the gap between bench and clinical results to provide better treatment and reduce death and sequelae of TBI.View original paper by Lozano and colleagues.

  5. Recovery of resting brain connectivity ensuing mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rose Dawn Bharath

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Brains reveal amplified plasticity as they recover from an injury. We aimed to define time dependent plasticity changes in patients recovering from mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI. 25 subjects with mild head injury were longitudinally evaluated within 36 hours, 3 and 6 months using resting state functional connectivity (RSFC. Region of interest (ROI based connectivity differences over time within the patient group and in comparison with a healthy control group were analyzed at p<0.005. We found 33 distinct ROI pairs that revealed significant changes in their connectivity strength with time. Within three months, the majority of the ROI pairs had decreased connectivity in mTBI population, which increased and became comparable to healthy controls at 6 months. Initial imaging within 36 hours of injury revealed hyper connectivity predominantly involving the salience network and default mode network, which reduced at 3 months when lingual, inferior frontal and fronto-parietal networks revealed hyper connectivity. At six months all the evaluated networks revealed hyper connectivity and became comparable to the healthy controls. Our findings in a fairly homogenous group of patients with mTBI evaluated during the 6 month window of recovery defines time varying brain connectivity changes as the brain recovers from an injury. A majority of these changes were seen in the frontal and parietal lobes between 3-6 months after injury. Hyper connectivity of several networks supported normal recovery in the first six months and it remains to be seen in future studies whether this can predict an early and efficient recovery of brain function.

  6. Extravascular Lung Water and Acute Lung Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritesh Maharaj

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury carries a high burden of morbidity and mortality and is characterised by nonhydrostatic pulmonary oedema. The aim of this paper is to highlight the role of accurate quantification of extravascular lung water in diagnosis, management, and prognosis in “acute lung injury” and “acute respiratory distress syndrome”. Several studies have verified the accuracy of both the single and the double transpulmonary thermal indicator techniques. Both experimental and clinical studies were searched in PUBMED using the term “extravascular lung water” and “acute lung injury”. Extravascular lung water measurement offers information not otherwise available by other methods such as chest radiography, arterial blood gas, and chest auscultation at the bedside. Recent data have highlighted the role of extravascular lung water in response to treatment to guide fluid therapy and ventilator strategies. The quantification of extravascular lung water may predict mortality and multiorgan dysfunction. The limitations of the dilution method are also discussed.

  7. Amelioration of acute sequelae of blast induced mild traumatic brain injury by N-acetyl cysteine: a double-blind, placebo controlled study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Hoffer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI secondary to blast exposure is the most common battlefield injury in Southwest Asia. There has been little prospective work in the combat setting to test the efficacy of new countermeasures. The goal of this study was to compare the efficacy of N-acetyl cysteine (NAC versus placebo on the symptoms associated with blast exposure mTBI in a combat setting. METHODS: This study was a randomized double blind, placebo-controlled study that was conducted on active duty service members at a forward deployed field hospital in Iraq. All symptomatic U.S. service members who were exposed to significant ordnance blast and who met the criteria for mTBI were offered participation in the study and 81 individuals agreed to participate. Individuals underwent a baseline evaluation and then were randomly assigned to receive either N-acetyl cysteine (NAC or placebo for seven days. Each subject was re-evaluated at 3 and 7 days. Outcome measures were the presence of the following sequelae of mTBI: dizziness, hearing loss, headache, memory loss, sleep disturbances, and neurocognitive dysfunction. The resolution of these symptoms seven days after the blast exposure was the main outcome measure in this study. Logistic regression on the outcome of 'no day 7 symptoms' indicated that NAC treatment was significantly better than placebo (OR = 3.6, p = 0.006. Secondary analysis revealed subjects receiving NAC within 24 hours of blast had an 86% chance of symptom resolution with no reported side effects versus 42% for those seen early who received placebo. CONCLUSION: This study, conducted in an active theatre of war, demonstrates that NAC, a safe pharmaceutical countermeasure, has beneficial effects on the severity and resolution of sequelae of blast induced mTBI. This is the first demonstration of an effective short term countermeasure for mTBI. Further work on long term outcomes and the potential use of NAC in civilian m

  8. TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY IN PEDIATRIC AGE GROUP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayagriva

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury is one of the major causes of morbidity and mortality in children. The anatomical features, physiological response to injury, neuronal development, and low myelination in children cause different clinical features compared to the adult traumatic brain injury. Our aim is to study the incidence, predisposing factors, clinical presentations, and outcome in pediatric head injuries. The patients included in this retrospective study are under the age of 14 years admitted in the Neurosurgery Department of King George Hospital, Visakhapatnam, which is a tertiary care centre. The study period is two years’ duration from 1.1.2013 to 31.12.2014. Data collected on the basis of history, physical examination, base line investigations, and the plain CT scan is all cases. The pediatric patients were 226 in total 1643 case of head injury cases. There were 64.6% (n=146 males and 35.4% (n=80 females. The age ranged from 12 days to 14 years. Fall from height was the commonest cause of head injury found in 48.6% (n=110 cases, road traffic accidents (RTA in 34.5% (n=78 and other causes 16.8% (n=38; 49 (21.68% patients had associated injuries. At 55.75% (n=126 cases mild head injury with GCS 13-15 was present and severe head injury with GCS less than 8 in 29 (12.8% patients. The 188 patients are treated conservatively, 38 patients underwent different neurosurgical procedures in which 5 patients died. CONCLUSION: Head injury in pediatric age group carries high risk of morbidity and mortality. Good outcome achieved by early diagnosis and referral from primary care centers to tertiary care centers.

  9. [Acoustic thermometry of the patient brain with traumatic brain injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anosov, A A; Balashov, I S; Beliaev, R V; Vilkov, V A; Garskov, R V; Kazanskiĭ, A S; Mansfel'd, A D; Shcherbakov, M I

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive deep brain acoustic thermometry is carried out for two patients at Burdenko Neurosurgery Institute. This method is based on the measurements of the own thermal acoustic radiation of the investigated object. These two patients have got the brain injury. Some of their skull bones are absent. Infrared thermometry was also used to measure the surface temperature of the forehead skin. On the basis of the experimental data the temperatures deep within the brain were reconstructed. The values for the two patients are equal to 37.3 0.7 and 37.0 0.3 degrees C.

  10. The Impact of Traumatic Brain Injury on the Aging Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jacob S; Hobbs, Jonathan G; Bailes, Julian E

    2016-09-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) has come to the forefront of both the scientific and popular culture. Specifically, sports-related concussions or mild TBI (mTBI) has become the center of scientific scrutiny with a large amount of research focusing on the long-term sequela of this type of injury. As the populace continues to age, the impact of TBI on the aging brain will become clearer. Currently, reports have come to light that link TBI to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, as well as certain psychiatric diseases. Whether these associations are causations, however, is yet to be determined. Other long-term sequelae, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), appear to be associated with repetitive injuries. Going forward, as we gain better understanding of the pathophysiological process involved in TBI and subclinical head traumas, and individual traits that influence susceptibility to neurocognitive diseases, a clearer, more comprehensive understanding of the connection between brain injury and resultant disease processes in the aging brain will become evident.

  11. Traumatic Brain Injury as a Disorder of Brain Connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Jasmeet P.; Bigler, Erin D.; Verfaellie, Mieke

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Recent advances in neuroimaging methodologies sensitive to axonal injury have made it possible to assess in vivo the extent of traumatic brain injury (TBI) -related disruption in neural structures and their connections. The objective of this paper is to review studies examining connectivity in TBI with an emphasis on structural and functional MRI methods that have proven to be valuable in uncovering neural abnormalities associated with this condition. Methods We review studies that have examined white matter integrity in TBI of varying etiology and levels of severity, and consider how findings at different times post-injury may inform underlying mechanisms of post-injury progression and recovery. Moreover, in light of recent advances in neuroimaging methods to study the functional connectivity among brain regions that form integrated networks, we review TBI studies that use resting-state functional connectivity MRI methodology to examine neural networks disrupted by putative axonal injury. Results The findings suggest that TBI is associated with altered structural and functional connectivity, characterized by decreased integrity of white matter pathways and imbalance and inefficiency of functional networks. These structural and functional alterations are often associated with neurocognitive dysfunction and poor functional outcomes. Conclusions TBI has a negative impact on distributed brain networks that lead to behavioral disturbance. PMID:26888612

  12. Gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can predict functional recovery in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgin, Sevil; Guclu-Gunduz, Arzu; Oruckaptan, Hakan; Kose, Nezire; Celik, Bülent

    2012-09-05

    Fifty-one patients with mild (n = 14), moderate (n = 10) and severe traumatic brain injury (n = 27) received early rehabilitation. Level of consciousness was evaluated using the Glasgow Coma Score. Functional level was determined using the Glasgow Outcome Score, whilst mobility was evaluated using the Mobility Scale for Acute Stroke. Activities of daily living were assessed using the Barthel Index. Following Bobath neurodevelopmental therapy, the level of consciousness was significantly improved in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury, but was not greatly influenced in patients with mild traumatic brain injury. Mobility and functional level were significantly improved in patients with mild, moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Gait recovery was more obvious in patients with mild traumatic brain injury than in patients with moderate and severe traumatic brain injury. Activities of daily living showed an improvement but this was insignificant except for patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Nevertheless, complete recovery was not acquired at discharge. Multiple regression analysis showed that gait and Glasgow Coma Scale scores can be considered predictors of functional outcomes following traumatic brain injury.

  13. New Antioxidant Drugs for Neonatal Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luisa Tataranno

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The brain injury concept covers a lot of heterogeneity in terms of aetiology involving multiple factors, genetic, hemodynamic, metabolic, nutritional, endocrinological, toxic, and infectious mechanisms, acting in antenatal or postnatal period. Increased vulnerability of the immature brain to oxidative stress is documented because of the limited capacity of antioxidant enzymes and the high free radicals (FRs generation in rapidly growing tissue. FRs impair transmembrane enzyme Na+/K+-ATPase activity resulting in persistent membrane depolarization and excessive release of FR and excitatory aminoacid glutamate. Besides being neurotoxic, glutamate is also toxic to oligodendroglia, via FR effects. Neuronal cells die of oxidative stress. Excess of free iron and deficient iron/binding metabolising capacity are additional features favouring oxidative stress in newborn. Each step in the oxidative injury cascade has become a potential target for neuroprotective intervention. The administration of antioxidants for suspected or proven brain injury is still not accepted for clinical use due to uncertain beneficial effects when treatments are started after resuscitation of an asphyxiated newborn. The challenge for the future is the early identification of high-risk babies to target a safe and not toxic antioxidant therapy in combination with standard therapies to prevent brain injury and long-term neurodevelopmental impairment.

  14. Interviewing Children with Acquired Brain Injury (ABI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boylan, Anne-Marie; Linden, Mark; Alderdice, Fiona

    2009-01-01

    Research into the lives of children with acquired brain injury (ABI) often neglects to incorporate children as participants, preferring to obtain the opinions of the adult carer (e.g. McKinlay et al., 2002). There has been a concerted attempt to move away from this position by those working in children's research with current etiquette…

  15. Fatigue in adults with traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollayeva, Tatyana; Kendzerska, Tetyana; Mollayeva, Shirin

    2013-01-01

    , assess, and critically appraise studies that assessed predictors for fatigue and the consequences of fatigue on at least two separate time points following traumatic brain injury. METHODS/DESIGN: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, CINAHL, and PsycINFO will be systematically...

  16. Traumatic Brain Injury: Nuclear Medicine Neuroimaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez-Catasús, Carlos A; Vállez Garcia, David; Le Riverend Morales, Eloísa; Galvizu Sánchez, Reinaldo; Dierckx, Rudi; Dierckx, Rudi AJO; Otte, Andreas; de Vries, Erik FJ; van Waarde, Aren; Leenders, Klaus L

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides an up-to-date review of nuclear medicine neuroimaging in traumatic brain injury (TBI). 18F-FDG PET will remain a valuable tool in researching complex mechanisms associated with early metabolic dysfunction in TBI. Although evidence-based imaging studies are needed, 18F-FDG PET

  17. Fitness to drive after traumatic brain injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwer, WH; Withaar, FK

    This paper deals with the issue of fitness to drive in patients suffering from traumatic brain injury (TBI). Guidelines for assessment are proposed and three types of studies are reviewed: studies about impairments of attention and information processing, studies of driving competence, and driver

  18. Centralized rehabilitation after servere traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase Worså; Liebach, Annette; Nordenbo, Annette Mosbæk

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To present results from the first 3 years of centralized subacute rehabilitation after very severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and to compare results of centralized versus decentralized rehabilitation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospectively, the most severely injured group of adults fr...

  19. Referral Patterns as a Contextual Variable in Pediatric Brain Injury: A Retrospective Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccia, Angela Hein; Lundine, Jennifer P; Coreno, Alyssa

    2016-11-01

    Access to speech-language pathology (SLP) services is a critical variable in the rehabilitation of pediatric brain injury. In this study, we examined patterns of SLP referral and factors affecting referral during the acute period following brain injury in 2 large pediatric specialty hospitals. In a retrospective, cohort chart review study, data collection focused on referrals made during the acute period using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes for primary diagnoses of brain injury between 2007 and 2014 (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2014). A total of 200 charts were reviewed. Data extraction included demographic and injury-related variables, referral for rehabilitation across disciplines, and plans of care following assessment. Samples for both facilities were similar except for primary mechanism of traumatic brain injuries and severity. SLP referral rate at Hospital 1 was 36% and only 2% at Hospital 2. Regression revealed that individuals were less likely to receive an SLP referral if injury severity was classified as unknown or mild or if they were younger in age. SLP referral rates in the early acute period for children with brain injury were poor, creating a barrier to rehabilitation. This not only limits access to SLP services, but also may have broader and long-term impact.

  20. Acute alcohol-induced liver injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gavin Edward Arteel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol consumption is customary in most cultures and alcohol abuse is common worldwide. For example, more than 50% of Americans consume alcohol, with an estimated 23.1% of Americans participating in heavy and/or binge drinking at least once a month. A safe and effective therapy for alcoholic liver disease (ALD in humans is still elusive, despite significant advances in our understanding of how the disease is initiated and progresses. It is now clear that acute alcohol binges not only can be acutely toxic to the liver, but also can contribute to the chronicity of ALD. Potential mechanisms by which acute alcohol causes damage include steatosis, dysregulated immunity and inflammation and altered gut permeability. Recent interest in modeling acute alcohol exposure has yielded new insights into potential mechanisms of acute injury, that also may well be relevant for chronic ALD. Recent work by this group on the role of PAI-1 and fibrin metabolism in mediating acute alcohol-induced liver damage serve as an example of possible new targets that may be useful for alcohol abuse, be it acute or chronic.

  1. Management of acute lateral ankle ligament injury in the athlete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bekerom, Michel P. J.; Kerkhoffs, Gino M. M. J.; McCollum, Graham A.; Calder, James D. F.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2013-01-01

    Inversion injuries involve about 25 % of all injuries of the musculoskeletal system and about 50 % of these injuries are sport-related. This article reviews the acute lateral ankle injuries with special emphasis on a rationale for treatment of these injuries in athletes. A narrative review was

  2. Centralized rehabilitation after servere traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engberg, Aase Worså; Liebach, Annette; Nordenbo, Annette Mosbæk

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To present results from the first 3 years of centralized subacute rehabilitation after very severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and to compare results of centralized versus decentralized rehabilitation. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Prospectively, the most severely injured group of adults from...... an uptake area of 2.4 million in Denmark were included at admission to a regional brain injury unit (BIU), on average 19 days after injury. Patients in the retrospective study used for comparison were randomly chosen from the national hospital register. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Out of 117 patients...... post-trauma was 0.29, and at 1 year 0.055 per 100,000 population. By comparison of 39 patients from the centralized unit injured in 2000-2003 with 21 patients injured in 1982, 1987 or 1992 and with similar PTA- and age distributions and male/female ratio, Glasgow Outcome Scale score at discharge...

  3. Relatives of patients with severe brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Anne; Petersen, Janne; Lykke Mortensen, Erik

    2015-01-01

    relatives of patients with severe brain injury. METHODS: The relatives were assessed on the anxiety and depression scales from the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised and latent variable growth curve models were used to model the trajectories. The effects of patient's age, patient's Glasgow Coma Score, level......PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: To investigate trajectories and predictors of trajectories of anxiety and depression in relatives of patients with a severe brain injury during the first year after injury. RESEARCH DESIGN: A prospective longitudinal study with four repeated measurements. SUBJECTS: Ninety...... improvement. Higher initial level of symptoms of depression was seen in female relatives. Higher initial level of anxiety was associated with younger patient age, lower level of function and consciousness in the patient and the relative being female or the spouse. CONCLUSION: Future research and interventions...

  4. Resting network plasticity following brain injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Nakamura

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine neural network properties at separate time-points during recovery from traumatic brain injury (TBI using graph theory. Whole-brain analyses of the topological properties of the fMRI signal were conducted in 6 participants at 3 months and 6 months following severe TBI. Results revealed alterations of network properties including a change in the degree distribution, reduced overall strength in connectivity, and increased "small-worldness" from 3 months to 6 months post injury. The findings here indicate that, during recovery from injury, the strength but not the number of network connections diminishes, so that over the course of recovery, the network begins to approximate what is observed in healthy adults. These are the first data examining functional connectivity in a disrupted neural system during recovery.

  5. Advanced Neuromonitoring and Imaging in Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart H. Friess

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While the cornerstone of monitoring following severe pediatric traumatic brain injury is serial neurologic examinations, vital signs, and intracranial pressure monitoring, additional techniques may provide useful insight into early detection of evolving brain injury. This paper provides an overview of recent advances in neuromonitoring, neuroimaging, and biomarker analysis of pediatric patients following traumatic brain injury.

  6. Perspective on Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury | Igun | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Traumatic brain injury is an important aspect of paediatric trauma because of its contribution to mortality ant post trauma seqeulae. Management of traumatic brain injury remains a challenge to surgeons, especially in developing countries. This study aims to determine the pattern of traumatic brain injury among ...

  7. Heterogeneity of brain lesions in pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigler, Erin D; Abildskov, Tracy J; Petrie, Joann; Farrer, Thomas J; Dennis, Maureen; Simic, Nevena; Taylor, H Gerry; Rubin, Kenneth H; Vannatta, Kathryn; Gerhardt, Cynthia A; Stancin, Terry; Owen Yeates, Keith

    2013-07-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a method to identify and quantify abnormalities resulting from traumatic brain injury (TBI). MRI abnormalities in children with TBI have not been fully characterized according to the frequency, location, and quantitative measurement of a range of pathologies critical for studies of neuropsychological outcome. Here, we report MRI findings from a large, multicenter study of childhood TBI, the Social Outcomes of Brain Injury in Kids (SOBIK) study, which compared qualitative and quantitative neuroimaging findings in 72 children with complicated mild-to-severe TBI to 52 children with orthopedic injury (OI). Qualitative analyses of MRI scans coded white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), hemosiderin deposits reflecting prior hemorrhagic lesions, regions of encephalomalacia and/or atrophy, and corpus callosum atrophy and traumatic shear lesions. Two automated quantitative analyses were conducted: (a) FreeSurfer methods computed volumes for total brain, white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), corpus callosum, ventricles, amygdala, hippocampus, basal ganglia, and thalamus along with a ventricle-to-brain ratio (VBR); and (b) voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to identify WM, GM, and cerebrospinal fluid. We also examined performance on the Processing Speed Index (PSI) from the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, Fourth Edition, in relation to the above-mentioned neuroimaging variables. WMHs, hemosiderin deposits, and focal areas of encephalomalacia or atrophy were common in children with TBI, were related to injury severity, and were mostly observed within a frontotemporal distribution. Quantitative analyses showed volumetric changes related to injury severity, especially ventricular enlargement and reduced corpus callosum volume. VBM demonstrated similar findings, but, in addition, GM reductions in the inferior frontal, basal forebrain region, especially in the severe TBI group. The complicated mild TBI group showed few differences from

  8. Social functioning after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temkin, Nancy R; Corrigan, John D; Dikmen, Sureyya S; Machamer, Joan

    2009-01-01

    To determine the relationship between adult-onset traumatic brain injury (TBI) and social functioning including employment, social relationships, independent living, recreation, functional status, and quality of life 6 months or longer after injury. Not applicable. Systematic review of the published, peer-reviewed literature. Not applicable. Fourteen primary and 25 secondary studies were identified that allowed comparison to controls for adults who were at least 6 months post-TBI. TBI decreases the probability of employment after injury in those who were workers before their injury, lengthens the timing of their return if they do return to work, and decreases the likelihood that they will return to the same position. Those with moderate and severe TBI are clearly affected, but there was insufficient evidence of a relationship between unemployment and mild TBI. Penetrating head injury sustained in wartime is clearly associated with increased unemployment. TBI also adversely affects leisure and recreation, social relationships, functional status, quality of life, and independent living. Although there is a dose-response relationship between severity of injury and social outcomes, there is insufficient evidence to determine at what level of severity the adverse effects are demonstrated. TBI clearly has adverse effects on social functioning for adults. While some consequences might arise from injuries to other parts of the body, those with moderate to severe TBI have more impaired functioning than do those with other injuries alone.

  9. Sodium hypochlorite-induced acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon W Peck

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium hypochlorite (bleach is commonly used as an irrigant during dental proce-dures as well as a topical antiseptic agent. Although it is generally safe when applied topically, reports of accidental injection of sodium hypochlorite into tissue have been reported. Local necrosis, pain and nerve damage have been described as a result of exposure, but sodium hypo-chlorite has never been implicated as a cause of an acute kidney injury (AKI. In this report, we describe the first case of accidental sodium hypochlorite injection into the infraorbital tissue during a dental procedure that precipitated the AKI. We speculate that oxidative species induced by sodium hypochlorite caused AKI secondary to the renal tubular injury, causing mild acute tubular necrosis.

  10. Contribution of neutrophils to acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grommes, Jochen; Soehnlein, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of acute lung injury (ALI) and its most severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), remain unsolved problems of intensive care medicine. ALI/ARDS are characterized by lung edema due to increased permeability of the alveolar-capillary barrier and subsequent impairment of arterial oxygenation. Lung edema, endothelial and epithelial injury are accompanied by an influx of neutrophils into the interstitium and broncheoalveolar space. Hence, activation and recruitment of neutrophils are regarded to play a key role in progression of ALI/ARDS. Neutrophils are the first cells to be recruited to the site of inflammation and have a potent antimicrobial armour that includes oxidants, proteinases and cationic peptides. Under pathological circumstances, however, unregulated release of these microbicidal compounds into the extracellular space paradoxically can damage host tissues. This review focuses on the mechanisms of neutrophil recruitment into the lung and on the contribution of neutrophils to tissue damage in ALI.

  11. Nutritional Support in Acute Kidney Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ayşe BİLGİÇ; Ali AKÇAY; Siren SEZER

    2013-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication affecting many hospitalized patients and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality. AKI seldom occurs as isolated organ failure; much more often it emerges as a component of the multiple organ failure syndrome, within the framework of the severe-prolonged catabolic phase determined by critical illness. Patients with AKI often have protein-energy wasting, which represents a major negative prognostic factor. Malnutrition in AKI pat...

  12. Acute subdural hematoma, Head injury, Functional reco

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    kim

    Results. A total of 259 patients were diagnosed with acute subdural hematomas during the study period. The mean age was 41.1 years + 19.659 and 223 (86.1%) were men while 36 (13.9%) were women. The most common cause of injury was assault (44.8%) with road traffic and falls accounting for 24.7% and 30.5%.

  13. Multi-modal MRI of mild traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ponnada A. Narayana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multi-modal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI that included high resolution structural imaging, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, magnetization transfer ratio (MTR imaging, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI were performed in mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI patients with negative computed tomographic scans and in an orthopedic-injured (OI group without concomitant injury to the brain. The OI group served as a comparison group for mTBI. MRI scans were performed both in the acute phase of injury (~24 h and at follow-up (~90 days. DTI data was analyzed using tract based spatial statistics (TBSS. Global and regional atrophies were calculated using tensor-based morphometry (TBM. MTR values were calculated using the standard method. MRSI was analyzed using LC Model. At the initial scan, the mean diffusivity (MD was significantly higher in the mTBI cohort relative to the comparison group in several white matter (WM regions that included internal capsule, external capsule, superior corona radiata, anterior corona radiata, posterior corona radiata, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, inferior longitudinal fasciculus, forceps major and forceps minor of the corpus callosum, superior longitudinal fasciculus, and corticospinal tract in the right hemisphere. TBSS analysis failed to detect significant differences in any DTI measures between the initial and follow-up scans either in the mTBI or OI group. No significant differences were found in MRSI, MTR or morphometry between the mTBI and OI cohorts either at the initial or follow-up scans with or without family wise error (FWE correction. Our study suggests that a number of WM tracts are affected in mTBI in the acute phase of injury and that these changes disappear by 90 days. This study also suggests that none of the MRI-modalities used in this study, with the exception of DTI, is sensitive in detecting changes in the acute phase of mTBI.

  14. Posttraumatic rehabilitation and one year outcome following acute traumatic brain injury (TBI): data from the well defined population based German Prospective Study 2000-2002.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wild, K R H

    2008-01-01

    Follow-up examination to review the one-year outcome of patients after craniocerebral trauma with respect to health related quality of life (QoL) and social reintegration. The data are derived from the prospective controlled, well defined population based, multiple centre study that was performed in Germany for the first time in the years 2000-2001 with emphasis on quality management (structural, process, outcome) and regarding the patient's age, physical troubles, and impaired mental-cognitive, neurobehavioral functioning. TBI severity assessment is according to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score. Early outcome after rehabilitation is assessed by the Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOS) score of patients following rehabilitation and of 63% of all TBI with the aid of follow-up examination (simplified questionnaire) after one year. Catchment areas are Hanover (industrial) and Münster (more rural) with 2,114 million inhabitants. TBI is diagnosed according to ICD 10 S-02, S-04, S-06, S-07, S-09 with at least two of the following symptoms: dizziness or vomiting; retrograde or anterograde amnesia, impaired consciousness, skull fracture, and/or focal neurological impairment. Within one year 6.783 patients (58% male) were examined in the regional hospitals after acute TBI. The regional TBI incidence regarding hospital admission was 321/100.000 TBI. 28% of patients were 65 years of age. GCS was only assessed in 55% of patients. They were 90.9% mild, 3.9% moderate, and 5.2% severe TBI. A total of 5.221 TBI (= 77%) was hospitalised; 1.4% of them died. Only 258 patients (= 4.9%) of the hospitalized TBI received in-hospital neurorehabilitation (73% male), 68% within one month after injury. They were 10.9% severe, 23.4% moderate, and 65.7 mild TBI. 5% were 65 years. One-year follow-up examinations of 4307 individuals (= 63.5% of all TBI) are discussed. A total of 883 patients (= 20.6%) reported posttraumatic troubles, one half were > 64 years. One hundred and sixty patients (= 3

  15. Quantification of structural changes in the corpus callosumin children with profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stivaros, Stavros M. [Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Academic Unit of Paediatric Radiology, Royal Manchester Children' s Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); University of Manchester, Centre for Imaging Sciences, Institute of Population Health, Manchester (United Kingdom); Radon, Mark R. [The Walton Centre NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Neuroradiology, Liverpool (United Kingdom); Mileva, Reneta; Gledson, Ann; Keane, John A. [University of Manchester, School of Computer Science, Manchester (United Kingdom); Connolly, Daniel J.A.; Batty, Ruth [Sheffield Children' s Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Neuroradiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Cowell, Patricia E. [University of Sheffield, Department of Human Communication Sciences, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Hoggard, Nigel; Griffiths, Paul D. [University of Sheffield, Academic Unit of Radiology, Sheffield (United Kingdom); Wright, Neville B.; Tang, Vivian [Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, Academic Unit of Paediatric Radiology, Royal Manchester Children' s Hospital, Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-15

    Birth-related acute profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury has specific patterns of damage including the paracentral lobules. To test the hypothesis that there is anatomically coherent regional volume loss of the corpus callosum as a result of this hemispheric abnormality. Study subjects included 13 children with proven acute profound hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and 13 children with developmental delay but no brain abnormalities. A computerised system divided the corpus callosum into 100 segments, measuring each width. Principal component analysis grouped the widths into contiguous anatomical regions. We conducted analysis of variance of corpus callosum widths as well as support vector machine stratification into patient groups. There was statistically significant narrowing of the mid-posterior body and genu of the corpus callosum in children with hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. Support vector machine analysis yielded over 95% accuracy in patient group stratification using the corpus callosum centile widths. Focal volume loss is seen in the corpus callosum of children with hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury secondary to loss of commissural fibres arising in the paracentral lobules. Support vector machine stratification into the hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury group or the control group on the basis of corpus callosum width is highly accurate and points towards rapid clinical translation of this technique as a potential biomarker of hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury. (orig.)

  16. Four cases with localized brain-stem lesion on CT scan following closed head injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeki, Naokatsu; Odaki, Masaru; Oka, Nobuo; Takase, Manabu; Ono, Junichi.

    1981-01-01

    Cases of primary brain-stem injury following closed head injury, verified by a CT scan, have been increasingly reported. However, most of them have other intracranial lesions in addition to the brain stem, resulting in a poor outcome. The CT scan of 200 cases with severe head injury-Araki's classification of types 3 and 4 - were analysed. Four cases out of them had localized brain-stem lesion without any other significant intracranial injury on a CT scan at the acute stage and had a better outcome than had previously been reported. In this analysis, these 4 cases were studied, and the CT findings, prognosis, and pathogenesis of the localized brain-stem injury were discussed. Follow-up CT of three cases, and taken one month or more later, showed diffuse cortical atrophy. This may indicate the presence of diffuse cerebral injury which could not be seen on CT scans at the acute stage. This atrophic change may also be related with the mechanism of posttraumatic conscious impairment and posttraumatic neurological deficits, such as mental symptoms and impairment of the higher cortical function. Shearing injury is a probable pathogenesis for this diffuse cortical injury. On the other hand, one case did not have any cortical atrophy on a follow-up CT scan. Therefore, this is a case with a localized primary brain-stem injury. Coup injury against the brain stem by a tentorial margin in a case with a small tentorial opening is a possible mechanism producing the localized brain-stem injury. (J.P.N.)

  17. Astrocyte roles in traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burda, Joshua E.; Bernstein, Alexander M.; Sofroniew, Michael V.

    2015-01-01

    Astrocytes sense changes in neural activity and extracellular space composition. In response, they exert homeostatic mechanisms critical for maintaining neural circuit function, such as buffering neurotransmitters, modulating extracellular osmolarity and calibrating neurovascular coupling. In addition to upholding normal brain activities, astrocytes respond to diverse forms of brain injury with heterogeneous and progressive changes of gene expression, morphology, proliferative capacity and function that are collectively referred to as reactive astrogliosis. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) sets in motion complex events in which noxious mechanical forces cause tissue damage and disrupt central nervous system (CNS) homeostasis, which in turn trigger diverse multi-cellular responses that evolve over time and can lead either to neural repair or secondary cellular injury. In response to TBI, astrocytes in different cellular microenvironments tune their reactivity to varying degrees of axonal injury, vascular disruption, ischemia and inflammation. Here we review different forms of TBI-induced astrocyte reactivity and the functional consequences of these responses for TBI pathobiology. Evidence regarding astrocyte contribution to post-traumatic tissue repair and synaptic remodeling is examined, and the potential for targeting specific aspects of astrogliosis to ameliorate TBI sequelae is considered. PMID:25828533

  18. Priming the inflammatory pump of the CNS after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witcher, Kristina G; Eiferman, Daniel S; Godbout, Jonathan P

    2015-10-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can lead to secondary neuropsychiatric problems that develop and persist years after injury. Mounting evidence indicates that neuroinflammatory processes progress after the initial head injury and worsen with time. Microglia contribute to this inflammation by maintaining a primed profile long after the acute effects of the injury have dissipated. This may set the stage for glial dysfunction and hyperactivity to challenges including subsequent head injury, stress, or induction of a peripheral immune response. This review discusses the evidence that microglia become primed following TBI and how this corresponds with vulnerability to a 'second hit' and subsequent neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative complications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging in diffuse brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Hiroyuki; Yasuda, Kazuhiro; Mashiko, Kunihiro; Henmi, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Toshibumi; Kobayashi, Shiro; Nakazawa, Shozo

    1992-01-01

    Forty cases diagnosed as diffuse brain injury (DBI) were studied by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed within 3 days after injury. These cases were divided into two groups, which were the concussion group and diffuse axonal injury (DAI) group established by Gennarelli. There were no findings on computerized tomography (CT) in the concussion group except for two cases which had a brain edema or subarachnoid hemorrhage. But on MRI, high intensity areas on T2 weighted imaging were demonstrated in the cerebral white matter in this group. Many lesions in this group were thought to be edemas of the cerebral white matter, because of the fact that on serial MRI, they were isointense. In mild types of DAI, the lesions on MRI were located only in the cerebral white matter, whereas, in the severe types of DAI, lesions were located in the basal ganglia, the corpus callosum, the dorsal part of the brain stem as well as in the cerebral white matter. As for CT findings, parenchymal lesions were not visualized especially in mild DAI. Our results suggested that the lesions in cerebral concussion were edemas in cerebral white matter. In mild DAI they were non-hemorrhagic contusion; and in severe DAI they were hemorrhagic contusions in the cerebral white matter, the basal ganglia, the corpus callosum or the dorsal part of the brain stem. (author)

  20. A population-based study on epidemiology of intensive care unit treated traumatic brain injury in Iceland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsdottir, G M; Lund, S H; Snorradottir, B; Karason, S; Olafsson, I H; Reynisson, K; Mogensen, B; Sigvaldason, K

    2017-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a worldwide health issue and a significant cause of preventable deaths and disabilities. We aimed to describe population-based data on intensive care treated traumatic brain injury in Iceland over 15 years period. Retrospective review of all intensive care unit admissions due to traumatic brain injury at The National University Hospital of Iceland 1999-2013. Data were collected on demographics, mechanism of injury, alcohol consumption, glasgow come scale upon admission, Injury Severity Scoring, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score, length of stay, interventions and mortality (defined as glasgow outcome score one). All computerized tomography scans were reviewed for Marshall score classification. Intensive care unit admissions due to traumatic brain injury were 583. The incidence decreased significantly from 14/100.000/year to 12/100.000/year. Males were 72% and the mean age was 41 year. Majority of patients (42%) had severe traumatic brain injury. The most common mechanism of injury was a fall from low heights (36.3%). The mortality was 18.2%. Increasing age, injury severity score, Marshall score and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score are all independent risk factors for death. Glasgow coma scale was not an independent prognostic factor for outcome. Incidence decreased with a shift in injury mechanism from road traffic accidents to falls and an increased rate of traumatic brain injury in older patients following a fall from standing or low heights. Mortality was higher in older patients falling from low heights than in younger patients suffering multiple injuries in road traffic accidents. Age, injury severity score, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II score and Marshall score are good prognostic factors for outcome. Traumatic brain injury continues to be a considerable problem and the increase in severe traumatic brain injury in the middle age and older age groups after a seemingly

  1. Acute liver failure and acute kidney injury: Definitions, prognosis, and outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Włodzimirow, K.A.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this thesis was to investigate definitions, prognostic indicators and their association with adverse events, mainly mortality for acute liver failure (ALF), acute-on-chronic liver failure (ACLF) and acute kidney injury (AKI).

  2. Traumatic brain injury and olfactory deficits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fortin, Audrey; Lefebvre, Mathilde Beaulieu; Ptito, Maurice

    2010-01-01

    PRIMARY OBJECTIVE: Olfactory functions are not systematically evaluated following traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study aimed at comparing two smell tests that are used in a clinical setting. RESEARCH DESIGN: The University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) and the Alberta Smell....... RESULTS: The scores of the two smell tests were significantly correlated. Both tests indicated that patients with frontal lesion performed significantly worse than patients with other types of lesion. Mood and injury severity were not associated with olfactory impairment when age was taken into account...

  3. Surviving severe traumatic brain injury in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Lene; Poulsen, Ingrid; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To identify all hospitalized patients surviving severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in Denmark and to compare these patients to TBI patients admitted to highly specialized rehabilitation (HS-rehabilitation). PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients surviving severe TBI were identified from...... severe TBI were admitted to HS-rehabilitation. Female sex, older age, and non-working status pre-injury were independent predictors of no HS-rehabilitation among patients surviving severe TBI. CONCLUSION: The incidence rate of hospitalized patients surviving severe TBI was stable in Denmark...

  4. Volumetric analysis of day of injury computed tomography is associated with rehabilitation outcomes after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majercik, Sarah; Bledsoe, Joseph; Ryser, David; Hopkins, Ramona O; Fair, Joseph E; Brock Frost, R; MacDonald, Joel; Barrett, Ryan; Horn, Susan; Pisani, David; Bigler, Erin D; Gardner, Scott; Stevens, Mark; Larson, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Day-of-injury (DOI) brain lesion volumes in traumatic brain injury (TBI) patients are rarely used to predict long-term outcomes in the acute setting. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between acute brain injury lesion volume and rehabilitation outcomes in patients with TBI at a level one trauma center. Patients with TBI who were admitted to our rehabilitation unit after the acute care trauma service from February 2009-July 2011 were eligible for the study. Demographic data and outcome variables including cognitive and motor Functional Independence Measure (FIM) scores, length of stay (LOS) in the rehabilitation unit, and ability to return to home were obtained. The DOI quantitative injury lesion volumes and degree of midline shift were obtained from DOI brain computed tomography scans. A multiple stepwise regression model including 13 independent variables was created. This model was used to predict postrehabilitation outcomes, including FIM scores and ability to return to home. A p value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Ninety-six patients were enrolled in the study. Mean age was 43 ± 21 years, admission Glasgow Coma Score was 8.4 ± 4.8, Injury Severity Score was 24.7 ± 9.9, and head Abbreviated Injury Scale score was 3.73 ± 0.97. Acute hospital LOS was 12.3 ± 8.9 days, and rehabilitation LOS was 15.9 ± 9.3 days. Day-of-injury TBI lesion volumes were inversely associated with cognitive FIM scores at rehabilitation admission (p = 0.004) and discharge (p = 0.004) and inversely associated with ability to be discharged to home after rehabilitation (p = 0.006). In a cohort of patients with moderate to severe TBI requiring a rehabilitation unit stay after the acute care hospital stay, DOI brain injury lesion volumes are associated with worse cognitive FIM scores at the time of rehabilitation admission and discharge. Smaller-injury volumes were associated with eventual discharge to home. Volumetric neuroimaging in the acute

  5. Cognitive retraining in traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diya Nangia

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is often associated with cognitive impairments. The psychological sequelae of cognitive deficits and emotional problems contribute significantly to the disability in the patient and to the distress of the family. The study aimed to develop a cognitive retraining programme to enhance cognitive functioning in TBI. 25 years old male presenting with history of left temporal hemorrhagic contusion with cerebral edema underwent 2 months of a cognitive retaining programme, addressing executive functions impairment. A single case experimental design with pre- and post-assessment was adopted to evaluate changes in the patient in response to the intervention. Improvements were found in cognitive functioning, and in symptom reduction and behaviour. The 2 months hospital based cognitive retraining programme was found to be efficacious in ameliorating symptoms and improving cognitive, social and occupational functioning post traumatic brain injury.

  6. Surgical management of traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartings, Jed A; Vidgeon, Steven; Strong, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    OBJECT: Mass lesions from traumatic brain injury (TBI) often require surgical evacuation as a life-saving measure and to improve outcomes, but optimal timing and surgical technique, including decompressive craniectomy, have not been fully defined. The authors compared neurosurgical approaches...... in the treatment of TBI at 2 academic medical centers to document variations in real-world practice and evaluate the efficacies of different approaches on postsurgical course and long-term outcome. METHODS: Patients 18 years of age or older who required neurosurgical lesion evacuation or decompression for TBI were...... enrolled in the Co-Operative Studies on Brain Injury Depolarizations (COSBID) at King's College Hospital (KCH, n = 27) and Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU, n = 24) from July 2004 to March 2010. Subdural electrode strips were placed at the time of surgery for subsequent electrocorticographic...

  7. Maternal organ donation and acute injuries in surviving children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redelmeier, Donald A; Woodfine, Jason D; Thiruchelvam, Deva; Scales, Damon C

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to test whether maternal deceased organ donation is associated with rates of subsequent acute injuries among surviving children after their mother's death. This is a longitudinal cohort analysis of children linked to mothers who died of a catastrophic brain event in Ontario, Canada, between April 1988 and March 2012. Surviving children were distinguished by whether their mother was an organ donor after death. The primary outcome was an acute injury event in surviving children during the year after their mother's death. Surviving children (n=454) had a total of 293 injury events during the year after their mother's death, equivalent to an average of 65 events per 100 children per year and a significant difference comparing children of mothers who were organ donors to children of mothers who were not organ donors (21 vs 82, Pinjuries among surviving children after their mother's death. An awareness of this positive association provides some reassurance about deceased organ donation programs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Epidemiology of Overuse and Acute Injuries Among Competitive Collegiate Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingzhen; Tibbetts, Abigail S.; Covassin, Tracey; Cheng, Gang; Nayar, Saloni; Heiden, Erin

    2012-01-01

    Context: Although overuse injuries are gaining attention, epidemiologic studies on overuse injuries in male and female collegiate athletes are lacking. (70.7%) acute injuries were reported. The overall injury rate was Objective: To report the epidemiology of overuse injuries sustained by collegiate athletes and to compare the rates of overuse and acute injuries. Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Setting: A National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I university. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 1317 reported injuries sustained by 573 male and female athletes in 16 collegiate sports teams during the 2005–2008 seasons. Main Outcome Measure(s): The injury and athlete-exposure (AE) data were obtained from the Sports Injury Monitoring System. An injury was coded as either overuse or acute based on the nature of injury. Injury rate was calculated as the total number of overuse (or acute) injuries during the study period divided by the total number of AEs during the same period. Results: A total of 386 (29.3%) overuse injuries and 931 63.1 per 10000 AEs. The rate ratio (RR) of acute versus overuse injuries was 2.34 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.05, 2.67). Football had the highest RR (RR = 8.35, 95% CI = 5.38, 12.97), and women's rowing had the lowest (RR = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.51, 1.10). Men had a higher acute injury rate than women (49.8 versus 38.6 per 10000 AEs). Female athletes had a higher rate of overuse injury than male athletes (24.6 versus 13.2 per 10000 AEs). More than half of the overuse injuries (50.8%) resulted in no time loss from sport. Conclusions: Additional studies are needed to examine why female athletes are at greater risk for overuse injuries and identify the best practices for prevention and rehabilitation of overuse injuries. PMID:22488286

  9. Sepsis-induced acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Hernando; Kellum, John A

    2016-12-01

    Sepsis is a common and frequently fatal condition in which mortality has been consistently linked to increasing organ dysfunction. For example, acute kidney injury (AKI) occurs in 40-50% of septic patients and increases mortality six to eight-fold. However, the mechanisms by which sepsis causes organ dysfunction are not well understood and hence current therapy remains reactive and nonspecific. Recent studies have challenged the previous notion that organ dysfunction is solely secondary to hypoperfusion, by showing, for example, that AKI occurs in the setting of normal or increased renal blood flow; and that it is characterized not by acute tubular necrosis or apoptosis, but rather by heterogeneous areas of colocalized sluggish peritubular blood flow and tubular epithelial cell oxidative stress. Evidence has also shown that microvascular dysfunction, inflammation, and the metabolic response to inflammatory injury are fundamental pathophysiologic mechanisms that may explain the development of sepsis-induced AKI. The implications of these findings are significant because in the context of decades of negative clinical trials in the field, the recognition that other mechanisms are at play opens the possibility to better understand the processes of injury and repair, and provides an invaluable opportunity to design mechanism-targeted therapeutic interventions.

  10. Acute injury of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination, and clinical stress tests. If the clinical stress test is positive, stress radiography could be performed. There is no consensus about the usefulness of stress radiography in acute ankle sprain, particularly about the cut-off talar tilt angle beyond which a two-ligament rupture would be certain, ranging from 5 to 30 . Today MRI is not used for this indication, although it allows, with controlled positioning of the foot and with defined sections, visualization of injured lateral collateral ankle ligaments. In ankle injuries, plain radiographs form the established basis of diagnostic imaging and can provide definitive answers in most cases. CT is used in complex fractures for complete visualization. MRI is the method of choice for several diagnostic problem cases, including occult fractures and post-traumatic avascular necrosis. In tendon injuries, MRI is important if ultrasound is not diagnostic. Generally, for the evaluation of acute ankle injuries, MRI is the most important second-step procedure when radiographs are nondiagnostic. (orig.) [de

  11. [Prognosis in pediatric traumatic brain injury. A dynamic cohort study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Solís, María G; Villa-Manzano, Alberto I; Sánchez-Mosco, Dalia I; Vargas-Lares, José de Jesús; Plascencia-Fernández, Irma

    2013-01-01

    traumatic brain injury is a main cause of hospital admission and death in children. Our objective was to identify prognostic factors of pediatric traumatic brain injury. this was a dynamic cohort study of traumatic brain injury with 6 months follow-up. The exposition was: mild or moderate/severe traumatic brain injury, searching for prognosis (morbidity-mortality and decreased Glasgow scale). Relative risk and logistic regression was estimated for prognostic factors. we evaluated 440 patients with mild traumatic brain injury and 98 with moderate/severe traumatic brain injury. Morbidity for mild traumatic brain injury was 1 %; for moderate/severe traumatic brain injury, 5 %. There were no deaths. Prognostic factors for moderate/severe traumatic brain injury were associated injuries (RR = 133), fractures (RR = 60), street accidents (RR = 17), night time accidents (RR = 2.3) and weekend accidents (RR = 2). Decreased Glasgow scale was found in 9 %, having as prognostic factors: visible injuries (RR = 3), grown-up supervision (RR = 2.5) and time of progress (RR = 1.6). there should be a prognosis established based on kinetic energy of the injury and not only with Glasgow Scale.

  12. Reducing Secondary Insults in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 24 Jun 2015 2. REPORT TYPE Journal...transport, intracranial pressure, monitoring, hypoxia, hypotension 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT SAR 18. NUMBER OF...of productivity8 Previous studies suggest that secondary insults such as hypoxia and hypotension may worsen a brain injury.9-’ 9 Recent recognition

  13. Traumatic Brain Injury: Caregivers’ Problems and Needs

    OpenAIRE

    syed tajjudin syed hassan; WF Khaw; AR Rosna; J Husna

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an increasingly major world health problem. This short review using the most pertinent articles on TBI caregiving problems and needs highlights the pressing issues. Articles focusing on both TBI-caregivers’ problems and needs are rarely found, especially for developing countries. Most TBI-caregiving is done by family members, whose altered lives portend burden and stresses which add to the overwhelming demand of caring for the TBI-survivor. Lack of information,...

  14. Optimizing Hemodynamic Support of Acute Spinal Cord Injury Based on Injury Mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    1991). Review of the secondary injury theory of acute spinal cord trauma with emphasis on vascular mechanisms. J. Neurosurg 75, 15-26. 2...AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0194 TITLE: Optimizing Hemodynamic Support of Acute Spinal Cord Injury Based on Injury Mechanism PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...individuals who sustain an acute spinal cord injury (SCI). Treatment options include urgent surgical decompression to relieve pressure on the spinal

  15. Traumatic brain injury in modern war

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Geoffrey S. F.; Hawley, Jason; Grimes, Jamie; Macedonia, Christian; Hancock, James; Jaffee, Michael; Dombroski, Todd; Ecklund, James M.

    2013-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is common and especially with military service. In Iraq and Afghanistan, explosive blast related TBI has become prominent and is mainly from improvised explosive devices (IED). Civilian standard of care clinical practice guidelines (CPG) were appropriate has been applied to the combat setting. When such CPGs do not exist or are not applicable, new practice standards for the military are created, as for TBI. Thus, CPGs for prehospital care of combat TBI CPG [1] and mild TBI/concussion [2] were introduced as was a DoD system-wide clinical care program, the first large scale system wide effort to address all severities of TBI in a comprehensive organized way. As TBI remains incompletely understood, substantial research is underway. For the DoD, leading this effort are The Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center, National Intrepid Center of Excellence and the Defense Centers of Excellence for Psychological Health and Traumatic Brain Injury. This program is a beginning, a work in progress ready to leverage advances made scientifically and always with the intent of providing the best care to its military beneficiaries.

  16. Misconceptions about brain injury in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maviş, Ilknur; Akyıldız, Didem

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to provide information about the knowledge and beliefs that people have regarding brain injury and to examine if the misbeliefs of adults in Turkey are similar to the misconceptions previously reported in the US and UK. Two hundred and fifty-three respondents answered questions about general brain injury knowledge, coma and unconsciousness, memory deficits and brain injury recovery in a questionnaire. Chi-square analyses revealed significant differences based on age, education and gender. Significant differences were determined between Turkish and US participants and Turkish and UK participants by Student t-test analysis. Findings were compared with those reported by previous researchers from the UK and US who administered the same questionnaire. A close examination of the survey makes it clear that the percentages for the 'general knowledge on BI' were found to be higher. Participants' levels of accurate information on coma and unconsciousness and memory deficits ranked secondly and thirdly, respectively. The recovery process paled in significance, as it did not feature very highly. The general public should be informed about the seriousness and pervasiveness of the problems related to consequences of BI before taking decisions concerning language or cognitive therapies for their victims. Healthcare professionals should take roles in advocating reliable publicity primarily by dispelling misconceptions about BI.

  17. Behavioral Outcomes Differ Between Rotational Acceleration and Blast Mechanisms of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian D. Stemper

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI can result from a number of mechanisms, including blunt impact, head rotational acceleration, exposure to blast, and penetration of projectiles. Mechanism is likely to influence the type, severity, and chronicity of outcomes. The objective of this study was to determine differences in the severity and time-course of behavioral outcomes following blast and rotational mTBI. The Medical College of Wisconsin (MCW Rotational Injury model and a shock tube model of primary blast injury were used to induce mTBI in rats and behavioral assessments were conducted within the first week, as well as 30 and 60 days following injury. Acute recovery time demonstrated similar increases over protocol-matched shams, indicating acute injury severity equivalence between the two mechanisms. Post-injury behavior in the elevated plus maze demonstrated differing trends, with rotationally injured rats acutely demonstrating greater activity, whereas blast-injured rats had decreased activity that developed at chronic time points. Similarly, blast-injured rats demonstrated trends associated with cognitive deficits that were not apparent following rotational injuries. These findings demonstrate that rotational and blast injury result in behavioral changes with different qualitative and temporal manifestations. Whereas rotational injury was characterized by a rapidly emerging phenotype consistent with behavioral disinhibition, blast injury was associated with emotional and cognitive differences that were not evident acutely, but developed later, with an anxiety-like phenotype still present in injured animals at our most chronic measurements.

  18. Emerging Therapies in Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochanek, Patrick M.; Jackson, Travis C.; Ferguson, Nikki Miller; Carlson, Shaun W.; Simon, Dennis W.; Brockman, Erik C.; Ji, Jing; Bayir, Hülya; Poloyac, Samuel M.; Wagner, Amy K.; Kline, Anthony E.; Empey, Philip E.; Clark, Robert S.B.; Jackson, Edwin K.; Dixon, C. Edward

    2015-01-01

    Despite decades of basic and clinical research, treatments to improve outcomes after traumatic brain injury (TBI) are limited. However, based on the recent recognition of the prevalence of mild TBI, and its potential link to neurodegenerative disease, many new and exciting secondary injury mechanisms have been identified and several new therapies are being evaluated targeting both classic and novel paradigms. This includes a robust increase in both preclinical and clinical investigations. Using a mechanism-based approach the authors define the targets and emerging therapies for TBI. They address putative new therapies for TBI across both the spectrum of injury severity and the continuum of care, from the field to rehabilitation. They discuss TBI therapy using 11 categories, namely, (1) excitotoxicity and neuronal death, (2) brain edema, (3) mitochondria and oxidative stress, (4) axonal injury, (5) inflammation, (6) ischemia and cerebral blood flow dysregulation, (7) cognitive enhancement, (8) augmentation of endogenous neuroprotection, (9) cellular therapies, (10) combination therapy, and (11) TBI resuscitation. The current golden age of TBI research represents a special opportunity for the development of breakthroughs in the field. PMID:25714870

  19. A Brain-Machine-Brain Interface for Rewiring of Cortical Circuitry after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    Restoration of function after brain damage using a neural prosthesis ,” Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA (PNAS), vol. 110, no. 52, pp. 21177-21182...of function after brain damage using a neural prosthesis David J. Guggenmosa,b,1, Meysam Azinc,2, Scott Barbaya,b, Jonathan D. Mahnkend, Caleb Dunhama...can be used effectively to bridge damaged neural pathways functionally and promote recovery after brain injury. brain–machine–brain interface | neural

  20. Rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury after acupuncture sessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papasotiriou, Marios; Betsi, Grigoria; Tsironi, Maria; Assimakopoulos, Georgios

    2014-05-01

    Rhabdomyolysis is usually caused by muscle injury, drugs or alcohol and presents with muscle weakness and pain. It is characterized by rise in serum creatine kinase, aminotransferases and electrolytes as well as myoglobinuria. Myoglobinuria may cause acute kidney injury by direct proximal tubule cytotoxicity, renal vasoconstriction, intraluminal cast formation and distal tubule obstruction. Muscle pain and weakness as well as vascular injury have been reported after acupuncture. We report a case of severe rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury after acupuncture sessions.

  1. Depression, anxiety and quality-of-life among relatives of patients with severe brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Anne; Welling, Karen-Lise; Qvist, Jesper

    2012-01-01

    Primary objective: To investigate the emotional well-being of relatives of patients with a severe brain injury in the acute setting, as well as risk factors associated with high anxiety and depression scores and impaired quality-of-life. Research design: Clinical convenience sample. Methods...... and procedures: Participants included 45 relatives of patients with severe brain injury recruited at a NICU. All relatives completed selected scales from the SCL-90-R and SF-36 ~ 14 days after injury. Data concerning the condition of the patient were also collected. Main outcome and results: Of the relatives, 51...

  2. Aquaporin 9 in rat brain after severe traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Liu

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To reveal the expression and possible roles of aquaporin 9 (AQP9 in rat brain, after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI. METHODS: Brain water content (BWC, tetrazolium chloride staining, Evans blue staining, immunohistochemistry (IHC, immunofluorescence (IF, western blot, and real-time polymerase chain reaction were used. RESULTS: The BWC reached the first and second (highest peaks at 6 and 72 hours, and the blood brain barrier (BBB was severely destroyed at six hours after the TBI. The worst brain ischemia occurred at 72 hours after TBI. Widespread AQP9-positive astrocytes and neurons in the hypothalamus were detected by means of IHC and IF after TBI. The abundance of AQP9 and its mRNA increased after TBI and reached two peaks at 6 and 72 hours, respectively, after TBI. CONCLUSIONS: Increased AQP9 might contribute to clearance of excess water and lactate in the early stage of TBI. Widespread AQP9-positive astrocytes might help lactate move into neurons and result in cellular brain edema in the later stage of TBI. AQP9-positive neurons suggest that AQP9 plays a role in energy balance after TBI.

  3. Back to the future: estimating pre-injury brain volume in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, David E; Ochs, Alfred L; D Zannoni, Megan; Seabaugh, Jan M

    2014-11-15

    A recent meta-analysis by Hedman et al. allows for accurate estimation of brain volume changes throughout the life span. Additionally, Tate et al. showed that intracranial volume at a later point in life can be used to estimate reliably brain volume at an earlier point in life. These advancements were combined to create a model which allowed the estimation of brain volume just prior to injury in a group of patients with mild or moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI). This volume estimation model was used in combination with actual measurements of brain volume to test hypotheses about progressive brain volume changes in the patients. Twenty six patients with mild or moderate TBI were compared to 20 normal control subjects. NeuroQuant® was used to measure brain MRI volume. Brain volume after the injury (from MRI scans performed at t1 and t2) was compared to brain volume just before the injury (volume estimation at t0) using longitudinal designs. Groups were compared with respect to volume changes in whole brain parenchyma (WBP) and its 3 major subdivisions: cortical gray matter (GM), cerebral white matter (CWM) and subcortical nuclei+infratentorial regions (SCN+IFT). Using the normal control data, the volume estimation model was tested by comparing measured brain volume to estimated brain volume; reliability ranged from good to excellent. During the initial phase after injury (t0-t1), the TBI patients had abnormally rapid atrophy of WBP and CWM, and abnormally rapid enlargement of SCN+IFT. Rates of volume change during t0-t1 correlated with cross-sectional measures of volume change at t1, supporting the internal reliability of the volume estimation model. A logistic regression analysis using the volume change data produced a function which perfectly predicted group membership (TBI patients vs. normal control subjects). During the first few months after injury, patients with mild or moderate TBI have rapid atrophy of WBP and CWM, and rapid enlargement of SCN+IFT. The

  4. Acute lung injury induces cardiovascular dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suda, Koichi; Tsuruta, Masashi; Eom, Jihyoun

    2011-01-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is associated with systemic inflammation and cardiovascular dysfunction. IL-6 is a biomarker of this systemic response and a predictor of cardiovascular events, but its possible causal role is uncertain. Inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β2 agonists (ICS/LABA) down......-regulate the systemic expression of IL-6, but whether they can ameliorate the cardiovascular dysfunction related to ALI is uncertain. We sought to determine whether IL-6 contributes to the cardiovascular dysfunction related to ALI, and whether budesonide/formoterol ameliorates this process. Wild-type mice were...... the rise in the systemic expression of IL-6 (P cardiovascular dysfunction related to LPS, and pretreatment with budesonide/formoterol reduces the systemic expression of IL-6 and improves cardiovascular dysfunction. ICS/LABA may reduce acute cardiovascular...

  5. Acute Kidney Injury: Diagnostic Approaches and Controversies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Konstantinos; Spanou, Loukia

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a significant independent risk factor for morbidity and mortality. In the last ten years a large number of publications have highlighted the limitations of traditional approaches and the inadequacies of conventional biomarkers to diagnose and monitor renal insufficiency in the acute setting. A great effort was directed not only to the discovery and validation of new biomarkers aimed to detect AKI more accurately but also to standardise the definition of AKI. Despite the advances in both areas, biomarkers have not yet entered into routine clinical practice and the definition of this syndrome has many areas of uncertainty. This review will discuss the controversies in diagnosis and the potential of novel biomarkers to improve the definition of the syndrome. PMID:28167845

  6. Acute kidney injury in the cancer patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, G Adam; Hu, Daniel; Okusa, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent and significant complication of cancer and cancer therapy. Cancer patients frequently encounter risk factors for AKI including older age, CKD, prerenal conditions, sepsis, exposure to nephrotoxins, and obstructive physiology. AKI can also be secondary to paraneoplastic conditions, including glomerulonephritis and microangiopathic processes. This complication can have significant consequences, including effects on patients' ability to continue to receive therapy for their malignancy. This review will serve to summarize potential etiologies of AKI that present in patients with cancer as well as to highlight specific patient populations, such as the critically ill cancer patient. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Acute kidney injury and residual renal function

    OpenAIRE

    Ronco, Claudio; Rosner, Mitchell H

    2012-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) occurring in patients admitted to the ICU may result in impaired renal function on long-term follow-up after ICU discharge. The damage induced by subclinical or manifest episodes of AKI may, in fact, produce an irreversible loss of a variable amount of renal mass with deleterious effects on overall renal function. This may be the case even though baseline glomerular filtration rate appears to return to normal but renal reserve is impaired. This may have an important ...

  8. Acute Management of Hemostasis in Patients With Neurological Injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baharoglu, M. Irem; Brand, Anneke; Koopman, Maria M.; Vermeulen, Marinus; Roos, Yvo B. W. E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Neurological injuries can be divided into those with traumatic and nontraumatic causes. The largest groups are traumatic brain injury (TBI) and nontraumatic stroke. TBI patients may present with intracranial hemorrhages (contusions, or subdural or epidural hematomas). Strokes are ischemic or

  9. Secondary Damage after Traumatic Brain Injury: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology and Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. Engel (Doortje Caroline)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractTraumatic brain injury (TBI) is defined as a microscopic or macroscopic injury to the brain caused by external physical forces. Road traffic accidents, falls, sports injuries (i.e. boxing), recreational accidents (i.e. parachute jumping), the use of firearms, assault, child abuse,

  10. Neonatal ischemic brain injury: what every radiologist needs to know

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badve, Chaitra A.; Khanna, Paritosh C.; Ishak, Gisele E.

    2012-01-01

    We present a pictorial review of neonatal ischemic brain injury and look at its pathophysiology, imaging features and differential diagnoses from a radiologist's perspective. The concept of perinatal stroke is defined and its distinction from hypoxic-ischemic injury is emphasized. A brief review of recent imaging advances is included and a diagnostic approach to neonatal ischemic brain injury is suggested. (orig.)

  11. Determinants of postoperative acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelha, Fernando José; Botelho, Miguela; Fernandes, Vera; Barros, Henrique

    2009-01-01

    Development of acute kidney injury (AKI) during the perioperative period is associated with increases in morbidity and mortality. Our aim was to evaluate the incidence and determinants of postoperative AKI after major noncardiac surgery in patients with previously normal renal function. This retrospective cohort study was carried out in the multidisciplinary Post-Anaesthesia Care Unit (PACU) with five intensive care beds. The study population consisted of 1166 patients with no previous renal insufficiency who were admitted to these intensive care unit (ICU) beds over 2 years. After admission patients were followed for the development of AKI, defined as proposed by The Acute Kidney Injury Network (increment of serum creatinine [greater than or equal to] 0.3 mg/dL or 50% from baseline within 48 hours or urine output 6 hours despite fluid resuscitation when applicable). Patient preoperative characteristics, intraoperative management and outcome were evaluated for associations with acute kidney injury using an univariate and multiple logistic regression model. A total of 1597 patients were admitted to the PACU and of these, 1166 met the inclusion criteria. Eighty-seven patients (7.5%) met AKI criteria. Univariate analysis identified age, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status, emergency surgery, high risk surgery, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart disease and Revised Cardiac Risk Index (RCRI) score as independent preoperative determinants for AKI in the postoperative period. Multivariate analysis identified ASA physical status, RCRI score, high risk surgery and congestive heart disease as preoperative determinants for AKI in the postoperative period. Patients that developed AKI had higher Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II, higher PACU length of stay (LOS), higher PACU mortality, higher hospital mortality and higher mortality at 6 months follow-up. AKI was an independent

  12. Patterns of neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, Linda S. de; Groenendaal, Floris

    2010-01-01

    Enormous progress has been made in assessing the neonatal brain, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this review, we will describe the use of MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in detecting different patterns of brain injury in (full-term) human neonates following hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and indicate the relevance of these findings in predicting neurodevelopmental outcome. (orig.)

  13. Patterns of neonatal hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vries, Linda S. de [University Medical Centre, Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands); Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, University Medical Centre, Department of Neonatology, KE 04.123.1, P.O. Box 85090, Utrecht (Netherlands); Groenendaal, Floris [University Medical Centre, Department of Neonatology, Wilhelmina Children' s Hospital, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-06-15

    Enormous progress has been made in assessing the neonatal brain, using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this review, we will describe the use of MRI and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in detecting different patterns of brain injury in (full-term) human neonates following hypoxic-ischaemic brain injury and indicate the relevance of these findings in predicting neurodevelopmental outcome. (orig.)

  14. Neuroimaging in adult penetrating brain injury: a guide for radiographers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Temple, Nikki; Donald, Cortny; Skora, Amanda [Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia); Reed, Warren, E-mail: warren.reed@sydney.edu.au [Medical Image Optimisation and Perception Group, Discipline of Medical Radiation Sciences, The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Penetrating brain injuries (PBI) are a medical emergency, often resulting in complex damage and high mortality rates. Neuroimaging is essential to evaluate the location and extent of injuries, and to manage them accordingly. Currently, a myriad of imaging modalities are included in the diagnostic workup for adult PBI, including skull radiography, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and angiography, with each modality providing their own particular benefits. This literature review explores the current modalities available for investigating PBI and aims to assist in decision making for the appropriate use of diagnostic imaging when presented with an adult PBI. Based on the current literature, the authors have developed an imaging pathway for adult penetrating brain injury that functions as both a learning tool and reference guide for radiographers and other health professionals. Currently, CT is recommended as the imaging modality of choice for the initial assessment of PBI patients, while MRI is important in the sub-acute setting where it aids prognosis prediction and rehabilitation planning, Additional follow-up imaging, such as angiography, should be dependent upon clinical findings.

  15. Subjective complaints after acquired brain injury: presentation of the Brain Injury Complaint Questionnaire (BICoQ).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallat-Azouvi, Claire; Paillat, Cyrille; Bercovici, Stéphanie; Morin, Bénédicte; Paquereau, Julie; Charanton, James; Ghout, Idir; Azouvi, Philippe

    2018-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to present a new complaint questionnaire designed to assess a wide range of difficulties commonly reported by patients with acquired brain injury. Patients (n =  619) had been referred to a community re-entry service at a chronic stage after brain injury, mainly traumatic brain injury (TBI). The Brain Injury Complaint Questionnaire (BICoQ) includes 25 questions in the following domains: cognition, behavior, fatigue and sleep, mood, and somatic problems. A self and a proxy questionnaire were given. An additional question was given to the relative, about the patient's awareness of his difficulties. The questionnaires had a good internal coherence, as measured with Cronbach's alpha. The most frequent complaints were, in decreasing order, mental slowness, memory troubles, fatigue, concentration difficulties, anxiety, and dual tasking problems. Principal component analysis with varimax rotation yielded six underlying factors explaining 50.5% of total variance: somatic concerns, cognition, and lack of drive, lack of control, psycholinguistic disorders, mood, and mental fatigue/slowness. About 52% of patients reported fewer complaints than their proxy, suggesting lack of awareness. The total complaint scores were not significantly correlated with any injury severity measure, but were significantly correlated with disability and poorer quality of life (Note: only factor 2 [cognition/lack of drive] was significantly related to disability.) The BICoQ is a simple scale that can be used in addition to traditional clinical and cognitive assessment measures, and to assess awareness of everyday life problems. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Role of Intravenous Levetiracetam in Seizure Prophylaxis of Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BATOOL F. KIRMANI

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI can cause seizures and the development of epilepsy. The incidence of seizures varies from 21% in patients with severe brain injuries to 50% in patients with war-related penetrating TBI. In the acute and sub-acute periods following injury, seizures can lead to increased intracranial pressure and cerebral edema, further complicating TBI management. Anticonvulsants should be used for seizure prophylaxis and treatment. Phenytoin is the most widely prescribed anticonvulsant in these patients. Intravenous levetiracetam, made available in 2006, is now being considered as an alternative to phenytoin in acute care settings. When compared with phenytoin, levetiracetam has fewer side-effects and drug-drug interactions. In the following, the role of levetiracetam in TBI care and the supporting evidence is discussed.

  17. Sleep disruption and the sequelae associated with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Smith, Kelly E; Nguyen, Linda; Turner, Ryan C; Logsdon, Aric F; Jackson, Garrett J; Huber, Jason D; Rosen, Charles L; Miller, Diane B

    2015-08-01

    Sleep disruption, which includes a loss of sleep as well as poor quality fragmented sleep, frequently follows traumatic brain injury (TBI) impacting a large number of patients each year in the United States. Fragmented and/or disrupted sleep can worsen neuropsychiatric, behavioral, and physical symptoms of TBI. Additionally, sleep disruption impairs recovery and can lead to cognitive decline. The most common sleep disruption following TBI is insomnia, which is difficulty staying asleep. The consequences of disrupted sleep following injury range from deranged metabolomics and blood brain barrier compromise to altered neuroplasticity and degeneration. There are several theories for why sleep is necessary (e.g., glymphatic clearance and metabolic regulation) and these may help explain how sleep disruption contributes to degeneration within the brain. Experimental data indicate disrupted sleep allows hyperphosphorylated tau and amyloid β plaques to accumulate. As sleep disruption may act as a cellular stressor, target areas warranting further scientific investigation include the increase in endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress following acute periods of sleep deprivation. Potential treatment options for restoring the normal sleep cycle include melatonin derivatives and cognitive behavioral therapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Human models of acute lung injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alastair G. Proudfoot

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute lung injury (ALI is a syndrome that is characterised by acute inflammation and tissue injury that affects normal gas exchange in the lungs. Hallmarks of ALI include dysfunction of the alveolar-capillary membrane resulting in increased vascular permeability, an influx of inflammatory cells into the lung and a local pro-coagulant state. Patients with ALI present with severe hypoxaemia and radiological evidence of bilateral pulmonary oedema. The syndrome has a mortality rate of approximately 35% and usually requires invasive mechanical ventilation. ALI can follow direct pulmonary insults, such as pneumonia, or occur indirectly as a result of blood-borne insults, commonly severe bacterial sepsis. Although animal models of ALI have been developed, none of them fully recapitulate the human disease. The differences between the human syndrome and the phenotype observed in animal models might, in part, explain why interventions that are successful in models have failed to translate into novel therapies. Improved animal models and the development of human in vivo and ex vivo models are therefore required. In this article, we consider the clinical features of ALI, discuss the limitations of current animal models and highlight how emerging human models of ALI might help to answer outstanding questions about this syndrome.

  19. Sodium selenate reduces hyperphosphorylated tau and improves outcomes after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shultz, Sandy R; Wright, David K; Zheng, Ping; Stuchbery, Ryan; Liu, Shi-Jie; Sashindranath, Maithili; Medcalf, Robert L; Johnston, Leigh A; Hovens, Christopher M; Jones, Nigel C; O'Brien, Terence J

    2015-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a common and serious neurodegenerative condition that lacks a pharmaceutical intervention to improve long-term outcome. Hyperphosphorylated tau is implicated in some of the consequences of traumatic brain injury and is a potential pharmacological target. Protein phosphatase 2A is a heterotrimeric protein that regulates key signalling pathways, and protein phosphatase 2A heterotrimers consisting of the PR55 B-subunit represent the major tau phosphatase in the brain. Here we investigated whether traumatic brain injury in rats and humans would induce changes in protein phosphatase 2A and phosphorylated tau, and whether treatment with sodium selenate-a potent PR55 activator-would reduce phosphorylated tau and improve traumatic brain injury outcomes in rats. Ninety young adult male Long-Evans rats were administered either a fluid percussion injury or sham-injury. A proportion of rats were killed at 2, 24, and 72 h post-injury to assess acute changes in protein phosphatase 2A and tau. Other rats were given either sodium selenate or saline-vehicle treatment that was continuously administered via subcutaneous osmotic pump for 12 weeks. Serial magnetic resonance imaging was acquired prior to, and at 1, 4, and 12 weeks post-injury to assess evolving structural brain damage and axonal injury. Behavioural impairments were assessed at 12 weeks post-injury. The results showed that traumatic brain injury in rats acutely reduced PR55 expression and protein phosphatase 2A activity, and increased the expression of phosphorylated tau and the ratio of phosphorylated tau to total tau. Similar findings were seen in post-mortem brain samples from acute human traumatic brain injury patients, although many did not reach statistical significance. Continuous sodium selenate treatment for 12 weeks after sham or fluid percussion injury in rats increased protein phosphatase 2A activity and PR55 expression, and reduced the ratio of phosphorylated tau to total tau

  20. Time dysperception perspective for acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, Federica; Piras, Fabrizio; Ciullo, Valentina; Danese, Emanuela; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2014-01-13

    Distortions of time perception are presented by a number of neuropsychiatric illnesses. Here we survey timing abilities in clinical populations with focal lesions in key brain structures recently implicated in human studies of timing. We also review timing performance in amnesic and traumatic brain injured patients in order to identify the nature of specific timing disorders in different brain damaged populations. We purposely analyzed the complex relationship between both cognitive and contextual factors involved in time estimation, as to characterize the correlation between timed and other cognitive behaviors in each group. We assume that interval timing is a solid construct to study cognitive dysfunctions following brain injury, as timing performance is a sensitive metric of information processing, while temporal cognition has the potential of influencing a wide range of cognitive processes. Moreover, temporal performance is a sensitive assay of damage to the underlying neural substrate after a brain insult. Further research in neurological and psychiatric patients will clarify whether time distortions are a manifestation of, or a mechanism for, cognitive and behavioral symptoms of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  1. MECHANISMS OF SECONDARY BRAIN DAMAGE IN COMA DEVELOPED IN ACUTE PERIOD OF ISCHEMIC STROKE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Константин Владимирович Лукашев

    2017-06-01

    Conclusions. One of the mechanisms of secondary brain damage in patients in coma in acute period of ischemic stroke is a worsening dysfunction of the brain stem followed bythe cerebral autoregulationdisturbance in the absence of a significant increase of intracranial pressure.This causes disturbances of the central hemodynamics, the mechanical and gas exchange properties,the accumulation of extravascular lung water.These processesresult in acute lung injury, itbeing a critical element in the development and progression of systemic hypoxia as a key mechanism of secondary brain damage.

  2. Hymenoptera Stings and the Acute Kidney Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashad Dongol

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Hymenoptera stings are a health concern. Apidae (bees, Vespidae (hornets, yellow jackets and wasps and Formicidae (ants are medically-important stinging insects under the order Hymenoptera. Clinical features from simple skin manifestations to severe and fatal organ injury are due to the hypersensitivity reactions and/ or the toxic effects of the venom inoculated. Here we discuss on Hymenoptera stings involving apids (honey bees and vespids (wasps, hornets and yellow jackets and their effect on renal function and associated morphological changes in the kidney. Despite the differences in venom composition and quantity released per sting in two insect groups, both lead to similar medical consequences, such as localised normal allergic reactions, mild to severe anaphylaxis and shock and multiple organ and tissue injury leading to multiple organ failure. Acute kidney injury (AKI is one of the unusual complications of Hymenoptera stings and has the basis of both immune-mediated and toxic effects. Evidence has proven that supportive therapy along with the standard medication is very efficient in completely restoring the kidney function without any recurrence.

  3. Patient Effort in Traumatic Brain Injury Inpatient Rehabilitation: Course and Associations With Age, Brain Injury Severity, and Time Postinjury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seel, Ronald T; Corrigan, John D; Dijkers, Marcel P; Barrett, Ryan S; Bogner, Jennifer; Smout, Randall J; Garmoe, William; Horn, Susan D

    2015-08-01

    To describe patients' level of effort in occupational, physical, and speech therapy sessions during traumatic brain injury (TBI) inpatient rehabilitation and to evaluate how age, injury severity, cognitive impairment, and time are associated with effort. Prospective, multicenter, longitudinal cohort study. Acute TBI rehabilitation programs. Patients (N=1946) receiving 138,555 therapy sessions. Not applicable. Effort in rehabilitation sessions rated on the Rehabilitation Intensity of Therapy Scale, FIM, Comprehensive Severity Index brain injury severity score, posttraumatic amnesia (PTA), and Agitated Behavior Scale (ABS). The Rehabilitation Intensity of Therapy Scale effort ratings in individual therapy sessions closely conformed to a normative distribution for all 3 disciplines. Mean Rehabilitation Intensity of Therapy Scale ratings for patients' therapy sessions were higher in the discharge week than in the admission week (Prehabilitation, differences in effort ratings (Prehabilitation admission, days from admission, and daily ratings of PTA and ABS score were predictors of level of effort (Prehabilitation setting using the Rehabilitation Intensity of Therapy Scale. Patients who sustain TBI show varying levels of effort in rehabilitation therapy sessions, with effort tending to increase over the stay. PTA and agitated behavior are primary risk factors that substantially reduce patient effort in therapies. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular mechanisms of cognitive dysfunction following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kendall R; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in significant disability due to cognitive deficits particularly in attention, learning and memory, and higher-order executive functions. The role of TBI in chronic neurodegeneration and the development of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and most recently chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) is of particular importance. However, despite significant effort very few therapeutic options exist to prevent or reverse cognitive impairment following TBI. In this review, we present experimental evidence of the known secondary injury mechanisms which contribute to neuronal cell loss, axonal injury, and synaptic dysfunction and hence cognitive impairment both acutely and chronically following TBI. In particular we focus on the mechanisms linking TBI to the development of two forms of dementia: AD and CTE. We provide evidence of potential molecular mechanisms involved in modulating Aβ and Tau following TBI and provide evidence of the role of these mechanisms in AD pathology. Additionally we propose a mechanism by which Aβ generated as a direct result of TBI is capable of exacerbating secondary injury mechanisms thereby establishing a neurotoxic cascade that leads to chronic neurodegeneration.

  5. Isolated traumatic brain injury and venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Gent, Jan-Michael; Bandle, Jesse; Calvo, Richard Y; Zander, Ashley L; Olson, Erik J; Shackford, Steven R; Peck, Kimberly A; Sise, C Beth; Sise, Michael J

    2014-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is considered an independent risk factor of venous thromboembolism (VTE). However, the role of TBI severity in VTE risk has not been determined. We hypothesized that increased severity of brain injury in patients with isolated TBI (iTBI) is associated with an increased incidence of VTE. The records of patients admitted from June 2006 to December 2011 were reviewed for injury data, VTE risk factors, results of lower extremity surveillance ultrasound, and severity of TBI. Patients were identified by DRG International Classification of Diseases-9th Rev. codes for TBI, and only those with a nonhead Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) score of 1 or lower, indicating minimal associated injury, were included. The association of iTBI and VTE was determined using a case-control design. Among iTBI patients, those diagnosed with VTE (cases) were matched for age, sex, and admission year to those without VTE (controls). Data were analyzed using conditional logistic regression. There were 345 iTBI patients: 41 cases (12%) and 304 controls (88%). A total of 151 controls could not be matched to an appropriate case and were excluded. Of the remaining 153 controls, 1 to 16 controls were matched to each of the 41 VTE cases. Compared with the controls, the cases had a higher mean head-AIS score (4.4 vs. 3.9, p = 0.001) and overall Injury Severity Score (20.4 vs. 16.8, p = 0.001). Following adjustment for all factors found to be associated with VTE (ventilator days, central line placement, operative time > 2 hours, chemoprophylaxis, history of VTE, and history of cancer), the cases were significantly more likely to have a greater head injury severity (head-AIS score ≥ 5; odds ratio, 5.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.59-17.30; p = 0.006). The incidence of VTE in iTBI patients was significantly associated with the severity of TBI. VTE surveillance protocols may be warranted in these high-risk patients, as early detection of VTE could guide subsequent therapy

  6. Traumatic Brain Injury: Are We Conducting Enough Resarch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-17

    FROM: 59 MDW/SGVU SUBJECT: Professional Presentation Approval 7 APR 2017 1. Your paper, entitled Traumatic Brain Injury: Are We Conducting Enough...review and approval.) NA - Pubmed searches w ere the only source of data 6. TITLE OF MATERIAL TO BE PUBLISHED OR PRESENTED: Traumatic Brain Injury...Traumatic Brain Injury: Are We Conducting Enough Research? Capt Mariya Gusman MD, Lt Col Jonathan A Sosnov MD, Jeffrey T Howard PhD Background

  7. Obesity, Acute Kidney Injury, and Mortality in Critical Illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danziger, John; Chen, Ken P; Lee, Joon; Feng, Mengling; Mark, Roger G; Celi, Leo Anthony; Mukamal, Kenneth J

    2016-02-01

    Although obesity is associated with risk for chronic kidney disease and improved survival, less is known about the associations of obesity with risk of acute kidney injury and post acute kidney injury mortality. In a single-center inception cohort of almost 15,000 critically ill patients, we evaluated the association of obesity with acute kidney injury and acute kidney injury severity, as well as in-hospital and 1-year survival. Acute kidney injury was defined using the Kidney Disease Outcome Quality Initiative criteria. The acute kidney injury prevalence rates for normal, overweight, class I, II, and III obesity were 18.6%, 20.6%, 22.5%, 24.3%, and 24.0%, respectively, and the adjusted odds ratios of acute kidney injury were 1.18 (95% CI, 1.06-1.31), 1.35 (1.19-1.53), 1.47 (1.25-1.73), and 1.59 (1.31-1.87) when compared with normal weight, respectively. Each 5-kg/m² increase in body mass index was associated with a 10% risk (95% CI, 1.06-1.24; p Obesity is a risk factor for acute kidney injury, which is associated with increased short- and long-term mortality.

  8. Biomarkers of renal recovery after acute kidney injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaião, Sérgio Mina; Paiva, José Artur Osório de Carvalho

    2017-01-01

    Novel biomarkers can be suitable for early acute kidney injury diagnosis and the prediction of the need for dialysis. It remains unclear whether such biomarkers may also play a role in the prediction of recovery after established acute kidney injury or in aiding the decision of when to stop renal support therapy. PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar were searched for studies that reported on the epidemiology of renal recovery after acute kidney injury, the risk factors of recovery versus non-recovery after acute kidney injury, and potential biomarkers of acute kidney injury recovery. The reference lists of these articles and relevant review articles were also reviewed. Final references were selected for inclusion in the review based on their relevance. New biomarkers exhibited a potential role in the early diagnosis of acute kidney injury recovery. Urine HGF, IGFBP-7, TIMP-2 and NGAL may improve our ability to predict the odds and timing of recovery and eventually renal support withdrawal. Acute kidney injury recovery requires more study, and its definition needs to be standardized to allow for better and more powerful research on biomarkers because some of them show potential for the prediction of acute kidney injury recovery. PMID:29044306

  9. Outcome of pregnancy related acute kidney injury requiring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Outcome of pregnancy related acute kidney injury requiring haemodialysis in a Nigerian teaching hospital. ... Two patients died, one patient regained normal renal function and another had partial recovery of renal function. The remaining 4 (50%) ... Keywords: Acute Kidney Injury, Pregnancy, Haemodialysis, Renal Outcome ...

  10. Autophagy in proximal tubules protects against acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Man; Wei, Qingqing; Dong, Guie; Komatsu, Masaaki; Su, Yunchao; Dong, Zheng

    2012-12-01

    Autophagy is induced in renal tubular cells during acute kidney injury; however, whether this is protective or injurious remains controversial. We address this question by pharmacologic and genetic blockade of autophagy using mouse models of cisplatin- and ischemia-reperfusion-induced acute kidney injury. Chloroquine, a pharmacological inhibitor of autophagy, blocked autophagic flux and enhanced acute kidney injury in both models. Rapamycin, however, activated autophagy and protected against cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury. We also established a renal proximal tubule-specific autophagy-related gene 7-knockout mouse model shown to be defective in both basal and cisplatin-induced autophagy in kidneys. Compared with wild-type littermates, these knockout mice were markedly more sensitive to cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury as indicated by renal functional loss, tissue damage, and apoptosis. Mechanistically, these knockout mice had heightened activation of p53 and c-Jun N terminal kinase, the signaling pathways contributing to cisplatin acute kidney injury. Proximal tubular cells isolated from the knockout mice were more sensitive to cisplatin-induced apoptosis than cells from wild-type mice. In addition, the knockout mice were more sensitive to renal ischemia-reperfusion injury than their wild-type littermates. Thus, our results establish a renoprotective role of tubular cell autophagy in acute kidney injury where it may interfere with cell killing mechanisms.

  11. Hypersexuality or altered sexual preference following brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, B L; Cummings, J L; McIntyre, H; Ebers, G; Grode, M

    1986-01-01

    Eight patients are described in whom either hypersexuality (four cases) or change in sexual preference (four cases) occurred following brain injury. In this series disinhibition of sexual activity and hypersexuality followed medial basal-frontal or diencephalic injury. This contrasted with the patients demonstrating altered sexual preference whose injuries involved limbic system structures. In some patients altered sexual behaviour may be the presenting or dominant feature of brain injury. Images PMID:3746322

  12. Hypersexuality or altered sexual preference following brain injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, B L; Cummings, J L; McIntyre, H; Ebers, G; Grode, M

    1986-01-01

    Eight patients are described in whom either hypersexuality (four cases) or change in sexual preference (four cases) occurred following brain injury. In this series disinhibition of sexual activity and hypersexuality followed medial basal-frontal or diencephalic injury. This contrasted with the patients demonstrating altered sexual preference whose injuries involved limbic system structures. In some patients altered sexual behaviour may be the presenting or dominant feature of brain injury.

  13. 4: Rehabilitation after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Fary; Baguley, Ian J; Cameron, Ian D

    2003-03-17

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) commonly affects younger people and causes life-long impairments in physical, cognitive, behavioural and social function. The cognitive, behavioural and personality deficits are usually more disabling than the residual physical deficits. Recovery from TBI can continue for at least 5 years after injury. Rehabilitation is effective using an interdisciplinary approach, and close liaison with the patient, family and carers. The focus is on issues such as retraining in activities of daily living, pain management, cognitive and behavioural therapies, and pharmacological management. The social burden of TBI is significant, and therefore family education and counselling, and support of patient and carers, is important. General practitioners play an important role in providing ongoing support in the community, monitoring for medical complications, behavioural and personality issues, social reintegration, carer coping skills and return-to-work issues.

  14. Fear of falling after brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collicutt McGrath, Joanna

    2008-07-01

    To investigate the prevalence and nature of fear of falling in a sample of people with severe acquired brain injury. A descriptive study. A regional inpatient neurological rehabilitation unit. One hundred and five adults with acquired brain injury of mixed aetiology. All 105 participants were rated by observers who were asked to judge the degree to which fear behaviour interfered with rehabilitation therapy (activity limitation). Eighty-two participants also rated themselves. They were asked to report the degree of distress caused by fear. Both participants and observers were asked to describe the focus of any reported fear. Two stepwise logistic regression analyses were carried out to identify variables that predicted fear giving rise to significant activity limitation and fear giving rise to significant subjective distress. Self and observer rating scales designed and constructed specifically for the study. Raters reported significant fear-related activity limitation in 12-15% of participants. Significant fear-related subjective distress was reported by 40% of participants. Fear of falling, fear of physical harm and fear of not making sufficient rehabilitation progress dominated the reports of both observers and participants. The variables predicting significant activity limitation were premorbid alcohol misuse, low functional ability and the occurrence of a fall since onset. The variables predicting significant subjective distress were poor motor coordination and organization, and good verbal comprehension. Fear of falling is a clinically significant phenomenon in younger adults recovering from severe acquired brain injury. Fear sufficient to cause high degrees of subjective distress was often not evident to observers. Proactive questioning about fear of falling is therefore advisable when working clinically with this group.

  15. Lymphocytes Contribute to the Pathophysiology of Neonatal Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshed Nazmi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundPeriventricular leukomalacia (PVL is the most common form of preterm brain injury affecting the cerebral white matter. This type of injury involves a multiphase process and is induced by many factors, including hypoxia–ischemia (HI and infection. Previous studies have suggested that lymphocytes play a significant role in the pathogenesis of brain injury, and the aim of this study was to determine the contribution of lymphocyte subsets to preterm brain injury.MethodsImmunohistochemistry on brain sections from neonatal mice was performed to evaluate the extent of brain injury in wild-type and T cell and B cell-deficient neonatal mice (Rag1−/− mice using a mouse model of HI-induced preterm brain injury. Flow cytometry was performed to determine the presence of different types of immune cells in mouse brains following HI. In addition, immunostaining for CD3 T cells and CD20 B cells was performed on postmortem preterm human infant brains with PVL.ResultsMature lymphocyte-deficient Rag1−/− mice showed protection from white matter loss compared to wild type mice as indicated by myelin basic protein immunostaining of mouse brains. CD3+ T cells and CD20+ B cells were observed in the postmortem preterm infant brains with PVL. Flow cytometry analysis of mouse brains after HI-induced injury showed increased frequency of CD3+ T, αβT and B cells at 7 days after HI in the ipsilateral (injured hemisphere compared to the contralateral (control, uninjured hemisphere.ConclusionLymphocytes were found in the injured brain after injury in both mice and humans, and lack of mature lymphocytes protected neonatal mice from HI-induced brain white matter injury. This finding provides insight into the pathology of perinatal brain injury and suggests new avenues for the development of therapeutic strategies.

  16. Increased vagal tone accounts for the observed immune paralysis in patients with traumatic brain injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kox, M.; Pompe, J.C.; Pickkers, P.; Hoedemaekers, C.W.E.; Vugt, A.B. van; Hoeven, J.G. van der

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability, especially in the younger population. In the acute phase after TBI, patients are more vulnerable to infection, associated with a decreased immune response in vitro. The cause of this immune paralysis is poorly understood. Apart

  17. Increased Intracranial Pressure during Hemodialysis in a Patient with Anoxic Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anton; Damholt, Mette B; Strange, Ditte G

    2017-01-01

    (CRRT) was initiated due to acute kidney injury, during which the patient developed severe intracranial hypertension. CT of the brain showed diffuse cerebral edema. CRRT was discontinued, sedation was increased, and hypertonic saline was administered, upon which ICP normalized. Due to persistent...

  18. Gabapentin in the management of dysautonomia following severe traumatic brain injury: a case series

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baguley, Ian J; Heriseanu, Roxana E; Gurka, Joseph A

    2007-01-01

    The pharmacological management of dysautonomia, otherwise known as autonomic storms, following acute neurological insults, is problematic and remains poorly researched. This paper presents six subjects with dysautonomia following extremely severe traumatic brain injury where gabapentin controlled...... stimuli may represent a better option for dysautonomia management than drugs which increase inhibition of efferent pathways. Potential mechanisms for these effects are discussed....

  19. New Methods of Low-Field Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Application to Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-15

    by up to an hour. Subdural hemorrhage (or hematoma ) is a form of traumatic brain injury, in which blood gathers between the dura and arachnoid mater...immediate, “point-of-care” detection and diagnosis of acute intracranial pathology which can be critical in patient management. For exam- ple, the

  20. Performance of Serum Creatinine and Kidney Injury Biomarkers for Diagnosing Histologic Acute Tubular Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moledina, Dennis G; Hall, Isaac E; Thiessen-Philbrook, Heather; Reese, Peter P; Weng, Francis L; Schröppel, Bernd; Doshi, Mona D; Wilson, F Perry; Coca, Steven G; Parikh, Chirag R

    2017-12-01

    The diagnosis of acute kidney injury (AKI), which is currently defined as an increase in serum creatinine (Scr) concentration, provides little information on the condition's actual cause. To improve phenotyping of AKI, many urinary biomarkers of tubular injury are being investigated. Because AKI cases are not frequently biopsied, the diagnostic accuracy of concentrations of Scr and urinary biomarkers for histologic acute tubular injury is unknown. Cross-sectional analysis from multicenter prospective cohort. Hospitalized deceased kidney donors on whom kidney biopsies were performed at the time of organ procurement for histologic evaluation. (1) AKI diagnosed by change in Scr concentration during donor hospitalization and (2) concentrations of urinary biomarkers (neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin [NGAL], liver-type fatty acid-binding protein [L-FABP], interleukin 18 [IL-18], and kidney injury molecule 1 [KIM-1]) measured at organ procurement. Histologic acute tubular injury. Of 581 donors, 98 (17%) had mild acute tubular injury and 57 (10%) had severe acute tubular injury. Overall, Scr-based AKI had poor diagnostic performance for identifying histologic acute tubular injury and 49% of donors with severe acute tubular injury did not have AKI. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) of change in Scr concentration for diagnosing severe acute tubular injury was 0.58 (95% CI, 0.49-0.67) and for any acute tubular injury was 0.52 (95% CI, 0.45-0.58). Compared with Scr concentration, NGAL concentration demonstrated higher AUROC for diagnosing both severe acute tubular injury (0.67; 95% CI, 0.60-0.74; P=0.03) and any acute tubular injury (0.60; 95% CI, 0.55-0.66; P=0.005). In donors who did not have Scr-based AKI, NGAL concentrations were higher with increasing severities of acute tubular injury (subclinical AKI). However, compared with Scr concentration, AUROCs for acute tubular injury diagnosis were not significantly higher for urinary L

  1. [Injuries to the upper cervical medulla in severe brain injuries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woischneck, D; Kapapa, T; Grimm, C; Skalej, M; Schmitz, B; Blumstein, N; Firsching, R

    2011-10-01

    Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed in 250 patients who had been unconscious post-trauma for at least 24 hours. The frequency and the characteristics of injuries to the upper cervical myelon were determined. Between 1996 and 2009, MRI was carried out within 8 days of trauma. No lesions of the upper cervical medulla were found without accompanying damage to the medulla oblongata. Two groups were found to have a lesion in the upper cervical myelon. (i) In 3.2 % of the patients in a state of deep coma MRI revealed lesions in the entire brain stem. These died without waking from coma. (ii) 2 % of the patients were found to have additional damage to the distal medulla oblongata. These victims of high-speed traumas awoke from coma after 2-3 days. They revealed frontal contusions of the brain and traumatic subarachnoidal hemorrhages. Injuries to the bony upper cervical spine and/or the skull base were frequent. Four of them died, one patient survived with severe disabilities. Two types of lesions involving the upper cervical myelon could be differentiated, both of which occur only in association with lesions in the medulla oblongata. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Integrative Medicine in Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, David F; Hudak, Anne M; Robbins, William

    2017-05-01

    Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is a group of diverse medical and health care systems, practices, and products that are not presently considered to be a part of conventional medicine. Integrative medicine combines treatment with conventional medical practices and elements of CAM in which there is strong evidence in efficacy and safety. Although there is growing interest in the integrative medical approach in treating the patient population with traumatic brain injury, there is a paucity in high-quality clinical trials supporting its use. This article reviews the background and current clinical data concerning some of the more common CAM interventions. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Cannabinoids: Well-Suited Candidates for the Treatment of Perinatal Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Martínez-Orgado

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Perinatal brain injury can be induced by a number of different damaging events occurring during or shortly after birth, including neonatal asphyxia, neonatal hypoxia-ischemia and stroke-induced focal ischemia. Typical manifestations of these conditions are the presence of glutamate excitoxicity, neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, the combination of which can potentially result in apoptotic-necrotic cell death, generation of brain lesions and long-lasting functional impairment. In spite of the high incidence of perinatal brain injury, the number of clinical interventions available for the treatment of the affected newborn babies is extremely limited. Hence, there is a dramatic need to develop new effective therapies aimed to prevent acute brain damage and enhance the endogenous mechanisms of long-term brain repair. The endocannabinoid system is an endogenous neuromodulatory system involved in the control of multiple central and peripheral functions. An early responder to neuronal injury, the endocannabinoid system has been described as an endogenous neuroprotective system that once activated can prevent glutamate excitotoxicity, intracellular calcium accumulation, activation of cell death pathways, microglia activation, neurovascular reactivity and infiltration of circulating leukocytes across the blood-brain barrier. The modulation of the endocannabinoid system has proven to be an effective neuroprotective strategy to prevent and reduce neonatal brain injury in different animal models and species. Also, the beneficial role of the endocannabinoid system on the control of the endogenous repairing responses (neurogenesis and white matter restoration to neonatal brain injury has been described in independent studies. This review addresses the particular effects of several drugs that modulate the activity of the endocannabinoid system on the progression of different manifestations of perinatal brain injury during both the acute and chronic

  4. A case of acute kidney injury by near-drowning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirah Amir

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury following immersion or near-drowning is rarely described and no data from Malaysia have been found. We report a case of acute kidney injury following a near-drowning event. A 20-yearold man who recovered from near-drowning in a swimming pool 5 days earlier presented to our clinic with abdominal pain, anorexia, nausea and polyuria. Dipstick urinalysis showed a trace of blood. The serum creatinine level was 10-fold higher than the normal range. A bedside ultrasound showed features suggestive of acute tubular necrosis. He is then referred to the hospital with the diagnosis of acute kidney injury with the possibility of acute tubular necrosis secondary to near-drowning. We suggest that any patient presenting after immersion or near-drowning to be should assessed for potential acute kidney injury

  5. A case of acute kidney injury by near-drowning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, A; Lee, Y L

    2013-01-01

    Acute kidney injury following immersion or near-drowning is rarely described and no data from Malaysia have been found. We report a case of acute kidney injury following a near-drowning event. A 20-year-old man who recovered from near-drowning in a swimming pool 5 days earlier presented to our clinic with abdominal pain, anorexia, nausea and polyuria. Dipstick urinalysis showed a trace of blood. The serum creatinine level was 10-fold higher than the normal range. A bedside ultrasound showed features suggestive of acute tubular necrosis. He is then referred to the hospital with the diagnosis of acute kidney injury with the possibility of acute tubular necrosis secondary to near-drowning. We suggest that any patient presenting after immersion or near-drowning to be should assessed for potential acute kidney injury.

  6. Family needs in the chronic phase after severe brain injury in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doser, Karoline; Norup, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective: This preliminary study aimed at investigating (1) changes in the status of family members between time of injury and follow-up in the chronic phase and (2) the most important needs within the family in the chronic phase and whether the needs were perceived as met. Participants......: The sample comprised 42 relatives (76% female, mean age = 53 years) of patients with severe brain injury, who had received intensive sub-acute rehabilitation. The relatives were contacted in the chronic phase after brain injury. Outcome measure: A set of questions about demographics and time spent caregiving...... for the patient was completed. The relatives completed the revised version of the Family Needs Questionnaire, a questionnaire consisting of 37 items related to different needs following brain injury. Results: Significant changes in status were found in employment (z = -3.464, p = 0.001) and co-habitation (z = -3...

  7. Symptomatic heterotopic ossification after very severe traumatic brain injury in 114 patients: incidence and risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Louise Lau; Sonne-Holm, Stig; Krasheninnikoff, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The incidence of heterotopic ossification (HO) among patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) varies in the literature from 11 to 73.3%. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of HO among patients with very severe TBI treated in a new established intensive rehabilitation Brain...... as well as data about trauma severity and hospital stay of these patients have been registered prospectively in a database (Danish National Head Injury database) at the Brain Injury Unit where the sub acute rehabilitation took place. The present study was based retrospectively on this database, combined...... with X-rays obtained for symptoms of HO and/or as fracture control. Clinically significant HO was found in 7.9% of the patients. Logistic regression showed an independent significant positive correlation between HO, the female gender and a high Injury Severity Score. The low incidence of HO might...

  8. Understanding acute ankle ligamentous sprain injury in sports

    OpenAIRE

    Fong, Daniel TP; Chan, Yue-Yan; Mok, Kam-Ming; Yung, Patrick SH; Chan, Kai-Ming

    2009-01-01

    Abstract This paper summarizes the current understanding on acute ankle sprain injury, which is the most common acute sport trauma, accounting for about 14% of all sport-related injuries. Among, 80% are ligamentous sprains caused by explosive inversion or supination. The injury motion often happens at the subtalar joint and tears the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL) which possesses the lowest ultimate load among the lateral ligaments at the ankle. For extrinsic risk factors to ankle sprai...

  9. Traumatic Brain Injury in the Workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paci, Michael; Infante-Rivard, Claire; Marcoux, Judith

    2017-09-01

    Work-related traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) are not well documented in the literature. Published studies mostly rely on worker databases that fail to provide clinically relevant information. Our objective is to describe the characteristics of hospitalized patients and their work-related TBI. We used the Québec provincial trauma and TBI program databases to identify all patients with a diagnosis of work-related TBI admitted to the Montreal General Hospital, a level 1 trauma center, between 2000 and 2014. Data from their medical records were extracted using a predetermined information sheet. Simple descriptive statistics (means and percentages) were used to summarize the data. A total of 285 cases were analyzed. Workplace TBI patients were middle-aged (mean, 43.62 years), overwhelmingly male (male:female 18:1), mostly healthy, and had completed a high school level education. Most workers were from the construction industry; falling was the most common mechanism of injury. The majority of patients (76.8%) presented with a mild TBI; only a minority (14%) required neurosurgery. The most common finding on computed tomography was skull fracture. The median length of hospitalization was 7 days, after which most patients were discharged directly home. A total of 8.1% died of their injuries. Our study found that most hospitalized victims of work-related TBI had mild injury; however, some required neurosurgical intervention and a non-negligible proportion died of their injury. Improving fall prevention, accurately document helmet use and increasing the safety practice in the construction industry may help decrease work-related TBI burden.

  10. Predictive and associated factors of psychiatric disorders after traumatic brain injury: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Kate Rachel; Ponsford, Jennie Louise; Johnston, Lisa; Schönberger, Michael

    2011-07-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common and often debilitating following traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, there is little consensus within the literature regarding the risk factors for post-injury psychiatric disorders. A 1-year prospective study was conducted to examine which pre-injury, injury-related, and concurrent factors were associated with experiencing a psychiatric disorder, diagnosed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders, at 1 year post-injury. Participants were 122 adults with TBI and 88 proxy informants. Psychiatric disorders were common both pre-injury (54.1%) and at 12 months post-injury (45.9%). Results of regression analyses indicated individuals without a pre-injury psychiatric disorder or psychiatric symptomatology in the acute post-injury period were less likely to have a psychiatric disorder at 12 months post-injury. These findings confirm the importance of pre-injury history for the prediction of post-injury psychiatric disorders. Limb injury also emerged as a useful early indicator of later psychiatric disorder. Post-injury psychiatric disorders were associated with concurrent unemployment, pain, poor quality of life, and use of unproductive coping skills. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  11. Fluid management in acute kidney injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perner, Anders; Prowle, John; Joannidis, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) and fluids are closely linked through oliguria, which is a marker of the former and a trigger for administration of the latter. Recent progress in this field has challenged the physiological and clinical rational of using oliguria as a trigger for the administration...... of fluid and brought attention to the delicate balance between benefits and harms of different aspects of fluid management in critically ill patients, in particular those with AKI. This narrative review addresses various aspects of fluid management in AKI outlining physiological aspects, the effects...... of crystalloids and colloids on kidney function and the effect of various resuscitation and de-resuscitation strategies on the course and outcome of AKI....

  12. Ischemic preconditioning protects against ischemic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-meng Ma

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we hypothesized that an increase in integrin αv ß 3 and its co-activator vascular endothelial growth factor play important neuroprotective roles in ischemic injury. We performed ischemic preconditioning with bilateral common carotid artery occlusion for 5 minutes in C57BL/6J mice. This was followed by ischemic injury with bilateral common carotid artery occlusion for 30 minutes. The time interval between ischemic preconditioning and lethal ischemia was 48 hours. Histopathological analysis showed that ischemic preconditioning substantially diminished damage to neurons in the hippocampus 7 days after ischemia. Evans Blue dye assay showed that ischemic preconditioning reduced damage to the blood-brain barrier 24 hours after ischemia. This demonstrates the neuroprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning. Western blot assay revealed a significant reduction in protein levels of integrin αv ß 3, vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptor in mice given ischemic preconditioning compared with mice not given ischemic preconditioning 24 hours after ischemia. These findings suggest that the neuroprotective effect of ischemic preconditioning is associated with lower integrin αv ß 3 and vascular endothelial growth factor levels in the brain following ischemia.

  13. MRI of radiation injury to the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curnes, J.T.; Laster, D.W.; Ball, M.R.; Moody, D.M.; Witcofski, R.L.

    1986-01-01

    Nine patients with a history of radiation of 2400-6000 rad (24-60 Gy) to the brain were examined by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT). MRI demonstrated abnormalities in the periventricular white matter in all patients. The abnormal periventricular signal was characterized by a long T2 and was demonstrated best on coronal spin-echo (SE) 1000/80 images. A characteristic scalloped appearance at the junction of the gray-white matter was seen on MR images of seven patients, and represented extensive white-matter damage involving the more peripheral arcuate fiber systems. This differs from transependymal absorption, which is seen best on SE 3000/80 images and has a smooth peripheral margin. Cranial CT demonstrated white-matter lucencies in six cases but generally failed to display the extent of white-matter injury demonstrated by MRI. MRI is uniquely suited to detect radiation injury to the brain because of its extreme sensitivity to white-matter edema

  14. Neuropsychological rehabilitation for traumatic brain injury patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Chantsoulis

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this review is to discuss the basic forms of neuropsychological rehabilitation for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI. More broadly, we discussed cognitive rehabilitation therapy (CRT which constitutes a fundamental component in therapeutic interaction at many centres worldwide. Equally presented is a comprehensive model of rehabilitation, the fundamental component of which is CRT. It should be noted that the principles of this approach first arose in Poland in the 1970s, in other words, several decades before their appearance in other programmemes. Taken into consideration are four factors conditioning the effectiveness of such a process: comprehensiveness, earlier interaction, universality and its individualized character. A comprehensive programmeme of rehabilitation covers: cognitive rehabilitation, individual and group rehabilitation with the application of a therapeutic environment, specialist vocational rehabilitation, as well as family psychotherapy. These training programmemes are conducted within the scope of the ‘Academy of Life,’ which provides support for the patients in their efforts and shows them the means by which they can overcome existing difficulties. Equally emphasized is the close cooperation of the whole team of specialists, as well as the active participation of the family as an essential condition for the effectiveness of rehabilitation and, in effect, a return of the patient to a relatively normal life. Also presented are newly developing neurothechnologies and the neuromarkers of brain injuries. This enables a correct diagnosis to be made and, as a result, the selection of appropriate methods for neuropsychological rehabilitation, including neurotherapy.

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury: Caregivers’ Problems and Needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    syed tajjudin syed hassan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI is an increasingly major world health problem. This short review using the most pertinent articles on TBI caregiving problems and needs highlights the pressing issues. Articles focusing on both TBI-caregivers’ problems and needs are rarely found, especially for developing countries. Most TBI-caregiving is done by family members, whose altered lives portend burden and stresses which add to the overwhelming demand of caring for the TBI-survivor. Lack of information, fi nancial inadequacy, anxiety, distress, coping defi cits, poor adaptability, inadequate knowledge and skills, and a poor support system comprise the major problems. Dysfunctional communication between caregivers and care-receivers has been little researched. The major needs are focused on health and rehabilitation information, fi nancial advice and assistance, emotional and social support, and positive psychological encouragement. In time, health information needs may be met, but not emotional support. Information on TBI caregiving problems and unmet needs is critical to all relevant healthcare stakeholders. Keywords: caregivers, rehabilitation, traumatic brain injury

  16. Psychiatric disorders and traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Schwarzbold

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Marcelo Schwarzbold1, Alexandre Diaz1, Evandro Tostes Martins2, Armanda Rufino1, Lúcia Nazareth Amante1,3, Maria Emília Thais1, João Quevedo4, Alexandre Hohl1, Marcelo Neves Linhares1,5,6, Roger Walz1,61Núcleo de Pesquisas em Neurologia Clínica e Experimental (NUPNEC, Departamento de Clínica Médica, Hospital Universitário, UFSC, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 2Unidade de Terapia Intensiva, Hospital Governador Celso Ramos, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 3Departamento de Enfermagem, UFSC, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 4Laboratório de Neurociências, UNESC, Criciúma, SC, Brazil; 5Departamento de Cirurgia, Hospital Universitário, UFSC, Florianópolis, SC, Brazil; 6Centro de Cirurgia de Epilepsia de Santa Catarina (CEPESC, Hospital Governador Celso Ramos, Florianópolis, SC, BrazilAbstract: Psychiatric disorders after traumatic brain injury (TBI are frequent. Researches in this area are important for the patients’ care and they may provide hints for the comprehension of primary psychiatric disorders. Here we approach epidemiology, diagnosis, associated factors and treatment of the main psychiatric disorders after TBI. Finally, the present situation of the knowledge in this field is discussed.Keywords: psychiatric disorders, traumatic brain injury, neuropsychiatry, diagnostic, epidemiology, pathophysiology

  17. Dialysis Requiring Acute Kidney Injury in Acute Cerebrovascular Accident Hospitalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadkarni, Girish N; Patel, Achint A; Konstantinidis, Ioannis; Mahajan, Abhimanyu; Agarwal, Shiv Kumar; Kamat, Sunil; Annapureddy, Narender; Benjo, Alexandre; Thakar, Charuhas V

    2015-11-01

    The epidemiology of dialysis requiring acute kidney injury (AKI-D) in acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) admissions is poorly understood with previous studies being from a single center or year. We used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample to evaluate the yearly incidence trends of AKI-D in hospitalizations with AIS and ICH from 2002 to 2011. We also evaluated the trend of impact of AKI-D on in-hospital mortality and adverse discharge using adjusted odds ratios (aOR) after adjusting for demographics and comorbidity indices. We extracted a total of 3,937,928 and 696,754 hospitalizations with AIS and ICH, respectively. AKI-D occurred in 1.5 and 3.5 per 1000 in AIS and ICH admissions, respectively. Incidence of admissions complicated by AKI-D doubled from 0.9/1000 to 1.7/1000 in AIS and from 2.1/1000 to 4.3/1000 in ICH admissions. In AIS admissions, AKI-D was associated with 30% higher odds of mortality (aOR, 1.30; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-1.48; Paccident continues to grow and is associated with increased mortality and adverse discharge. This highlights the need for early diagnosis, better risk stratification, and preparedness for need for complex long-term care in this vulnerable population. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Ethics of neuroimaging after serious brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijer, Charles; Peterson, Andrew; Webster, Fiona; Graham, Mackenzie; Cruse, Damian; Fernández-Espejo, Davinia; Gofton, Teneille; Gonzalez-Lara, Laura E; Lazosky, Andrea; Naci, Lorina; Norton, Loretta; Speechley, Kathy; Young, Bryan; Owen, Adrian M

    2014-05-20

    Patient outcome after serious brain injury is highly variable. Following a period of coma, some patients recover while others progress into a vegetative state (unresponsive wakefulness syndrome) or minimally conscious state. In both cases, assessment is difficult and misdiagnosis may be as high as 43%. Recent advances in neuroimaging suggest a solution. Both functional magnetic resonance imaging and electroencephalography have been used to detect residual cognitive function in vegetative and minimally conscious patients. Neuroimaging may improve diagnosis and prognostication. These techniques are beginning to be applied to comatose patients soon after injury. Evidence of preserved cognitive function may predict recovery, and this information would help families and health providers. Complex ethical issues arise due to the vulnerability of patients and families, difficulties interpreting negative results, restriction of communication to "yes" or "no" answers, and cost. We seek to investigate ethical issues in the use of neuroimaging in behaviorally nonresponsive patients who have suffered serious brain injury. The objectives of this research are to: (1) create an approach to capacity assessment using neuroimaging; (2) develop an ethics of welfare framework to guide considerations of quality of life; (3) explore the impact of neuroimaging on families; and, (4) analyze the ethics of the use of neuroimaging in comatose patients. Our research program encompasses four projects and uses a mixed methods approach. Project 1 asks whether decision making capacity can be assessed in behaviorally nonresponsive patients. We will specify cognitive functions required for capacity and detail their assessment. Further, we will develop and pilot a series of scenarios and questions suitable for assessing capacity. Project 2 examines the ethics of welfare as a guide for neuroimaging. It grounds an obligation to explore patients' interests, and we explore conceptual issues in the

  19. Chronic traumatic encephalopathy-integration of canonical traumatic brain injury secondary injury mechanisms with tau pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulbe, Jacqueline R; Hall, Edward D

    2017-11-01

    In recent years, a new neurodegenerative tauopathy labeled Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), has been identified that is believed to be primarily a sequela of repeated mild traumatic brain injury (TBI), often referred to as concussion, that occurs in athletes participating in contact sports (e.g. boxing, American football, Australian football, rugby, soccer, ice hockey) or in military combatants, especially after blast-induced injuries. Since the identification of CTE, and its neuropathological finding of deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau protein, mechanistic attention has been on lumping the disorder together with various other non-traumatic neurodegenerative tauopathies. Indeed, brains from suspected CTE cases that have come to autopsy have been confirmed to have deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau in locations that make its anatomical distribution distinct for other tauopathies. The fact that these individuals experienced repetitive TBI episodes during their athletic or military careers suggests that the secondary injury mechanisms that have been extensively characterized in acute TBI preclinical models, and in TBI patients, including glutamate excitotoxicity, intracellular calcium overload, mitochondrial dysfunction, free radical-induced oxidative damage and neuroinflammation, may contribute to the brain damage associated with CTE. Thus, the current review begins with an in depth analysis of what is known about the tau protein and its functions and dysfunctions followed by a discussion of the major TBI secondary injury mechanisms, and how the latter have been shown to contribute to tau pathology. The value of this review is that it might lead to improved neuroprotective strategies for either prophylactically attenuating the development of CTE or slowing its progression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Early endocrine alterations reflect prolonged stress and relate to one year functional outcome in patients with severe brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marina, Djordje; Klose, Marianne; Nordenbo, Annette

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Severe brain injury poses a risk of developing acute and chronic hypopituitarism. Pituitary hormone alterations developed in the early recovery phase after brain injury may have implications for long-term functional recovery. The objective was to assess the pattern and prevalence...... of pituitary hormone alterations three months after severe brain injury with relation to functional outcome at one year follow-up. DESIGN: Prospective study at a tertiary university referral centre. METHODS: A total of 163 patients admitted to neurorehabilitation after severe traumatic (N=111) or non......-traumatic (N=52) brain injury were included. Main outcome measures were endocrine alterations 3.3 months (median) after the brain injury and their relationship to functioning and ability of the patients at one year follow-up, as measured by Functional Independence Measure and Glasgow Outcome Scale...

  1. Hematological parameters after acute radiation injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirashima, Kunitake

    1989-01-01

    According to clinical experiences of radiation accidents during the past two decades, utilization of measured hematologic changes as a direcrt indicator of the severity of radiation injury provides important information for diagnosis and prognostic evaluation in individual cases. Hematologic changes can be described in terms of prognostic categories based on the possible outcome of the acute radiation syndrome. The five categories suggested by Wald according to the grade of severity. By the actual application of this category to our experience of the 1971 Chiba accident of exposure to irridium 192, it was proved that the estimated dose was well correlated to the value by cytogenetic analysis and physical estimation used of thermo-luminescence phenomena. In hematological parameters, a decrease of lymphocytes occurs whithin 24 hours after the exposure. The level of this early lymphopenia is regarded as one of the best indicators of severity of radiation injury. For the decision of therapeutic procedures, however, the total granulocyte count and platelet count are more valuable to exclude severe infection and bleeding symptoms occurred one month after the exposure. The limitation of the approach by hematologic data must exist in the case exposed in a non-uniform fashion. To overwhelm this difficulty, the application of rapid marrow scanning by short-lived RI such as 52 Fe is expected and the bone marrow imaging by magnetic resonance studies is more exciting. For more sensitive and technically easy-drived methods detecting hematologic injury, our new method of detecting micro-nucleus in polychromatic erythroblasts from cultured erythroid colonies from peripheral blood is now developing. Preliminary data have shown the sensitivity of this method is comparable to the cytogenetic study of pheripheral lymphocytes. (author)

  2. Renal recovery after acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forni, L G; Darmon, M; Ostermann, M; Oudemans-van Straaten, H M; Pettilä, V; Prowle, J R; Schetz, M; Joannidis, M

    2017-06-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a frequent complication of critical illness and carries a significant risk of short- and long-term mortality, chronic kidney disease (CKD) and cardiovascular events. The degree of renal recovery from AKI may substantially affect these long-term endpoints. Therefore maximising recovery of renal function should be the goal of any AKI prevention and treatment strategy. Defining renal recovery is far from straightforward due in part to the limitations of the tests available to assess renal function. Here, we discuss common pitfalls in the evaluation of renal recovery and provide suggestions for improved assessment in the future. We review the epidemiology of renal recovery and of the association between AKI and the development of CKD. Finally, we stress the importance of post-discharge follow-up of AKI patients and make suggestions for its incorporation into clinical practice. Summary key points are that risk factors for non-recovery of AKI are age, CKD, comorbidity, higher severity of AKI and acute disease scores. Second, AKI and CKD are mutually related and seem to have a common denominator. Third, despite its limitations full recovery of AKI may best be defined as the absence of AKI criteria, and partial recovery as a fall in AKI stage. Fourth, after an episode of AKI, serial follow-up measurements of serum creatinine and proteinuria are warranted to diagnose renal impairment and prevent further progression. Measures to promote recovery are similar to those preventing renal harm. Specific interventions promoting repair are still experimental.

  3. Salvianolic Acids Attenuate Rat Hippocampal Injury after Acute CO Poisoning by Improving Blood Flow Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Guan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon monoxide (CO poisoning causes the major injury and death due to poisoning worldwide. The most severe damage via CO poisoning is brain injury and mortality. Delayed encephalopathy after acute CO poisoning (DEACMP occurs in forty percent of the survivors of acute CO exposure. But the pathological cause for DEACMP is not well understood. And the corresponding therapy is not well developed. In order to investigate the effects of salvianolic acid (SA on brain injury caused by CO exposure from the view point of hemorheology, we employed a rat model and studied the dynamic of blood changes in the hemorheological and coagulative properties over acute CO exposure. Compared with the groups of CO and 20% mannitol + CO treatments, the severe hippocampal injury caused by acute CO exposure was prevented by SA treatment. These protective effects were associated with the retaining level of hematocrit (Hct, plasma viscosity, fibrinogen, whole blood viscosities and malondialdehyde (MDA levels in red blood cells (RBCs. These results indicated that SA treatment could significantly improve the deformation of erythrocytes and prevent the damage caused by CO poisoning. Meanwhile, hemorheological indexes are good indicators for monitoring the pathological dynamic after acute CO poisoning.

  4. MR imaging of acute hemorrhagic brain infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchino, Akira; Ohnari, Norihiro; Ohno, Masato

    1989-01-01

    Six patients with acute hemorrhagic brain infarct were imaged using spin-echo (SE) pulse sequences on a 1.5 Tesla MR scanner. Including two patients with repeated MR imaging, a total of eight examinations, all performed within 15 days after stroke, were analyzed retrospectively. Four patients revealed massive hemorrhages in the basal ganglia or cerebellum and three cases demonstrated multiple linear hemorrhages in the cerebral cortex. On T1-weighted images, hemorrhages were either mildly or definitely hyperintense relative to gray matter, while varied from mildly hypointense to hyperintense on T2-weighted images. T1-weighted images were superior to T2-weighted images in detection of hemorrhgage. CT failed to detect hemorrhage in two of five cases: indicative of MR superiority to CT in the diagnosis of acute hemorrhagic infarcts. (author)

  5. Chronic Traumatic Brain Injury in Amateur Boxers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Rahmati

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & objective: Despite of young and adolescence intent to the boxing sport, because of dominant aggression and direct blows contact to head, face and central nervous system, it is continuously criticize by different groups. The groups of sporting and physician conventions are distinguished boxing with physical and neuropsychological disorders and some groups believe that side effects of this sport are not more than other sports. For this base the aim of this study was to determine the chronic traumatic brain injury in a group amateur boxers.Materials & Methods: In a case-control study, three groups of sport men were considered, each group contained 20 randomly selected cases. The first group were amateur boxers with 4 years minimal activity(directly has been presented to the head blows, second group were amateur soccer players with 4 years minimal activity(has been presented to the not very severe head blows, third group were non athlete subjects .The groups were matched in weight, height, age and education .To understand brain disorder interview by medicine method has been used, then Wiskancin, Bonardele, Bender geshtalt, Kim karad visual memory, Benton and wechler memory (Alef type tests has been performed and EEG has got in the same hour and condition.Results: The homogeneity of between group variances was gained by the statistical method. Also between structural–visual abilities neuropsychological aspect in groups, significant difference has been gained (p= 0.000. In Kim karad visual memory test at the mild and long term visual memory deficit, significant differences between three groups was observed (P= 0.000, P=0.009 that least score has been belonged to the boxers. Also in boxers 6 abnormal EEGs is observed.Conclusion: It can be said that of four years amateur boxing can affect on boxers visual and memory perception and their spatial orientation. Additionally our study have showed that amateur boxing has a significant

  6. Estrogen treatment following severe burn injury reduces brain inflammation and apoptotic signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idris Ahamed H

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with severe burn injury experience a rapid elevation in multiple circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines, with the levels correlating with both injury severity and outcome. Accumulations of these cytokines in animal models have been observed in remote organs, however data are lacking regarding early brain cytokine levels following burn injury, and the effects of estradiol on these levels. Using an experimental animal model, we studied the acute effects of a full-thickness third degree burn on brain levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 and the protective effects of acute estrogen treatment on these levels. Additionally, the acute administration of estrogen on regulation of inflammatory and apoptotic events in the brain following severe burn injury were studied through measuring the levels of phospho-ERK, phospho-Akt, active caspase-3, and PARP cleavage in the placebo and estrogen treated groups. Methods In this study, 149 adult Sprague-Dawley male rats received 3rd degree 40% total body surface area (TBSA burns. Fifteen minutes following burn injury, the animals received a subcutaneous injection of either placebo (n = 72 or 17 beta-estradiol (n = 72. Brains were harvested at 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 12, 18, and 24 hours after injury from the control (n = 5, placebo (n = 8/time point, and estrogen treated animals (n = 8/time point. The brain cytokine levels were measured using the ELISA method. In addition, we assessed the levels of phosphorylated-ERK, phosphorylated-Akt, active caspase-3, and the levels of cleaved PARP at the 24 hour time-point using Western blot analysis. Results In burned rats, 17 beta-estradiol significantly decreased the levels of brain tissue TNF-α (~25%, IL-1β (~60%, and IL-6 (~90% when compared to the placebo group. In addition, we determined that in the estrogen-treated rats there was an increase in the levels of phospho-ERK (p p p p Conclusion Following severe burn injury, estrogens decrease both

  7. Traumatic brain injury among refugees and asylum seekers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPherson, Jacob I

    2017-12-28

    Refugees and asylum seekers face many challenges in their pursuit of a safe home. The journey for displaced individuals can be extremely dangerous and many do not survive or go missing. Survivors face significant risks of injury, abuse, and torture. Traumatic brain injury is one of the most common and disabling injuries sustained by these populations. This already complex condition can have profound implications on these groups and their families due to factors related to mental health, cultural perspectives, and their ability to navigate healthcare systems. A literature review was performed to investigate the incidence and prevalence of torture and traumatic brain injury in displaced and fleeing populations. Impacts of traumatic brain injury and residency status on outcomes in these individuals were also examined. The incidence and prevalence of torture and traumatic brain injury among refugees and asylum seekers is significant. These populations may access healthcare systems differently than other groups and as a result may experience a unique health-related outcomes following traumatic brain injury. This information should sensitize healthcare providers to a potential history of traumatic brain injury sustained by patients/clients who are refugees or asylum seekers and may serve to guide some clinical encounters. Implications for rehabilitation Traumatic brain injuries are commonly sustained by refugees and asylum seekers. Cultural factors may complicate how refugees and asylum seekers understand, report, and manage these injuries. The above may be worsened by cognitive, emotional, and behavioral changes following traumatic brain injury. Rehabilitation providers should be aware of potential traumatic brain injury history during encounters with refugee and asylum seeker populations, especially if a history of torture is suspected.

  8. The Brain Tourniquet: Physiological Isolation of Brain Regions Damaged by Traumatic Head Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-19

    brain slices were treated after injury with either a nootropic agent (aniracetam, cyclothiazide, IDRA 21, or 1-BCP) or the antiepileptic drug...pharmacological approach. 15. SUBJECT TERMS traumatic brain injury, cell necrosis, neuroprotection, nootropics , epilepsy, long-term potentiation...render their use problematic in an effective brain tourniquet system. We chose to focus our investigations on the nootropic (cognition enhancing) drugs

  9. Apathy following traumatic brain injury: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worthington, Andrew; Wood, Rodger Ll

    2018-04-13

    Apathy is a common problem after traumatic brain injury (TBI) and can have a major impact on cognitive function, psychosocial outcome and engagement in rehabilitation. For scientists and clinicians it remains one of the least understood aspects of brain-behaviour relationships encompassing disturbances of cognition, motivation, emotion and action, and is variously an indication of organic brain disease or psychiatric disorder. Apathy can be both sign and symptom and has been proposed as a diagnosis in its own right as well as a secondary feature of other conditions. This review considers previous approaches to apathy in terms of relevant psychological constructs and those neural counterparts most likely to be implicated after TBI. Neurobehavioural disorders of apathy are characterised chiefly by dysfunction of executive control of goal-oriented behaviour or the neural substrates of reward-based and emotional learning. We argue that it is possible to distinguish a primary disorder of apathy as an organic neurobehavioural state from secondary presentations due to an impoverished environment or psychological disturbance which has implications for treatment. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Serum uric acid and acute kidney injury: A mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Hahn

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute kidney injury causes great morbidity and mortality in both the community and hospital settings. Understanding the etiological factors and the pathophysiological principles resulting in acute kidney injury is essential in prompting appropriate therapies. Recently hyperuricemia has been recognized as a potentially modifiable risk factor for acute kidney injury, including that associated with cardiovascular surgery, radiocontrast administration, rhabdomyolysis, and associated with heat stress. This review discussed the evidence that repeated episodes of acute kidney injury from heat stress and dehydration may also underlie the pathogenesis of the chronic kidney disease epidemic that is occurring in Central America (Mesoamerican nephropathy. Potential mechanisms for how uric acid might contribute to acute kidney injury are also discussed, including systemic effects on renal microvasculature and hemodynamics, and local crystalline and noncrystalline effects on the renal tubules. Pilot clinical trials also show potential benefits of lowering uric acid on acute kidney injury associated with a variety of insults. In summary, there is mounting evidence that hyperuricemia may have a significant role in the development of acute kidney injury. Prospective, placebo controlled, randomized trials are needed to determine the potential benefit of uric acid lowering therapy on kidney and cardio-metabolic diseases.

  11. Impact of additional extracranial injuries on outcome after mild traumatic brain injury.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stulemeijer, M.; Werf, S.P. van der; Jacobs, B.; Biert, J.; Vugt, A.B. van; Brauer, J.; Vos, P.E.

    2006-01-01

    Many patients with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) concurrently sustain extracranial injuries; however, little is known about the impact of these additional injuries on outcome. We assessed the impact of additional injuries on the severity of postconcussional symptoms (PCS) and functional outcome

  12. Traumatic Brain Injury and Metabolic Dysfunction Among Head ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    more common in males and young people. Keywords: Traumatic Brain Injury, Plasma Glucose, Cortisol, ... disability and death among young adults through a variety of mechanisms, and is now recognised as a .... such as ischaemic stroke, intracranial haemorrhage or traumatic brain injury and is associated with increased.

  13. Evidence for impaired plasticity after traumatic brain injury in the developing brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Nan; Yang, Ya; Glover, David P; Zhang, Jiangyang; Saraswati, Manda; Robertson, Courtney; Pelled, Galit

    2014-02-15

    The robustness of plasticity mechanisms during brain development is essential for synaptic formation and has a beneficial outcome after sensory deprivation. However, the role of plasticity in recovery after acute brain injury in children has not been well defined. Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability among children, and long-term disability from pediatric TBI can be particularly devastating. We investigated the altered cortical plasticity 2-3 weeks after injury in a pediatric rat model of TBI. Significant decreases in neurophysiological responses across the depth of the noninjured, primary somatosensory cortex (S1) in TBI rats, compared to age-matched controls, were detected with electrophysiological measurements of multi-unit activity (86.4% decrease), local field potential (75.3% decrease), and functional magnetic resonance imaging (77.6% decrease). Because the corpus callosum is a clinically important white matter tract that was shown to be consistently involved in post-traumatic axonal injury, we investigated its anatomical and functional characteristics after TBI. Indeed, corpus callosum abnormalities in TBI rats were detected with diffusion tensor imaging (9.3% decrease in fractional anisotropy) and histopathological analysis (14% myelination volume decreases). Whole-cell patch clamp recordings further revealed that TBI results in significant decreases in spontaneous firing rate (57% decrease) and the potential to induce long-term potentiation in neurons located in layer V of the noninjured S1 by stimulation of the corpus callosum (82% decrease). The results suggest that post-TBI plasticity can translate into inappropriate neuronal connections and dramatic changes in the function of neuronal networks.

  14. Guillain Barre Syndrome Following Traumatic Brain Injury: A Rare Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirac Unal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS is an immune-mediated acute inflammatory disorder of the peripheral nervous system. Infectious agents were usually accused of playing a role in the etiology of GBS. Guillain-Barre syndrome has rarely been reported following subdural and subarachnoid hemorrhage after head trauma. Case Presentation We report on a 63-year-old male patient presenting GBS following Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI. Only five other similar cases are described in the literature. Conclusions Sudden onset of GBS symptoms following trauma may erroneously be assessed as secondary complications of the TBI and can lead to unnecessary procedures such as computerized tomography (CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI for a definitive diagnosis and may be a waste of time.

  15. Utility of the Validity-10 scale across the recovery trajectory following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippa, Sara M; Lange, Rael T; Bailie, Jason M; Kennedy, Jan E; Brickell, Tracey A; French, Louis M

    2016-01-01

    The Validity-10 scale was recently developed to screen for symptom exaggeration in patients following traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, it has only been validated on patients with TBI largely in the chronic phase of recovery. The influence of time since injury on the Validity-10 scale was investigated in 2,661 male servicemembers with TBI presenting to six U.S. Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Centers. Participants completed the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory (NSI). The Validity-10 scale and NSI total score were both weakly statistically significantly (1) positively correlated with time since injury, (2) negatively correlated with bodily injury severity, and (3) higher in participants undergoing medical board evaluations than in participants who returned to duty or were still hospitalized. Participants were statistically more likely to screen positive for possible symptom exaggeration on the Validity-10 scale as time since injury increased. However, the Validity-10 scale was only weakly related to time since injury, TBI severity, bodily injury severity, disposition, age, and return to duty status. That false positives are not increased in the acute phase of recovery and that the Validity-10 scale is not strongly related to clinical factors support the use of the Validity-10 scale in the acute recovery phase and across the TBI recovery trajectory.

  16. Antioxidant therapies in traumatic brain injury: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romero-Rivera Hector Rolando

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress constitute one of the commonest mechanism of the secondary injury contributing to neuronal death in traumatic brain injury cases. The oxidative stress induced secondary injury blockade may be considered as to be a good alternative to improve the outcome of traumatic brain injury (TBI treatment. Due to absence of definitive therapy of traumatic brain injury has forced researcher to utilize unconventional therapies and its roles investigated in the improvement of management and outcome in recent year. Antioxidant therapies are proven effective in many preclinical studies and encouraging results and the role of antioxidant mediaction may act as further advancement in the traumatic brain injury management it may represent aonr of newer moadlaity in neurosurgical aramamentorium, this kind of therapy could be a good alternative or adjuct to the previously established neuroprotection agents in TBI.

  17. The correlation of insulin resistance with the cerebral injury and stress reaction in patients with traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhan Lan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the correlation of insulin resistance with the cerebral injury and stress reaction in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI. Methods: 78 patients who were diagnosed with acute traumatic brain injury in our hospital between May 2014 and August 2016 were selected as the TBI group, and 90 healthy volunteers who received physical examination during the same period were selected as the control group. The peripheral blood was collected to detect glucose, insulin and nerve injury marker molecules, stress hormones as well as oxidative stress reaction products, and the insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR was calculated. Results: The HOMA-IR index of TBI group was significantly higher than that of control group (P<0.05; serum neuron-specific enolase (NSE, ubiquitin carboxy-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1, S100β, myelin basic protein (MBP, glucagon, growth hormone, cortisol, malondialdehyde (MDA and 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdGlevels of TBI group were significantly higher than those of control group (P<0.05; serum NSE, UCH-L1, S100β, MBP, glucagon, growth hormone, cortisol, MDA and 8-OHdG levels of patients with high HOMA-IR were significantly higher than those of patients with low HOMA-IR (P<0.05. Conclusion: The insulin resistance increases significantly in patients with traumatic brain injury, and is closely related to the degree of cerebral injury and stress reaction.

  18. Impact of Acute Kidney Injury in Patients Hospitalized With Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Lakhmir S; Amdur, Richard L; Faselis, Charles; Li, Ping; Kimmel, Paul L; Palant, Carlos E

    2017-04-01

    Pneumonia is a common cause of hospitalization and can be complicated by the development of acute kidney injury. Acute kidney injury is associated with major adverse kidney events (death, dialysis, and durable loss of renal function [chronic kidney disease]). Because pneumonia and acute kidney injury are in part mediated by inflammation, we hypothesized that when acute kidney injury complicates pneumonia, major adverse kidney events outcomes would be exacerbated. We sought to assess the frequency of major adverse kidney events after a hospitalization for either pneumonia, acute kidney injury, or the combination of both. We conducted a retrospective database analysis of the national Veterans Affairs database for patients with a admission diagnosis of International Classification of Diseases-9 code 584.xx (acute kidney injury) or 486.xx (pneumonia) between October 1, 1999, and December 31, 2005. Three groups of patients were created, based on the diagnosis of the index admission and serum creatinine values: 1) acute kidney injury, 2) pneumonia, and 3) pneumonia with acute kidney injury. Patients with mean baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 45 mL/min/1.73 m were excluded. The primary endpoint was major adverse kidney events defined as the composite of death, chronic dialysis, or a permanent loss of renal function after the primary discharge. The observations of 54,894 subjects were analyzed. Mean age was 68.7 ± 12.3 years. The percentage of female was 2.4, 73.3% were Caucasian, and 19.7% were African-American. Differences across the three diagnostic groups were significant for death, 25% decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate from baseline, major adverse kidney events following admission, and major adverse kidney events during admission (all p pneumonia + acute kidney injury group (51% died and 62% reached major adverse kidney events). In both unadjusted and adjusted time to event analyses, patients with pneumonia + acute kidney injury

  19. Diagnostic confirmation of mild traumatic brain injury by diffusion tensor imaging: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Ranga

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Traumatic brain injury is a form of acquired brain injury that results from sudden trauma to the head. Specifically, mild traumatic brain injury is a clinical diagnosis that can have significant effects on an individual's life, yet is difficult to identify through traditional imaging techniques. Case presentation This is the case of a 68-year-old previously healthy African American woman who was involved in a motor vehicle accident that resulted in significant head trauma. After the accident, she experienced symptoms indicative of mild traumatic brain injury and sought a neurological consultation when her symptoms did not subside. She was initially evaluated with a neurological examination, psychological evaluation, acute concussion evaluation and a third-party memory test using software from CNS Vital Signs for neurocognitive function. A diagnosis of post-concussion syndrome was suggested. Diffusion tensor imaging revealed decreased fractional anisotropy in the region immediately adjacent to both lateral ventricles, which was used to confirm the diagnosis. Fractional anisotropy is a scalar value between zero and one that describes the degree of anisotropy of a diffusion process. These results are indicative of post-traumatic gliosis and are undetectable by magnetic resonance imaging. Our patient was treated with cognitive therapy. Conclusion Minor traumatic brain injury is a common injury with variable clinical presentation. The system of diagnosis used in this case found a significant relationship between the clinical assessment and imaging results. This would not have been possible using traditional imaging techniques and highlights the benefits of using diffusion tensor imaging in the sub-acute assessment of minor traumatic brain injury.

  20. A comparison of two assessments of high level cognitive communication disorders in mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blyth, Tanya; Scott, Amanda; Bond, Annabelle; Paul, Eldho

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) frequently encounter cognitive communication disorders. Deficits can be subtle but can seriously influence an individual's ability to achieve life goals. Feedback from rehabilitation facilities indicated that high level cognitive communication disorders are not consistently identified in the acute setting. This study aimed to compare the cognitive communication results from two screening assessments, the Cognistat and the Cognitive Linguistic Quick Test (CLQT), in participants with a mild traumatic brain injury and to relate these findings to a range of prognostic indicators. Eighty-three adults post-TBI (16-81 years; 79.5% males) were recruited at an acute trauma centre. The language components of the two tests were analysed. The CLQT identified more participants with an impairment in language than the Cognistat, 19.3% compared to 1.2% (p communication deficits than the Cognistat in the acute setting.

  1. Aetiology and treatment outcome of severe traumatic brain injuries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major challenge to the patient, the relatives, the care givers, and the society in general. The primary and secondary injuries, and the high metabolism are formidable stages of the injury, each capable of taking the life of the patient. The objectives were to determine the ...

  2. Neonatal ischemic brain injury: what every radiologist needs to know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badve, Chaitra A.; Khanna, Paritosh C.; Ishak, Gisele E. [Seattle Children' s Hospital, University of Washington Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-05-15

    We present a pictorial review of neonatal ischemic brain injury and look at its pathophysiology, imaging features and differential diagnoses from a radiologist's perspective. The concept of perinatal stroke is defined and its distinction from hypoxic-ischemic injury is emphasized. A brief review of recent imaging advances is included and a diagnostic approach to neonatal ischemic brain injury is suggested. (orig.)

  3. Lung injury in acute pancreatitis: mechanisms, prevention, and therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, Conor J

    2012-02-03

    Lung injury is the most pertinent manifestation of extra-abdominal organ dysfunction in pancreatitis. The propensity of this retroperitoneal inflammatory condition to engender a diffuse and life-threatening lung injury is significant. Approximately one third of patients will develop acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, which account for 60% of all deaths within the first week. The variability in the clinical course of pancreatitis renders it a vexing entity and makes demonstration of the efficacy of any specific intervention difficult. The distinct pathologic entity of pancreatitis-associated lung injury is reviewed with a focus on etiology and potential therapeutic maneuvers.

  4. Rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury after acupuncture sessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marios Papasotiriou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdomyolysis is usually caused by muscle injury, drugs or alcohol and presents with muscle weakness and pain. It is characterized by rise in serum creatine kinase, aminotransferases and electrolytes as well as myoglobinuria. Myoglobinuria may cause acute kidney injury by direct proximal tubule cytotoxicity, renal vasoconstriction, intraluminal cast formation and distal tubule obstruction. Muscle pain and weakness as well as vascular injury have been reported after acupuncture. We report a case of severe rhabdomyolysis and acute kidney injury after acupuncture sessions.

  5. Simultaneous cesarean delivery and craniotomy in a term pregnant patient with traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawfik, Mohamed Mohamed; Badran, Basma Abed; Eisa, Ahmed Amin; Barakat, Rafik Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    The management of pregnant patients with traumatic brain injury is challenging. A multidisciplinary team approach is mandatory, and management should be individualized according to the type and extent of injury, maternal status, gestational age, and fetal status. We report a 27-year-old term primigravida presenting after head injury with Glasgow coma scale score 11 and anisocoria. Depressed temporal bone fracture and acute epidural hematoma were diagnosed, necessitating an urgent neurosurgery. Her fetus was viable with no signs of distress and no detected placental abnormalities. Cesarean delivery was performed followed by craniotomy in the same setting under general anesthesia with good outcome of the patient and her baby. PMID:25829914

  6. Dental Trauma 2- Acute Management of Fracture Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djemal, Serpil; Singh, Parmjit; Polycarpou, Nectaria; Tomson, Rachel; Kelleher, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Fortunately, traumatic dental injuries are a relatively uncommon occurrence in general dental practice. However, when they do present, timely diagnosis and treatment of such injuries is essential to maximize the chance of a successful outcome. This is the second part of a two-part series on traumatic dental injuries that are commonly encountered in the clinical setting. Part one covered the management of acute luxation/displacement injuries affecting the supporting structures of the tooth, while part two will cover the management of fracture injuries associated with teeth and the alveolar bone. Clinical relevance: Traumatic dental injuries are uncommon occurrences in everyday general dental practice. This article aims to provide a simple, step-by-step approach in the diagnosis and clinical management of acute fracture injuries.

  7. Altered network topology in pediatric traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Emily L.; Rashid, Faisal; Babikian, Talin; Mink, Richard; Babbitt, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey; Giza, Christopher C.; Asarnow, Robert F.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2017-11-01

    Outcome after a traumatic brain injury (TBI) is quite variable, and this variability is not solely accounted for by severity or demographics. Identifying sub-groups of patients who recover faster or more fully will help researchers and clinicians understand sources of this variability, and hopefully lead to new therapies for patients with a more prolonged recovery profile. We have previously identified two subgroups within the pediatric TBI patient population with different recovery profiles based on an ERP-derived (event-related potential) measure of interhemispheric transfer time (IHTT). Here we examine structural network topology across both patient groups and healthy controls, focusing on the `rich-club' - the core of the network, marked by high degree nodes. These analyses were done at two points post-injury - 2-5 months (post-acute), and 13-19 months (chronic). In the post-acute time-point, we found that the TBI-slow group, those showing longitudinal degeneration, showed hyperconnectivity within the rich-club nodes relative to the healthy controls, at the expense of local connectivity. There were minimal differences between the healthy controls and the TBI-normal group (those patients who show signs of recovery). At the chronic phase, these disruptions were no longer significant, but closer analysis showed that this was likely due to the loss of power from a smaller sample size at the chronic time-point, rather than a sign of recovery. We have previously shown disruptions to white matter (WM) integrity that persist and progress over time in the TBI-slow group, and here we again find differences in the TBI-slow group that fail to resolve over the first year post-injury.

  8. Nonsurgical interventions after mild traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygren-de Boussard, Catharina; Holm, Lena W; Cancelliere, Carol

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To synthesize the best available evidence regarding the impact of nonsurgical interventions on persistent symptoms after mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE and other databases were searched (2001-2012) with terms including "rehabilitation." Inclusion criteria were...... of 7 studies related to nonsurgical interventions were found to have a low risk of bias. One studied the effect of a scheduled telephone intervention offering counseling and education on outcome and found a significantly better outcome for symptoms (6.6 difference in adjusted mean symptom score; 95...... evidence suggests that early, reassuring educational information is beneficial after MTBI. Well-designed intervention studies are required to develop effective treatments and improve outcomes for adults and children at risk for persistent symptoms after MTBI....

  9. Monitoring Agitated Behavior After acquired Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aadal, Lena; Mortensen, Jesper; Nielsen, Jørgen Feldbaek

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To describe the onset, duration, intensity, and nursing shift variation of agitated behavior in patients with acquired brain injury (ABI) at a rehabilitation hospital. Design: Prospective descriptive study. Methods: A total of 11 patients with agitated behavior were included. Agitated...... behavior was registered with the Agitated Behavior Scale (ABS). The nurse or therapist allocated the individual patient assessed ABS during each shift. Intensity of agitated behavior was tested using exact test. A within-subject shift effect was analyzed with repeated-measure ANOVA. Findings: The onset...... of agitated behavior was at a median of 14 (1–28) days from admission. Seven patients remained agitated beyond 3 weeks from onset. Severe intensity of agitation was observed in 86 of 453 nursing shifts. Differences in agitated behavior between day, evening, and night shifts were found, F(2.20) = 7.90, p...

  10. Traumatic brain injury: caregivers' problems and needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, S T S; Khaw, W F; Rosna, A R; Husna, J

    2011-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is an increasingly major world health problem. This short review using the most pertinent articles on TBI caregiving problems and needs highlights the pressing issues. Articles focusing on both TBI-caregivers' problems and needs are rarely found, especially for developing countries. Most TBI-caregiving is done by family members, whose altered lives portend burden and stresses which add to the overwhelming demand of caring for the TBI-survivor. Lack of information, financial inadequacy, anxiety, distress, coping deficits, poor adaptability, inadequate knowledge and skills, and a poor support system comprise the major problems. Dysfunctional communication between caregivers and care-receivers has been little researched. The major needs are focused on health and rehabilitation information, financial advice and assistance, emotional and social support, and positive psychological encouragement. In time, health information needs may be met, but not emotional support. Information on TBI caregiving problems and unmet needs is critical to all relevant healthcare stakeholders.

  11. Brain injury in a forensic psychiatry population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colantonio, A; Stamenova, V; Abramowitz, C; Clarke, D; Christensen, B

    2007-12-01

    The prevalence and profile of adults with a history of traumatic brain injury (TBI) has not been studied in large North American forensic mental health populations. This study investigated how adults with a documented history of TBI differed with the non-TBI forensic population with respect to demographics, psychiatric diagnoses and history of offences. A retrospective chart review of all consecutive admissions to a forensic psychiatry programme in Toronto, Canada was conducted. Information on history of TBI, psychiatric diagnoses, living environments and types of criminal offences were obtained from medical records. History of TBI was ascertained in 23% of 394 eligible patient records. Compared to those without a documented history of TBI, persons with this history were less likely to be diagnosed with schizophrenia but more likely to have alcohol/substance abuse disorder. There were also differences observed with respect to offence profiles. This study provides evidence to support routine screening for a history of TBI in forensic psychiatry.

  12. Destination memory in traumatic brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wili Wilu, Amina; Coello, Yann; El Haj, Mohamad

    2018-03-17

    Destination memory, which is socially driven, refers to the ability to remember to whom one has sent information. Our study investigated destination memory in patients with traumatic brain injuries (TBIs). Patients and control participants were invited to tell proverbs (e.g., "the pen is mightier than the sword") to pictures of celebrities (e.g., Barack Obama). Then they were asked to indicate to which celebrity they had previously told the proverbs. Besides the assessment of destination memory, participants performed a binding task in which they were required to associate letters with their corresponding location. Analysis demonstrated less destination memory and binding in patients with TBIs than in controls. In both populations, significant correlations were observed between destination memory and performances on the binding task. These findings demonstrate difficulty in the ability to attribute information to its appropriate destination in TBI patients, perhaps owing to difficulties in binding separate information together to form a coherent representation of an event in memory.

  13. Rehabilitation of persons with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this NIH Consensus Statement is to inform the biomedical research and clinical practice communities of the results of the NIH Consensus Development Conference on Rehabilitation of Persons with Traumatic Brain Injury. The statement provides state-of-the-art information regarding effective rehabilitation measures for persons who have suffered a traumatic brain injury (TBI) and presents the conclusions and recommendations of the consensus panel regarding these issues. In addition, the statement identifies those areas that deserve further investigation. Upon completion of this educational activity, the reader should possess a clear working clinical knowledge of the state of the art regarding this topic. The target audience for this statement includes, but is not limited to, pediatricians, family practitioners, internists, neurologists, physiatrists, psychologists, and behavioral medicine specialists. Participants were a non-Federal, nonadvocate, 16-member panel representing the fields of neuropsychology, neurology, psychiatry, behavioral medicine, family medicine, pediatrics, physical medicine and rehabilitation, speech and hearing, occupational therapy, nursing, epidemiology, biostatistics and the public. In addition, 23 experts from these same fields presented data to the panel and a conference audience of 883. The literature was searched through Medline and an extensive bibliography of references was provided to the panel and the conference audience. Experts prepared abstracts with relevant citations from the literature. A compendium of evidence was prepared by the panel which included a contribution from a patient with TBI, a report from an Evidence Based Practice Center of the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research, and a report from the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Scientific evidence was given precedence over clinical anecdotal experience. The panel, answering predefined

  14. Transfusion related acute lung injury presenting with acute dyspnoea: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haji Altaf

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Transfusion-related acute lung injury is emerging as a common cause of transfusion-related adverse events. However, awareness about this entity in the medical fraternity is low and it, consequently, remains a very under-reported and often an under-diagnosed complication of transfusion therapy. Case presentation We report a case of a 46-year old woman who developed acute respiratory and hemodynamic instability following a single unit blood transfusion in the postoperative period. Investigation results were non-specific and a diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury was made after excluding other possible causes of acute lung injury. She responded to symptomatic management with ventilatory and vasopressor support and recovered completely over the next 72 hours. Conclusion The diagnosis of transfusion-related acute lung injury relies on excluding other causes of acute pulmonary edema following transfusion, such as sepsis, volume overload, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema. All plasma containing blood products have been implicated in transfusion-related acute lung injury, with the majority being linked to whole blood, packed red blood cells, platelets, and fresh-frozen plasma. The pathogenesis of transfusion-related acute lung injury may be explained by a "two-hit" hypothesis, involving priming of the inflammatory machinery and then activation of this primed mechanism. Treatment is supportive, with prognosis being substantially better than for most other causes of acute lung injury.

  15. Neuroprotective Strategies after Repetitive Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    performance in the HBOT groups improved sig- nificantly and was highly correlated with increased ipsilat- eral hippocampal blood volume ( cerebrovascular ...Oxygen Therapy Induces Cerebrovascular Changes and Improves Complex Learning/Memory in a Rat Open Head Bonk Chronic Brain Contusion Model. Undersea...injury. Dynamic brain trauma includes direct injury where trauma is directly imposed on the brain (e.g., non- accidental trauma, contact sports, falls

  16. Continuous EEG-SEP monitoring in severe brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amantini, A; Fossi, S; Grippo, A; Innocenti, P; Amadori, A; Bucciardini, L; Cossu, C; Nardini, C; Scarpelli, S; Roma, V; Pinto, F

    2009-04-01

    To monitor acute brain injury in the neurological intensive care unit (NICU), we used EEG and somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) in combination to achieve more accuracy in detecting brain function deterioration. Sixty-eight patients (head trauma and intracranial hemorrhage; GCSSEP and intracranial pressure monitoring (ICP). Fifty-five patients were considered "stable" or improving, considering the GCS and CT scan: in this group, SEP didn't show significant changes. Thirteen patients showed neurological deteriorations and, in all patients, cortical SEP showed significant alterations (amplitude decrease>50% often till complete disappearance). SEP deterioration anticipated ICP increase in 30%, was contemporary in 38%, and followed ICP increase in 23%. Considering SEP and ICP in relation to clinical course, all patients but one with ICP less than 20 mmHg were stable, while the three patients with ICP greater than 40 mmHg all died. Among the 26 patients with ICP of 20-40 mmHg, 17 were stable, while nine showed clinical and neurophysiological deterioration. Thus, there is a range of ICP values (20-40 mmHg) were ICP is scarcely indicative of clinical deterioration, rather it is the SEP changes that identify brain function deterioration. Therefore, SEP have a twofold interest with respect to ICP: their changes can precede an ICP increase and they can constitute a complementary tool to interpret ICP trends. It has been very important to associate SEP and EEG: about 60% of our patients were deeply sedated and, because of their relative insensitivity to anesthetics, only SEP allowed us to monitor brain damage evolution when EEG was scarcely valuable. We observed 3% of nonconvulsive status epilepticus compared to 18% of neurological deterioration. If the aim of neurophysiological monitoring is to "detect and protect", it may not be limited to detecting seizures, rather it should be able to identify brain deterioration, so we propose the combined monitoring of EEG with SEP.

  17. A Brain-Machine-Brain Interface for Rewiring of Cortical Circuitry after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    reaching chamber and a single banana -flavored food pellet (45 mg, Bioserv) was placed into a shallow food well 2 cm from the front wall on an external...Kansas City, Kansas, September 21, 2010. Invited Speaker, Neural Bases of Recovery after Brain Injury, Neuroplasticity in the Mature Brain, 20th...in rats. Eur. J. Neurosci. 17, 623–627. Rema, V., and Ebner, F.F. (2003). Lesions of mature barrel field cortex interfere with sensory processing and

  18. Snake-bite-induced Acute Kidney Injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naqvi, R.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the clinical spectrum and outcome of patients presenting to a tertiary care kidney center, developing acute kidney injury (AKI) after snake-bite. Study Design: An observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Nephrology Department, Sindh Institute of Urology and Transplantation (SIUT), Karachi, from January 1990 to December 2014. Methodology: All patients coming to SIUT identified as having AKI after snake-bite during the study period were included. AKI was defined according to RIFLE criteria with sudden rise in creatinine or decline in urine output or both. Demographics, clinical presentation, laboratory profile, and final outcome was noted. Result: During the studied period, 115 cases of AKI, secondary to snake-bite, were registered at this institution. Median age of patients was 35.92 ±15.04 (range: 6 - 70) years and male to female ratio was 1.6:1. Time from bite and referral to this hospital ranged from 2 to 28 days (mean: 8.77 ±5.58 days). Oligo-anuria was the most common presentation, being found in 98 (93.90 percentage) patients. Bleeding diathesis was reported in 75 (65.21 percentage) patients on presentation. All patients had normal sized, non-obstructed kidneys on ultrasonography, with no previous comorbids. Renal replacement therapy (RRT) was required in 106 (92.17 percentage) patients. Complete recovery was seen in 59 (51.30 percentage), while 15 (13.04 percentage) patients expired during acute phase of illness, 4 (3.47 percentage) developed CKD, 11 (9.56 percentage) required dialysis beyond 90 days, and 26 (22.60 percentage) were lost to long-term follow-up. Conclusion: Snake-bite, leading to multiple complications including renal failure and death, is a major health issue in tropical countries. Late referral of these patients to specialized centres Result in undesirable outcome. (author)

  19. Iatrogenic traumatic brain injury during tooth extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troxel, Mark

    2015-01-01

    An 8 yr old spayed female Yorkshire terrier was referred for evaluation of progressive neurological signs after a routine dental prophylaxis with tooth extractions. The patient was circling to the left and blind in the right eye with right hemiparesis. Neurolocalization was to the left forebrain. MRI revealed a linear tract extending from the caudal oropharynx, through the left retrobulbar space and frontal lobe, into the left parietal lobe. A small skull fracture was identified in the frontal bone through which the linear tract passed. Those findings were consistent with iatrogenic trauma from slippage of a dental elevator during extraction of tooth 210. The dog was treated empirically with clindamycin. The patient regained most of its normal neurological function within the first 4 mo after the initial injury. Although still not normal, the dog has a good quality of life. Traumatic brain injury is a rarely reported complication of extraction. Care must be taken while performing dental cleaning and tooth extraction, especially of the maxillary premolar and molar teeth to avoid iatrogenic damage to surrounding structures.

  20. Dysautonomia after severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, H T; Heeren, A H; Vos, P E

    2010-09-01

    Dysautonomia after traumatic brain injury (TBI) is characterized by episodes of increased heart rate, respiratory rate, temperature, blood pressure, muscle tone, decorticate or decerebrate posturing, and profuse sweating. This study addresses the incidence of dysautonomia after severe TBI, the clinical variables that are associated with dysautonomia, and the functional outcome of patients with dysautonomia. A historic cohort study in patients with severe TBI [Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) dysautonomia was 11.8%. Episodes of dysautonomia were prevalent during a mean period of 20.1 days (range 3-68) and were often initiated by discomfort. Patients with dysautonomia showed significant longer periods of coma (24.78 vs. 7.99 days) and mechanical ventilation (22.67 vs. 7.21 days). Dysautonomia was associated with diffuse axonal injury (DAI) [relative risk (RR) 20.83, CI 4.92-83.33] and the development of spasticity (RR 16.94, CI 3.96-71.42). Patients with dysautonomia experienced more secondary complications. They tended to have poorer outcome. Dysautonomia occurs in approximately 10% of patients surviving severe TBI and is associated with DAI and the development of spasticity at follow-up. The initiation of dysautonomia by discomfort supports the Excitatory: Inhibitory Ratio model as pathophysiological mechanism.

  1. [Clinical analysis of acute encephalocele during operation in 21 patients with severe craniocerebral injury].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Qiang; Qu, Chun-cheng; Liang, Wen-zhi; Qin, Hao; Yu, Rui

    2011-03-08

    To analyze the clinical features of acute intra-operative encephalocele and the proper prophylactic-therapeutic measures for severe craniocerebral injury. The clinical data were collected and analyzed for 21 patients with severe head injuries who suffered acute intra-operative encephalocele from June 2008 to May 2010. There were 12 males and 9 females with an age range of 18 - 69 years old. Among these patients, 6 died with a mortality rate of 28.5%. It was lower than that reported in literatures. One patient died post-operatively of severe brain swelling and intracranial infection secondary to leakage of cerebrospinal fluid. Four patients died of severe craniocerebral injury, brain swelling and brain stem failure. And 1 patient died after his guardian abandoned the treatment. The follow-up period for the remaining 15 surviving patients was 3 - 6 months. According to the Glasgow outcome score (GOS), there were a favorable prognosis (n = 9), moderate disabilities (n = 5) and severe disability (n = 1). The probability of acute intra-operative encephalocele may be predicted in advance with a combination of clinical features and computed tomographic scans. The therapeutic success rate of acute encephalocele will be boosted by taking protective and therapeutic measures pre- and intra-operatively.

  2. The role of the immune system in central nervous system plasticity after acute injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peruzzotti-Jametti, Luca; Donegá, Matteo; Giusto, Elena; Mallucci, Giulia; Marchetti, Bianca; Pluchino, Stefano

    2014-12-26

    Acute brain injuries cause rapid cell death that activates bidirectional crosstalk between the injured brain and the immune system. In the acute phase, the damaged CNS activates resident and circulating immune cells via the local and systemic release of soluble mediators. This early immune activation is necessary to confine the injured tissue and foster the clearance of cellular debris, thus bringing the inflammatory reaction to a close. In the chronic phase, a sustained immune activation has been described in many CNS disorders, and the degree of this prolonged response has variable effects on spontaneous brain regenerative processes. The challenge for treating acute CNS damage is to understand how to optimally engage and modify these immune responses, thus providing new strategies that will compensate for tissue lost to injury. Herein we have reviewed the available information regarding the role and function of the innate and adaptive immune responses in influencing CNS plasticity during the acute and chronic phases of after injury. We have examined how CNS damage evolves along the activation of main cellular and molecular pathways that are associated with intrinsic repair, neuronal functional plasticity and facilitation of tissue reorganization. Copyright © 2014 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Characteristics of acute groin injuries in the adductor muscles: Adetailed MRI study in athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serner, A.; Weir, A.; Tol, J. L.; Thorborg, K.; Roemer, F.; Guermazi, A.; Yamashiro, E.; Hölmich, P.

    2018-01-01

    Acute adductor injuries account for the majority of acute groin injuries; however, little is known about specific injury characteristics, which could be important for the understanding of etiology and management of these injuries. The study aim was to describe acute adductor injuries in athletes

  4. Reflex anuria: a rare cause of acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Adediran

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute Kidney Injury results from pre renal, post renal or intrinsic renal causes. Reflex anuria is a very rare cause of renal impairment which happens due to irritation or trauma to one kidney or ureter, or severely painful stimuli to other nearby organs. Case Presentation: Here we present a case of acute kidney injury secondary to reflex anuria in a patient who underwent extensive gynecological surgery along with ureteral manipulation which recovered spontaneously. Conclusion: Reflex Anuria is a rare and often not considered as cause of acute kidney injury. This case illustrates that this should be kept as a differential in potential cause of acute kidney injury in patient undergoing urogenital or gynecological surgeries.

  5. Acute kidney injury secondary to iatrogenic bilateral ureteric ligation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute kidney injury secondary to iatrogenic bilateral ureteric ligation following emergency abdominal hysterectomy. Oluseyi A. Adejumo, Olurotimi S. Ogundiniyi, Ayodeji A. Akinbodewa, Lawrence A. Adesunloro, Oladimeji J. Olafisoye ...

  6. Brain functional connectivity and cognition in mild traumatic brain injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, K.L.; Zhang, Y.L.; Chen, H.; Zhang, J.N.; Zhang, Y.; Qiu, M.G.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze brain functional connectivity and its relationship to cognition in patients with mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Twenty-five patients with mTBI and 25 healthy control subjects were studied using resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI). Amplitudes of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFFs) and functional connectivity (FC) were calculated and correlated with cognition. Compared with the normal control group, the mTBI patients showed a significant decrease in working memory index (WMI) and processing speed index (PSI), as well as significantly decreased ALFFs in the cingulate gyrus, the middle frontal gyrus and superior frontal gyrus. In contrast, the mTBI patients' ALFFs in the left middle occipital gyrus, the left precuneus, and lingual gyrus increased. Additionally, FC significantly decreased in the thalamus, caudate nucleus, and right hippocampus in the mTBI patients. Statistical analysis further showed a significant positive correlation between the ALFF in the cingulate gyrus and the WMI (R 2 = 0.423, P < 0.05) and a significant positive correlation between the FC in the left thalamus and left middle frontal gyrus and the WMI (R 2 = 0.381, P < 0.05). rs-fMRI can reveal the functional state of the brain in patients with mTBI. This finding differed from observations of the normal control group and was significantly associated with clinical cognitive dysfunction. Therefore, rs-fMRI offers an objective imaging modality for treatment planning and prognosis assessment in patients with mTBI. (orig.)

  7. VEGF Promotes Malaria-Associated Acute Lung Injury in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carapau, Daniel; Pena, Ana C.; Ataíde, Ricardo; Monteiro, Carla A. A.; Félix, Nuno; Costa-Silva, Artur; Marinho, Claudio R. F.; Dias, Sérgio; Mota, Maria M.

    2010-01-01

    The spectrum of the clinical presentation and severity of malaria infections is broad, ranging from uncomplicated febrile illness to severe forms of disease such as cerebral malaria (CM), acute lung injury (ALI), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), pregnancy-associated malaria (PAM) or severe anemia (SA). Rodent models that mimic human CM, PAM and SA syndromes have been established. Here, we show that DBA/2 mice infected with P. berghei ANKA constitute a new model for malaria-associated ALI. Up to 60% of the mice showed dyspnea, airway obstruction and hypoxemia and died between days 7 and 12 post-infection. The most common pathological findings were pleural effusion, pulmonary hemorrhage and edema, consistent with increased lung vessel permeability, while the blood-brain barrier was intact. Malaria-associated ALI correlated with high levels of circulating VEGF, produced de novo in the spleen, and its blockage led to protection of mice from this syndrome. In addition, either splenectomization or administration of the anti-inflammatory molecule carbon monoxide led to a significant reduction in the levels of sera VEGF and to protection from ALI. The similarities between the physiopathological lesions described here and the ones occurring in humans, as well as the demonstration that VEGF is a critical host factor in the onset of malaria-associated ALI in mice, not only offers important mechanistic insights into the processes underlying the pathology related with malaria but may also pave the way for interventional studies. PMID:20502682

  8. Finding effective biomarkers for pediatric traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olena Y Glushakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As traumatic brain injury (TBI continues to affect children and young adults worldwide, research on reliable biomarkers grows as a possible aid in determining the severity of injury. However, many studies have revealed that diverse biomarkers such as S100B and myelin basic protein (MBP have many limitations, such as their elevated normative concentrations in young children. Therefore, the results of these studies have yet to be translated to clinical applications. However, despite the setbacks of research into S100B and MBP, investigators continue to research viable biomarkers, notably glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1, as possible aids in medical decision making. Studies have revealed that GFAP and UCH-L1 actually are better predictors of injury progression than the before-mentioned biomarkers S100B and MBP. In addition, UCH-L1 has demonstrated an ability to detect injury while CT is negative, suggesting an ability to detect acute intracranial lesions. Here, we evaluate research testing levels of GFAP and UCH-L1 on children diagnosed with TBI and compare our results to those of other tested biomarkers. In a recent study done by Hayes et al., GFAP and UCH-L1 demonstrated the potential to recognize children with the possibility of poor outcome, allowing for more specialized treatments with clinical and laboratory applications. Although studies on GFAP and UCH-L1 have for the most part warranted positive results, further studies will be needed to confirm their role as reliable markers for pediatric TBI.

  9. Experimental Models of Transfusion-Related Acute Lung Injury (TRALI)

    OpenAIRE

    Gilliss, Brian M.; Looney, Mark R.

    2011-01-01

    Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) is defined clinically as acute lung injury occurring within six hours of the transfusion of any blood product. It is the leading cause of transfusion-related death in the United States, but under-recognition and diagnostic uncertainty have limited clinical research to smaller case control studies. In this review we will discuss the contribution of experimental models to the understanding of TRALI pathophysiology and potential therapeutic approache...

  10. Incidence of pediatric acute kidney injury in hospitalized patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd. Ashraf; Naveed Shahzad; Altaf Hussain; Shafat Ahmed Tak; Syed Tariq Ahmed Bukhari; Aliya Kachru

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric acute kidney injury (pAKI) is a common complication associated with high mortality in children. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) and mortality in hospitalized (critically ill and non-critically ill) patients. This was a retrospective study conducted during the period of June 1, 2013, to May 31, 2014, at the Postgraduate Department of Pediatrics, G. B. Pant Hospital, an Associated Hospital of Government Medical College, Srinagar,...

  11. Acute and subacute chemical-induced lung injuries: HRCT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akira, Masanori, E-mail: Akira@kch.hosp.go.jp [Department of Radiology, National Hospital Organization Kinki-Chuo Chest Medical Center, 1180 Nagasone-cho, Kita-ku, Sakai City, Osaka 591-8555 (Japan); Suganuma, Narufumi [Department of Environmental Medicine, Kochi Medical School (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Lung injury caused by chemicals includes bronchitis, bronchiolitis, chemical pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, acute respiratory distress syndrome, organizing pneumonia, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, and sarcoid-like granulomatous lung disease. Each chemical induces variable pathophysiology and the situation resembles to the drug induced lung disease. The HRCT features are variable and nonspecific, however HRCT may be useful in the evaluation of the lung injuries and so we should know about HRCT features of lung parenchymal abnormalities caused by chemicals.

  12. Acute Kidney Injury and Big Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Scott M; Goldstein, Stuart L; Bagshaw, Sean M

    2018-01-01

    The recognition of a standardized, consensus definition for acute kidney injury (AKI) has been an important milestone in critical care nephrology, which has facilitated innovation in prevention, quality of care, and outcomes research among the growing population of hospitalized patients susceptible to AKI. Concomitantly, there have been substantial advances in "big data" technologies in medicine, including electronic health records (EHR), data registries and repositories, and data management and analytic methodologies. EHRs are increasingly being adopted, clinical informatics is constantly being refined, and the field of EHR-enabled care improvement and research has grown exponentially. While these fields have matured independently, integrating the two has the potential to redefine and integrate AKI-related care and research. AKI is an ideal condition to exploit big data health care innovation for several reasons: AKI is common, increasingly encountered in hospitalized settings, imposes meaningful risk for adverse events and poor outcomes, has incremental cost implications, and has been plagued by suboptimal quality of care. In this concise review, we discuss the potential applications of big data technologies, particularly modern EHR platforms and health data repositories, to transform our capacity for AKI prediction, detection, and care quality. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Acute Kidney Injury and Information Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Küllmar, Mira; Zarbock, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a common complication that occurs in critically ill patients and it is associated with a worse outcome. Since therapy options are limited, prevention and early detection are the essential cornerstones to improve patient outcomes. Therefore, using health information technology (HIT) to detect AKI early might be useful for clinicians. Patient data can be extracted real-time from electronic health records. Programmed electronic alert systems (e-alerts) can increase clinicians' awareness for AKI. Integrated into clinical decision support systems, implementation of HIT might improve clinical processes and patient outcomes. Several studies show the application of e-alerts in AKI detection and the implementation in processes of care. Monitoring nephrotoxic medication is one successful approach of implementing e-alerts in prevention of AKI. Information technology in AKI is in an early phase of development and further multicenter prospective studies are required to draw optimally on the maximum potential of this concept. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Sports-related brain injuries: connecting pathology to diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, James; Connolly, Ian D; Dangelmajer, Sean; Kintzing, James; Ho, Allen L; Grant, Gerald

    2016-04-01

    Brain injuries are becoming increasingly common in athletes and represent an important diagnostic challenge. Early detection and management of brain injuries in sports are of utmost importance in preventing chronic neurological and psychiatric decline. These types of injuries incurred during sports are referred to as mild traumatic brain injuries, which represent a heterogeneous spectrum of disease. The most dramatic manifestation of chronic mild traumatic brain injuries is termed chronic traumatic encephalopathy, which is associated with profound neuropsychiatric deficits. Because chronic traumatic encephalopathy can only be diagnosed by postmortem examination, new diagnostic methodologies are needed for early detection and amelioration of disease burden. This review examines the pathology driving changes in athletes participating in high-impact sports and how this understanding can lead to innovations in neuroimaging and biomarker discovery.

  15. Traumatic Brain Injury and Delayed Sequelae: A Review - Traumatic Brain Injury and Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (Concussion are Precursors to Later-Onset Brain Disorders, Including Early-Onset Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Kiraly

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain injuries are too common. Most people are unaware of the incidence of and horrendous consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI and mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI. Research and the advent of sophisticated imaging have led to progression in the understanding of brain pathophysiology following TBI. Seminal evidence from animal and human experiments demonstrate links between TBI and the subsequent onset of premature, psychiatric syndromes and neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD and Parkinson's disease (PD. Objectives of this summary are, therefore, to instill appreciation regarding the importance of brain injury prevention, diagnosis, and treatment, and to increase awareness regarding the long-term delayed consequences following TBI.

  16. Transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI – acase report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Łata

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion-related acute lung injury is defined as acute respiratory failure which develops during or within 6 hours after transfusion of a blood component in a patient with no risk factors for respiratory insufficiency. Transfusion-related acute lung injury is diagnosed based on clinical manifestation and by excluding other causes of acute lung injury. Unambiguous diagnosis is difficult. Looking for anti-HLA and/or anti-HNA antibodies in donors and sometimes in recipients plays an important role in lab tests. Negative antibody findings, either in a donor or in a recipient, do not exclude transfusion-related acute lung injury, which, however, does not exempt from performing leukocyte antibody tests since they are extremely important for transfusion-related acute lung injury prophylaxis. The ways to prevent this reaction include: disqualifying donors with anti-HLA/HNA antibodies, screening for antibodies in multiparous women and in individuals after transfusion, modifying the way blood components are prepared and limiting blood transfusion in clinical practice. The paper presents a case of a 38-year-old woman with acute myeloid leukaemia, hospitalised at the Department of Internal Diseases and Haematology of the Military Institute of Medicine for subsequent courses of chemotherapy. During treatment, the patient had red cells and platelets concentrates transfused several times with no transfusion-related reactions. Eight days after the last chemotherapy infusion, the patient developed high temperature and her platelet count was 14 × 103 /mL. Therefore, the patient received a platelet concentrate again. About 1 hour after transfusion, the patient complained about chest pain and dyspnoea. She needed oxygen therapy. Chest X-ray revealed lung oedema with no signs of left ventricular failure. Once other causes of acute lung injury were excluded, transfusion-related acute lung injury was diagnosed.

  17. Pituitary dysfunction following traumatic brain injury or subarachnoid haemorrhage - in "Endocrine Management in the Intensive Care Unit".

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hannon, M J

    2012-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage are important causes of morbidity and mortality in the developed world. There is a large body of evidence that demonstrates that both conditions may adversely affect pituitary function in both the acute and chronic phases of recovery. Diagnosis of hypopituitarism and accurate treatment of pituitary disorders offers the opportunity to improve mortality and outcome in both traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage. In this article, we will review the history and pathophysiology of pituitary function in the acute phase following traumatic brain injury and subarachnoid haemorrhage, and we will discuss in detail three key aspects of pituitary dysfunction which occur in the early course of TBI; acute cortisol deficiency, diabetes insipidus and SIAD.

  18. DARPA challenge: developing new technologies for brain and spinal injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macedonia, Christian; Zamisch, Monica; Judy, Jack; Ling, Geoffrey

    2012-06-01

    The repair of traumatic injuries to the central nervous system remains among the most challenging and exciting frontiers in medicine. In both traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injuries, the ultimate goals are to minimize damage and foster recovery. Numerous DARPA initiatives are in progress to meet these goals. The PREventing Violent Explosive Neurologic Trauma program focuses on the characterization of non-penetrating brain injuries resulting from explosive blast, devising predictive models and test platforms, and creating strategies for mitigation and treatment. To this end, animal models of blast induced brain injury are being established, including swine and non-human primates. Assessment of brain injury in blast injured humans will provide invaluable information on brain injury associated motor and cognitive dysfunctions. The Blast Gauge effort provided a device to measure warfighter's blast exposures which will contribute to diagnosing the level of brain injury. The program Cavitation as a Damage Mechanism for Traumatic Brain Injury from Explosive Blast developed mathematical models that predict stresses, strains, and cavitation induced from blast exposures, and is devising mitigation technologies to eliminate injuries resulting from cavitation. The Revolutionizing Prosthetics program is developing an avant-garde prosthetic arm that responds to direct neural control and provides sensory feedback through electrical stimulation. The Reliable Neural-Interface Technology effort will devise technologies to optimally extract information from the nervous system to control next generation prosthetic devices with high fidelity. The emerging knowledge and technologies arising from these DARPA programs will significantly improve the treatment of brain and spinal cord injured patients.

  19. Tensor-Based Morphometry Reveals Volumetric Deficits in Moderate=Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Emily L; Hua, Xue; Villalon-Reina, Julio; Moran, Lisa M; Kernan, Claudia; Babikian, Talin; Mink, Richard; Babbitt, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey; Giza, Christopher C; Thompson, Paul M; Asarnow, Robert F

    2016-05-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cause widespread and prolonged brain degeneration. TBI can affect cognitive function and brain integrity for many years after injury, often with lasting effects in children, whose brains are still immature. Although TBI varies in how it affects different individuals, image analysis methods such as tensor-based morphometry (TBM) can reveal common areas of brain atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), secondary effects of the initial injury, which will differ between subjects. Here we studied 36 pediatric moderate to severe TBI (msTBI) participants in the post-acute phase (1-6 months post-injury) and 18 msTBI participants who returned for their chronic assessment, along with well-matched controls at both time-points. Participants completed a battery of cognitive tests that we used to create a global cognitive performance score. Using TBM, we created three-dimensional (3D) maps of individual and group differences in regional brain volumes. At both the post-acute and chronic time-points, the greatest group differences were expansion of the lateral ventricles and reduction of the lingual gyrus in the TBI group. We found a number of smaller clusters of volume reduction in the cingulate gyrus, thalamus, and fusiform gyrus, and throughout the frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices. Additionally, we found extensive associations between our cognitive performance measure and regional brain volume. Our results indicate a pattern of atrophy still detectable 1-year post-injury, which may partially underlie the cognitive deficits frequently found in TBI.

  20. Tensor-Based Morphometry Reveals Volumetric Deficits in Moderate=Severe Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xue; Villalon-Reina, Julio; Moran, Lisa M.; Kernan, Claudia; Babikian, Talin; Mink, Richard; Babbitt, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey; Giza, Christopher C.; Thompson, Paul M.; Asarnow, Robert F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can cause widespread and prolonged brain degeneration. TBI can affect cognitive function and brain integrity for many years after injury, often with lasting effects in children, whose brains are still immature. Although TBI varies in how it affects different individuals, image analysis methods such as tensor-based morphometry (TBM) can reveal common areas of brain atrophy on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), secondary effects of the initial injury, which will differ between subjects. Here we studied 36 pediatric moderate to severe TBI (msTBI) participants in the post-acute phase (1–6 months post-injury) and 18 msTBI participants who returned for their chronic assessment, along with well-matched controls at both time-points. Participants completed a battery of cognitive tests that we used to create a global cognitive performance score. Using TBM, we created three-dimensional (3D) maps of individual and group differences in regional brain volumes. At both the post-acute and chronic time-points, the greatest group differences were expansion of the lateral ventricles and reduction of the lingual gyrus in the TBI group. We found a number of smaller clusters of volume reduction in the cingulate gyrus, thalamus, and fusiform gyrus, and throughout the frontal, temporal, and parietal cortices. Additionally, we found extensive associations between our cognitive performance measure and regional brain volume. Our results indicate a pattern of atrophy still detectable 1-year post-injury, which may partially underlie the cognitive deficits frequently found in TBI. PMID:26393494

  1. Longitudinal Trajectories of Health Related Quality of Life in Danish Family Members of Individuals with Severe Brain Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norup, Anne; Snipes, Daniel J.; Siert, Lars

    2013-01-01

    – Emotional scores were higher when patients had high Rancho Los Amigos Scale scores at admission to early intensive rehabilitation in hospital. These results suggest that the acute and sub-acute periods after brain injury are an extremely difficult time psychologically for many families, and family......Scant research has examined health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in family members of patients with severe brain injury, even less has been done in Scandinavian countries, and none has examined this construct longitudinally. The current study therefore used multilevel modelling to investigate...... the trajectories of HRQoL in 94 Danish family members of patients with severe brain injury at five time points, beginning at the patient's stay in a neuro intensive care unit through one year after injury. The family members’ HRQoL scores significantly and strongly increased over time, and Role Limitations...

  2. Assessing Neuro-Systemic & Behavioral Components in the Pathophysiology of Blast-Related Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firas H Kobeissy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Among the U.S. military personnel, blast injury is among the leading causes of brain injury. During the past decade, it has become apparent that even blast injury as a form of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI may lead to multiple different adverse outcomes, such as neuropsychiatric symptoms and long-term cognitive disability. Blast injury is characterized by blast overpressure (BOP, blast duration, and blast impulse. While the blast injuries of a victim close to the explosion will be severe, majority of victims are usually at a distance leading to milder form described as mild blast TBI (mbTBI. A major feature of mbTBI is its complex manifestation occurring in concert at different organ levels involving systemic, cerebral, neuronal and neuropsychiatric responses; some of which are shared with other forms of brain trauma such as acute brain injury and other neuropsychiatric disorders such as PTSD. The pathophysiology of blast injury exposure involves complex cascades of chronic psychological stress, autonomic dysfunction and neuro/systemic inflammation. These factors render blast injury as an arduous challenge in terms of diagnosis and treatment as well as identification of sensitive and specific biomarkers distinguishing mTBI from other non-TBI pathologies and from neuropsychiatric disorders with similar symptoms. This is due to the distinct but shared and partially identified biochemical pathways and neuro-histopathological changes that might be linked to behavioral deficits observed. Taken together, this article aims to provide an overview of the current status of the cellular and pathological mechanisms involved in blast overpressure injury and argues for the urgent need to identify potential biomarkers that can hint at the different mechanisms involved.

  3. Aging, neurodegenerative disease, and traumatic brain injury: the role of neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esopenko, Carrie; Levine, Brian

    2015-02-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a highly prevalent condition with significant effects on cognition and behavior. While the acute and sub-acute effects of TBI recover over time, relatively little is known about the long-term effects of TBI in relation to neurodegenerative disease. This issue has recently garnered a great deal of attention due to publicity surrounding chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in professional athletes, although CTE is but one of several neurodegenerative disorders associated with a history of TBI. Here, we review the literative on neurodegenerative disorders linked to remote TBI. We also review the evidence for neuroimaging changes associated with unhealthy brain aging in the context of remote TBI. We conclude that neuroimaging biomarkers have significant potential to increase understanding of the mechanisms of unhealthy brain aging and neurodegeneration following TBI, with potential for identifying those at risk for unhealthy brain aging prior to the clinical manifestation of neurodegenerative disease.

  4. MRI findings of acute cerebral swelling and brain edema in the acute stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oki, Hideo; Ueda, Shin; Matsumoto, Keizo; Kashihara, Michiharu; Furuichi, Masashi.

    1988-01-01

    We report two cases, one of acute cerebral swelling and the other with a major stroke, whose MRI has shown very interesting findings. Case 1, a 32-year-old male, was admitted to our service because of a lowering of his consciousness immediately after a head injury. On admission, the patient was semicomatous (E 1 M 2 V 1 , with anisocoria (R > L). His plain skull X-ray was normal. A CT scan, however, demonstrated right isodensity hemispheric swelling associated with a subarachnoid hemorrhage in the right Sylvian fissure. A right carotid angiogram showed no vascular disorders. MR imaging of the spin density demonstrated a hyperintensitive thickening of the gray matter in the whole right hemisphere. Case 2, a 58-year-old female, was admitted because of a sudden onset of loss of consciousness, with right hemiparesis and dysarthria. On admission, her consciousness was semicomatous (E 1 M 3 V 1 ), and it deteriorated to a deep coma 1 hour later. A CT scan demonstrated a diffuse left hemispheric low density, with a finding of hemorrhagic infarction in the basal ganglia. MR imaging of the spin density showed a hyperintensitive thickening of the gray matter resembling that of Case 1. The findings of the spin-echo images of our two cases showed a hyperintensitive thickening of the gray matter in both. The hyperintensity and thickening of the gray matter apparently indicated a sort of hyperemia and brain edema. These findings led us to suspect that the hyperemia associated with acute cerebral swelling and ischemic brain edema of our two cases originated in the gray matter, although it has been considered that the pathogenesis of acute cerebral swelling is not known and that brain edema, especially vasogenic edema, will mostly develop in the white matter rather than in the gray matter. (author)

  5. Functional Outcome Prediction after Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury Based on Acute Clinical Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Ludovic; Cordemans, Virginie; Cernat, Eduard; M'Bra, Kouamé Innocent; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc

    2017-06-15

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a devastating condition that affects patients on both a personal and societal level. The objective of the study is to improve the prediction of long-term functional outcome following SCI based on the acute clinical findings. A total of 76 patients with acute traumatic SCI were prospectively enrolled in a cohort study in a single Level I trauma center. Spinal Cord Independence Measure (SCIM) at 1 year after the trauma was the primary outcome. Potential predictors of functional outcome were recorded during the acute hospitalization: age, sex, level and type of injury, comorbidities, American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) Impairment Scale (AIS), ASIA Motor Score (AMS), ASIA Light Touch score (LT), ASIA Pin Prick score (PP), Injury Severity Score (ISS), traumatic brain injury, and delay from trauma to surgery. A linear regression model was created with the primary outcome modeled relative to the acute clinical findings. Only four variables were selected in the model, with performance averaging an R-square value of 0.57. In descending order, the best predictors for SCIM at 1 year were: LT, AIS grade, ISS, and AMS. One-year functional outcome (SCIM) can be estimated by a simple equation that takes into account four parameters of the initial physical examination. Estimating the patient long-term outcome early after traumatic SCI is important in order to define the management strategies that might diminish the costs and to give the patient and family a better view of the long-term expectations.

  6. Interleukin-1 Receptor in Seizure Susceptibility after Traumatic Injury to the Pediatric Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Bridgette D; O'Brien, Terence J; Gimlin, Kayleen; Wright, David K; Kim, Shi Eun; Casillas-Espinosa, Pablo M; Webster, Kyria M; Petrou, Steven; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J

    2017-08-16

    Epilepsy after pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with poor quality of life. This study aimed to characterize post-traumatic epilepsy in a mouse model of pediatric brain injury, and to evaluate the role of interleukin-1 (IL-1) signaling as a target for pharmacological intervention. Male mice received a controlled cortical impact or sham surgery at postnatal day 21, approximating a toddler-aged child. Mice were treated acutely with an IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra; 100 mg/kg, s.c.) or vehicle. Spontaneous and evoked seizures were evaluated from video-EEG recordings. Behavioral assays tested for functional outcomes, postmortem analyses assessed neuropathology, and brain atrophy was detected by ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging. At 2 weeks and 3 months post-injury, TBI mice showed an elevated seizure response to the convulsant pentylenetetrazol compared with sham mice, associated with abnormal hippocampal mossy fiber sprouting. A robust increase in IL-1β and IL-1 receptor were detected after TBI. IL-1Ra treatment reduced seizure susceptibility 2 weeks after TBI compared with vehicle, and a reduction in hippocampal astrogliosis. In a chronic study, IL-1Ra-TBI mice showed improved spatial memory at 4 months post-injury. At 5 months, most TBI mice exhibited spontaneous seizures during a 7 d video-EEG recording period. At 6 months, IL-1Ra-TBI mice had fewer evoked seizures compared with vehicle controls, coinciding with greater preservation of cortical tissue. Findings demonstrate this model's utility to delineate mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis after pediatric brain injury, and provide evidence of IL-1 signaling as a mediator of post-traumatic astrogliosis and seizure susceptibility. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Epilepsy is a common cause of morbidity after traumatic brain injury in early childhood. However, a limited understanding of how epilepsy develops, particularly in the immature brain, likely contributes to the lack of efficacious treatments

  7. Characteristics and correlates of rehabilitation charges during inpatient traumatic brain injury rehabilitation in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Karen Sui-Geok; Earnest, Arul; Chiong, Yi; Kong, Keng-He

    2010-01-01

    A prospective study of 91 consecutive traumatic brain injury admissions to rehabilitation over a 2-year period to determine factors impacting on rehabilitation charges. Discharge records of 91 adult traumatic brain injury patients comprising total unsubsidized billings for each completed inpatient rehabilitation episode were used to derive total charges. Co-variates analysed included demographic, acute traumatic brain injury and rehabilitation variables including the Modified Barthel Index score. The total median rehabilitation charge per episode was S$7845.50 (range: S$970.55-$44,817.20) [1 Euro=S$2.10]. The top 3 contributory median total charges/episode included bed, board and nursing (S$5616.00), occupational therapy (S$606.00), and physical therapy (S$526.00). Patients with lower admission Glasgow Coma Scale scores, longer post-traumatic amnesia duration, dysphagia and medical complications during rehabilitation, lower admission Modified Barthel Index scores, longer acute and rehabilitation length of stay had significantly higher rehabilitation charges (pcharges (pcharges. This study has potential implications for healthcare resource planning for traumatic brain injury rehabilitation.

  8. Longitudinal Examination of Resilience After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwitz, Jennifer H; Sima, Adam P; Kreutzer, Jeffrey S; Dreer, Laura E; Bergquist, Thomas F; Zafonte, Ross; Johnson-Greene, Douglas; Felix, Elizabeth R

    2018-02-01

    To evaluate (1) the trajectory of resilience during the first year after a moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI); (2) factors associated with resilience at 3, 6, and 12 months postinjury; and (3) changing relationships over time between resilience and other factors. Longitudinal analysis of an observational cohort. Five inpatient rehabilitation centers. Patients with TBI (N=195) enrolled in the resilience module of the TBI Model Systems study with data collected at 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-up. Not applicable. Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale. Initially, resilience levels appeared to be stable during the first year postinjury. Individual growth curve models were used to examine resilience over time in relation to demographic, psychosocial, and injury characteristics. After adjusting for these characteristics, resilience actually declined over time. Higher levels of resilience were related to nonminority status, absence of preinjury substance abuse, lower anxiety and disability level, and greater life satisfaction. Resilience is a construct that is relevant to understanding brain injury outcomes and has potential value in planning clinical interventions. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pediatric traumatic brain injury affects multisensory integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Königs, Marsh; Weeda, Wouter D; van Heurn, L W Ernest; Vermeulen, R Jeroen; Goslings, J Carel; Luitse, Jan S K; Poll-The, Bwee Tien; Beelen, Anita; van der Wees, Marleen; Kemps, Rachèl J J K; Catsman-Berrevoets, Coriene E; Oosterlaan, Jaap

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the impact of pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) on multisensory integration in relation to general neurocognitive functioning. Children with a hospital admission for TBI aged between 6 and 13 years (n = 94) were compared with children with trauma control (TC) injuries (n = 39), while differentiating between mild TBI without risk factors for complicated TBI (mild RF- ; n = 19), mild TBI with ≥1 risk factor (mild RF+ ; n = 45), and moderate/severe TBI (n = 30). We measured set-shifting performance based on visual information (visual shift condition) and set-shifting performance based on audiovisual information, requiring multisensory integration (audiovisual shift condition). Effects of TBI on set-shifting performance were traced back to task strategy (i.e., boundary separation), processing efficiency (i.e., drift rate), or extradecisional processes (i.e., nondecision time) using diffusion model analysis. General neurocognitive functioning was measured using estimated full-scale IQ (FSIQ). The TBI group showed selectively reduced performance in the audiovisual shift condition (p = .009, Cohen's d = -0.51). Follow-up analyses in the audiovisual shift condition revealed reduced performance in the mildRF+ TBI group and moderate/severe TBI group (ps ≤ .025, ds ≤ -0.61). These effects were traced back to lower drift rate (ps ≤ .048, ds ≤ -0.44), reflecting reduced multisensory integration efficiency. Notably, accuracy and drift rate in the audiovisual shift condition partially mediated the relation between TBI and FSIQ. Children with mildRF+ or moderate/severe TBI are at risk for reduced multisensory integration efficiency, possibly contributing to decreased general neurocognitive functioning. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. Computed Tomography: Ocular Manifestations In Acute Head Injury

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    post-traumatic amnesia, neurologic signs of brain. 3 injury or skull fractures. The Glasgow coma score and the Revised trauma scores (RTS) are commonly used in grading the severity of head injury into mild, moderate, and severe. The RTS is a triage tool and the score is inferred from physiologic derangement on initial.

  11. An overview of strength training injuries: acute and chronic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallee, Mark E; Balam, Tucker

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces the history of strength training, explains the many different styles of strength training, and discusses common injuries specific to each style. Strength training is broken down into five disciplines: basic strength or resistance training, bodybuilding, power lifting, style-dependant strength sports (e.g., strongman competitions, Highland games, field events such as shot put, discus, hammer throw, and javelin), and Olympic-style weightlifting. Each style has its own principal injuries, both acute and chronic, related to the individual technique. Acute injuries should be further categorized as emergent or nonemergent. Specific age-related populations (i.e., the very young and the aging athlete) carry additional considerations.

  12. Risk Adjustment In Neurocritical care (RAIN)--prospective validation of risk prediction models for adult patients with acute traumatic brain injury to use to evaluate the optimum location and comparative costs of neurocritical care: a cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, D A; Prabhu, G; Grieve, R; Harvey, S E; Sadique, M Z; Gomes, M; Griggs, K A; Walmsley, E; Smith, M; Yeoman, P; Lecky, F E; Hutchinson, P J A; Menon, D K; Rowan, K M

    2013-06-01

    To validate risk prediction models for acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to use the best model to evaluate the optimum location and comparative costs of neurocritical care in the NHS. Cohort study. Sixty-seven adult critical care units. Adult patients admitted to critical care following actual/suspected TBI with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of traffic accidents (RTAs) (33%), falls (47%) and assault (12%). Patients were predominantly young (mean age 45 years overall) and male (76% overall). Six-month mortality was 22% for RTAs, 32% for falls and 17% for assault. Of survivors at 6 months with a known GOSE category, 44% had severe disability, 30% moderate disability and 26% made a good recovery. Overall, 61% of patients with known outcome had an unfavourable outcome (death or severe disability) at 6 months. Between 35% and 70% of survivors reported problems across the five domains of the EQ-5D-3L. Of the 10 risk models selected for validation, the best discrimination overall was from the International Mission for Prognosis and Analysis of Clinical Trials in TBI Lab model (IMPACT) (c-index 0.779 for mortality, 0.713 for unfavourable outcome). The model was well calibrated for 6-month mortality but substantially underpredicted the risk of unfavourable outcome at 6 months. Baseline patient characteristics were similar between dedicated neurocritical care units and combined neuro/general critical care units. In lifetime cost-effectiveness analysis, dedicated neurocritical care units had higher mean lifetime quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) at small additional mean costs with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of £14,000 per QALY and incremental net monetary benefit (INB) of £17,000. The cost-effectiveness acceptability curve suggested that the probability that dedicated compared with combined neurocritical care units are cost-effective is around 60%. There were substantial differences in case mix between the 'early' (within 18 hours of

  13. Development of brain injury criteria (BrIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takhounts, Erik G; Craig, Matthew J; Moorhouse, Kevin; McFadden, Joe; Hasija, Vikas

    2013-11-01

    Rotational motion of the head as a mechanism for brain injury was proposed back in the 1940s. Since then a multitude of research studies by various institutions were conducted to confirm/reject this hypothesis. Most of the studies were conducted on animals and concluded that rotational kinematics experienced by the animal's head may cause axonal deformations large enough to induce their functional deficit. Other studies utilized physical and mathematical models of human and animal heads to derive brain injury criteria based on deformation/pressure histories computed from their models. This study differs from the previous research in the following ways: first, it uses two different detailed mathematical models of human head (SIMon and GHBMC), each validated against various human brain response datasets; then establishes physical (strain and stress based) injury criteria for various types of brain injury based on scaled animal injury data; and finally, uses Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs) (Hybrid III 50th Male, Hybrid III 5th Female, THOR 50th Male, ES-2re, SID-IIs, WorldSID 50th Male, and WorldSID 5th Female) test data (NCAP, pendulum, and frontal offset tests) to establish a kinematically based brain injury criterion (BrIC) for all ATDs. Similar procedures were applied to college football data where thousands of head impacts were recorded using a six degrees of freedom (6 DOF) instrumented helmet system. Since animal injury data used in derivation of BrIC were predominantly for diffuse axonal injury (DAI) type, which is currently an AIS 4+ injury, cumulative strain damage measure (CSDM) and maximum principal strain (MPS) were used to derive risk curves for AIS 4+ anatomic brain injuries. The AIS 1+, 2+, 3+, and 5+ risk curves for CSDM and MPS were then computed using the ratios between corresponding risk curves for head injury criterion (HIC) at a 50% risk. The risk curves for BrIC were then obtained from CSDM and MPS risk curves using the linear relationship

  14. Persuasive discourse impairments in traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghayoumi, Zahra; Yadegari, Fariba; Mahmoodi-Bakhtiari, Behrooz; Fakharian, Esmaeil; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Rasouli, Maryam

    2015-03-01

    Considering the cognitive and linguistic complexity of discourse production, it is expected that individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) should face difficulties in this task. Therefore, clinical examination of discourse has become a useful tool for studying and assessment of communication skills of people suffering from TBI. Among different genres of discourse, persuasive discourse is considered as a more cognitively demanding task. However, little is known about persuasive discourse in individuals suffering from TBI. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of adults with TBI on a task of spoken persuasive discourse to determine the impaired linguistic measures. Thirteen TBI nonaphasic Persian speaking individuals, ranged between 19 to 40 years (Mean = 25.64 years; SD = 6.10) and 59 healthy adults matched by age, were asked to perform the persuasive discourse task. The task included asking the participants to express their opinion on a topic, and after the analysis of the produced discourse, the two groups were compared on the basis of their language productivity, sentential complexity, maze ratio and cohesion ratio. The TBI group produced discourses with less productivity, sentential complexity, cohesion ratio and more maze ratio compared the control group. As it is important to consider acquired communication disorders particularly discourse impairment of brain injured patients along with their other clinical impairments and regarding the fact that persuasive discourse is crucial in academic and social situations, the persuasive discourse task presented in this study could be a useful tool for speech therapists, intending to evaluate communication disorders in patients with TBI.

  15. Nursing Activities Score and Acute Kidney Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Filipe Utuari de Andrade; Watanabe, Mirian; Fonseca, Cassiane Dezoti da; Padilha, Katia Grillo; Vattimo, Maria de Fátima Fernandes

    2017-01-01

    to evaluate the nursing workload in intensive care patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). A quantitative study, conducted in an intensive care unit, from April to August of 2015. The Nursing Activities Score (NAS) and Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) were used to measure nursing workload and to classify the stage of AKI, respectively. A total of 190 patients were included. Patients who developed AKI (44.2%) had higher NAS when compared to those without AKI (43.7% vs 40.7%), p terapia intensiva com lesão renal aguda (LRA). estudo quantitativo, em Unidade de Terapia Intensiva, no período de abril a agosto de 2015. O Nursing Activities Score (NAS) e o Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) foram utilizados para medir a carga de trabalho de enfermagem e classificar o estágio da LRA, respectivamente. foram incluídos 190 pacientes. Os pacientes que desenvolveram LRA (44,2%) possuíam NAS superiores quando comparados aos sem LRA (43,7% vs 40,7%), p<0,001. Os pacientes com LRA nos estágios 1, 2 e 3 de LRA demonstraram NAS superiores aos sem LRA, houve relação entre os estágios 2 e 3 com os sem LRA, p=0,002 e p<0,001. o NAS apresentou associação com a existência de LRA, visto que seu valor aumenta com a progressão dos estágios, tendo associação com os estágios 2 e 3 de LRA.

  16. Laboratory test surveillance following acute kidney injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Matheny

    Full Text Available Patients with hospitalized acute kidney injury (AKI are at increased risk for accelerated loss of kidney function, morbidity, and mortality. We sought to inform efforts at improving post-AKI outcomes by describing the receipt of renal-specific laboratory test surveillance among a large high-risk cohort.We acquired clinical data from the Electronic health record (EHR of 5 Veterans Affairs (VA hospitals to identify patients hospitalized with AKI from January 1st, 2002 to December 31st, 2009, and followed these patients for 1 year or until death, enrollment in palliative care, or improvement in renal function to estimated GFR (eGFR ≥ 60 L/min/1.73 m(2. Using demographic data, administrative codes, and laboratory test data, we evaluated the receipt and timing of outpatient testing for serum concentrations of creatinine and any as well as quantitative proteinuria recommended for CKD risk stratification. Additionally, we reported the rate of phosphorus and parathyroid hormone (PTH monitoring recommended for chronic kidney disease (CKD patients.A total of 10,955 patients admitted with AKI were discharged with an eGFR<60 mL/min/1.73 m2. During outpatient follow-up at 90 and 365 days, respectively, creatinine was measured on 69% and 85% of patients, quantitative proteinuria was measured on 6% and 12% of patients, PTH or phosphorus was measured on 10% and 15% of patients.Measurement of creatinine was common among all patients following AKI. However, patients with AKI were infrequently monitored with assessments of quantitative proteinuria or mineral metabolism disorder, even for patients with baseline kidney disease.

  17. Acute Pancreatitis and Rhabdomyolysis with Acute Kidney Injury following Multiple Wasp Stings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seo Hee Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple wasp stings can induce multiple organ dysfunction by toxic reactions. However, acute pancreatitis is a rare manifestation in wasp sting injury. A 74-year-old woman visited the emergency department by anaphylactic shock because of multiple wasp stings. Acute kidney injury, rhabdomyolysis, hepatotoxicity, and coagulopathy were developed next day. Serum amylase and lipase were elevated and an abdominal computed tomography revealed an acute pancreatitis. Urine output was recovered after 16 days of oliguria (below 500 ml/day. Her kidney, liver, and pancreas injury gradually improved after sessions of renal replacement therapy.

  18. Predicting institutionalization after traumatic brain injury inpatient rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eum, Regina S; Seel, Ronald T; Goldstein, Richard; Brown, Allen W; Watanabe, Thomas K; Zasler, Nathan D; Roth, Elliot J; Zafonte, Ross D; Glenn, Mel B

    2015-02-15

    Risk factors contributing to institutionalization after inpatient rehabilitation for people with traumatic brain injury (TBI) have not been well studied and need to be better understood to guide clinicians during rehabilitation. We aimed to develop a prognostic model that could be used at admission to inpatient rehabilitation facilities to predict discharge disposition. The model could be used to provide the interdisciplinary team with information regarding aspects of patients' functioning and/or their living situation that need particular attention during inpatient rehabilitation if institutionalization is to be avoided. The study population included 7219 patients with moderate-severe TBI in the Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems (TBIMS) National Database enrolled from 2002-2012 who had not been institutionalized prior to injury. Based on institutionalization predictors in other populations, we hypothesized that among people who had lived at a private residence prior to injury, greater dependence in locomotion, bed-chair-wheelchair transfers, bladder and bowel continence, feeding, and comprehension at admission to inpatient rehabilitation programs would predict institutionalization at discharge. Logistic regression was used, with adjustment for demographic factors, proxy measures for TBI severity, and acute-care length-of-stay. C-statistic and predictiveness curves validated a five-variable model. Higher levels of independence in bladder management (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 0.88; 95% CI 0.83, 0.93), bed-chair-wheelchair transfers (OR, 0.81 [95% CI, 0.83-0.93]), and comprehension (OR, 0.78 [95% CI, 0.68, 0.89]) at admission were associated with lower risks of institutionalization on discharge. For every 10-year increment in age was associated with a 1.38 times higher risk for institutionalization (95% CI, 1.29, 1.48) and living alone was associated with a 2.34 times higher risk (95% CI, 1.86, 2.94). The c-statistic was 0.780. We conclude that this simple model

  19. Music therapy for acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradt, Joke; Magee, Wendy L; Dileo, Cheryl; Wheeler, Barbara L; McGilloway, Emer

    2010-07-07

    Acquired brain injury (ABI) can result in impairments in motor function, language, cognition, sensory processing and emotional disturbances. This may severely reduce a survivor's quality of life. Music therapy has been used in rehabilitation to stimulate brain functions involved in movement, cognition, speech, emotions and sensory perceptions. A systematic review is needed to gauge the efficacy of music therapy as a rehabilitation intervention for people with ABI. To examine the effects of music therapy with standard care versus standard care alone or standard care combined with other therapies on gait, upper extremity function, communication, mood and emotions, social skills, pain, behavioral outcomes, activities of daily living and adverse events. We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (February 2010), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library Issue 2, 2009), MEDLINE (July 2009), EMBASE (August 2009), CINAHL (March 2010), PsycINFO (July 2009), LILACS (August 2009), AMED (August 2009) and Science Citation Index (August 2009). We handsearched music therapy journals and conference proceedings, searched dissertation and specialist music databases, trials and research registers, reference lists, and contacted experts and music therapy associations. There was no language restriction. Randomized and quasi-randomized controlled trials that compared music therapy interventions and standard care with standard care alone or combined with other therapies for people older than 16 years of age who had acquired brain damage of a non-degenerative nature and were participating in treatment programs offered in hospital, outpatient or community settings. Two review authors independently assessed methodological quality and extracted data. We present results using mean differences (using post-test scores) as all outcomes were measured with the same scale. We included seven studies (184 participants). The results suggest that rhythmic

  20. Spreading depolarisations and outcome after traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartings, Jed A; Bullock, M Ross; Okonkwo, David O

    2011-01-01

    Pathological waves of spreading mass neuronal depolarisation arise repeatedly in injured, but potentially salvageable, grey matter in 50-60% of patients after traumatic brain injury (TBI). We aimed to ascertain whether spreading depolarisations are independently associated with unfavourable...

  1. Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research (FITBIR) Informatics System

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research (FITBIR) informatics system is an extensible, scalable informatics platform for TBI relevant imaging,...

  2. Preliminary questions before studying mild traumatic brain injury outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol, P; Carrière, H; Habonimana, D; Dumond, J-J

    2009-07-01

    To point out from the literature the issues in mild traumatic brain injury outcome. METHODOLOGY-RESULTS: The literature review allows to point out several different factors involved in the difficulty to study mild traumatic brain injury: mild traumatic brain injury definition, postconcussional syndrome definition, diagnosis threshold, severity and functional symptoms outcome, neuropsychological tests, unspecific syndrome feature, individual factors, confounding factors and treatment interventions. The mild traumatic brain injury outcome study is complicated by the definitions issues and especially their practical use and by the multiplicity and the intricate interrelationships among involved factors. The individual outcome and social cost weight is widely emphasized for an event still considered as medically trivial. The well-ordered preventive interventions necessity and the targeted treatment programs need for the persisting postconcussive symptoms complete our critical review.

  3. Falls and traumatic brain injury among older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filer, William; Harris, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    This commentary discusses traumatic brain injury (TBI) related to falls among elderly individuals, as well as common TBI sequelae and their treatment. It also discusses the current understanding of TBI-related dementia and chronic traumatic encephalopathy.

  4. Rehabilitation of discourse impairments after acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gindri, Gigiane; Pagliarin, Karina Carlesso; Casarin, Fabíola Schwengber; Branco, Laura Damiani; Ferré, Perrine; Joanette, Yves; Fonseca, Rochele Paz

    2014-01-01

    Language impairments in patients with acquired brain injury can have a negative impact on social life as well as on other cognitive domains. Discourse impairments are among the most commonly reported communication deficits among patients with acquired brain damage. Despite advances in the development of diagnostic tools for detecting such impairments, few studies have investigated interventions to rehabilitate patients presenting with these conditions. The aim of this study was to present a systematic review of the methods used in the rehabilitation of discourse following acquired brain injury. The PubMed database was searched for articles using the following keywords: "rehabilitation", "neurological injury", "communication" and "discursive abilities". A total of 162 abstracts were found, but only seven of these met criteria for inclusion in the review. Four studies involved samples of individuals with aphasia whereas three studies recruited samples of individuals with traumatic brain injury. All but one article found that patient performance improved following participation in a discourse rehabilitation program.

  5. Rates of symptom reporting following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikmen, Sureyya; Machamer, Joan; Fann, Jesse R; Temkin, Nancy R

    2010-05-01

    This study examines rates of reporting of new or worse post-traumatic symptoms for patients with a broad range of injury severity at 1 month and 1 year after traumatic brain injury (TBI), as compared with those whose injury spared the head, and assesses variables related to symptom reporting at 1 year post-injury. Seven hundred thirty two TBI subjects and 120 general trauma comparison (TC) subjects provided new or worse symptom information at 1 month and/or 1 year post-injury. Symptom reporting at 1 year post-injury was compared in subgroups based on basic demographics, preexisting conditions, and severity of brain injury. The TBI group reported significantly more symptoms at 1 month and 1 year after injury than TCs (each p < .001). Although symptom endorsement declined from 1 month to 1 year, 53% of people with TBI and 24% of TC continued to report 3 or more symptoms at 1 year post-injury. Symptom reporting in the TBI group was significantly related to age, gender, preinjury alcohol abuse, pre-injury psychiatric history, and severity of TBI. Symptom reporting is common following a traumatic injury and continues to be experienced by a substantial number of TBI subjects of all severity levels at 1 year post-injury.

  6. Cooking breakfast after a brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annick N. Tanguay

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Acquired brain injury (ABI often compromises the ability to carry out instrumental activities of daily living such as cooking. ABI patients’ difficulties with executive functions and memory result in less independent and efficient meal preparation. Accurately assessing safety and proficiency in cooking is essential for successful community reintegration following ABI, but in vivo assessment of cooking by clinicians is time-consuming, costly, and difficult to standardize. Accordingly, we examined the usefulness of a computerized meal preparation task (the Breakfast Task; Craik & Bialystok, 2006 as an indicator of real life meal preparation skills. Twenty-two ABI patients and 22 age-matched controls completed the Breakfast Task and the Rehabilitation Activities of Daily Living Survey (RADLS; Salmon, 2003. Patients also prepared actual meals, and were rated by members of the clinical team. As expected, the ABI patients had significant difficulty on all aspects of the Breakfast Task (failing to have all their foods ready at the same time, over- and under-cooking foods, setting fewer places at the table, and so on relative to controls. Surprisingly, however, patients’ Breakfast Task performance was not correlated with their in vivo meal preparation. These results indicate caution when endeavoring to replace traditional evaluation methods with computerized tasks for the sake of expediency.

  7. Visual problems associated with traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Richard A

    2018-02-28

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) and its associated concussion are major causes of disability and death. All ages can be affected but children, young adults and the elderly are particularly susceptible. A decline in mortality has resulted in many more individuals living with a disability caused by TBI including those affecting vision. This review describes: (1) the major clinical and pathological features of TBI; (2) the visual signs and symptoms associated with the disorder; and (3) discusses the assessment of quality of life and visual rehabilitation of the patient. Defects in primary vision such as visual acuity and visual fields, eye movement including vergence, saccadic and smooth pursuit movements, and in more complex aspects of vision involving visual perception, motion vision ('akinopsia'), and visuo-spatial function have all been reported in TBI. Eye movement dysfunction may be an early sign of TBI. Hence, TBI can result in a variety of visual problems, many patients exhibiting multiple visual defects in combination with a decline in overall health. Patients with chronic dysfunction following TBI may require occupational, vestibular, cognitive and other forms of physical therapy. Such patients may also benefit from visual rehabilitation, including reading-related oculomotor training and the prescribing of spectacles with a variety of tints and prism combinations. © 2018 Optometry Australia.

  8. Participation in leisure activities during brain injury rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Jennifer; Braithwaite, Helen; Gustafsson, Louise; Griffin, Janelle; Collier, Ann Maree; Fletcher, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    To describe and compare pre- and post-injury leisure activities of individuals receiving brain injury rehabilitation and explore levels of leisure participation and satisfaction. Cross-sectional descriptive study incorporating a survey of current and past leisure activities. Questionnaires were completed by 40 individuals with an acquired brain injury receiving inpatient or outpatient rehabilitation. Shortened Version of the Nottingham Leisure Questionnaire and Changes in Leisure Questionnaire (developed for this study). Leisure participation declined following injury, particularly in social leisure activities. Pre-injury activities with high rates of discontinued or decreased participation were driving, going to pubs and parties, do-it-yourself activities and attending sports events. Inpatient participants generally attributed decreased participation to the hospital environment, whereas outpatient participants reported this predominantly as a result of disability. Post-injury levels of perceived leisure satisfaction were significantly lower for the inpatient group compared to pre-injury, but not for the outpatient group. Uptake of some new leisure activities was reported post-injury, however not at the rate to which participation declined. Leisure participation decreases during brain injury rehabilitation compared to pre-injury levels. Re-engagement in relevant, age-appropriate leisure activities needs to be addressed during rehabilitation to improve participation in this domain.

  9. Dedifferentiation Does Not Account for Hyperconnectivity after Traumatic Brain Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Bernier, Rachel Anne; Roy, Arnab; Venkatesan, Umesh Meyyappan; Grossner, Emily C.; Brenner, Einat K.; Hillary, Frank Gerard

    2017-01-01

    Objective Changes in functional network connectivity following traumatic brain injury (TBI) have received increasing attention in recent neuroimaging literature. This study sought to understand how disrupted systems adapt to injury during resting and goal-directed brain states. Hyperconnectivity has been a common finding, and dedifferentiation (or loss of segregation of networks) is one possible explanation for this finding. We hypothesized that individuals with TBI would show dedifferenti...

  10. Analysis of Surfing Injuries Presenting in the Acute Trauma Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jubbal, Kevin T; Chen, Charlie; Costantini, Todd; Herrera, Fernando; Dobke, Marek; Suliman, Ahmed

    2017-05-01

    Surfing is a rapidly growing major worldwide sport; however, little is understood regarding severe injuries and resulting hospital admissions. This study explores surfing-related injuries in the major surfing hub of San Diego presenting in the acute trauma setting. The purpose of this study is to address the void of information regarding severe surfing injuries in the trauma setting, including injury patterns, associated hospitalization course, and risk factors. Understanding the injury patterns in surfing accidents is crucial for proper management of surfing injuries. A retrospective analysis was performed of all surfing-related injuries in a Level 1 trauma center between 2000 and 2016. A total of 93 patients were identified. Body parts most commonly affected include the head (42, 46%), face (21, 22%), and spine (47, 51%). Twenty-eight (30%) patients required surgical intervention, including 19 for spinal injuries, 3 for facial injuries, 4 for upper extremity injuries, and 2 for lower extremity injuries. The distribution for most presentations (55, 59%) occurred in the summer months between July and September. The Injury Severity Score demonstrated strong positive correlation with the length of hospital stay, with a Pearson coefficient of 0.52 (P sport, is not without major risks. In contrast with other studies, we found a high proportion of head, face, and spine injuries in patients presenting with surfing injuries in the trauma setting, consistent with its presentation as a high velocity and high impact injury. With plastic surgeons often treating severe head and facial injuries, understanding the injury patterns in severe surfing accidents is crucial for proper management. High rates of positive alcohol and drug screening signal the importance to bring awareness to the dangers of surfing under the influence.

  11. [Brain injury knowledge in family members of neurosurgical patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Main, Blanca; Castaño-León, Ana M; Munarriz, Pablo M; Gómez, Pedro A; Rios-Lago, Marcos; Lagares, Alfonso

    Several studies have shown misconceptions about brain injury in different populations. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge and perceptions about brain injury of family members of neurosurgical patients in our hospital. The participants (n=81) were relatives of patients admitted to the neurosurgery department between February and August 2016. They voluntarily completed a 19-item true-false format survey about brain injury based on a translation of other questionnaires used in previous studies from other countries (USA, Canada, UK, Ireland and New Zealand). Also, some sociodemographic data were collected (age, sex, education level and the patient's pathology). Data analysis was developed through graphical modelling with a regularisation parameter plotted on a network representing the association of the items of the questionnaire from the response pattern of participants. Data analysis showed two conceptual areas with a high rate of wrong answers: behaviour and management of patients, and expectations about acquired brain injury recovery. The results obtained in this study would enable us to objectify misconceptions about acquired brain injury in patients' relatives attended in the neurosurgery department. This lack of knowledge could be a great obstacle in patients' recovery process. Therefore, we suggest placing the emphasis on the provision of information on brain injury to patients' families, especially with regard to its symptoms and course of development. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  12. Characteristics of acute groin injuries in the hip flexor muscles a detailed MRI study in athletes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serner, A.; Weir, A.; Tol, J. L.; Thorborg, K.; Roemer, F.; Guermazi, A.; Yamashiro, E.; Hölmich, P.

    2018-01-01

    Hip flexor injuries account for one-third of acute groin injuries; however, little is known about specific injury characteristics. The aims of this study were to describe acute hip flexor injuries using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in athletes with acute groin pain and to compare specific muscle

  13. Traumatic Brain Injury Increases Cortical Glutamate Network Activity by Compromising GABAergic Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantu, David; Walker, Kendall; Andresen, Lauren; Taylor-Weiner, Amaro; Hampton, David; Tesco, Giuseppina; Dulla, Chris G

    2015-08-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a major risk factor for developing pharmaco-resistant epilepsy. Although disruptions in brain circuitry are associated with TBI, the precise mechanisms by which brain injury leads to epileptiform network activity is unknown. Using controlled cortical impact (CCI) as a model of TBI, we examined how cortical excitability and glutamatergic signaling was altered following injury. We optically mapped cortical glutamate signaling using FRET-based glutamate biosensors, while simultaneously recording cortical field potentials in acute brain slices 2-4 weeks following CCI. Cortical electrical stimulation evoked polyphasic, epileptiform field potentials and disrupted the input-output relationship in deep layers of CCI-injured cortex. High-speed glutamate biosensor imaging showed that glutamate signaling was significantly increased in the injured cortex. Elevated glutamate responses correlated with epileptiform activity, were highest directly adjacent to the injury, and spread via deep cortical layers. Immunoreactivity for markers of GABAergic interneurons were significantly decreased throughout CCI cortex. Lastly, spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic current frequency decreased and spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic current increased after CCI injury. Our results suggest that specific cortical neuronal microcircuits may initiate and facilitate the spread of epileptiform activity following TBI. Increased glutamatergic signaling due to loss of GABAergic control may provide a mechanism by which TBI can give rise to post-traumatic epilepsy. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Neuropsychology and rehabilitation of patients with severe acquired brain injury: a complex relationship?

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio De Tanti; Donatella Saviola

    2015-01-01

    The complexity of simultaneous impairments in persons with severe acquired brain injury calls for coordinated work by a team of specialists in order to optimise residual potential and deal immediately with aspects that interfere with recovery. Here we propose a review of the main critical aspects that can interfere with neuropsychological rehabilitation in these subjects in the post-acute intensive rehabilitation stage: associated damage, complications, sensory and motor impairment and ...

  15. Neuropsychology and rehabilitation of patients with severe acquired brain injury: a complex relationship?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio De Tanti

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of simultaneous impairments in persons with severe acquired brain injury calls for coordinated work by a team of specialists in order to optimise residual potential and deal immediately with aspects that interfere with recovery. Here we propose a review of the main critical aspects that can interfere with neuropsychological rehabilitation in these subjects in the post-acute intensive rehabilitation stage: associated damage, complications, sensory and motor impairment and pharmacological treatment.

  16. Development of an Ontology for Rehabilitation: Traumatic Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grove, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) rehabilitation interventions are very heterogeneous due to injury characteristics and pathology, patient demographics, healthcare settings, caregiver variability, and individualized, multi-discipline treatment plans. Consequently, comparing and generalizing the effectiveness of interventions is limited largely due to…

  17. Traumatic Brain Injury in the Accident and Emergency Department of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Traumatic brain injury is a major public health problem in Nigeria, as it could be associated with long term and life long deficits. Unlike other parts of the world, in our country, motorcycles are possibly the main cause of this injury. Unfortunately, we do not have a national epidemiological data base yet. This study ...

  18. Effect of acute stretch injury on action potential and network activity of rat neocortical neurons in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magou, George C; Pfister, Bryan J; Berlin, Joshua R

    2015-10-22

    The basis for acute seizures following traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains unclear. Animal models of TBI have revealed acute hyperexcitablility in cortical neurons that could underlie seizure activity, but studying initiating events causing hyperexcitability is difficult in these models. In vitro models of stretch injury with cultured cortical neurons, a surrogate for TBI, allow facile investigation of cellular changes after injury but they have only demonstrated post-injury hypoexcitability. The goal of this study was to determine if neuronal hyperexcitability could be triggered by in vitro stretch injury. Controlled uniaxial stretch injury was delivered to a spatially delimited region of a spontaneously active network of cultured rat cortical neurons, yielding a region of stretch-injured neurons and adjacent regions of non-stretched neurons that did not directly experience stretch injury. Spontaneous electrical activity was measured in non-stretched and stretch-injured neurons, and in control neuronal networks not subjected to stretch injury. Non-stretched neurons in stretch-injured cultures displayed a three-fold increase in action potential firing rate and bursting activity 30-60 min post-injury. Stretch-injured neurons, however, displayed dramatically lower rates of action potential firing and bursting. These results demonstrate that acute hyperexcitability can be observed in non-stretched neurons located in regions adjacent to the site of stretch injury, consistent with reports that seizure activity can arise from regions surrounding the site of localized brain injury. Thus, this in vitro procedure for localized neuronal stretch injury may provide a model to study the earliest cellular changes in neuronal function associated with acute post-traumatic seizures. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Young Children's Acute Stress After a Burn Injury: Disentangling the Role of Injury Severity and Parental Acute Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Ann-Christin; Landolt, Markus A

    2017-09-01

    Although injury severity and parental stress are strong predictors of posttraumatic adjustment in young children after burns, little is known about the interplay of these variables. This study aimed at clarifying mediation processes between injury severity and mother's, father's, and young child's acute stress. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the relationships between injury severity and parental and child acute stress. Parents of 138 burn-injured children (ages 1-4 years) completed standardized questionnaires on average 19 days postinjury. Sixteen children (11.7%) met Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition, preschool criteria for posttraumatic stress disorder (excluding time criterion). The model revealed a significant mediation of maternal acute stress, with the effect of injury severity on a child's acute stress mediated by maternal acute stress. Paternal acute stress failed to serve as a mediating variable. Our findings confirm mothers' crucial role in the posttraumatic adjustment of young children. Clinically, mothers' acute stress should be monitored. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  20. CELECOXIB ATTENUATES SYSTEMIC LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-INDUCED BRAIN INFLAMMATION AND WHITE MATTER INJURY IN THE NEONATAL RATS

    Science.gov (United States)

    FAN, L.-W.; KAIZAKI, A.; TIEN, L.-T.; PANG, Y.; TANAKA, S.; NUMAZAWA, S.; BHATT, A. J.; CAI, Z.

    2013-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced white matter injury in the neonatal rat brain is associated with inflammatory processes. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) can be induced by inflammatory stimuli, such as cytokines and pro-inflammatory molecules, suggesting that COX-2 may be considered as the target for anti-inflammation. The objective of the present study was to examine whether celecoxib, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, can reduce systemic LPS-induced brain inflammation and brain damage. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of LPS (2 mg/kg) was performed in postnatal day 5 (P5) of Sprague-Dawley rat pups and celecoxib (20 mg/kg) or vehicle was administered i.p. 5 min after LPS injection. The body weight and wire hanging maneuver test were performed 24 hr after the LPS exposure, and brain injury was examined after these tests. Systemic LPS exposure resulted in an impairment of behavioral performance and acute brain injury, as indicated by apoptotic death of oligodendrocytes (OLs) and loss of OL immunoreactivity in the neonatal rat brain. Treatments with celecoxib significantly reduced systemic LPS-induced neurobehavioral disturbance and brain damage. Celecoxib administration significantly attenuated systemic LPS-induced increments in the number of activated microglia and astrocytes, concentrations of IL-1β and TNFα, and protein levels of phosphorylated-p38 MAPK in the neonatal rat brain. The protection of celecoxib was also associated with a reduction of systemic LPS-induced COX-2+ cells which were double labeled with GFAP+ (astrocyte) cells. The overall results suggest that celecoxib was capable of attenuating the brain injury and neurobehavioral disturbance induced by systemic LPS exposure, and the protective effects are associated with its anti-inflammatory properties. PMID:23485816

  1. MRI of acute cervical injury: correlation with neurologic deficit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hyun, Chang Dong; Kwon, Soon Tae; Lim, Seung Chul; Shin, Myung Jin; Han, Boo Kyung; Kim, Sang Joon; Park, Man Soo; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Suh, Dae Chul

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate MRI findings of spinal cord according to mechanism in acute cervical spinal injury. 25 patients under went MRI within 1 month after acute cervical trauma. Axial T1Wl (TR/TE: 500/20), gradient-echo (TR/TE: 300/14), sagittal T1Wl (TR/TE: 500/20), proton (TR/TE: 2000. 20 msec), T2Wl (TR/TE: 2000/80) were performed. In 11 patients, post-enhancement T1Wl was done. Change of spinal cord signal intensity on MRI in addition to the presence of abnormal changes of vertebral body, intervertebral disc and paraspinal soft tissue were evaluated. 15 patients had flexion injury, seven had extension injury and three had injury of unknown mechanism. Twelve patients showed iso-signal intensity on T2Wl and high signal intensity on T2Wl. Three patients showed low signal intensity on T1Wl and high signal intensity on T2Wl. Spinal cord hemorrhage occured in 10 patients. We found cord swelling in nine patients and cord compression in 12 patients. In nine patients with cord swelling, extent of cord injury was more than one segment of vertebral body. Ligamentous injury, disc injury, soft tissue injury occurred in 16 (64%), 17 (68%), 15 (60%) patients respectively. Vertebral body fracture was found in 17 patients (68%). The levels of fracture were C6 (eight patients) and C5 (five patients). MRI is valuable in exaluetion of the spinal cord, intervertebral disc, and soft tissue lesions in acute cervical spinal injury. Prognosis is worse in flexion injury than in extension injury, and is well correlated with cord hemorrhage and lesion extent

  2. Statistical analysis plan for the Erythropoietin in Traumatic Brain Injury trial: a randomised controlled trial of erythropoietin versus placebo in moderate and severe traumatic brain injury.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Presneill, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    The Erythropoietin in Traumatic Brain Injury (EPO-TBI) trial aims to determine whether the administration of erythropoietin to patients with moderate or severe traumatic brain injury improves patient-centred outcomes.

  3. Adding insult to brain injury: young adults' experiences of residing in nursing homes following acquired brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Aoife; Heary, Caroline; Ward, Marcia; MacNeela, Pádraig

    2017-08-28

    There is general consensus that adults under age 65 with acquired brain injury residing in nursing homes is inappropriate, however there is a limited evidence base on the issue. Previous research has relied heavily on third-party informants and qualitative studies have been of questionable methodological quality, with no known study adopting a phenomenological approach. This study explored the lived experiences of young adults with brain injury residing in aged care facilities. Interpretative phenomenological analysis was employed to collect and analyze data from six semi-structured interviews with participants regarding their experiences of living in nursing homes. Two themes were identified, including "Corporeal prison of acquired brain injury: broken selves" and "Existential prison of the nursing home: stagnated lives". Results illustrated that young adults with acquired brain injury can experience aged care as an existential prison in which their lives feel at a standstill. This experience was characterized by feelings of not belonging in a terminal environment, confinement, disempowerment, emptiness and hope for greater autonomy through rehabilitation. It is hoped that this study will provide relevant professionals, services and policy-makers with insight into the challenges and needs of young adults with brain injury facing these circumstances. Implications for rehabilitation This study supports the contention that more home-like and age-appropriate residential rehabilitation services for young adults with acquired brain injury are needed. As development of alternative accommodation is a lengthy process, the study findings suggest that the interim implementation of rehabilitative care in nursing homes should be considered. Taken together with existing research, it is proposed that nursing home staff may require training to deliver evidence-based rehabilitative interventions to those with brain injury. The present findings add support to the call for systemic

  4. Internet and Social Media Use After Traumatic Brain Injury: A Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Sparr, Christina; Hart, Tessa; Bergquist, Thomas; Bogner, Jennifer; Dreer, Laura; Juengst, Shannon; Mellick, David; OʼNeil-Pirozzi, Therese M; Sander, Angelle M; Whiteneck, Gale G

    To characterize Internet and social media use among adults with moderate to severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and to compare demographic and socioeconomic factors associated with Internet use between those with and without TBI. Ten Traumatic Brain Injury Model Systems centers. Persons with moderate to severe TBI (N = 337) enrolled in the TBI Model Systems National Database and eligible for follow-up from April 1, 2014, to March 31, 2015. Prospective cross-sectional observational cohort study. Internet usage survey. The proportion of Internet users with TBI was high (74%) but significantly lower than those in the general population (84%). Smartphones were the most prevalent means of Internet access for persons with TBI. The majority of Internet users with TBI had a profile account on a social networking site (79%), with more than half of the sample reporting multiplatform use of 2 or more social networking sites. Despite the prevalence of Internet use among persons with TBI, technological disparities remain in comparison with the general population. The extent of social media use among persons with TBI demonstrates the potential of these platforms for social engagement and other purposes. However, further research examining the quality of online activities and identifying potential risk factors of problematic use is recommended.

  5. Combined high cervical spine and brain stem injuries: a complex and devastating injury in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Philippe-Gabriel; Meyer, Fabien; Orliaguet, Gilles; Blanot, Stéphane; Renier, Dominique; Carli, Pierre

    2005-10-01

    In young children, high cervical spine injuries (HCSI) can result in inaugural reversible, cardiac arrest or apnea. We noted in children sustaining such injuries an unusual incidence of associated brain stem injuries and defined a special pattern of combined lesions. Children with HSCI surviving inaugural cardiac arrest/apnea were selected for a retrospective analysis of a trauma data bank. Epidemiologic, clinical, and radiological characteristics, and outcome were reviewed and compared with those of the rest of the trauma population with severe neurologic injuries (defined by a Glasgow Coma Scale brain stem injury in all patients. Children with combined lesions had more frequent severe facial and skull base fractures compared with the rest of the population. They also were younger and sustained more frequent severe distracting injury to the neck than the rest of the population. Mortality rate (69%) was 2.6-fold higher than that observed in children without HCSI. In survivors, none demonstrated spinal cord injury resulting in persistent peripheral neurologic deficits, but only one achieved a good recovery. Combined HCSI and brain stem injuries must be suspected in young children sustaining a severe distracting injury to the craniocervical junction. Early recognition of these catastrophic injuries by systematic spiral cervical spine and brain stem computed tomographic scan evaluation is mandatory.

  6. Early magnetic resonance detection of cortical necrosis and acute network injury associated with neonatal and infantile cerebral infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okabe, Tetsuhiko; Aida, Noriko; Nozawa, Kumiko [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan); Niwa, Tetsu [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Yokohama (Japan); Tokai University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Isehara (Japan); Shibasaki, Jun [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Neonatology, Yokohama (Japan); Osaka, Hitoshi [Kanagawa Children' s Medical Center, Department of Neurology, Yokohama (Japan)

    2014-05-15

    Knowledge of MRI findings in pediatric cerebral infarction is limited. To determine whether cortical necrosis and network injury appear in the acute phase in post-stroke children and to identify anatomical location of acute network injury and the ages at which these phenomena are seen. Images from 12 children (age range: 0-9 years; neonates [<1 month], n=5; infants [1 month-12 months], n=3; others [≥1 year], n=4) with acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) cortical infarction were retrospectively analyzed. Cortical necrosis was defined as hyperintense cortical lesions on T1-weighted imaging that lacked evidence of hemorrhage. Acute network injury was defined as hyperintense lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging that were not in the MCA territory and had fiber connections with the affected cerebral cortex. MRI was performed within the first week after disease onset. Cortical necrosis was only found in three neonates. Acute network injury was seen in the corticospinal tract (CST), thalamus and corpus callosum. Acute network injury along the CST was found in five neonates and one 7-month-old infant. Acute network injury was evident in the thalamus of four neonates and two infants (ages 4 and 7 months) and in the corpus callosum of five neonates and two infants (ages 4 and 7 months). The entire thalamus was involved in three children when infarction of MCA was complete. In acute MCA cortical infarction, MRI findings indicating cortical necrosis or acute network injury was frequently found in neonates and early infants. Response to injury in a developing brain may be faster than that in a mature one. (orig.)

  7. Early magnetic resonance detection of cortical necrosis and acute network injury associated with neonatal and infantile cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okabe, Tetsuhiko; Aida, Noriko; Nozawa, Kumiko; Niwa, Tetsu; Shibasaki, Jun; Osaka, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge of MRI findings in pediatric cerebral infarction is limited. To determine whether cortical necrosis and network injury appear in the acute phase in post-stroke children and to identify anatomical location of acute network injury and the ages at which these phenomena are seen. Images from 12 children (age range: 0-9 years; neonates [<1 month], n=5; infants [1 month-12 months], n=3; others [≥1 year], n=4) with acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) cortical infarction were retrospectively analyzed. Cortical necrosis was defined as hyperintense cortical lesions on T1-weighted imaging that lacked evidence of hemorrhage. Acute network injury was defined as hyperintense lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging that were not in the MCA territory and had fiber connections with the affected cerebral cortex. MRI was performed within the first week after disease onset. Cortical necrosis was only found in three neonates. Acute network injury was seen in the corticospinal tract (CST), thalamus and corpus callosum. Acute network injury along the CST was found in five neonates and one 7-month-old infant. Acute network injury was evident in the thalamus of four neonates and two infants (ages 4 and 7 months) and in the corpus callosum of five neonates and two infants (ages 4 and 7 months). The entire thalamus was involved in three children when infarction of MCA was complete. In acute MCA cortical infarction, MRI findings indicating cortical necrosis or acute network injury was frequently found in neonates and early infants. Response to injury in a developing brain may be faster than that in a mature one. (orig.)

  8. Early magnetic resonance detection of cortical necrosis and acute network injury associated with neonatal and infantile cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Tetsuhiko; Aida, Noriko; Niwa, Tetsu; Nozawa, Kumiko; Shibasaki, Jun; Osaka, Hitoshi

    2014-05-01

    Knowledge of MRI findings in pediatric cerebral infarction is limited. To determine whether cortical necrosis and network injury appear in the acute phase in post-stroke children and to identify anatomical location of acute network injury and the ages at which these phenomena are seen. Images from 12 children (age range: 0-9 years; neonates [acute middle cerebral artery (MCA) cortical infarction were retrospectively analyzed. Cortical necrosis was defined as hyperintense cortical lesions on T1-weighted imaging that lacked evidence of hemorrhage. Acute network injury was defined as hyperintense lesions on diffusion-weighted imaging that were not in the MCA territory and had fiber connections with the affected cerebral cortex. MRI was performed within the first week after disease onset. Cortical necrosis was only found in three neonates. Acute network injury was seen in the corticospinal tract (CST), thalamus and corpus callosum. Acute network injury along the CST was found in five neonates and one 7-month-old infant. Acute network injury was evident in the thalamus of four neonates and two infants (ages 4 and 7 months) and in the corpus callosum of five neonates and two infants (ages 4 and 7 months). The entire thalamus was involved in three children when infarction of MCA was complete. In acute MCA cortical infarction, MRI findings indicating cortical necrosis or acute network injury was frequently found in neonates and early infants. Response to injury in a developing brain may be faster than that in a mature one.

  9. Neuropsychological Consequences of Traumatic Brain Injury in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord-Maes, Janiece; Obrzut, John E.

    1996-01-01

    This article discusses recent findings concerning cognitive outcomes in traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children and adolescents, with a particular focus on age differences with TBI. It suggests a relationship between specific learning disorders and brain dysfunction, addresses differential hemispheric functioning with TBI, and outlines recent…

  10. Pharmacologic resuscitation for hemorrhagic shock combined with traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Guang; Duggan, Michael; Imam, Ayesha

    2012-01-01

    [Hex]) after traumatic brain injury (TBI) decreases brain swelling, without affecting size of the lesion. This study was performed to determine whether addition of VPA to Hex would decrease the lesion size in a clinically relevant large animal model of TBI + HS....

  11. [Traumatic brain injuries--forensic and expertise aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuleković, Petar; Simić, Milan; Misić-Pavkov, Gordana; Cigić, Tomislav; Kojadinović, Zeljko; Dilvesi, Dula

    2008-01-01

    Traumatic brain injuries have major socio-economic importance due to their frequency, high mortality and serious consequences. According to their nature the consequences of these injuries may be classified as neurological, psychiatric and esthetic. Various lesions of brain structures cause neurological consequences such as disturbance of motor functions, sensibility, coordination or involuntary movements, speech disturbances and other deviations, as well as epilepsy. Psychiatric consequences include cognitive deficit, emotional disturbances and behavior disturbances. CRIMINAL-LEGAL ASPECT OF TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURIES AND LITIGATION: Criminal-legal aspect of traumatic brain injuries expertise understands the qualification of these injuries as mild, serious and qualified serious body injuries as well as the expertise about the mechanisms of their occurrence. Litigation expertise includes the estimation of pain, fear, diminished, i.e. lost vital activity and disability, esthetic marring, and psychological suffer based on the diminished general vital activity and esthetic marring. Evaluation of consequences of traumatic brain injuries should be performed only when it can be positively confirmed that they are permanent, i.e. at least one year after the injury. Expertise of these injuries is interdisciplinary. Among clinical doctors the most competent medical expert is the one who is in charge for diagnostics and injury treatment, with the recommendation to avoid, if possible, the doctor who conducted treatment. For the estimation of general vital activity, the neurological consequences, pain and esthetic marring expertise, the most competent doctors are neurosurgeon and neurologist. Psychological psychiatric consequences and fear expertise have to be performed by the psychiatrist. Specialists of forensic medicine contribute with knowledge of criminal low and legal expertise.

  12. Neurological aspects of acute radiation injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torubarov, F.S.; Bushmanov, A.Yu.

    1999-01-01

    Results of the most important clinical studies of human nervous system reactions to acute radiation, carried out at Neurology Clinic of the State Research Center of Russia - Institute of Biophysics are presented. Clinical picture of changes in the nervous system in acute radiation disease caused by homologous and heterologous external irradiation is described. Main neurological syndrome of extremely severe acute radiation disease: acute radiation encephalopathy, radiation toxic encephalopathy, and hemorrhagic syndrome of the central nervous system is distinguished. Relationship between neurological disorders and the geometry of exposure are considered [ru

  13. Brain injury-associated biomarkers of TGF-beta1, S100B, GFAP, NF-L, tTG, AbetaPP, and tau were concomitantly enhanced and the UPS was impaired during acute brain injury caused by Toxocara canis in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Dar-Der

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Because the outcomes and sequelae after different types of brain injury (BI are variable and difficult to predict, investigations on whether enhanced expressions of BI-associated biomarkers (BIABs, including transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1, S100B, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, neurofilament light chain (NF-L, tissue transglutaminases (tTGs, β-amyloid precursor proteins (AβPP, and tau are present as well as whether impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS is present have been widely used to help delineate pathophysiological mechanisms in various BIs. Larvae of Toxocara canis can invade the brain and cause BI in humans and mice, leading to cerebral toxocariasis (CT. Because the parasitic burden is light in CT, it may be too cryptic to be detected in humans, making it difficult to clearly understand the pathogenesis of subtle BI in CT. Since the pathogenesis of murine toxocariasis is very similar to that in humans, it appears appropriate to use a murine model to investigate the pathogenesis of CT. Methods BIAB expressions and UPS function in the brains of mice inoculated with a single dose of 250 T. canis embryonated eggs was investigated from 3 days (dpi to 8 weeks post-infection (wpi by Western blotting and RT-PCR. Results Results revealed that at 4 and 8 wpi, T. canis larvae were found to have invaded areas around the choroid plexus but without eliciting leukocyte infiltration in brains of infected mice; nevertheless, astrogliosis, an indicator of BI, with 78.9~142.0-fold increases in GFAP expression was present. Meanwhile, markedly increased levels of other BIAB proteins including TGF-β1, S100B, NF-L, tTG, AβPP, and tau, with increases ranging 2.0~12.0-fold were found, although their corresponding mRNA expressions were not found to be present at 8 wpi. Concomitantly, UPS impairment was evidenced by the overexpression of conjugated ubiquitin and ubiquitin in the brain. Conclusion Further studies

  14. Injury to Allografts: innate immune pathways to acute and chronic rejection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Land, W. G.

    2005-01-01

    An emerging body of evidence suggests that innate immunity, as the first line of host defense against invading pathogens or their components [pathogen-associated molecular patterns, (PAMPs)], plays also a critical role in acute and chronic allograft rejection. Injury to the donor organ induces an inflammatory milieu in the allograft, which appears to be the initial key event for activation of the innate immune system. Injury-induced generation of putative endogenous molecular ligand, in terms of damaged/danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) such as heat shock proteins, are recognized by Toll-like receptors (TLRs), a family of pattern recognition receptors on cells of innate immunity. Acute allograft injury (e.g. oxidative stress during donor brain-death condition, post-ischemic reperfusion injury in the recipient) includes DAMPs which may interact with, and activate, innate TLR-bearing dendritic cells (DCs) which, in turn, via direct allo-recognition through donor-derived DCs and indirect allo-recogntion through recipient-derived DCs, initiate the recipient's adaptive alloimmune response leading to acute allograft rejection. Chronic injurious events in the allograft (e.g. hypertension, hyperlipidemia, CMV infection, administration of cell-toxic drugs [calcineurin-inhibitors]) induce the generation of D AMPs , which may interact with and activate innate TLR-bearing vascular cells (endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells) which, in turn, contribute to the development of atherosclerosis of donor organ vessels (alloatherosclerosis), thus promoting chronic allograft rejection. (author)

  15. The characteristics of falls in an inpatient traumatic brain injury rehabilitation setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKechnie, Duncan; Fisher, Murray J; Pryor, Julie

    2016-01-01

    To describe the nature of falls in an inpatient traumatic brain injury rehabilitation setting. Falls are the most frequently recorded patient safety incident in the inpatient context. However, higher rates of falls are reported in rehabilitation settings compared to acute care settings. In the rehabilitation setting, patients with a traumatic brain injury have been identified as at a high risk of falling. However to date, research into the nature of falls involving this patient population is limited. Five-year retrospective cohort study design. Falls data from an inpatient traumatic brain injury rehabilitation unit were retrieved from the NSW Ministry of Health Incident Information Management System and patient clinical notes; nursing shift data were retrieved from the local rostering system. The fall rate was 5·18 per 1000 patient bed days. Over a 24-hour period falls (n = 103) occurred in a trimodal pattern. The median fall free period after admission was 14 days and 22% of traumatic brain injury patients had at least one fall. 53% of falls occurred in the patient's bedroom and 57% were attributed to loss of balance. At time of fall, 93% of fallers had impaired mobility and 85% required assistance for transfers. Falls within inpatient traumatic brain injury rehabilitation are a significant and complex clinical issue. While many patients continued to be at risk of falling several months after admission, a repeat faller's first fall occurred earlier in their admission than a single faller's. Generic falls prevention measures are insufficient for preventing falls in the brain injury rehabilitation population. Falls prevention initiatives should target times of high patient activity and situations where there is decreased nursing capacity to observe patients. Rehabilitation clinicians need to be mindful that a patient's risk of falling is not static and in fact, may increase over time. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Spatial patterns of progressive brain volume loss after moderate-severe traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Amy; de Simoni, Sara; Bourke, Niall; Patel, Maneesh C; Scott, Gregory; Sharp, David J

    2018-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury leads to significant loss of brain volume, which continues into the chronic stage. This can be sensitively measured using volumetric analysis of MRI. Here we: (i) investigated longitudinal patterns of brain atrophy; (ii) tested whether atrophy is greatest in sulcal cortical regions; and (iii) showed how atrophy could be used to power intervention trials aimed at slowing neurodegeneration. In 61 patients with moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (mean age = 41.55 years ± 12.77) and 32 healthy controls (mean age = 34.22 years ± 10.29), cross-sectional and longitudinal (1-year follow-up) brain structure was assessed using voxel-based morphometry on T1-weighted scans. Longitudinal brain volume changes were characterized using a novel neuroimaging analysis pipeline that generates a Jacobian determinant metric, reflecting spatial warping between baseline and follow-up scans. Jacobian determinant values were summarized regionally and compared with clinical and neuropsychological measures. Patients with traumatic brain injury showed lower grey and white matter volume in multiple brain regions compared to controls at baseline. Atrophy over 1 year was pronounced following traumatic brain injury. Patients with traumatic brain injury lost a mean (± standard deviation) of 1.55% ± 2.19 of grey matter volume per year, 1.49% ± 2.20 of white matter volume or 1.51% ± 1.60 of whole brain volume. Healthy controls lost 0.55% ± 1.13 of grey matter volume and gained 0.26% ± 1.11 of white matter volume; equating to a 0.22% ± 0.83 reduction in whole brain volume. Atrophy was greatest in white matter, where the majority (84%) of regions were affected. This effect was independent of and substantially greater than that of ageing. Increased atrophy was also seen in cortical sulci compared to gyri. There was no relationship between atrophy and time since injury or age at baseline. Atrophy rates were related to memory performance at the end of the

  17. Effects of acute selective pudendal nerve electrical stimulation after simulated childbirth injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai-Hong; Gill, Bradley C; Dissaranan, Charuspong; Zutshi, Massarat; Balog, Brian M; Lin, Danli; Damaser, Margot S

    2013-02-01

    During childbirth, a combinatorial injury occurs and can result in stress urinary incontinence (SUI). Simulated childbirth injury, consisting of vaginal distension (VD) and pudendal nerve crush (PNC), results in slowed recovery of continence, as well as decreased expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), a regenerative cytokine. Electrical stimulation has been shown to upregulate BDNF in motor neurons and facilitate axon regrowth through the increase of β(II)-tubulin expression after injury. In this study, female rats underwent selective pudendal nerve motor branch (PNMB) stimulation after simulated childbirth injury or sham injury to determine whether such stimulation affects bladder and anal function after injury and whether the stimulation increases BDNF expression in Onuf's nucleus after injury. Rats received 4 h of VD followed by bilateral PNC and 1 h of subthreshold electrical stimulation of the left PNMB and sham stimulation of the right PNMB. Rats underwent filling cystometry and anal pressure recording before, during, and after the stimulation. Bladder and anal contractile function were partially disrupted after injury. PNMB stimulation temporarily inhibited bladder contraction after injury. Two days and 1 wk after injury, BDNF expression in Onuf's nucleus of the stimulated side was significantly increased compared with the sham-stimulated side, whereas β(II)-tubulin expression in Onuf's nucleus of the stimulated side was significantly increased only 1 wk after injury. Acute electrical stimulation of the pudendal nerve proximal to the crush site upregulates BDNF and β(II)-tubulin in Onuf's nucleus after simulated childbirth injury, which could be a potential preventive option for SUI after childbirth injury.

  18. Sleep-wake disorders persist 18 months after traumatic brain injury but remain underrecognized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbach, Lukas L; Büchele, Fabian; Valko, Philipp O; Li, Tongzhou; Maric, Angelina; Stover, John F; Bassetti, Claudio L; Mica, Ladislav; Werth, Esther; Baumann, Christian R

    2016-05-24

    This study is a prospective, controlled clinical and electrophysiologic trial examining the chronic course of posttraumatic sleep-wake disturbances (SWD). We screened 140 patients with acute, first-ever traumatic brain injury of any severity and included 60 patients for prospective follow-up examinations. Patients with prior brain trauma, other neurologic or systemic disease, drug abuse, or psychiatric comorbidities were excluded. Eighteen months after trauma, we performed detailed sleep assessment in 31 participants. As a control group, we enrolled healthy individuals without prior brain trauma matched for age, sex, and sleep satiation. In the chronic state after traumatic brain injury, sleep need per 24 hours was persistently increased in trauma patients (8.1 ± 0.5 hours) as compared to healthy controls (7.1 ± 0.7 hours). The prevalence of chronic objective excessive daytime sleepiness was 67% in patients with brain trauma compared to 19% in controls. Patients significantly underestimated excessive daytime sleepiness and sleep need, emphasizing the unreliability of self-assessments on SWD in trauma patients. This study provides prospective, controlled, and objective evidence for chronic persistence of posttraumatic SWD, which remain underestimated by patients. These results have clinical and medicolegal implications given that SWD can exacerbate other outcomes of traumatic brain injury, impair quality of life, and are associated with public safety hazards. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  19. Clinical relevance of cortical spreading depression in neurological disorders: migraine, malignant stroke, subarachnoid and intracranial hemorrhage, and traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, Martin; Dreier, Jens Peter; Fabricius, Martin

    2011-01-01

    to suggest that CSD is involved in the mechanism of migraine, stroke, subarachnoid hemorrhage and traumatic brain injury. The implications of these findings are widespread and suggest that intrinsic brain mechanisms have the potential to worsen the outcome of cerebrovascular episodes or brain trauma...... as a pathophysiological mechanism for this group of acute neurological disorders. The findings have implications for monitoring and treatment of patients with acute brain disorders in the intensive care unit. Drawing on the large body of experimental findings from animal studies of CSD obtained during decades we suggest...... treatment strategies, which may be used to prevent or attenuate secondary neuronal damage in acutely injured human brain cortex caused by depolarization waves....

  20. Assessing the relationship between neurocognitive performance and brain volume in chronic moderate-severe traumatic brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikos eKonstantinou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Characterize the scale and pattern of long-term atrophy in grey matter (GM, white matter (WM and cerebrospinal (CSF in chronic moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI and its relationship to neurocognitive outcomes.Participants. The TBI group consisted of 17 males with primary diagnosis of moderate-severe closed head injury. Participants had not received any systematic, post-acute rehabilitation and were recruited on average 8.36 years post-injury. The control group consisted of 15 males matched on age and education.Main measures. Neurocognitive battery included widely used tests of verbal memory, visual memory, executive functioning, and attention/organization. GM,WM, and CSF volumes were calculated from segmented T1-weighted anatomical MR images. Voxel-based morphometry was employed to identify brain regions with differences in GM and WM between TBI and control groups.Results. Chronic TBI results in significant neurocognitive impairments, and significant loss of GM and WM volume, and significant increase in CSF volume. Brain atrophy is not widespread, but it is rather distributed in a fronto-thalamic network. The extent of volume loss is predictive of performance on the neurocognitive tests.Conclusion. Significant brain atrophy and associated neurocognitive impairments during the chronic stages of TBI support the notion that TBI results in a chronic condition with lifelong implications.

  1. Response of the cerebral vasculature following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Arjang; Zhang, John H; Obenaus, Andre

    2017-07-01

    The critical role of the vasculature and its repair in neurological disease states is beginning to emerge particularly for stroke, dementia, epilepsy, Parkinson's disease, tumors and others. However, little attention has been focused on how the cerebral vasculature responds following traumatic brain injury (TBI). TBI often results in significant injury to the vasculature in the brain with subsequent cerebral hypoperfusion, ischemia, hypoxia, hemorrhage, blood-brain barrier disruption and edema. The sequalae that follow TBI result in neurological dysfunction across a host of physiological and psychological domains. Given the importance of restoring vascular function after injury, emerging research has focused on understanding the vascular response after TBI and the key cellular and molecular components of vascular repair. A more complete understanding of vascular repair mechanisms are needed and could lead to development of new vasculogenic therapies, not only for TBI but potentially vascular-related brain injuries. In this review, we delineate the vascular effects of TBI, its temporal response to injury and putative biomarkers for arterial and venous repair in TBI. We highlight several molecular pathways that may play a significant role in vascular repair after brain injury.

  2. N-octanoyl dopamine treatment exerts renoprotective properties in acute kidney injury but not in renal allograft recipients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klotz, Sarah; Pallavi, Prama; Tsagogiorgas, Charalambos; Zimmer, Fabian; Zoellner, Frank G.; Binzen, Uta; Greffrath, Wolfgang; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Walter, Jakob; Harmsen, Martin C.; Kraemer, Bernhard K.; Hafner, Mathias; Yard, Benito A.; Hoeger, Simone

    N-octanoyl dopamine (NOD) treatment improves renal function when applied to brain dead donors and in the setting of warm ischaemia-induced acute kidney injury (AKI). Because it also activates transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) channels, we first assessed if NOD conveys its

  3. Perioperative aspirin and clonidine and risk of acute kidney injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garg, Amit X; Kurz, Andrea; Sessler, Daniel I

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Acute kidney injury, a common complication of surgery, is associated with poor outcomes and high health care costs. Some studies suggest aspirin or clonidine administered during the perioperative period reduces the risk of acute kidney injury; however, these effects are uncertain...... and each intervention has the potential for harm. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether aspirin compared with placebo, and clonidine compared with placebo, alters the risk of perioperative acute kidney injury. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A 2 × 2 factorial randomized, blinded, clinical trial of 6905...... patients undergoing noncardiac surgery from 88 centers in 22 countries with consecutive patients enrolled between January 2011 and December 2013. INTERVENTIONS: Patients were assigned to take aspirin (200 mg) or placebo 2 to 4 hours before surgery and then aspirin (100 mg) or placebo daily up to 30 days...

  4. Intranasal epidermal growth factor treatment rescues neonatal brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scafidi, Joseph; Hammond, Timothy R.; Scafidi, Susanna; Ritter, Jonathan; Jablonska, Beata; Roncal, Maria; Szigeti-Buck, Klara; Coman, Daniel; Huang, Yuegao; McCarter, Robert J.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Horvath, Tamas L.; Gallo, Vittorio

    2014-02-01

    There are no clinically relevant treatments available that improve function in the growing population of very preterm infants (less than 32 weeks' gestation) with neonatal brain injury. Diffuse white matter injury (DWMI) is a common finding in these children and results in chronic neurodevelopmental impairments. As shown recently, failure in oligodendrocyte progenitor cell maturation contributes to DWMI. We demonstrated previously that the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has an important role in oligodendrocyte development. Here we examine whether enhanced EGFR signalling stimulates the endogenous response of EGFR-expressing progenitor cells during a critical period after brain injury, and promotes cellular and behavioural recovery in the developing brain. Using an established mouse model of very preterm brain injury, we demonstrate that selective overexpression of human EGFR in oligodendrocyte lineage cells or the administration of intranasal heparin-binding EGF immediately after injury decreases oligodendroglia death, enhances generation of new oligodendrocytes from progenitor cells and promotes functional recovery. Furthermore, these interventions diminish ultrastructural abnormalities and alleviate behavioural deficits on white-matter-specific paradigms. Inhibition of EGFR signalling with a molecularly targeted agent used for cancer therapy demonstrates that EGFR activation is an important contributor to oligodendrocyte regeneration and functional recovery after DWMI. Thus, our study provides direct evidence that targeting EGFR in oligodendrocyte progenitor cells at a specific time after injury is clinically feasible and potentially applicable to the treatment of premature children with white matter injury.

  5. Minocycline Transiently Reduces Microglia/Macrophage Activation but Exacerbates Cognitive Deficits Following Repetitive Traumatic Brain Injury in the Neonatal Rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanlon, Lauren A.; Huh, Jimmy W.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated microglial/macrophage-associated biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid of infant victims of abusive head trauma (AHT) suggest that these cells play a role in the pathophysiology of the injury. In a model of AHT in 11-day-old rats, 3 impacts (24 hours apart) resulted in spatial learning and memory deficits and increased brain microglial/macrophage reactivity, traumatic axonal injury, neuronal degeneration, and cortical and white-matter atrophy. The antibiotic minocycline has been effective in decreasing injury-induced microglial/macrophage activation while simultaneously attenuating cellular and functional deficits in models of neonatal hypoxic ischemia, but the potential for this compound to rescue deficits after impact-based trauma to the immature brain remains unexplored. Acute minocycline administration in this model of AHT decreased microglial/macrophage reactivity in the corpus callosum of brain-injured animals at 3 days postinjury, but this effect was lost by 7 days postinjury. Additionally, minocycline treatment had no effect on traumatic axonal injury, neurodegeneration, tissue atrophy, or spatial learning deficits. Interestingly, minocycline-treated animals demonstrated exacerbated injury-induced spatial memory deficits. These results contrast with previous findings in other models of brain injury and suggest that minocycline is ineffective in reducing microglial/macrophage activation and ameliorating injury-induced deficits following repetitive neonatal traumatic brain injury. PMID:26825312

  6. Brain perfusion in acute and chronic hyperglycemia in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kikano, G.E.; LaManna, J.C.; Harik, S.I.

    1989-01-01

    Recent studies show that acute and chronic hyperglycemia cause a diffuse decrease in regional cerebral blood flow and that chronic hyperglycemia decreases the brain L-glucose space. Since these changes can be caused by a decreased density of perfused brain capillaries, we used 30 adult male Wistar rats to study the effect of acute and chronic hyperglycemia on (1) the brain intravascular space using radioiodinated albumin, (2) the anatomic density of brain capillaries using alkaline phosphatase histochemistry, and (3) the fraction of brain capillaries that are perfused using the fluorescein isothiocyanate-dextran method. Our results indicate that acute and chronic hyperglycemia do not affect the brain intravascular space nor the anatomic density of brain capillaries. Also, there were no differences in capillary recruitment among normoglycemic, acutely hyperglycemic, and chronically hyperglycemic rats. These results suggest that the shrinkage of the brain L-glucose space in chronic hyperglycemia is more likely due to changes in the blood-brain barrier permeability to L-glucose

  7. Transfusion Related Acute Lung Injury -A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamika

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Transfusion related acute lung injury (TRALI is a rare but life threatening complication of blood transfusion which is being increasingly recognized. It is caused by cross reaction between donor antibodies and host leucocytes or between donor leucocytes with host antibodies. TRALI usually presents as an Acute Lung Injury (ALI resulting in pulmonary congestion and edema, often leading to Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS. We report a case of TRALI in a patient who underwent laparotomy for ruptured corpus luteal cyst requiring blood transfusion. She presented with acute pulmonary edema about an hour after commencing a blood transfusion .This was managed conservatively with oxygen, steroids and diuretics. Patient improved rapidly and later discharged without any residual complications.

  8. Ammonium dichromate poisoning: A rare cause of acute kidney injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Radhakrishnan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonium dichromate is an inorganic compound frequently used in screen and color printing. Being a strong oxidizing agent, it causes oxygen free radical injury resulting in organ failure. We report a 25-year-old female who presented with acute kidney injury after consumption of ammonium dichromate. She was managed successfully with hemodialysis and supportive measures. This case is reported to highlight the toxicity of ammonium dichromate.

  9. Transient risk factors of acute occupational injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østerlund, Anna H; Lander, Flemming; Nielsen, Kent

    2017-01-01

    2.7, 95% CI 1.9-3.9), being distracted by someone (OR 3.1, 95% CI 2.3-4.1), non-routine task (OR 8.2, 95% CI 5.3-12.5), altered surroundings (OR 20.9, 95% CI 12.2-35.8), and broken machinery or materials (OR 20.6, 95% CI 13.5-31.7). The risk of occupational injury did not vary substantially....... In particular, equipment (broken machinery or materials) and work-practice-related factors (non-routine task and altered surroundings) increased the risk of an occupational injury. Elaboration of results in relation to hazard period and information bias is warranted....... risk factors (time pressure, disagreement with someone, feeling sick, being distracted by someone, non-routine task, altered surroundings, and broken machinery and materials) for occupational injuries. In the study, 1693 patients with occupational injuries were recruited from a total of 4002...

  10. Methodology of the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bembea, Melania M; Jouvet, Philippe; Willson, Douglas; Thomas, Neal J

    2015-06-01

    This article describes the methodology used for the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference. Consensus conference of international experts in pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome using the Research ANd Development/University of California, Los Angeles appropriateness method and an expert recommendations process developed by the French-speaking intensive care society. Topics related to pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome were divided into nine subgroups with a review of the literature. A group of 27 experts met three times over the course of 2 years and collaborated in their respective subgroups to define pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome and to make recommendations regarding treatment and future research priorities. The consensus conference resulted in summary of recommendations published in Pediatric Critical Care Medicine, the present Pediatric Acute Lung Injury Consensus Conference methodology article, articles on the nine pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome subtopics, and a review of pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome pathophysiology published in this supplement of Pediatric Critical Care Medicine. The methodology described involved experts from around the world and the use of modern information technology. This resulted in recommendations for pediatric acute respiratory distress syndrome management, the identification of current research gaps, and future priorities.

  11. Acute Kidney Injury in Western Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchard, Josée; Mehta, Ravindra L

    2016-10-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is frequent and is associated with poor outcomes, including increased mortality, higher risk of chronic kidney disease, and prolonged hospital lengths of stay. The epidemiology of AKI mainly derives from studies performed in Western high-income countries. More limited data are available from Western low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) located in Central and South America. In this review, we summarize the most recent data on the epidemiology of AKI in Western countries, aiming to contrast results from industrialized high-income countries with LMICs. The global picture of AKI in LMICs is not as well characterized as in the USA and Europe. In addition, in some LMICs, the epidemiology of AKI may vary depending on the region and socioeconomic status, which contributes to the difficulty of getting a better portrait of the clinical condition. In low-income regions and tropical countries, AKI is frequently attributed to diarrhea, infections, nephrotoxins, as well as obstetric complications. As opposed to the situation in high-income countries, access to basic care in LMICs is limited by economic constraints, and treatment is often delayed due to late presentation and recognition of the condition, which contribute to worse outcomes. In addition, dialysis is often not available or must be paid by patients, which further restricts its use. There are great disparities in the epidemiology of AKI between Western high-income countries and Western LMICs. In LMICs, education and training programs should increase the public awareness of AKI and improve preventive and basic treatments to improve AKI outcomes. (1) More than 90% of the patients recruited in AKI studies using KDIGO-equivalent criteria originate from North America, Europe, or Oceania, although these regions represent less than a fifth of the global population. However, the pooled incidence of AKI in hospitalized patients reaches 20% globally with moderate variance between regions. (2

  12. Peritoneal dialysis for acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Linfeng; Zhang, Ling; Liu, Guan J; Fu, Ping

    2017-12-04

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) has been suggested as an effective and safe dialysis modality in patients with acute kidney injury (AKI). However, whether PD is superior to extracorporeal therapy (e.g. haemodialysis) in terms of improving survival, recovery of kidney function, metabolic and clinical outcomes is still inconclusive. The aim of this review was to evaluate the benefits and harms of PD for patients with AKI compared with extracorporeal therapy or different PD modalities. We searched the Cochrane Kidney and Transplant Register of Studies to 29 May 2017 through contact with the Information Specialist using search terms relevant to this review. Studies in the Register are identified through searches of CENTRAL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE, conference proceedings, the International Clinical Trials Register (ICTRP) Search Portal, and ClinicalTrials.gov. We also searched the China Biological Medicine Database. We included patients with AKI who were randomised to receive PD, extracorporeal therapy, or different PD modalities regardless of their age, sex, primary disease and clinical course. Screening, selection, data extraction and quality assessments for each retrieved article were carried out by two authors using standardised forms. Authors contacted when published data were incomplete. Statistical analyses were performed using the random effects model and results expressed as risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Heterogeneity among studies was explored using the Cochran Q statistic and the I 2 test. Outcomes of interest included all-cause mortality, recovery of kidney function, weekly delivered Kt/V, correction of acidosis, fluid removal, duration of dialysis, and infectious complications. Confidence in the evidence was assessing using GRADE. Six studies (484 participants) met our inclusion criteria. Five studies compared high volume PD with daily haemodialysis, extended daily haemodialysis, or continuous renal replacement therapy. One study focused on the

  13. Patient Satisfaction in the Treatment of Acute Hamstring Strain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LingLing- Lai

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The impact of musculoskeletal injuries often caused loss time in sport participation. Athletes who suffered from these injuries experienced a decrease in performance and physical disability. Although a variety of treatments have been implemented to the muscle injuries, the administration of autologous blood injection is replacing the conventional rehabilitation to expedite the process of muscle recovery. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP is relatively new in muscle injury treatment and there is lack of evidence of the satisfaction of PRP treatment in muscle injuries. Purposes: The study aimed to investigate the patient satisfaction in the administration of PRP treatment and rehabilitation program for acute hamstring strain injury. Methods: Participants (competitive, semi-competitive and recreational athletes with acute hamstring strain injury (Grade II were recruited. Participants were randomly divided into either the PRP treatment or rehabilitation program. Participants were required to attend weekly follow up assessment for recovery evaluation. All the participants were required to complete a patient satisfaction questionnaire (PSQ-18 at the end of study.  The questionnaire is divided into seven sub-scales: general satisfaction, technical quality, interpersonal manner, communication, financial aspect, time spent with doctor, accessibility and convenience. Results: Participants were 22.35 ± 3.41 years. Duration from injury to first presentation in clinic ranged from two to ten days. Mean duration of recovery was 5.64 weeks. No statistically significant difference in the patient satisfaction sub-scales score between the two groups (p>0.05. Conclusion: The present study demonstrates that PRP treatment is as satisfactory as conventional rehabilitation program in managing acute hamstring strain injury. Both  modalities are correspondingly safe and have high degree of satisfaction. Given the acceptable outcomes, patients are likely to

  14. Reliability of the NINDS common data elements cranial tomography (CT) rating variables for traumatic brain injury (TBI)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harburg, Leah; McCormack, Erin; Kenney, Kimbra; Moore, Carol; Yang, Kelly; Vos, Pieter; Jacobs, Bram; Madden, Christopher J; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon R; Bogoslovsky, Tanya

    2017-01-01

    Background: Non-contrast head computer tomography (CT) is widely used to evaluate eligibility of patients after acute traumatic brain injury (TBI) for clinical trials. The NINDS Common Data Elements (CDEs) TBI were developed to standardize collection of CT variables. The objectives of this study

  15. Early Gelatinase Activity Is Not a Determinant of Long-Term Recovery after Traumatic Brain Injury in the Immature Mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Bridgette D.; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J.; Gooyit, Major; Tercovich, Kayleen G.; Peng, Zhihong; Nguyen, Trung T.; Schroeder, Valerie A.; Suckow, Mark A.; Chang, Mayland; Raber, Jacob; Trivedi, Alpa

    2015-01-01

    The gelatinases, matrix metalloproteinases (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, are thought to be key mediators of secondary damage in adult animal models of brain injury. Moreover, an acute increase in these proteases in plasma and brain extracellular fluid of adult patients with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) is associated with poorer clinical outcomes and mortality. Nonetheless, their involvement after TBI in the pediatric brain remains understudied. Using a murine model of TBI at postnatal day 21 (p21), approximating a toddler-aged child, we saw upregulation of active and pro-MMP-9 and MMP-2 by gelatin zymography at 48 h post-injury. We therefore investigated the role of gelatinases on long-term structural and behavioral outcomes after injury after acute inhibition with a selective gelatinase inhibitor, p-OH SB-3CT. After systemic administration, p-OH SB-3CT crossed the blood-brain barrier at therapeutically-relevant concentrations. TBI at p21 induced hyperactivity, deficits in spatial learning and memory, and reduced sociability when mice were assessed at adulthood, alongside pronounced tissue loss in key neuroanatomical regions. Acute and short-term post-injury treatment with p-OH SB-3CT did not ameliorate these long-term behavioral, cognitive, or neuropathological deficits as compared to vehicle-treated controls, suggesting that these deficits were independent of MMP-9 and MMP-2 upregulation. These findings emphasize the vulnerability of the immature brain to the consequences of traumatic injuries. However, early upregulation of gelatinases do not appear to be key determinants of long-term recovery after an early-life injury. PMID:26588471

  16. Social Competence at Two Years after Childhood Traumatic Brain Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vicki; Beauchamp, Miriam H; Yeates, Keith Owen; Crossley, Louise; Ryan, Nicholas; Hearps, Stephen J C; Catroppa, Cathy

    2017-07-15

    Children with traumatic brain injury (TBI) are at risk for social impairment, but research has yet to document the trajectory of these skills post-injury and factors that may predict social problems. This study addressed these gaps in knowledge, reporting on findings from a prospective, longitudinal follow-up study that investigated social outcomes post-injury and explored factors contributing to these outcomes at two years post-injury. The sample included 113 children, 74 with TBI and 39 typically developing (TD) controls. TBI participants were recruited on presentation to the hospital. Parents rated pre-injury function at that time, and all children underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Participants were followed up at two years post-injury. Outcomes were social adjustment, social participation, social relationships, and social cognition. Predictors of social outcomes examined included brain lesion characteristics, child cognition (6 months post-TBI), and behavior and environmental factors (pre-injury and two years). Reduced social adjustment (p = 0.011) and social participation (p Poor social adjustment was predicted by externalizing behavior problems and younger age at injury. Reduced social participation was linked to internalizing behavior problems. Greater lesion volume, lower socioeconomic status, and family burden contributed to poorer social relationships, whereas age at injury predicted social cognition. Within the TBI group, 23% of children exhibited social impairments. Younger age at injury, greater pre-injury, and current behavior problems and family dysfunction, and poorer intelligence quotient (IQ), processing speed, and empathy were linked to impairment. Further follow-up is required to track social recovery and the influences of cognition, brain, and environment over time.

  17. MW151 Inhibited IL-1β Levels after Traumatic Brain Injury with No Effect on Microglia Physiological Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam D Bachstetter

    Full Text Available A prevailing neuroinflammation hypothesis is that increased production of proinflammatory cytokines contributes to progressive neuropathology, secondary to the primary damage caused by a traumatic brain injury (TBI. In support of the hypothesis, post-injury interventions that inhibit the proinflammatory cytokine surge can attenuate the progressive pathology. However, other post-injury neuroinflammatory responses are key to endogenous recovery responses. Therefore, it is critical that pharmacological attenuation of detrimental or dysregulated neuroinflammatory processes avoid pan-suppression of inflammation. MW151 is a CNS-penetrant, small molecule experimental therapeutic that restores injury- or disease-induced overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines towards homeostasis without immunosuppression. Post-injury administration of MW151 in a closed head injury model of mild TBI suppressed acute cytokine up-regulation and downstream cognitive impairment. Here, we report results from a diffuse brain injury model in mice using midline fluid percussion. Low dose (0.5-5.0 mg/kg administration of MW151 suppresses interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β levels in the cortex while sparing reactive microglia and astrocyte responses. To probe molecular mechanisms, we used live cell imaging of the BV-2 microglia cell line to demonstrate that MW151 does not affect proliferation, migration, or phagocytosis of the cells. Our results provide insight into the roles of glial responses to brain injury and indicate the feasibility of using appropriate dosing for selective therapeutic modulation of injurious IL-1β increases while sparing other glial responses to injury.

  18. Acute hand and wrist injuries in athletes: evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, W J; Slowman, L S

    2001-01-01

    Acute hand and wrist injuries in the athlete constitute a unique orthopaedic challenge. Because of the particular demands on the athlete (e.g., financial implications, coaching and administration pressures, self-esteem issues), a specialized management approach is often necessary. Common sites of injury include the ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb metacarpophalangeal joint, proximal interphalangeal joint, metacarpals and phalanges, scaphoid, hamate, and distal radius. Treatment of these injuries varies depending on the patient's age, sport, position played, and level of competition, but departures from standard practice as regards surgery, rehabilitation, and return to competition should never compromise care.

  19. The Importance of Early Brain Injury after Subarachnoid Hemorrhage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehba, Fatima A.; Hou, Jack; Pluta, Ryszard M.; Zhang, John H.

    2012-01-01

    Aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) is a medical emergency that accounts for 5% of all stroke cases. Individuals affected are typically in the prime of their lives (mean age 50 years). Approximately 12% of patients die before receiving medical attention, 33% within 48 hours and 50% within 30 days of aSAH. Of the survivors 50% suffer from permanent disability with an estimated lifetime cost more than double that of an ischemic stroke. Traditionally, spasm that develops in large cerebral arteries 3-7 days after aneurysm rupture is considered the most important determinant of brain injury and outcome after aSAH. However, recent studies show that prevention of delayed vasospasm does not improve outcome in aSAH patients. This finding has finally brought in focus the influence of early brain injury on outcome of aSAH. A substantial amount of evidence indicates that brain injury begins at the aneurysm rupture, evolves with time and plays an important role in patients’ outcome. In this manuscript we review early brain injury after aSAH. Due to the early nature, most of the information on this injury comes from animals and few only from autopsy of patients who died within days after aSAH. Consequently, we began with a review of animal models of early brain injury, next we review the mechanisms of brain injury according to the sequence of their temporal appearance and finally we discuss the failure of clinical translation of therapies successful in animal models of aSAH. PMID:22414893

  20. Fatal traumatic brain injury with electrical weapon falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Mark W; Adamec, Jiri; Wetli, Charles V; Williams, Howard E

    2016-10-01

    While generally reducing morbidity and mortality, electrical weapons have risks associated with their usage, including eye injuries and falls. With sufficient probe spread, an uncontrolled fall to the ground typically occurs along with the possibility of a fatal brain injury. We analyzed possible risk factors including running and elevated surfaces with established head-injury criteria to estimate the risk of brain injury. We searched for cases of arrest-related or in-custody death, with TASER(®) electrical weapon usage where fall-induced injuries might have contributed to the death. We found 24 cases meeting our initial inclusion criteria of a fatal fall involving electronic control. We then excluded 5 cases as intentional jumps, leaving 19 cases of forced falls. Autopsy reports and other records were analyzed to determine which of these deaths were from brain injury caused by the fall. We found 16 probable cases of fatal brain injuries induced by electronic control from electrical weapons. Out of 3 million field uses, this gives a risk of 5.3 ± 2.6 PPM which is higher than the theoretical risk of electrocution. The mean age was 46 ± 14 years which is significantly greater that the age of the typical ARD (36 ± 10). Probe shots to the subject's back may present a higher risk of a fatal fall. The use of electronic control presents a small but real risk of death from fatal traumatic brain injury. Increased age represents an independent risk factor for such fatalities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  1. Severe traumatic head injury: prognostic value of brain stem injuries detected at MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilario, A; Ramos, A; Millan, J M; Salvador, E; Gomez, P A; Cicuendez, M; Diez-Lobato, R; Lagares, A

    2012-11-01

    Traumatic brain injuries represent an important cause of death for young people. The main objectives of this work are to correlate brain stem injuries detected at MR imaging with outcome at 6 months in patients with severe TBI, and to determine which MR imaging findings could be related to a worse prognosis. One hundred and eight patients with severe TBI were studied by MR imaging in the first 30 days after trauma. Brain stem injury was categorized as anterior or posterior, hemorrhagic or nonhemorrhagic, and unilateral or bilateral. Outcome measures were GOSE and Barthel Index 6 months postinjury. The relationship between MR imaging findings of brain stem injuries, outcome, and disability was explored by univariate analysis. Prognostic capability of MR imaging findings was also explored by calculation of sensitivity, specificity, and area under the ROC curve for poor and good outcome. Brain stem lesions were detected in 51 patients, of whom 66% showed a poor outcome, as expressed by the GOSE scale. Bilateral involvement was strongly associated with poor outcome (P brain stem injuries detected at MR imaging are poor prognostic signs. Nonhemorrhagic injuries showed the highest positive predictive value for good outcome.

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute spinal-cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Hideki; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Yamada, Takahisa; Iwata, Kinjiro; Okumura, Terufumi; Hoshino, Daisaku.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides a noninvasive and very important method of investigating spinal-cord injuries. By means of MRI we examined 36 patients with spinal injuries, 34 of them in the acute stage. 19 cases had complete spinal-cord injury with paraplegia, while 17 cases had incomplete spinal-cord injury. MRI showed the injured spinal-cord in the acute stage to be partially swollen, with a high signal intensity in the T 2 -weighted images. In the chronic stage, the injured cord may show atrophic changes with a post-traumatic cavity or myelomalacia, which appears as a high-signal-intensity lesion in the T 2 -weighted images and as a low-signal intensity in the T 1 -weighted images. The cases with complete spinal injuries showed a high signal intensity at the wide level, and these prognoses were poor. The cases with incomplete injuries showed normal findings or a high-signal-intensity spot. In the Gd-DTPA enhanced images, the injured cords were enhanced very well in the subchronic stage. MRI is thus found to be useful in the diagnosis of spinal injuries; it also demonstrates a potential for predicting the neurological prognosis. (author)

  3. New insights into the mechanisms of acute kidney injury in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glodowski, Seth D; Wagener, Gebhard

    2015-03-01

    Acute kidney injury is a frequent complication in the intensive care unit that is associated with increased mortality and morbidity. Traditional models consider reductions of global renal blood flow as the cause of acute kidney injury. However, a complex interplay between ischemia-reperfusion injury and inflammation may lead to intrarenal hypoperfusion and acute kidney injury. The role of changes of global renal blood flow as a cause for acute kidney injury remains controversial, especially in sepsis-induced acute kidney injury. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Role of Melatonin in Traumatic Brain Injury and Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehar Naseem

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain and spinal cord are implicated in incidences of two of the most severe injuries of central nervous system (CNS. Traumatic brain injury (TBI is a devastating neurological deficit involving primary and secondary injury cascades. The primary and secondary mechanisms include complex consequences of activation of proinflammatory cytokines, cerebral edema, upregulation of NF-κβ, disruption of blood-brain barrier (BBB, and oxidative stress. Spinal cord injury (SCI includes primary and secondary injury cascades. Primary injury leads to secondary injury in which generation of free radicals and oxidative or nitrative damage play an important pathophysiological role. The indoleamine melatonin is a hormone secreted or synthesized by pineal gland in the brain which helps to regulate sleep and wake cycle. Melatonin has been shown to be a versatile hormone having antioxidative, antiapoptotic, neuroprotective, and anti-inflammatory properties. It has a special characteristic of crossing BBB. Melatonin has neuroprotective role in the injured part of the CNS after TBI and SCI. A number of studies have successfully shown its therapeutic value as a neuroprotective agent in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Here in this review we have compiled the literature supporting consequences of CNS injuries, TBI and SCI, and the protective role of melatonin in it.

  5. The Role of Substance P in Secondary Pathophysiology after Traumatic Brain Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Vink

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It has recently been shown that substance P (SP plays a major role in the secondary injury process following traumatic brain injury (TBI, particularly with respect to neuroinflammation, increased blood–brain barrier (BBB permeability, and edema formation. Edema formation is associated with the development of increased intracranial pressure (ICP that has been widely associated with increased mortality and morbidity after neurotrauma. However, a pharmacological intervention to specifically reduce ICP is yet to be developed, with current interventions limited to osmotic therapy rather than addressing the cause of increased ICP. Given that previous publications have shown that SP, NK1 receptor antagonists reduce edema after TBI, more recent studies have examined whether these compounds might also reduce ICP and improve brain oxygenation after TBI. We discuss the results of these studies, which demonstrate that NK1 antagonists reduce posttraumatic ICP to near normal levels within 4 h of drug administration, as well as restoring brain oxygenation to near normal levels in the same time frame. The improvements in these parameters occurred in association with an improvement in BBB integrity to serum proteins, suggesting that SP-mediated increases in vascular permeability significantly contribute to the development of increased ICP after acute brain injury. NK1 antagonists may therefore provide a novel, mechanistically targeted approach to the management of increased ICP.

  6. Novel Genetic Models to Study the Role of Inflammation in Brain Injury-Induced Alzheimer’s Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    5 6 The Department of Neurosciences hosts a weekly Fellow’s Seminar series in which all graduate students and post -doctoral fellows present their...experimental design, data analysis and interpretation of results, as well as manuscript preparation. Name: Olga N. Kokiko-Cochran Project Role: Post - doc ... post -injury time points. By contrast, the acute macrophage response to TBI in hTau mice is enhanced compared to brain injured controls. Brain injured

  7. Injury timing alters metabolic, inflammatory and functional outcomes following repeated mild traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Zachary M; Gaier, Kristopher R; Karelina, Kate

    2014-10-01

    Repeated head injuries are a major public health concern both for athletes, and members of the police and armed forces. There is ample experimental and clinical evidence that there is a period of enhanced vulnerability to subsequent injury following head trauma. Injuries that occur close together in time produce greater cognitive, histological, and behavioral impairments than do injuries separated by a longer period. Traumatic brain injuries alter cerebral glucose metabolism and the resolution of altered glucose metabolism may signal the end of the period of greater vulnerability. Here, we injured mice either once or twice separated by three or 20days. Repeated injuries that were separated by three days were associated with greater axonal degeneration, enhanced inflammatory responses, and poorer performance in a spatial learning and memory task. A single injury induced a transient but marked increase in local cerebral glucose utilization in the injured hippocampus and sensorimotor cortex, whereas a second injury, three days after the first, failed to induce an increase in glucose utilization at the same time point. In contrast, when the second injury occurred substantially later (20days after the first injury), an increase in glucose utilization occurred that paralleled the increase observed following a single injury. The increased glucose utilization observed after a single injury appears to be an adaptive component of recovery, while mice with 2 injuries separated by three days were not able to mount this response, thus this second injury may have produced a significant energetic crisis such that energetic demands outstripped the ability of the damaged cells to utilize energy. These data strongly reinforce the idea that too rapid return to activity after a traumatic brain injury can induce permanent damage and disability, and that monitoring cerebral energy utilization may be a tool to determine when it is safe to return to the activity that caused the initial

  8. Fresh Frozen Plasma Modulates Brain Gene Expression in a Swine Model of Traumatic Brain Injury and Shock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Martin; Bambakidis, Ted; Dekker, Simone E

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Resuscitation with fresh frozen plasma (FFP) decreases brain lesion size and swelling in a swine model of traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock. We hypothesized that brain gene expression profiles after traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock would be modulated by FFP resu...

  9. Differential role of tumor necrosis factor receptors in mouse brain inflammatory responses in cryolesion brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quintana, Albert; Giralt, Mercedes; Rojas, Santiago

    2005-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is one of the mediators dramatically increased after traumatic brain injury that leads to the activation, proliferation, and hypertrophy of mononuclear, phagocytic cells and gliosis. Eventually, TNF-alpha can induce both apoptosis and necrosis via...... by TNFR1 deficiency. Overall, these results suggest that TNFR1 is involved in the early establishment of the inflammatory response and that its deficiency causes a decreased inflammatory response and tissue damage following brain injury....

  10. Transcranial vibro-acoustography can detect traumatic brain injury, in-vivo: Preliminary studies.</