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Sample records for acute bleeding arterioenteric

  1. Endovascular Management of Acute Bleeding Arterioenteric Fistulas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonhardt, Henrik; Mellander, Stefan; Snygg, Johan; Loenn, Lars

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review the outcome of endovascular transcatheter repair of emergent arterioenteric fistulas. Cases of abdominal arterioenteric fistulas (defined as a fistula between a major artery and the small intestine or colon, thus not the esophagus or stomach), diagnosed over the 3-year period between December 2002 and December 2005 at our institution, were retrospectively reviewed. Five patients with severe enteric bleeding underwent angiography and endovascular repair. Four presented primary arterioenteric fistulas, and one presented a secondary aortoenteric fistula. All had massive persistent bleeding with hypotension despite volume substitution and transfusion by the time of endovascular management. Outcome after treatment of these patients was investigated for major procedure-related complications, recurrence, reintervention, morbidity, and mortality. Mean follow-up time was 3 months (range, 1-6 months). All massive bleeding was controlled by occlusive balloon catheters. Four fistulas were successfully sealed with stent-grafts, resulting in a technical success rate of 80%. One patient was circulatory stabilized by endovascular management but needed immediate further open surgery. There were no procedure-related major complications. Mean hospital stay after the initial endovascular intervention was 19 days. Rebleeding occurred in four patients (80%) after a free interval of 2 weeks or longer. During the follow-up period three patients needed reintervention. The in-hospital mortality was 20% and the 30-day mortality was 40%. The midterm outcome was poor, due to comorbidities or rebleeding, with a mortality of 80% within 6 months. In conclusion, endovascular repair is an efficient and safe method to stabilize patients with life-threatening bleeding arterioenteric fistulas in the emergent episode. However, in this group of patients with severe comorbidities, the risk of rebleeding is high and further intervention must be considered

  2. Endovascular management of acute bleeding arterioenteric fistulas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leonhardt, H.; Mellander, S.; Snygg, J.

    2008-01-01

    . All had massive persistent bleeding with hypotension despite volume substitution and transfusion by the time of endovascular management. Outcome after treatment of these patients was investigated for major procedure-related complications, recurrence, reintervention, morbidity, and mortality. Mean...... follow-up time was 3 months (range, 1-6 months). All massive bleeding was controlled by occlusive balloon catheters. Four fistulas were successfully sealed with stent-grafts, resulting in a technical success rate of 80%. One patient was circulatory stabilized by endovascular management but needed...

  3. Endovascular management of acute bleeding arterioenteric fistulas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leonhardt, H.; Mellander, S.; Snygg, J.

    2008-01-01

    follow-up time was 3 months (range, 1-6 months). All massive bleeding was controlled by occlusive balloon catheters. Four fistulas were successfully sealed with stent-grafts, resulting in a technical success rate of 80%. One patient was circulatory stabilized by endovascular management but needed...... reintervention. The in-hospital mortality was 20% and the 30-day mortality was 40%. The midterm outcome was poor, due to comorbidities or rebleeding, with a mortality of 80% within 6 months. In conclusion, endovascular repair is an efficient and safe method to stabilize patients with life-threatening bleeding...

  4. Volcano-like intermittent bleeding activity for seven years from an arterio-enteric fistula on a kidney graft site after pancreas-kidney transplantation: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schölmerich Jürgen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction We report the first case of a patient who underwent simultaneous kidney and pancreas transplantation and who then suffered from repeated episodes of severe gastrointestinal bleeding over a period of seven years. Locating the site of gastrointestinal bleeding is a challenging task. This case illustrates that detection of an arterio-enteric fistula can be very difficult, especially in technically-challenging situations such as cases of severe intra-abdominal adhesions. It is important to consider the possibility of arterio-enteric fistulas in cases of intermittent bleeding episodes, especially in transplant patients. Case presentation A 40-year-old Caucasian man received a combined pancreas-kidney transplantation as a result of complications from diabetes mellitus type I. Thereafter, he suffered from intermittent clinically-relevant episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding. Repeat endoscopic, surgical, scintigraphic, and angiographic investigations during his episodes of acute bleeding could not locate the bleeding site. He finally died in hemorrhagic shock due to arterio-enteric bleeding at the kidney graft site, which was diagnosed post-mortem. Conclusions In accordance with the literature, we suggest considering the removal of any rejected transplant organs in situations where arterio-enteric fistulas seem likely but cannot be excluded by repeat conventional or computed tomography-angiographic methods. Arterio-enteric fistulas may intermittently bleed over many years.

  5. Management of acute gastric varices bleeding

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    Chen-Jung Chang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Gastroesophageal varices bleeding is a major complication in patients with cirrhosis. Gastric varices (GVs occur in approximately 20% of patients with portal hypertension. However, GV bleeding develops in only 25% of patients with GV and requires more transfusion and has higher mortality than esophageal variceal (EV bleeding. The best strategy for managing acute GV bleeding is similar to that of acute EV bleeding, which involves airway protection, hemodynamic stabilization, and intensive care. Blood transfusion should be cautiously administered in order to avoid rebleeding. Vasoactive agents such as terlipressin or somatostatin should be used when GV bleeding is suspected. Routine use of prophylactic antibiotics reduces bacterial infection and lowers rebleeding rates. By administering endoscopic cyanoacrylate injection, the initial hemostasis rate achieved is at least 90% in most cases; the average mortality rate of GV bleeding is approximately 10–30% and the rebleeding rate is between 22% and 37%. Although endoscopic injection of cyanoacrylate is superior to sclerotherapy and band ligation, and has remained the treatment of choice for treating acute GV bleeding, the outcome of this treatment is still unsatisfactory. New treatment options, such as thrombin injection, transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunts, or balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration, have shown promising results for acute GV bleeding. However, randomized controlled trials are needed to compare the efficacy of these therapies with cyanoacrylate.

  6. Treatment of acute variceal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Flemming; Krag, Aleksander Ahm; Møller, Søren

    2008-01-01

    to failure to control initial bleeding or early re-bleeding occurring in up to 30-40% of patients. Initial procedures are to secure and protect the airway, and administer volume replacement to stabilize the patient. Treatment with vasoactive drugs should be started as soon as possible, since a reduction...

  7. Transarterial embolization of acute intercostal artery bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jae Ik; Park, Auh Whan; Lee, Seon Joo [Inje University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Gi Young; Yoon, Hyun Ki [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Chang Jin [Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Tae Beom [Donga University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Hwan [Kyimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-09-15

    To report our experiences of transarterial embolization for acute intercostal artery bleeding. A retrospectively analysis of the causes, clinical manifestations, angiographic findings and transarterial embolization technique in 8 patients with acute intercostal artery bleeding, with a review of the anatomical basis. The causes of intercostal artery bleeding were iatrogenic and traumatic in 88 and 12% of cases, respectively. Active bleeding from the collateral intercostal or posterior intercostal arteries was angiographically demonstrated in 75 and 25% of cases, respectively. Transarterial embolization successfully achieved hemostasis in all cases. However, two patient with hypovolemic shock expired due to a massive hemothorax, despite successful transarterial embolization. Intercostal access should be performed through the middle of the intercostal space to avoid injury to the collateral intercostal artery. Transarterial embolization is an effective method for the control of intercostal artery bleeding.

  8. Management of Acute Bleeding Per Rectum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benita K.T. Tan

    2004-01-01

    Conclusion: Perianal conditions contributed to the majority of acute patient admissions. Colonic causes of bleeding were less common and were most stable. There were differences in the frequencies of aetiologies in our population compared to Western populations. Understanding the common pathologies and outcomes guides the management of our patients.

  9. Continued bleeding following acute intracerebral hemorrhage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, H.B.

    2014-01-01

    In this Ph.D. thesis, ‘Continued bleeding following acute intracerebral hemorrhage’, we have discussed the background literature, risk factors, and underlying biology of hematoma expansion, as well as the clinical applicability of the CT angiography (CTA) 'spot sign' as an imaging marker of this

  10. Somatostatin analogues for acute bleeding oesophageal varices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Hrobjartsson, A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Somatostatin and its derivatives are sometimes used for emergency treatment of bleeding oesophageal varices in patients with cirrhosis of the liver. OBJECTIVES: To study whether somatostatin or its analogues improve survival or reduce the need for blood transfusions in patients...... with bleeding oesophageal varices. SEARCH STRATEGY: PubMed and The Cochrane Library were searched (November 2007). Reference lists of publications, contacts with authors. SELECTION CRITERIA: All randomised trials comparing somatostatin or analogues with placebo or no treatment in patients suspected of acute...... or recent bleeding from oesophageal varices. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: The outcome measures extracted were: mortality, blood transfusions, use of balloon tamponade, initial haemostasis and rebleeding. Intention-to-treat analyses including all randomised patients were conducted if possible; a random...

  11. Acute Leukemia Presenting with Gingival Bleeding. A Case Report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is a case report of a five year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia who presented in our clinic with gingival bleeding. Sepcific highlights were focused on the management of the patient and current trends in the treatment of the disease with emphasis on early diagnosis of the disease in other to improve the ...

  12. Transcatheter embolization for treatment of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uflacker, R.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment of lower gastrointestinal bleeding was attempted in 13 patients by selective embolization of branches of the mesenteric arteries with Gelfoam. Bleeding was adequately controlled in 11 patients with active bleeding during the examination. One patient improved after embolization but bleeding recurred within 24 hours and in another patient the catheterization was unsuccessful. Five patients with diverticular hemorrhage were embolized in the right colic artery four times, and once in the middle colic artery. Three patients had embolization of the ileocolic artery because of hemorrhage from cecal angiodysplasia, post appendectomy, and leukemia infiltration. Three patients had the superior hemorrhoidal artery embolized because of bleeding from unspecific proctitis, infiltration of the rectum from a carcinoma of the bladder, and transendoscopic polypectomy. One patient was septic and bled from jejunal ulcers. Ischemic changes with infarction of the large bowel developed in two patients and were treated by partial semi-elective colectomy, three and four days after embolization. Four other patients developed pain and fever after embolization. Transcatheter embolization of branches of mesenteric arteries in an effective way to control acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding, but still has a significant rate of complications that must be seriously weighed against the advantages of operation. (orig.)

  13. N-butyl cyanoacrylate embolotherapy for acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Ho; Kim, Ji Hoon; Koh, Young Hwan; Han, Dae Hee; Cha, Joo Hee; Seong, Chang Kyu; Song, Chi Sung [Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-01-15

    Various embolic agents have been used for embolization of acute gastrointestinal (GI) arterial bleeding. N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) is not easy to handle, but it is a useful embolic agent. In this retrospective study, we describe our experience with NBCA embolization of acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding. NBCA embolization was performed in seven patients with acute upper GI arterial bleeding; they had five gastric ulcers and two duodenal ulcers. NBCA embolization was done in the left gastric artery (n = 3), right gastric artery (n = 2), gastroduodenal artery (n = 1) and pancreaticoduodenal artery (n = 1). Coil was used along with NBCA in a gastric bleeding patient because of difficulty in selecting a feeding artery. NBCA was mixed with Lipiodol at the ratio of 1:1 to 1:2. The blood pressure and heart rate around the time of embolization, the serial hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and the transfusion requirements were reviewed to evaluate hemostasis and rebleeding. Technical success was achieved in all the cases. Two procedure-related complications happened; embolism of the NBCA mixture to the common hepatic artery occurred in a case with embolization of the left gastric artery, and reflux of the NBCA mixture occurred into the adjacent gastric tissue, but these did not cause any clinical problems. Four of seven patients did not present with rebleeding, but two had rebleeding 10 and 16 days, respectively, after embolization and they died of cardiac arrest at 2 months and 37 days, respectively. One other patient died of sepsis and respiratory failure within 24 hours without rebleeding. NBCA embolization with or without other embolic agents could be safe and effective for treating acute gastroduodenal ulcer bleeding.

  14. Colonoscopy in the diagnosis of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Borba de Souza e Benevides

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lower gastrointestinal bleeding is defined as a bleeding originated from a source distal to the Treitz ligament and the colonoscopy is well established as the diagnostic procedure of choice. Objective: To evaluate the results of colonoscopies performed to diagnose the cause of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding in a general hospital at Mato Grosso do Sul. Material and methods: Colonoscopy procedures performed in the Endoscopy service of the Hospital Regional de Mato Grosso do Sul in those patients admitted due to an acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding from January 2014 to December 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. The studied variables were age, gender, diagnosis and localization of the lesion. Results: The mean age was 66 years, and there was a little predominance of the male gender. Diverticular disease was the main cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding in this study, followed by cancer, inflammatory gastrointestinal disease, polyps, and angiodysplasia. Conclusion: The colonoscopy showed to be an effective diagnostic method in the case of acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding and a good therapeutic tool in the case of diverticular disease and angiodysplasia. Resumo: Hemorragia digestiva baixa é definida como sangramento originado de uma fonte distal ao ligamento de Treitz e a colonoscopia esta bem estabelecida como o seu procedimento diagnóstico de escolha. Objetivo: Avaliar os resultados das colonoscopias realizadas para elucidação diagnóstica dos casos de Hemorragia digestiva baixa aguda em um Hospital Geral de Mato Grosso do Sul. Materiais e métodos: Foram analisadas, de forma retrospectiva, as colonoscopias realizadas nos pacientes internados devido à hemorragia digestiva baixa aguda, no período de janeiro de 2014 a dezembro de 2015, no serviço de endoscopia digestiva do Hospital Regional de Mato Grosso do Sul. As variáveis estudadas foram a idade, sexo, diagnóstico e localização da lesão. Resultados: A média de

  15. Complex endoscopic treatment of acute gastrointestinal bleeding of ulcer origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Izbitsky

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB is determined in 20-30% of patients with peptic ulcer disease. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is on the first place as the main cause of deaths from peptic ulcer ahead of the other complications. Rebleeding occurs in 30-38% of patients. Materials and Methods For getting of the objective endoscopic picture in patients with bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers we used the classification of J.A. Forrest in our study: Type I - active bleeding: • I a - pulsating jet; • I b - stream. Type II - signs of recent bleeding: • II a - visible (non-bleeding visible vessel; • II b - fixed thrombus - a clot; • II c - flat black spot (black bottom ulcers. Type III - ulcer with a clean (white down. Integrated endoscopic hemostasis included: irrigation of ulcer defect and area around it with 3% hydrogen peroxide solution in a volume of 10 - 30ml; Injection of 2-4 mL of diluted epinephrine (1:10000 for hemostasis; use of Argon plasma coagulation. Results and Discussion Integrated endoscopic stop of bleeding was performed in 57 patients who were examined and treated at the Department of Surgery from 2006 to 2012. In 16 patients bleeding was caused by gastric ulcer. Gastric ulcer type I localization according to classification (HD Johnson, 1965 was determined in 9 patients, type II - in 2 patients, type III – in 5 patients. In 31 patients bleeding was caused by duodenal peptic ulcer, in 4 patients - erosive gastritis, 1 - erosive esophagitis, and in 5 patients - gastroenteroanastomosis area peptic ulcer. Final hemostasis was achieved in 55 (96.5% patients. In 50 (87.7% patients it was sufficient to conduct a single session of complex endoscopic treatment. In 5 (8.8% patients – it was done two times. In 2 (3.5% cases operation was performed due to the recurrent bleeding. The source of major bleeding in these patients was: chronic, duodenal ulcer penetrating into the head of the pancreas in one case complicated by subcompensated

  16. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chueh-Ling; Wu, Cheng-Kun; Shi, Hon-Yi; Tai, Wei-Chen; Liang, Chih-Ming; Yang, Shih-Cheng; Wu, Keng-Liang; Chiu, Yi-Chun; Chuah, Seng-Kee

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Acute variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis is related to high mortality and medical expenses. The purpose of present studies was to analyze the medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding among patients with cirrhosis and potential influencing clinical factors. A total of 151,863 patients with cirrhosis with International Classification of Diseases-9 codes 456.0 and 456.20 were analyzed from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database from January 1, 1996 to December 31, 2010. Time intervals were divided into three phases for analysis as T1 (1996–2000), T2 (2001–2005), and T3 (2006–2010). The endpoints were prevalence, length of hospital stay, medical expenses, and mortality rate. Our results showed that more patients were expenses increased (P 1, patients from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high patient numbers were independent factors for longer hospital stay and higher medical expenses. Aged patients, female sex, increased CCI score, and low doctor service volume were independent factors for both in-hospital and 5-year mortality. Patients from teaching hospitals and medium to high or very high service volume hospitals were independent factors for in-hospital mortality, but not 5-year mortality. Medical expenses in treating acute esophageal variceal bleeding increased despite the decreased prevalence rate and length of hospital stay in Taiwan. Aged patients, female sex, patients with increased CCI score from teaching hospitals, and medium to high or very high patient numbers were the independent factors for increased medical expenses. PMID:27428225

  17. Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with problems in the joints, or gastrointestinal or urogenital tracts. Symptoms You may have symptoms such as: Blood ... may be internal bleeding or shock. Signs of infection develop, including increased pain, redness, swelling, yellow or ...

  18. Angiographically Negative Acute Arterial Upper and Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Incidence, Predictive Factors, and Clinical Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Hyoung; Shin, Ji Hoon; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Chae, Eun Young; Myung, Seung Jae; Ko, Gi Young; Gwon, Dong Il; Sung, Kyu Bo

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence, predictive factors, and clinical outcomes of angiographically negative acute arterial upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. From 2001 to 2008, 143 consecutive patients who underwent an angiography for acute arterial upper or lower GI bleeding were examined. The angiographies revealed a negative bleeding focus in 75 of 143 (52%) patients. The incidence of an angiographically negative outcome was significantly higher in patients with a stable hemodynamic status (p < 0.001), or in patients with lower GI bleeding (p = 0.032). A follow-up of the 75 patients (range: 0-72 months, mean: 8 ± 14 months) revealed that 60 of the 75 (80%) patients with a negative bleeding focus underwent conservative management only, and acute bleeding was controlled without rebleeding. Three of the 75 (4%) patients underwent exploratory surgery due to prolonged bleeding; however, no bleeding focus was detected. Rebleeding occurred in 12 of 75 (16%) patients. Of these, six patients experienced massive rebleeding and died of disseminated intravascular coagulation within four to nine hours after the rebleeding episode. Four of the 16 patients underwent a repeat angiography and the two remaining patients underwent a surgical intervention to control the bleeding. Angiographically negative results are relatively common in patients with acute GI bleeding, especially in patients with a stable hemodynamic status or lower GI bleeding. Most patients with a negative bleeding focus have experienced spontaneous resolution of their condition

  19. Effect of Ramadan fasting on acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amine, El Mekkaoui; Kaoutar, Saâda; Ihssane, Mellouki; Adil, Ibrahimi; Dafr-Allah, Benajah

    2013-03-01

    Prolonged fasting may precipitate or exacerbate gastrointestinal complaints. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation between Ramadan fasting and acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB), and to assess characteristics of those occurred in the holly month. Retrospective analysis was conducted for all patients, who underwent endoscopy for AUGIB in Ramadan (R) and the month before Ramadan (BR). Epidemiological, clinical and etiological characteristics and outcome of patients having AUGIB were compared between the two periods from 2001 to 2010. Two hundred and ninety-one patients had endoscopy for AUGIB during the two periods study. There was an increasing trend in the overall number of patients in Ramadan period (n = 132, 45.4% versus n = 159, 54.6%), especially with duodenal ulcer (n = 48, 37.2% versus n = 81, 62.8%). The most frequent etiology was peptic ulcer but it was more observed in group R than in group BR (46.2% versus 57.9%, P = 0.04), especially duodenal ulcer (36.4% versus 50.3%, P = 0.01); this finding persisted in multivariable modeling (adjusted odds ratio: 1.67; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-2.69, P = 0.03). In contrast, there was a decreasing trend in rate of variceal bleeding from BR period (26.5%) to R period (18.9%; P = 0.11). Regarding the outcome, there were no significant differences between the two periods of the study: Recurrent bleeding (10.6% versus 7.5%, P = 0.36) and mortality rate (5.3% versus 4.4%, P = 0.7). The most frequent etiology of AUGIB was peptic ulcer during Ramadan. However, Ramadan fasting did not influence the outcome of the patients. Prophylactic measures should be taken for people with risk factors for peptic ulcer disease.

  20. Acute gingival bleeding as a complication of dengue hemorrhagic fever

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    Saif Khan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is mosquito borne disease caused by dengue virus (DENV of Flaviviridae family. The clinical manifestations range from fever to severe hemorrhage, shock and death. Here, we report a case of 20-year-old male patient undergoing orthodontic treatment presenting with acute gingival bleeding with a history of fever, weakness, backache, retro orbital pain and ecchymosis over his right arm. The hematological investigations revealed anemia, thrombocytopenia and positive dengue non-structural protein-1 antigen and also positive immunoglobulin M and immunoglobulin G antibodies for DENV. Patient was diagnosed as a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever and was immediately referred for appropriate management. This case report emphasizes the importance of taking correct and thorough medical history.

  1. Desmopressin acetate (DDAVP) for preventing and treating acute bleeds during pregnancy in women with congenital bleeding disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karanth, Laxminarayan; Barua, Ankur; Kanagasabai, Sachchithanantham; Nair, Sreekumar

    2015-09-09

    Congenital bleeding disorders can cause obstetric haemorrhage during pregnancy, labour and following delivery. Desmopressin acetate is found to be an effective drug which can reduce the risk of haemorrhage and can also stop bleeding in certain congenital bleeding disorders. Its use in pregnancy has been controversial. Hence beneficial and adverse effects of desmopressin acetate in these groups of pregnant women should be evaluated.This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2013. To determine the efficacy of desmopressin acetate in preventing and treating acute bleeds during pregnancy in women with congenital bleeding disorders. We searched the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group's Coaguopathies Trials Register comprising references identified from comprehensive electronic database searches and handsearches of relevant and abstract books of conferences proceedings. We also searched for any randomised controlled trials in a registry of ongoing trials and the reference lists of relevant articles and reviews.Date of most recent search: 18 June 2015. Randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials investigating the efficacy of desmopressin acetate versus tranexamic acid or factor VIII or rFactor VII or fresh frozen plasma in preventing and treating congenital bleeding disorders during pregnancy were eligible. No trials matching the selection criteria were eligible for inclusion. No trials matching the selection criteria were eligible for inclusion. The review did not identify any randomised controlled trials investigating the relative effectiveness of desmopressin acetate for bleeding during pregnancy in women with congenital bleeding disorders. In the absence of high quality evidence, clinicians need to use their clinical judgement and lower level evidence (e.g. from observational trials) to decide whether or not to treat women with congenital bleeding disorders with desmopressin acetate.Given the ethical considerations, future

  2. Diagnosis and treatment of acute pancreatitis associated with bleeding via angiography and transcatheter embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yong; Liang Huimin; Zheng Chuansheng; Zhou Guofeng; Feng Gansheng

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the method and efficacy of selective mesenteric angiography in diagnosis and transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) for therapy with acute pancreatitis complicated by bleeding. Method: The authors retrospectively reviewed the clinical characteristics, angiography findings and TAE outcome of 19 patients with gastrointestinal bleeding or abdominal bleeding secondary to acute pancreatitis. Result: Of the 19 cases, the authors performed 23 selective mesenteric angiographies and identified 9 with pancreatic and peripancreatic arterial rupture, 10 with formation and rupture of pseudoaneurysms, 1 with splenic vein thrombosis and 4 with failure to detect the bleeding point. TAE were performed in 13 patients with 5 rebleeding after embolization. The new bleeding points were denonetated in 4 out of 5 patients on angiograms. Three embolizations were undertaken again. two of 3 patients finally died of serious infection and multiple organs failure. One was alive without bleeding again. Conclusion: Angiography and TAE play a central role in the management of hemorrhagic complications of acute pancreatitis. (authors)

  3. Superselective transarterial embolization for the management of acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In Kyoung; Kim, Young Min; Kim, Jeong; Shin, Sang Soo; Yoon Woong; Kim, Jae Kyu; Park, Jin Gyoon; Cho, Chol Kyoon; Kang, Heoung Keun

    2006-01-01

    We wanted to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of superselective transarterial embolization for the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. We evaluated 97 of 115 patients who had undergone diagnostic angiography and transarterial embolization for gastrointestinal bleeding from February 2001 to July 2004, and they subsequently underwent superselective transarterial embolization. Their ages ranged from 17 to 88 years (mean age: 58.5 years), and 73 were men and 24 were women. The etiologies were a postoperative condition (n=31), ulcer (n=23), Mallory-Weiss syndrome (n=3), trauma (n=3), pseudoaneurysm from pancreatitis (n=3), diverticula (n=2), inflammatory bowel disease (n=2), tumor (n=2), Behcet's disease (n=2), hemobilia (n=1), and unknown origin (n=25). The regions of bleeding were the esophagus (n=3), stomach and duodenum (n=41), small bowel (n=38) and colon (n=15). All the patients underwent superselective transarterial embolization using microcoils, gelfoam or a combination of microcoils and gelfoam. Technical success was defined as devascularization of targeted vascular lesion or the disappearance of extravasation of the contrast media, as noted on the angiography after embolization. Clinical success was defined as the disappearance of clinical symptoms and the reestablishment of normal cardiovascular hemodynamics after transarterial embolization without any operation or endoscopic management. The technical success rate was 100%. The primary clinical success rate was 67% (65 of 97 patients). Of the 32 primary failures, fourteen patients underwent repeat embolization; of these, clinical success was achieved in all the patients and so the secondary clinical success rate was 81% (79 of 97 patients). Of the 18 patients with primary failures, five patients underwent operation, one patient underwent endoscopic management and the others died during the observation period due to disseminated coagulopathy or complications of their underlying diseases. During the

  4. Superselective transarterial embolization for the management of acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, In Kyoung; Kim, Young Min; Kim, Jeong; Shin, Sang Soo; Yoon Woong; Kim, Jae Kyu; Park, Jin Gyoon [Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chol Kyoon; Kang, Heoung Keun [Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Hwasun (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-03-15

    We wanted to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of superselective transarterial embolization for the management of gastrointestinal bleeding. We evaluated 97 of 115 patients who had undergone diagnostic angiography and transarterial embolization for gastrointestinal bleeding from February 2001 to July 2004, and they subsequently underwent superselective transarterial embolization. Their ages ranged from 17 to 88 years (mean age: 58.5 years), and 73 were men and 24 were women. The etiologies were a postoperative condition (n=31), ulcer (n=23), Mallory-Weiss syndrome (n=3), trauma (n=3), pseudoaneurysm from pancreatitis (n=3), diverticula (n=2), inflammatory bowel disease (n=2), tumor (n=2), Behcet's disease (n=2), hemobilia (n=1), and unknown origin (n=25). The regions of bleeding were the esophagus (n=3), stomach and duodenum (n=41), small bowel (n=38) and colon (n=15). All the patients underwent superselective transarterial embolization using microcoils, gelfoam or a combination of microcoils and gelfoam. Technical success was defined as devascularization of targeted vascular lesion or the disappearance of extravasation of the contrast media, as noted on the angiography after embolization. Clinical success was defined as the disappearance of clinical symptoms and the reestablishment of normal cardiovascular hemodynamics after transarterial embolization without any operation or endoscopic management. The technical success rate was 100%. The primary clinical success rate was 67% (65 of 97 patients). Of the 32 primary failures, fourteen patients underwent repeat embolization; of these, clinical success was achieved in all the patients and so the secondary clinical success rate was 81% (79 of 97 patients). Of the 18 patients with primary failures, five patients underwent operation, one patient underwent endoscopic management and the others died during the observation period due to disseminated coagulopathy or complications of their underlying diseases. During

  5. Use of Ulipristal Acetate for the Management of Fibroid-Related Acute Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendas, Kristina; Leyland, Nicholas A

    2016-01-01

    Episodes of acute abnormal uterine bleeding related to uterine fibroids can cause significant morbidity. Traditional management with high-dose hormonal regimens may not be as effective when used in women with fibroids. A 32-year-old woman with a 12 cm uterine fibroid presented with an episode of acute abnormal uterine bleeding requiring blood transfusion. In lieu of using a hormonal maintenance regimen after the bleeding had stabilized, the patient was treated with ulipristal acetate 5 mg daily for three months. Amenorrhea was induced rapidly and the patient had no further episodes of acute excessive uterine bleeding. She subsequently underwent a laparoscopic myomectomy with a satisfactory outcome. Ulipristal acetate has been shown to induce amenorrhea rapidly in women with uterine fibroids, and it can be a useful treatment in the emergency management of fibroid-related acute abnormal uterine bleeding. Copyright © 2016 Society of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists of Canada. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. New Trends in Acute Management of Colonic Diverticular Bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Cirocchi, Roberto; Grassi, Veronica; Cavaliere, Davide; Renzi, Claudio; Tabola, Renata; Poli, Giulia; Avenia, Stefano; Farinella, Eleonora; Arezzo, Alberto; Vettoretto, Nereo; D?Andrea, Vito; Binda, Gian Andrea; Fingerhut, Abe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Colonic diverticular disease is the most common cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. In the past, this condition was usually managed with urgent colectomy. Recently, the development of endoscopy and interventional radiology has led to a change in the management of colonic diverticular bleeding. The aim of this systematic review is to define the best treatment for colonic diverticular bleeding. A systematic bibliographic research was performed on the online databases for studies ...

  7. New Trends in Acute Management of Colonic Diverticular Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirocchi, Roberto; Grassi, Veronica; Cavaliere, Davide; Renzi, Claudio; Tabola, Renata; Poli, Giulia; Avenia, Stefano; Farinella, Eleonora; Arezzo, Alberto; Vettoretto, Nereo; D’Andrea, Vito; Binda, Gian Andrea; Fingerhut, Abe

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Colonic diverticular disease is the most common cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. In the past, this condition was usually managed with urgent colectomy. Recently, the development of endoscopy and interventional radiology has led to a change in the management of colonic diverticular bleeding. The aim of this systematic review is to define the best treatment for colonic diverticular bleeding. A systematic bibliographic research was performed on the online databases for studies (randomized controlled trials [RCTs], observational trials, case series, and case reports) published between 2005 and 2014, concerning patients admitted with a diagnosis of diverticular bleeding according to the PRISMA methodology. The outcomes of interest were: diagnosis of diverticulosis as source of bleeding; incidence of self-limiting diverticular bleeding; management of non self-limiting bleeding (endoscopy, angiography, surgery); and recurrent diverticular bleeding. Fourteen studies were retrieved for analysis. No RCTs were found. Eleven non-randomized clinical controlled trials (NRCCTs) were included in this systematic review. In all studies, the definitive diagnosis of diverticular bleeding was always made by urgent colonoscopy. The colonic diverticular bleeding stopped spontaneously in over 80% of the patients, but a re-bleeding was not rare. Recently, interventional endoscopy and angiography became the first-line approach, thus relegating emergency colectomy to patients presenting with hemodynamic instability or as a second-line treatment after failure or complications of hemostasis with less invasive treatments. Colonoscopy is effective to diagnose diverticular bleeding. Nowadays, interventional endoscopy and angiographic treatment have gained a leading role and colectomy should only be entertained in case of failure of the former. PMID:26554768

  8. Transcatheter arterial embolization in gastric cancer patients with acute bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Joo; Shin, Ji Hoon; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Ko, Gi-Young; Gwon, Dong-Il; Song, Ho-Young; Sung, Kyu-Bo [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea)

    2009-04-15

    The safety and clinical effectiveness of transcatheter arterial embolization for bleeding associated with unresectable gastric cancer was evaluated. Twenty-three patients with bleeding from unresectable gastric cancer underwent transcatheter arterial embolization. Of the 23 patients, eight showed signs of active bleeding, such as contrast extravasation or pseudoaneurysm, seven showed only tumor staining, and the remaining eight patients showed negative angiographic findings. All embolization procedures were successful without procedure-related complications. In all eight active bleeding patients, immediate hemostasis was achieved. The overall clinical success rate was 52% (12/23). Recurrent bleeding within 1 month occurred in one (8%) in 12 patients with initial clinical success. One patient showed partial splenic infarction after embolization of the splenic artery for active bleeding from the short gastric artery. Overall 30-day mortality rate was 43% (10/23). The median overall survival period was 38 days. In patients with bleeding from unresectable gastric cancer, transcatheter arterial embolization was found to be safe and effective for achieving immediate hemostasis for active bleeding. Although the clinical success rate was not high, the recurrent bleeding rate was low at 1 month post procedure. (orig.)

  9. Management of acute nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Current policies and future perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.L. Holster (Ingrid); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractAcute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a gastroenterological emergency with a mortality of 6%-13%. The vast majority of these bleeds are due to peptic ulcers. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and Helicobacter pylori are the main risk factors for peptic ulcer disease.

  10. Effects of Ramadan fasting on acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to peptic ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    MH Emami; H Rahimi

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: As, acid negatively affects duodenal and gastric mucosal defense, we designed this study to investigate if fasting during Ramadan can promote peptic ulcer and its complication, acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. METHODS: All patients files who had admitted to hospital with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding from 10th day of Ramadan till one month later, in 2002 to 2004 were reviewed. Patients were divided into two groups: fasting group who were fasting, at least 10 day...

  11. [Gastrointestinal lesions and characteristics of acute gastrointestinal bleeding in acenocoumarol-treated patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nantes, Óscar; Zozaya, José Manuel; Montes, Ramón; Hermida, José

    2014-01-01

    In the last few years, the number of anticoagulated patients has significantly increased and, as a consequence, so have hemorrhagic complications due to this therapy. We analyzed gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding because it is the most frequent type of major bleeding in these patients, and we hypothesized that they would have lesions responsible for GI bleeding regardless of the intensity of anticoagulation, although excessively anticoagulated patients would have more serious hemorrhages. To study the characteristics of anticoagulated patients with GI bleeding and the relationship between the degree of anticoagulation and a finding of causative lesions and bleeding severity. We prospectively studied 96 patients, all anticoagulated with acenocoumarol and consecutively admitted to hospital between 01/01/2003 and 09/30/2005 because of acute GI bleeding. We excluded patients with severe liver disease, as well as nine patients with incomplete details. The incidence of GI bleeding requiring hospitalization was 19.6 cases/100,000 inhabitants-year. In 90% of patients, we found a causative (85% of upper GI bleeding and 50% of lower GI bleeding) or potentially causative lesion, and 30% of them required endoscopic treatment, without differences depending on the intensity of anticoagulation. No relationship was found between the type of lesions observed and the degree of anticoagulation in these patients. Patients who received more intense anticoagulation therapy had more severe hemorrhages (23% of patients with an INR ≥4 had a life-threatening bleed versus only 4% of patients with INR <4). We found an incidence of 20 severe GI bleeding episodes in anticoagulated patients per 100,000 inhabitants-year, with no difference in localization or in the frequency of causative lesions depending on the intensity of anticoagulation. Patients receiving more intense anticoagulation had more severe GI bleeding episodes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights

  12. Management of Adult Jehovah's Witness Patients with Acute Bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berend, Kenrick; Levi, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    Because of the firm refusal of transfusion of blood and blood components by Jehovah's Witnesses, the management of Jehovah's Witness patients with severe bleeding is often complicated by medical, ethical, and legal concerns. Because of a rapidly growing and worldwide membership, physicians working

  13. Clinical predictors of outcome in acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. Endoscopy has traditionally been used to risk stratify patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). This is problematic in resource-poor environments. The study aimed to identify patients who would not require urgent endoscopy by identifying clinical variables before endoscopy that predict uneventful ...

  14. Hook worm caused chronic anemia found during the procedure of acute gastrointestinal bleeding: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Upper gastrointestinal bleeding with complicated factors is always difficult to find the primary origin. Case presentation Here we present a case of a 74-year-old male farmer suffered from acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding caused by gastric ulcer and Mallory-Weiss syndrome and chronic anemia which was at last found caused by hook worm infection. Conclusion It tells us that considering multi-possibility when can not explain the symptom with monophyletism is very important for clinicians. PMID:19178754

  15. Endovascular control of the acute bleeding in patients with advanced neoplasms of the neck

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachvarov, Ch.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: Advanced neoplastic processes in the neck can cause acute life-threatening bleeding. Source of the bleeding can be vessels from a tumor mass or invasion of the main cervical arterial vessels. Poor general condition of the patients and accompanying complications create additional difficulties in getting these situations under control. What you will learn: Endovascular embolization of acute bleeding from advanced cervical neoplasms requires detailed knowledge of anatomical structures in this area and precision equipment with the possibility of super selective catheterization of small caliber vessels. The presentation discusses the various embolization materials and possibilities for their application in the neck. The experience of 5 embolization sessions in 4 patients is presented. An important point is discussion of the possible complications and how to avoid them. Discussion: Acute bleeding from large tumor formation is often a real risk to the life of the patient. Getting these conditions under control usually postpones the poor prognosis of the main disease. Postembolization syndrome and postembolization tissue necrosis define the basic cares in the early and late period after such a procedure. Conclusion: Acute bleeding from advanced neoplastic processes in the neck offers a real challenge. For their successful mastery it is required certain technical skills, unconventional solutions and a wide range of materials for embolization. A multidisciplinary approach is required to view the specific care these patients need and the possible complications

  16. Acute intracranial bleeding and recurrence after bur hole craniostomy for chronic subdural hematoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Chang Hwan; Lee, Soo Eon; Kim, Chang Hyeun; Kim, Jeong Eun; Kang, Hyun-Seung; Park, Chul-Kee; Paek, Sun Ha; Kim, Chi Heon; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Jin Wook; Kim, Yong Hwy; Kim, Dong Gyu; Chung, Chun Kee; Jung, Hee-Won; Yoo, Heon

    2015-07-01

    There is inconsistency among the perioperative management strategies currently used for chronic subdural hematoma (cSDH). Moreover, postoperative complications such as acute intracranial bleeding and cSDH recurrence affect clinical outcome of cSDH surgery. This study evaluated the risk factors associated with acute intracranial bleeding and cSDH recurrence and identified an effective perioperative strategy for cSDH patients. A retrospective study of patients who underwent bur hole craniostomy for cSDH between 2008 and 2012 was performed. A consecutive series of 303 cSDH patients (234 males and 69 females; mean age 67.17 years) was analyzed. Postoperative acute intracranial bleeding developed in 14 patients (4.57%) within a mean of 3.07 days and recurrence was observed in 37 patients (12.21%) within a mean of 31.69 days (range 10-104 days) after initial bur hole craniostomy. The comorbidities of hematological disease and prior shunt surgery were clinical factors associated with acute bleeding. There was a significant risk of recurrence in patients with diabetes mellitus, but recurrence did not affect the final neurological outcome (p = 0.776). Surgical details, including the number of operative bur holes, saline irrigation of the hematoma cavity, use of a drain, and type of postoperative ambulation, were not significantly associated with outcome. However, a large amount of drainage was associated with postoperative acute bleeding. Bur hole craniostomy is an effective surgical procedure for initial and recurrent cSDH. Patients with hematological disease or a history of prior shunt surgery are at risk for postoperative acute bleeding; therefore, these patients should be carefully monitored to avoid overdrainage. Surgeons should consider informing patients with diabetes mellitus that this comorbidity is associated with an increased likelihood of recurrence.

  17. Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Characteristics and Clinical Outcome of Patients Treated With an Intensive Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantopoulou, Georgia; Konstantakis, Christos; Kottorοu, Anastasia; Skroubis, Georgios; Theocharis, Georgios; Theopistos, Vasileios; Triantos, Christos; Nikolopoulou, Vasiliki; Thomopoulos, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Background In recent years major advances have been made in the management of patients with acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding. The aim of this study was to investigate the characteristics and clinical outcome of patients with acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (ALGIB) treated with an intensive protocol. Methods We analyzed the medical records of 528 patients with ALGIB. All patients after hemodynamic stabilization underwent colonoscopy during the first 24 h of hospitalization and capsule enteroscopy when needed. Patients with massive ongoing bleeding underwent computed tomography angiography (CTA), and when active bleeding was detected embolization was immediately performed. Results The mean age of the patients was 70.2 ± 14.6 years and 271 (51.3%) of them were men. At least one comorbidity was present in 464 patients (87.9%), cardiovascular disease in 266 (50.4%), while 158 (30%) patients were on antiplatelet drugs and 96 (18.2%) on anticoagulants. The most common causes of bleeding were diverticulosis (19.7%) and ischemic colitis (19.3%). Thirty-six patients (6.9%) had small intestinal bleeding. In 117 patients (22.2%) active bleeding or recent bleeding stigmata were found and in 82 of them (92.1%) endoscopic hemostasis was applied. Embolization was performed in 10 (1.9%) and was successful in seven (70%) cases, while surgical hemostasis was required in only six (1.1%) cases. Forty-four (8.3%) patients had a rebleeding episode, and 13 patients died with an overall mortality of 2.5%. Conclusions Management of ALGIB based on an intensive protocol is safe and effective. The bleeding source can be identified in most cases with a favorable outcome. PMID:29317943

  18. An Unusual Cause of Acute Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding: Acute Esophageal Necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikhil R. Kalva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute esophageal necrosis (AEN, also called “black esophagus,” is a condition characterized by circumferential necrosis of the esophagus with universal distal involvement and variable proximal extension with clear demarcation at the gastroesophageal junction. It is an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is recognized with distinct and striking mucosal findings on endoscopy. The patients are usually older and are critically ill with shared comorbidities, which include atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, hypertension, chronic renal insufficiency, and malnutrition. Alcoholism and substance abuse could be seen in younger patients. Patients usually have systemic hypotension along with upper abdominal pain in the background of clinical presentation of hematemesis and melena. The endoscopic findings confirm the diagnosis and biopsy is not always necessary unless clinically indicated in atypical presentations. Herein we present two cases with distinct clinical presentation and discuss the endoscopic findings along with a review of the published literature on the management of AEN.

  19. Extramedullary Relapse of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Presenting as Abnormal Uterine Bleeding: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robillard, Diana T; Kutny, Matthew A; Chewning, Joseph H; Arbuckle, Janeen L

    2017-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood malignancy. Relapse of ALL occurs in 15%-20% of patients, with 2%-6% occurring exclusively in extramedullary sites. Relapse of ALL in gynecologic organs is extremely rare. We present a case of a 12-year-old girl with a history of ALL who was referred to the pediatric gynecology clinic with abnormal uterine bleeding. She was determined to have an extramedullary uterine relapse of her ALL. Abnormal uterine bleeding in the setting of childhood malignancy is a frequent reason for consultation to pediatric and adolescent gynecology services. This bleeding is commonly attributed to thrombocytopenia due to bone marrow suppressive chemotherapeutic agents. However, as shown in this report, abnormal uterine bleeding might be a manifestation of an extramedullary relapse. Copyright © 2017 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Abnormal uterine bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anovulatory bleeding; Abnormal uterine bleeding - hormonal; Polymenorrhea - dysfunctional uterine bleeding ... ACOG committee opinion no. 557: Management of acute abnormal uterine bleeding in nonpregnant reproductive-aged women. Reaffirmed 2015. ACOG. ...

  1. Comparison of ACUITY and CRUSADE Scores in Predicting Major Bleeding during Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis C. L. Correia

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background:The ACUITY and CRUSADE scores are validated models for prediction of major bleeding events in acute coronary syndrome (ACS. However, the comparative performances of these scores are not known.Objective:To compare the accuracy of ACUITY and CRUSADE in predicting major bleeding events during ACS.Methods:This study included 519 patients consecutively admitted for unstable angina, non-ST-elevation or ST-elevation myocardial infarction. The scores were calculated based on admission data. We considered major bleeding events during hospitalization and not related to cardiac surgery, according to the Bleeding Academic Research Consortium (BARC criteria (type 3 or 5: hemodynamic instability, need for transfusion, drop in hemoglobin ≥ 3 g, and intracranial, intraocular or fatal bleeding.Results:Major bleeding was observed in 31 patients (23 caused by femoral puncture, 5 digestive, 3 in other sites, an incidence of 6%. While both scores were associated with bleeding, ACUITY demonstrated better C-statistics (0.73, 95% CI = 0.63 - 0.82 as compared with CRUSADE (0.62, 95% CI = 0.53 - 0.71; p = 0.04. The best performance of ACUITY was also reflected by a net reclassification improvement of + 0.19 (p = 0.02 over CRUSADE’s definition of low or high risk. Exploratory analysis suggested that the presence of the variables ‘age’ and ‘type of ACS’ in ACUITY was the main reason for its superiority.Conclusion:The ACUITY Score is a better predictor of major bleeding when compared with the CRUSADE Score in patients hospitalized for ACS.

  2. Stent grafting of acute hepatic artery bleeding following pancreatic head resection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoupis, Christoforos; Ludwig, Karin; Triller, Juergen; Inderbitzin, Daniel; Do, Dai-Do

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the potential of hepatic artery stent grafting in cases of acute hemorrhage of the gastroduodenal artery stump following pancreatic head resection. Five consecutive male patients were treated because of acute, life-threatening massive bleeding. Instead of re-operation, emergency angiography, with the potential of endovascular treatment, was performed. Because of bleeding from the hepatic artery, a stent graft (with the over-the-wire or monorail technique) was implanted to control the hemmorhage by preserving patency of the artery. The outcome was evaluated. In all cases, the hepatic artery stent grafting was successfully performed, and the bleeding was immediately stopped. Clinically, immediately after the procedure, there was an obvious improvement in the general patient condition. There were no immediate procedure-related complications. Completion angiography (n=5) demonstrated control of the hemorrhage and patency of the hepatic artery and the stent graft. Although all patients recovered hemodynamically, three individuals died 2 to 10 days after the procedure. The remaining two patients survived, without the need for re-operation. Transluminal stent graft placement in the hepatic artery is a safe and technically feasible solution to control life-threatening bleeding of the gastroduodenal artery stump. (orig.)

  3. Treatment of Acute Abnormal Uterine Bleeding in Adolescents: What Are Providers Doing in Various Specialties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguelet, Patricia S; Buyers, Eliza M; Lange-Liss, Jill H; Scott, Stephen M

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess whether variability exists in the management of acute abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) in adolescents between pediatric Emergency Department (ED) physicians, pediatric gynecologists, and adolescent medicine specialists. Retrospective chart review. Tertiary care medical center ED. We included girls aged 9-22 years who presented from July 2008 to June 2014 with the complaint of acute AUB. Patients were identified using the International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision codes for heavy menstrual bleeding, AUB, and irregular menses. Exclusion criteria included pregnancy and current use of hormonal therapy. One hundred fifty patients were included. Among those evaluated, 61% (n = 92) were prescribed hormonal medication to stop their bleeding by providers from the ED, Adolescent Medicine, or Pediatric Gynecology. ED physicians prescribed mostly single-dose and multidose taper combined oral contraceptive pills (85%; n = 24), compared with Adolescent Medicine (54%, n = 7), and Gynecology (28%, n = 13). Pediatric gynecologists were more likely than ED physicians to treat patients with norethindrone acetate, either alone or in combination with a single dose combined oral contraceptive pill (61%, n = 33 vs 7%, n = 2; P bleeding, side effects, and patient satisfaction are valuable next steps. Copyright © 2015 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation and management of acute menorrhagia in women with and without underlying bleeding disorders: consensus from an international expert panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    James, Andra H.; Kouides, Peter A.; Abdul-Kadir, Rezan; Dietrich, Jennifer E.; Edlund, Mans; Federici, Augusto B.; Halimeh, Susan; Kamphuisen, Pieter Willem; Lee, Christine A.; Martínez-Perez, Oscar; McLintock, Claire; Peyvandi, Flora; Philipp, Claire; Wilkinson, Jeffrey; Winikoff, Rochelle

    2011-01-01

    Acute menorrhagia is a common gynecological disorder. Prevalence is high among women with inherited bleeding disorders and recent guidance for optimal management is lacking. Following a comprehensive review of the literature, an international expert panel in obstetrics, gynecology and hematology

  5. Acute and massive bleeding from placenta previa and infants' brain damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Ken; Tokunaga, Shuichi; Furukawa, Seishi; Sameshima, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    Among the causes of third trimester bleeding, the impact of placenta previa on cerebral palsy is not well known. To clarify the effect of maternal bleeding from placenta previa on cerebral palsy, and in particular when and how it occurs. A descriptive study. Sixty infants born to mothers with placenta previa in our regional population-based study of 160,000 deliveries from 1998 to 2012. Premature deliveries occurring atplacenta accreta were excluded. Prevalence of cystic periventricular leukomalacia (PVL) and cerebral palsy (CP). Five infants had PVL and 4 of these infants developed CP (1/40,000 deliveries). Acute and massive bleeding (>500g within 8h) occurred at around 30-31 weeks of gestation, and was severe enough to deliver the fetus. None of the 5 infants with PVL underwent antenatal corticosteroid treatment, and 1 infant had mild neonatal hypocapnia with a PaCO2 placenta previa at around 30 weeks of gestation may be a risk factor for CP, and requires careful neonatal follow-up. The underlying process connecting massive placental bleeding and PVL requires further investigation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in operated stomach: Outcome of 105 cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolopoulou, Vassiliki N; Thomopoulos, Konstantinos C; Theocharis, George I; Arvaniti, Vassiliki A; Vagianos, Constantine E

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To compare the causes and clinical outcome of patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGB) and a history of gastric surgery to those with AUGB but without a history of gastric surgery in the past. METHODS: The causes and clinical outcome were compared between 105 patients with AUGB and a history of gastric surgery, and 608 patients with AUGB but without a history of gastric surgery. RESULTS: Patients who underwent gastric surgery in the past were older (mean age: 68.1±11.7 years vs 62.8±17.8 years, P = 0.001), and the most common cause of bleeding was marginal ulcer in 63 patients (60%). No identifiable source of bleeding could be found in 22 patients (20.9%) compared to 42/608 (6.9%) in patients without a history of gastric surgery (P = 0.003). Endoscopic hemostasis was permanently successful in 26 out of 35 patients (74.3%) with peptic ulcers and active bleeding or non-bleeding visible vessel. Nine patients (8.6%) were operated due to continuing or recurrent bleeding, compared to 23/608 (3.8%) in the group of patients without gastric surgery in the past (P = 0.028). Especially in peptic ulcer bleeding patients, emergency surgery was more common in the group of patients with gastric surgery in the past [9/73 (12.3%) vs 19/360 (5.3%), P = 0.025]. Moreover surgically treated patients in the past required more blood transfusion (3.3±4.0 vs 1.5±1.7, P = 0.0001) and longer hospitalization time (8.6±4.0 vs 6.9±4.9 d, P = 0.001) than patients without a history of gastric surgery. Mortality was not different between the two groups [4/105 (3.8%) vs 19/608 (3.1%)]. CONCLUSION: Upper gastrointestinal bleeding seems to be more severe in surgically treated patients than in non-operated patients. PMID:16052690

  7. Detection and localization of acute upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding with arterial phase multi-detector row helical CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaeckle, T.; Stuber, G.; Hoffmann, M.H.K.; Jeltsch, M.; Schmitz, B.L.; Aschoff, A.J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of multi-detector row helical CT (MDCT) for detection and localization of acute upper and lower gastrointestinal (GI) hemorrhage or intraperitoneal bleeding. Thirty-six consecutive patients with clinical signs of acute bleeding underwent biphasic (16- or 40-channel) MDCT. MDCT findings were correlated with endoscopy, angiography or surgery. Among the 36 patients evaluated, 26 were examined for GI bleeding and 10 for intraperitoneal hemorrhage. Confirmed sites of GI bleeding were the stomach (n = 5), duodenum (n = 5), small bowel (n = 6), large bowel (n = 8) and rectum (n = 2). The correct site of bleeding was identifiable on MDCT in 24/26 patients with GI bleeding. In 20 of these 24 patients, active CM extravasation was apparent during the exam. Among the ten patients with intraperitoneal hemorrhage, MDCT correctly identified the bleeding source in nine patients. Our findings suggest that fast and accurate localization of acute gastrointestinal and intraperitoneal bleeding is achievable on MDCT. (orig.)

  8. Acute Abdominal Pain Secondary to Retroperitoneal Bleeding From a Giant Adrenal Lipoma With Review of Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyaz M. Singaporewalla

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Adrenal lipomas are rare, non-functioning benign tumours, which are primarily detected during autopsy or imaging, as asymptomatic incidentalomas. Occasionally, they can present with abdominal pain due to their large size. Imaging studies help to determine the origin, volume, composition of the lesion and presence of bleeding. Histopathology, however, is necessary to differentiate an adrenal lipoma from other fatty tumours such as myelolipoma, angiomyolipomas, teratomas and liposarcomas. We report a case of spontaneous bleeding from a giant adrenal lipoma that presented as an acute abdomen, and was initially mistaken on imaging for the more common myelolipoma. The literature is reviewed to discuss the clinical, pathological and radiological features, and the optimum therapeutic management.

  9. [Gastric schwannoma: rare differenzial diagnosis of acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyros, Orestis; Schickel, Stephan; Schierle, Katrin; Hoffmeister, Albrecht; Gockel, Ines

    2017-08-01

    Schwannomas are benign tumors derived from Schwann cells and their typical site of origin is the subcutaneous tissue of the extremities. Gastrointestinal localization of Schwannomas is extremely rare and the stomach is the prevalent site. Gastric schwannomas primarily occur in the gastric submucosa and are usually asymptomatic.We present a rare case of a solitary gastric schwannoma in a 51-year old male, which initially manifested with hematemesis by acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. The upper GI-Endoscopy revealed a gastric submucosal tumor, 7 cm in size, located in the proximal corpus and fundus. In the endoscopical Ultrasound (EUS-Examination), the lesion appeared to arise from the fourth proper muscle layer (Muscularis propria). The fourth layer origin and the isoechogenicity, as compared to the normal muscle layer, are endoscopic ultrasonographic characteristics of gastric schwannomas and help in distinguishing them from gastrointestinal tumors (GIST). Because of the unclear histological identity, the patient underwent a "rendezvous" endoscopic-laparoscopic surgical resection of the tumor in toto. The histomorphological features of the lesion and the strong expression of S100 in combination with absence of DOG1 expression indicated the diagnosis of gastric schwannoma. There was no evidence of malignancy. The postoperative course was uncomplicated.This is a very rare manifestation of gastric schwannoma, representing a rare differenzial diagnosis in a case of acute upper GI-Bleeding. Only 14 % of gastric schwanommas are presented with gastrointestinal bleeding, including mainly melena rather than hematemesis. This case is considered to be worthy of presentation owing to the rare and unusual cause of upper GI bleeding implied in it. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. A new progestogen-only medical therapy for outpatient management of acute, abnormal uterine bleeding: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerman, Stacy R; Nelson, Anita L

    2013-06-01

    The objective of this investigation was to study short-term efficacy and feasibility of a new progestogen-only treatment for outpatient management of acute abnormal uterine bleeding. This was a prospective, single-arm, pilot clinical trial of a progestogen-only bridging treatment for acute abnormal uterine bleeding in nonpregnant, premenopausal women in the Gynecologic Urgent Care Clinic at Harbor-UCLA Medical Center. Subjects were administered a depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate 150 mg intramuscular injection and given medroxyprogesterone acetate 20 mg to be taken orally every 8 hours for 3 days. The primary outcome measures included a percentage of women who stopped bleeding in 5 days, time to bleeding cessation, reduction in numbers of pads used, side effects, and patient satisfaction. All 48 women stopped bleeding within 5 days; 4 women had spotting only at the time of their last contact during the 5 day follow-up. Mean time to bleeding cessation was 2.6 days. Side effects were infrequent and patient satisfaction was high. Injection of depo-medroxyprogesterone acetate 150 mg intramuscularly combined with 3 days of oral medroxyprogesterone acetate 20 mg every 8 hours for 9 doses is an effective outpatient therapy for acute abnormal uterine bleeding. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Abdominal blood pool scintigraphy in the management of acute or intermittent gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalff, V.; Kelly, M.J.; Dudley, F.; Metz, G.

    1983-01-01

    Gastrointestinal blood pool scintigraphy, using a modified in-vivo blood cell labelling technique with technetium-99, is a new, easily performed, non-invasive procedure. It is valuable in screening patients with acute or intermittent gastrointestinal blood loss in whom duodenoscopic and sigmoidoscopic findings are unhelpful. This paper reviews the value of this scintigraphic technique over the first eight months of its use in a major teaching hospital, and compares the results with other published data. If used and interpreted appropriately, scintigraphy is sensitive in detecting and localizing the bleeding site, and is very helpful in indicating the optimal timing of emergency contrast angiography

  12. Acute Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Olmesartan-Associated Collagenous Gastroduodenitis: A Potential Endoscopic Complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Hudacko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Collagenous gastroenteritis is a rare disease that is known to be associated with the drug olmesartan, an angiotensin II receptor antagonist used to treat hypertension. It is characterized histologically by increased subepithelial collagen deposition with associated inflammation and epithelial injury. Endoscopically, the mucosa appears inflamed and friable and may be nodular or atrophic. We report a case of acute gastric bleeding on direct mucosal contact during endoscopy in a patient with olmesartan-associated collagenous gastroduodenitis to raise awareness of this potential endoscopic complication.

  13. Interventions for treating acute bleeding episodes in people with acquired hemophilia A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yan; Zhou, Ruiqing; Duan, Xin; Long, Dan; Yang, Songtao

    2014-08-28

    Acquired hemophilia A is a rare bleeding disorder caused by autoantibodies to coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). In most cases, bleeding episodes are spontaneous and severe at presentation. The optimal hemostatic therapy is controversial. To determine the efficacy of hemostatic therapies for acute bleeds in people with acquired hemophilia A; and to compare different forms of therapy for these bleeds. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2014, Issue 4) and MEDLINE (Ovid) (1948 to 30 April 2014). We searched the conference proceedings of the: American Society of Hematology; European Hematology Association; International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH); and the European Association for Haemophilia and Allied Disorders (EAHAD) (from 2000 to 30 April 2014). In addition to this we searched clinical trials registers. All randomised controlled trials and quasi-randomised trials of hemostatic therapies for people with acquired hemophilia A, with no restrictions on gender, age or ethnicity. No trials matching the selection criteria were eligible for inclusion. No trials matching the selection criteria were eligible for inclusion. No randomised clinical trials of hemostatic therapies for acquired hemophilia A were found. Thus, we are not able to draw any conclusions or make any recommendations on the optimal hemostatic therapies for acquired hemophilia A based on the highest quality of evidence. GIven that carrying out randomized controlled trials in this field is a complex task, the authors suggest that, while planning randomised controlled trials in which patients can be enrolled, clinicians treating the disease continue to base their choices on alternative, lower quality sources of evidence, which hopefully, in the future, will also be appraised and incorporated in a Cochrane Review.

  14. A Rare Case of Pancreas Divisum Accompanied by Acute Pancreatitis Following Endoscopic Hemostasis for Duodenal Ulcer Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yong Hyeok; Yoon, Soon Man; Kim, Eun Bee; Oh, Youngmin; Kim, Keunmo; Lee, Jisun; Park, Seon Mee; Youn, Sei Jin

    2017-04-25

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is treated using endoscopic hemostasis using clips or bands. Pancreas divisum (PD), a congenital anomaly of the pancreas, usually has no clinical symptoms; however, pancreatitis may occur if there are disturbances in the drainage of pancreatic secretions. We report an unusual case of PD accompanied by acute pancreatitis, following endoscopic band ligation for duodenal ulcer bleeding. A 48-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital due to melena. An upper endoscopy revealed a small ulcer with oozing adjacent minor papilla. An endoscopic band ligation was performed on this lesion. Acute pancreatitis developed suddenly 6 hours after the band ligation and improved dramatically after removal of the band. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography was performed, revealing complete PD. Endoscopic band ligation is known as the effective method for peptic ulcer bleeding; however, it should be used carefully in duodenal ulcer bleeding near the minor duodenal papilla due to the possibility of PD.

  15. Low platelet count is potentially the most important contributor to severe bleeding in patients newly diagnosed with acute promyelocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Y

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Yu-hua Song,1,2 Peng Peng,3 Chun Qiao,1 Run Zhang,1 Jian-yong Li,1 Hua Lu1 1Department of Hematology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Jiangsu Province Hospital, 2Department of Hematology, 3Department of Oncology, The Second Hospital of Nanjing, Nanjing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The objective of the current study was to provide more appropriate therapeutic strategies for reducing severe hemorrhaging by assessing the recovery of abnormal coagulation indexes in patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL during induction therapy. Retrospective analyses of 112 patients newly diagnosed with APL were performed during initial treatment. In our study, the early death rate was 5.36%. Hemorrhage was the leading cause of death during the induction period (4/6. The values of white blood cell count, lactate dehydrogenase, prothrombin time (PT, fibrinogen (Fbg, hemoglobin, and bone marrow leukemic promyelocytes were significantly different in the high-risk group compared to the low/intermediate-risk groups. There were significant differences in the white blood cell count, bone marrow leukemic promyelocytes, platelet (PLT count, and the levels of lactate dehydrogenase, d-dimer, PT, and Fbg, as well as in FLT3-ITD mutations between patients with major bleeding and those with minor bleeding. Hemostatic variables significantly improved over time during induction therapy. The recovery times of the PLT, PT, and Fbg values were significantly slower in patients with major bleeding than in those with minor bleeding. Specifically, the PLT level in patients with major bleeding was not similar to that in the minor bleeding group until after 4 weeks of treatment. Hemorrhages were the most common cause of induction death in this study. High-risk patients were more prone to serious clinical bleeding symptoms. Patients with major bleeding had more rapid proliferation characteristics and an increased incidence of FLT3-ITD

  16. Effect of Transfusion Strategy in Acute Non-variceal Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Rasmus; Svenningsen, Peter; Hillingsø, Jens

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) is a common cause of admissions as well as aggressive transfusion of blood products. Whether the transfusion strategy in NVUGIB impacts on hemostasis is unknown and constitutes the focus of this study. METHOD: Retrospective...... analysis of all hospital admissions in Denmark between 2011 and 2013 where hemostatic endoscopic interventions in either the stomach or duodenum had been employed. Regression modeling was used to predict the effect of units transfused of packed red blood cells (PRBC), fresh frozen plasma (FFP......), and platelets (PLT) on primary outcome 30-day mortality as well as secondary hemostasis-related outcomes and need for re-endoscopy and conversion to surgery. The model was corrected for confounders, including transfusion of other blood products (PRBC, FFP, and PLT, respectively), patient age as well as pre...

  17. Promoting the management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeds among junior doctors: a quality improvement project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunsbury, Emma; Allison, Emma; Colleypriest, Ben

    2015-01-01

    Though they are knowledgeable, foundation year one (FY1) doctors can lack skills and confidence in acute situations due to inexperience. This was witnessed when a new FY1 on call attended an acute upper gastrointestinal bleed (UGIB), a common emergency with a 10% in hospital mortality rate. We aimed to improve FY1s' ability to manage these critical patients through simulation based teaching, before and after the introduction of an algorithm summarising current guidelines. After assessing the FY1s' perceived level of confidence in managing UGIBs, they individually attended a simulation session which evaluated specific aspects of their assessment and management plans. Immediate debriefing and subsequent teaching sessions reinforced learning points, with an algorithm instituted as an aide mémoire to improve efficiency. A repeat simulation session assessed improvements in both subjective confidence and objective management targets. All FY1s expressed improved confidence in managing patients with UGIBs. There were improvements across the board in their assessment and management, notably: verbalisation of concern for hypotension increased to 100% (from 60%), two points of intravenous access requested in 100% of cases (from 53%), and a 76 second reduction in time to call for senior support. Collectively, these individual aspects led to improved patient care. Effective management of acute patients is best learnt through exposure, and simulation based teaching provides a safe but powerful modality to aid transition from textbook theory to ward situations. Algorithms can streamline care and hasten the stabilisation of patients. This project reinforces generic competencies that FY1s can translate to their management of not only UGIBs, but many acute presentations, providing a convincing argument for broader simulation use in FY1 teaching.

  18. Bleeding risk during treatment of acute thrombotic events with subcutaneous LMWH compared to intravenous unfractionated heparin; a systematic review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Costantino

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Low Molecular Weight Heparins (LMWH are at least as effective antithrombotic drugs as Unfractionated Heparin (UFH. However, it is still unclear whether the safety profiles of LMWH and UFH differ. We performed a systematic review to compare the bleeding risk of fixed dose subcutaneous LMWH and adjusted dose UFH for treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE or acute coronary syndromes (ACS. Major bleeding was the primary end point. METHODS: Electronic databases (MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library were searched up to May 2010 with no language restrictions. Randomized controlled trials in which subcutaneous LMWH were compared to intravenous UFH for the treatment of acute thrombotic events were selected. Two reviewers independently screened studies and extracted data on study design, study quality, incidence of major bleeding, patients' characteristics, type, dose and number of daily administrations of LMWH, co-treatments, study end points and efficacy outcome. Pooled odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CI were calculated using the random effects model. RESULTS: Twenty-seven studies were included. A total of 14,002 patients received UFH and 14,635 patients LMWH. Overall, no difference in major bleeding was observed between LMWH patients and UFH (OR = 0.79, 95% CI 0.60-1.04. In patients with VTE LMWH appeared safer than UFH, (OR = 0.68, 95% CI 0.47-1.00. CONCLUSION: The results of our systematic review suggest that the use of LMWH in the treatment of VTE might be associated with a reduction in major bleeding compared with UFH. The choice of which heparin to use to minimize bleeding risk must be based on the single patient, taking into account the bleeding profile of different heparins in different settings.

  19. Scintigraphic demonstration of acute gastrointestinal bleeding caused by gallbladder carcinoma eroding the colon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czerniak, A.; Zwas, S.T.; Rabau, M.Y.; Avigad, I.; Borag, B.; Wolfstein, I.

    1985-08-01

    Massive lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding caused by gallbladder carcinoma eroding into the colonic wall was demonstrated accurately by Tc-99m RBCs. In addition, retrograde bleeding into the gallbladder was also identified while arteriography did not show contrast extravasation. This case supports the use of Tc-99m RBCs over Tc-99m sulfur colloid for more accurate localization of lower GI bleeding.

  20. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in octogenarians: Clinical outcome and factors related to mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theocharis, George J; Arvaniti, Vassiliki; Assimakopoulos, Stelios F; Thomopoulos, Konstantinos C; Xourgias, Vassilis; Mylonakou, Irini; Nikolopoulou, Vassiliki N

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the aetiology, clinical outcome and factors related to mortality of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) in octogenarians. METHODS: We reviewed the records of all patients over 65 years old who were hospitalised with AUGIB in two hospitals from January 2006 to December of 2006. Patients were divided into two groups: Group A (65-80 years old) and Group B (> 80 years old). RESULTS: Four hundred and sixteen patients over 65 years of age were hospitalized because of AUGIB. Group A included 269 patients and Group B 147 patients. Co-morbidity was more common in octogenarians (P = 0.04). The main cause of bleeding was peptic ulcer in both groups. Rebleeding and emergency surgery were uncommon in octogenarians and not different from those in younger patients. In-hospital complications were more common in octogenarians (P = 0.05) and more patients died in the group of octogenarians compared to the younger age group (P = 0.02). Inability to perform endoscopic examination (P = 0.002), presence of high risk for rebleeding stigmata (P = 0.004), urea on admission (P = 0.036), rebleeding (P = 0.004) and presence of severe co-morbidity (P < 0.0001) were related to mortality. In multivariate analysis, only the presence of severe co-morbidity was independently related to mortality (P = 0.032). CONCLUSION: While rebleeding and emergency surgery rates are relatively low in octogenarians with AUGIB, the presence of severe co-morbidity is the main factor of adverse outcome. PMID:18609689

  1. Controlled trial of ligation plus vasoconstrictor versus proton pump inhibitor in the control of acute esophageal variceal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Gin-Ho; Perng, Daw-Shyong; Chang, Chi-Yang; Tai, Chi-Ming; Wang, Huay-Min; Lin, Hui-Chen

    2013-04-01

    Endoscopic therapy combined with vasoconstrictor was generally recommended to treat acute variceal bleeding. However, up to 30% of patients may still encounter treatment failure. This trial was to evaluate the efficacy of combination with endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) and proton pump inhibitor (PPI) infusion in patients with acute variceal bleeding. Cirrhotic patients presenting with acute esophageal variceal bleeding were rescued by emergency EVL. Soon after arresting of bleeding varices, eligible subjects were randomized to two groups. Vasoconstrictor group received either somatostatin or terlipressin infusion. PPI group received either omeprazole or pantoprazole. End points were initial hemostasis, very early rebleeding rate, and adverse events. Sixty patients were enrolled in vasoconstrictor group and 58 patients in PPI group. Both groups were comparable in baseline data. Initial hemostasis was achieved in 98% in vasoconstrictor group and 100% in PPI group (P = 1.0). Very early rebleeding within 48-120 h occurred in one patient (2%) in vasoconstrictor group and one patient (2%) in the PPI group (P = 1.0). Treatment failure was 4% in vasoconstrictor group and 2% in PPI group (P = 0.95). Adverse events occurred in 33 patients (55%) in vasoconstrictor group and three patients (6%) in PPI group (P EVL, adjuvant therapy with PPI infusion was similar to combination with vasoconstrictor infusion in terms of initial hemostasis, very early rebleeding rate, and associated with fewer adverse events. © 2012 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Prevalence and outcome of gastrointestinal bleeding and use of acid suppressants in acutely ill adult intensive care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, Mette; Perner, Anders; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2015-01-01

    replacement therapy (6.9, 2.7-17.5), co-existing coagulopathy (5.2, 2.3-11.8), acute coagulopathy (4.2, 1.7-10.2), use of acid suppressants (3.6, 1.3-10.2) and higher organ failure score (1.4, 1.2-1.5). In ICU, 73 % (71-76 %) of patients received acid suppressants; most received proton pump inhibitors....... In patients with clinically important GI bleeding, crude and adjusted odds for mortality were 3.7 (1.7-8.0) and 1.7 (0.7-4.3), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: In ICU patients clinically important GI bleeding is rare, and acid suppressants are frequently used. Co-existing diseases, liver failure, coagulopathy......PURPOSE: To describe the prevalence of, risk factors for, and prognostic importance of gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and use of acid suppressants in acutely ill adult intensive care patients. METHODS: We included adults without GI bleeding who were acutely admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU...

  3. Improved outcomes following implementation of an acute gastrointestinal bleeding multidisciplinary protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Tyler J; Go, Kristina L; Hughes, Steven J; Croft, Chasen A; Smith, Robert Stephen; Efron, Philip A; Moore, Frederick A; Brakenridge, Scott C; Mohr, Alicia M; Jordan, Janeen R

    2017-07-01

    Effective multidisciplinary management of gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB) requires effective communication. We instituted a protocol to standardize communication practices with the hypothesis that outcomes would improve following protocol initiation. We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of 442 patients who required procedural management of acute GIB at our institution during a 50-month period spanning 25 months before and 25 months after implementation of a multidisciplinary communication protocol. The protocol stipulates that when a patient with severe GIB is identified, a conference call is coordinated among the gastroenterology, interventional radiology, and acute care surgery teams. A consensus plan is generated and then reassessed following procedural interventions and changes in patients' status. Patients' characteristics, management strategies, and outcomes were compared before and after protocol initiation. Patient populations before and after protocol initiation were similar in age, comorbidities, outpatient use of antiplatelet/anticoagulant medications, admission vital signs, and admission laboratory values. The median interval between admission and the first procedure was significantly shorter in the protocol group (40 vs 47 hours, p = 0.046). The proportion of patients who received packed red blood cell transfusions decreased following protocol initiation (41% vs 50%, p = 0.018). Median hospital length of stay was significantly shorter in the protocol group (5.0 vs 6.0 days, p = 0.014). Readmissions with GIB were decreased after protocol implementation (8% vs. 15%, p = 0.023). Implementation of a multidisciplinary protocol for management of acute GIB was associated with earlier intervention, fewer packed red blood cell transfusions, shorter hospital length of stay, and fewer readmissions with GIB. Future research should seek to establish causal relationships between communication practices and outcomes. Therapeutic study, level III.

  4. Clinical significance of diminution of high-density areas in basal cisterns following acute aneurysmal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuzaki, Takayuki; Takeda, Rihei; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Sato, Shigeru; Fujiwara, Hidetoshi

    1983-01-01

    We analyzed the sequential changes in the high density in basal cisterns in the acute stage of aneurysmal bleeding. We could recognize Group 3 (clot or thick layer), according to Fisher's classification, in 66.3% of the intracranial aneurysms at admission (83 cases). In the early stage of an intracranial aneurysm, a subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) was detected in all the patients on CT. We evaluated 40 cases of Group 3 sequentially on CT. This investigation showed that 55% of the Grade I--Ii group, 27.3% of the Grade III group, and 11.1% of the Grade IV--V group changed to Group 2(thin or diffuse pattern) in approximately 20 hours on the average. As for the correlation between the high density in basal cisterns and the neurological condition (Hunt and Hess), we found a neurological improvement in the decreased-high-density group. The unchanged- high-density group showed deterioration. Compared with the decreased-high-density group, the unchanged group showed a greater increase in the CVI (Cerebro Ventricular Index). RI ( 111 In) cisternography also showed a disturbance of the CSF circulation. To lower the vasospasm it is important to decrease the high density in an early stage by carrying out CSF. It was considered to be prognostic when a CT scan was performed within 24 hours after SAH. (author)

  5. [The role of endoscopy in determining the indications for the surgical treatment of the Mallory-Weiss syndrome and of bleeding acute gastroduodenal ulcers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skriabin, O N; Korobchenko, A A; Lobach, S M; Musinov, I M

    1997-01-01

    The frequency of acute sources of bleeding has recently increased (47%) in the general picture of gastrointestinal bleedings which makes the improvement of diagnosing "acute" sources of hemorrhage and the development of more perfect methods of nonoperative hemostasis very actual. The authors believe that "Kaprofer" used in most of patients with bleedings from acute ulcers and ruptures of the gastro-esophageal zone mucosa (95%) allows the hemorrhage to be arrested. The treatment can be continued without operative interventions. Search for new hemostatic drugs must be performed in order to obtain reliable and long-term effects of drugs with a minimum aggressive action upon the mucosa.

  6. New Trends in Acute Management of Colonic Diverticular Bleeding: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirocchi, Roberto; Grassi, Veronica; Cavaliere, Davide; Renzi, Claudio; Tabola, Renata; Poli, Giulia; Avenia, Stefano; Farinella, Eleonora; Arezzo, Alberto; Vettoretto, Nereo; D'Andrea, Vito; Binda, Gian Andrea; Fingerhut, Abe

    2015-11-01

    Colonic diverticular disease is the most common cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. In the past, this condition was usually managed with urgent colectomy. Recently, the development of endoscopy and interventional radiology has led to a change in the management of colonic diverticular bleeding.The aim of this systematic review is to define the best treatment for colonic diverticular bleeding.A systematic bibliographic research was performed on the online databases for studies (randomized controlled trials [RCTs], observational trials, case series, and case reports) published between 2005 and 2014, concerning patients admitted with a diagnosis of diverticular bleeding according to the PRISMA methodology.The outcomes of interest were: diagnosis of diverticulosis as source of bleeding; incidence of self-limiting diverticular bleeding; management of non self-limiting bleeding (endoscopy, angiography, surgery); and recurrent diverticular bleeding.Fourteen studies were retrieved for analysis. No RCTs were found. Eleven non-randomized clinical controlled trials (NRCCTs) were included in this systematic review. In all studies, the definitive diagnosis of diverticular bleeding was always made by urgent colonoscopy. The colonic diverticular bleeding stopped spontaneously in over 80% of the patients, but a re-bleeding was not rare. Recently, interventional endoscopy and angiography became the first-line approach, thus relegating emergency colectomy to patients presenting with hemodynamic instability or as a second-line treatment after failure or complications of hemostasis with less invasive treatments.Colonoscopy is effective to diagnose diverticular bleeding. Nowadays, interventional endoscopy and angiographic treatment have gained a leading role and colectomy should only be entertained in case of failure of the former.

  7. PROPOSAL OF A CLINICAL CARE PATHWAY FOR THE MANAGEMENT OF ACUTE UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matheus Cavalcante FRANCO

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background - Upper gastrointestinal bleeding implies significant clinical and economic repercussions. The correct establishment of the latest therapies for the upper gastrointestinal bleeding is associated with reduced in-hospital mortality. The use of clinical pathways for the upper gastrointestinal bleeding is associated with shorter hospital stay and lower hospital costs. Objective - The primary objective is the development of a clinical care pathway for the management of patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, to be used in tertiary hospital. Methods - It was conducted an extensive literature review on the management of upper gastrointestinal bleeding, contained in the primary and secondary information sources. Results - The result is a clinical care pathway for the upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with evidence of recent bleeding, diagnosed by melena or hematemesis in the last 12 hours, who are admitted in the emergency rooms and intensive care units of tertiary hospitals. In this compact and understandable pathway, it is well demonstrated the management since the admission, with definition of the inclusion and exclusion criteria, passing through the initial clinical treatment, posterior guidance for endoscopic therapy, and referral to rescue therapies in cases of persistent or rebleeding. It was also included the care that must be taken before hospital discharge for all patients who recover from an episode of bleeding. Conclusion - The introduction of a clinical care pathway for patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding may contribute to standardization of medical practices, decrease in waiting time for medications and services, length of hospital stay and costs.

  8. Acute gastrointestinal bleeding following aortic valve replacement in a patient with Heyde's sindrome. Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Palma, G D; Salvatori, F; Masone, S; Simeoli, I; Rega, M; Celiento, M; Persico, G

    2007-09-01

    A 58-year old man was admitted to the hospital because of melena. He had a 1-year history of mechanical aortic valve replacement and coronary stent placement because of myocardial infarction and he was taking warfarin and clopidogrel. Esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy were negative for bleeding. Capsule endoscopy showed bleeding diffuse angiodysplasia of the small bowel. The patient was treated with octreotide 20 mg, at monthly interval. After 25 months there had been no recurrence of gastrointestinal bleeding. The case suggests that mechanical valve replacement may not prevent gastrointestinal bleeding in Heyde syndrome and that octreotide treatment should be considered in these cases.

  9. Correlation of adjusted blood requirement index with treatment intervention and outcome in patients presenting with acute variceal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaberi, B.F.; Riaz, M.F.; Sultan, B.A.; Gobindram, P.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the correlation of ABRI with treatment intervention and outcome as discharged or expired in patients of acute variceal bleed. Records of all the patients admitted in Medical Unit-IV, Civil Hospital Karachi with acute variceal bleeding during January 2004 to October 2006 were retrieved. Use of vasoactive agents (Terlipressin/Octreotide), endoscopic band ligation (EBL) and outcome (Discharged/Expired) were noted. ABRI was calculated by the following formula. ABRI= Blood Units Transfused/((Final Hematocrit-Initial Hematocrit)+0.01) Mean ABRI were compared by student's 't' test according to vasoactive therapy, EBL and outcome. Correlation of ABRI with the same variables was also studied by plotting Receiver Operative Curves (ROC). Seventy six patients fulfilling inclusion criteria were selected. No statistically significant difference was observed in the mean ABRI scores when compared according to vasoactive drug administration, EBL and outcome. Significant correlation with mortality was seen on ROC plot with significantly larger area under the curve. (author)

  10. Balancing Potency of Platelet Inhibition with Bleeding Risk in the Early Treatment of Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slattery, David E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To review available evidence and examine issues surrounding the use of advanced antiplatelet therapy in an effort to provide a practical guide for emergency physicians caring for patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS.Data Sources: American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA 2007 guidelines for the management of patients with unstable angina (UA and non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI, AHA/ACC 2007 focused update for the management of patients with STEMI, selected clinical articles identified through the PubMed database (1965-February 2008, and manual searches for relevant articles identified from those retrieved.Study Selection: English-language controlled studies and randomized clinical trials that assessed the efficacy and safety of antiplatelet therapy in treating patients with all ACS manifestations.Data Extraction and Synthesis: Clinical data, including treatment regimens and patient demographics and outcomes, were extracted and critically analyzed from the selected studies and clinical trials. Pertinent data from relevant patient registries were also evaluated to assess current clinical practice.Conclusions: As platelet activation and aggregation are central to ACS pathology, antiplatelet agents are critical to early treatment. A widely accepted first-line treatment is aspirin, which acts to decrease platelet activation via inhibition of thromboxane A2 synthesis. Thienopyridines, which inhibit ADP-induced platelet activation, and glycoprotein (GP receptor antagonists, which bind to platelet GP IIb/IIIa receptors and hinder their role in platelet aggregation and thrombus formation, provide complementary mechanisms of platelet inhibition and are often employed in combination with aspirin. While the higher levels of platelet inhibition that accompany combination therapy improve protection against ischemic and peri-procedural events, the risk of bleeding is also increased. Thus, the

  11. Lactic Acidosis Induced by Linezolid Mimics Symptoms of an Acute Intracranial Bleed: A Case Report and Literature Review

    OpenAIRE

    Zuccarini, Nichole Suzzanne; Yousuf, Tariq; Wozniczka, Daniel; Rauf, Anis Abdul

    2016-01-01

    Lactic acidosis is common and most often associated with disturbed acid-base balance. Rarely, it can be a life-threatening medication side effect. Hence, determining the etiology of lactic acidosis early in patients is paramount in choosing the correct therapeutic intervention. Although lactic acidosis as an adverse drug reaction of linezolid is a well-recognized and documented clinical entity, the occurrence of such mimicking an acute intracranial bleed has not been reported to our knowledge...

  12. Correlation of coagulation markers and 4F-PCC-mediated reversal of rivaroxaban in a rabbit model of acute bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzog, Eva; Kaspereit, Franz; Krege, Wilfried; Mueller-Cohrs, Jochen; Doerr, Baerbel; Niebl, Peter; Dickneite, Gerhard

    2015-03-01

    Rivaroxaban is an oral, selective direct factor Xa inhibitor approved for several indications in patients at risk of thrombotic events. One limitation of its clinical use is the lack of data pertaining to its reversal in situations where urgent response is critical (e.g. acute bleeding events or emergency surgery). This study assessed the effectiveness of a four-factor prothrombin complex concentrate (4F-PCC; Beriplex(®)/Kcentra(®)) for the reversal of rivaroxaban-associated bleeding in an in vivo rabbit model, and evaluated the correlations between in vitro coagulation parameters and haemostasis in vivo. Administration of single intravenous doses of rivaroxaban (150-450 μg/kg) resulted in increased and prolonged bleeding following standardised kidney incision. Pre-incision treatment with 4F-PCC (25-100 IU/kg) resulted in a dose-dependent reversal of rivaroxaban (150 and 300 μg/kg)-associated increases in time to haemostasis and blood loss; no reversal was seen at the highest rivaroxaban dose (450 μg/kg). Of the in vitro biomarkers tested, thrombin generation and whole-blood clotting time correlated well with in vivo measures of 4F-PCC-mediated effects. Thrombin generation was highly reagent-dependent, with the assay initiated using the phospholipid-only reagent being the most predictive of effective haemostasis in vivo. In summary, in a rabbit model of acute bleeding, treatment with 4F-PCC reduced bleeding to control levels following rivaroxaban 150 μg/kg and 300 μg/kg administration. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients on long-term oral anticoagulation therapy: Endoscopic findings, clinical management and outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomopoulos, Konstantinos C; Mimidis, Konstantinos P; Theocharis, George J; Gatopoulou, Anthie G; Kartalis, Georgios N; Nikolopoulou, Vassiliki N

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Acute gastrointestinal bleeding is a severe complication in patients receiving long-term oral anticoagulant therapy. The purpose of this study was to describe the causes and clinical outcome of these patients. METHODS: From January 1999 to October 2003, 111 patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) were hospitalized while on oral anticoagulants. The causes and clinical outcome of these patients were compared with those of 604 patients hospitalized during 2000-2001 with AUGIB who were not taking warfarin. RESULTS: The most common cause of bleeding was peptic ulcer in 51 patients (45%) receiving anticoagulants compared to 359/604 (59.4%) patients not receiving warfarin (P<0.05). No identifiable source of bleeding could be found in 33 patients (29.7%) compared to 31/604 (5.1%) patients not receiving anticoagulants (P = 0.0001). The majority of patients with concurrent use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) (26/35, 74.3%) had a peptic ulcer as a cause of bleeding while 32/76 (40.8%) patients not taking a great dose of NSAIDs had a negative upper and lower gastrointestinal endoscopy. Endoscopic hemostasis was applied and no complication was reported. Six patients (5.4%) were operated due to continuing or recurrent hemorrhage, compared to 23/604 (3.8%) patients not receiving anticoagulants. Four patients died, the overall mortality was 3.6% in patients with AUGIB due to anticoagulants, which was not different from that in patients not receiving anticoagulant therapy. CONCLUSION: Patients with AUGIB while on long-term anticoagulant therapy had a clinical outcome, which is not different from that of patients not taking anticoagulants. Early endoscopy is important for the management of these patients and endoscopic hemostasis can be safely applied. PMID:15761977

  14. The value of multidetector-row computed tomography for localization of obscure acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Wei-Chou [Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Shih-Hung [Department of Emergency Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taiwan (China); Chang, Wei-Kuo [Division of Gasteroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taiwan (China); Liu, Chang-Hsien [Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taiwan (China); Tung, Ho-Jui [Department of Healthcare Administration, Asia University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, Chung-Bao [Department of Surgery, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taiwan (China); Huang, Guo-Shu; Hsu, Hsian-He [Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taiwan (China); Yu, Chih-Yung, E-mail: chougo2002@yahoo.com.tw [Department of Radiology, Tri-Service General Hospital, National Defense Medical Center, Taiwan (China)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: There are no simple guidelines on when to perform multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) for diagnosis of obscure acute gastrointestinal bleeding (AGIB). We used a risk scoring system to evaluate the diagnostic power of MDCT for patients with obscure AGIB. Materials and methods: Ninety-two patients with obscure AGIB who were referred for an MDCT scan after unsuccessful endoscopic treatment at presentation were studied. We recorded clinical data and calculated Blatchford score for each patient. Patients who required transfusion more than 500 mL of blood to maintain the vital signs were classified as high-risk patients. Two radiologists independently reviewed and categorized MDCT signs of obscure AGIB. Discordant findings were resolved by consensus. One-way ANOVA was used to compare clinical data between two groups; kappa statistics were used to estimate agreement on MDCT findings between radiologists. Results: Of the 92 patients, 62 (67.4%) were classified as high-risk patients. Blatchford scores of high-risk patients were significantly greater than those of low-risk patients. Sensitivity for MDCT diagnosing obscure AGIB was 81% in high-risk patients, as compared with 50% in the low-risk. When used in conjunction with selection of the cut-off value of 13 in Blatchford scoring system, the sensitivity and specificity of MDCT were 70.9% and 73.7%, respectively. Contrast extravasation was the most specific sign of AGIB (k = .87), recognition of which would have improved diagnostic accuracy. Conclusions: With the aid of Blatchford scoring system for evaluating the disease severity, MDCT can localize the bleeders of obscure AGIB more efficiently.

  15. The value of multidetector-row computed tomography for localization of obscure acute gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Wei-Chou; Tsai, Shih-Hung; Chang, Wei-Kuo; Liu, Chang-Hsien; Tung, Ho-Jui; Hsieh, Chung-Bao; Huang, Guo-Shu; Hsu, Hsian-He; Yu, Chih-Yung

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: There are no simple guidelines on when to perform multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT) for diagnosis of obscure acute gastrointestinal bleeding (AGIB). We used a risk scoring system to evaluate the diagnostic power of MDCT for patients with obscure AGIB. Materials and methods: Ninety-two patients with obscure AGIB who were referred for an MDCT scan after unsuccessful endoscopic treatment at presentation were studied. We recorded clinical data and calculated Blatchford score for each patient. Patients who required transfusion more than 500 mL of blood to maintain the vital signs were classified as high-risk patients. Two radiologists independently reviewed and categorized MDCT signs of obscure AGIB. Discordant findings were resolved by consensus. One-way ANOVA was used to compare clinical data between two groups; kappa statistics were used to estimate agreement on MDCT findings between radiologists. Results: Of the 92 patients, 62 (67.4%) were classified as high-risk patients. Blatchford scores of high-risk patients were significantly greater than those of low-risk patients. Sensitivity for MDCT diagnosing obscure AGIB was 81% in high-risk patients, as compared with 50% in the low-risk. When used in conjunction with selection of the cut-off value of 13 in Blatchford scoring system, the sensitivity and specificity of MDCT were 70.9% and 73.7%, respectively. Contrast extravasation was the most specific sign of AGIB (k = .87), recognition of which would have improved diagnostic accuracy. Conclusions: With the aid of Blatchford scoring system for evaluating the disease severity, MDCT can localize the bleeders of obscure AGIB more efficiently.

  16. Similar rebleeding rate in 3-day and 7-day intravenous ceftriaxone prophylaxis for patients with acute variceal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tzong-Hsi; Huang, Chung-Tsui; Lin, Chien-Chu; Chung, Chen-Shuan; Lin, Cheng-Kuan; Tsai, Kuang-Chau

    2016-07-01

    Although prophylactic antibiotics have been recommended for cirrhotic patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, the duration of its use remains an inconclusive issue. We designed this study to investigate the duration of antibiotic prophylaxis for cirrhotic patients with acute esophageal variceal bleeding. We enrolled those patients suffering from acute esophageal variceal bleeding and receiving band ligation. They were randomly allocated to two groups to receive prophylactic antibiotics; Group I: receiving intravenous ceftriaxone 500 mg every 12 hours for 3 days, and Group II: same regimen for 7 days. We used rebleeding rate within 14 days as the primary end point and also evaluated the survival rate within 28 days and the amount of transfusion during admission. There were 38 patients in Group I and 33 patients in Group II that completed the study course for analysis. Overall, there was no significant difference in the baseline characteristics between these two groups. There were three patients both in Group I and Group II who developed rebleeding within 14 days (8% vs. 9%, p > 0.99). There was also no difference between Group I and Group II in transfusion amount (2.71 ± 2.84 units vs. 3.18 ± 4.07, p = 0.839) and survival rate in 28 days (100 vs. 97%, p = 0.465). Our small scale study demonstrated that there was no difference in the rebleeding rate between 3-day and 7-day ceftriaxone prophylaxis for cirrhotic patients with acute esophageal variceal bleeding. There was also no difference in 28 day survival rate between these two groups. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Acute pancreatitis associated left-sided portal hypertension with severe gastrointestinal bleeding treated by transcatheter splenic artery embolization: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhi-yu; Li, Bin; Wu, Yu-lian; Xie, Qiu-ping

    2013-06-01

    Left-sided portal hypertension (LSPH) followed by acute pancreatitis is a rare condition with most patients being asymptomatic. In cases where gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is present, however, the condition is more complicated and the mortality is very high because of the difficulty in diagnosing and selecting optimal treatment. A successfully treated case with severe GI bleeding by transcatheter splenic artery embolization is reported in this article. The patient exhibited severe uncontrollable GI bleeding and was confirmed as gastric varices secondary to LSPH by enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan and CT-angiography. After embolization, the bleeding stopped and stabilized for the entire follow-up period without any severe complications. In conclusion, embolization of the splenic artery is a simple, safe, and effective method of controlling gastric variceal bleeding caused by LSPH in acute pancreatitis.

  18. Effect of recombinant Factor VIIa on outcome of acute variceal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Flemming; D'Amico, Gennaro; Rusch, Ea

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Two randomized controlled studies have evaluated the effect of recombinant Factor VIIa (rFVIIa) on variceal bleeding in cirrhosis without showing significant benefit. The aim of the present study was to perform a meta-analysis of the two trials on individual patient data...... vasoactive drug infusion and Child-Pugh score >8. RESULTS: 497 patients were eligible for the meta-analysis; 308 (62%) had active variceal bleeding at endoscopy (oozing or spurting) and 283 of these had a Child-Pugh score >8. Analysis on the composite endpoint in all patients with bleeding from oesophageal...... varices did not show any beneficial treatment effect. However, failure rate for the primary composite end-point was significantly lower in treated patients with active bleeding at endoscopy (17%) compared to placebo (26%, p=0.049). This difference was highly significant in patients with Child-Pugh score...

  19. Prevalence and Risk Factors of Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Crohn Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guanwei; Ren, Jianan; Wang, Gefei; Wu, Qin; Gu, Guosheng; Ren, Huajian; Liu, Song; Hong, Zhiwu; Li, Ranran; Li, Yuan; Guo, Kun; Wu, Xiuwen; Li, Jieshou

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding (ALGIB) is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of Crohn disease (CD). Thus far, few studies of ALGIB in the context of CD have been published, most of which were case reports with limited value. We aimed to explore the prevalence of ALGIB in CD patients, evaluate risk factors for hemorrhagic CD and its recurrence, and analyze clinical data of the death cases. A total of 1374 CD patients registered from January 2007 to June 2013 were examined. Medical records of 73 patients with ALGIB and 146 matched as controls were reviewed and analyzed retrospectively. Logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards analyses were performed to identify risk factors for ALGIB and the cumulative probability of rebleeding. Kaplan–Meier curves with log-rank tests were used to demonstrate the cumulative survival rates of rebleeding. The prevalence of ALGIB was 5.31% (73/1374) in this study. In the univariate analysis, possible risk factors for ALGIB were duration of CD (odds ratio [OR] 0.60, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.33–1.09, P = 0.095), perianal disease (OR 1.96, 95% CI 0.92–4.20, P = 0.082), left colon involvement (OR 2.16, 95% CI 1.10–4.24, P = 0.025), azathioprine use ≥1 year (OR 0.46, 95% CI 0.23–0.90, P = 0.023), and previous hemorrhage history (OR 11.86, 95% CI 5.38–26.12, P factors. Older age (HR 0.23, 95% CI 0.07–0.77, P = 0.018), surgical treatment (HR 0.17, 95% CI 0.06–0.50, P 3 months ago (HR 0.24, 95% CI 0.07–0.82, P = 0.022) resulted to be predictors associated with rebleeding after discharge. Patients who died often suffered severe concomitant diseases, and the overall mortality rate was 8.22% (6/73). We speculated that a special hemorrhagic phenotype of CD that was predisposed to rebleeding may exist. Further studies are warranted to investigate the pathogenesis and discover the optimum treatments of choice. PMID:25984665

  20. Early Diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Vietnamese Patients with Acute Peptic Ulcer Bleeding: A Prospective Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duc Trong Quach

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. To investigate H. pylori infection rate and evaluate a combined set of tests for H. pylori diagnosis in Vietnamese patients with acute peptic ulcer bleeding (PUD. Methods. Consecutive patients with acute PUB were enrolled prospectively. Rapid urease test (RUT with 3 biopsies was carried out randomly. Patients without RUT or with negative RUT received urea breath test (UBT and serological and urinary H. pylori antibody tests. H. pylori was considered positive if RUT or any noninvasive test was positive. Patients were divided into group A (RUT plus noninvasive tests and group B (only noninvasive tests. Results. The overall H. pylori infection rate was 94.2% (161/171. Groups A and B had no differences in demographic characteristics, bleeding severity, endoscopic findings, and proton pump inhibitor use. H. pylori-positive rate in group A was significantly higher than that in group B (98.2% versus 86.7%, p=0.004. The positive rate of RUT was similar at each biopsy site but significantly increased if RUT results from 2 or 3 sites were combined (p<0.05. Conclusions. H. pylori infection rate in Vietnamese patients with acute PUB is high. RUT is an excellent test if at least 2 biopsies are taken.

  1. [Related factors to re-bleeding and mortality in cirrhotic patients with acute variceal bleeding at Hipolito Unanue Hospital, Lima, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Pérez, Víctor Felipe; Raymundo Cajo, Roxana Magali; Gutiérrez de Aranguren, Constantino Fernando

    2013-01-01

    To determine related factors to 5 days re-bleeding and 6 week-mortality of an episode of variceal bleeding in cirrhotic patients. Observational, descriptive, co relational, retrospective study. In this study were included the cirrhotic patients who entered to Hipolito Unanue Hospital, Lima, Peru, between January 2006 and February 2012 with suspicion of variceal bleeding. Were excluded patients who bled from nonvariceal origin, or that did not have the data in clinical history to calculate the Child Pugh score, the Model for terminal diseases of the liver (MELD), or the endoscopic report detailing the bleeding source and the presence of esophageal and/or gastric varices. We include 63 patients, 35 (55.6%) were men. The median of age was of 64 years. 26 of them (41.3%) were Child Pugh C, where as the median of MELD score was 9. The multivariate analysis found that the Child Pugh score was related to 6 weeks-mortality (p=0,003), where as the presence of active bleeding during endoscopy (p=0.012) and the value of creatinine (p=0.012) were related to 5 days re-bleeding. The Child Pugh score was related to 6 weeks-mortality in cirrhotic patients with variceal bleeding. Active bleeding during endoscopy and the value of creatinine were related to 5 days re-bleeding.

  2. Superselective transcatheter renal arterial embolization for acute renal bleeding in patients with renal insufficiency: its clinical efficacy and safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Tingyang; Zhou Bing; Yu Wenqiang; Luo Zuyan; Mao Yingmin; Chen Fanghong; Li Bo; Yuan Jianhua

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical efficacy and complications of super selective renal arterial embolization in treating acute renal arterial bleeding in patients with renal insufficiency, and to evaluate the influence of the treatment on the renal function. Methods: During the period of January 2000 December 2009, super selective renal arterial embolization was performed in our institution for acute renal bleeding in 13 patients with renal insufficiency. The complete clinical and imaging materials of all patients were properly collected. The clinical effectiveness, the renal function, the extent of embolization and the complications were observed and the relationship between each other was analyzed. Results: The embolization procedure was successfully completed in all patients with a technical success rate of 100%. The mean embolized territory was 22% of a single kidney. Three days after the procedure, the hemoglobin level, hematocrit, blood pressure and heart rate were considerably improved in all patients. Compared to the corresponding preoperative data, all the differences were statistically significant (P 0.05), while the blood urea nitrogen was markedly decreased (P=0.011). Post embolization syndrome occurred in 5 patients and progressive aggravation of the renal function was observed in one patient, who had to receive hemodialysis finally. The embolized territory in patients occurring complications was larger than that in patients without occurring complications (U=1.500, P=0.006). Conclusion: Super selective renal arterial embolization is an effective and safe treatment for acute renal arterial bleeding in patients with renal insufficiency, the therapy will not significantly worsen the renal function. Appropriate and reasonable extent of embolization, as small as possible, is the key point for reducing the complications. (authors)

  3. Evaluation of Results in Patients with Acute Upper Gis Bleeding: A Goverment Hospital Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilge Bas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to assess the characteristics of patients with upper gastrointestinal system (GIS bleeding in our clinic. Material and Method: The patients who admitted to Usak State Hospital Gastroenterology Department with upper gastrointestinal system bleeding were retrospectively evaluated between May 2009 and March 2012. The patients were assessed for age, sex, complaints, history of medication, management, history of bleeding, laboratory findings, endoscopic findings, need for transfusion, hospitalization duration and mortality. Results: 392 patients admitted to our department with upper gastrointestinal system bleeding. 263 (67.1% of the patient were male and 129 (32.9% were female. It was presented only melena in 120 (%30.6 patients, hematemesis in 140 (%35.7 patients and both hematemesis and melena in 132 (%33.7 patients at admission. The mean hemoglobin level was 7.8±1.5 g/dl, and the mean hematocrit level was 27.4±4%. It was established coronary artery disease in 50 (12.8% patients, diabetes mellitus in 20 (5.1% patients, cerebrovascular disease in 8 (2% patients and peripheral arterial disease in 4 (1% patients. We presented 194 (49.5% bulbus ulcer, 117 (29.8% erosive gastritis, 35 (8.9% gastric ulcer in patients at upper gastrointestinal system endoscopy. We established Helicobacter pylori infection in 264 (67.3 % patients. Discussion: Duodenal ulcer and eritematous gastritis are the most common causes of upper GIS bleedings. In addition, Helicobacter pylori infection is keep in mind as a important bleeding cause in that patients. It is useful to give stomach acid suppressor therapy to the patients who have coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular disease and diabetes mellitus, especially if they have gastric complaints.

  4. Acute myocardial infarction, ischemic cerebrovascular disease and variceal bleeding due to portal vein thrombosis in a patient with hereditary thrombophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Bulent; Yilmaz, Yusuf; Algin, Oktay; Keskin, Murat; Kiyici, Murat; Kocamaz, Guzin; Dolar, Enver

    2008-04-01

    We report on a 43-year-old female patient with multiple thrombotic risk factors who, in a few months, developed acute myocardial infarction, an ischemic cerebrovascular event and variceal bleeding due to portal vein thrombosis. The factor V Leiden mutation was carried in heterozygous form, homocysteine was elevated at 19.6 micromol/l, and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T mutation was carried in homozygous form. Moderately increased plasma homocysteine level and a reduced protein S activity were evident. Anticardiolipin IgG antibodies were mildly positive. We conclude that the presence of multiple genetic and environmental risk factors greatly amplifies the risk of clinical thrombotic events.

  5. Restrictive vs liberal blood transfusion for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding: rationale and protocol for a cluster randomized feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jairath, Vipul; Kahan, Brennan C; Gray, Alasdair; Doré, Caroline J; Mora, Ana; Dyer, Claire; Stokes, Elizabeth A; Llewelyn, Charlotte; Bailey, Adam A; Dallal, Helen; Everett, Simon M; James, Martin W; Stanley, Adrian J; Church, Nicholas; Darwent, Melanie; Greenaway, John; Le Jeune, Ivan; Reckless, Ian; Campbell, Helen E; Meredith, Sarah; Palmer, Kelvin R; Logan, Richard F A; Travis, Simon P L; Walsh, Timothy S; Murphy, Michael F

    2013-07-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) is the commonest reason for hospitalization with hemorrhage in the UK and the leading indication for transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs). Observational studies suggest an association between more liberal RBC transfusion and adverse patient outcomes, and a recent randomised trial reported increased further bleeding and mortality with a liberal transfusion policy. TRIGGER (Transfusion in Gastrointestinal Bleeding) is a pragmatic, cluster randomized trial which aims to evaluate the feasibility and safety of implementing a restrictive versus liberal RBC transfusion policy in adult patients admitted with AUGIB. The trial will take place in 6 UK hospitals, and each centre will be randomly allocated to a transfusion policy. Clinicians throughout each hospital will manage all eligible patients according to the transfusion policy for the 6-month trial recruitment period. In the restrictive centers, patients become eligible for RBC transfusion when their hemoglobin is liberal centers patients become eligible for transfusion once their hemoglobin is <10 g/dL. All clinicians will have the discretion to transfuse outside of the policy but will be asked to document the reasons for doing so. Feasibility outcome measures include protocol adherence, recruitment rate, and evidence of selection bias. Clinical outcome measures include further bleeding, mortality, thromboembolic events, and infections. Quality of life will be measured using the EuroQol EQ-5D at day 28, and the costs associated with hospitalization for AUGIB in the UK will be estimated. Consent will be sought from participants or their representatives according to patient capacity for use of routine hospital data and day 28 follow up. The study has ethical approval for conduct in England and Scotland. Results will be analysed according to a pre-defined statistical analysis plan and disseminated in peer reviewed publications to relevant stakeholders. The results of this

  6. Pharmaco-induced vasospasm therapy for acute lower gastrointestinal bleeding: A preliminary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Huei-Lung, E-mail: hlliang@vghks.gov.tw [Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chiang, Chia-Ling [Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Chen, Matt Chiung-Yu [Department of Radiology, Yuan' s General Hospital, Kaohsiung. Taiwan (China); Lin, Yih-Huie; Huang, Jer-Shyung; Pan, Huay-Ben [Department of Radiology, Kaohsiung Veterans General Hospital, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: To report a novel technique and preliminary clinical outcomes in managing lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB). Materials and methods: Eighteen LGIB patients (11 men and 7 women, mean age: 66.2 years) were treated with artificially induced vasospasm therapy by semi-selective catheterization technique. Epinephrine bolus injection was used to initiate the vascular spasm, and followed by a small dose vasopressin infusion (3–5 units/h) for 3 h. The technical success, clinical success, recurrent bleeding and major complications of this study were evaluated and reported. Results: Sixteen bleeders were in the superior mesenteric artery and 2 in the inferior mesenteric artery. All patients achieved successful immediate hemostasis. Early recurrent bleeding (<30 days) was found in 4 patients with local and new-foci re-bleeding in 2 (11.1%) each. Repeated vasospasm therapy was given to 3 patients, with clinical success in 2. Technical success for the 21 bleeding episodes was 100%. Lesion-based and patient-based primary and overall clinical successes were achieved in 89.4% (17/19) and 77.7% (14/18), and 94.7% (18/19) and 88.8% (16/18), respectively. None of our patients had complications of bowel ischemia or other major procedure-related complications. The one year survival of our patients was 72.2 ± 10.6%. Conclusions: Pharmaco-induced vasospasm therapy seems to be a safe and effective method to treat LGIB from our small patient-cohort study. Further evaluation with large series study is warranted. Considering the advanced age and complex medical problems of these patients, this treatment may be considered as an alternative approach for interventional radiologists in management of LGIB.

  7. iPad-based primary 2D reading of CT angiography examinations of patients with suspected acute gastrointestinal bleeding: preliminary experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggioni, L; Neri, E; Bargellini, I; Scalise, P; Calcagni, F; Mantarro, A; D'Ippolito, G; Bartolozzi, C

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the iPad (Apple Inc., Cupertino, CA) for two-dimensional (2D) reading of CT angiography (CTA) studies performed for suspected acute non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding. 24 CTA examinations of patients with suspected acute gastrointestinal bleeding confirmed (19/24, 79.2%) or ruled out (5/24, 20.8%) by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) were retrospectively reviewed by three independent readers on a commercial picture archiving communication system (PACS) workstation and on an iPad with Retina Display® 64 GB (Apple Inc.). The time needed to complete reading of every CTA examination was recorded, as well as the rate of detection of arterial bleeding and identification of suspected bleeding arteries on both devices. Overall, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity, specificity, positive- and negative-predictive values for bleeding detection were not significantly different while using the iPad and workstation (0.774 vs 0.847, 0.947 vs 0.895, 0.6 vs 0.8, 0.9 vs 0.944 and 0.750 vs 0.667, respectively; p > 0.05). In DSA-positive cases, the iPad and workstation allowed correct identification of the bleeding source in 17/19 cases (89.5%) and 15/19 cases (78.9%), respectively (p > 0.05). Finally, the time needed to complete reading of every CTA study was significantly shorter using the iPad (169 ± 74 vs 222 ± 70 s, respectively; p iPad-based preliminary 2D reading of CTA studies has comparable diagnostic accuracy for detection of acute gastrointestinal bleeding and can be significantly faster. The iPad could be used by on-call interventional radiologists for immediate decision on percutaneous embolization in patients with suspected acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

  8. Upper gastrointestinal bleed in a post menopausal woman due to combination of high first dose aspirin and clopidogrel prescribed for acute coronary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal R Tandon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Combination of aspirin, clopidogrel and enoxaparin remains the standard treatment for acute coronary syndrome (ACS but is known to increase the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleed (UGIB. We hereby report an unusual case of gastrointestinal bleed (GIB as it resulted inspite of proton pump inhibitor (PPI prophylaxis within the second day of treatment in a post-menopausal woman (PMW with high first dose of aspirin clopidogrel dual combination in a patient of ACS.

  9. Impact of chronic kidney disease on long-term ischemic and bleeding outcomes in medically managed patients with acute coronary syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melloni, Chiara; Cornel, Jan H; Hafley, Gail

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: We aimed to study the relationship of chronic kidney disease stages with long-term ischemic and bleeding outcomes in medically managed acute coronary syndrome patients and the influence of more potent antiplatelet therapies on platelet reactivity by chronic kidney disease stage. METHODS...... AND RESULTS: We estimated creatinine clearance for 8953 medically managed acute coronary syndrome patients enrolled in the Targeted Platelet Inhibition to Clarify the Optimal Strategy to Medically Manage Acute Coronary Syndromes trial. Patients were classified by chronic kidney disease stage: normal renal...... coronary syndrome patients, the long-term risks of ischemic and bleeding outcomes increased markedly with worse chronic kidney disease stages. Despite lower platelet reactivity of prasugrel compared with clopidogrel, no treatment interactions for ischemic and bleeding outcomes were observed....

  10. Restrictive versus liberal blood transfusion for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (TRIGGER): a pragmatic, open-label, cluster randomised feasibility trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jairath, Vipul; Kahan, Brennan C; Gray, Alasdair; Doré, Caroline J; Mora, Ana; James, Martin W; Stanley, Adrian J; Everett, Simon M; Bailey, Adam A; Dallal, Helen; Greenaway, John; Le Jeune, Ivan; Darwent, Melanie; Church, Nicholas; Reckless, Ian; Hodge, Renate; Dyer, Claire; Meredith, Sarah; Llewelyn, Charlotte; Palmer, Kelvin R; Logan, Richard F; Travis, Simon P; Walsh, Timothy S; Murphy, Michael F

    2015-07-11

    Transfusion thresholds for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding are controversial. So far, only three small, underpowered studies and one single-centre trial have been done. Findings from the single-centre trial showed reduced mortality with restrictive red blood cell (RBC) transfusion. We aimed to assess whether a multicentre, cluster randomised trial is a feasible method to substantiate or refute this finding. In this pragmatic, open-label, cluster randomised feasibility trial, done in six university hospitals in the UK, we enrolled all patients aged 18 years or older with new presentations of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding, irrespective of comorbidity, except for exsanguinating haemorrhage. We randomly assigned hospitals (1:1) with a computer-generated randomisation sequence (random permuted block size of 6, without stratification or matching) to either a restrictive (transfusion when haemoglobin concentration fell below 80 g/L) or liberal (transfusion when haemoglobin concentration fell below 100 g/L) RBC transfusion policy. Neither patients nor investigators were masked to treatment allocation. Feasibility outcomes were recruitment rate, protocol adherence, haemoglobin concentration, RBC exposure, selection bias, and information to guide design and economic evaluation of the phase 3 trial. Main exploratory clinical outcomes were further bleeding and mortality at day 28. We did analyses on all enrolled patients for whom an outcome was available. This trial is registered, ISRCTN85757829 and NCT02105532. Between Sept 3, 2012, and March 1, 2013, we enrolled 936 patients across six hospitals (403 patients in three hospitals with a restrictive policy and 533 patients in three hospitals with a liberal policy). Recruitment rate was significantly higher for the liberal than for the restrictive policy (62% vs 55%; p=0·04). Despite some baseline imbalances, Rockall and Blatchford risk scores were identical between policies. Protocol adherence was 96% (SD 10) in

  11. Risk for Major Bleeding in Patients Receiving Ticagrelor Compared With Aspirin After Transient Ischemic Attack or Acute Ischemic Stroke in the SOCRATES Study (Acute Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack Treated With Aspirin or Ticagrelor and Patient Outcomes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easton, J Donald; Aunes, Maria; Albers, Gregory W; Amarenco, Pierre; Bokelund-Singh, Sara; Denison, Hans; Evans, Scott R; Held, Peter; Jahreskog, Marianne; Jonasson, Jenny; Minematsu, Kazuo; Molina, Carlos A; Wang, Yongjun; Wong, K S Lawrence; Johnston, S Claiborne

    2017-09-05

    Patients with minor acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack are at high risk for subsequent stroke, and more potent antiplatelet therapy in the acute setting is needed. However, the potential benefit of more intense antiplatelet therapy must be assessed in relation to the risk for major bleeding. The SOCRATES trial (Acute Stroke or Transient Ischemic Attack Treated With Aspirin or Ticagrelor and Patient Outcomes) was the first trial with ticagrelor in patients with acute ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack in which the efficacy and safety of ticagrelor were compared with those of aspirin. The main safety objective was assessment of PLATO (Platelet Inhibition and Patient Outcomes)-defined major bleeds on treatment, with special focus on intracranial hemorrhage (ICrH). An independent adjudication committee blinded to study treatment classified bleeds according to the PLATO, TIMI (Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction), and GUSTO (Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Coronary Arteries) definitions. The definitions of ICrH and major bleeding excluded cerebral microbleeds and asymptomatic hemorrhagic transformations of cerebral infarctions so that the definitions better discriminated important events in the acute stroke population. A total of 13 130 of 13 199 randomized patients received at least 1 dose of study drug and were included in the safety analysis set. PLATO major bleeds occurred in 31 patients (0.5%) on ticagrelor and 38 patients (0.6%) on aspirin (hazard ratio, 0.83; 95% confidence interval, 0.52-1.34). The most common locations of major bleeds were intracranial and gastrointestinal. ICrH was reported in 12 patients (0.2%) on ticagrelor and 18 patients (0.3%) on aspirin. Thirteen of all 30 ICrHs (4 on ticagrelor and 9 on aspirin) were hemorrhagic strokes, and 4 (2 in each group) were symptomatic hemorrhagic transformations of brain infarctions. The ICrHs were spontaneous in 6 and 13, traumatic in 3 and 3, and procedural in 3 and 2

  12. Hemorragia digestiva baja masiva en pacientes con enfermedad de Crohn Major acute bleeding in patients with Crohn's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Barreiro de Acosta

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: analizar la frecuencia de las hemorragias masivas en la EC e intentar determinar sus potenciales factores de riesgo (ambientales, propios de la enfermedad y genéticos. Material y métodos: se estudió de manera retrospectiva una cohorte de 174 pacientes -103 mujeres (59% y 71 hombres (41%, edad media de 37 años- con EC, analizándose las hemorragias digestivas masivas que se habían producido en relación con su enfermedad. Se revisaron asimismo potenciales factores de riesgo como hábito tabáquico, localización de la enfermedad y presencia de mutaciones genéticas en CARD15, RTL-4 y CD14, entre otros. Resultados: tres pacientes (1,7% presentaron una hemorragia digestiva masiva que precisó intervención quirúrgica para su resolución. Esta indicación de cirugía supone el 3,4% de las cirugías en relación con la EC. Todos los pacientes eran jóvenes y su enfermedad seguía un patrón inflamatorio y estaba localizada en el íleon. No se ha evidenciado asociación estadísticamente significativa entre las hemorragias digestivas masivas y los potenciales factores de riesgo analizados. Conclusiones: la hemorragia digestiva baja masiva es una complicación poco común, aunque grave de la EC. Se trata habitualmente de pacientes con patrón inflamatorio de la enfermedad y afectación ileal. Para su diagnóstico resulta clave la asociación de endoscopia y arteriografía, y su resolución suele ser quirúrgica.Objective: we aimed at evaluating the frequency of acute severe bleeding in CD and its potential association to some risk factors, including clinical features of CD, environmental factors, and genetic alterations. Material and methods: 174 consecutive patients with CD (103 female (59% and 71 men (41%, with a mean age of 37 years were included. We analyzed all major acute lower gastrointestinal (GI hemorrhage related to CD. Potential risk factors like smoking, site of disease, and presence of gene mutations in CARD15, TLR-4, and

  13. State-of-the-art management of acute bleeding peptic ulcer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Dhahab, Hisham; McNabb-Baltar, Julia; Al-Taweel, Talal; Barkun, Alan

    2013-01-01

    The management of patients with non variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding has evolved, as have its causes and prognosis, over the past 20 years. The addition of high-quality data coupled to the publication of authoritative national and international guidelines have helped define current-day standards of care. This review highlights the relevant clinical evidence and consensus recommendations that will hopefully result in promoting the effective dissemination and knowledge translation of important information in the management of patients afflicted with this common entity.

  14. Effect of endoscopic injection of cyanoacrylate in treatment of acute esophageal and gastric variceal bleeding in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Xiaoxing

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveTo investigate the effect and safety of endoscopic injection of cyanoacrylate in the treatment of esophageal and gastric variceal bleeding (EGVB in children. MethodsThe clinical data of 35 children with acute EGVB who were treated with endoscopic injection of cyanoacrylate in Children′s Hospital of Baoji Maternal and Child Health Care Hospital from August 2010 to August 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. The emergency response rate, rebleeding rate, and incidence of complications after the treatment were analyzed statistically. ResultsThirty-five patients received 46 times of endoscopic injection of cyanoacrylate in total. The response rate to the initial injection was 95.6% (44/46. The volume of cyanoacrylate injected was 0.2-0.6 ml, with a mean volume of 0.4±0.2 ml. The emergency hemostasis rate was 93.4% (43/46, the rebleeding rate was 11.4% (4/35, and the cycle for 4 patients with the recurrence of bleeding to be cured was 1.2-23.0 months (mean 121±10.9 months. One patient experienced abdominal pain, and no patients experienced ectopic embolism. Two patients died after injection. ConclusionFrequent, small-volume endoscopic injection of cyanoacrylate is an effective and convenient therapeutic method for EGVB in children, has few complications, and holds promise for clinical application.

  15. Effect of Bleeding Risk on Type of Stent Used in Patients Presenting With Acute Coronary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alraies, M Chadi; Lee, Sang Yeub; Lipinski, Michael J; Buchanan, Kyle; Steinvil, Arie; Rogers, Toby; Koifman, Edward; Gai, Jiaxiang; Torguson, Rebecca; Ben-Dor, Itsik; Satler, Lowell F; Pichard, Augusto D; Waksman, Ron

    2017-10-15

    Patients at high bleeding risk (HBR) are at increased risk of bleeding following percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with drug-eluting stents (DES) due to the need for longer dual antiplatelet duration. We sought to evaluate the likelihood of receiving DES during PCI in HBR populations and to characterize DES utilization trends over time. Consecutive patients who underwent PCI from April 2003 to September 2015 were identified. HBR is defined as patients fulfilling 1 or more of the HBR criteria: age ≥75 years, anticoagulation use at discharge, history of stroke, cancer in previous 3 years, glucocorticoid use, hemoglobin (Hgb) HBR definition. When adjusting for known risk factors, HBR patients were less likely to receive a DES compared with non-HBR patients (odds ratio [OR] 0.58, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.54 to 0.62, p HBR patients, having 3 or more HBR criteria versus HBR criteria had lower likelihood of receiving a DES (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.44 to 0.57, p HBR has a significant impact upon the decision to use DES. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of INR monitoring, reversal agent use, heparin bridging, and anticoagulant interruption on rebleeding and thromboembolism in acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyoshi Nagata

    Full Text Available Anticoagulant management of acute gastrointestinal bleeding (GIB during the pre-endoscopic period has not been fully addressed in American, European, or Asian guidelines. This study sought to evaluate the risks of rebleeding and thromboembolism in anticoagulated patients with acute GIB.Baseline, endoscopy, and outcome data were reviewed for 314 patients with acute GIB: 157 anticoagulant users and 157 age-, sex-, and important risk-matched non-users. Data were also compared between direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs and warfarin users.Between anticoagulant users and non-users, of whom 70% underwent early endoscopy, no endoscopy-related adverse events or significant differences were found in the rate of endoscopic therapy need, transfusion need, rebleeding, or thromboembolism. Rebleeding was associated with shock, comorbidities, low platelet count and albumin level, and low-dose aspirin use but not HAS-BLED score, any endoscopic results, heparin bridge, or international normalized ratio (INR ≥ 2.5. Risks for thromboembolism were INR ≥ 2.5, difference in onset and pre-endoscopic INR, reversal agent use, and anticoagulant interruption but not CHA2DS2-VASc score, any endoscopic results, or heparin bridge. In patients without reversal agent use, heparin bridge, or anticoagulant interruption, there was only one rebleeding event and no thromboembolic events. Warfarin users had a significantly higher transfusion need than DOACs users.Endoscopy appears to be safe for anticoagulant users with acute GIB compared with non-users. Patient background factors were associated with rebleeding, whereas anticoagulant management factors (e.g. INR correction, reversal agent use, and drug interruption were associated with thromboembolism. Early intervention without reversal agent use, heparin bridge, or anticoagulant interruption may be warranted for acute GIB.

  17. Development and external validation of a post-discharge bleeding risk score in patients with acute coronary syndrome: The BleeMACS score

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raposeiras-Roubín, Sergio; Faxén, Jonas; Íñiguez-Romo, Andrés; Henriques, Jose Paulo Simao; D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Saucedo, Jorge; Szummer, Karolina; Jernberg, Tomas; James, Stefan K.; Juanatey, José Ramón González; Wilton, Stephen B.; Kikkert, Wouter J.; Nuñez-Gil, Iván; Ariza-Sole, Albert; Song, Xiantao; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Liebetrau, Christoph; Kawaji, Tetsuma; Moretti, Claudio; Huczek, Zenon; Nie, Shao-Ping; Fujii, Toshiharu; Correia, Luis; Kawashiri, Masa-Aki; Caneiro-Queija, Berenice; Cobas-Paz, Rafael; Acuña, José María García; Southern, Danielle; Alfonso, Emilio; Terol, Belén; Garay, Alberto; Zhang, Dongfeng; Chen, Yalei; Xanthopoulou, Ioanna; Osman, Neriman; Möllmann, Helge; Shiomi, Hiroki; Giordana, Francesca; Gaita, Fiorenzo; Kowara, Michal; Filipiak, Krzysztof; Wang, Xiao; Yan, Yan; Fan, Jing-Yao; Ikari, Yuji; Nakahayshi, Takuya; Sakata, Kenji; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Kalpak, Oliver; Kedev, Sasko; Rivera-Asenjo, Daniel; Abu-Assi, Emad

    2018-01-01

    Background: Accurate 1-year bleeding risk estimation after hospital discharge for acute coronary syndrome(ACS) may help clinicians guide the type and duration of antithrombotic therapy. Currently there are no predictive models for this purpose. The aim of this study was to derive and validate a

  18. Intracerebral Hemorrhage; towards physiological imaging of hemorrhage risk in acute and chronic bleeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael eJakubovic

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Despite improvements in management and prevention of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH, there has been little improvement in mortality over the last 30 years. Hematoma expansion, primarily during the first few hours is highly predictive of neurological deterioration, poor functional outcome and mortality. For each 10% increase in ICH size, there is a 5% increase in mortality and an additional 16% chance of poorer functional outcome. As such, both the identification and prevention of hematoma expansion are attractive therapeutic targets in ICH. Previous studies suggest that contrast extravasation seen on CT Angiography (CTA, MRI, and digital subtraction angiography correlates with hematoma growth, indicating ongoing bleeding. Contrast extravasation on the arterial phase of a CTA has been coined the CTA Spot Sign. These easily identifiable foci of contrast enhancement have been identified as independent predictors of hematoma growth, mortality and clinical outcome in primary ICH. The Spot Sign score, developed to stratify risk of hematoma expansion, has shown high inter-observer agreement. Post-contrast leakage or delayed CTA Spot Sign, on post contrast CT following CTA or delayed CTA respectively are seen in an additional ~8% of patients and explain apparently false negative observations on early CTA imaging in patients subsequently undergoing hematoma expansion. CT perfusion provides an opportunity to acquire dynamic imaging and has been shown to quantify rates of contrast extravasation. Intravenous recombinant factor VIIa(rFVIIa within 4 hours of ICH onset has been shown to significantly reduce hematoma growth. However, clinical efficacy has yet to be proven. There is compelling evidence that cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA may precede the radiographic evidence of vascular disease and as such contribute to microbleeding. The interplay between microbleeding, CAA,CTA Spot Sign and genetic composition (ApoE genotype may be crucial in developing a

  19. [Bleeding gastric ulcers and acute hepatitis: 2 simultaneous adverse reactions due to nimesulide in a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejos, S; Torrejón, N; Reyes, H; Meneses, M

    2000-12-01

    A 66 year-old obese woman with arthrosis, self-medicated with oral nimesulide, 200 mg daily. After 6 weeks she developed nausea, jaundice and dark urine. Two weeks later she had recurrent hematemesis and was hospitalized. Besides obesity and anemia her physical examination was unremarkable. An upper GI endoscopy revealed 3 acute gastric ulcers and a 4th one in the pyloric channel. Abdominal ultrasonogram showed a slightly enlarged liver with diffuse reduction in ecogenicity; the gallbladder and biliary tract were normal. Blood tests demonstrated a conjugated hyperbilirubinemia (maximal total value: 18.4 mg/dl), ALAT 960 U/l, ASAT 850 U/l, GGT 420 U/l, alkaline phosphatases mildly elevated, pro-time 49% and albumin 2.7 mg/dl. Serum markers for hepatitis A, B and C viruses were negative. ANA, AMA, anti-SmA, were negative. Ceruloplasmin was normal. A liver biopsy showed bridging necrosis and other signs of acute toxic liver damage. Gastric ulcers healed after conventional treatment and hepatitis subsided after 2 months leaving no signs of chronic liver damage. The diagnosis of toxic hepatitis due to nimesulide was supported by the time-course of drug usage, sex, age, absence of other causes of liver disease, a compatible liver biopsy and the improvement after drug withdrawal. Peptic ulcers or toxic hepatitis have been previously described as independent adverse reactions in patients taking nimesulide or other NSAIDs but their simultaneous occurrence in a single patient is a unique event that deserves to be reported.

  20. Reduction in cardiac mortality with bivalirudin in patients with and without major bleeding: The HORIZONS-AMI trial (Harmonizing Outcomes with Revascularization and Stents in Acute Myocardial Infarction).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Gregg W; Clayton, Tim; Deliargyris, Efthymios N; Prats, Jayne; Mehran, Roxana; Pocock, Stuart J

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether, in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), the reduction in cardiac mortality in those taking bivalirudin compared with unfractionated heparin plus a glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor (UFH+GPI) can be fully attributed to reduced bleeding. The association between hemorrhagic complications and mortality may explain the survival benefit with bivalirudin. A total of 3,602 STEMI patients undergoing primary PCI were randomized to bivalirudin versus UFH+GPI. Three-year cardiac mortality was analyzed in patients with and without major bleeding. When compared with UFH+GPI, bivalirudin resulted in lower 3-year rates of major bleeding (6.9% vs. 10.5%, hazard ratio [HR]: 0.64 [95% confidence interval (CI): 0.51 to 0.80], p accounting for major bleeding and other adverse events, bivalirudin was still associated with a 43% reduction in 3-year cardiac mortality (adjusted HR: 0.57 [95% CI: 0.39 to 0.83], p = 0.003). Bivalirudin reduces cardiac mortality in patients with STEMI undergoing primary PCI, an effect that can only partly be attributed to prevention of bleeding. Further studies are required to identify the nonhematologic benefits of bivalirudin. (Harmonizing Outcomes With Revascularization and Stents in Acute Myocardial Infarction; NCT00433966). Copyright © 2014 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Intra-Arterial Treatment in Patients with Acute Massive Gastrointestinal Bleeding after Endoscopic Failure: Comparisons between Positive versus Negative Contrast Extravasation Groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Wei Chou; Liu, Chang Hsien; Hsu, Hsian He; Huang, Guo Shu; Hsieh, Tasi Yuan; Tsai, Shin Hung; Hsieh, Chung Bao; Yu, Chin Yung; Tung, Ho Jui

    2011-01-01

    To determine whether treatment outcome is associated with visualization of contrast extravasation in patients with acute massive gastrointestinal bleeding after endoscopic failure. From January 2007 to December 2009, patients that experienced a first attack of acute gastrointestinal bleeding after failure of initial endoscopy were referred to our interventional department for intra-arterial treatment. We enrolled 79 patients and divided them into two groups: positive and negative extravasation. For positive extravasation, patients were treated by coil embolization; and in negative extravasation, patients were treated with intra-arterial vasopressin infusion. The two groups were compared for clinical parameters, hemodynamics, laboratory findings, endoscopic characteristics, and mortality rates. Forty-eight patients had detectable contrast extravasation (positive extravasation), while 31 patients did not (negative extravasation). Fifty-six patients survived from this bleeding episode (overall clinical success rate, 71%). An elevation of hemoglobin level was observed in the both two groups; significantly greater in the positive extravasation group compared to the negative extravasation group. Although these patients were all at high risk of dying, the 90-day mortality rate was significantly lower in the positive extravasation than in the negative extravasation (20% versus 42%, p < 0.05). A multivariate analysis suggested that successful hemo stasis (odds ratio [OR] = 28.66) is the most important predictor affecting the mortality in the two groups of patients. Visualization of contrast extravasation on angiography usually can target the bleeding artery directly, resulting in a higher success rate to control of hemorrhage.

  2. Vaginal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gynecology. ACOG Practice Bulletin No. 128. Diagnosis of abnormal uterine bleeding in reproductive-aged women. Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2012;120:197. Kaunitz AM. Approach to abnormal uterine bleeding in nonpregnant reproductive-age women. http://www.uptodate. ...

  3. Impact of chronic kidney disease on long-term ischemic and bleeding outcomes in medically managed patients with acute coronary syndromes: Insights from the TRILOGY ACS Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melloni, Chiara; Cornel, Jan H; Hafley, Gail; Neely, Megan L; Clemmensen, Peter; Zamoryakhin, Dmitry; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; White, Harvey D; Fox, Keith Aa; Ohman, E Magnus; Armstrong, Paul W; Roe, Matthew T

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to study the relationship of chronic kidney disease stages with long-term ischemic and bleeding outcomes in medically managed acute coronary syndrome patients and the influence of more potent antiplatelet therapies on platelet reactivity by chronic kidney disease stage. We estimated creatinine clearance for 8953 medically managed acute coronary syndrome patients enrolled in the Targeted Platelet Inhibition to Clarify the Optimal Strategy to Medically Manage Acute Coronary Syndromes trial. Patients were classified by chronic kidney disease stage: normal renal function/mild (creatinine clearance >60 mL/min); moderate (creatinine clearance 30-60 mL/min); severe (creatinine clearance stroke; primary end point) and bleeding (Global Use of Strategies to Open Occluded Coronary Arteries and Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction bleeding) outcomes by chronic kidney disease stage and treatment allocation (prasugrel vs. clopidogrel) within each stage. Adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for moderate and for severe chronic kidney disease vs. normal/mild chronic kidney disease were estimated. Platelet reactivity at 30 days was assessed in a subset of patients (n = 1947). The majority of patients were in the normal/mild chronic kidney disease group (67%), followed by moderate chronic kidney disease (29%) and severe chronic kidney disease (4%). The incidence of ischemic and bleeding outcomes increased sharply across chronic kidney disease stages and no significant treatment interactions were observed. The adjusted risk of the primary end point increased across chronic kidney disease stages (moderate vs. normal/mild: hazard ratio 1.26; 95% confidence interval 1.09-1.46; severe vs. normal/mild: hazard ratio 1.60; 95% confidence interval 1.25-2.04). Platelet reactivity was lower in patients treated with prasugrel compared with clopidogrel, across all three chronic kidney disease stages. Among medically managed acute coronary syndrome patients, the long

  4. Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patients About ACOG Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause Home For Patients Search FAQs Perimenopausal Bleeding and ... 2011 PDF Format Perimenopausal Bleeding and Bleeding After Menopause Gynecologic Problems What are menopause and perimenopause? What ...

  5. [Gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanas, Ángel

    2015-09-01

    In the Digestive Disease Week in 2015 there have been some new contributions in the field of gastrointestinal bleeding that deserve to be highlighted. Treatment of celecoxib with a proton pump inhibitor is safer than treatment with nonselective NSAID and a proton pump inhibitor in high risk gastrointestinal and cardiovascular patients who mostly also take acetylsalicylic acid. Several studies confirm the need to restart the antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy at an early stage after a gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The need for urgent endoscopy before 6-12 h after the onset of upper gastrointestinal bleeding episode may be beneficial in patients with hemodynamic instability and high risk for comorbidity. It is confirmed that in Western but not in Japanese populations, gastrointestinal bleeding episodes admitted to hospital during weekend days are associated with a worse prognosis associated with delays in the clinical management of the events. The strategy of a restrictive policy on blood transfusions during an upper GI bleeding event has been challenged. Several studies have shown the benefit of identifying the bleeding vessel in non varicose underlying gastric lesions by Doppler ultrasound which allows direct endoscopic therapy in the patient with upper GI bleeding. Finally, it has been reported that lower gastrointestinal bleeding diverticula band ligation or hemoclipping are both safe and have the same long-term outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Rectal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rectal bleeding and any signs of shock: Rapid, shallow breathing Dizziness or lightheadedness after standing up Blurred ... shield Mayo Clinic logo are trademarks of Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. © 1998-2018 Mayo ...

  7. Provision of out-of-hours services for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in England: results of the 2014-2015 BSG/NHS England national survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedjat-Shokouhi, Bahman; Glynn, Michael; Denton, Erika R E; Greenfield, Simon M

    2017-01-01

    There has been a drive to raise the standard of management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) in the UK, including three previous audits, sponsored by the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG). To review the results of the latest BSG/National Health Service (NHS) England national survey of endoscopy services in England between 2014 and 2015. All NHS hospitals accepting acute admissions in England (168) were invited to respond to the survey. Overall, 142 hospitals (84%) returned data. 85% of hospitals used a validated risk assessment score at the time of patient's admission. While 80% of hospitals provided a 24/7 endoscopy service for unstable patients, and another 10% were in network to provide an acute service, only 60% performed an endoscopy within 24 hours for stable acute admissions or inpatients with AUGIB. 11% of hospitals operated an out-of-hours ad hoc rota. 43% felt that pressure from routine work affected their ability to offer a next-day oesophagogastroduodenoscopy service, while 20% of hospitals struggled to recruit endoscopists. 28% of units reported that the previous national audit performed in 2013 had a positive influence on service development. This survey has revealed significant deficiencies in provision of services for patients with AUGIB in England, without a significant increase in number of hospitals providing an emergency AUGIB service since the last national audit in 2013.

  8. Provision of out-of-hours services for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding in England: results of the 2014–2015 BSG/NHS England national survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedjat-Shokouhi, Bahman; Glynn, Michael; Denton, Erika R E; Greenfield, Simon M

    2017-01-01

    Background There has been a drive to raise the standard of management of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding (AUGIB) in the UK, including three previous audits, sponsored by the British Society of Gastroenterology (BSG). Objective To review the results of the latest BSG/National Health Service (NHS) England national survey of endoscopy services in England between 2014 and 2015. Method All NHS hospitals accepting acute admissions in England (168) were invited to respond to the survey. Results Overall, 142 hospitals (84%) returned data. 85% of hospitals used a validated risk assessment score at the time of patient's admission. While 80% of hospitals provided a 24/7 endoscopy service for unstable patients, and another 10% were in network to provide an acute service, only 60% performed an endoscopy within 24 hours for stable acute admissions or inpatients with AUGIB. 11% of hospitals operated an out-of-hours ad hoc rota. 43% felt that pressure from routine work affected their ability to offer a next-day oesophagogastroduodenoscopy service, while 20% of hospitals struggled to recruit endoscopists. 28% of units reported that the previous national audit performed in 2013 had a positive influence on service development. Conclusions This survey has revealed significant deficiencies in provision of services for patients with AUGIB in England, without a significant increase in number of hospitals providing an emergency AUGIB service since the last national audit in 2013. PMID:28839878

  9. Bleeding Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... study of intranasal desmopressin and oral tranexamic acid . British Journal of Haematology; 145(2): 212-220. Bleeding ... Ayisyen Français Polski Português Italiano Deutsch 日本語 فارسی English A federal government website managed by the Office ...

  10. The secondary prophylactic efficacy of beta-blocker after endoscopic gastric variceal obturation for first acute episode of gastric variceal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon Han Choi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/AimsThe most appropriate treatment for acute gastric variceal bleeding (GVB is currently endoscopic gastric variceal obturation (GVO using Histoacryl®. However, the secondary prophylactic efficacy of beta-blocker (BB after GVO for the first acute episode of GVB has not yet been established. The secondary prophylactic efficacy of BB after GVO for the first acute episode of GVB was evaluated in this study.MethodsNinety-three patients at Soonchunhyang University Hospital with acute GVB who received GVO using Histoacryl® were enrolled between June 2001 and March 2010. Among these, 42 patients underwent GVO alone (GVO group and 51 patients underwent GVO with adjuvant BB therapy (GVO+BB group. This study was intended for patients in whom a desired heart rate was reached. The rates of rebleeding-free survival and overall survival were calculated for the two study groups using Kaplan-Meyer analysis and Cox's proportional-hazards model.ResultsThe follow-up period after the initial eradication of gastric varices was 18.14±25.22 months (mean±SD. During the follow-up period, rebleeding occurred in 10 (23.8% and 21 (41.2% GVO and GVO+BB patients, respectively, and 39 patients died [23 (54.8% in the GVO group and 16 (31.4% in the GVO+BB group]. The mean rebleeding-free survival time did not differ significantly between the GVO and GVO+BB groups (65.40 and 37.40 months, respectively; P=0.774, whereas the mean overall survival time did differ (52.54 and 72.65 months, respectively; P=0.036.Conclusions Adjuvant BB therapy after GVO using Histoacryl® for the first acute episode of GVB could decrease the mortality rate relative to GVO alone. However, adjuvant BB therapy afforded no benefit for the secondary prevention of rebleeding in GV.

  11. Increased serum levels of fibrinogen degradation products due to treatment with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator for acute myocardial infarction are related to bleeding complications, but not to coronary patency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Brower (Ronald); D. Collen; G.A. van Es (Gerrit Anne); J. Lubsen (Jacob); P.W.J.C. Serruys (Patrick); M.L. Simoons (Maarten); M. Verstraete (Marc); A.E.R. Arnold (Alfred)

    1989-01-01

    textabstractThe association of increasing serum levels of fibrinogen degradation products after recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) therapy with bleeding and early coronary patency was assessed in 242 patients with acute myocardial infarction. After administration of 5,000 IU

  12. Recombinant coagulation factor VIIa labelled with the fac-99 mTc(CO)3-core: synthesis and in vitro evaluation of a putative new radiopharmaceutical for imaging in acute bleeding lesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jacob; Christensen, Jesper B.; Olsen, Ole H.

    2011-01-01

    Coagulation in blood is initiated when coagulation factor VII (FVII) binds to exposed TF and is activated to FVIIa, and the TF/ FVIIa complex may therefore provide a marker of vascular injury potentially applicable in diagnostic imaging of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Methods: Recombinan...

  13. Surgical treatment of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a potentially life-threatening abdominal emergency condition. More immediately life-threatening is massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding resulting in cardiovascular compromise causing dizziness, syncope and shock. The causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding include bleeding ...

  14. Analysis of Dosimetric Parameters Associated With Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity and Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Treated With Gemcitabine-Based Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Akira; Shibuya, Keiko; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the dosimetric parameters associated with gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The data from 40 patients were analyzed retrospectively. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of conventional fractionated three-dimensional radiotherapy and weekly gemcitabine. Treatment-related acute GI toxicity and upper GI bleeding (UGB) were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 4.0. The dosimetric parameters (mean dose, maximal absolute dose which covers 2 cm 3 of the organ, and absolute volume receiving 10–50 Gy [V 10–50 ]) of the stomach, duodenum, small intestine, and a composite structure of the stomach and duodenum (StoDuo) were obtained. The planning target volume was also obtained. Univariate analyses were performed to identify the predictive factors for the risk of grade 2 or greater acute GI toxicity and grade 3 or greater UGB, respectively. Results: The median follow-up period was 15.7 months (range, 4–37). The actual incidence of acute GI toxicity was 33%. The estimated incidence of UGB at 1 year was 20%. Regarding acute GI toxicity, a V 50 of ≥16 cm 3 of the stomach was the best predictor, and the actual incidence in patients with V 50 3 of the stomach vs. those with V 50 of ≥16 cm 3 was 9% vs. 61%, respectively (p = 0.001). Regarding UGB, V 50 of ≥33 cm 3 of the StoDuo was the best predictor, and the estimated incidence at 1 year in patients with V 50 3 of the StoDuo vs. those with V 50 ≥33 cm 3 was 0% vs. 44%, respectively (p = 0.002). The dosimetric parameters correlated highly with one another. Conclusion: The irradiated absolute volume of the stomach and duodenum are important for the risk of acute GI toxicity and UGB. These results could be helpful in escalating the radiation doses using novel techniques, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy, for the treatment of pancreatic

  15. Analysis of Dosimetric Parameters Associated With Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity and Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Patients Treated With Gemcitabine-Based Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Akira [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Shibuya, Keiko, E-mail: kei@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Shiinoki, Takehiro; Mizowaki, Takashi; Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To identify the dosimetric parameters associated with gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity in patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) treated with gemcitabine-based chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The data from 40 patients were analyzed retrospectively. Chemoradiotherapy consisted of conventional fractionated three-dimensional radiotherapy and weekly gemcitabine. Treatment-related acute GI toxicity and upper GI bleeding (UGB) were graded according to the Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Events, version 4.0. The dosimetric parameters (mean dose, maximal absolute dose which covers 2 cm{sup 3} of the organ, and absolute volume receiving 10-50 Gy [V{sub 10-50}]) of the stomach, duodenum, small intestine, and a composite structure of the stomach and duodenum (StoDuo) were obtained. The planning target volume was also obtained. Univariate analyses were performed to identify the predictive factors for the risk of grade 2 or greater acute GI toxicity and grade 3 or greater UGB, respectively. Results: The median follow-up period was 15.7 months (range, 4-37). The actual incidence of acute GI toxicity was 33%. The estimated incidence of UGB at 1 year was 20%. Regarding acute GI toxicity, a V{sub 50} of {>=}16 cm{sup 3} of the stomach was the best predictor, and the actual incidence in patients with V{sub 50} <16 cm{sup 3} of the stomach vs. those with V{sub 50} of {>=}16 cm{sup 3} was 9% vs. 61%, respectively (p = 0.001). Regarding UGB, V{sub 50} of {>=}33 cm{sup 3} of the StoDuo was the best predictor, and the estimated incidence at 1 year in patients with V{sub 50} <33 cm{sup 3} of the StoDuo vs. those with V{sub 50} {>=}33 cm{sup 3} was 0% vs. 44%, respectively (p = 0.002). The dosimetric parameters correlated highly with one another. Conclusion: The irradiated absolute volume of the stomach and duodenum are important for the risk of acute GI toxicity and UGB. These results could be helpful in escalating the radiation doses using novel

  16. [APPROACH TO PATIENTS WITH GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolić, M; Hanževački, M; Jurčić, P; Budimir, I; Ljubičić, N

    2015-11-01

    In the developed Western countries, despite the accumulation of knowledge about the causes and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding, as well as the experience of gastroenterologists-endoscopists using sophisticated endoscopic devices, the number of hospitalizations and mortality rates has not declined as expected. The most likely explanations are the following: aging population, increased prevalence of alcoholic liver cirrhosis, gastroesophageal reflux disease and obesity, Helicobacter pylori antibiotic resistance, using dual anti-aggregation therapy, anticoagulants, and excessive use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The aim of this paper is to show the incidence and the most common signs and symptoms of gastrointestinal bleeding. The aim is also to present initial clinical evaluation, diagnostic methods, the main causes of gastrointestinal bleeding, endoscopic hemostatic modalities and treatment of bleeding from the upper and lower gastrointestinal tract. Using the MEDLINE and Ovid databases, we searched the meta-analyses and systematic reviews published in English during the 2005-2015 period. Meta-analyses included results of randomized, double-blind studies on adults treated for gastrointestinal bleeding. Included were guidelines of the European and American Society of Gastroenterological Endoscopy, as well as recent expert work. In this review, we bring the state-of-the-art on gastrointestinal bleeding, new classification of gastrointestinal bleeding from the upper, mid and lower gut, controversy of nasogastric tube placement, use of prokinetic agents and inhibitor proton pumps in acute gastrointestinal bleeding from the upper tract, restrictive transfusion strategy, useful clinical stratification of the severity of bleeding, indications for hospitalization and outcome of using the clinical bleeding score, proper use of gastroprotection in patients at a high risk of peptic ulcer, the need of initial endoscopy, variceal assessment in newly diagnosed

  17. Onyx (ethylene-vinyl-alcohol-copolymer). A novel approach to the endovascular treatment of acute bleeding; Onyx (Ethylen-Vinyl-Alkohol-Kopolymer). Ein neuer Anwendungsbereich in der endovaskulaeren Behandlung akuter peripherer Blutungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller-Wille, R.; Herold, T.; Jung, E. M.; Rennert, J.; Heiss, P.; Feuerbach, S.; Zorger, N. [Inst. fuer Roentgendiagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum Regensburg (Germany); Lenhart, M. [Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie, Sozialstiftung Bamberg (Germany); Paetzel, C. [Inst. fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Klinikum Weiden (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of our retrospective study was to determine the feasibility and efficacy of the endovascular embolization of peripheral acute arterial hemorrhage using Onyx. Materials and Methods: Between October 2003 and February 2007, 14 patients with acute arterial bleeding underwent percutaneous arterial embolization using Onyx. Bleeding was caused by iatrogenic vessel injury (6 patients), malignancy/inflammation (5 patients) and trauma (3 patients). Hematomas were located in the pelvis (5 patients), followed by liver (3 patients), retroperitoneal space (2 patients), thorax (2 patients), pancreas (1 patient), and thigh (1 patient). The number of embolized arteries, the volume and viscosity of embolic agent (Onyx), the number of additionally used coils, the embolization time, and the technical and clinical outcome were documented. Procedure-related complications, recurrent bleeding during hospital stay and outcome were recorded. Results: In 14 patients selective endovascular embolization of 15 arteries was performed. The average volume of injected Onyx was 1.3 {+-} 0.8 ml. In 6 cases (42.9%) Onyx was used in conjunction with coils. The average time between the correct placement of microcatheter and complete embolization was 24.9 {+-} 12.6 minutes. In 13 of 14 patients (92.8%), embolization was technically successful. In one case, procedure-related complications occurred and embolization was performed in a second session a day later. After technically successful embolization, no recurrent bleeding occurred during hospitalization. Out of 14 patients, six (42.9%) died 1 - 38 days after technically successful embolization due to multiple organ failure (2 patients), hypoxic brain injury (2 patients), septic shock (1 patient) or malignancy-associated death (1 patient). (orig.)

  18. Appendicular bleeding: an excepcional cause of lower hemorrhage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Magaz-Martínez

    Full Text Available Chronic complications of acute appendicitis managed in a conservative manner are not frequent. We present a case of acute lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage in a young patient with a previous acute appendicitis without surgical intervention. The colonoscopy detected an appendicular bleeding which was surgically treated. The anatomopathological diagnosis was granulomatous appendicitis. The clinical evolution of the patient was favorable without bleeding recurrence. Appendicular hemorrhage can be an unusual complication -however potentially severe- of acute appendicitis not treated surgically.

  19. Management of refractory bleeding post-cardiopulmonary bypass in an acute heparin-induced thrombocytopenia type II renal failure patient who underwent urgent cardiac surgery with bivalirudin (Angiox®) anticoagulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassen, Kimberly; Maccaroni, Maria R; Sabry, Haytham; Mukherjee, Smitangshu; Serumadar, Shankari; Birdi, Inderpaul

    2018-04-01

    Acute heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) patients present a myriad of anticoagulation management challenges, in clinical settings where unfractionated heparin (UFH) is the traditional drug of choice. UFH use in cardiac surgery is a known entity that has been subject to rigorous research. Research has, thus, led to its unparalleled use and the development of well-established protocols for cardiac surgery. In comparison to UFH, bivalirudin use for acute HIT patients requiring urgent cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) is still in its infancy. We describe the tailored post-CPB management of refractory bleeding in a 65-year-old infective endocarditis, acute HIT patient with renal failure who underwent urgent aortic valve replacement and mitral valve repair with bivalirudin anticoagulation. A management approach that entailed a combination of continuous venovenous haemofiltration (CVVH), 4-Factor prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) (Beriplex), recombinant factor VIIa (rFactor VIIa) and desmopressin (DDAVP) were consecutively used post-operatively in theatre. Based on this case study experience, two modifications to institutional protocols are recommended. The first is the use of CVVH in theatre to eliminate bivalirudin in renal failure patients or in patients where bivalirudin elimination is prolonged. Secondly, a 'rescue therapy/intervention' algorithm for the swift identification of refractory bleeding post-CPB is also recommended. Rescue therapy agents, such as a 4-Factor PCCs and rFactor VIIa, should be incorporated into the protocol after a robust evidence-based search and agreement with the haematologist. The aim of these recommendations is to reduce the risk of bleeding associated with bivalirudin use for inexperienced institutions and experienced institutions alike, until larger randomized, controlled studies provide more in-depth knowledge to expand our clinical practice.

  20. Bleeding in cancer patients and its treatment: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnstone, Candice; Rich, Shayna E

    2017-12-18

    Bleeding is a common problem in cancer patients, related to local tumor invasion, tumor angiogenesis, systemic effects of the cancer, or anti-cancer treatments. Existing bleeds can also be exacerbated by medications such as bevacizumab, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and anticoagulants. Patients may develop acute catastrophic bleeding, episodic major bleeding, or low-volume oozing. Bleeding may present as bruising, petechiae, epistaxis, hemoptysis, hematemesis, hematochezia, melena, hematuria, or vaginal bleeding. Therapeutic intervention for bleeding should start by establishing goals of care, and treatment choice should be guided by life expectancy and quality of life. Careful thought should be given to discontinuation of medications and reversal of anticoagulation. Interventions to stop or slow bleeding may include systemic agents or transfusion of blood products. Noninvasive local treatment options include applied pressure, dressings, packing, and radiation therapy. Invasive local treatments include percutaneous embolization, endoscopic procedures, and surgical treatment.

  1. Jejunal Diverticula Causing Unusual Massive Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiong-Hee Wong

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Jejunal diverticula are rare and difficult to diagnose. They are often asymptomatic, but they may infrequently cause serious acute complications, such as diverticulitis with or without perforation, volvulus, intussusception, or hemorrhage. Hemorrhage of jejunal diverticula usually presents as lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Diverticula with bleeding may be associated with some anticoagulants, antiplatelets or nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agents in the elderly. In our case, upper gastroscopy and colonoscopy could not easily disclose the bleeding. Selective mesenteric angiography is the gold standard for diagnosis of active and fatal bleeding. The management of a bleeding jejunal diverticulum is surgical resection of the involved segment of jejunum.

  2. Effects of Acute Bleeding Followed by Hydroxyethyl Starch 130/0.4 or a Crystalloid on Propofol Concentrations, Cerebral Oxygenation, and Electroencephalographic and Haemodynamic Variables in Pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aura Silva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding changes the haemodynamics, compromising organ perfusion. In this study, the effects of bleeding followed by replacement with hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4 (HES or lactated Ringer’s (LR on cerebral oxygenation and electroencephalogram-derived parameters were investigated. Twelve young pigs under propofol-remifentanil anaesthesia were bled 30 mL/kg and, after a 20-minute waiting period, volume replacement was performed with HES (GHES; N=6 or LR (GRL; N=6. Bleeding caused a decrease of more than 50% in mean arterial pressure (P<0.01 and a decrease in cerebral oximetry (P=0.039, bispectral index, and electroencephalogram total power (P=0.04 and P<0.01, resp., while propofol plasma concentrations increased (P<0.01. Both solutions restored the haemodynamics and cerebral oxygenation similarly and were accompanied by an increase in electroencephalogram total power. No differences between groups were found. However, one hour after the end of the volume replacement, the cardiac output (P=0.03 and the cerebral oxygenation (P=0.008 decreased in the GLR and were significantly lower than in GHES (P=0.02. Volume replacement with HES 130/0.4 was capable of maintaining the cardiac output and cerebral oxygenation during a longer period than LR and caused a decrease in the propofol plasma concentrations.

  3. Investigation of the effect of Acute Normovolemic Hemodilution and Tranexamic Acid on the amount of bleeding during off-pump coronary artery bypass graft surgery: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Jalaeian Taghadoomi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Postoperative bleeding and transfusion remain a source of morbidity and cost after open heart operations . To evaluate the effect of ANH method and tranexamic acid on blood transfusion requirements and blood loss after off pump coronary artery bypass surgery (OPCAB. Materials and Methods: The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE, and EMBASE from inception to December 2014; reference lists of published guidelines, reviews, and associated articles, as well as conference proceedings.We included articles with available abstract in English language. Manual searching was done within the reference list of articles. Three reviewers independently reviewed and assessed eligibility criteria, assessed quality, and extracted data. Results: Bleeding and hemorrhagic complications and the consequent need for allogeneic transfusion are still major problems after off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery that can reduced in combination of ANH method and tranexamic acid. Conclusion: Tranexamic acid and ANH appear to be effective in reducing postoperative bleeding and the need for allogeneic blood products.

  4. Embolisation of acute abdominal and thoracal bleeding with ethylene-vinyl-alcohol copolymer (Onyx {sup registered}); Embolisation akuter abdomineller und thorakaler Blutungen mit Ethylen-Vinyl-Alkohol-Kopolymer (Onyx {sup registered}). Erste Erfahrungen im arteriellen Gefaessgebiet des Koerperstamms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adamus, R.; Uder, M.; Kleinschmidt, T.; Detmar, K.; Bolte, R.; Stein, H.; Loose, R.W.

    2010-10-15

    During the last years most embolizations with the liquid agent Onyx have been performed in the field of neuroradiological interventions. There is minimal experience with arterial embolizations of the body trunk. 23 patients suffering from acute abdominal or thoracic bleeding underwent 28 embolizations with Onyx (17 male, 6 female, mean age 69 years). 27 interventions were technically and clinically successful. One patient with rebleeding from a jejunal artery aneurysm underwent surgery. Onyx embolizations were performed in renal, hepatic, iliac and bronchial arteries and esophageal varices. Compared with prior embolisation agents Onyx offers advantages due to good controllability. Fast arterial occlusion improves time management of patients. In comparison with prior techniques we observed a significant reduction of fluoroscopy time. Quantitative measurements demonstrated a significant higher embolisation agent contrast. (orig.)

  5. Causes of lower gastrointestinal bleeding on colonoscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, A.U.; Gul, R.; Khursheed, L.; Hadayat, R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Bleeding from anus is usually referred as rectal bleeding but actually rectal bleeding is defined as bleeding from lower colon or rectum, which means bleeding from a place distal to ligament of Treitz. This study was conducted to determine the frequency of different causes of rectal bleeding in patients at Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad. Methods: One hundred and seventy-five patients with evidence of rectal bleed, without gender discrimination were selected by non-probability convenient sampling from the out-patient department and general medical wards. Patients with suspected upper GI source of bleeding; acute infectious bloody diarrhoea and any coagulopathy were excluded from the study. All patients were subjected to fibre optic colonoscopy after preparation of the gut and findings were recorded. Where necessary, biopsy samples were also taken. Diagnosis was based on colonoscopic findings. Results: A total of 175 patients (92 males and 83 females) with mean age 35.81±9.18 years were part of the study. Colonoscopy showed abnormal findings in 150 (85.7%) patients. The commonest diagnosis was haemorrhoids, which was found in 39 (22.3%) patients. It was followed by inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in 30 (17.1%) patients, solitary rectal ulcer in 13 (7.4%) patients and polyps in 25 (14.3%) patients. Other less frequent findings were non-specific inflammation and fungating growths in rectum. Conclusion: Haemorrhoids was the leading cause of bleeding per rectum in this study, followed by evidence of IBD while infrequent findings of polyps and diverticuli indicate that these are uncommon in this region. (author)

  6. Advances in gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanas, Ángel

    2016-09-01

    The main innovations of the latest meeting of the Gastroenterological Association (2016) concerning upper gastrointestinal bleeding from the clinician's perspective can be summarised as follows: a) The Glasgow-Blatchford scale has the best accuracy in predicting the need for surgical intervention and hospital mortality; b) Prognostic scales for non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding are also useful for lower gastrointestinal bleeding; c) Preliminary data suggest that treatment with hemospray does not seem to be superior to current standard treatment in controlling active peptic ulcer bleeding; d) Either famotidine or a proton pump inhibitor may be effective in preventing haemorrhagic recurrence in patients taking aspirin, but this finding needs to be confirmed in further studies; e) There was confirmation of the need to re-introduce antiplatelet therapy as early as possible in patients with antiplatelet-associated gastrointestinal bleeding in order to prevent cardiovascular mortality; f) Routine clinical practice suggests that gastrointestinal or cardiovascular complications with celecoxib or traditional NSAIDs are very low; g) Dabigatran is associated with an increased incidence of gastrointestinal bleeding compared with apixaban or warfarin. At least half of the episodes are located in the lower gastrointestinal tract; h) Implant devices for external ventricular circulatory support are associated with early gastrointestinal bleeding in up to one third of patients; the bleeding is often secondary to arteriovenous malformations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Bleeding esophageal varices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... amount of bleeding, the only symptom may be dark or black streaks in the stools. If larger amounts of bleeding occur, symptoms ... exam which may show: Bloody or black stool (in a rectal exam) Low ... the use of a camera on a flexible tube to examine the esophagus ...

  8. Assessment of Postmenopausal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Yuan Hsu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Postmenopausal bleeding is bleeding that occurs 12 or more months after the last menstrual period and accounts for 5% of all gynecologic office visits. While it is not always a symptom of cancer, the exclusion of endometrial hyperplasia and carcinoma is the key issue in the evaluation of patients with postmenopausal bleeding. The primary evaluation of postmenopausal women who present with abnormal uterine bleeding includes a medical history and a pelvic examination. Investigative studies, such as a uterine biopsy, ultrasound, hysteroscopy or dilation and curettage, may be required. Treatment will depend on the cause determined. The most important point is that irregular perimenopausal or postmenopausal bleeding should not be ignored or assumed to be a normal phenomenon.

  9. Clinical approach to a patient with abnormal uterine bleeding

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    bleeding, type, appearance, duration, cyclicity and associated ... Clinical approach. In all cases where the main complaint is that of excessive menstrual bleeding, an immediate differentiation must be made between acute severe blood loss and chronic excessive ... management rules can be implemented. In such patients ...

  10. Coffee grounds emesis: not just an upper GI bleed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bou-Abdallah, Jad Z; Murthy, Uma K; Mehta, Nilish; Prasad, Heramba N; Kaul, Vivek

    2012-07-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding manifests as hematemesis, melena, or hematochezia. Initial management is identical, irrespective of nasogastric (NG) aspirate results. Current practice includes early upper endoscopy. Significantly fewer high-risk bleeding lesions are found on endoscopy in patients with coffee grounds vs. bloody NG aspirates. We present a case series to illustrate that patients with coffee grounds emesis (CGE) often have other unsuspected illnesses that may be overlooked due to preoccupation with the GI bleed. A retrospective chart review of a series of 6 patients presenting with CGE and admitted for upper GI bleeding was performed. All 6 patients were hemodynamically stable at admission. NG lavage showed coffee grounds that cleared easily. None of the patients required blood transfusions during their hospital stay. Endoscopy in 3 of 6 patients failed to find any significant UGI lesions or stigmata of recent bleed. Although patients were admitted for UGI bleeding, the more significant associated diagnoses included acute myocardial infarction, urosepsis, small bowel obstruction, bilateral pulmonary emboli, and acute renal failure. Hemodynamically stable patients presenting with coffee grounds NG aspirate and no fall in hemoglobin/hematocrit should be evaluated for other non-GI bleeding-related conditions even as the GI bleed is being managed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... uterine cancer isn’t the cause. Women after menopause Hormone replacement therapy is a common cause of uterine bleeding after menopause. Other causes include endometrial and uterine cancer. These ...

  12. Gastrointestinal bleeding from supraduodenal artery with aberrant origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiong Han, MD, PhD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Angiography and endovascular embolization play an important role in controlling acute arterial upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage, particularly when endoscopic intervention fails to do so. In our case, the patient presented with recurrent life-threatening bleed in spite of multiple prior endoscopic interventions and gastroduodenal artery embolization. Our teaching points focus on the role of angiography in acute upper gastrointestinal bleed and when to conduct empiric embolization, while reviewing the supraduodenal artery as an atypical but important potential culprit for refractory upper gastrointestinal bleed.

  13. Acquired Inhibitors: A Special Case of Bleeding in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G. Stefanacci

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This literature review is intended to familiarize physicians and healthcare providers of older adults with the potential causes of acute bleeding in older adults and to review diagnostic approaches that can produce prompt identification of acute bleeding and facilitate timely treatment. Adverse events from anticoagulant treatment and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID and aspirin use and abuse are among the most common causes of bleeding in older adults. Diagnoses infrequently considered—mild congenital hemophilia, acquired hemophilia, von Willebrand disease, and platelet dysfunction—can contribute to acute bleeding in older adults. The approach to management of bleeding varies. Management of acute bleeding in older adults can be challenging because these patients often have chronic comorbidity and have been prescribed long-term concomitant medications that can complicate diagnosis and treatment. Prompt recognition of acquired hemophilia, referral to an expert hematologist, and timely initiation of treatment could improve outcome in older patients who experience bleeding episodes resulting from this condition.

  14. HYSTEROSCOPY IN POSTMENOPAUSAL BLEEDING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardhan, S; Mohan, S; Ranjan, P

    2001-04-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the utility of hysteroscopy as a diagnostic tool in cases of postmenopausal bleeding. The study includes 42 cases presenting with postmenopausal bleeding on which hysterscopy was performed using rigid hysteroscope (CIRCON) with glycine 1.5% as the distension medium. In 17 of the 42 cases positive hysteroscopic findings were noted which included 2 cases of endometrial carcinoma, 2 cases of postmenopausal endometritis, 4 cases of endometrial polyp, 5 cases of endometrial hyperplasia, 1 case of submucous myoma and 3 cases of endocervical polyp whereas normal postmenopausal endometrium was noticed in rest of the 25 cases. Endometrial biopsy was done in all these cases so that the hysteroscopic findings could be corroborated with tissue diagnosis. Hysteroscopy along with directed endometrial biopsy proved to be a useful diagnostic aid in cases of postmenopausal bleeding.

  15. Heavy Menstrual Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... option. It also is used to treat endometrial cancer. After the uterus is removed, a woman can no longer get ... to stop or reduce menstrual bleeding. Endometrial Cancer: Cancer of the lining of the uterus. Endometrial Biopsy: A procedure in which a small ...

  16. Bleeding Disorders Treatment Options

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rare bleeding disorders are usually made from human plasma and are treated to eliminate viruses like HIV and hepatitis B and C. ... concentrate (PCC) This concentrate is made from human plasma and ... (VKCFD). It is treated to eliminate viruses like HIV and hepatitis B and C. ...

  17. Vaginal or uterine bleeding - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Metrorrhagia and other menstrual conditions; Abnormal menstrual periods; Abnormal vaginal bleeding ... of regular ovulation (anovulation). Doctors call the problem abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) . AUB is more common in teenagers and ...

  18. Therapeutic Options for Patients Bleeding with Peptic Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABR Thomson

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available It is likely that the best outcome for the patient with an acute upper gastrointestinal bleed (GIB includes early diagnosis: for a bleeding lesion with a high risk of rebleeding, in an older patient with systolic h.ypotension or in a person with multiple medical problems. Early therapeutic endoscopy with meticulous control of intragastric pH will Likely achieve the best outcome. The ideal pH criterion to stop bleeding or to prevent recurrence is unknown. An algorithm is presented to guide the clinical management of patients with GIB, and to focus on important questi.ons for future therapeutic studies.

  19. Gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to ulcer in duodenal diverticulosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banos Madrid, Ramon; Alberca de las Parras, Fernando; Vargas Acosta, Angel and others

    2006-01-01

    The reasons more frequent of high gastrointestinal bleeding are the peptic gastric and duodenal, followed by acute erosion and the varicose veins in oesophagus and stomachs. The diverticulosis of the small bowel is a very rare reason of gastrointestinal bleeding, must considerate in patients with bleeding without evident reason in oesophagus and stomach the habitual is to diagnose this entity of occidental form in the course of endoscopic procedures, radiological of surgical. The complications associated with the diverticulosis duodenal are rare; it justifies supporting a not surgical attitude at first

  20. Gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to ulcer in duodenal diverticulosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramon Banos Madrid; Fernando Alberca de las Parras; Angel Vargas Acosta and others

    2006-01-01

    The reasons more frequent of high gastrointestinal bleeding are the peptic gastric and duodenal, followed by acute erosions and the varicose veins in oesophagus and stomach. The diverticulosis of the small bowel is a very rare reason of gastrointestinal bleeding, must considerate in patients with bleeding without evident reason in oesophagus and stomach, the habitual is to diagnose this entity of accidental form in the course of endoscopic procedures, radiological or surgical. The complications associated with the diverticulosis duodenal are rare; it justifies supporting a not surgical attitude at first

  1. Risk of bleeding related to antithrombotic treatment in cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke; Olesen, Jonas B; Charlot, Mette

    2012-01-01

    Antithrombotic therapy is a cornerstone of treatment in patients with cardiovascular disease with bleeding being the most feared complication. This review describes the risk of bleeding related to different combinations of antithrombotic drugs used for cardiovascular disease: acute coronary...... syndrome (ACS), atrial fibrillation (AF), cerebrovascular (CVD) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Different risk assessment schemes and bleeding definitions are compared. The HAS-BLED risk score is recommended in patients with AF and in ACS patients with AF. In patients with ACS with or without...

  2. Pinworms and postmenopausal bleeding.

    OpenAIRE

    al-Rufaie, H K; Rix, G H; Pérez Clemente, M P; al-Shawaf, T

    1998-01-01

    The human pinworm Enterobius vermicularis is normally found within the human gastrointestinal tract. Pregnant females migrate out of their host's anus at night to lay their eggs perianally. As a consequence of this nocturnal migration some worms find their way into adjacent orifices, most commonly the female genitourinary tract, producing irritative symptoms such as vulvovaginitis. A case of pinworm infestation of the uterus presented as postmenopausal bleeding.

  3. Value of Adjusted Blood Requirement Index in determining failure to control bleed in patients with variceal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Shahab; Khalid, Abdullah B; Awan, Safia; Shah, Hasnain A; Hamid, Saeed; Jafri, Wasim

    2015-03-01

    Variceal bleeding is a serious complication in patients with cirrhosis. Among the criteria that were proposed in Baveno conferences, the Adjusted Blood Requirement Index (ABRI) has not been validated prospectively in clinical practice. We therefore aim to evaluate the measurement of ABRI as a marker of failure to control bleeding and to evaluate the consistency of ABRI in relation to other criteria of failure to control variceal bleeding. All patients with variceal bleeding who presented to Aga Khan University Hospital from January 2010 to December 2012 who were administered transfusion of packed red blood cells were included after obtaining informed consent. All patients were managed as per the standard protocol with intravenous terlipressin along with band ligation and injection of cyanoacrylate in cases of esophageal and fundal varices, respectively. Hemoglobin and hematocrit were measured every 6 h for 48 h and then every 12 h until 5 days of index bleed in each patient. Packed cells were transfused if hemoglobin decreased below 8 g/dl. The number of blood units transfused, change in hemoglobin values, and ABRI were calculated after each unit of blood transfusion till 120 h. In patients in whom bleed could not be controlled, an ABRI value of 0.75 or more was compared with other Baveno IV-based parameters that define failure to control variceal bleeding. During the study period, 137 eligible patients with variceal bleed were admitted. The mean age of the patients was 52±12 years. The majority of patients (50.4%) were in Child-Pugh class B, followed by 38% in Child-Pugh class C. According to the Baveno IV criteria, overall failure to control acute variceal bleeding occurred in 52 (37.9%) patients. Excluding ABRI, failure to control bleeding was found in 22/137 (16%) patients, whereas ABRI-based criteria showed that in 34/137 (24.8%) patients, bleeding could not be controlled. There were only four (2.9%) patients with variceal bleeding in whom ABRI and

  4. Mild bleeding disorders

    OpenAIRE

    PERROUD, V.

    2011-01-01

    Contrairement aux troubles hémorragiques sévères, les maladies hémorragiques modérées (Mild Bleeding Disorders = MBD) sont difficiles à diagnostiquer chez les enfants, car la limite entre le physiologique et le pathologique est mal définie et l'approche diagnostique est peu systématisée. Qu'entend-on par MBD ? On peut les définir comme des diathèses hémorragiques sans répercussion sévère sur la vie quotidienne et, en principe, sans risque vital : épistaxis, gingivorragies, rect...

  5. Risk of bleeding related to antithrombotic treatment in cardiovascular disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke; Olesen, Jonas B; Charlot, Mette

    2012-01-01

    syndrome (ACS), atrial fibrillation (AF), cerebrovascular (CVD) and peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Different risk assessment schemes and bleeding definitions are compared. The HAS-BLED risk score is recommended in patients with AF and in ACS patients with AF. In patients with ACS with or without......Antithrombotic therapy is a cornerstone of treatment in patients with cardiovascular disease with bleeding being the most feared complication. This review describes the risk of bleeding related to different combinations of antithrombotic drugs used for cardiovascular disease: acute coronary...... a stent dual antiplatelet therapy with a P2Y12 receptor antagonist and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) is recommended for 12 months, preferable with prasugrel or ticagrelor unless there is an additional indication of warfarin or increased risk of bleeding. In patients with AF, warfarin is recommended...

  6. Risk of bleeding in patients with acute myocardial infarction treated with different combinations of aspirin, clopidogrel, and vitamin K antagonists in Denmark: a retrospective analysis of nationwide registry data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke; Hansen, Morten L; Abildstrom, Steen Z

    2009-01-01

    . Numbers needed to harm were 81.2 for aspirin plus clopidogrel, 45.4 for aspirin plus vitamin K antagonist, 15.2 for clopidogrel plus vitamin K antagonist, and 12.5 for triple therapy. 702 (37.9%) of 1852 patients with non-fatal bleeding had recurrent myocardial infarction or died during the study period......BACKGROUND: Combinations of aspirin, clopidogrel, and vitamin K antagonists are widely used in patients after myocardial infarction. However, data for the safety of combinations are sparse. We examined the risk of hospital admission for bleeding associated with different antithrombotic regimens...... according to the following groups: monotherapy with aspirin, clopidogrel, or vitamin K antagonist; dual therapy with aspirin plus clopidogrel, aspirin plus vitamin K antagonist, or clopidogrel plus vitamin K antagonist; or triple therapy including all three drugs. Risk of hospital admission for bleeding...

  7. Bleeding in children with cancer

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Siluan early warning signs of childhood cancer, compiled by the South. African Children's Cancer Study Group (SACCSG). An increased risk of bleeding during the cancer treatment period is almost always present, due to the bone marrow suppressive effect of chemotherapy. Fortunately, death due to bleeding is rare these ...

  8. Ectopic Pregnancy: An unusual cause of lower GIT bleeding. A case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding, when it occurs, may present a diagnostic and treatment challenge to the surgeon. We report a case an ectopic pregnancy that eroded the colon and presented with severe rectal bleeding. The paper discusses the differential diagnoses, management and outcome of massive ...

  9. Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ngu, Jing H.; Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Chin, YK

    2017-01-01

    Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding: a prospective international multicenter study.......Performance of upper gastrointestinal bleeding risk assessment scores in variceal bleeding: a prospective international multicenter study....

  10. Application of endoscopic hemoclips for nonvariceal bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal tract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shi-Bin; Gong, Ai-Xia; Leng, Jing; Ma, Jing; Ge, Lin-Mei

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To investigate acute nonvariceal bleeding in the upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract and evaluate the effects of endoscopic hemoclipping. METHODS: Sixty-eight cases of acute nonvariceal bleeding in the upper GI tract were given endoscopic treatment with hemoclip application. Clinical data, endoscopic findings, and the effects of the therapy were evaluated. RESULTS: The 68 cases (male:female = 42:26, age from 9 to 70 years, average 54.4) presented with hematemesis in 26 cases (38.2%), melena in nine cases (13.3%), and both in 33 cases (48.5%). The causes of the bleeding included gastric ulcer (29 cases), duodenal ulcer (11 cases), Dieulafoy’s lesion (11 cases), Mallory-Weiss syndrome (six cases), post-operative (three cases), post-polypectomy bleeding (five cases), and post-sphincterotomy bleeding (three cases); 42 cases had active bleeding. The mean number of hemoclips applied was four. Permanent hemostasis was obtained by hemoclip application in 59 cases; 6 cases required emergent surgery (three cases had peptic ulcers, one had Dieulafoy’s lesion, and two were caused by sphincterotomy); three patients died (two had Dieulafoy’s lesion and one was caused by sphincterotomy); and one had recurrent bleeding with Dieulafoy’s lesion 10 mo later, but in a different location. CONCLUSION: Endoscopic hemoclip application was an effective and safe method for acute nonvariceal bleeding in the upper GI tract with satisfactory outcomes. PMID:19750577

  11. Side Effects: Bleeding and Bruising

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy and targeted therapy, can increase patients’ risk of bleeding and bruising, also called thrombocytopenia. Learn about steps to take if you are at increased risk of a low platelet count.

  12. The medical management of abnormal uterine bleeding in reproductive-aged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Linda D; Gueye, Ndeye-Aicha

    2016-01-01

    In the treatment of women with abnormal uterine bleeding, once a thorough history, physical examination, and indicated imaging studies are performed and all significant structural causes are excluded, medical management is the first-line approach. Determining the acuity of the bleeding, the patient's medical history, assessing risk factors, and establishing a diagnosis will individualize their medical regimen. In acute abnormal uterine bleeding with a normal uterus, parenteral estrogen, a multidose combined oral contraceptive regimen, a multidose progestin-only regimen, and tranexamic acid are all viable options, given the appropriate clinical scenario. Heavy menstrual bleeding can be treated with a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, combined oral contraceptives, continuous oral progestins, and tranexamic acid with high efficacy. Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs may be utilized with hormonal methods and tranexamic acid to decrease menstrual bleeding. Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists are indicated in patients with leiomyoma and abnormal uterine bleeding in preparation for surgical interventions. In women with inherited bleeding disorders all hormonal methods as well as tranexamic acid can be used to treat abnormal uterine bleeding. Women on anticoagulation therapy should consider using progestin-only methods as well as a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist to treat their heavy menstrual bleeding. Given these myriad options for medical treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding, many patients may avoid surgical intervention. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, Fatima Regina Silva; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding. (author)

  14. Computed tomography angiography in patients with active gastrointestinal bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Fatima Regina Silva; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: fatima.rsreis@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Medicina; Cardia, P.P. [Hospital Vera Cruz, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2015-11-15

    Gastrointestinal bleeding represents a common medical emergency, with considerable morbidity and mortality rates, and a prompt diagnosis is essential for a better prognosis. In such a context, endoscopy is the main diagnostic tool; however, in cases where the gastrointestinal hemorrhage is massive, the exact bleeding site might go undetected. In addition, a trained professional is not always present to perform the procedure. In an emergency setting, optical colonoscopy presents limitations connected with the absence of bowel preparation, so most of the small bowel cannot be assessed. Scintigraphy cannot accurately demonstrate the anatomic location of the bleeding and is not available at emergency settings. The use of capsule endoscopy is inappropriate in the acute setting, particularly in the emergency department at night, and is a highly expensive method. Digital angiography, despite its high sensitivity, is invasive, presents catheterization-related risks, in addition to its low availability at emergency settings. On the other hand, computed tomography angiography is fast, widely available and minimally invasive, emerging as a promising method in the diagnostic algorithm of these patients, being capable of determining the location and cause of bleeding with high accuracy. Based on a critical literature review and on their own experience, the authors propose a computed tomography angiography protocol to assess the patient with gastrointestinal bleeding. (author)

  15. Acute GI bleeding by multiple jejunal gastrointestinal autonomic nerve tumour associated with neurofibromatosis type I Urgencia quirúrgica por sangrado intestinal debido a tumor intestinal de nervios autónomos asociados a neurofibromatosis tipo I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Keese

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe a surgical emergency due to GI-bleeding caused by gastrointestinal autonomic nerve tumours (GANT's in a patient with von Recklinghausen's disease. A 72 year old female patient with von Recklinghausen's disease was admitted with maelena. Endoscopy showed no active bleeding in the stomach and the colon. Therefore an angio-CT-scan was performed which revealed masses of the proximal jejunum as source of bleeding. Laparotomy was indicated and a 20 cm segment of jejunum which carried multiple extraluminal tumours was resected. The source of the bleeding was a 2 cm tumour which had eroded the mucosal surface. Immunohistologically, evidence of neuronal differentiation could be shown in the spindle-formed cells with positive staining for C-Kit (CD 117, CD 34, and a locally positive staining for synaptophysine and S100. This case report illustrates the association between neurofibromatosis and stromal tumours and should alert surgeons and gastroenterologist about gastrointestinal manifestations in patients with von Recklinghausen's disease.Se describe una urgencia quirúrgica por sangrado intestinal debido a tumor gastrointestinal de nervios autónomos (GANT asociado a enfermedad de von Recklinghausen. Una mujer de 72 años con neurofibromatosis fue ingresada con signos de melena. La endoscopia digestiva alta y baja fue negativa. Se indicó TAC con contraste que advirtió tumores yeyunales como causa del sangrado. Se realizó laparotomía y resección de un segmento de 20 cm de yeyuno que incluía varios tumores. La causa del sangrado activo fue lesión en mucosa intestinal por erosión tumoral. El análisis por inmunohistoquímica de la pieza mostró diferenciación neuronal, con células fusiformes con tinción positiva para el C-Kit (CD 117, CD 34. Esta nota clínica pone de manifiesto la asociación entre la neurofibromatosis y los tumores estromales y debe alertar a gastroenterólogos y cirujanos sobre las posibles manifestaciones

  16. Do statins protect against upper gastrointestinal bleeding?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulmez, Sinem Ezgi; Lassen, Annmarie Touborg; Aalykke, Claus

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: Recently, an apparent protective effect of statins against upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB) was postulated in a post hoc analysis of a randomized trial. We aimed to evaluate the effect of statin use on acute nonvariceal UGB alone or in combinations with low-dose aspirin and other...... antithrombotic drugs. METHODS: A population-based case-control study was conducted in the County of Funen, Denmark. Cases (n = 3652) were all subjects with a first discharge diagnosis of serious UGB from a hospital during the period 1995 to 2006. Age- and gender-matched controls (10 for each case) (n = 36 502...... significant protective effect was observed for concurrent users of low-dose aspirin [OR 0.43 (0.18-1.05)]. CONCLUSION: Statins do not prevent UGB, except possibly in users of low-dose aspirin....

  17. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding: role of 64-row computed tomographic angiography in diagnosis and therapeutic planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jian-Zhuang; Zhang, Meng-Fan; Rong, Ai-Mei; Fang, Xiang-Jie; Zhang, Kai; Huang, Guo-Hao; Chen, Peng-Fei; Wang, Zhao-Yang; Duan, Xu-Hua; Han, Xin-Wei; Liu, Yan-Jie

    2015-04-07

    To determine the value of computed tomographic angiography (CTA) for diagnosis and therapeutic planning in lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Sixty-three consecutive patients with acute lower GI bleeding underwent CTA before endovascular or surgical treatment. CTA was used to determine whether the lower GI bleeding was suitable for endovascular treatment, surgical resection, or conservative treatment in each patient. Treatment planning with CTA was compared with actual treatment decisions or endovascular or surgical treatment that had been carried out in each patient based on CTA findings. 64-row CTA detected active extravasation of contrast material in 57 patients and six patients had no demonstrable active bleeding, resulting in an accuracy of 90.5% in the detection of acute GI bleeding (57 of 63). In three of the six patients with no demonstrable active bleeding, active lower GI bleeding recurred within one week after CTA, and angiography revealed acute bleeding. The overall location-based accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for the detection of GI bleeding by 64-row CTA were 98.8% (249 of 252), 95.0% (57 of 60), 100% (192 of 192), 100% (57 of 57), and 98.5% (192 of 195), respectively. Treatment planning was correctly established on the basis of 64-row CTA with an accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of 98.4% (248 of 252), 93.3% (56 of 60), 100% (192 of 192), 100% (56 of 56), and 97.5% (192 of 196), respectively, in a location-based evaluation. 64-row CTA is safe and effective in making decisions regarding treatment, without performing digital subtraction angiography or surgery, in the majority of patients with lower GI bleeding.

  18. Coagulation management in massive bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffee, Matthew J; Deloughery, Thomas G; Thorborg, Per A

    2010-04-01

    To update readers on recent literature regarding treatment of coagulopathy for patients with life-threatening bleeding, highlighting emerging therapeutic options, controversial topics, and ongoing clinical trials. Massive transfusion protocols featuring immediate availability of blood products and multidisciplinary communication reduce mortality and conserve resources. There is a growing consensus that immediate administration of plasma and platelet units in a 1: 1: 1 ratio with red cell units reduces early mortality. Lyophilized and recombinant blood product components may have advantages over traditional blood products in certain clinical circumstances. Massive transfusion protocols standardize treatment of the coagulopathy of massive bleeding, leading to rapid restoration of hemostasis and decrease in early mortality.

  19. Managing oral bleeding in children with hereditary bleeding disorders

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All the patients presented with bleeding gingivae secondary to either physiologic processes of eruption, infective or traumatic dental conditions. The management of the patients was comprehensive with a multidisciplinary approach. The prevention of traumatic and infective dental conditions is an important part of oral health ...

  20. Predictors of bleeding during heparin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, A M; Jick, H

    1980-09-12

    Among 2,656 patients receiving heparin sodium therapy, bleeding was a dose-related phenomenon that occurred most commonly among women, severely ill patients, and patients who received asprin during heparin therapy. Except for dose, factors that predisposed patients to bleeding were more strongly associated with major bleeding than with minor bleeding. Heavy alcohol drinkers were at particularly high risk for major bleeding episodes during heparinization. The seven-day cumulative risk for any bleeding was 9.1%. Risk was greatest on the third day of heparin administration.

  1. Management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B.

    2012-01-01

    -risk stigmata. Although selected patients can be discharged promptly after endoscopy, high-risk patients should be hospitalized for at least 3 days after endoscopic hemostasis. Patients with peptic ulcer bleeding who require secondary cardiovascular prophylaxis should start receiving acetylsalicylic acid (ASA...

  2. Abnormal uterine bleeding in perimenopause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, S R; Lumsden, M A

    2017-10-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is one of the commonest presenting complaints encountered in a gynecologist's office or primary-care setting. The wider availability of diagnostic tools has allowed prompt diagnosis and treatment of an increasing number of menstrual disorders in an office setting. This White Paper reviews the advantages and disadvantages of transvaginal ultrasound, blind endometrial sampling and diagnostic hysteroscopy. Once a proper diagnosis has been established, appropriate therapy may be embarked upon. Fortunately, only a minority of such patients will have premalignant or malignant disease. When bleeding is sufficient to cause severe anemia or even hypovolemia, prompt intervention is called for. In most of the cases, however, the abnormal uterine bleeding will be disquieting to the patient and significantly affect her 'quality of life'. Sometimes, reassurance and expectant management will be sufficient in such patients. Overall, however, in cases of benign disease, some intervention will be required. The use of oral contraceptive pills especially those with a short hormone-free interval, the insertion of the levonorgestrel intrauterine system, the incorporation of newer medical therapies including antifibrinolytic drugs and selective progesterone receptor modulators and minimally invasive treatments have made outpatient therapy increasingly effective. For others, operative hysteroscopy and endometrial ablation are proven therapeutic tools to provide both long- and short-term relief of abnormal uterine bleeding, thus avoiding, or deferring, hysterectomy.

  3. Spontaneous Bleeding Associated with Ginkgo biloba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bent, Stephen; Goldberg, Harley; Padula, Amy; Avins, Andrew L

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND Ginkgo biloba (ginkgo) is a herbal remedy used by over 2% of the adult population in the United States. Several review articles have suggested that ginkgo may increase the risk of bleeding. OBJECTIVE To report a case of bleeding associated with using ginkgo, to systematically review the literature for similar case reports, and to evaluate whether using ginkgo is causally related to bleeding. DATA SOURCES We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, IBIDS, and the Cochrane Collaboration Database from 1966 to October 2004 with no language restrictions. REVIEW METHODS Published case reports of bleeding events in persons using ginkgo were selected. Two reviewers independently abstracted a standard set of information to assess whether ginkgo caused the bleeding event. RESULTS Fifteen published case reports described a temporal association between using ginkgo and a bleeding event. Most cases involved serious medical conditions, including 8 episodes of intracranial bleeding. However, 13 of the case reports identified other risk factors for bleeding. Only 6 reports clearly described that ginkgo was stopped and that bleeding did not recur. Bleeding times, measured in 3 reports, were elevated when patients were taking ginkgo. CONCLUSION A structured assessment of published case reports suggests a possible causal association between using ginkgo and bleeding events. Given the widespread use of this herb and the serious nature of the reported events, further studies are needed. Patients using ginkgo, particularly those with known bleeding risks, should be counseled about a possible increase in bleeding risk. PMID:16050865

  4. Neurosurgical management in children with bleeding diathesis: auditing neurological outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Zaitun; Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran; Crimmins, Darach; Caird, John

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to assess the outcome of neurosurgical treatment in children with bleeding diathesis and also to evaluate the current management plan applied in the authors' service. METHODS The authors retrospectively analyzed all cases in which neurosurgical procedures were performed in pediatric patients presenting with intracranial hematoma due to an underlying bleeding tendency over a 5-year period at their institution. They evaluated the patients' neurological symptoms from the initial referral, hematological abnormalities, surgical treatment, neurological outcome, and scores on the Pediatric Glasgow Outcome Scale-Extended (GOS-E Peds) obtained 1 year after the last operation. RESULTS Five patients with a bleeding diathesis who underwent surgery for intracranial hematoma were identified; the diagnosis was hemophilia A in 3 cases, idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura in 1 case, and severe aplastic anemia in 1 case. Intracerebral hematoma (ICH) (n = 4) and acute subdural hematoma (n = 1) were confirmed on radiological investigations. In 2 of the 4 patients with ICH, the diagnosis of bleeding diathesis was made for the first time on presentation. Four patients (all male) were younger than 2 years; the patient with severe aplastic anemia and spontaneous ICH was 15 years old and female. The duration of symptoms varied from 24 hours to 5 days. Neurological examination at 1 year's follow-up showed complete recovery (GOS-E Peds score of 1) in 3 cases and mild weakness (GOS-E Peds score of 2) in 2 cases. CONCLUSIONS Neurosurgical management of patients with bleeding diathesis should be carried out in a tertiary-care setting with multidisciplinary team management, including members with expertise in neuroimaging and hematology, in addition to neurosurgery. Early diagnosis and prompt treatment of a bleeding diathesis is crucial for full neurological recovery.

  5. The Clinical Outcomes of Transcatheter Microcoil Embolization in Patients with Active Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding in the Small Bowel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwak, Hyo Sung; Han, Young Min; Lee, Soo Teik

    2009-01-01

    To assess the clinical outcomes of the transcatheter microcoil embolization in patients with active lower gastrointestinal (LGI) bleeding in the small bowel, as well as to compare the mortality rates between the two groups based on the visualization or non-visualization of the bleeding focus determined by an angiography. We retrospectively evaluated all of the consecutive patients who underwent an angiography for treatment of acute LGI bleeding between January 2003 and October 2007. In total, the study included 36 patients who underwent a colonoscopy and were diagnosed to have an active bleeding in the LGI tracts. Based on the visualization or non-visualization of the bleeding focus, determined by an angiography, the patients were classified into two groups. The clinical outcomes included technical success, clinical success (no rebleeding within 30 days), delayed rebleeding (> 30 days), as well as the major and minor complication rates. Of the 36 patients, 17 had angiography-proven bleeding that was distal to the marginal artery. The remaining 19 patients did not have a bleeding focus based on the angiography results. The technical and clinical success rates of performing transcatheter microcoil embolizations in patients with active bleeding were 100% and 88%, respectively (15 of 17). One patient died from continued LGI bleeding and one patient received surgery to treat the continued bleeding. There was no note made on the delayed bleeding or on the major or minor complications. Of the 19 patients without active bleeding, 16 (84%) did not have recurrent bleeding. One patient died due to continuous bleeding and multi-organ failure. The superselective microcoil embolization can help successfully treat patients with active LGI bleeding in the small bowel, identified by the results of an angiography. The mortality rate is not significantly different between the patients of the visualization and non-visualization groups on angiography

  6. Risk factors for band-induced ulcer bleeding after prophylactic and therapeutic endoscopic variceal band ligation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Marie; Vaughan, Rhys; Angus, Peter W; Gow, Paul J; Parker, Frank; Hey, Penelope; Efthymiou, Marios

    2015-08-01

    Endoscopic variceal band ligation (EVBL) aims to eradicate high-risk oesophageal varices. There is a small risk of precipitating bleeding from EVBL-induced oesophageal ulceration, which is associated with significant mortality. We explore the risk factors and outcome of EVBL-induced ulcer bleeding. Retrospective review of our endoscopy database between 2007 and 2012 identified upper endoscopies during which EVBL was performed. Patient demographics, biochemistry and endoscopic findings were recorded as were the complications of EVBL-induced ulcer bleeding and death. A total of 749 episodes of EVBL were performed in 347 patients with a mean Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score of 15.8. In all, 609 procedures were performed for prophylaxis and 140 for acute haemorrhage. There were 21 episodes (2.8% of procedures) of EVBL-induced ulcer bleeding in 18 patients, five of whom subsequently died (28%). On multivariable analysis, acute variceal haemorrhage was the only significant predictor of EVBL-induced ulcer bleeding [odds ratio (OR) 6.25 (2.57-15.14), Pulcer bleeding rate was 1.5%, with 22% mortality. In this group, higher MELD score and reflux oesophagitis were associated significantly with EVBL-induced ulcer bleeding [OR 25.53 (2.14-303.26), P=0.010 and OR 1.07 (1.01-1.13), P=0.019, respectively]. Our EVBL-induced ulcer bleeding rate was low, but associated with significant mortality. Highest rates were observed following EVBL for acute variceal haemorrhage, for which EVBL is unavoidable. The incidence was lower following prophylactic EVBL, with the MELD score being the predominant risk factor. Reflux oesophagitis requires further investigation as a potentially modifiable risk factor for EVBL-induced ulcer bleeding.

  7. Endoscopic ultrasound coil placement of gastric varices: Emerging modality for recurrent bleeding gastric varices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogesh Harwani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric varices are the probable source of bleeding in 10-36% of patients, with acute variceal bleeding and carry high mortality and rebleeding rates. Till date, cyanoacrylate glue injection is considered as the standard of care but has high complication rate. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS guided coil placement is a new emerging technique of management of gastric varices. In this case report, we detail the EUS guided coil placement for management of gastric varices after failed glue injections.

  8. Cause of Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Bleeding in Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Patient

    OpenAIRE

    Sari, Elza Febria; Syam, Ari Fahrial; Nainggolan, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    Dengue fever is an acute mosquito-transmitted disease caused by the dengue fever virus which had clinical manifestations range from fever to severe hemorrhage, shock, and death.1 There were 500,000 cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever and 25,000 deaths due to dengue annually worldwide. Bleeding is one of the major problems encountered in dengue fever. The reported prevalence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in dengue patients varies from 5% to 30%. The pathogenesis of hemorrhage could be mult...

  9. Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitamin K deficiency bleeding of the newborn (VKDB) is a bleeding disorder in babies. It most often develops shortly ... A lack of vitamin K may cause severe bleeding in newborn babies. Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting. Babies often have a ...

  10. Gastrointestinal Bleeding Secondary to Calciphylaxis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Nancy; Haq, Khwaja F.; Mahajan, Sugandhi; Nagpal, Prashant; Doshi, Bijal

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 66 Final Diagnosis: Calciphylaxis Symptoms: Gastrointesinal haemorrhage Medication: None Clinical Procedure: Hemodialysis • blood transfusions Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: Calciphylaxis is associated with a high mortality that approaches 80%. The diagnosis is usually made when obvious skin lesions (painful violaceous mottling of the skin) are present. However, visceral involvement is rare. We present a case of calciphylaxis leading to lower gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and rectal ulceration of the GI mucosa. Case Report: A 66-year-old woman with past medical history of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, end-stage renal disease (ESRD), recently diagnosed ovarian cancer, and on hemodialysis (HD) presented with painful black necrotic eschar on both legs. The radiograph of the legs demonstrated extensive calcification of the lower extremity arteries. The hospital course was complicated with lower GI bleeding. A CT scan of the abdomen revealed severe circumferential calcification of the abdominal aorta, celiac artery, and superior and inferior mesenteric arteries and their branches. Colonoscopy revealed severe rectal necrosis. She was deemed to be a poor surgical candidate due to comorbidities and presence of extensive vascular calcifications. Recurrent episodes of profuse GI bleeding were managed conservatively with blood transfusion as needed. Following her diagnosis of calciphylaxis, supplementation with vitamin D and calcium containing phosphate binders was stopped. She was started on daily hemodialysis with low calcium dialysate bath as well as intravenous sodium thiosulphate. The clinical condition of the patient deteriorated. The patient died secondary to multiorgan failure. Conclusions: Calciphylaxis leading to intestinal ischemia/perforation should be considered in the differential diagnosis in ESRD on HD presenting with abdominal pain or GI bleeding. PMID:26572938

  11. Antifibrinolytics for heavy menstrual bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lethaby, A; Farquhar, C; Cooke, I

    2000-01-01

    Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) is an important cause of ill health in women. Medical therapy, with the avoidance of possibly unnecessary surgery, is an attractive treatment option. A wide variety of medications are available to reduce heavy menstrual bleeding but there is considerable variation in practice and uncertainty about the most appropriate therapy. Plasminogen activators are a group of enzymes that cause fibrinolysis (the dissolution of clots). An increase in the levels of plasminogen activators has been found in the endometrium of women with heavy menstrual bleeding compared to those with normal menstrual loss. Plasminogen activator inhibitors (antifibrinolytic agents) have therefore been promoted as a treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding. There has been a reluctance to prescribe tranexamic acid due to possible side effects of the drugs such as an increased risk of thrombogenic disease (deep venous thrombosis). Long term studies in Sweden, however, have shown that the rate of incidence of thrombosis in women treated with tranexamic acid is comparable with the spontaneous frequency of thrombosis in women. To determine the effectiveness of antifibrinolytics in achieving a reduction in heavy menstrual bleeding. All studies which might describe randomised controlled trials of antifibrinolytic therapy for the treatment of heavy menstrual bleeding were obtained by electronic searches of MEDLINE 1966-1997, EMBASE 1980-1997 and the Cochrane Library. Companies producing antifibrinolytics and experts within the field were contacted for reference lists and information on unpublished trials. Randomised controlled trials in women of reproductive age treated with antifibrinolytic agents versus placebo, no treatment or any other medical (non-surgical) therapy for regular heavy menstrual bleeding within either the primary, family planning or specialist clinic settings. Women with post menopausal bleeding, intermenstrual bleeding, iatrogenic or pathological causes of

  12. Acute epistaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvi, Aijaz; Joyner-Triplett, Nedra

    1996-05-01

    Preview Acute anterior nosebleeds are frightening because bleeding is often so copious and seemingly unstoppable. But, ironically, this type is usually less severe than posterior epistaxis, in which blood may run briskly but unseen down the throat. The choice among the many treatment methods available depends on the source and cause of epistaxis. The authors present a methodical approach to patient evaluation and describe the best therapy for various situations.

  13. Detection and localization of lower gastrointestinal bleeding site with scintigraphic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, A.

    1988-01-01

    Successful management of acute gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding frequently depends on accurate localization of the bleeding site. History and clinical findings are often misleading in localizing the site of hemorrhage. The widespread application of flexible endoscopy and selective arteriography now provides accurate diagnoses for the majority of patients with upper GI tract hemorrhage, but lower GI bleeding still is a serious diagnostic problem. Endoscopy and barium studies are of limited value in examining the small bowel and colon in the face of active hemorrhage. Arteriography, although successful in many cases, has limitations. The angiographic demonstration of bleeding is possible only when the injection of contrast material coincides with active bleeding. Since lower GI bleeding is commonly intermittent rather than continuous, a high rate of negative angiographic examinations has been reported. Repeated angiography to pursue recurrent episodes of bleeding is impractical. Because of these shortcomings, in the past decade several noninvasive scintigraphic techniques have been developed to detect and localize sites of GI bleeding. In this chapter the authors discuss details related to the technetium 99m sulfur colloid (Tc-SC) and technetium 99m-labeled red blood cell (Tc-RBC) techniques

  14. [Management of new oral anticoagulants in gastrointestinal bleeding and endoscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Molino, Fátima; Gonzalez, Isabel; Saperas, Esteve

    2015-10-01

    New oral direct anticoagulants agents are alternatives to warfarin for long-term anticoagulation in a growing number of patients that require long-term anticoagulation for atrial fibrillation, deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism. These new agents with predictable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamics profiles offer a favorable global safety profile, but increased gastrointestinal bleeding compared to the vitamin K antagonists. Many gastroenterologists are unfamiliar and may be wary of these newer drugs, since Clinical experience is limited and no specific antidote is available to reverse their anticoagulant effect. In this article the risk of these new agents and, how to manage these agents in both the presence of acute gastrointestinal bleeding and in patients undergoing endoscopic procedures is reviewed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  15. Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahn, Benjamin; Bitton, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    This article provides an overview of the evaluation and management of lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB) in children. The common etiologies at different ages are reviewed. Conditions with endoscopic importance for diagnosis or therapy include solitary rectal ulcer syndrome, polyps, vascular lesions, and colonic inflammation and ulceration. Diagnostic modalities for identifying causes of LGIB in children include endoscopy and colonoscopy, cross-sectional and nuclear medicine imaging, video capsule endoscopy, and enteroscopy. Pre-endoscopic preparation and decision-making unique to pediatrics is highlighted. The authors conclude with a summary of current and emerging therapeutic hemostatic techniques that can be used in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Vascular gastric anomalies as a cause of relapsing bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golubović Gradimir

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Although relatively rare, gastric vascular anomalies can be recognized as a source of both chronic and acute blood loss, most often presenting as long term iron deficiency anemia, rarely as severe acute gastrointestinal bleeding. Case report. We present five patients with various gastric vascular anomalies, diagnosed during the year of 2003. in the Clinical Hospital Center Zemun. The diagnosis was based on endoscopic appearances, clinical history and characteristic histological findings. Gastric vascular anomalies presented in our review were: portal hypertensive gastropathy, gastric antral vascular ectasia, angiodysplasia, hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia and Dieulafoy lesion. The used treatment modalities included surgery and various endoscopic techniques (schlerotherapy, argon plasma coagulation. Conclusion. Patients presented with chronic iron deficiency anemia or acute and recurrent gastrointestinal hemorrhage should be considered as having one of gastric vascular anomalies.

  17. A STUDY ON ENDOSCOPIC EVALUATION OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranaya Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB is one of the commonest gastrointestinal emergencies encountered by clinicians. Peptic ulcers are the most common cause of UGIB. Endoscopy has become the preferred method for diagnosis in patients with acute UGIB. This study is done in a diagnostic upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGIE setup of a tertiary care hospital to ascertain the causes of UGIB prevalent in this part of our country which might differ from other studies. AIM To ascertain prevalent causes of UGIB in patients of this part of India admitted to a Govt. Tertiary Hospital with a provisional diagnosis of UGIB. METHOD One hundred consecutive patients with UGIB were subjected to UGIE to find out the aetiology. The clinical profile and endoscopic findings were analysed and compared with the data on UGIB from other studies. RESULTS The mean age of patients was 47.03 years with male: female ratio of 2.33:1. 58% of patients were first time bleeders. Majority of patients presented with melaena. Visualisation of active bleeding achieved to 85.7% when endoscopy was done within first 24 hrs. The commonest cause of UGIB was duodenal ulcer (DU which accounted for 41% cases. Gastric ulcer was responsible in 13% of cases. Portal hypertension was responsible for bleed in only 13%. Neoplasms accounted for 25% of cases. Other less common causes were erosive gastritis (3%, gastric polyp (3%, Mallory-Weiss tear (1%, and Dieulafoy’s lesion (1%. Among bleeding peptic ulcers, 27.8% of cases were classified as Forrest IIa and 20.4% in Forrest IIb & IIc each. Acid peptic disease was past history elicited in majority (33% followed by NSAID (26% and alcohol (26%. CONCLUSION The present study has diagnosed various causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in this part of country. The incidence of gastric carcinoma as a cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding is significantly high compared to those in other studies. UGI endoscopy should be done in every case

  18. Management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg; Jørgensen, Henrik Stig; Schaffalitzky de Muckadell, Ove B

    2012-01-01

    Description: A multidisciplinary group of Danish experts developed this guideline on management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Sources of data included published studies up to March 2011. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations have been graded. The guideline was approved by the D......Description: A multidisciplinary group of Danish experts developed this guideline on management of bleeding gastroduodenal ulcers. Sources of data included published studies up to March 2011. Quality of evidence and strength of recommendations have been graded. The guideline was approved...... by the Danish Society of Gastroenterology and Hepatology September 4, 2011. Recommendations: Recommendations emphasize the importance of early and efficient resuscitation. Endoscopy should generally be performed within 24 hours, reducing operation rate, rebleeding rate and duration of in-patient stay. When...... in achieving endoscopic hemostasis. Use of endoscopic monotherapy with epinephrine injection is not recommended. Intravenous high-dose proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy for 72 hours after successful endoscopic hemostasis is recommended as it decreases both rebleeding rate and mortality in patients with high...

  19. Gastric ulcer bleeding: diagnosis by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voloudaki, Argyro; Tsagaraki, Kaliopi; Mouzas, John; Gourtsoyiannis, Nickolas

    1999-01-01

    A case of CT demonstration of a bleeding gastric ulcer is presented, in a patient with confusing clinical manifestations. Abdominal CT was performed without oral contrast medium administration, and showed extravasation of intravenous contrast into a gastric lumen distended with material of mixed attenuation. It is postulated that if radiopaque oral contrast had been given, peptic ulcer bleeding would probably have been masked. CT demonstration of gastric ulcer bleeding, may be of value in cases of differential diagnostic dilemmas

  20. Epinephrine plus argon plasma or heater probe coagulation in ulcer bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaman, Ahmet; Baskol, Mevlut; Gursoy, Sebnem; Torun, Edip; Yurci, Alper; Ozel, Banu Demet; Guven, Kadri; Ozbakir, Omer; Yucesoy, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To compare the effectiveness of argon plasma coagulation (APC) and heater probe coagulation (HPC) in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. METHODS: Eighty-five (18 female, 67 male) patients admitted for acute gastrointestinal bleeding due to gastric or duodenal ulcer were included in the study. Upper endoscopy was performed and HPC or APC were chosen randomly to stop the bleeding. Initial hemostasis and rebleeding rates were primary and secondary end-points of the study. RESULTS: Initial hemostasis was achieved in 97.7% (42/43) and 81% (36/42) of the APC and HPC groups, respectively (P 0.05). CONCLUSION: APC is an effective hemostatic method in bleeding peptic ulcers. Larger multicenter trials are necessary to confirm these results. PMID:22039325

  1. Solitary tubercular caecal ulcer causing massive lower gastrointestinal bleed: a formidable diagnostic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Duvuru; Karthikeyan, Vilvapathy Senguttuvan; Sistla, Sarath Chandra; Ali, Sheik Manwar

    2014-03-06

    Gastrointestinal (GI) haemorrhage is a common surgical emergency accounting for approximately 1% of acute hospital admissions. Lower GI bleed is less common and less severe than upper GI bleed and is usually caused by diverticulosis, neoplasms, angiodysplasia and inflammatory bowel disease. A 51-year-old man presented with massive lower GI bleed. He had no history of tuberculosis. He underwent colonoscopy and an isolated caecal ulcer was noted. Segmental ileocaecal resection was performed and no specific cause was identifiable on histopathology. PCR was performed on this specimen and it was positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This case reports the unusual presentation of tuberculosis as solitary caecal ulcer with massive lower GI bleed and highlights the role of PCR as an adjuvant diagnostic tool for its diagnosis when characteristic histopathological findings are absent.

  2. [Gastrointestinal bleeding, NSAIDs, aspirin and anticoagulants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanas, Ángel

    2014-09-01

    The studies presented at the recent American Congress of Gastroenterology in the field of non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (associated or not to NSAIDs or ASA use) have not been numerous but interesting. The key findings are: a) rabeprazole, the only PPI that had few studies in this field, is effective in the prevention of gastric ulcers; b) famotidine could also be effective in the prevention of complications by AAS; c) the new competitive inhibitors of the acid potassium pump are effective (as much as PPIs) on the recurrence of peptic ulcers by ASA; d) early endoscop (<8 h) in non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding seems to offer no better results than those made in the first 24 h; e) endoscopic therapy in Forrest 1a ulcers does not obliterate the bleeding artery in 30% of cases and is the cause of bleeding recurrence; f) alternative therapies with glue or clotting products are being increasingly used in endoscopic therapy of gastrointestinal bleeding; g) liberal administration of blood in the GI bleeding is associated with poor prognosis; h) lesions of the small intestine are frequent cause of gastrointestinal bleeding when upper endoscopy shows no positive stigmata; and i) capsule endoscopy studies have high performance in gastrointestinal bleeding of obscure origin, if performed early in the first two days after the beginning of the bleeding episode. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Serendipity in scintigraphic gastrointestinal bleeding studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goergen, T.G.

    1983-01-01

    A retrospective review of 80 scintigraphic bleeding studies performed with Tc-99m sulfur colloid or Tc-99m labeled red blood cells showed five cases where there were abnormal findings not related to bleeding. In some cases, the abnormalities were initially confused with bleeding or could obscure an area of bleeding, while in other cases, the abnormalities represented additional clinical information. These included bone marrow replacement related to tumor and radiation therapy, hyperemia related to a uterine leiomyoma and a diverticular abscess, and a dilated abdominal aorta (aneurysm). Recognition of such abnormalities should prevent an erroneous diagnosis and the additional information may be of clinical value

  4. Serendipity in scintigraphic gastrointestinal bleeding studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goergen, T.G.

    1983-09-01

    A retrospective review of 80 scintigraphic bleeding studies performed with Tc-99m sulfur colloid or Tc-99m labeled red blood cells showed five cases where there were abnormal findings not related to bleeding. In some cases, the abnormalities were initially confused with bleeding or could obscure an area of bleeding, while in other cases, the abnormalities represented additional clinical information. These included bone marrow replacement related to tumor and radiation therapy, hyperemia related to a uterine leiomyoma and a diverticular abscess, and a dilated abdominal aorta (aneurysm). Recognition of such abnormalities should prevent an erroneous diagnosis and the additional information may be of clinical value.

  5. Endoscopic variceal ligation-induced ulcer bleeding: What are the risk factors and treatment strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eunae; Jun, Chung Hwan; Cho, Sung Bum; Park, Chang Hwan; Kim, Hyun Soo; Choi, Sung Kyu; Rew, Jong Sun

    2017-06-01

    This study was aimed to determine the risk factors of endoscopic variceal ligation-(EVL) induced ulcer bleeding.The prevalence of EVL-induced ulcer bleeding is reported to be 3.6%. However, there are only limited reports of this serious complication, and the risk factors and the treatment methods are not well established.A total of 430 patients who had undergone EVL in Chonnam National University Hospital from January 2014 to October 2016 were studied. EVL was performed for prophylaxis or acute hemorrhage. The patients were classified into 2 groups: a bleeding group (n = 33) and a non-bleeding group (n = 397). The patients who had endoscopically confirmed EVL-induced ulcer bleeding were included in the bleeding group.EVL-induced ulcer bleeding occurred in 7.7% (n = 33) of the patients. In a multivariate analysis, model for end-stage liver disease (MELD) score >10 (odds ratio [OR]: 3.42, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.10-10.64), concomitant GV F3 (OR: 14.1, 95% CI: 2.84-71.43), and detachment of o-ring bands on follow-up endoscopy (OR: 8.06, 95% CI: 2.55-25.64) were independent predictive factors of EVL-induced ulcer bleeding. Various endoscopic modalities were attempted for hemostasis (EVL in 8 cases [24.2%], endoscopic variceal obturation [EVO] with cyanoacrylate in 6 cases [18.2%], argon plasma coagulation [APC] in 1 case (3%), Sengstaken-Blakemore (SB) tube in 3 cases [9.1%]), and proton pump inhibitor therapy only in 15 cases (45.5%).MELD score >10, concomitant GV F3, and detachment of o-ring bands on follow-up endoscopy are risk factors for EVL-induced ulcer bleeding.

  6. Prediction of bleeding and thrombosis by standard biochemical coagulation variables in haematological intensive care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, L; Madsen, M B; Dahl, M; Kampmann, P; Perner, A

    2018-02-01

    We assessed the value of standard biochemical coagulation parameters in predicting bleeding, thrombosis and mortality in adult Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients with haematological malignancies. We screened all patients with acute leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndrome admitted to a university hospital ICU during 2008-2012. Data were obtained from the clinical chemistry laboratory database and patient files. We graded bleeding according to the World Health Organisation (WHO)-system within 24-h, within 5-days and during the whole ICU stay. We analysed the predictive values of laboratory parameters using multiple logistic regression and receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curves. As we previously have established that platelet count at admission was associated with bleeding, we focused on International Normalised Ratio (INR), activated pro-thrombin time (APTT), anti-thrombin, D-dimer and fibrinogen, and markers of infection (C-reactive protein, pro-calcitonin), kidney function (creatinine) and tissue damage (lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)). We included 116 patients; 66 (57%) had at least one bleeding episode and 11 (9%) patients had at least one thrombotic event. The differences in coagulation values when bleeding compared to baseline values were minor. INR was the only variable we found associated with subsequent bleeding within 24 h from admission to ICU (odds ratio 2.91, 95% CI: 1.01-8.43, P = 0.048). ROC analyses did not show predictive value of any of the other variables with regards to bleeding and none of the variables were associated with thrombosis in adjusted analyses. Increased levels of LDH at admission were associated with increased 7-day and 30-day mortality. Increased INR at admission was associated with a higher rate of bleeding in ICU patients with haematological malignancies. No other biochemical coagulation or other parameter had any association with bleeding, thrombosis or mortality except increased LDH, which at ICU admission was associated

  7. Massive rectal bleeding from colonic diverticulosis | Olokoba ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: This is to describe a case of colonic diverticulosis causing massive rectal bleeding in an elderly Nigerian man. Case report: We highlight a case of a 79 year old man who presented with massive rectal bleeding due to colonic diverticulosis from our centre. Colonoscopy identified multiple diverticula in the ...

  8. Gastrointestinal bleeding following NSAID ingestion in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    presented with GI bleeding following ingestion of NSAID. Two female children ... users of NSAIDs [2]. The risk and the magnitude of. NSAID-induced GI injury in children are uncertain. Here, we report two cases of GI bleeding in children following NSAID use. .... Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug induced gastrointestinal ...

  9. Rectal bleeding in children: endoscopic evaluation revisited

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ridder, Lissy; van Lingen, Anna V.; Taminiau, Jan A. J. M.; Benninga, Marc A.

    2007-01-01

    Objectives Rectal bleeding is an alarming event both for the child and parents. It is hypothesized that colonoscopy instead of sigmoidoscopy and adding esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy in case of accompanying complaints, improves the diagnostic accuracy in children with prolonged rectal bleeding. Study

  10. RESEARCH Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for bleeding varices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Portal hypertension due to intrahepatic disease or extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO) is an important cause of upper gastro- intestinal bleeding in children. About 50% of children with EHPVO present with bleeding from oesophageal varices.1-3 Improvements in the management of children with intrahepatic ...

  11. Duodenal diverticular bleeding: an endoscopic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Valdivielso-Cortázar

    Full Text Available Duodenal diverticula are an uncommon cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Until recently, it was primarily managed with surgery, but advances in the field of endoscopy have made management increasingly less invasive. We report a case of duodenal diverticular bleeding that was endoscopically managed, and review the literature about the various endoscopic therapies thus far described.

  12. Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding (DUB) (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Feelings Expert Answers Q&A Movies & More for Teens Teens site Sitio para adolescentes Body Mind Sexual Health ... English Español Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB) KidsHealth / For Teens / Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB) What's in this article? ...

  13. Massive rectal bleeding from colonic diverticulosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABEOLUGBENGAS

    Objectives: This is to describe a case of colonic diverticulosis causing massive rectal bleeding in an elderly Nigerian man. ... also oozing blood. He was worked up, and had surgery for hemicolectomy due to massive blood loss following failure of initial conservative management. .... bleeding patterns observed in fifty cases.

  14. Giant gastric lipoma presenting as GI bleed: Enucleation or Resection?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Termos

    Full Text Available Introduction: Gastric lipomas are unusual benign lesions and account for less than 1% of all tumours of the stomach and 5% of all gastrointestinal lipomas (Thompson et al.2003; Fernandez et al. 1983 [1,2]. Although predominantly asymptomatic and indolent; they may present with gastric outlet obstruction and upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding owing to size and ulceration. Only a few cases have been reported, presenting large in size with massive GI bleeding (Alcalde Escribano et al. 1989; Johnson et al. 1981 [3,4]. Presentation of case: We report the case of a 62-year-old gentleman who presented to the emergency department with massive upper GI hemorrhage. He was initially resuscitated and stabilized. Later gastroscopy showed a large submucosal tumour (Fig. 1. Biopsy revealed adipose tissue. Computed tomography (CT scan of the abdomen and pelvis showed a huge well defined oval soft tissue lesion measuring about 16 × 8 × 8 cm. The mass noted a homogenous fat density arising from the posterior wall of stomach with no extramural infiltration (Fig. 2. The tumour was completely enucleated through an explorative gastrotomy incision (Fig. 4. Discussion and conclusion: Massive bleeding secondary to a giant gastric lipoma is a rare finding of a rare disease. The majority of cases in the literature result in major gastric resection. Familiarity with its radiological findings and a high index of suspicion can lead to proper diagnosis in the acute setting. If malignancy is carefully ruled out, stomach preserving surgery is an optimal treatment option. Keywords: Case report, Lipoma, Gastric lipoma, G I bleeding, Enucleation, Gastric resection

  15. Pantoprazole for the Treatment of Peptic Ulcer Bleeding and Prevention of Rebleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christo J. Van Rensburg

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adding proton pump inhibitors (PPIs to endoscopic therapy has become the mainstay of treatment for peptic ulcer bleeding, with current consensus guidelines recommending high-dose intravenous (IV PPI therapy (IV bolus followed by continuous therapy. However, whether or not high-dose PPI therapy is more effective than low-dose PPI therapy is still debated. Furthermore, maintaining pH ≥ 4 appears to prevent mucosal bleeding in patients with acute stress ulcers; thus, stress ulcer prophylaxis with acid-suppressing therapy has been increasingly recommended in intensive care units (ICUs. This review evaluates the evidence for the efficacy of IV pantoprazole, a PPI, in preventing ulcer rebleeding after endoscopic hemostasis, and in controlling gastric pH and protecting against upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding in high-risk ICU patients. The review concludes that IV pantoprazole provides an effective option in the treatment of upper GI bleeding, the prevention of rebleeding, and for the prophylaxis of acute bleeding stress ulcers.

  16. Endoscopic management of bleeding peptic ulcers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooqi, J.I.; Farooqi, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Peptic ulcers account for more than half of the cases of non variceal upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and therefore, are the focus of most of the methods of endoscopic hemostasis. Surgical intervention is now largely reserved for patients in whom endoscopic hemostasis has failed. A variety of endoscopic techniques have been employed to stop bleeding and reduce the risk of rebleeding, with no major differences in outcome between these methods. These include injection therapy, fibrin injection, heater probe, mono polar electrocautery, bipolar electrocautery, lasers and mechanical hemo clipping. The most important factor in determining outcome after gastrointestinal bleeding is rebleeding or persistent bleeding. The endoscopic appearance of an ulcer, however, provides the most useful prognostic information for bleeding. Recurrent bleeding after initial endoscopic hemostasis occurs in 15-20% of patients with a bleeding peptic ulcer. The best approach to these patients remains controversial; the current options are repeat endoscopic therapy with the same or a different technique, emergency surgery or semi elective surgery after repeat endoscopic hemostasis. The combination of epinephrine injection with thermal coagulation may be more effective than epinephrine injection alone. Newer modalities such as fibrin injection or the application of hemo clips appear promising and comparative studies are awaited. (author)

  17. THROMBIN GENERATION AND BLEEDING IN HEMOPHILIA A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen E.; Whelihan, Matthew F.; Gissel, Matthew; Mann, Kenneth G.; Rivard, Georges E.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Hemophilia A displays phenotypic heterogeneity with respect to clinical severity. Aim To determine if tissue factor (TF)-initiated thrombin generation profiles in whole blood in the presence of corn trypsin inhibitor (CTI) are predictive of bleeding risk in hemophilia A. Methods We studied factor(F) VIII deficient individuals (11 mild, 4 moderate and 12 severe) with a well-characterized five-year bleeding history that included hemarthrosis, soft tissue hematoma and annual FVIII concentrate usage. This clinical information was used to generate a bleeding score. The bleeding scores (range 0–32) were separated into three groups (bleeding score groupings: 0, 0 and ≤9.6, >9.6), with the higher bleeding tendency having a higher score. Whole blood collected by phlebotomy and contact pathway suppressed by 100μg/mL CTI was stimulated to react by the addition of 5pM TF. Reactions were quenched at 20min by inhibitors. Thrombin generation, determined by ELISA for thrombin – antithrombin was evaluated in terms of clot time (CT), maximum level (MaxL) and maximum rate (MaxR) and compared to the bleeding score. Results Data are shown as the mean±SD. MaxL was significantly different (phemophilia A. PMID:19563500

  18. Arterial Embolization in the Management of Mesenteric Bleeding Secondary to Blunt Abdominal Trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghelfi, Julien, E-mail: JGhelfi@chu-grenoble.fr; Frandon, Julien, E-mail: JFrandon2@chu-grenoble.fr [CHU de Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Radiologie et Imagerie Médicale (France); Barbois, Sandrine, E-mail: SBarbois@chu-grenoble.fr [CHU de Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Chirurgie Digestive et d’Urgences (France); Vendrell, Anne, E-mail: AVendrell@chu-grenoble.fr; Rodiere, Mathieu, E-mail: MRodiere@chu-grenoble.fr; Sengel, Christian, E-mail: CSengel@chu-grenoble.fr; Bricault, Ivan, E-mail: IBricault@chu-grenoble.fr [CHU de Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Radiologie et Imagerie Médicale (France); Arvieux, Catherine, E-mail: CArvieux@chu-grenoble.fr [CHU de Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Chirurgie Digestive et d’Urgences (France); Ferretti, Gilbert, E-mail: GFerretti@chu-grenoble.fr; Thony, Frédéric, E-mail: FThony@chu-grenoble.fr [CHU de Grenoble, Clinique Universitaire de Radiologie et Imagerie Médicale (France)

    2016-05-15

    IntroductionMesenteric bleeding is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication of blunt abdominal trauma. It can induce active hemorrhage and a compressive hematoma leading to bowel ischemia. Emergency laparotomy remains the gold standard treatment. We aimed to study the effectiveness and complications of embolization in patients with post-traumatic mesenteric bleeding.Materials and MethodsThe medical records of 7 consecutive patients with active mesenteric bleeding treated by embolization in a level-one trauma center from 2007 to 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients presented with active mesenteric bleeding on CT scans without major signs of intestinal ischemia. We focused on technical success, clinical success, and the complications of embolization.ResultsSix endovascular procedures were successful in controlling hemorrhage but 1 patient had surgery to stop associated arterial and venous bleeding. One patient suffered from bowel ischemia, a major complication of embolization, which was confirmed by surgery. No acute renal failure was noted after angiography. For 1 patient we performed combined management as the endovascular approach allowed an easier surgical exploration.ConclusionIn mesenteric trauma with active bleeding, embolization is a valuable alternative to surgery and should be considered, taking into account the risk of bowel ischemia.

  19. Risks of bleeding and thrombosis in intensive care unit patients with haematological malignancies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russell, Lene; Holst, Lars Broksø; Kjeldsen, Lars

    2017-01-01

    products and risk factors for bleeding in an adult population of ICU patients with haematological malignancies. METHODS: We screened all patients with acute leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndrome admitted to a university hospital ICU during 2008-2012. Bleeding in ICU was scored according to the WHO grading...... lower and upper airways and upper GI tract. Thirty-nine (59%) of the 66 patients had severe or debilitating (WHO grade 3 or 4) bleeding. The median platelet count on the day of grade 3 or 4 bleeding was 23 × 109 per litre (IQR 13-39). Nine patients (8%) died in ICU following a bleeding episode; five...... was the cause of death in four patients. The median platelet count was 20 × 109 per litre (15-48) at the time of thrombosis. The patients received a median of 6 units of red blood cells, 1 unit of fresh frozen plasma and 8 units of platelet concentrates in ICU. CONCLUSIONS: Severe and debilitating bleeding...

  20. Endoscopic findings of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with liver cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hadayat, R.; Rehman, A.U.; Gandapur, A.

    2015-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a common medical emergency. A common risk factor of upper GI bleeding is cirrhosis of liver, which can lead to variceal haemorrhage. 30-40% of cirrhotic patients who bleed may have non-variceal upper GI bleeding and it is frequently caused by peptic ulcers, portal gastropathy, Mallory-Weiss tear, and gastro-duodenal erosions. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of upper gastrointestinal endoscopic findings among patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding with liver cirrhosis. Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was carried out in Gastroenterology and Hepatology Department of Ayub Teaching Hospital, Abbottabad from February 2012 to June 2013. 252 patients diagnosed with cirrhosis, presenting with upper GI bleed, age ?50 years of either gender, and were included in the study. Non-probability consecutive sampling was used. Endoscopy was performed on each patient and the findings documented. Results: The mean age was 57.84 ± 6.29 years. There were 158 (62.7%) males and 94 (37.3%) females. The most common endoscopic finding was oesophageal varices (92.9%, n=234) followed by portal hypertensive gastropathy (38.9%, n=98) with almost equal distribution among males and females. Gastric varices were found in 33.3% of patients (n=84). Among other non-variceal lesions, peptic ulcer disease was seen in 26 patients (10.3%) while gastric erosions were found in 8 patients (3.2%). Conclusion: In patients with acute upper GI bleeding and liver cirrhosis, the most common endoscopic finding is oesophageal varices, with a substantially higher value in our part of the country, apart from other non-variceal causes. (author)

  1. Mortality from nonulcer bleeding is similar to that of ulcer bleeding in high-risk patients with nonvariceal hemorrhage: a prospective database study in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmo, Riccardo; Del Piano, Mario; Rotondano, Gianluca; Koch, Maurizio; Bianco, Maria Antonia; Zambelli, Alessandro; Di Matteo, Giovanni; Grossi, Enzo; Cipolletta, Livio; Prometeo Investigators

    2012-02-01

    Nonulcer causes of bleeding are often regarded as minor, ie, associated with a lower risk of mortality. To assess the risk of death from nonulcer causes of upper GI bleeding (UGIB). Secondary analysis of prospectively collected data from 3 national databases. Community and teaching hospitals. Consecutive patients admitted for acute nonvariceal UGIB. Early endoscopy, medical and endoscopic treatment as appropriate. Thirty-day mortality, recurrent bleeding, and need for surgery. A total of 3207 patients (65.8% male), mean (standard deviation) age 68.3 (16.4) years, were analyzed. Overall mortality was 4.45% (143 patients). According to the source of bleeding, mortality was 9.8% for neoplasia, 4.8% for Mallory-Weiss tears, 4.8% for vascular lesions, 4.4% for gastroduodenal erosions, 4.4% for duodenal ulcer, and 3.1% for gastric ulcer. Frequency of death was not different among benign endoscopic diagnoses (overall P = .567). Risk of death was significantly higher in patients with neoplasia compared with benign conditions (odds ratio 2.50; 95% CI, 1.32-4.46; P Society of Anesthesiologists score (1-2 vs 3-4, P Society of Anesthesiologists class score in the Prometeo study. Nonulcer causes of nonvariceal UGIB have a risk of death, similar to bleeding peptic ulcers in the clinical context of a high-risk patient. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahoo, Eric E; Ross, Christopher W

    2014-11-25

    A compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system for a turbine engine for directing cooling fluids from a compressor to a turbine airfoil cooling system to supply cooling fluids to one or more airfoils of a rotor assembly is disclosed. The compressor bleed cooling fluid feed system may enable cooling fluids to be exhausted from a compressor exhaust plenum through a downstream compressor bleed collection chamber and into the turbine airfoil cooling system. As such, the suction created in the compressor exhaust plenum mitigates boundary layer growth along the inner surface while providing flow of cooling fluids to the turbine airfoils.

  3. Peptic ulcer bleeding: is Helicobacter pylori a risk factor in an endemic area?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotoudehmanesh, Rasoul; Asgari, Ali Ali; Fakheri, Hafez Tirgar; Nouraie, Mehdi; Khatibian, Morteza; Shirazian, Nahid

    2005-01-01

    A high prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection has been reported in Iran. Although the importance of H. pylori in the induction of peptic ulcer disease is clearly defined, only few studies have addressed its role in bleeding from peptic ulcers. We evaluated the role of H. pylori in peptic ulcer bleeding. Patients with acute peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) and those with peptic ulcer disease without bleeding ('controls') were enrolled. Upper GI endoscopy and rapid urease test were performed in both groups. Histological study for detection of H. pylori was performed in patients with active bleeding, if RUT was negative. Other variables evaluated included sex, age, smoking, previous history of bleeding, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs use, ulcer size, ulcer location, and duration of acid-peptic disease. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent risk factors. 161 patients with PUB and 287 control patients were enrolled. H. pylori infection was seen more frequently in patients with duodenal ulcer than gastric ulcer (88.9% vs. 60.5%, pulcer located in the stomach and not in the duodenum, and more often had large ulcer (>1 cm). Logistic regression analysis showed that H. pylori infection was protective in PUB after controlling for confounders (OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.21-0.79), when ulcer location was not entered in the model. A second model including ulcer location (to test for a residual effect) showed that H. pylori infection was not a significant risk factor in PUB (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.30-1.24). H. pylori may not be an independent factor in bleeding from peptic ulcers. The lower frequency of this infection in these patients can be described by the higher frequency of bleeding from gastric ulcers, which are less H. pylori related compared with duodenal ulcer.

  4. Recombinant factor VIIa for variceal bleeding in patients with advanced cirrhosis: A randomized, controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosch, Jaime; Thabut, Dominique; Albillos, Agustín

    2008-01-01

    A beneficial effect of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in Child-Pugh class B and C patients with cirrhosis who have variceal bleeding has been suggested. This randomized controlled trial assessed the efficacy and safety of rFVIIa in patients with advanced cirrhosis and active variceal...... events, were comparable between groups. CONCLUSION: Treatment with rFVIIa had no significant effect on the primary composite endpoint compared with placebo. Therefore, decision on the use of this hemostatic agent in acute variceal bleeding should be carefully considered, because results of this study do...

  5. Abnormal uterine bleeding in women receiving direct oral anticoagulants for the treatment of venous thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godin, Richard; Marcoux, Violaine; Tagalakis, Vicky

    2017-08-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) is a common complication of anticoagulant therapy in premenopausal women affected with acute venous thromboembolism. AUB impacts quality of life, and can lead to premature cessation of anticoagulation. There is increasing data to suggest that the direct oral anticoagulants when used for the treatment of venous thromboembolism differ in their menstrual bleeding profile. This article aims to review the existing literature regarding the association between AUB and the direct oral anticoagulants and make practical recommendations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. AL Amyloidosis Complicated by Persistent Oral Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Antonio Liarte Marconcini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of amyloid light chain (AL amyloidosis is presented here with uncontrolled bleeding after a nonsurgical dental procedure, most likely multifactorial in nature, and consequently treated with a multidisciplinary approach.

  7. Gastrointestinal Bleeding: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... peptic ulcers , tears or inflammation in the esophagus, diverticulosis and diverticulitis , ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease , colonic ... PubMed (National Library of Medicine) Article: Small intestinal diverticulum with bleeding: Case report and literature review. Article: ...

  8. Fibrinogen concentrate for bleeding - a systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lunde, J; Stensballe, J; Wikkelsø, A

    2014-01-01

    included a control group. Three out of 11 found a reduction in transfusion requirements while mortality was reduced in two and bleeding in one. In the available RCTs, which all have substantial shortcomings, we found a significant reduction in bleeding and transfusions requirements. However, data......Fibrinogen concentrate as part of treatment protocols increasingly draws attention. Fibrinogen substitution in cases of hypofibrinogenaemia has the potential to reduce bleeding, transfusion requirement and subsequently reduce morbidity and mortality. A systematic search for randomised controlled...... determined to be of high risk of bias and none reported a significant effect on mortality. Two RCTs found a significant reduction in bleeding and five RCTs found a significant reduction in transfusion requirements. The 23 non-randomised studies included a total of 2825 patients, but only 11 of 23 studies...

  9. CLSM bleed water reduction test results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.A.; Rajendran, N.

    1997-01-01

    Previous testing by BSRI/SRTC/Raytheon indicated that the CLSM specified for the Tank 20 closure generates about 6 gallons (23 liters) of bleed water per cubic yard of material (0.76 m3).1 This amount to about 10 percent of the total mixing water. HLWE requested that the CLSM mix be optimized to reduce bleed water while maintaining flow. Elimination of bleed water from the CLSM mix specified for High-Level Waste Tank Closure will result in waste minimization, time savings and cost savings. Over thirty mixes were formulated and evaluated at the on-site Raytheon Test Laboratory. Improved low bleed water CLSM mixes were identified. Results are documented in this report

  10. Management of patients with ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laine, Loren; Jensen, Dennis M

    2012-03-01

    This guideline presents recommendations for the step-wise management of patients with overt upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Hemodynamic status is first assessed, and resuscitation initiated as needed. Patients are risk-stratified based on features such as hemodynamic status, comorbidities, age, and laboratory tests. Pre-endoscopic erythromycin is considered to increase diagnostic yield at first endoscopy. Pre-endoscopic proton pump inhibitor (PPI) may be considered to decrease the need for endoscopic therapy but does not improve clinical outcomes. Upper endoscopy is generally performed within 24h. The endoscopic features of ulcers direct further management. Patients with active bleeding or non-bleeding visible vessels receive endoscopic therapy (e.g., bipolar electrocoagulation, heater probe, sclerosant, clips) and those with an adherent clot may receive endoscopic therapy; these patients then receive intravenous PPI with a bolus followed by continuous infusion. Patients with flat spots or clean-based ulcers do not require endoscopic therapy or intensive PPI therapy. Recurrent bleeding after endoscopic therapy is treated with a second endoscopic treatment; if bleeding persists or recurs, treatment with surgery or interventional radiology is undertaken. Prevention of recurrent bleeding is based on the etiology of the bleeding ulcer. H. pylori is eradicated and after cure is documented anti-ulcer therapy is generally not given. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are stopped; if they must be resumed low-dose COX-2-selective NSAID plus PPI is used. Patients with established cardiovascular disease who require aspirin should start PPI and generally re-institute aspirin soon after bleeding ceases (within 7 days and ideally 1-3 days). Patients with idiopathic ulcers receive long-term anti-ulcer therapy.

  11. Engine bleed air reduction in DC-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, W. H.; Viele, M. R.

    1980-01-01

    An 0.8 percent fuel savings was achieved by a reduction in engine bleed air through the use of cabin air recirculation. The recirculation system was evaluated in revenue service on a DC-10. The cabin remained comfortable with reductions in cabin fresh air (engine bleed air) as much as 50 percent. Flight test verified the predicted fuel saving of 0.8 percent.

  12. Helping mothers survive bleeding after birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelissen, Ellen; Ersdal, Hege; Ostergaard, Doris

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate "Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth" (HMS BAB) simulation-based training in a low-resource setting. DESIGN: Educational intervention study. SETTING: Rural referral hospital in Northern Tanzania. POPULATION: Clinicians, nurse-midwives, medical attendants, and ambul......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate "Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth" (HMS BAB) simulation-based training in a low-resource setting. DESIGN: Educational intervention study. SETTING: Rural referral hospital in Northern Tanzania. POPULATION: Clinicians, nurse-midwives, medical attendants...

  13. Transcatheter emboilization therapy of massive colonic bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, G. H.; Oh, J. H.; Yoon, Y.

    1996-01-01

    To evaulate the efficacy and safety of emergent superselective transcatheter embolization for controlling massive colonic bleeding. Six of the seven patients who had symptom of massive gastrointestinal bleeding underwent emergent transcatheter embolization for control of the bleeding. Gastrointestinal bleeding in these patients was originated from various colonic diseases: rectal cancer(n=1), proctitis(n=1), benign ulcer(n=1), mucosal injury by ventriculoperitoneal shunt(n=1), and unknown(n=2). All patients except one with rectal cancer were critically ill. Superselective embolization were done by using Gelfoam particles and/or coils. The vessels embolized were ileocolic artery(n=1). superior rectal artery(n=2), inferior rectal artery (n=1), and middle and inferior rectal arteries(n=1). Hemostasis was successful immediately in all patients. Two underwnet surgery due to recurrent bleeding developed 3 days after the procedure(n=1) or in associalion with underlying rectal cancer(n=1). On surgical specimen of two cases, there was no mucosal ischemic change. Transcatheter embolization is a safe and effective treatment of method for the control of massive colonic bleeding

  14. [Hysteroscopic polypectomy, treatment of abnormal uterine bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Los Rios, P José F; López, R Claudia; Cifuentes, P Carolina; Angulo, C Mónica; Palacios-Barahona, Arlex U

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the hysteroscopic polypectomy in terms of the decrease of the abnormal uterine bleeding. A cross-sectional and analytical study was done with patients to whom a hysteroscopic polypectomy was done for treating the abnormal uterine bleeding, between January 2009 and December 2013. The response to the treatment was evaluated via a survey given to the patients about the behavior of the abnormal uterine bleeding after the procedure and about overall satisfaction. The results were obtained after a hysteroscopic polypectomy done to 128 patients and were as follows. The average time from the polypectomy applied until the survey was 30.5 months, with a standard deviation of 18 months. 67.2% of the patients reported decreased abnormal uterine bleeding and the 32.8% reported a persistence of symptoms. On average 82.8% of the. patients were satisfied with the treatment. Bivariate and multivariate analysis showed no association between the variables studied and no improvement of abnormal uterine bleeding after surgery (polypectomy). There were no complications. Hysteroscopic polypectomy is a safe surgical treatment, which decreases on two of three patients the abnormal uterine bleeding in the presence of endometrial polyps, with an acceptable level of satisfaction.

  15. Bleeding and starving: fasting and delayed refeeding after upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Jorge; Meira, Tânia; Nunes, Ana; Santos, Carla Adriana

    2014-01-01

    Early refeeding after nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding is safe and reduces hospital stay/costs. The aim of this study was obtaining objective data on refeeding after nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. From 1 year span records of nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding patients that underwent urgent endoscopy: clinical features; rockall score; endoscopic data, including severity of lesions and therapy; feeding related records of seven days: liquid diet prescription, first liquid intake, soft/solid diet prescription, first soft/solid intake. From 133 patients (84 men) Rockall classification was possible in 126: 76 score ≥5, 50 score gastrointestinal bleeding patients must be refed earlier, according to guidelines.

  16. Antifibrinolytics for heavy menstrual bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant-Smith, Alison C; Lethaby, Anne; Farquhar, Cindy; Hickey, Martha

    2018-04-15

    Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) is an important physical and social problem for women. Oral treatment for HMB includes antifibrinolytic drugs, which are designed to reduce bleeding by inhibiting clot-dissolving enzymes in the endometrium.Historically, there has been some concern that using the antifibrinolytic tranexamic acid (TXA) for HMB may increase the risk of venous thromboembolic disease. This is an umbrella term for deep venous thrombosis (blood clots in the blood vessels in the legs) and pulmonary emboli (blood clots in the blood vessels in the lungs). To determine the effectiveness and safety of antifibrinolytic medications as a treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding. We searched the Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility (CGF) Group trials register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO and two trials registers in November 2017, together with reference checking and contact with study authors and experts in the field. We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing antifibrinolytic agents versus placebo, no treatment or other medical treatment in women of reproductive age with HMB. Twelve studies utilised TXA and one utilised a prodrug of TXA (Kabi). We used standard methodological procedures expected by Cochrane. The primary review outcomes were menstrual blood loss (MBL), improvement in HMB, and thromboembolic events. We included 13 RCTs (1312 participants analysed). The evidence was very low to moderate quality: the main limitations were risk of bias (associated with lack of blinding, and poor reporting of study methods), imprecision and inconsistency.Antifibrinolytics (TXA or Kabi) versus no treatment or placeboWhen compared with a placebo, antifibrinolytics were associated with reduced mean blood loss (MD -53.20 mL per cycle, 95% CI -62.70 to -43.70; I² = 8%; 4 RCTs, participants = 565; moderate-quality evidence) and higher rates of improvement (RR 3.34, 95% CI 1.84 to 6.09; 3 RCTS, participants = 271; moderate-quality evidence). This suggests that

  17. Management of Acute Gastric Ulcer Bleeding | van Rensburg | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Gastroenterology Review. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 10, No 1 (2012) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  18. Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Pattern of presentation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: This study was carried out at the Medical Unit of the University College Hospital, Ibadan. Consecutive patients with any or all of haematemesis, melaena or haematochezia were recruited for the study. Demographic data, clinical presentation, history of NSAIDs ingestion, presence of other comorbid conditions were ...

  19. Esophageal variceal ligation for hemostasis of acute variceal bleeding

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Endoscopic variceal ligation is widely accepted as the optimum endoscopic treatment for esophageal variceal hemorrhage. In Morocco, there are no data regarding the efficacy of this technique. Our aim was to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of endoscopic variceal ligation in the management of ...

  20. A rare cause of anemia due to upper gastrointestinal bleeding: Cameron lesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismet Özaydın

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Asymptomatic large hiatal hernias may lead to iron deficiency anemia due to occult and massive bleeding from linear gastric erosions or ulcers on the mucosal folds at the level of the diaphragm called the Cameron lesions. The diagnosis is usually made during upper gastrointestinal system endoscopies. Current therapy includes the medication with proton pump inhibitors in combination with oral iron supplements and in some cases surgical reconstruction of hiatal hernia with fundoplication. We present a case of a 78-year-old woman who was admitted to the outpatient clinic with the diagnosis of iron deficiency anemia without signs of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. She was treated with medication and her follow-up gastroscopy showed a total cure. She is asymptomatic for two years after treatment with proton pump inhibitors and iron supplements. Cameron lesions should be kept in mind as an unusual cause of iron deficiency anemia due to gastrointestinal bleeding

  1. Prediction of bleeding and thrombosis by standard biochemical coagulation variables in haematological intensive care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Russell, L.; Madsen, M. B.; Dahl, M.

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: We assessed the value of standard biochemical coagulation parameters in predicting bleeding, thrombosis and mortality in adult Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients with haematological malignancies. Methods: We screened all patients with acute leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndrome admitted...... to a university hospital ICU during 2008-2012. Data were obtained from the clinical chemistry laboratory database and patient files. We graded bleeding according to the World Health Organisation (WHO)-system within 24-h, within 5-days and during the whole ICU stay. We analysed the predictive values of laboratory...... parameters using multiple logistic regression and receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curves. As we previously have established that platelet count at admission was associated with bleeding, we focused on International Normalised Ratio (INR), activated pro-thrombin time (APTT), anti-thrombin, D...

  2. Predicting major bleeding in patients with noncardioembolic stroke on antiplatelets: S2TOP-BLEED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilkens, Nina A; Algra, Ale; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Reitsma, Johannes B; Bath, Philip M; Csiba, Laszlo; Hacke, Werner; Kappelle, L Jaap; Koudstaal, Peter J; Leys, Didier; Mas, Jean-Louis; Sacco, Ralph L; Amarenco, Pierre; Sissani, Leila; Greving, Jacoba P

    2017-08-29

    To develop and externally validate a prediction model for major bleeding in patients with a TIA or ischemic stroke on antiplatelet agents. We combined individual patient data from 6 randomized clinical trials (CAPRIE, ESPS-2, MATCH, CHARISMA, ESPRIT, and PRoFESS) investigating antiplatelet therapy after TIA or ischemic stroke. Cox regression analyses stratified by trial were performed to study the association between predictors and major bleeding. A risk prediction model was derived and validated in the PERFORM trial. Performance was assessed with the c statistic and calibration plots. Major bleeding occurred in 1,530 of the 43,112 patients during 94,833 person-years of follow-up. The observed 3-year risk of major bleeding was 4.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 4.4%-4.9%). Predictors were male sex, smoking, type of antiplatelet agents (aspirin-clopidogrel), outcome on modified Rankin Scale ≥3, prior stroke, high blood pressure, lower body mass index, elderly, Asian ethnicity, and diabetes (S 2 TOP-BLEED). The S 2 TOP-BLEED score had a c statistic of 0.63 (95% CI 0.60-0.64) and showed good calibration in the development data. Major bleeding risk ranged from 2% in patients aged 45-54 years without additional risk factors to more than 10% in patients aged 75-84 years with multiple risk factors. In external validation, the model had a c statistic of 0.61 (95% CI 0.59-0.63) and slightly underestimated major bleeding risk. The S 2 TOP-BLEED score can be used to estimate 3-year major bleeding risk in patients with a TIA or ischemic stroke who use antiplatelet agents, based on readily available characteristics. The discriminatory performance may be improved by identifying stronger predictors of major bleeding. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  3. Interventions for treating post-extraction bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumbargere Nagraj, Sumanth; Prashanti, Eachempati; Aggarwal, Himanshi; Lingappa, Ashok; Muthu, Murugan S; Kiran Kumar Krishanappa, Salian; Hassan, Haszelini

    2018-03-04

    Post-extraction bleeding (PEB) is a recognised, frequently encountered complication in dental practice, which is defined as bleeding that continues beyond 8 to 12 hours after dental extraction. The incidence of post-extraction bleeding varies from 0% to 26%. If post-extraction bleeding is not managed, complications can range from soft tissue haematomas to severe blood loss. Local causes of bleeding include soft tissue and bone bleeding. Systemic causes include platelet problems, coagulation disorders or excessive fibrinolysis, and inherited or acquired problems (medication induced). There is a wide array of techniques suggested for the treatment of post-extraction bleeding, which include interventions aimed at both local and systemic causes. This is an update of a review published in June 2016. To assess the effects of interventions for treating different types of post-extraction bleeding. Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 24 January 2018), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2017, Issue 12), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 24 January 2018), Embase Ovid (1 May 2015 to 24 January 2018) and CINAHL EBSCO (1937 to 24 January 2018). The US National Institutes of Health Trials Registry (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform were searched for ongoing trials. We searched the reference lists of relevant systematic reviews. We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that evaluated any intervention for treating PEB, with male or female participants of any age, regardless of type of teeth (anterior or posterior, mandibular or maxillary). Trials could compare one type of intervention with another, with placebo, or with no treatment. Three pairs of review authors independently screened search records. We obtained full papers for potentially relevant trials. If data had been extracted

  4. Secondary electric power generation with minimum engine bleed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagge, G. E.

    1983-01-01

    Secondary electric power generation with minimum engine bleed is discussed. Present and future jet engine systems are compared. The role of auxiliary power units is evaluated. Details of secondary electric power generation systems with and without auxiliary power units are given. Advanced bleed systems are compared with minimum bleed systems. A cost model of ownership is given. The difference in the cost of ownership between a minimum bleed system and an advanced bleed system is given.

  5. Pantoprazole before Endoscopy in Patients with Gastroduodenal Ulcer Bleeding: Does the duration of Infusion and Ulcer Location Influence the Effects?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan Rácz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of preemptive pantoprazole infusion on early endoscopic findings in patients with acute ulcer bleeding. Records of 333 patients admitted with acute ulcer bleeding were analyzed. Ulcer bleeders were given either 80 mg bolus of pantoprazole followed by continuous infusion of 8 mg per hour or saline infusion until endoscopy. In 93 patients saline infusion whereas in 240 patients bolus plus infusion of pantoprazole was administrated with mean (±SD durations of 5.45±12.9 hours and 6.9±13.2 hours, respectively (P=0.29. Actively bleeding ulcers were detected in 46/240 (19.2% of cases in the pantoprazole group as compared with 23/93 (24.7% in the saline infusion group (P=0.26. Different durations of pantoprazole infusion (0–4 hours, >4 hours, and >6 hours had no significant effect on endoscopic and clinical outcome parameters in duodenal ulcer bleeders. Gastric ulcer bleeders on pantoprazole infusion longer than 4 and 6 hours before endoscopy had actively bleeding ulcers in 4.3% and 5% compared to the 19.5% active bleeding rate in the saline group (P=0.02 and P=0.04. Preemptive infusion of high-dose pantoprazole longer than 4 hours before endoscopy decreased the ratio of active bleeding only in gastric but not in duodenal ulcer patients.

  6. Reliability measures in managing GI bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenberg, Amnon

    2012-06-01

    Multiple procedures and devices are used in a complex interplay to diagnose and treat GI bleeding. To model how a large variety of diagnostic and therapeutic components interact in the successful management of GI bleeding. The analysis uses the concept of reliability block diagrams from probability theory to model management outcome. Separate components of the management process are arranged in a serial or parallel fashion. If the outcome depends on the function of each component individually, such components are modeled to be arranged in series. If components complement each other and can mutually compensate for each of their failures, such components are arranged in a parallel fashion. General endoscopy practice. Patients with GI bleeding of unknown etiology. All available endoscopic and radiographic means to diagnose and treat GI bleeding. Process reliability in achieving hemostasis. Serial arrangements tend to reduce process reliability, whereas parallel arrangements increase it. Whenever possible, serial components should be bridged and complemented by additional alternative (parallel) routes of operation. Parallel components with low individual reliability can still contribute to overall process reliability as long as they function independently of other pre-existing alternatives. Probability of success associated with individual components is partly unknown. Modeling management of GI bleeding by a reliability block diagram provides a useful tool in assessing the impact of individual endoscopic techniques and administrative structures on the overall outcome. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Update on non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanas, Ángel

    2013-10-01

    This article summarizes the main studies in the field of non-variceal gastrointestinal bleeding reported in the last American Congress of Gastroenterology (Digestive Disease Week) in 2013. Some of these studies have provided new knowledge and expertise in areas of uncertainty. In this context and among other findings, it has been reported that the administration of a proton pump inhibitor (PPI) prior to endoscopy or the early performance of endoscopy-within 6 hours of admission in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) (or colonoscopy within 24 hours in patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding)-does not improve the prognosis of the event. It has also been reported that oral administration of a PPI after endoscopic hemostasis may produce a similar outcome to that of intravenously administered PPI in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB). In the field of endoscopic therapy, the use of radiofrequency ablation for antral vascular ectasia is of interest. Regarding UGIB and nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), new data confirm the risk of cardiovascular events by stopping treatment with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) after an episode of UGIB, the increased risk of UGIB when associating gastrotoxic drugs, and the need to identify both the gastrointestinal and cardiovascular risks of each NSAID and coxib when prescribing these agents. Finally, there is evidence that both environmental and genetic factors are involved in individual susceptibility to gastrointestinal bleeding. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  8. Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Gastrointestinal Bleeding: A Case-Control Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal, Alfonso; Ortega, Sara; Del Olmo, Lourdes; Vidal, Xavier; Aguirre, Carmelo; Ruiz, Borja; Conforti, Anita; Leone, Roberto; López-Vázquez, Paula; Figueiras, Adolfo; Ibáñez, Luisa

    2011-01-01

    Background Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) have been associated with upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Given their worldwide use, even small risks account for a large number of cases. This study has been conducted with carefully collected information to further investigate the relationship between SSRIs and upper GI bleeding. Methods We conducted a case-control study in hospitals in Spain and in Italy. Cases were patients aged ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of acute upper GI bleeding diagnosed by endoscopy; three controls were matched by sex, age, date of admission (within 3 months) and hospital among patients who were admitted for elective surgery for non-painful disorders. Exposures to SSRIs, other antidepressants and other drugs were defined as any use of these drugs in the 7 days before the day on which upper gastrointestinal bleeding started (index day). Results 581 cases of upper GI bleeding and 1358 controls were considered eligible for the study; no differences in age or sex distribution were observed between cases and controls after matching. Overall, 4.0% of the cases and 3.3% of controls used an SSRI antidepressant in the week before the index day. No significant risk of upper GI bleeding was encountered for SSRI antidepressants (adjusted odds ratio, 1.06, 95% CI, 0.57–1.96) or for whichever other grouping of antidepressants. Conclusions The results of this case-control study showed no significant increase in upper GI bleeding with SSRIs and provide good evidence that the magnitude of any increase in risk is not greater than 2. PMID:21625637

  9. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and gastrointestinal bleeding: a case-control study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Carvajal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs have been associated with upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding. Given their worldwide use, even small risks account for a large number of cases. This study has been conducted with carefully collected information to further investigate the relationship between SSRIs and upper GI bleeding. METHODS: We conducted a case-control study in hospitals in Spain and in Italy. Cases were patients aged ≥18 years with a primary diagnosis of acute upper GI bleeding diagnosed by endoscopy; three controls were matched by sex, age, date of admission (within 3 months and hospital among patients who were admitted for elective surgery for non-painful disorders. Exposures to SSRIs, other antidepressants and other drugs were defined as any use of these drugs in the 7 days before the day on which upper gastrointestinal bleeding started (index day. RESULTS: 581 cases of upper GI bleeding and 1358 controls were considered eligible for the study; no differences in age or sex distribution were observed between cases and controls after matching. Overall, 4.0% of the cases and 3.3% of controls used an SSRI antidepressant in the week before the index day. No significant risk of upper GI bleeding was encountered for SSRI antidepressants (adjusted odds ratio, 1.06, 95% CI, 0.57-1.96 or for whichever other grouping of antidepressants. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this case-control study showed no significant increase in upper GI bleeding with SSRIs and provide good evidence that the magnitude of any increase in risk is not greater than 2.

  10. Octreotide in the Control of Post-Sclerotherapy Bleeding from Oesophageal Varices, Ulcers and Oesophagitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spencer A. Jenkins

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding from oesophageal varices, oesophageal ulcers or oesophagitis is occasionally massive and difficult to control. Octreotide, a synthetic analogue of somatostin lowers portal pressure and collateral blood flow including that through varices, increases lower oesophageal sphincter pressure, and inhibits the gastric secretion of acid as well as pepsin. Our current experience suggests it is effective in controlling acute variceal haemorrhage. Therefore we have examined the efficacy of octreotide in the control of postsclerotherapy bleeding from oesophageal varices, oesophageal ulcers and oesophagitis. During the study period 77 patients experienced a significant gastrointestinal bleed (blood pressure 100 beats per min or the need to transfuse 2 or more units of blood to restore the haemoglobin level following injection sclerotherapy of oesophageal varices. The source of bleeding was varices in 42 patients, oesophageal ulcers in 31 and oesophagitis in 4. All patients received a continuous intravenous infusion of octreotide (50 μg/h for between 40–140h. If bleeding was not controlled in the first 12h after commencing octreotide hourly bolus doses (50 μg for 24h were superimposed on the continuous infusion. Haemorrhage was successfully controlled by an infusion of octreotide in 38 of the 42 patients with bleeding from varices, in 30 of 31 patients with oesophageal ulceration, and all patients with oesophagitis. In the 1 patient with persistent bleeding from oesophageal ulceration and in 2 of the 4 with continued haemorrhage from varices, haemostasis was achieved by hourly boluses of 50 μg octreotide for 24h in addition to the continuous infusion. No major complications were associated with octreotide administration. The results of this study clearly indicate that octreotide is a safe and effective treatment for the control of severe haemorrhage after technically successful injection sclerotherapy.

  11. Analysis of Risk Factors for Colonic Diverticular Bleeding: A Matched Case-Control Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Yuusaku; Kudo, Shin-ei; Miyachi, Hideyuki; Misawa, Masashi; Okoshi, Shogo; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2016-03-01

    Diverticular bleeding can occasionally cause massive bleeding that requires urgent colonoscopy (CS) and treatment. The aim of this study was to identify significant risk factors for colonic diverticular hemorrhage. Between January 2009 and December 2012, 26,602 patients underwent CS at our institution. One hundred twenty-three patients underwent an urgent CS due to acute lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage. Seventy-two patients were diagnosed with colonic diverticular hemorrhage. One hundred forty-nine age- and sex-matched controls were selected from the patients with nonbleeding diverticula who underwent CS during the same period. The relationship of risk factors to diverticular bleeding was compared between the cases and controls. Uni- and multivariate conditional logistic regression analyses demonstrated that the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (odds ratio [OR], 14.70; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.89 to 55.80; pdisease (OR, 8.66; 95% CI, 2.33 to 32.10; p=0.00126), and hyperuricemia (OR, 15.5; 95% CI, 1.74 to 138.00; p=0.014) remained statistically significant predictors of diverticular bleeding. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, cerebrovascular disease and hyperuricemia were significant risks for colonic diverticular hemorrhage. The knowledge obtained from this study may provide some insight into the diagnostic process for patients with lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

  12. More favorable outcomes with peptic ulcer bleeding due to Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chason, Rebecca D; Reisch, Joan S; Rockey, Don C

    2013-09-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common complication of peptic ulcer disease, often caused by Helicobacter pylori and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the cause and biologic behavior of ulcers associated with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding might lead to divergent patient outcomes. In this Institutional Review Board-approved study, we compared clinical features and outcomes of patients with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding due to ulcers categorized into 4 groups: Helicobacter pylori positive or negative combined with NSAID usage positive or negative. Likelihood chi-squared analyses were utilized for group comparisons and stepwise multiple logistic regression models were utilized to determine which factors were related to bleeding outcomes. Of 2242 patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding, 575 (26%) had gastroduodenal ulcer disease, and of those with appropriate diagnostic testing, approximately half (228, 10% overall) had evidence of Helicobacter pylori infection and half (216, 10% overall) had no evidence of Helicobacter pylori infection. Patients without Helicobacter pylori infection had significantly more comorbid conditions than those with Helicobacter pylori and higher Charlson Index comorbidity scores (2.6 ± 2.6 [mean and SD] vs 1.9 ± 2.3, P = .003). Hospital length of stay was significantly longer for Helicobacter pylori-negative patients (mean 11.4 ± 21.7 vs 6 ± 8.5 days and median 5.5 vs 3 days, P Helicobacter pylori-negative patients than Helicobacter pylori-positive patients (11% vs 5%, P = .009). Rebleeding was most frequent in patients without Helicobacter pylori and with no reported use of NSAIDS (18%, P = .01). Helicobacter pylori-negative ulcers were associated with poorer outcomes regardless of use of NSAIDs. Patients with ulcers negative for Helicobacter pylori and no history of NSAID use had the worst outcomes and had more severe systemic disease

  13. Outcome of the Pediatric Patients with Portal Cavernoma: The Retrospective Study for 10 Years Focusing on Recurrent Variceal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongjie Guo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Portal cavernoma (PC is the most critical condition with risk or variceal hemorrhage in pediatric patients. We retrospectively investigated the patients with PC focusing on the predictors for recurrent variceal bleeding. Methods. Between July 2003 and June 2013, we retrospectively enrolled all consecutive patients admitted to our department with a diagnosis of PC without abdominal malignancy or liver cirrhosis. The primary endpoint of this observational study was recurrent variceal bleeding. Independent predictors of recurrent variceal bleeding were identified using the logistic regression model. Results. A total of 157 patients were enrolled in the study. During the follow-up period, 24 patients exhibited onset of recurrent variceal bleeding. Acute variceal bleeding was subjected to conservative symptomatic treatment and emergency endoscopic sclerotherapy. Surgical procedure selection was based on the severity of vascular dilation and collateral circulation. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the presence of ascites, collateral circulation, and portal venous pressure were independent prognostic factors of recurrent variceal bleeding for patients with portal cavernoma. Conclusions. The presence of ascites, collateral circulation, and portal venous pressure evaluation are important and could predict the postsurgical recurrent variceal bleeding in patients with portal cavernoma.

  14. Control of port-site bleeding from smaller incisions after laparoscopic cholecystectomy surgery: a new, innovative, and easier technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Vijay; Dy, Victor

    2002-08-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has become the standard of care for patients with acute cholecystitis, symptomatic cholelithiasis, and biliary dyskinesia. Most surgeons now perform this procedure as outpatient surgery. In a standard laparoscopic cholecystectomy procedure, three trocar incisions are made outside the umbilicus. Stopping the bleeding from these port sites can be problematic because of the small size of the incision and the fact that these bleeding points are situated deep in the incision. This is especially true in obese patients and patients taking Asprin or Plavix and undergoing emergency cholecystectomy. In these circumstances, control of the bleeding requires either enlargement of the incision or placement of deep sutures, leading to an ugly scar. We present a simple and innovative technique for controlling port-site bleeding, which involves plugging the port-site hole with Surgicel (Johnson & Johnson Medical, Inc., Arlington, Texas). Our experience with 20 patients to date has shown wound healing to be excellent, with no complications such as hematoma or infection.

  15. Bleeding stomal varices in portal hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Tran-Harding, MD

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 50-year-old man with a history of liver cirrhosis and colon cancer post end colostomy presenting to the emergency department with stomal bleeding and passage of clots into the colostomy bag. The patient was treated with transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS and concomitant embolization of the stomal varices via the TIPS shunt using N-butyl cyanoacrylate mixed with ethiodol. Although stomal variceal bleeding is uncommon, this entity can have up to 40% mortality upon initial presentation, given the challenges in diagnosis and management. Currently, there are no established standard treatments for stomal variceal bleeding. In addition, to the best of our knowledge, there are no cases in the current literature in which treatment of this entity is performed with a combination of TIPS shunt placement and N-butyl cyanoacrylate variceal embolization. Keywords: Stomal varices, TIPS, Cirrhosis, Colon cancer, Embolization, NBCA

  16. Radiotherapy in benign uterine bleeding disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryberg, M.; Pettersson, F.; Lundell, M.

    1989-01-01

    Radiotherapy was earlier a method of choice for treatment of benign bleeding disorders (metropathia), especially in woman of high surgical risk. During the period 1912 to 1977 933 women with benign bleeding disorders were treated at Radiumhemmet with intracavitary brachytherapy or external irradiation or a combination of both. The result with regard to cure of the uterine bleedings was good (48%). Hormonal withdrawal symptoms after treatment were noted in 45% of the patients. In the long term follow up an increased risk of cardiovascular death was found in women treated before menopause. Malignant tumours occurred in 107 cases versus 90.2 expected. The estimated ovarian dose of ionizing radiation varied from 3.5 Gy to 6.0 Gy for the three standard techniques. Two women gave birth to a healthy child 4 and 5 years after intracavitary radium treatment. The estimated absorbed dose to the ovaries in these two women were 1 Gy and 4 Gy, respectively

  17. Hemospray application in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Lyn A; Stanley, Adrian J; Bergman, Jacques J

    2013-01-01

    in combination with other hemostatic modalities at the endoscopists' discretion. RESULTS: Sixty-three patients (44 men, 19 women), median age 69 (range, 21 to 98) years with NVUGIB requiring endoscopic hemostasis were treated with TC-325. There were 30 patients with bleeding ulcers and 33 with other NVUGIB......BACKGROUND: Hemospray TM (TC-325) is a novel hemostatic agent licensed for use in nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding (NVUGIB) in Europe. GOALS: We present the operating characteristics and performance of TC-325 in the largest registry to date of patients presenting with NVUGIB in everyday...... pathology. Fifty-five (87%) were treated with TC-325 as monotherapy; 47 [85%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 76%-94%] of them achieved primary hemostasis, and rebleeding rate at 7 days was 15% (95% CI, 5%-25%). Primary hemostasis rate for TC-325 in patients with ulcer bleeds was 76% (95% CI, 59%-93%). Eight...

  18. Successful Management of Neobladder Variceal Bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atwal, Dinesh; Chatterjee, Kshitij, E-mail: kchatterjee@uams.edu [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Department of Internal Medicine, Residency Program: Slot 634 (United States); Osborne, Scott [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Kakkera, Krishna; Deas, Steven [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Department of Internal Medicine, Residency Program: Slot 634 (United States); Li, Ruizong [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology (United States); Erbland, Marcia [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Department of Internal Medicine, Residency Program: Slot 634 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Hematuria from a neobladder can occur due to a variety of pathologies including tumors, stones, and fistulas. Variceal bleeding in a neobladder is a very rare condition with only one case reported in literature. We present a case of a patient with cirrhosis and portal hypertension and an ileocolic orthotopic neobladder presenting with hematuria. Computed tomographic angiography showed dilated varices around the neobladder which were successfully embolized. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report case of variceal bleeding in a neobladder successfully managed with the combination of TIPS (transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt) procedure and embolization.

  19. Scintigraphic pattern of small bowel bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anshu Rajnish Sharma; Charan, S.; Silva, I.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Small intestine is the longest part of gastrointestinal tract. Intra-luminal haemorrhage occurring anywhere in its long and tortuous course is difficult to trace. It is relatively inaccessible to endoscopic evaluation. Upper GI endoscopy can see only up to distal duodenum, whereas colonoscope can view maximum of 30 centimeters of terminal ileum after negotiating the scope through ileo-caecal valve. Hence, localization of bleeding source from small bowel remains a difficult clinical problem. This group of patients can be evaluated with scintigraphy for localizing the site of bleeding before undergoing either angiography or surgery. To our best of knowledge, there is no study, which has utilized scintigraphy for evaluation of small bowel bleed exclusively. The present study has been designed to know the efficacy of 99mTc-RBC scintigraphy in detecting small bowel bleed and to know whether it can differentiate between jejunal and ileal bleeding ? Materials and methods: Thirteen patients presenting with lower gastrointestinal bleeding (malena) were enrolled for the study. In all cases, upper GI endoscopy (UGIE) was unremarkable. Colonoscopic examination was either negative or suspected bleeding occurring proximal to ileo-caecal valve. Thus, in these patients, it is presumed clinically that bleeding is originating from small bowel. Barium meal follow through (BMFT) studies, however, could not delineate any etiological lesion in these patients. There were 8 men and 5 women (mean age 48 years). All patients were anemic (Hb- 6 gm%) and mean 3 units of blood were transfused.These patients were subjected to Tc-99m labeled red blood cells scintigraphy (15 mci, in-vivo method) for localization of source of bleeding. The scintiscan was acquired in two phases. A first pass phase acquired at a rate of 2 seconds per frame for 60 seconds followed by acquisition of static abdominal images (500 K, 256 x 256 matrix) at 5 minutes intervals up to 90 minutes on LFOV gamma

  20. Prospective analysis of delayed colorectal post-polypectomy bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Kyung; Seo, Jeong Yeon; Lee, Min-Gu; Yang, Hyo-Joon; Jung, Yoon Suk; Choi, Kyu Yong; Kim, Hungdai; Kim, Hyung Ook; Jung, Kyung Uk; Chun, Ho-Kyung; Park, Dong Il

    2018-01-17

    Although post-polypectomy bleeding is the most frequent complication after colonoscopic polypectomy, only few studies have investigated the incidence of bleeding prospectively. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of delayed post-polypectomy bleeding and its associated risk factors prospectively. Patients who underwent colonoscopic polypectomy at Kangbuk Samsung Hospital from January 2013 to December 2014 were prospectively enrolled in this study. Trained nurses contacted patients via telephone 7 and 30 days after polypectomy and completed a standardized questionnaire regarding the development of bleeding. Delayed post-polypectomy bleeding was categorized as minor or major and early or late bleeding. Major delayed bleeding was defined as a > 2-g/dL drop in the hemoglobin level, requiring hospitalization for control of bleeding or blood transfusion; late delayed bleeding was defined as bleeding occurring later than 24 h after polypectomy. A total of 8175 colonoscopic polypectomies were performed in 3887 patients. Overall, 133 (3.4%) patients developed delayed post-polypectomy bleeding. Among them, 90 (2.3%) and 43 (1.1%) patients developed minor and major delayed bleeding, respectively, and 39 (1.0%) patients developed late delayed bleeding. In the polyp-based multivariate analysis, young age ( 10 mm (OR 2.45; 95% CI 1.38-4.36) were significant risk factors for major delayed bleeding, while young age (< 50 years; OR 2.6; 95% CI 1.35-5.12) and immediate bleeding (OR 3.3; 95% CI 1.49-7.30) were significant risk factors for late delayed bleeding. Young age, aspirin use, polyp size, and immediate bleeding were found to be independent risk factors for delayed post-polypectomy bleeding.

  1. Comparison of Endoscopic Variceal Ligation and Endoscopic Variceal Obliteration in Patients with GOV1 Bleeding

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Hyoung Ju; Jun, Chung Hwan; Lee, Du Hyeon; Cho, Eun Ae; Park, Seon Young; Cho, Sung Bum; Park, Chang Hwan; Joo, Young Eun; Kim, HyunSoo; Choi, Sung Kyu; Rew, Jong Sun

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy, rebleeding rates, survival, and complications of endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) with those of endoscopic variceal obliteration (EVO) in patients with acute type 1 gastroesophageal variceal (GOV1) bleeding. Data were collected retrospectively at a single center. A total of 84 patients were selected (20 patients underwent EVL; 64 patients underwent EVO) from February 2004 to September 2011. Their clinical characteristics, laboratory results...

  2. Abnormal gastrointestinal accumulation of radiotracer by gastric bleeding during 99mTc-MDP bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Kyung A.; Lee, Sang Woo; Lee, Jae Tae; Lee, Kyu Bo

    1998-01-01

    We present a case in which a patient with acute hemorrhagic gastritis demonstrated abnormal gastrointestinal accumulation of radiotracer during 99m Tc-methylene diphosphonate (MDP) skeletal scintigraphy. A hemorrhagic gastritis was subsequently demonstrated by endoscopy. The mechanism for the intestinal localization of 99m Tc-MDP in this patients is not clear, but we guess that the extravasated blood containing the radiopharmaceutical cannot recirculate and stays at the bleeding site, so we can see the intestinal activity

  3. Embolotherapy for Gastric Variceal Bleeding from Pseudoaneurysm of Short Gastric Artery: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jae Han; Kim, Young Dae; Kim, Dong Hyun [Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    The complications of pancreatitis, such as pseudocyst or abscesses, are well known to radiologists. Yet formation of a pseudoaneurysm of the short gastric artery is an uncommon complication of acute pancreatitis. It is also very rare for a psuedoaneurysm of the short gastric artery to cause splenic vein occlusion and the final result is gastric varices. We report here on a case that showed the dramatic effect of embolotherapy for a pseudoaneurysm of the short gastric artery that caused gastric variceal bleeding

  4. The Multifactorial Nature of Thromboembolic and Bleeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Thromboembolic and bleeding complications are the main causes of morbidity and mortality in patients with mechanical heart valves1. The risk factors for these complications in Tanzania have not been established. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted among patients with mechanical heart ...

  5. Dysfunctional uterine bleedings of a climacteric period

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prilepskaya, V.N.

    1993-01-01

    Climacteric period of some women is complicated by dysfunctional uterine bleedings (DUB). Bearing in mind the fact that DUBS are caused by disorder of estrin rhysmic secretion, the paper presents the methods of differential diagnostics for investigations into functional disorders in the hypothalamus -hypophysis - ovaries - uterus system. The preference is given to roentgenologic and radioimmunologic diagnostic methods

  6. Systemic causes of heavy menstrual bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschueren, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    Heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) is a common problem in fertile women. In addition to local factors, such as a polyp or a uterine fibroid, systemic causes may lead to HMB. These systemic causes are discussed in this thesis. For years, women with HMB were tested underlying thyroid disorder, but our

  7. Thromboembolic and Bleeding Complications among Patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This study was conducted to determine the incidence of thromboembolic and bleeding complications among patients with mechanical heart valves operated from 1990 to 2003 attending the Muhimbili National Hospital. Study design: This was a retrospective cohort study conducted at the cardiac, anticoagulation ...

  8. RESEARCH Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for bleeding varices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RESEARCH. 884 November 2012, Vol. 102, No. 11 SAMJ. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for bleeding varices in children with intrahepatic and extrahepatic portal venous ... Progress has been made in developing newer endoscopic techniques ... a sclerosant, usually 0.5 - 0.75 ml per injection, at multiple (up to.

  9. Massive rectal bleeding from colonic diverticulosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABEOLUGBENGAS

    barium enema studies have indicated increasing world prevalence ... Other diagnostic modalities include barium enema, computerised ... This is in contrast to the findings in our patient when colonoscopy was carried out, in which the diverticula were more at the descending colon-left sided, and were found to be bleeding.

  10. An unusual cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding: ' '

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary. This is an unusual case report of a 60-year-old man who presented with massive rectal bleeding due to angiomatous formation. ' He was also found to be cirrhosis and to have an ectopic left kidney in the ... attribuable a la formation angiomateuse. On a decouvert qu' ... challenging experience to the treating team.

  11. Endometrial biopsy findings in postmenopausal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarfraz, T.; Tariq, H.

    2007-01-01

    To study endometrial histopathology in women presenting with postmenopausal bleeding. A two-year study from January 2003 to December 2004 of 100 cases of postmenopausal bleeding was conducted at Combined Military Hospital, Sialkot. The histopathology of endometrial biopsy specimens was done to find out the causes of postmenopausal bleeding in these ladies. All these 100 patients had confirmed menopause and the average age was 55 years and above. The most common histopathological diagnosis was senile endometrial atrophy (27%), followed by simple cystic hyperplasia in (17%). Three cases of simple cystic hyperplasia had coexistent ovarian tumors. Glandular hyperplasia without atypia was seen in 6% and with atypia in 4%. Other causes were endometritis (13%), endometrial polyps (8%), proliferative phase endometrium (6%) and secretary phase endometrium (5%). Endometrial carcinoma was seen in (6%) cases, (8%) biopsy specimens were non-representative. Although senile endometrial atrophy was most commonly found in these ladies but a significant percentage of endometrial hyperplasia and endometrial cancer implies the need for investigating all cases of postmenopausal bleeding. Bimanual examination and pelvic ultrasonography should be combined with endometrial sampling so that rare pelvic pathologies may not be missed. (author)

  12. First trimester bleeding and maternal cardiovascular morbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jacob A; Langhoff-Roos, Jens

    2012-01-01

    First trimester bleeding without miscarriage is a risk factor for complications later in the pregnancy, such as preterm delivery. Also, first trimester miscarriage has been linked to subsequent maternal ischemic heart disease. We investigated the link between maternal cardiovascular disease prior...

  13. Managing Chemotherapy Side Effects: Bleeding Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... nurse: 1. What problems should I call you about? 2. How long should I wait for the bleeding to stop before I call you or go to the emergency room? 3. Is it okay to drink beer, wine, or other drinks with alcohol? Yes No, don’ ...

  14. Medical treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Jen Chen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Heavy menstrual bleeding, or menorrhagia, is subjectively defined as a “complaint of a large amount of bleeding during menstrual cycles that occurs over several consecutive cycles” and is objectively defined as menstrual blood loss of more than 80 mL per cycle that is associated with an anemia status (defined as a hemoglobin level of <10 g/dL. During their reproductive age, more than 30% of women will complain of or experience a heavy amount of bleeding, which leads to a debilitating health outcome, including significantly reduced health-related quality of life, and a considerable economic burden on the health care system. Although surgical treatment might be the most important definite treatment, especially hysterectomy for those women who have finished bearing children, the uterus is still regarded as the regulator and controller of important physiological functions, a sexual organ, a source of energy and vitality, and a maintainer of youth and attractiveness. This has resulted in a modern trend in which women may reconsider the possibility of organ preservation. For women who wish to retain the uterus, medical treatment may be one of the best alternatives. In this review, recent trends in the management of women with heavy menstrual bleeding are discussed.

  15. Risk Factors for Post-TAVI Bleeding According to the VARC-2 Bleeding Definition and Effect of the Bleeding on Short-Term Mortality: A Meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiayang; Yu, Wenyuan; Jin, Qi; Li, Yaqiong; Liu, Nan; Hou, Xiaotong; Yu, Yang

    2017-04-01

    In this study we investigated the effect of post-transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) bleeding (per Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 [VARC-2] bleeding criteria) on 30-day postoperative mortality and examined the correlation between pre- or intraoperative variables and bleeding. Multiple electronic literature databases were searched using predefined criteria, with bleeding defined per Valve Academic Research Consortium-2 criteria. A total of 10 eligible articles with 3602 patients were included in the meta-analysis. The meta-analysis revealed that post-TAVI bleeding was associated with a 323% increase in 30-day postoperative mortality (odds risk [OR]; 4.23, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.80-6.40; P Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE), aortic valve area, mean pressure gradient, left ventricular ejection fraction, preoperative hemoglobin and platelet levels, and study design had no significant effects on the results of the meta-analysis. Post-TAVI bleeding, in particular, major bleeding/life-threatening bleeding, increased 30-day postoperative mortality. Transapical access was a significant bleeding risk factor. Preexisting AF independently correlated with TAVI-associated bleeding, likely because of AF-related anticoagulation. Recognition of the importance and determinants of post-TAVI bleeding should lead to strategies to improve outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. THERMOELECTRIC SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICE FOR CAUTERY OF BLEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis V. Yevdulov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Objectives The aim of the work is to study the possibilities for using a semiconductor device to cauterise bleeding by means of cooling (cryocautery. Method The study is based on methods for approximate modeling of heat exchange processes. Results The construction of a device for cauterisation of bleeding, the actuating element of which consists of a thermoelectric battery operating in cooling mode at the time of blood flow cautery and in heating mode when removing the device from the damaged area, is considered. A model of a device, realised on the basis of the solution of the problem of solidification of a viscous liquid by the method of L.S. Leibenson, is proposed, taking into account the electro- and thermo-physical characteristics of the thermoelectric battery cold source. As a result of the numerical experiment, the dependence of the duration of the ice crust formation on tissues 1 mm thick (which corresponds to the cauterisation of bleeding is obtained on the value of the supply current of the thermoelectric battery. With increasing current, the duration of the ice crust formation is reduced; this can be of the order of 160 s at 5 A. It was demonstrated that the selection of thermoelectric battery parameters and current should be guided by medical norms and standards in order to avoid frostbite in the tissues adjacent to the bleeding zone. Conclusion The special design of thermoelectric device provides an effective technical means for cauterising bleeding by freezing (cryocautery, providing high intensity of cooling, shortenened thrombus formation duration, and eliminating painful sensations when removing the device from a damaged area. 

  17. Splenic Artery Embolization for the Treatment of Gastric Variceal Bleeding Secondary to Splenic Vein Thrombosis Complicated by Necrotizing Pancreatitis: Report of a Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee Joon Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Splenic vein thrombosis is a relatively common finding in pancreatitis. Gastric variceal bleeding is a life-threatening complication of splenic vein thrombosis, resulting from increased blood flow to short gastric vein. Traditionally, splenectomy is considered the treatment of choice. However, surgery in necrotizing pancreatitis is dangerous, because of severe inflammation, adhesion, and bleeding tendency. In the Warshaw operation, gastric variceal bleeding is rare, even though splenic vein is resected. Because the splenic artery is also resected, blood flow to short gastric vein is not increased problematically. Herein, we report a case of gastric variceal bleeding secondary to splenic vein thrombosis complicated by necrotizing pancreatitis successfully treated with splenic artery embolization. Splenic artery embolization could be the best treatment option for gastric variceal bleeding when splenectomy is difficult such as in case associated with severe acute pancreatitis or associated with severe adhesion or in patients with high operation risk.

  18. Dynamic study on digital cineangiography of acute digestive tract hemorrhage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jianming; Feng Gansheng; Zeng Jun; Xu Caiyuan

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To study dynamically acute gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage with digital cine angiography. Methods: Fifty patients with acute gastrointestinal tract hemorrhage were performed with digital cineangiography and observed dynamically during arterial, capillary and venous phases. Results: Among 50 cases, there were positive results in 44 ones including gastrointestinal hemorrhage in 14, biliary hemorrhage in 2, splenic arterial bleeding in 3, left gastric arterial bleeding in 4, right gastroepiploic arterial bleeding in 5, SMA bleeding in 7 and IMA bleeding in 9.17 cases underwent a permanent embolization through artery and 11 with temporary embolization as well as 9 with infusion of hemostatic agent via artery. Conclusions: Serial digital cineangiogram can dynamically show acute digestive tract hemorrhage within different phase. It is helpful to detect the location and cause of hemorrhage

  19. Comparison of Endoscopic Variceal Ligation and Endoscopic Variceal Obliteration in Patients with GOV1 Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Hyoung Ju; Jun, Chung Hwan; Lee, Du Hyeon; Cho, Eun Ae; Park, Seon Young; Cho, Sung Bum; Park, Chang Hwan; Joo, Young Eun; Kim, Hyunsoo; Choi, Sung Kyu; Rew, Jong Sun

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy, rebleeding rates, survival, and complications of endoscopic variceal ligation (EVL) with those of endoscopic variceal obliteration (EVO) in patients with acute type 1 gastroesophageal variceal (GOV1) bleeding. Data were collected retrospectively at a single center. A total of 84 patients were selected (20 patients underwent EVL; 64 patients underwent EVO) from February 2004 to September 2011. Their clinical characteristics, laboratory results, vital signs, Child-Pugh score, Model for End-stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, and overall mortality were evaluated. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics between the two groups. The success rate in initial control of active bleeding was not significantly different between the EVL and EVO groups (18/20 EVL, or 90.0%, compared with 62/64 EVO, or 96.9%; p=0.239). The early rebleeding rate was also not significantly different between the groups (3/18 EVL, or 16.7% compared with 17/62 EVO, or 27.4%; p=0.422). The late rebleeding rate of the EVL group was lower than that of the EVO group (3/18 EVL, or 16.7%, compared with 26/59 EVO, or 44.1%; p=0.042). The time-to-rebleeding was 594 days for the EVL group and 326 days for the EVO group (p=0.054). In the multivariate analysis, portal vein thrombosis (PVT) was a significant risk factor for early rebleeding. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and previous history of bleeding were significant risk factors for very late rebleeding. In conclusion, EVL is better than EVO in reducing late rebleeding in acute GOV1 bleeding. HCC, PVT, and previous bleeding history were significant risk factors for rebleeding.

  20. Systematic review: tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingenberg, S.L.; Langholz, S.E.; Gluud, Lise Lotte

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tranexamic acid may reduce upper gastrointestinal bleeding and stabilize patients before endoscopic treatments. AIM: To review randomized trials on tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. METHODS: Manual and electronic searches of The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and...

  1. 14 CFR 23.1109 - Turbocharger bleed air system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Induction System § 23.1109 Turbocharger bleed air system. The following applies to turbocharged bleed air... vapors following any probable failure or malfunction of the engine exhaust, hydraulic, fuel, or oil...

  2. Breast cancer recurrence after reoperation for surgical bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rikke Nørgaard; Bhaskaran, K; Heide-Jørgensen, U

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bleeding activates platelets that can bind tumour cells, potentially promoting metastatic growth in patients with cancer. This study investigated whether reoperation for postoperative bleeding is associated with breast cancer recurrence. METHODS: Using the Danish Breast Cancer Group d...

  3. Henoch-Schönlein purpura in an older man presenting as rectal bleeding and IgA mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Howarth Charles B; Jirajariyavej Teeranun; Cheungpasitporn Wisit; Rosen Raquel M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Henoch-Schönlein purpura is the most common systemic vasculitis in children. Typical presentations are palpable purpura, abdominal pain, arthritis, and hematuria. This vasculitic syndrome can present as an uncommon cause of rectal bleeding in older patients. We report a case of an older man with Henoch-Schönlein purpura. He presented with rectal bleeding and acute kidney injury secondary to IgA mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis. Case presentation A 75-year-old Pol...

  4. Inhibidores de la bomba de protones por vía intravenosa en la hemorragia por úlcera péptica: ¿es necesaria la supresión ácida máxima para disminuir el resangrado? Intravenous proton-pump for acute peptic ulcer bleeding: is profound acid supression beneficial to reduce the risk of rebleeding?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Garrido

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: comparar dos pautas de pantoprazol por vía intravenosa en pacientes con hemorragia digestiva alta (HDA ulcerosa de alto riesgo para presentar persistencia o recidiva hemorrágica. Material y método: se randomizaron los pacientes en dos grupos: grupo 0: tratamiento con bolo de 80 mg i.v. de pantoprazol y perfusión continua a 8 mg/h durante 72 horas; grupo 1: tratamiento con 40 mg i.v. de pantoprazol diarios. Se analizó el porcentaje de persistencia/recidiva hemorrágica entre ambos grupos, requerimientos transfusionales, necesidad de cirugía y mortalidad del episodio hemorrágico. Resultados: se incluyeron 20 pacientes en el grupo 0 y 21 en el grupo 1. No se encontraron diferencias entre ambos grupos en cuanto al sexo, edad, hábito tabáquico, consumo de AINE, presencia de inestabilidad hemodinámica, estigma sobre el nicho ulceroso (Forrest Ia 5 vs. 14,3%, p = 0,322; Forrest Ib 30 vs. 33,3%, p = 0,819; Forrest IIa 60 vs. 50,1%, p = 0,753. El 90% de los pacientes del grupo 0 recibió tratamiento endoscópico vs. el 100% del grupo 1, p = 0,232. El 50% de los pacientes del grupo 0 recibió transfusión vs. el 52,4% del grupo 1, p = 0,879. Dos pacientes (10,5% del grupo 0 presentaron recidiva hemorrágica vs. 3 pacientes (14,3% del grupo 1, precisando cirugía 1 paciente de cada grupo y falleciendo 1 paciente del grupo 0. Conclusiones: la inhibición ácida máxima de la secreción ácida gástrica mediante bolo e infusión continua de pantoprazol no ofrece resultados superiores al tratamiento con dosis convencionales en el episodio hemorrágico agudo.Objective: to compare two regimens of pantoprazole administered intravenously in patients with ulcerative gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB, and a high risk of presenting with persitent or recurrent hemorrhage. Material and method: patients were randomized into two groups: group 0 - treatment with a 80 mg bolus of pantoprazole administered intravenously, followed by continuous infusion of

  5. 14 CFR 23.1111 - Turbine engine bleed air system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Turbine engine bleed air system. 23.1111... Induction System § 23.1111 Turbine engine bleed air system. For turbine engine bleed air systems, the following apply: (a) No hazard may result if duct rupture or failure occurs anywhere between the engine port...

  6. Colonoscopic examination of rectal bleeding in children: A report of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rectal bleeding in children is a frightening and cause of great concern, and of parental anxiety. In this report, we present the value of colonoscopy to unravel the diagnostic conundrum often associated with rectal bleeding in children. Key words: Children, colonoscopy, juvenile polyps, rectal bleeding ...

  7. Leech as a cause of abnormal vaginal bleeding: Presentation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leech bites are a recognized cause of bleeding from any human orifice upon exposure to water which is infested with leeches. A high level of suspicion is necessary to make the diagnosis and institute cost-effective definitive treatment for leech bite induced bleeding including vaginal bleeding as has been revealed by the ...

  8. No increased systemic fibrinolysis in women with heavy menstrual bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiewel-Verschueren, S.; Knol, H. M.; Lisman, T.; Bogchelman, D. H.; Kluin-Nelemans, J. C.; van der Zee, A.G.J.; Mulder, A.B.; Meijer, K.

    BackgroundBleeding disorders have been recognized as important etiologic or contributory factors in women with heavy menstrual bleeding. Fibrinolysis in the endometrium plays a role in heavy menstrual bleeding. It is unknown whether increased systemic fibrinolysis might also increase the risk of

  9. Small intestinal diverticulum with bleeding: Case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lifang; Lu, Wei; Sun, Yinping; Liang, Junrong; Feng, Shanshan; Shi, Yongquan; Wu, Qiong; Wang, Jianhong; Wu, Kaichun

    2018-03-01

    Small intestinal diverticulum with bleeding is an important reason for obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGB) , in addition to tumor and vascular diseases. Small intestinal diverticulum with bleeding is difficult to detect by barium meal and angiographic methods and has been regarded as an important cause of obscure gastrointestinal tract bleeding in adolescents. Because of its complicated etiology and non-specific clinical manifestations, it is relatively difficult to detect small intestinal diverticulum with bleeding, especially in patients with a large amount of bleeding and hemodynamic instability. This retrospective study collects clinical statistics of 19 patients admitted to our hospital from January 2010 to December 2016. Patients who had small intestinal diverticulum patients with bleeding were included in this study. Patients who were taking anticoagulants were excluded DIAGNOSES:: Small intestinal diverticulum patients with bleeding. This retrospective study describes the clinical features of patients with small intestinal diverticulum whose main symptom was gastrointestinal bleeding and analyze the literature on this topic, with particular reference to the clinical characteristics, pathological features, and choice of examination methods. Small intestinal diverticulum with bleeding is a common cause of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, but it is difficult to detect using normal examination methods. For patients with repeated gastrointestinal bleeding and no positive results found on gastroscopy and colonoscopy, endoscopy of the small intestine and CTE with contrast can be considered as a diagnostic modality.

  10. Helping mothers survive bleeding after birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nelissen, Ellen; Ersdal, Hege; Ostergaard, Doris

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate "Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth" (HMS BAB) simulation-based training in a low-resource setting. DESIGN: Educational intervention study. SETTING: Rural referral hospital in Northern Tanzania. POPULATION: Clinicians, nurse-midwives, medical attendants, and ambul......OBJECTIVE: To evaluate "Helping Mothers Survive Bleeding After Birth" (HMS BAB) simulation-based training in a low-resource setting. DESIGN: Educational intervention study. SETTING: Rural referral hospital in Northern Tanzania. POPULATION: Clinicians, nurse-midwives, medical attendants...... low (3% pass rate for basic delivery and management of postpartum hemorrhage). CONCLUSIONS: The HMS BAB simulation-based training has potential to contribute to education of health care providers. We recommend a full day of training and validation of the facilitators to improve the training....

  11. Management of variceal and nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Suzane

    2014-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal haemorrhage remains the most common medical emergency managed by gastroenterologists. Causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) in patients with liver cirrhosis can be grouped into two categories: the first includes lesions that arise by virtue of portal hypertension, namely gastroesophageal varices and portal hypertensive gastropathy; and the second includes lesions seen in the general population (peptic ulcer, erosive gastritis, reflux esophagitis, Mallory–Weiss syndrome, tumors, etc.). Emergency upper gastrointestinal endoscopy is the standard procedure recommended for both diagnosis and treatment of UGIB. The endoscopic treatment of choice for esophageal variceal bleeding is band ligation of varices. Bleeding from gastric varices is treated by injection with cyanoacrylate. Treatment with vasoactive drugs as well as antibiotic treatment is started before or at the same time as endoscopy. Bleeding from portal hypertensive gastropathy is less frequent, usually chronic and treatment options include β-blocker therapy, injection therapy and interventional radiology. The standard of care of UGIB in patients with cirrhosis includes careful resuscitation, preferably in an intensive care setting, medical and endoscopic therapy, early consideration for placement of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt and, sometimes, surgical therapy or hepatic transplant. PMID:25177367

  12. Treatment and prognosis in peptic ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Stig Borbjerg

    2014-01-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is a frequent cause of admission. Despite several advances in treatment the 30-day mortality seems unchanged at a level around 11%. Use of risk scoring systems is shown to be advantageous in the primary assessment of patients presenting with symptoms of peptic ulcer bleeding. Studies performed outside Denmark have demonstrated that use of risk scoring systems facilitates identification of low-risk patients suitable for outpatient management. Nevertheless, these systems have not been implemented for routine use in Denmark. This is mainly explained by concerns about the external validity due to considerable inter-country variation in patients' characteristics. In recent years, transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) has become increasingly used for achievement of hemostasis in patients with peptic ulcer bleeding not responding to endoscopic therapy. As rebleeding is associated with poor outcome TAE could, in theory, also be beneficial as a supplementary treatment in patients with ulcer bleeding responding to endoscopic therapy. This has not been examined previously. Several studies have concluded that peptic ulcer bleeding is associated with excess long-term mortality. These findings are, however, questioned as the studies were based on life-table analysis, unmatched control groups, or did not perform adequate adjustment for comorbidity. Treatment with blood transfusion is, among patients undergoing cardiac bypass surgery, shown to increase the long-term mortality. Despite frequent use of blood transfusion in treatment of peptic ulcer bleeding a possible adverse effect of on long-term survival has not been examined in these patients. The aims of the present thesis were: 1. To examine which risk scoring system is best at predicting need of hospital-based intervention, rebleeding, and mortality in patients presenting with upper gastrointestinal bleeding (Study I) 2. To evaluate if supplementary transcatheter arterial embolization (STAE) after

  13. [Bleeding gastric inflammatory fibroid polyp (Vanek's tumor)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guţu, E; Ghidirim, Gh; Mişin, I; Iakovleva, Iraida; Vozian, M

    2010-01-01

    Inflammatory fibroid polyp's (IFP) or Vanek tumor of the gastrointestinal tract represents a relatively unusual entity. IFP is an extremely rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. We report herein a case of a 30-year-old woman who had a gastric IFP complicated by gastrointestinal bleeding and obstructive symptoms. The lesion was mistaken on endoscopic, radiologic examination and in the operating room for a gastrointestinal stromal tumor (GIST). Preoperative endoscopic examination revealed a protruding oval-shaped submucosal lesion (approximately 7 cm in size) of the gastric antrum, with ulceration of the mucosal surface. Multiple endoscopic biopsies were negative for neoplastic changes. Barium meal study disclosed a large tumor in the prepyloric area of the stomach. Presumptive preoperative diagnosis was GIST. Subtotal Bilroth II gastrectomy en bloc with the mass and lymphadenectomy was performed. Surprisingly, the final histological diagnosis was IFP. Postoperative course was uneventful and no recurrences were observed during 4 years follow-up. With reference to case report, the etiology, diagnosis and treatment strategy of IFP will be discussed. This case highlights an unusual presentation of IFP. Although bleeding may represent a rare complication due IFP, it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of upper gastrointestinal hemorrhage of uncertain etiology.

  14. Treatment Modalities in Adolescents Who present With Heavy Menstrual Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaqzam, Tasneem S; Stanley, Angela C; Simpson, Pippa M; Flood, Veronica H; Menon, Seema

    2018-03-07

    This study sought to determine the relationship of bleeding disorders to iron deficiency anemia. Additionally, this study was undertaken to examine all current treatment modalities used in a menorrhagia clinic with respect to heavy menstrual bleeding management to identify the most effective options for menstrual management in the setting of an underlying bleeding disorder. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANT, INTERVENTION, AND MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Retrospective chart review of adolescent <21 years with heavy menstrual bleeding attending a multidisciplinary hematology-adolescent gynecology clinic. Information included demographics, bleeding diathesis, hematologic parameters, treatment, and the diagnosis was extracted from each chart. Subjects were grouped into two categories based on the diagnosis of a bleeding disorder. Hemoglobin level, iron deficiency anemia, and need for transfusion were compared between a bleeding disorder and no bleeding disorder group. Subjects were grouped into categories depending on hormonal modality and treatment success of the groups were compared. 73 subjects tested for a bleeding disorder. Of the subjects completing testing, 34 (46%) were diagnosed with a bleeding disorders. 39 (54%) subjects had heavy menstrual bleeding due to other causes. There was no significant difference in hemoglobin between those with and without a bleeding disorder. Iron deficiency anemia was significantly higher in subjects without bleeding disorder. When comparing hormone therapy success, the levonorgestrel IUD (LNG-IUD) (89%) had the highest rate of menstrual suppression followed by norethindrone acetate 5-10mg/day (83%), and the transdermal patch (80%). All subjects using both tranexamic acid and hormonal therapy had 100% achievement of menstrual suppression. A high frequency of bleeding disorder was found in those tested. Subjects with a bleeding disorder were less likely to present with severe anemia requiring blood transfusion and less likely to have iron

  15. Comparing Bleeding Risk Assessment Focused on Modifiable Risk Factors Only Versus Validated Bleeding Risk Scores in Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Yutao; Zhu, Hang; Chen, Yundai

    2018-01-01

    predictive ability for major bleeding (c-index 0.63, 95% confidence interval 0.56-0.69) and intracranial hemorrhage (0.72, 0.65-0.79) but nonsignificantly (and poorly) predicted extracranial bleeding (0.55, 0.54-0.56; P = .361). The HAS-BLED score was superior to predict bleeding events compared...

  16. Bleeding risk in 'real world' patients with atrial fibrillation: comparison of two established bleeding prediction schemes in a nationwide cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J B; Lip, G Y H; Hansen, P R

    2011-01-01

    Oral anticoagulation (OAC) in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) is a double-edged sword, because it decreases the risk of stroke at the cost of an increased risk of bleeding. We compared the performance of a new bleeding prediction scheme, HAS-BLED, with an older bleeding prediction scheme...

  17. [ENDOSCOPIC INJECTION TREATMENT OF BLEEDING PEPTIC ULCER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Freddy; Contardo, Carlos; Román, Rossana; Eduardo, Vesco; Dávalos, Milagros; Velásquez, Hermes; Soriano, César; Espejo, Hernán

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Objectives were two. (1) to determine theefficiency of the endoscopic injection therapy (EIT) in patients suffering from bleeding caused by peptic ulcer disease with high risk of recurrence, and (2) to recognize clinical and endoscopical risk factors that influence recurrence of hemorrhage and mortality from this pathology. METHODS: This is a retrospective study that included 121 patients, who were admitted by a unit specialized in managing gastrointestinal hemorrhage owing to peptic ulcer with active bleeding or non-bleeding visible vessel, and who underwent EIT with epinephrine between March, 1994 and February, 1996.RESULTS: Initial success was achieved in 119 patients who underwent EIT (99,1%). Bleeding persisted in one patient (0,9%), and in another one, EIT was not sucessful because of inaccessible location. Definite hemostasis was achieved in 93 patients (77,5%) and there was recurrence in 28 cases (23,5%). Twenty-six patients underwent surgical therapy (21,5%). The univariable analysis showed that hemorrhage recurrence was related to the presence of shock (p = 0,002), hematemesis (p = 0,2), age over 60 (p = 0,009), number of blood units transfused (p = 0,00000) and ulcer diameter larger than 2 cm (p = 0,018). The global mortality in our patients was of 10%, and surgical mortality was of 34,6%. Factors significantly related to mortality were hemorrhage recurrence (p = 0,000003), presence of concomitant disease (p = 0,05), and presence of gastric ulcer (p = 0,021), in addition to age (over 60), presence of shock and ulcer diameter larger than 2 cm (p = 0,05).CONCLUSION: EIT is a valuable procedure for the treatment of hemorrhage caused by peptic ulcer with high risk of recurrence (active hemorrhage or visible vessel), with a definite hemostasis of 77,5%. The presence of shock, hematemesis, age over 60, transfusion requirements of more than 3 blood units, and ulcer diameter of more than 2 cm are factors that increase the probability of hemorrhage

  18. Frank hematuria as the presentation feature of acute leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suriya Owais

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Muco-cutaneous bleeding is a common presenting feature of acute leukemias. Mucosal bleeding usually manifests as gum bleeding and/or epistaxis but may occur in any mucosal surface of the body. Hematuria as an isolated or main presenting feature of acute leukemia is rare. We describe two cases of acute leukemia, a 19 year old male with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a 52 year old male with acute myeloid leukemia, both presenting with gross hematuria. There was no demonstrable leukemic infiltration of the urinary tract on imaging studies. Hematuria in these patients was likely to be due to occult leukemic infiltration of the urinary system, aggravated by thrombocytopenia, as it subsided after starting chemotherapy. Our cases highlight that hematuria should be remembered as a rare presenting feature of acute leukemia.

  19. Risk factors for severity and recurrence of colonic diverticular bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquim Natércia

    Full Text Available Background: Colonic diverticular bleeding is the most common cause of lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Risk factors related to severity and repeated bleeding episodes are not completely clearly defined. Objective: To characterize a Portuguese population hospitalized due to colonic diverticular bleeding and to identify the clinical predictors related to bleeding severity and rebleeding. Methods: Retrospective analysis of all hospitalized patients diagnosed with colonic diverticular bleeding from January 2008 to December 2013 at our institution. The main outcomes evaluated were bleeding severity, defined as any transfusion support requirements and/or signs of hemodynamic shock, and 1-year recurrence rate. Results: Seventy-four patients were included, with a mean age of 75.7 ± 9.5 years; the majority were male (62.2%. Thirty-six patients (48.6% met the criteria for severe bleeding; four independent risk factors for severe diverticular bleeding were identified: low hemoglobin level at admission (≤ 11 g/dL; OR 18.8, older age (≥ 75 years; OR 4.7, bilateral diverticular location (OR 14.2 and chronic kidney disease (OR 5.6. The 1-year recurrence rate was 12.9%. We did not identify any independent risk factor for bleeding recurrence in this population. Conclusion: In this series, nearly half of the patients hospitalized with diverticular bleeding presented with severe bleeding. Patients with low hemoglobin levels, older age, bilateral diverticular location and chronic kidney disease had a significantly increased risk for severe diverticular bleeding. In addition, a small number of patients rebled within the first year after the index episode, although we could not identify independent risk factors associated with the recurrence of diverticular bleeding.

  20. Bleeding risk assessment and management in atrial fibrillation patients. Executive Summary of a Position Document from the European Heart Rhythm Association [EHRA], endorsed by the European Society of Cardiology [ESC] Working Group on Thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lip, Gregory Y H; Andreotti, Felicita; Fauchier, Laurent; Huber, Kurt; Hylek, Elaine; Knight, Eve; Lane, Deirdre; Levi, Marcel; Marín, Francisco; Palareti, Gualtiero; Kirchhof, Paulus

    2011-12-01

    In this executive summary of a Consensus Document from the European Heart Rhythm Association, endorsed by the European Society of Cardiology Working Group on Thrombosis, we comprehensively review the published evidence and propose a consensus on bleeding risk assessments in atrial fibrillation (AF) patients. The main aim of the document was to summarise 'best practice' in dealing with bleeding risk in AF patients when approaching antithrombotic therapy, by addressing the epidemiology and size of the problem, and review established bleeding risk factors. We also summarise definitions of bleeding in the published literature. Patient values and preferences balancing the risk of bleeding against thromboembolism as well as the prognostic implications of bleeding are reviewed. We also provide an overview of published bleeding risk stratification and bleeding risk schema. Brief discussion of special situations (e.g. periablation, peri-devices such as implantable cardioverter defibrillators [ICD] or pacemakers, presentation with acute coronary syndromes and/or requiring percutanous coronary interventions/stents and bridging therapy) is made, as well as a discussion of the prevention of bleeds and managing bleeding complications. Finally, this document puts forwards consensus statements that may help to define evidence gaps and assist in everyday clinical practice.

  1. High-dose versus low-dose intravenous proton pump inhibitor treatment for bleeding peptic ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontiadis, Grigorios I; Howden, Colin W; Barkun, Alan N

    2012-12-01

    Peptic ulcer bleeding is a common medical emergency associated with significant mortality and healthcare costs. All recent guidelines agree on the beneficial role of proton pump inhibitor treatment, but there is still controversy regarding the optimal dose and route of administration of proton pump inhibitors. The evaluated article reports on a large, single-center randomized controlled trial that compared the clinical efficacy of a low-dose twice-daily intravenous bolus regimen with a high-dose continuous intravenous infusion regimen in 875 patients with acute bleeding from peptic ulcers. The high-dose regimen was associated with significant reductions in rebleeding, blood transfusion requirements and length of hospital stay. There was no demonstrable difference in mortality or the need for endoscopic hemostatic treatment or surgery. We discuss the strengths and limitations of the evaluated article, as well as the implications for clinical practice.

  2. Gastrointestinal bleedings during therapy with new oral anticoagulants are rarely reported

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay-Nielsen, Morten; Kampmann, Jens Peter; Bisgaard, Thue

    2014-01-01

    , Surgical Section, Hvidovre Hospital, during a one-year-period. Patients in treatment with NOAC and admitted for gastrointestinal bleeding were identified. Relevant patients were cross-checked for a reported adverse drug event in the Danish Health and Medi-cines Authority's database on adverse medical......INTRODUCTION: Post-marketing surveillance of drugs relies on spontaneous reporting of adverse drug events to the Danish Health and Medicines Authority. A number of new oral anticoagulants (NOAC) have recently been marketed in Denmark. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reporting...... events. RESULTS: A total of 20 patients were acutely admitted for gastrointestinal bleeding while in treatment with a NOAC, an adverse medical event was reported for one of these patients (5%; 95% confidence interval: 0-25%). CONCLUSION: Serious adverse events in patients treated with NOAC...

  3. The influence of liver disease and portal hypertension on bleeding in Mallory-Weiss syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuman, B M; Threadgill, S T

    1994-01-01

    The records of 79 patients admitted to the hospital from January 1985 through December 1990 for acute esophageal hemorrhage were analyzed to determine the influence of liver disease and/or portal hypertension on the severity of bleeding from Mallory-Weiss syndrome. Forty-two patients had bled from Mallory-Weiss syndrome; 8 had liver disease and nonbleeding esophageal varices, 6 had liver disease without varices, and 28 had no evidence of liver disease. The severity of bleeding was determined by the transfusion requirement for each group. The number of units of blood needed for patients with liver disease was significantly increased (p Mallory-Weiss syndrome is primarily related to the status of liver function and that portal hypertension does not make an additive contribution.

  4. Usefulness of Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt in the Management of Bleeding Ectopic Varices in Cirrhotic Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vidal, V.; Joly, L.; Perreault, P.; Bouchard, L.; Lafortune, M.; Pomier-Layrargues, G.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the safety and efficacy of transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) in the control of bleeding from ectopic varices. Methods. From 1995 to 2004, 24 cirrhotic patients, bleeding from ectopic varices, mean age 54.5 years (range 15-76 years), were treated by TIPS. The etiology of cirrhosis was alcoholic in 13 patients and nonalcoholic in 11 patients. The location of the varices was duodenal (n = 5), stomal (n = 8), ileocolic (n = 6), anorectal (n = 3), umbilical (n = 1), and peritoneal (n 1). Results. TIPS controlled the bleeding in all patients and induced a decrease in the portacaval gradient from 19.7 ± 5.4 to 6.4 ± 3.1 mmHg. Postoperative complications included self-limited intra-abdominal bleeding (n = 2), self-limited hemobilia (n = 1), acute thrombosis of the shunt (n = 1), and bile leak treated by a covered stent (n = 1). Median follow-up was 592 days (range 28-2482 days). Rebleeding occurred in 6 patients. In 2 cases rebleeding was observed despite a post-TIPS portacaval gradient lower than 12 mmHg and was controlled by variceal embolization; 1 patient underwent surgical portacaval shunt and never rebled; in 3 patients rebleeding was related to TIPS stenosis and treated with shunt dilatation with addition of a new stent. The cumulative rate of rebleeding was 23% and 31% at 1 and 2 years, respectively. One- and 2-year survival rates were 80% and 76%, respectively. Conclusion. The present series demonstrates that bleeding from ectopic varices, a challenging clinical problem, can be managed safely by TIPS placement with low rebleeding and good survival rates

  5. Transjugular Endovascular Recanalization of Splenic Vein in Patients with Regional Portal Hypertension Complicated by Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Xuefeng; Nie, Ling; Wang, Zhu; Tsauo, Jiaywei; Tang, Chengwei; Li, Xiao, E-mail: simonlixiao@126.com [West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Department of Gastroenterology (China)

    2013-05-02

    PurposeRegional portal hypertension (RPH) is an uncommon clinical syndrome resulting from splenic vein stenosis/occlusion, which may cause gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding from the esophagogastric varices. The present study evaluated the safety and efficacy of transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein in patients with GI bleeding secondary to RPH.MethodsFrom December 2008 to May 2011, 11 patients who were diagnosed with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and had undergone transjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein were reviewed retrospectively. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed splenic vein stenosis in six cases and splenic vein occlusion in five. Etiology of RPH was chronic pancreatitis (n = 7), acute pancreatitis with pancreatic pseudocyst (n = 2), pancreatic injury (n = 1), and isolated pancreatic tuberculosis (n = 1).ResultsTechnical success was achieved in 8 of 11 patients via the transjugular approach, including six patients with splenic vein stenosis and two patients with splenic vein occlusion. Two patients underwent splenic vein venoplasty only, whereas four patients underwent bare stents deployment and two covered stents. Splenic vein pressure gradient (SPG) was reduced from 21.5 ± 7.3 to 2.9 ± 1.4 mmHg after the procedure (P < 0.01). For the remaining three patients who had technical failures, splenic artery embolization and subsequent splenectomy was performed. During a median follow-up time of 17.5 (range, 3–34) months, no recurrence of GI bleeding was observed.ConclusionsTransjugular endovascular recanalization of splenic vein is a safe and effective therapeutic option in patients with RPH complicated by GI bleeding and is not associated with an increased risk of procedure-related complications.

  6. Rectal bleeding in infancy: clinical, allergological, and microbiological examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvola, Taina; Ruuska, Tarja; Keränen, Jaakko; Hyöty, Heikki; Salminen, Seppo; Isolauri, Erika

    2006-04-01

    according to the following criteria: age and timing of fecal sampling being identical to within 1 month. Altogether, 32 (80%) infants manifested bloody stools during follow-up (mean [range]: 2.1 [1-15] per day). The mean number of days with rectal bleeding on follow-up was 6. Typically, bloody stools occurred irregularly, for which reason the mean time to the last occurrence of rectal bleeding was 24 (range: 1-85) days from admission. Atopic eczema at presentation or during follow-up was diagnosed in 38% of the infants. Increased specific IgE concentrations or a positive skin-prick test were uncommon. The growth of the infants was normal on admission and during follow-up. Colonoscopy revealed typically focal mucosal erythema and aphthous ulcerations. The mucosa appeared normal in less than half of the patients. No anorectal fissures or colonic polyps were found. Light microscopy revealed that the overall architecture of the mucosa was well maintained. Acute inflammation or postinflammatory state and focal infiltration of eosinophils in the lamina propria were the most common abnormalities. A cow's milk-elimination diet did not affect the duration of rectal bleeding. Cow's milk allergy was diagnosed in 7 (18%) patients. Virus-particle aggregates were found in the microvillus layer of the colon epithelium in 8 cases. The surface epithelium of the virus-positive colon biopsy specimens regularly showed degenerative changes in the microvillus layer and epithelial cells. Electron microscopy study of the colon biopsies disclosed virus particles (30 nm in diameter) on the surface of epithelial cells. Virus particles or RNA were present in feces in only a minority of the patients. All fecal cultures were negative for Salmonella, Shigella, and Yersinia. Campylobacter jejuni was found in the feces of 1 patient, and fecal cultures were positive for Clostridium difficile in 4 patients, Staphylococcus aureus in 8 patients, and yeast in 2 patients. Fluorescence in situ hybridization

  7. An Unusual Case of Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin N. Fiorino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 10-year-old boy presented with a 3-day history of worsening abdominal pain, fever, emesis and melena. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a right upper quadrant mass that was confirmed by computed tomography angiogram (CTA, which showed an 8 cm well-defined retroperitoneal vascular mass. 123Iodine metaiodobenzylguanidine (123MIBG scan indicated uptake only in the abdominal mass. Subsequent biopsy revealed a paraganglioma that was treated with chemotherapy. This case represents an unusual presentation of a paraganglioma associated with gastrointestinal (GI bleeding and highlights the utility of CTA and 123MIBG in evaluation and treatment.

  8. An unusual case of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorino, Kristin N; Lestini, Brian; Nichols, Kim E; Anupindi, Sudha A; Maqbool, Asim

    2011-01-01

    A 10-year-old boy presented with a 3-day history of worsening abdominal pain, fever, emesis and melena. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a right upper quadrant mass that was confirmed by computed tomography angiogram (CTA), which showed an 8 cm well-defined retroperitoneal vascular mass. (123)Iodine metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123)MIBG) scan indicated uptake only in the abdominal mass. Subsequent biopsy revealed a paraganglioma that was treated with chemotherapy. This case represents an unusual presentation of a paraganglioma associated with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and highlights the utility of CTA and (123)MIBG in evaluation and treatment.

  9. An Unusual Case of Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorino, Kristin N.; Lestini, Brian; Nichols, Kim E.; Anupindi, Sudha A.; Maqbool, Asim

    2011-01-01

    A 10-year-old boy presented with a 3-day history of worsening abdominal pain, fever, emesis and melena. Abdominal ultrasound revealed a right upper quadrant mass that was confirmed by computed tomography angiogram (CTA), which showed an 8 cm well-defined retroperitoneal vascular mass. 123Iodine metaiodobenzylguanidine (123MIBG) scan indicated uptake only in the abdominal mass. Subsequent biopsy revealed a paraganglioma that was treated with chemotherapy. This case represents an unusual presentation of a paraganglioma associated with gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding and highlights the utility of CTA and 123MIBG in evaluation and treatment. PMID:22606522

  10. Endoscopic hemostasis state of the art - Nonvariceal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goelder, Stefan Karl; Brueckner, Juliane; Messmann, Helmut

    2016-02-25

    New endoscopic techniques for hemostasis in nonvariceal bleeding were introduced and known methods further improved. Hemospray and Endoclot are two new compounds for topical treatment of bleeding. Initial studies in this area have shown a good hemostatic effect, especially in active large scale oozing bleeding, e.g., tumor bleedings. For further evaluation larger prospective studies comparing the substanced with other methods of endoscopic hemostasis are needed. For localized active arterial bleeding primary injection therapy in the area of ​​bleeding as well as in the four adjacent quadrants offers a good method to reduce bleeding activity. The injection is technically easy to learn and practicable. After bleeding activity is reduced the bleeding source can be localized more clearly for clip application. Today many different through-the-scope (TTS) clips are available. The ability to close and reopen a clip can aid towards good positioning at the bleeding site. Even more important is the rotatability of a clip before application. Often multiple TTS clips are required for secure closure of a bleeding vessel. One model has the ability to use three clips in series without changing the applicator. Severe arterial bleeding from vessels larger than 2 mm is often unmanageable with these conventional methods. Here is the over-the-scope-clip system another newly available method. It is similar to the ligation of esophageal varices and involves aspiration of tissue into a transparent cap before closure of the clip. Thus a greater vascular occlusion pressure can be achieved and larger vessels can be treated endoscopically. Patients with severe arterial bleeding from the upper gastrointestinal tract have a very high rate of recurrence after initial endoscopic treatment. These patients should always be managed in an interdisciplinary team of interventional radiologist and surgeons.

  11. Predicting major bleeding in patients with noncardioembolic stroke on antiplatelets: S2TOP-BLEED

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilkens, Nina A.; Algra, Ale; Diener, Hans-Christoph; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Bath, Philip M.; Csiba, Laszlo; Hacke, Werner; Kappelle, L. Jaap; Koudstaal, Peter J.; Leys, Didier; Mas, Jean-Louis; Sacco, Ralph L.; Amarenco, Pierre; Sissani, Leila; Greving, Jacoba P.; Gent, M.; Beaumont, D.; Blanchard, J.; Bousser, M. G.; Coffman, J.; Easton, J. D.; Hampton, J. R.; Harker, L. A.; Janzon, L.; Kusmierek, Jje; Panak, E.; Roberts, R. S.; Shannon, S.; Sicurella, J.; Tognoni, G.; Topol, E. J.; Verstraete, M.; Warlow, C.; Blard, J. M.; Capildeo, R.; Diener, H. C.; Ersmark, B.; Escartin, A.; Ferro, J.; Galvin, R.; Hogenhuis, Lah; Laterre, C.; Provincial, L.; Rinne, U. K.; Bovim, G.; Lowenthal, A.; Bogousslavsky, J.; Brass, L.; Cimminiello, C.; Csiba, L.; Kaste, M.; Leys, D.; Matias-Guiu, J.; Rupprecht, H. J.; Berger, P. B.; Bhatt, D. L.; Black, H. R.; Boden, W. E.; Cacoub, P.; Cohen, E. A.; Creager, M. A.; Flather, M. D.; Fox, Kaa; Hacke, W.; Haffner, S. M.; Hamm, C. W.; Hankey, G. J.; Johnston, S. C.; Mak, K. H.; Mas, J. L.; Montalescot, G.; Pearson, T. A.; Steg, P. G.; Steinhubl, S. R.; Weber, M. A.; Aichner, F.; Algra, A.; Chamorro, A.; Chen, Cplh; de Schryver, Ellm; Ferro, J. M.; van Gijn, J.; Hertzberger, L. I.; Koudstaal, P. J.; Ricci, S.; Ringelstein, E. B.; Vanhooren, G.; Venables, G. S.; Albers, G.; Bath, P.; Bornstein, N.; Chan, B.; Chen, S.-T.; Cunha, L.; Dahlöf, B.; DeKeyser, J.; Donnan, G.; Estol, C.; Gorelick, P.; Lu, C.; Pais, P.; Roberts, R.; Sacco, R.; Skvortsova, V.; Teal, P.; Toni, D.; Weber, M.; Yoon, B. W.; Yusuf, S.; Amarenco, P.; Bousser, M.-G.; Fisher, M.; Ford, I.; Fox, K. M.; Hennerici, M. G.; Mattle, H. P.; Rothwell, P.; Sissani, L.; Labreuche, J.; Steg, G.; Vicaut, E.

    2017-01-01

    To develop and externally validate a prediction model for major bleeding in patients with a TIA or ischemic stroke on antiplatelet agents. We combined individual patient data from 6 randomized clinical trials (CAPRIE, ESPS-2, MATCH, CHARISMA, ESPRIT, and PRoFESS) investigating antiplatelet therapy

  12. Otorrhagia bleeding due to leech bite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narges Askari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leeches are blood-sucking hermaphroditic parasites that attach to vertebrate hosts, bite through the skin, and suck out blood. When leeches feed, they secrete an anticoagulant (hirudin, which helps them get a full meal of blood. This is the first report of leech removal from external auditory canal. Previous leech involvement cases were explained in nasopharynx, larynx, pharynx, eye, and gastrointestinal tract. Prominent sign of all cases was active bleeding from the leech attachment site; that stopped with leech removal. A 24-year-old man was presented to Al-Zahra hospital with left otorrhagia and otalgia from 2 days ago. After suction of ear a small soft foreign body was seen in the external ear near the tympanic membrane, then the ear filled with glycerine phenice, the patient explained decreased movement of foreign body. Four hours later the bloody discharge stopped and otalgia decreased. After suction of clots, a leech was extruded from external auditory canal by alligator. Leech infestation is a rare cause of otorrhagia and should be suspected in the endemic region in all of unusual bleeding; it can be diagnosed and treated by exact inspection and removal.

  13. A biphasic model for bleeding in soft tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yi-Jui; Chong, Kwitae; Eldredge, Jeff D.; Teran, Joseph; Benharash, Peyman; Dutson, Erik

    2017-11-01

    The modeling of blood passing through soft tissues in the body is important for medical applications. The current study aims to capture the effect of tissue swelling and the transport of blood under bleeding or hemorrhaging conditions. The soft tissue is considered as a non-static poro-hyperelastic material with liquid-filled voids. A biphasic formulation effectively, a generalization of Darcy's law-is utilized, treating the phases as occupying fractions of the same volume. The interaction between phases is captured through a Stokes-like friction force on their relative velocities and a pressure that penalizes deviations from volume fractions summing to unity. The soft tissue is modeled as a hyperelastic material with a typical J-shaped stress-strain curve, while blood is considered as a Newtonian fluid. The method of Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics is used to discretize the conservation equations based on the ease of treating free surfaces in the liquid. Simulations of swelling under acute hemorrhage and of draining under gravity and compression will be demonstrated. Ongoing progress in modeling of organ tissues under injuries and surgical conditions will be discussed.

  14. Enteral alimentation and gastrointestinal bleeding in mechanically ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pingleton, S K; Hadzima, S K

    1983-01-01

    The incidence of upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in mechanically ventilated ICU patients receiving enteral alimentation was reviewed and compared to bleeding occurring in ventilated patients receiving prophylactic antacids or cimetidine. Of 250 patients admitted to our ICU during a 1-yr time period, 43 ventilated patients were studied. Patients in each group were comparable with respect to age, respiratory diagnosis, number of GI hemorrhage risk factors, and number of ventilator, ICU, and hospital days. Twenty-one patients had evidence of GI bleeding. Fourteen of 20 patients receiving antacids and 7 of 9 patients receiving cimetidine had evidence of GI bleeding. No bleeding occurred in 14 patients receiving enteral alimentation. Complications of enteral alimentation were few and none required discontinuation of enteral alimentation. Our preliminary data suggest the role of enteral alimentation in critically ill patients may include not only protection against malnutrition but also protection against GI bleeding.

  15. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding: American College of Nurse-Midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Variations in uterine bleeding, termed abnormal uterine bleeding, occur commonly among women and often are physiologic in nature with no significant consequences. However, abnormal uterine bleeding can cause significant distress to women or may signify an underlying pathologic condition. Most women experience variations in menstrual and perimenstrual bleeding in their lifetimes; therefore, the ability of the midwife to differentiate between normal and abnormal bleeding is a key diagnostic skill. A comprehensive history and use of the PALM-COEIN classification system will provide clear guidelines for clinical management, evidence-based treatment, and an individualized plan of care. The purpose of this Clinical Bulletin is to define and describe classifications of abnormal uterine bleeding, review updated terminology, and identify methods of assessment and treatment using a woman-centered approach. © 2016 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  16. Use of heparin in the investigation of obscure gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mernagh, J.R.; O'Donovan, N.; Somers, S.; Gill, G.; Sridhar, S.

    2001-01-01

    To determine if the administration of heparin improves the predictive value of angiography in the investigation of obscure gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. 18 patients with a history of chronic GI bleeding were investigated with angiography. For 6 patients, the cause of GI bleeding was established with angiography; the 12 patients who had negative results were given heparin for 24 h and were reassessed with angiography. After heparin administration, the source of GI bleeding was determined with angiography for 6 of the remaining 12 patients. Thus, heparinization increased diagnostic yield from 33% (6 of 18) to 67% (12 of 18). No significant complications, such as uncontrolled GI bleeding, occurred. Heparinization improves the diagnostic yield of angiography when obscure GI bleeding is being investigated. (author)

  17. Predictive factors of recurrent bleeding in Mallory-Weiss syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae Woo; Kim, Hyun Soo; Byun, Jong Won; Won, Chan Sik; Jee, Myeong Gwan; Park, Yong Soon; Baik, Soon Koo; Kwon, Sang Ok; Lee, Dong Ki

    2005-12-01

    Although the majority of patients with Mallory-Weiss syndrome (MWS) have a benign course, MWS patients with recurrent bleeding have an unfavorable outcome and require intensive care. Therefore, this study was carried out to identify the risk factors for recurrent bleeding in MWS patients. The medical records of patients with MWS between January 1999 and December 2003, were reviewed retrospectively. Demographics, initial clinical and laboratory parameters, and endoscopic findings of the patients with and without recurrent bleeding were compared and the potential risk factors predicting recurrent bleeding in MWS were evaluated. A total of one hundred and fifty-nine patients (22 women, 137 men, mean age 48.1 years old) were enrolled in the study. Recurrent bleeding was observed in 17 patients (10.7%). Those patients with recurrent bleeding showed higher frequency for the presence of shock at initial manifestation, combined liver cirrhosis and endoscopic findings of active bleeding, lower hemoglobin level and platelet count, higher amount of transfusions and epinephrine-mixed fluid injections, and longer hospital stay than those patients without recurrent bleeding. Significant risk factors predicting the recurrent bleeding in MWS were the presence of shock at initial manifestation (OR 3.71, 95% CI 1.07-14.90) and the evidence of active bleeding on endoscopic examination (OR 9.89, 95% CI 1.88-51.98) on multivariate analysis. Intensive care with close monitoring is required for the patients with shock on initial manifestation or with evidence of active bleeding on endoscopic examinations since these are independent risk factors predicting the recurrent bleeding in MWS patients.

  18. Endoscopic treatment for high-risk bleeding peptic ulcers: A randomized, controlled trial of epinephrine alone with epinephrine plus fresh frozen plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodadoostan, Mahsa; Karami-Horestani, Mohammad; Shavakhi, Ahmad; Sebghatollahi, Vahid

    2016-01-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common and potentially life-threatening emergency with substantial mortality. Fresh frozen plasma (FFP), a good source of coagulation factors, might be an ideal injection agent based on its physiologic properties. Therefore, we evaluated the role of FFP as a hemostatic agent in patients with high-risk bleeding peptic ulcers. From August 2015 to April 2016, 108 consecutive patients with high-risk bleeding ulcers were admitted to our university hospital. They were randomly assigned to undergo injection of epinephrine alone (A) or epinephrine plus FFP (B). The primary outcomes assessed were the initial hemostasis, recurrent bleeding, hospital stay, blood transfusion, surgery rate, and 14-day mortality. Initial hemostasis was achieved in 47 of 50 patients (94%) in the Group A and 49 of 50 patients (98%) in the Group B ( P = 0.61). There were no significant differences in the rate of recurrent bleeding between Group A (14%) and Group B (8%) ( P = 0.52). We found no significant differences between Group A and Group B with respect to the surgery rate, bleeding death, procedure-related death, and duration of hospitalization ( P > 0.05). It is concluded the injection of epinephrine alone was equally effective as injection of epinephrine plus FFP to endoscopic hemostasis. Epinephrine alone and epinephrine plus FFP were not different in recurrent bleeding, rate of surgery, blood transfusion, or mortality.

  19. Endoscopic treatment for high-risk bleeding peptic ulcers: A randomized, controlled trial of epinephrine alone with epinephrine plus fresh frozen plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahsa Khodadoostan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a common and potentially life-threatening emergency with substantial mortality. Fresh frozen plasma (FFP, a good source of coagulation factors, might be an ideal injection agent based on its physiologic properties. Therefore, we evaluated the role of FFP as a hemostatic agent in patients with high-risk bleeding peptic ulcers. Materials and Methods: From August 2015 to April 2016, 108 consecutive patients with high-risk bleeding ulcers were admitted to our university hospital. They were randomly assigned to undergo injection of epinephrine alone (A or epinephrine plus FFP (B. The primary outcomes assessed were the initial hemostasis, recurrent bleeding, hospital stay, blood transfusion, surgery rate, and 14-day mortality. Results: Initial hemostasis was achieved in 47 of 50 patients (94% in the Group A and 49 of 50 patients (98% in the Group B (P = 0.61. There were no significant differences in the rate of recurrent bleeding between Group A (14% and Group B (8% (P = 0.52. We found no significant differences between Group A and Group B with respect to the surgery rate, bleeding death, procedure-related death, and duration of hospitalization (P > 0.05. Conclusion: It is concluded the injection of epinephrine alone was equally effective as injection of epinephrine plus FFP to endoscopic hemostasis. Epinephrine alone and epinephrine plus FFP were not different in recurrent bleeding, rate of surgery, blood transfusion, or mortality.

  20. CERVICAL ECTOPIC PREGNANCY WITH MASSIVE BLEEDING: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavcho Tomov

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A 29-year-old patient with cervical ectopic pregnancy (CEP presented as "suspected" cervical mass, and irregular vaginal bleeding was directed to a gynecologic oncologist for consultation. During the examination a massive bleeding occurred. After an unsuccessful attempt to stop the bleeding with a balloon catheter and vaginal tamponade, a total abdominal hysterectomy was performed. The predisposing factors, the differential diagnostic possibilities and the clinical approaches in CEP are discussed. Total abdominal hysterectomy is the procedure of choice for treatment of cervical pregnancy under conditions of urgency and life-threatening bleeding.

  1. Recent Update of Embolization of Upper Gastrointestinal Tract Bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji Hoon [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding is a frequent complication with significant morbidity and mortality. Although endoscopic hemostasis remains the initial treatment modality, severe bleeding despite endoscopic management occurs in 5-10% of patients, necessitating surgery or interventional embolotherapy. Endovascular embolotherapy is now considered the first-line therapy for massive UGI bleeding that is refractory to endoscopic management. Interventional radiologists need to be familiar with the choice of embolic materials, technical aspects of embolotherapy, and the factors affecting the favorable or unfavorable outcomes after embolotherapy for UGI bleeding.

  2. Incidence and Management of Bleeding Complications Following Percutaneous Radiologic Gastrostomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Nieun; Shin, Ji Hoon; Ko, Gi Young; Yoon, Hyun Ki; Gwon, Dong Il; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Sung, Kyu Bo [Asan Medical Center, Ulsan University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding is a serious complication that sometimes occurs after percutaneous radiologic gastrostomy (PRG). We evaluated the incidence of bleeding complications after a PRG and its management including transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE). We retrospectively reviewed 574 patients who underwent PRG in our institution between 2000 and 2010. Eight patients (1.4%) had symptoms or signs of upper GI bleeding after PRG. The initial presentation was hematemesis (n = 3), melena (n = 2), hematochezia (n = 2) and bloody drainage through the gastrostomy tube (n = 1). The time interval between PRG placement and detection of bleeding ranged from immediately after to 3 days later (mean: 28 hours). The mean decrease in hemoglobin concentration was 3.69 g/dL (range, 0.9 to 6.8 g/dL). In three patients, bleeding was controlled by transfusion (n = 2) or compression of the gastrostomy site (n = 1). The remaining five patients underwent an angiography because bleeding could not be controlled by transfusion only. In one patient, the bleeding focus was not evident on angiography or endoscopy, and wedge resection including the tube insertion site was performed for hemostasis. The other four patients underwent prophylactic (n = 1) or therapeutic (n = 3) TAEs. In three patients, successful hemostasis was achieved by TAE, whereas the remaining one patient underwent exploration due to persistent bleeding despite TAE. We observed an incidence of upper GI bleeding complicating the PRG of 1.4%. TAE following conservative management appears to be safe and effective for hemostasis.

  3. Low hemoglobin levels are associated with upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Hasegawa, Rumiko; Shirai, Yoshinori; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-09-01

    Upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding can be fatal. Blood test variables were reviewed in search of threshold values to detect the presence of occult upper GI bleeding. The records of 1,023 patients who underwent endoscopy at the National Hospital Organization Shimoshizu Hospital from October 2014, to September 2015, were retrospectively reviewed. Of those, 95 had upper GI bleeding. One-way analysis of variance was applied to blood test variables comparing patients with and without upper GI bleeding. Logistic regression analysis was applied to detect the association of blood test parameters with upper GI bleeding, and receiver-operator characteristics were applied to establish threshold values. White blood cell count (WBC), platelet (Plt) count, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels were higher, and hemoglobin (Hb) and albumin (Alb) levels were lower in patients with upper GI bleeding. Logistic regression analysis showed that low Hb was significantly associated with upper GI bleeding and a Hb value of 10.8 g/dl was established as the threshold for the diagnosis. In patients with upper GI bleeding, WBC, Plt count, and BUN levels were higher and Hb and Alb levels were reduced. Hb at 10.8 g/dl was established as a threshold value to detect upper GI bleeding.

  4. [Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline on 'Vaginal bleeding'].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Corlien J H; Meijer, Loes J; Janssen, C A H Ineke; Burgers, Jako S; Opstelten, Wim

    2015-01-01

    The revised Dutch College of General Practitioners' practice guideline on 'Vaginal bleeding' provides recommendations for abnormal bleeding in women in the reproduction phase of life and for post-menopausal bleeding. This guideline is closely attuned to the guideline on 'Heavy menstrual bleeding' of the Dutch Society of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Transvaginal sonography is not reliable for excluding endometrial carcinoma in women with abnormal vaginal bleeding treated with tamoxifen. The choice of medical treatment is determined in consultation with the patient. The following factors are assessed: severity and bother, long-term need for contraception, preference for cycle control, desire to have a child, pain during menstruation, comorbidity and use of medication. Treatment options are nonhormonal (NSAIDs, or tranexamic acid) or hormonal (a levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system, or combined oral contraceptive). In women of reproductive age, referral is indicated if medical treatment is not effective. Other indications are intracavitary abnormalities diagnosed by transvaginal sonography, tamoxifen use, persistent contact bleeding, and suspicion of coagulation disorders. Indications for referral for post-menopausal bleeding include: sonographic endometrial thickness > 4 mm, abnormal cervical cytology, tamoxifen use, irregular bleeding during use of hormone therapy for vasomotor symptoms and persistent or recurrent bleeding, regardless of endometrial thickness.

  5. Abnormal Bleeding during Menopause Hormone Therapy: Insights for Clinical Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastião Freitas De Medeiros

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective Our objective was to review the involved mechanisms and propose actions for controlling/treating abnormal uterine bleeding during climacteric hormone therapy. Methods A systemic search of the databases SciELO, MEDLINE, and Pubmed was performed for identifying relevant publications on normal endometrial bleeding, abnormal uterine bleeding, and hormone therapy bleeding. Results Before starting hormone therapy, it is essential to exclude any abnormal organic condition, identify women at higher risk for bleeding, and adapt the regimen to suit eachwoman's characteristics. Abnormal bleeding with progesterone/progestogen only, combined sequential, or combined continuous regimens may be corrected by changing the progestogen, adjusting the progestogen or estrogen/progestogen doses, or even switching the initial regimen to other formulation. Conclusion To diminish the occurrence of abnormal bleeding during hormone therapy (HT, it is important to tailor the regimen to the needs of individual women and identify those with higher risk of bleeding. The use of new agents as adjuvant therapies for decreasing abnormal bleeding in women on HT awaits future studies.

  6. Comparison of Two Major Perioperative Bleeding Scores for Cardiac Surgery Trials: Universal Definition of Perioperative Bleeding in Cardiac Surgery and European Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting Bleeding Severity Grade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoszko, Justyna; Wijeysundera, Duminda N; Karkouti, Keyvan; Callum, Jeannie; Rao, Vivek; Crowther, Mark; Grocott, Hilary P; Pinto, Ruxandra; Scales, Damon C; Achen, Blaine; Brar, Sukhpal; Morrison, Doug; Wong, David; Bussières, Jean S; de Waal, Tonya; Harle, Christopher; de Médicis, Étienne; McAdams, Charles; Syed, Summer; Tran, Diem; Waters, Terry

    2018-03-15

    Research into major bleeding during cardiac surgery is challenging due to variability in how it is scored. Two consensus-based clinical scores for major bleeding: the Universal definition of perioperative bleeding and the European Coronary Artery Bypass Graft (E-CABG) bleeding severity grade, were compared in this substudy of the Transfusion Avoidance in Cardiac Surgery (TACS) trial. As part of TACS, 7,402 patients underwent cardiac surgery at 12 hospitals from 2014 to 2015. We examined content validity by comparing scored items, construct validity by examining associations with redo and complex procedures, and criterion validity by examining 28-day in-hospital mortality risk across bleeding severity categories. Hierarchical logistic regression models were constructed that incorporated important predictors and categories of bleeding. E-CABG and Universal scores were correlated (Spearman ρ = 0.78, P model discrimination based on predictors of perioperative mortality increased with additional inclusion of the Universal score (c-statistic increase from 0.83 to 0.91) or E-CABG (c-statistic increase from 0.83 to 0.92). When other major postoperative complications were added to these models, the association between Universal or E-CABG bleeding with mortality remained. Although each offers different advantages, both the Universal score and E-CABG performed well in the validity assessments, supporting their use as outcome measures in clinical trials.

  7. Bleeding Time, Volume of Shed Blood Collected at the Bleeding Time Site, and the Peripheral Venous Hematocrit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-10

    Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology 1991;98:327-328. 20. Bain B, Forster T. A sex difference in the bleeding time. 21. Smith PS, Baglini R, Meissner GF...Description of a method for determining the bleeding time and coagulation time and report of three cases of hemorrhagic disease relieved by...OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH CONTRACT N00014-88-C-0118 CONTRACT N00014-94-C-0149 TECHNICAL REPORT 95-01 BLEEDING TIME, VOLUME OF SHED BLOOD

  8. ENDOSCOPIC DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL BLEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Benedeto-Stojanov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGB is a common medical emergency problem with significant morbidity and mortality. The aim of this paper is to establish the incidence of upper gastrointestinal bleeding in relation to sex and age, determine the prevalence of bleeding lesions and perform analysis of bleeding peptic ulcer in relation to the location, age, gender, Forrest classification and the need for endoscopic hemostasis. Thе prospective study included 70 patients with UGB, 42 men and 28 women, mean age 68.64±13.66 years. The diagnosis of bleeding lesions was made exclusively by means of esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Forrest classification was used in the evaluation of the activity of bleeding ulcers of the stomach and duodenum. The largest number of bleeding patients was of male sex (60%. Bleeding most commonly occurred in patients older than 60 years (84.29%. Statistically, female patients were significantly older than patients of male gender (p=0.001. The most common cause of bleeding was peptic ulcer (65.71%. The average age of patients with gastric ulcer was 70.57±15.68 years, with a duodenal ulcer 63.78±16.70 years. In the duodenum, Forrest Ib, IIa and IIb ulcers were usually confirmed, whereas Forrest IIc ulcers were identified in the stomach. Endoscopic hemostasis was required in 55.56% of patients with duodenal and in 23.81% of patients with gastric ulcer. The incidence of UGB is higher in men and it increases with age. The most common cause of bleeding is ulcer disease. Patients with gastric ulcer are older than patients with duodenal ulcer, while both gastric and duodenal ulcers are found in the oldest patients. Duodenal ulcers cause serious bleeding and more often require endoscopic hemostasis.

  9. Abnormal gastrointestinal accumulation of radiotracer by gastric bleeding during {sup 99m}Tc-MDP bone scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kyung A.; Lee, Sang Woo; Lee, Jae Tae; Lee, Kyu Bo [College of Medicine, Kyungpook National Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-06-01

    We present a case in which a patient with acute hemorrhagic gastritis demonstrated abnormal gastrointestinal accumulation of radiotracer during {sup 99m}Tc-methylene diphosphonate (MDP) skeletal scintigraphy. A hemorrhagic gastritis was subsequently demonstrated by endoscopy. The mechanism for the intestinal localization of {sup 99m}Tc-MDP in this patients is not clear, but we guess that the extravasated blood containing the radiopharmaceutical cannot recirculate and stays at the bleeding site, so we can see the intestinal activity.

  10. Bleeding risk for surgical dialysis procedures in children with hemolytic uremic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weil, Brent R; Andreoli, Sharon P; Billmire, Deborah F

    2010-09-01

    Children with hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) frequently develop acute kidney injury (AKI) requiring renal replacement therapy (RRT). Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is commonly used. Despite high rates of thrombocytopenia, there is concern that platelet transfusions may worsen HUS by exacerbating microthrombi formation. We evaluated bleeding risk for PD catheter placement with or without central venous catheter (CVC) placement in children with HUS. Records from 1998 to 2007 were searched. Data regarding patient demographics, PD catheter placement, CVC placement, occurrence of procedure-associated bleeding, and time from insertion to removal of PD catheter were collected. Patients were stratified according to those who received and those who did not receive platelet transfusions. Seventy-three patients were identified. Twenty-two (30%) patients received platelet transfusion while 51 (70%) did not. Mean preoperative platelet counts were 37,600+/-21,900/mm(3) in patients receiving transfusions and 64,800 +/- 38,800/mm(3) in patients not receiving transfusions. Sixty-seven children (92%) also underwent CVC placement. There were no bleeding complications related to these procedures in either group. No differences in time to removal of the PD catheter were detected. Although caution and sound clinical judgment must be exercised, our findings suggest that PD catheter and CVC placement can be accomplished safely in most children with HUS, without need for platelet transfusion in spite of the associated thrombocytopenia.

  11. Gender differences and bleeding complications after PCI on first and second generation DES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanha, Wojciech; Kawecki, Damian; Roleder, Tomasz; Pluta, Aleksandra; Marcinkiewicz, Kamil; Morawiec, Beata; Kret, Mariusz; Pawlowski, Tomasz; Smolka, Grzegorz; Ochala, Andrzej; Wojakowski, Wojciech

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate gender differences in the long-term clinical outcomes and safety of patients treated with first- and second generation DES. The Katowice-Zabrze Registry included 1916 consecutive patients treated with either first or second generation DES. We evaluated major adverse cardiac and cerebrovascular events (MACCE) [composite of death, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke and target vessel revascularization (TVR)] at 12-month follow-up. Safety end point was bleeding complications and stent thrombosis. Registry included [unstable angina (UA) 1500(78%), non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) 285 (15%), ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction/left bundle branch block (STEMI/LBBB) 131 (7%)]. There were 35.5% females and 64.5% males. Women were older and had higher prevalence of comorbidities. Males more often had multivessel disease and higher Syntax score when comparable to females. We did not observed difference in acute and subacute stent thrombosis in our data, however, females had more in-hospital bleeding complications. Univariable Cox regression analysis revealed that women had similar outcomes when compared to men in terms of a risk of death, MI, TVR, stroke and MACCE at 1-year follow-up. There were no differences between males and females in MACCE when first- and second generation DES were analyzed separately. Despite higher risk profile, women treated with DES have similar outcomes as males in 1-year follow-up. However there is, an increased risk of in-hospital bleedings in women.

  12. Anemia, bleeding, and blood transfusion in the intensive care unit: causes, risks, costs, and new strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEvoy, Michael T; Shander, Aryeh

    2013-11-01

    The definition of anemia is controversial and varies with the sex, age, and ethnicity of the patient. Anemia afflicts half of hospitalized patients and most elderly hospitalized patients. Acute anemia in the operating room or intensive care unit is associated with increased morbidity as well as other adverse outcomes, including death. The risks of anemia are compounded by the added risks associated with transfusion of red blood cells, the most common treatment for severe anemia. The causes of anemia in hospitalized patients include iron deficiency, suppression of erythropoietin and iron transport, trauma, phlebotomy, coagulopathies, adverse effects of and reactions to medications, and stress-induced gastrointestinal bleeding. The types and causes of anemia and the increased health care utilization and costs associated with anemia and undetected internal bleeding are described. The potential benefits and risks associated with transfusion of red blood cells also are explored. Last, the strategies and new tools to help prevent anemia, allow earlier detection of internal bleeding, and avoid unnecessary blood transfusions are discussed.

  13. Challenges in the Management of Bleeding Disorders in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-04-04

    Apr 4, 2018 ... Background: Bleeding disorders (BDs) are characterized by abnormal bleeding for which effective management requires a combination of skill, workforce, diagnostic facilities, and adequate therapeutic options. Objectives: The objectives of this study were to determine the capacity of Nigerian hematologists ...

  14. The efficacy of endoscopic therapy in bleeding peptic ulcer patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Endotherapy is the primary modality for the control of bleeding from peptic ulceration. Objective. To assess the efficacy of endoscopic intervention for high-risk bleeding peptic ulcer disease and to benchmark our surgical and mortality rates. Methods. Two hundred and twenty-seven patients with peptic

  15. Leech as a cause of abnormal vaginal bleeding: Presentation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    days, menstrual cycle of 80ml. Rather than this specific figures, however, abnormal uterine bleeding should be defined in terms of deviation from an individual patient's established menstrual pattern1,2. Leech bite as a cause pf abnormal vaginal bleeding has been reported in ...

  16. Pattern recognition in menstrual bleeding diaries by statistical cluster analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wessel Jens

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of this paper is to empirically identify a treatment-independent statistical method to describe clinically relevant bleeding patterns by using bleeding diaries of clinical studies on various sex hormone containing drugs. Methods We used the four cluster analysis methods single, average and complete linkage as well as the method of Ward for the pattern recognition in menstrual bleeding diaries. The optimal number of clusters was determined using the semi-partial R2, the cubic cluster criterion, the pseudo-F- and the pseudo-t2-statistic. Finally, the interpretability of the results from a gynecological point of view was assessed. Results The method of Ward yielded distinct clusters of the bleeding diaries. The other methods successively chained the observations into one cluster. The optimal number of distinctive bleeding patterns was six. We found two desirable and four undesirable bleeding patterns. Cyclic and non cyclic bleeding patterns were well separated. Conclusion Using this cluster analysis with the method of Ward medications and devices having an impact on bleeding can be easily compared and categorized.

  17. First-trimester vaginal bleeding and complications later in pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jacob Alexander; Dideriksen, Katrine Lehrmann; Lidegaard, Øjvind

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the association of first-trimester bleeding without miscarriage and complications later in the first pregnancy as well as in the next pregnancy.......To evaluate the association of first-trimester bleeding without miscarriage and complications later in the first pregnancy as well as in the next pregnancy....

  18. Increased accuracy in heparin and protamine administration decreases bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Runge, Marx; Møller, Christian H; Steinbrüchel, Daniel A

    2009-01-01

    Three to 5 percent of the patients undergoing cardiac surgery are reoperated because of bleeding. When a surgical cause can be excluded, heparin/protamine mismatch may be considered. Insufficient reversal of heparin and overdosing of protamine may cause postoperative bleeding. The purpose...

  19. Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for bleeding varices in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Endoscopic injection sclerotherapy for bleeding varices in children with intrahepatic and extrahepatic portal venous obstruction: Benefit of injection tract embolisation. ... In a previous study at our institution, sclerotherapy was associated with a high re-bleeding rate and oesophageal ulceration. Embolisation of the injection ...

  20. 14 CFR 33.66 - Bleed air system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bleed air system. 33.66 Section 33.66 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.66 Bleed air system. The...

  1. Recombinant activated factor VII for uncontrolled bleeding postcardiac surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aly Makram Habib

    2016-10-01

    Conclusion: In this analysis, rFVIIa succefully reduced the chest tube bleeding and blood products transfused during severe post cardiac surgical bleeding. However, safety of rFVIIa remains unclear. Prospective controlled trials are still needed to confirm the role of rFVIIa.

  2. [Prophylaxis for stress ulcer bleeding in the intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avendaño-Reyes, J M; Jaramillo-Ramírez, H

    2014-01-01

    The critically ill patient can develop gastric erosions and, on occasion, stress ulcers with severe gastrointestinal bleeding that can be fatal. The purpose of this review was to provide current information on the pathophysiology, risk factors, and prophylaxis of digestive tract bleeding from stress ulcers in the intensive care unit. We identified articles through a PubMed search, covering the years 1970 to 2013. The most relevant articles were selected using the search phrases "stress ulcer", "stress ulcer bleeding prophylaxis", and "stress-related mucosal bleeding" in combination with "intensive care unit". The incidence of clinically significant bleeding has decreased dramatically since 1980. The most important risk factors are respiratory failure and coagulopathy. Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) or H2 receptor antagonists (H2RAs) are used in stress ulcer bleeding prophylaxis. Both drugs have been shown to be superior to placebo in reducing the risk for gastrointestinal bleeding and PPIs are at least as effective as H2RAs. Early enteral feeding has been shown to reduce the risk for stress ulcer bleeding, albeit in retrospective studies. Admittance to the intensive care unit in itself does not justify prophylaxis. PPIs are at least as effective as H2RAs. We should individualize the treatment of each patient in the intensive care unit, determining risk and evaluating the need to begin prophylaxis. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  3. Aetiology of Upper Gastrointestinal Bleeding in North-Eastern Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oesophageal varices were the most frequent cause of bleeding (45.3%) followed by non-ulcer peptic acid disease (23.7%) and peptic ulcer disease (16.9%). Gastric cancer and Mallory-Weiss syndrome were rare with each accounting for 1.9% of the cases. In 11 (10.4%) patients no source of bleeding could be identified.

  4. Packing of Renal Fossa: Useful Technique for Intractable Bleeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is no documented study to indicate the role of prolonged packing of renal fossa (24 to 48 hours) to control bleeding in life threating haemorrhage following open pyelolithotomy without compromise in the renal functions. On the contrary emergency nephrectomy was performed for intractable bleeding during renal stone ...

  5. Histopathological findings of Post-Menopausal bleeding in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Postmenopausal bleeding is an alarming sign that may be associated with uterine malignancy. In recent years about 60% of women with post menopausal bleeding are said to have no organic cause in developed countries. There is no data concerning about this issue in Ethiopia. Objective: To determine ...

  6. Prediction models in women with postmenopausal bleeding: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hanegem, Nehalennia; Breijer, Maria C.; Opmeer, Brent C.; Mol, Ben W. J.; Timmermans, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Postmenopausal bleeding is associated with an elevated risk of having endometrial cancer. The aim of this review is to give an overview of existing prediction models on endometrial cancer in women with postmenopausal bleeding. In a systematic search of the literature, we identified nine prognostic

  7. Gastrointestinal bleeding in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Kjeldsen, J

    2000-01-01

    Gastrointestinal bleeding occurs in a number of patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) and may lead to a high transfusion need. The aim of this study was to estimate the occurrence and severity of gastrointestinal bleeding in a geographically well defined HHT population....

  8. Bleeding gastrointestinal stromal tumour of the stomach complicated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inferior vena cava filter insertion was not possible due to non-availability. Coexistence of DVT needing anticoagulation and bleeding gastric GIST requiring urgent resection presented a management dilemna. Despite the risk, the patient was taken for an emergency tumor resection primarily to stop the bleeding and facilitate ...

  9. Delayed Bleeding and Pelvic Haematoma after Low-Energy Osteoporotic Pubic Rami Fracture in a Warfarin Patient: An Unusual Cause of Abdominal Pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Sandri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute abdominal pain may be the presenting symptom in a wide range of diseases in the elderly. Acute abdominal pain related to a delayed bleeding and pelvic haematoma after a low-energy pubic rami fracture is rare and can have important consequences; to the best of our knowledge, only one case has been previously described. Case Report. We present an unusual case of an 83-year-old woman taking warfarin for atrial fibrillation, admitted to the Emergency Department (ED with acute abdominal pain and progressive anemia related to a delayed bleeding and pelvic haematoma 72 hours after a low-energy osteoporotic pubic rami fracture. Warfarin was withheld, anticoagulation was reversed by using fresh frozen plasma and vitamin K, and concentrated red blood cells were given. Haemoglobin level gradually returned to normal with a progressive resorption of the haematoma. Conclusion. Delayed bleeding and pelvic haematoma after osteoporotic pubic rami fracture should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain in the elderly. This case indicates the need for hospital admission, careful haemodynamic monitoring, and early identification of bleeding in patients with “benign” osteoporotic pubic rami fracture, especially those receiving anticoagulants, to provide an adequate management and prevent severe complications.

  10. Delayed bleeding and pelvic haematoma after low-energy osteoporotic pubic rami fracture in a warfarin patient: an unusual cause of abdominal pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Andrea; Regis, Dario; Bizzotto, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Acute abdominal pain may be the presenting symptom in a wide range of diseases in the elderly. Acute abdominal pain related to a delayed bleeding and pelvic haematoma after a low-energy pubic rami fracture is rare and can have important consequences; to the best of our knowledge, only one case has been previously described. Case Report. We present an unusual case of an 83-year-old woman taking warfarin for atrial fibrillation, admitted to the Emergency Department (ED) with acute abdominal pain and progressive anemia related to a delayed bleeding and pelvic haematoma 72 hours after a low-energy osteoporotic pubic rami fracture. Warfarin was withheld, anticoagulation was reversed by using fresh frozen plasma and vitamin K, and concentrated red blood cells were given. Haemoglobin level gradually returned to normal with a progressive resorption of the haematoma. Conclusion. Delayed bleeding and pelvic haematoma after osteoporotic pubic rami fracture should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute abdominal pain in the elderly. This case indicates the need for hospital admission, careful haemodynamic monitoring, and early identification of bleeding in patients with "benign" osteoporotic pubic rami fracture, especially those receiving anticoagulants, to provide an adequate management and prevent severe complications.

  11. Alternative Treatment for Bleeding Peristomal Varices: Percutaneous Parastomal Embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pabon-Ramos, Waleska M., E-mail: waly.pr@duke.edu [Duke University Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States); Niemeyer, Matthew M. [Washington University Medical Center, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology (United States); Dasika, Narasimham L., E-mail: narasimh@med.umich.edu [University of Michigan Health System, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To describe how peristomal varices can be successfully embolized via a percutaneous parastomal approach. Methods: The medical records of patients who underwent this procedure between December 1, 2000, and May 31, 2008, were retrospectively reviewed. Procedural details were recorded. Median fluoroscopy time and bleeding-free interval were calculated. Results: Seven patients underwent eight parastomal embolizations. The technical success rate was 88 % (one failure). All embolizations were performed with coils combined with a sclerosant, another embolizing agent, or both. Of the seven successful parastomal embolizations, there were three cases of recurrent bleeding; the median time to rebleeding was 45 days (range 26-313 days). The remaining four patients did not develop recurrent bleeding during the follow-up period; their median bleeding-free interval was 131 days (range 40-659 days). Conclusion: This case review demonstrated that percutaneous parastomal embolization is a feasible technique to treat bleeding peristomal varices.

  12. Bleeding disorders in the tribe: result of consanguineous in breeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borhany Munira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To determine the frequency and clinical features of bleeding disorders in the tribe as a result of consanguineous marriages. Design Cross Sectional Study Introduction Countries in which consanguinity is a normal practice, these rare autosomal recessive disorders run in close families and tribes. Here we describe a family, living in village Ali Murad Chandio, District Badin, labeled as haemophilia. Patients & Methods Our team visited the village & developed the pedigree of the whole extended family, up to seven generations. Performa was filled by incorporating patients, family history of bleeding, signs & symptoms, and bleeding from any site. From them 144 individuals were screened with CBC, bleeding time, platelet aggregation studies & RiCoF. While for PT, APTT, VWF assay and Factor VIII assay, samples were kept frozen at -70 degrees C until tested. Results The family tree of the seven generations comprises of 533 individuals, 63 subjects died over a period of 20 years and 470 were alive. Out of all those 144 subjects were selected on the basis of the bleeding history. Among them 98(68.1% were diagnosed to have a bleeding disorder; 44.9% patients were male and 55.1% patients were female. Median age of all the patients was 20.81, range (4 months- 80 yrs. The results of bleeding have shown that majority had gum bleeding, epistaxis and menorrhagia. Most common bleeding disorder was Von Willebrand disease and Platelet functional disorders. Conclusion Consanguineous marriages keep all the beneficial and adversely affecting recessive genes within the family; in homozygous states. These genes express themselves and result in life threatening diseases. Awareness, education & genetic counseling will be needed to prevent the spread of such common occurrence of these bleeding disorders in the community.

  13. Does painless rectal bleeding equate to a colonic polyp?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Alison Morag; Sugarman, Ian

    2017-11-01

    It is often stated that if a patient presents with 'painless rectal bleeding' then a rectal polyp is the probable diagnosis. The aim of this study is to review our experience of children undergoing endoscopy to assess if the above statement is correct. The senior author keeps a prospective database of every child undergoing flexible sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy. As part of this database, the symptoms and signs that the patient presents with, specifically abdominal pain, diarrhoea, mucous per rectum and rectal bleeding, are recorded. These results have been analysed specifically to assess whether the opening statement is correct. Between 2000 and 2014, a total of 401 children have undergone flexible sigmoidoscopy (21) or colonoscopy (380) to investigate rectal bleeding. Of these 401 patients, 42 (10.5%) had at least one polyp. Four polyps (9%) occurred in 159 patients with no rectal bleeding during the study period. The remaining 42 polyps (91%) were identified in patients with rectal bleeding. Of these 42 polyps, painless rectal bleeding was the only symptom in 24 (57%). However, 123 patients were endoscoped with painless rectal bleeding alone, giving a polyp rate of 19.5% for this symptom. The polyp pickup rate was increased to 28% if rectal bleeding and mucous per rectum were present; however, only 25 patients had this clinical history. We confirm that the most common symptom of rectal polyps is painless rectal bleeding. However, only one in five patients with this clinical history has a rectal polyp at endoscopy. The polyp pickup rate at endoscopy is greater (28%) when a history of both rectal bleeding and mucous per rectumispresent. This information can be used to counsel parents preoperatively. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. [High risk factors of upper gastrointestinal bleeding after neurosurgical procedures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Kang; Wu, Gang; Cheng, Neng-neng; Yao, Cheng-jun; Zhou, Liang-fu

    2005-12-21

    To analyze high risk factors of postoperative upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding after neurosurgery so as to give guidance for prevention of GI bleeding. A questionnaire was developed to investigate the medical records of 1500 patients who were hospitalized and underwent neurosurgical operations in 1997. Logistic regression analysis was made. 1430 valid questionnaires were obtained. Postoperative upper GI bleeding occurred in 75 patients (5.24%). The incidence of upper GI bleeding were 6.64% (54/813) in the male patients and 3.40% (21/617) in the female persons (P = 0.007); 9.88% (41/415) in those aged > 50 and 3.35% in those aged hematoma, intraventricular hemorrhage, subdural hematoma, and extradural hematoma were 15.7%, 10.0%, 6.00%, and 2.94% respectively (P = 0.02). The incidence of upper GI bleeding of the patients with tumors of fourth ventricle of cerebrum, brainstem, cerebral hemisphere, and sellar hypothalamus were 15.79% (3/19), 7.89%, 5.71%, and 3.74% respectively. In the emergent cases, the incidence of upper GI bleeding was higher in those with hypertension. The incidence of upper GI bleeding was 5.46% in the patients undergoing adrenocortical hormone treatment, significantly higher than that in those who did not receive such treatment (2.13%). Patients who are at high risk of developing postoperative upper GI bleeding including that: age greater than 50 years; male; Glasgow Coma Score less than 10 pre and post operation; The lesion was located in brain stem and forth ventricle; Hypertensive cerebral hemorrhage; Intracerebral and intraventricular hemorrhagic brain trauma; Postoperative pneumonia, brain edema, encephalic high pressure, pyogenic infection of the central nervous system and other postoperative complications. The mortality of patients with postoperative upper GI bleeding was evidently higher than that of the patients without postoperative upper GI bleeding.

  15. The prevalence of underlying bleeding disorders in patients with heavy menstrual bleeding with and without gynecologic abnormalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, H. Marieke; Mulder, Andre; Bogchelman, Dick H.; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; Meijer, Karina

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of underlying bleeding disorders in women with heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) with and without gynecologic abnormalities. STUDY DESIGN: We performed a single-center prospective cohort study of 112 consecutive patients who were

  16. The analysis of the causes of uterine bleeding occurred after cesarean section and the evaluation of interventional therapy for bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Peng; Li Yuwei; Li Yunhui; Luo Bin; Wen Wen; Yang Bo

    2011-01-01

    Objective: to analyze the causes of uterine hemorrhage occurred after cesarean section and to investigate the value of angiography and transcatheter artery embolization (TAE) in the diagnosis and treatment of postpartum hemorrhage after cesarean section. Methods: During the period from Jan. 2001 to Dec. 2011, a total of 65 cases suffering from uterine bleeding after cesarean section had underwent uterine arteriography to clarify the diagnosis, which was followed by transcatheter uterine artery embolization (TUAE). The clinical data, the causes of bleeding and the angiographic features were retrospectively analyzed. Results: The causes of uterine bleeding after cesarean section included uterine artery pseudoaneurysm (n=26), uterine atony (n=18), placental factors (n=11), gestational hypertension (n=8), coexisting uterine fibroids (n=1) and uterine bleeding of unknown reason (n=1). Uterine artery angiography revealed contrast extravasation in all patients except one patient. The angiographic findings confirmed the diagnosis of uterine artery bleeding after cesarean section. The bleeding stopped after TUAE, and the patients were in stable condition. No serious complications occurred. Conclusion: Pseudoaneurysm is the primary cause of postpartum uterine hemorrhage after cesarean section. Transcatheter uterine artery angiography can promptly and reliably determine the causes of bleeding, and, at the same time, embolization therapy can be carried out to effectively stop the bleeding. (authors)

  17. Giant bleeding renal angiomyolipoma: diagnosis and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashebu, S.D.; Elshebiny, Y.H.; Dahniya, M.H.; Varro, J.; Al-khawari, H.

    2002-01-01

    A case of a giant bleeding renal angiomyolipoma is presented. The patient was a 40-year-old Egyptian male with no clinical or radiological evidence of tuberous sclerosis. The radiological features and management, including the role of angiography are briefly discussed and the medical reviews on this subject are briefly considered. There was no fever. He had a history of renal calculi. Physical examination revealed a mass in the right loin. His haemoglobin was 9.9 g/dL, blood pressure 110/70 and pulse 96 b.p.m. Routine biochemical investigations were normal. A plain radiograph of the abdomen suggested a right upper pole renal mass. Intravenous urography (IVU) confirmed a large space-occupying lesion. Ultrasonography (US) discovered mixed echogenicity but predominantly echogenic. A few hours after admission, the patient's blood pressure and haematocrit dropped. Plain and contrast enhanced CT (CECT) performed after resuscitation with three units of blood revealed a huge, heterogeneously enhancing and very vascular right renal tumour, with multiple small pseudoaneurysms. The tumour was predominantly of fat density, with soft tissue components and extended beyond the kidney into the perinephric space. The appearance was typical of an angiomyolipoma (AML). Small AML were demonstrated in the left kidney. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  18. Wireless capsule endoscopy: perspectives beyond gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redondo-Cerezo, Eduardo; Sánchez-Capilla, Antonio Damián; De La Torre-Rubio, Paloma; De Teresa, Javier

    2014-11-14

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (CE) is a technology developed for the endoscopic exploration of the small bowel. The first capsule model was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2001, and its first and essential indication was occult gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding. Over subsequent years, this technology has been refined to provide superior resolution, increased battery life, and capabilities to view different parts of the GI tract. Indeed, cases for which CE proved useful have increased significantly over the last few years, with new indications for the small bowel and technical improvements that have expanded its use to other parts of the GI tract, including the esophagus and colon. The main challenges in the development of CE are new devices with the ability to provide therapy, air inflation for a better vision of the small bowel, biopsy sampling systems attached to the capsule and the possibility to guide and move the capsule with an external motion control. In this article we review the current and new indications of CE, and the evolving technological changes shaping this technology, which has a promising potential in the coming future of gastroenterology.

  19. Agonist-induced platelet reactivity correlates with bleeding in haemato-oncological patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Batman, B.; van Bladel, E. R.; van Hamersveld, M.; Pasker-De Jong, Pieternel C M; Korporaal, S. J.A.; Urbanus, R. T.; Roest, M.; Boven, Leonie A; Fijnheer, R.

    2017-01-01

    Background and objective: Prophylactic platelet transfusions are administered to prevent bleeding in haemato-oncological patients. However, bleeding still occurs, despite these transfusions. This practice is costly and not without risk. Better predictors of bleeding are needed, and flow cytometric

  20. Severity and Features of Epistaxis in Children with a Mucocutaneous Bleeding Disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokhuijzen, Eva; Segbefia, Catherine I.; Biss, Tina T.; Clark, Dewi S.; James, Paula D.; Riddel, Jim; Blanchette, Victor S.; Rand, Margaret L.

    2018-01-01

    Objective To use standardized bleeding questionnaires to compare the severity and patterns of epistaxis in children with a mucocutaneous bleeding disorder and control children. Study design The epistaxis sections of the Pediatric Bleeding Questionnaire (PBQ) administered to pediatric patients with

  1. Management of dysfunctional uterine bleeding based on endometrial thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozgul Muneyyirci-Delale

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Ozgul Muneyyirci-Delale1,2, Anuja Gupta1,2, Cynthia Abraham1, Ashadeep Chandrareddy1, Charles H Bowers Jr2, Jed B Cutler2Departments of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1SUNY Downstate Medical Center, 2Kings County Hospital Center, Brooklyn, New York, USAObjective: To manage patients with dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB according to endometrial thickness.Methods: A retrospective chart review of 49 patients who reported 8 or more days of bleeding was performed. They were then divided into three groups based on endometrial thickness (mm: less than 6, 6–11, and greater than 11. These three groups were treated with combined oral contraceptive pills (OCP, conjugated estrogen plus progesterone and megestrol respectively. Patients given megestrol also underwent endometrial biopsy before treatment. Patients recorded the degree of bleeding each day for one month after starting treatment.Results: Mean endometrial thickness in the combined OCPs, conjugated estrogen plus progesterone and megestrol groups were 4, 8 and 14 mm, respectively. Combined OCPs decreased bleeding from 46 to 8 days (P < 0.05, n = 8. Conjugated estrogen plus progesterone decreased the number of days of bleeding from a mean of 41 to 9 (P < 0.01, n = 16. Megestrol decreased bleeding from 54 to 3 days (P < 0.001, n = 25. 52% of patients given megestrol had endometrial hyperplasia.Conclusion: These results support the effectiveness of treating patients with DUB according to endometrial thickness.Keywords: DUB, abnormal uterine bleeding, endometrium, hyperplasia, megestrol acetate

  2. [Management of intractable epistaxis and bleeding points localization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Da-Zhang; Cheng, Jing-Ning; Han, Jun; Shu, Ping; Zhang, Hua

    2005-05-01

    To investigate the common nasal bleeding points and the management of intractable epistaxis. The bleeding points and its correlation with age distribution, surgical techniques as well as its effects were studied retrospectively in 92 patients, in whom the bleeding points were not found by routine nasal endoscopy and the hemorrhage was not controlled with standard nasal packing. The bleeding points were found in the following different sites: superior wall of inferior nasal meatus (56.5%, 52/92), olfactory cleft of nasal septum (27.2%, 25/92), posterosuperior wall of middle nasal meatus (8.7%, 8/92) and uncertain (7.6%, 7/92). The results showed that the bleeding points had correlation with age. Epistaxis was well controlled by electrocoagulation in 83 cases, gelfoam packing in 8 cases, and transcatheter maxillary artery embolization in 1 case. There were no complications during a followed-up for 1 - 3 months after management. Among the 92 cases, the numbers of treatment needed to stop bleeding were 82 cases (89.1%) after 1 time of treatment, 9 cases (9.8%) after 2 times and in one case (1.1%) after 4 times. Endoscopy combined with displacement of the middle and inferior turbinate gives good visualization and direct management of the deeply-sited bleeding points, which were difficult in localization. The combined method provides an effective and safe way to control intractable epistaxis.

  3. Bleeding related to etonogestrel subdermal implant in a US population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Petra M; Long, Margaret E; Marnach, Mary L; Bury, Jessica E

    2011-05-01

    The etonogestrel subdermal implant received US Food and Drug Administration approval in 2006. Menstrual changes represent a common reason why recipients of this implant request early implant removal. Retrospective review of medical records of 155 patients with placement of this implant at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, and medical literature review. In 151 patients (97.4%), this implant was placed for contraception. Sixty-four patients (41.3%) contacted a health care provider about implant-related issues after insertion, including 39 (25.2%) for abnormal bleeding. Mean body mass index (BMI) was 28.5, higher than prior studies of implant-related bleeding. Implant removal rate was 25.2% (mean interval, 9.8 months), with 14.8% requesting removal for bleeding changes. No insertion or postinsertion complications or contraceptive failures were found. Age, race, BMI, parity, prior contraception method, and postpartum and breastfeeding status did not predict bleeding or removal for bleeding risk. Removal rates were higher for amenorrhea, occasional spotting or bleeding, and regular menses than for prolonged or continuous bleeding. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Acute Ischaemic Colitis- A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Basra

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Acute ischaemic colitis (AIC is being increasingly recognised as an uncommon cause of abdominal pain associated with fresh bleeding per rectum. It is paramount to maintain a high index of suspicion and adopt appropriate management strategies to avoid complications and inappropriate interventions. In this paper, we describe a case of AIC and review literature pertinent to the management of this condition. Keywords: Ischaemic colitis, acute abdomen, management.

  5. Importance of histopathological examination of endometrium in Dysfunctional Uterine Bleeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Yaminee Rana

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Abnormal uterine bleeding is a common condition affecting women of reproductive age that has significant social and economic impact. Dysfunctional uterine bleeding (DUB is defined as abnormal uterine bleeding in the absence of organic disease. Dysfunctional uterine bleeding is one of the most commonly encountered gynaecological problems. Objectives: This study is done to evaluate the histopathological pattern of the endometrial biopsies of patients with dysfunctional uterine bleeding and its correlation with clinical data. Methods: The present prospective study included evaluation of 208 cases of dysfunctional uterine bleeding in the Department of Pathology, B. J. Medical College, Ahmedabad over a period of 10 months, from January 2017 to October 2017. Women presenting with abnormal uterine bleeding were included in the study. Those women in which bleeding is secondary to systemic causes, organic causes and due to cervical and vaginal causes were excluded. The specimens were processed, embedded and cut into sections of 3-4 microns. The histopathological patterns were studied. Results: Age distribution varied from 18 years to 70 years, majority of the patients were between 21 to 30 years. Among the cases of DUB, proliferative phase accounted for 66.3% and secretory phase accounted for 21.3%. 18 cases (8.6% of atrophic endometrium, four cases (1.9% of irregular shedding and two cases of luteal phase insufficiency were received. Conclusion: Dysfunctional uterine bleeding is a common and debilitating condition in women of reproductive age. Endometrial biopsy could be effectively used as the first diagnostic step in DUB and thus ensures correct management.

  6. Restrictive versus liberal blood transfusion for gastrointestinal bleeding: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odutayo, Ayodele; Desborough, Michael J R; Trivella, Marialena; Stanley, Adrian J; Dorée, Carolyn; Collins, Gary S; Hopewell, Sally; Brunskill, Susan J; Kahan, Brennan C; Logan, Richard F A; Barkun, Alan N; Murphy, Michael F; Jairath, Vipul

    2017-05-01

    Acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding is a leading indication for red blood cell (RBC) transfusion worldwide, although optimal thresholds for transfusion are debated. We searched MEDLINE, Embase, CENTRAL, CINAHL, and the Transfusion Evidence Library from inception to Oct 20, 2016, for randomised controlled trials comparing restrictive and liberal RBC transfusion strategies for acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Main outcomes were mortality, rebleeding, ischaemic events, and mean RBC transfusion. We computed pooled estimates for each outcome by random effects meta-analysis, and individual participant data for a cluster randomised trial were re-analysed to facilitate meta-analysis. We compared treatment effects between patient subgroups, including patients with liver cirrhosis, patients with non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding, and patients with ischaemic heart disease at baseline. We included four published and one unpublished randomised controlled trial, totalling 1965 participants. The number of RBC units transfused was lower in the restrictive transfusion group than in the liberal transfusion group (mean difference -1·73 units, 95% CI -2·36 to -1·11, p<0·0001). Restrictive transfusion was associated with lower risk of all-cause mortality (relative risk [RR] 0·65, 95% CI 0·44-0·97, p=0·03) and rebleeding overall (0·58, 0·40-0·84, p=0·004). We detected no difference in risk of ischaemic events. There were no statistically significant differences in the subgroups. These results support more widespread implementation of restrictive transfusion policies for adults with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. None. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Transvaginal Ultrasound for the Diagnosis of Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Karen C; Goldstein, Steven R

    2017-03-01

    Transvaginal ultrasound is the first-line imaging test for the evaluation of abnormal uterine bleeding in both premenopausal and postmenopausal women. Transvaginal ultrasound can be used to diagnose structural causes of abnormal bleeding such as polyps, adenomyosis, leiomyomas, hyperplasia, and malignancy, and can also be beneficial in making the diagnosis of ovulatory dysfunction. Traditional 2-dimensional imaging is often enhanced by the addition of 3-dimension imaging with coronal reconstruction and saline infusion sonohysterography. In this article we discuss specific ultrasound findings and technical considerations useful in the diagnosis of abnormal uterine bleeding.

  8. Predicting Major Bleeding in Ischemic Stroke Patients With Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilkens, Nina A; Algra, Ale; Greving, Jacoba P

    2017-11-01

    Performance of risk scores for major bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation and a previous transient ischemic attack or ischemic stroke is not well established. We aimed to validate risk scores for major bleeding in patients with atrial fibrillation treated with oral anticoagulants after cerebral ischemia and explore the net benefit of oral anticoagulants among bleeding risk categories. We analyzed 3623 patients with a history of transient ischemic attack or stroke included in the RE-LY trial (Randomized Evaluation of Long-Term Anticoagulation Therapy). We assessed performance of HEMORR 2 HAGES (hepatic or renal disease, ethanol abuse, malignancy, older age, reduced platelet count or function, hypertension [uncontrolled], anemia, genetic factors, excessive fall risk, and stroke), Shireman, HAS-BLED (hypertension, abnormal renal/liver function, stroke, bleeding history or predisposition, labile international normalized ratio, elderly, drugs/alcohol concomitantly), ATRIA (Anticoagulation and Risk Factors in Atrial Fibrillation), and ORBIT scores (older age, reduced haemoglobin/haematocrit/history of anaemia, bleeding history, insufficient kidney function, and treatment with antiplatelet) with C statistics and calibration plots. Net benefit of oral anticoagulants was explored by comparing risk reduction in ischemic stroke with risk increase in major bleedings on warfarin. During 6922 person-years of follow-up, 266 patients experienced a major bleed (3.8 per 100 person-years). C statistics ranged from 0.62 (Shireman) to 0.67 (ATRIA). Calibration was poor for ATRIA and moderate for other models. The reduction in recurrent ischemic strokes on warfarin was larger than the increase in major bleeding risk, irrespective of bleeding risk category. Performance of prediction models for major bleeding in patients with cerebral ischemia and atrial fibrillation is modest but comparable with performance in patients with only atrial fibrillation. Bleeding risk scores cannot

  9. Clival chordoma manifesting as nasal bleeding. A case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitai, Ryuhei; Yoshida, Kazuhiko; Kubota, Toshihiko; Sato, Kazufumi; Handa, Yuji; Kasahara, Kazuma [University of Fukui, Department of Neurosurgery, Fukui (Japan); Nakajima, Hirofumi [Tsuruga Municipal Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Fukui (Japan)

    2005-05-01

    Chordoma is a rare cartilaginous tumor, for which bleeding presentation is unusual. We report a case of rare hemorrhaged clival chordoma, which was diagnosed correctly by magnetic resonance imaging. A 32-year-old man presented with nasal bleeding. The tumor was totally removed via a trans-sphenoidal approach, from which the surgical specimen confirmed chordoma. Epistaxis seemed to be caused by the spreading of the intratumoral hemorrhage into the sphenoid sinus. This case demonstrates the importance of an exact differential diagnostic evaluation, including chordoma, by use of modern imaging techniques for nasal bleeding. (orig.)

  10. Clival chordoma manifesting as nasal bleeding. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitai, Ryuhei; Yoshida, Kazuhiko; Kubota, Toshihiko; Sato, Kazufumi; Handa, Yuji; Kasahara, Kazuma; Nakajima, Hirofumi

    2005-01-01

    Chordoma is a rare cartilaginous tumor, for which bleeding presentation is unusual. We report a case of rare hemorrhaged clival chordoma, which was diagnosed correctly by magnetic resonance imaging. A 32-year-old man presented with nasal bleeding. The tumor was totally removed via a trans-sphenoidal approach, from which the surgical specimen confirmed chordoma. Epistaxis seemed to be caused by the spreading of the intratumoral hemorrhage into the sphenoid sinus. This case demonstrates the importance of an exact differential diagnostic evaluation, including chordoma, by use of modern imaging techniques for nasal bleeding. (orig.)

  11. Severe renal bleeding caused by a ruptured renal sheath: case report of a rare complication of percutaneous nephrolithotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunes Ali

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Percutaneous nephrolithotomy is a minimally invasive intervention for renal stone disease. Complications, which are rare and usually presented as case reports, are diversified as the utilization of the procedure is expanded. The procedure causes less blood loss and less morbidity when compared to open surgical procedures. Yet, there are some reports involving severe bleeding and relevant morbidity during surgery. These are usually related with the surgical technique or experience of the surgeon. Renal sheaths are designed to cause minimal trauma inside the kidney and, to our knowledge, there are no reports presenting the rupture of a sheath causing severe bleeding during the procedure. Case report We present an adult patient who had severe bleeding during percutaneous nephrolithotomy due to parenchymal injury caused by a ruptured renal sheath. During retrieval, due probably to rough handling of the equipment, a piece of stone with serrated edges ruptured the tip of the sheath, and this tip caused damage inside the kidney. The operation was terminated and measures were taken to control bleeding. The patient was transfused with a total of 1600 ml of blood, and the stones were cleared in a second look operation. Conclusion Although considered to be a minimally invasive procedure, some unexpected complications may arise during percutaneous nephrolithotomy. After being fragmanted, stone pieces may damage surgical equipment, causing acute and severe harm to the kidney. Surgeons must manipulate the equipment with fine and careful movements in order to prevent this situation.

  12. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided coil or glue injection in post-cyanoacrylate gastric variceal re-bleed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukkada, Roy J; Antony, Rajesh; Chooracken, Mathew J; Francis, Jose V; Chettupuzha, Antony P; Mathew, Pradeep G; Augustine, Philip; Koshy, Abraham

    2018-04-09

    N-butyl-cyanoacrylate injection is recommended in bleeding/recently bled gastric varices. However, cyanoacrylate injection is associated with re-bleed in 25% to 50% of patients. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided coil application is an emerging treatment modality for bleeding gastric varices. The aim of this study was to compare EUS-guided coil application combined with or without cyanoacrylate glue injection to injection alone in post-glue gastric variceal re-bleed. A retrospective analysis of a prospectively maintained database was performed. Thirty patients who re-bled after cyanoacrylate injection and who had EUS-guided coil application to gastric varices were included. The comparison was done with data of 51 patients who had only repeat cyanoacrylate injection. Both groups had a follow up for 12 months. EUS-guided coil application was done under endosonographic guidance. A single coil was placed in 7, two coils in each of 13 patients, three in 5, four in 3, five in one, and 6 coils in one patient. In addition, cyanoacrylate glue injection was given in 15 patients. Eight patients had repeat EUS-guided coil application 1 month later. Re-bleed and mortality were assessed. Coilng: Six out of 30 (20%) patients re-bled during follow up of 9 to 365 days. Three out of 30 (10%) died. One patient died 9 days after the procedure due to acute respiratory distress syndrome, one died 4 months after the procedure due to a re-bleed and one 5 months after the procedure due to spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Glue only: 26/51 (51%) re-bled during follow up of 45 to 365 days. EUS-guided coil application resulted in significantly less re-bleed than glue-only (Kaplan-Meir survival analysis with log-rank test, z = 5.4, p guided coil application with/without cyanoacrylate injection for the obliteration of gastric varices is effective for post-cyanoacrylate gastric variceal re-bleed.

  13. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding including coagulopathies and other menstrual disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deligeoroglou, Efthimios; Karountzos, Vasileios

    2018-04-01

    Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB) is a frequent cause of visits to the emergency department and a major reason for concern among adolescents and their families. The most common cause of AUB, in otherwise healthy adolescents, is ovulatory dysfunction, although 5-36% of adolescents who present with heavy menstrual bleeding, have an underlying bleeding disorder (BD). The most common form of BDs is von Willebrand Disease, reflecting 13% of adolescents with AUB. Management of AUB depends on the underlying etiology, the bleeding severity, as well as the need for hospitalization. Treatment of adolescents with an underlying coagulopathy depends on the severity of the BD, while therapeutic interventions are summarized in supportive measures, hormonal treatments (e.g. Combined Oral Contraceptives), non-hormonal treatments (e.g. tranexamic acid and desmopressin), surgical options (e.g. dilatation & curettage) and treatment options in specific conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hormone Replacement Therapy: Can It Cause Vaginal Bleeding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormone replacement therapy: Can it cause vaginal bleeding? I'm taking hormone therapy for menopause symptoms, and my monthly ... mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/menopause/expert-answers/hormone-replacement-therapy/FAQ-20058499 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions ...

  15. Predictive factors for intraoperative excessive bleeding in Graves’ disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosho Yamanouchi

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: A huge goiter presented as a predictive factor for excessive bleeding during surgery for Graves’ disease, and preparation for blood transfusion should be considered in cases where thyroids weigh more than 200 g.

  16. Management of bleeding and leakage after pancreatic surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Castro, S. M. M.; Busch, O. R. C.; Gouma, D. J.

    2004-01-01

    Pancreatic surgery has advanced considerably during the past decades. Recent studies report reduced morbidity rates and virtually no mortality after resection. However, postoperative complications are still a formidable menace. In this chapter we discuss the management of postoperative bleeding and

  17. Anode reactive bleed and injector shift control strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Jun [Rochester, NY; Chowdhury, Akbar [Pittsford, NY; Lerner, Seth E [Honeoye Falls, NY; Marley, William S [Rush, NY; Savage, David R [Rochester, NY; Leary, James K [Rochester, NY

    2012-01-03

    A system and method for correcting a large fuel cell voltage spread for a split sub-stack fuel cell system. The system includes a hydrogen source that provides hydrogen to each split sub-stack and bleed valves for bleeding the anode side of the sub-stacks. The system also includes a voltage measuring device for measuring the voltage of each cell in the split sub-stacks. The system provides two levels for correcting a large stack voltage spread problem. The first level includes sending fresh hydrogen to the weak sub-stack well before a normal reactive bleed would occur, and the second level includes sending fresh hydrogen to the weak sub-stack and opening the bleed valve of the other sub-stack when the cell voltage spread is close to stack failure.

  18. Pregnancy Complications: Bleeding and Spotting from the Vagina

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... miscarry have bleeding or spotting before the miscarriage. Ectopic pregnancy. This is when a fertilized egg implants itself ... of the uterus and begins to grow. An ectopic pregnancy cannot result in the birth of a baby. ...

  19. A rare cause of recurrent gastrointestinal bleeding: mesenteric hemangioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeytunlu Murat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage accounts for approximately 20% of gastrointestinal hemorrhage. The most common causes of lower gastrointestinal hemorrhage in adults are diverticular disease, inflammatory bowel disease, benign anorectal diseases, intestinal neoplasias, coagulopathies and arterio-venous malformations. Hemangiomas of gastrointestinal tract are rare. Mesenteric hemangiomas are also extremely rare. We present a 25-year-old female who was admitted to the emergency room with recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. An intraluminal bleeding mass inside the small intestinal segment was detected during explorative laparotomy as the cause of the recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding. After partial resection of small bowel segment, the histopathologic examination revealed a cavernous hemagioma of mesenteric origin. Although rare, gastrointestinal hemangioma should be thought in differential diagnosis as a cause of recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding.

  20. Evaluation and Management of Adolescents with Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Tanya L Kowalczyk; Miller, Rachel J; Mullins, Eric S

    2015-09-01

    The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics and the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists support the use of new terminology for abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) to consistently categorize AUB by etiology. The term AUB can be further classified as AUB/heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) (replacing the term "menorrhagia") or AUB/intermenstrual bleeding (replacing the term "metrorrhagia"). Although many cases of AUB in adolescent women are attributable to immaturity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, underlying bleeding disorders should be considered in women with AUB/HMB. This article reviews the new terminology for AUB, discusses important relevant features of history and examination, presents the laboratory evaluation of HMB, and describes hormonal (oral contraceptive pills, progestin-only methods, long-acting reversible contraceptives including intrauterine systems), hematologic (tranexamic acid and desmopressin), and surgical management options for AUB/HMB. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Saliency-Based Bleeding Localization for Wireless Capsule Endoscopy Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongda Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Stomach bleeding is a kind of gastrointestinal disease which can be diagnosed noninvasively by wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE. However, it requires much time for physicians to scan large amount of WCE images. Alternatively, computer-assisted bleeding localization systems are developed where color, edge, and intensity features are defined to distinguish lesions from normal tissues. This paper proposes a saliency-based localization system where three saliency maps are computed: phase congruency-based edge saliency map derived from Log-Gabor filter bands, intensity histogram-guided intensity saliency map, and red proportion-based saliency map. Fusing the three maps together, the proposed system can detect bleeding regions by thresholding the fused saliency map. Results demonstrate the accuracy of 98.97% for our system to mark bleeding regions.

  2. Transarterial embolization for management of severe postcoital bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen Eskandari

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Postcoital bleeding is an uncommon cause of gynecologic hemorrhage; however, it can be severe in a majority of cases necessitating surgical management. Methods: We report a case of severe postcoital bleeding in a young woman requiring blood transfusion. Results: Hemostasis was achieved using subselective embolization of cervical artery by metallic coils. Conclusion: Our case demonstrates a minimally invasive treatment for control of non-obstetric hemorrhage.

  3. Practical Approach to Endoscopic Management for Bleeding Gastric Varices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Young Suk [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    Bleeding from gastric varices is generally more severe than bleeding from esophageal varices, although it occurs less frequently. Recently, new endoscopic treatment options and interventional radiological procedures have broadened the therapeutic armamentarium for gastric varices. This review provides an overview of the classification and pathophysiology of gastric varices, an introduction to current endoscopic and interventional radiological management options for gastric varices, and details of a practical approach to endoscopic variceal obturation using N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate.

  4. Abnormal uterine bleeding in reproductive-aged women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Michelle L

    2015-03-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is a common medical condition with several causes. The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics published guidelines in 2011 to develop universally accepted nomenclature and a classification system. In addition, the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology recently updated recommendations on evaluation of abnormal uterine bleeding and indications for endometrial biopsies. This article reviews both medical and surgical treatments, including meta-analysis reviews of the most effective treatment options. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Fibrinogen concentrates for bleeding trauma patients: what is the evidence?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Martin; Ostrowski, S R; Windeløv, N A

    2011-01-01

    A balanced transfusion of red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma and platelets are recommended for massively bleeding trauma patients. Fibrinogen concentrates could potentially lessen or replace the need for fresh frozen plasma and/or platelet transfusions.......A balanced transfusion of red blood cells, fresh frozen plasma and platelets are recommended for massively bleeding trauma patients. Fibrinogen concentrates could potentially lessen or replace the need for fresh frozen plasma and/or platelet transfusions....

  6. Bleeding disorders in dental practice: A diagnostic overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhirup Goswami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dental health care workers are increasingly called upon to provide quality dental care to individuals whose bleeding and clotting mechanisms have been altered by inherited or acquired diseases. This provides an opportunity for the dentist who is trained in the recognition of oral and systemic signs of altered hemostasis to assist in the diagnosis of the underlying condition. A number of dental procedures result in the risk of bleeding that can have serious consequences, such as severe hemorrhage or possibly death, for the patient with a bleeding disorder. Oral care providers must be aware of the impact of bleeding disorders on the management of their patients. These disorders must be recognized from history, clinical examinations, and laboratory investigations, if indicated, prior to surgical procedures including those in dental surgery to prevent bleeding related complications. Safe dental care may require consultation with the patient′s physician, systemic management, and dental treatment modifications. The purpose of this article is how to identify these patients with bleeding disorders.

  7. Transvaginal sonography in abnormal uterine bleeding and correlation to hysteroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, S.; Shah, S.; Ali, H.; Khan, S.; Ehsan, N.; Ahmed, S.Z.

    2017-01-01

    To correlate results of Transvaginal sonography with those of hysteroscopy and biopsy in abnormal uterine bleeding to estimate the accuracy and analytical values of non-invasive transvaginal sonography in abnormal uterine bleeding. Methodology: This cross-sectional Study was carried out at BMCH, Quetta, Balochistan, Pakistan from March 2013 to February 2014 and included 200 patients of abnormal uterine bleeding. Exclusion criteria were pregnancy, virginity, local bleeding of perineal or vaginal origin. Hysteroscopy and biopsy and Transvaginal Ultrasound (TVS) were performed in all. Result: The most common type of bleeding was found to be menorrhagia in 39% while the least common type was postmenopausal bleeding in 9%. Mean endometrial thickness was 11.64 mm and it was noted that at less than 14mm thickness no serious pathology was found. Sensitivity of TVS for endometrial hyperplasia was found to be 66.66% while specificity was 100%. Positive analytical value was 100% while negative value was 100%. Overall sensitivity calculated for TVS was 94.44%, specificity 98.55%, PPV was 81.93% and NPV 98.55%. Conclusion: Sensitivity and specificity of TVS were lower than hysteroscopy and biopsy but the difference was not significant. TVS can be used as first line investigation while hysteroscopy and biopsy may be left for cases of high risk or in those cases where some positive findings could be found on TVS. (author)

  8. Congenital portosystemic shunts with and without gastrointestinal bleeding - case series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Ying; Chen, Jun; Chen, Qi; Ji, Min; Pa, Mier; Qiao, Zhongwei [Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Zhu, Hui [Fudan University Shanghai Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, Shanghai (China); Zheng, Shan [Children' s Hospital of Fudan University, Department of Surgery, Shanghai (China)

    2015-12-15

    The clinical presentation of congenital portosystemic shunt is variable and gastrointestinal bleeding is an uncommon presentation. To describe the imaging features of congenital portosystemic shunt as it presented in 11 children with (n = 6) and without gastrointestinal bleeding (n = 5). We performed a retrospective study on a clinical and imaging dataset of 11 children diagnosed with congenital portosystemic shunt. A total of 11 children with congenital portosystemic shunt were included in this study, 7 with extrahepatic portosystemic shunts and 4 with intrahepatic portosystemic shunts. Six patients with gastrointestinal bleeding had an extrahepatic portosystemic shunt, and the imaging results showed that the shunts originated from the splenomesenteric junction (n = 5) or splenic vein (n = 1) and connected to the internal iliac vein. Among the five cases of congenital portosystemic shunt without gastrointestinal bleeding, one case was an extrahepatic portosystemic shunt and the other four were intrahepatic portosystemic shunts. Most congenital portosystemic shunt patients with gastrointestinal bleeding had a shunt that drained portal blood into the iliac vein via an inferior mesenteric vein. This type of shunt was uncommon, but the concomitant rate of gastrointestinal bleeding with this type of shunt was high. (orig.)

  9. Evaluation and management of abnormal uterine bleeding in premenopausal women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Mary Gayle; Schmidt-Dalton, Tarin A; Weiss, Patrice M; Madsen, Keith P

    2012-01-01

    Up to 14 percent of women experience irregular or excessively heavy menstrual bleeding. This abnormal uterine bleeding generally can be divided into anovulatory and ovulatory patterns. Chronic anovulation can lead to irregular bleeding, prolonged unopposed estrogen stimulation of the endometrium, and increased risk of endometrial cancer. Causes include polycystic ovary syndrome, uncontrolled diabetes mellitus, thyroid dysfunction, hyperprolactinemia, and use of antipsychotics or antiepileptics. Women 35 years or older with recurrent anovulation, women younger than 35 years with risk factors for endometrial cancer, and women with excessive bleeding unresponsive to medical therapy should undergo endometrial biopsy. Treatment with combination oral contraceptives or progestins may regulate menstrual cycles. Histologic findings of hyperplasia without atypia may be treated with cyclic or continuous progestin. Women who have hyperplasia with atypia or adenocarcinoma should be referred to a gynecologist or gynecologic oncologist, respectively. Ovulatory abnormal uterine bleeding, or menorrhagia, may be caused by thyroid dysfunction, coagulation defects (most commonly von Willebrand disease), endometrial polyps, and submucosal fibroids. Transvaginal ultrasonography or saline infusion sonohysterography may be used to evaluate menorrhagia. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system is an effective treatment for menorrhagia. Oral progesterone for 21 days per month and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are also effective. Tranexamic acid is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of ovulatory bleeding, but is expensive. When clear structural causes are identified or medical management is ineffective, polypectomy, fibroidectomy, uterine artery embolization, and endometrial ablation may be considered. Hysterectomy is the most definitive treatment.

  10. Cambios en la etiología, resultados y características de los pacientes con hemorragia digestiva aguda grave a lo largo del periodo 1999-2005 Changes in the etiology, outcome, and characteristics of patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding between 1999 and 2005

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Garrido

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: analizar la evolución, a lo largo del periodo 1999-2005, de las siguientes variables de los pacientes ingresados por hemorragia digestiva (HD en una Unidad de Sangrantes: etiología, patología de base, consumo de AINE/anticoagulación y mortalidad. Material y métodos: durante el periodo 1999-2005 se ha estudiado la evolución de las siguientes causas de HD que requirieron ingreso en la Unidad de Sangrantes: ulcus duodenal (UD, ulcus gástrico (UG, hipertensión portal (HPT y otros. De igual forma se ha analizado la evolución en el porcentaje de enfermos ingresados con patología de base, consumo de fármacos AINE/anticoagulantes y mortalidad. Resultados: se han incluido 1.611 pacientes en el estudio con una edad media de 60,45 años (59,7-61,2, 76,41% hombres (74,3-78,5. La UD fue responsable del 22,20% de episodios (20,2-24,3, la UG del 18,40% (16,6-20,4 y la HPT del 33,60% (31,3-36,0. De forma global realizaban tratamiento con AINE el 34,5% (32,6-37,3, anticoagulación el 7,1% (6,0-8,6, presentaban patología de base el 72,6% (70,4-74,8 y la mortalidad global fue del 6,27% (5,16-7,59. A lo largo del periodo estudiado se constató un aumento de los pacientes con patología de base (p Objectives: to analyze the evolution of the following variables in patients admitted to a Blood Unit for gastrointestinal bleeding throughout 1999-2005: etiology, comorbid diseases, use of NSAIDs/anticoagulants, and mortality. Material and methods: we analyzed the evolution of the following causes of GIB that required admission to the Blood Unit from 1999 to 2005: duodenal ulcer (DU, gastric ulcer (GU, portal hypertension (PHT, and others. We also analyzed changes in the percentage of patients admitted with comorbid disease, use of NSAIDs/anticoagulants, and mortality. Results: 1,611 patients with a mean age of 60.45 years (59.7-61.2 were included in this study; 76.41% were males (74.3-78.5. DU was the cause of bleeding in 22.20% of cases (20

  11. Acute pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... its blood vessels. This problem is called acute pancreatitis. Acute pancreatitis affects men more often than women. Certain ... well it can be treated. Complications of acute pancreatitis may include: Acute kidney failure Long-term lung damage (ARDS) Buildup ...

  12. MR imaging of experimental subdural bleeding. Correlates of brain deformation and tissue water content, and changes in vital physiological parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orlin, J.R.; Thuomas, K.Aa.; Ponten, U.; Bergstroem, K.; Zwetnow, N.N.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate morphological and physiological changes during acute lethal subdural bleeding in 2 models of anaesthetized dogs. Material and Methods: In model I, blood from the aorta was led into a collapsed subdural rubber balloon while in model II, the blood was directed into the subdural compartment over the left cerebral frontoparietal lobe. Eight vital physiological parameters were continuously registered. MR imaging visualized the compression and displacement of cerebral tissue, and assessed the dynamic changes in cerebral tissue water. Results: In model I, tissue herniation and compression of cerebral ventricles led to death at a haematoma volume corresponding to 8% of the intracranial volume. In model II, the extravasated blood progressed infratentorially and into the spinal sac with a volume that was 3 times larger than that of the lethal haematoma. Tissue water increased almost linearly during bleeding in both models. (orig.)

  13. The Role of Adjuvant Acid Suppression on the Outcomes of Bleeding Esophageal Varices after Endoscopic Variceal Ligation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Kun Wu

    Full Text Available The impact of adjuvant acid suppression via proton pump inhibitors or histamine-2 receptor antagonists after endoscopic variceal ligation remains uncertain. We therefore aimed to evaluate the effect of adjuvant acid suppression on the rebleeding and mortality rates in patients who received endoscopic variceal ligation and vasoconstrictor therapy for bleeding esophageal varices. Data from 1997 to 2011 were extracted from the National Health Insurance Research Database in Taiwan. A total of 1576 cirrhotic patients aged > 18 years with a primary diagnosis of acute esophageal variceal bleeding who received endoscopic variceal ligation therapy were screened. After strict exclusion, 637 patients were recruited. The exclusion criteria included patients with gastric variceal bleeding, failure in the control of bleeding, mortality within 12 hours, and history of hepatocellular carcinoma or gastric cancer. Patients were divided into two groups: the vasoconstrictors group (n = 126 and vasoconstrictors plus acid suppression group (n = 511. We observed that the rebleeding and mortality rates were not significantly different between 2 groups during hospitalization and the 15-year follow-up period after discharge. A Charlson score ≥3 (odds ratio: 2.42, 95% confidence interval: 1.55 ~3.79, P = 0.0001, presence of hepatitis C virus (odds ratio: 1.70, 95% confidence interval: 1.15 ~2.52, P = 0.0085, and cirrhosis (odds ratio: 1.69, 95% confidence interval: 1.08 ~2.66, P = 0.0229 were the independent risk factors of mortality after discharge. In conclusion, the results of the current study suggest that adjuvant acid suppression prescription to patients who received endoscopic variceal ligation and vasoconstrictor therapy for bleeding esophageal varices may not change the rebleeding and mortality outcomes compared to that for those who received endoscopic variceal ligation and vasoconstrictor agents without acid suppression.

  14. Prognostic variables in patients with cirrhosis and oesophageal varices without prior bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, S; Bendtsen, F; Christensen, E

    1994-01-01

    As identification of patients at risk of bleeding or death is essential for prophylaxis, we determined the prognostic influence of various patient characteristics on the risk of bleeding and death. Fifty-five patients with cirrhosis and oesophageal varices without previous bleeding were included...... a significant relation with an increased risk of bleeding or death: high plasma volume (p varices (p

  15. Fasting for haemostasis in children with gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shuang-Hong; Guo, Qin; Liu, Guan J; Wan, Chaomin

    2016-05-19

    Gastrointestinal bleeding refers to loss of blood from any site of the digestive tract. In paediatric clinical practice, it is usually a complaint of children attending the emergency department as a symptom of diseases such as ulcers, gastric or oesophageal varices, gastritis, Mallory-Weiss tears, anorectal fissures, allergic colitis, infectious colitis, intussusception, Henoch-Schonlein purpura, and Meckel's diverticulum; it also occurs with high incidence in critically ill children hospitalised in intensive care units and is caused by stress-induced gastropathy. No matter what the cause of gastrointestinal bleeding, fasting is believed to be necessary due to the fear that eating may affect haemostasis or aggravate bleeding. To assess the effects and safety of fasting for haemostasis in gastrointestinal bleeding in children. We searched EBM Reviews - the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (May 2016), Ovid MEDLINE(R) (1946 to 3 May 2016), EMBASE (1980 to 2016 Week 18), Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM) (1978 to 3 May 2016), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) (1979 to 3 May 2016), VIP Database (1989 to 4 May 2016) and Wanfang Data (1990 to 4 May 2016). We used no restrictions on language or study setting and limited searches in CNKI and Wanfang Data to the medical field. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs in children with gastrointestinal bleeding that compared fasting with feeding. Two review authors independently screened the literature search results, and there were no disagreements. We identified no RCTs or quasi-RCTs that compared the effects and safety of fasting with feeding for haemostasis in children with gastrointestinal bleeding. No study fulfilled the criteria for considering studies for our review. There is currently no information available from RCTs or quasi-RCTs to support or refute the use of fasting for haemostasis in children with gastrointestinal bleeding.

  16. A novel semi-quantitative method for measuring tissue bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukcevic, G; Volarevic, V; Raicevic, S; Tanaskovic, I; Milicic, B; Vulovic, T; Arsenijevic, S

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we describe a new semi-quantitative method for measuring the extent of bleeding in pathohistological tissue samples. To test our novel method, we recruited 120 female patients in their first trimester of pregnancy and divided them into three groups of 40. Group I was the control group, in which no dilation was applied. Group II was an experimental group, in which dilation was performed using classical mechanical dilators. Group III was also an experimental group, in which dilation was performed using a hydraulic dilator. Tissue samples were taken from the patients' cervical canals using a Novak's probe via energetic single-step curettage prior to any dilation in Group I and after dilation in Groups II and III. After the tissue samples were prepared, light microscopy was used to obtain microphotographs at 100x magnification. The surfaces affected by bleeding were measured in the microphotographs using the Autodesk AutoCAD 2009 program and its "polylines" function. The lines were used to mark the area around the entire sample (marked A) and to create "polyline" areas around each bleeding area on the sample (marked B). The percentage of the total area affected by bleeding was calculated using the formula: N = Bt x 100 / At where N is the percentage (%) of the tissue sample surface affected by bleeding, At (A total) is the sum of the surfaces of all of the tissue samples and Bt (B total) is the sum of all the surfaces affected by bleeding in all of the tissue samples. This novel semi-quantitative method utilizes the Autodesk AutoCAD 2009 program, which is simple to use and widely available, thereby offering a new, objective and precise approach to estimate the extent of bleeding in tissue samples.

  17. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug related upper gastrointestinal bleeding: types of drug use and patient profiles in real clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sostres, Carlos; Carrera-Lasfuentes, Patrica; Lanas, Angel

    2017-10-01

    The best available evidence regarding non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID)-related gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding comes from randomized controlled trials including patients who use NSAIDs to manage chronic rheumatic diseases; however, patients with varying background profiles commonly take NSAIDs for many other reasons, often without prescription, and such usage has not been well studied. To define the characteristics of patients hospitalized for upper GI bleeding in clinical practice, we conducted a case-control study among patients with endoscopy-proven major upper GI bleeding due to gastroduodenal peptic lesions and control subjects. We used adjusted logistic regression models to estimate bleeding risks. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 22.0. Our analysis included 3785 cases and 6540 controls, including 1270 cases (33.55%) and 834 controls (12.75%) reporting recent use (NSAIDs including high-dose acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). NSAID use was associated with increased risk of upper GI bleeding, with an adjusted relative risk of 4.86 (95% CI, 4.32-5.46). Acute musculoskeletal pain (36.1%), chronic osteoarthritis (13.5%), and headache (13.6%) were the most common reasons for NSAID use. Among cases, only 17.31% took NSAIDs and 6.38% took high dose ASA due to chronic osteoarthritis. Demographic characteristics significantly differed between subjects with chronic vs. acute musculoskeletal pain. Proton pump inhibitor use was significantly higher in patients who used NSAIDs due to chronic osteoarthritis compared to patients with acute musculoskeletal pain. NSAID (65.15%) or high-dose ASA use (65.83%) preceding upper GI bleeding was most often short-term. In over half of cases (63.62%), the upper GI bleeding event was not preceded by dyspeptic warning symptoms. The majority of patients hospitalized due to NSAID-related upper GI bleeding reported short-term NSAID use for reasons other than chronic rheumatic disease. These findings suggest that current prevention

  18. Acute Subdural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Lester

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 21-year-old female with no past medical history presented to the ED after multiple tonic-clonic seizures over the previous 12 hours, the longest lasting 20 seconds. She returned to baseline after each seizure, had no obvious signs of trauma, and did not exhibit any focal neurologic deficits. She denied illicit drugs or new medications. A family member noted that she had fallen from her bed (approximately 3 feet high 2 days ago. Significant findings: Non-contrast Computed Tomography (CT of the Head showed a dense extra-axial collection along the left frontal and parietal regions, extending superior to the vertex with mild mass effect, but no midline shift. Discussion: Intracranial hemorrhage (ICH is a term to describe any abnormal bleeding within the bony confines of the skull. Most commonly, subdural hemorrhages (SDH result from injury to the bridging veins that lead to bleeding between the dura and arachnoid maters. However, in 20%-30% of cases an arterial source of bleeding can be found.1 For adults, motor vehicle collisions and other unintentional head trauma are typically the provoking factors in developing SDH. Falls in the elderly are a common cause of SDH since diffuse cerebral atrophy leads to increased shear forces upon vasculature structures during the fall. The risk of SDH increases with the use of anti-thrombotic agents.2 Clinical presentation varies from asymptomatic to coma (in 50 percent of acute SDH. Chronic SDH may present with headaches, light-headedness, cognitive impairment, and seizures.1 The risk of posttraumatic epileptic seizures (PTS is higher in acute SDH. Risk factors for acute SDH PTS include low Glasgow Coma Score and craniotomy, whereas risk factors for PTS in chronic SDH include alcohol abuse, change in mental status, previous stroke, and hematoma density on CT.3 CT is the most widely used imaging modality for identifying ICH. Acute SDH (within 1-2 days are visualized as hyperdense

  19. What is the recurrence rate of postmenopausal bleeding in women who have a thin endometrium during a first episode of postmenopausal bleeding?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Doorn, H. C.; Timmermans, A.; Opmeer, B. C.; Kruitwagen, R. F. M. P.; Dijkhuizen, F. P. H. L. J.; Kooi, G. S.; van de Weijer, P. H. M.; Mol, B. W. J.

    2008-01-01

    Objective. To determine the incidence and significance of recurrent postmenopausal bleeding among women diagnosed with an endometrial thickness <= 4 mm after a first episode of postmenopausal bleeding. Methods. Consecutive patients not using hormone replacement therapy (HRT) presenting with a first

  20. What is the recurrence rate of postmenopausal bleeding in women who have a thin endometrium during a first episode of postmenopausal bleeding?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, H.C. van; Timmermans, A.; Opmeer, B.C.; Kruitwagen, R.F.P.M.; Dijkhuizen, F.P.; Kooi, G.S.; Weijer, P.H.M. van de; Mol, B.W.; Dupomeb, F.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence and significance of recurrent postmenopausal bleeding among women diagnosed with an endometrial thickness < or =4 mm after a first episode of postmenopausal bleeding. METHODS: Consecutive patients not using hormone replacement therapy (HRT) presenting with a

  1. Uso de octreotida na hemorragia digestiva alta secundária à hipertensão portal em pacientes pediátricos: experiência de um serviço terciário Uso de octreotide en la hemorragia digestiva alta secundaria a hipertensión portal en pacientes pediátricos: experiencia de un servicio terciario Octreotide for acute gastrointestinal bleeding secondary to portal hypertension in pediatric patients: experience of a tertiary center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Gois Meneses

    2011-12-01

    ños, variación de 7 meses a 18,9 años, en el periodo de 1998 a 2006, en un hospital terciario universitario. El diagnóstico de hipertensión portal fue establecido por ultrasonografía y la cirrosis fue confirmada por la histología y clasificada respecto a la gravedad por el escore Child-Pugh. RESULTADOS: Las causas de la hipertensión portal fueron obstrucción extrahepática de la vena porta en 11/17 casos (64,7% y cirrosis hepática en 6/17 (35,3%. El sangramiento fue controlado en 14/17 pacientes (82,3%. El tiempo de infusión de la droga necesario para control del sangramiento fue semejante entre cirróticos y no cirróticos, pero la caída en los niveles de hemoglobina, el volumen transfusional requerido y el tiempo de internación fueron superiores en los pacientes con cirrosis, aunque sin diferencia estadística. Esas mismas variables no se modificaron respecto a los dos distintos esquemas de infusión de la droga: con dosis de ataque o iniciando con dosis de mantenimiento. Fracaso terapéutico fue observado con mayor frecuencia entre los pacientes cirróticos (33,3%. Hiperglucemia fue el único efecto secundario detectado durante la infusión. CONCLUSIONES: La administración de octreotide en niños y adolescentes con sangramiento digestivo por hipertensión portal fue segura y efectiva en el control del sangramiento agudo, independiente de la causa de la hipertensión portal y del esquema de infusión.OBJECTIVE: To describe clinical data of children and adolescents with portal hypertension, during with and without liver cirrhosis, treated with octreotide during episodes of acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding. METHODS: Retrospective and descriptive study of 26 episodes of gastrointestinal bleeding in 17 patients (mean age: 8.6 years; range: seven months to 18.9 years assisted at a tertiary university hospital from 1996 to 2006. Portal hypertension diagnosis was based on ultrasonography. Liver cirrhosis was confirmed by histology and hepatic function was

  2. Management and outcome of bleeding pseudoaneurysm associated with chronic pancreatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Yi-Yin

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A bleeding pseudoaneurysm in patients with chronic pancreatitis is a rare and potentially lethal complication. Optimal treatment of bleeding peripancreatic pseudoaneurysm remains controversial. This study reports on experience at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital (CGMH in managing of bleeding pseudoaneurysms associated with chronic pancreatitis. Methods The medical records of 9 patients (8 males and 1 female; age range, 28 – 71 years; median, 36 years with bleeding pseudoaneurysms associated with chronic pancreatitis treated at CGMH between Aug. 1992 and Sep. 2004 were retrospectively reviewed. Alcohol abuse (n = 7;78% was the predominant predisposing factor. Diagnoses of bleeding pseudoaneurysms were based on angiographic (7/7, computed tomographic (4/7, ultrasound (2/5, and surgical (2/2 findings. Whether surgery or angiographic embolization was performed was primarily based on patient clinical condition. Median follow-up was 38 months (range, 4 – 87 months. Results Abdominal computed tomography revealed bleeding pseudoaneurysms in 4 of 7 patients (57%. Angiography determined correct diagnosis in 7 patients (7/7, 100%. The splenic artery was involved in 5 cases, the pancreaticoduodenal artery in 2, the gastroduodenal artery in 1, and the middle colic artery in 1. Initial treatment was emergency (n = 4 or elective (n = 3 surgery in 7 patients and arterial embolization in 2. Rebleeding was detected after initial treatment in 3 patients. Overall, 5 arterial embolizations and 9 surgical interventions were performed; the respective rates of success of these treatments were 20% (1/5 and 89% (8/9. Five patients developed pseudocysts before treatment (n = 3 or following intervention (n = 2. Pseudocyst formation was identified in 2 of the 3 rebleeding patients. Five patients underwent surgical treatment for associated pseudocysts and bleeding did not recur. One patient died from angiography-related complications. Overall mortality

  3. Bleed water testing program for controlled low strength material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    Bleed water measurements for two Controlled Low Strength Material (CLSM) mixes were conducted to provide engineering data for the Tank 20F closure activities. CLSM Mix 1 contained 150 pounds of cement per cubic yard whereas CLSM Mix 2 contained 50 pounds per cub yard. SRS currently used CLSM Mix 2 for various applications. Bleed water percentages and generation rates were measured along with flow and compressive strength. This information will be used to select a mix design for the Tank 20F closure activities and to establish the engineering requirements, such as, lift height, time required between lifts and quantity of bleed water to be removed from the tank during the placement activities. Mix 1 is recommended for placement within Tank 20F because it has better flow characteristics, less segregation, lower percentage of bleed water and slightly higher strength. Optimization of Mix 1 was beyond the scope of this study. However, further testing of thickening additives, such as clays (bentonite), sodium silicate or fine silicas maybe useful for decreasing or eliminating bleed water

  4. Portable semiconductor laser system to stop internal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rediker, Robert H.; Durville, Frederic M.; Cho, George; Boll, James H.

    1995-03-01

    One significant cause of death during a sever trauma (gun wound or stab wound) is internal bleeding. A semiconductor diode laser system has been used in in vitro studies of cauterizing veins and arteries to stop bleeding. The conditions of laparoscopic surgery, including bleeding conditions (blood flow and pressure), are simulated. Results have been obtained both with and without using a hemostat (e.g., forceps) to temporarily stop the bleeding prior to the cautery. With the hemostat and a fiber-coupled 810-nm laser, blood vessels of up to 5 mm diameter were cauterized with an 8 W output from the fiber. Great cautions must be used in extrapolating from these in vitro results, since the exact conditions of bleeding in a living being are impossible to exactly reproduce in a laboratory in-vitro experiment. In a living being, when blood flow stops the cessation of nourishment to the vessels results in irreversible physiological changes. Also, the blood itself is different from blood in a living being because an anti-clotting agent (heparin) was added in order to inhibit the blood's natural tendency to coagulate.

  5. Histopathological pattern of abnormal uterine bleeding in endometrial biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, S; Lakhey, M; Vaidya, S; Sharma, P K; Hirachand, S; Lama, S; KC, S

    2013-03-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is a common presenting complaint in gyanecology out patient department. Histopathological evaluation of the endometrial samples plays a significant role in the diagnosis of abnormal uterine bleeding. This study was carried out to determine the histopathological pattern of the endometrium in women of various age groups presenting with abnormal uterine bleeding. Endometrial biopsies and curettings of patients presenting with abnormal uterine bleeding was retrospectively studied. A total of 403 endometrial biopsies and curettings were analyzed. The age of the patients ranged from 18 to 70 years. Normal cyclical endometrium was seen in 165 (40.94%) cases, followed by 54 (13.40%) cases of disordered proliferative endometrium and 44 (10.92%) cases of hyperplasia. Malignancy was seen in 10 (2.48%) cases. Hyperplasia and malignancy were more common in the perimenopausal and postmenopausal age groups. Histopathological examination of endometrial biopsies and curettings in patients presenting with abnormal uterine bleeding showed a wide spectrum of changes ranging from normal endometrium to malignancy. Endometrial evaluation is specially recommended in women of perimenopausal and postmenopausal age groups presenting with AUB, to rule out a possibility of any preneoplastic condition or malignancy.

  6. DSA diagnosis and interventional management of postoperative bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yuwei; Zhang Fuqiang; Li Yunhui; Yuan Liang; Si Guangyan; Liu Lili

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the clinical application of DSA and interventional management in diagnosing and treating the bleeding after surgery. Methods: The clinical data and the interventional management of 14 patients with DSA-proved postoperative bleeding, encountered during the period of Aug. 2005-Jan. 2008, were retrospectively analyzed. The surgeries included subtotal gastrectomy (n=4), pancreatoduodenectomy (n=3), cesarean section (n=2), nephrolithotomy (n=3), heminephrectomy (n=1), internal hemorrhoidectomy (n=1). Results: Seventeen arterial bleeding sites were demonstrated, including gastroduodenal (n=2), left gastric (n=4), phrenic (n=1), short gastric (n=1), superior mesenteric (n=2), renal (n=4), uterine (n=2) and internal pudendal (n=1) artery. The diagnosis was confirmed with DSA in all 14 patients, of which embolization was successfully carried out in 13 in one session (92.8%). The remaining one case had to be operated again to stop the bleeding because of the failure of the superselective catheterization. No serious complications, such as organ necrosis or visceral dysfunction, occurred. Conclusion: As a safe, minimally-invasive and effective technique, DSA and interventional management are very helpful in diagnosing and treating the bleeding after surgery. (authors)

  7. Mortality in high-risk patients with bleeding Mallory-Weiss syndrome is similar to that of peptic ulcer bleeding. Results of a prospective database study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubičić, Neven; Budimir, Ivan; Pavić, Tajana; Bišćanin, Alen; Puljiz, Zeljko; Bratanić, Andre; Troskot, Branko; Zekanović, Dražen

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the predictive factors influencing mortality in patients with bleeding Mallory-Weiss syndrome in comparison with peptic ulcer bleeding. Between January 2005 and December 2009, 281 patients with endoscopically confirmed Mallory-Weiss syndrome and 1530 patients with peptic ulcer bleeding were consecutively evaluated. The 30-day mortality and clinical outcome were related to the patients' demographic data, endoscopic, and clinical characteristics. The one-year cumulative incidence for bleeding Mallory-Weiss syndrome was 7.3 cases/100,000 people and for peptic ulcer bleeding 40.4 cases/100,000 people. The age-standardized incidence for both bleeding Mallory-Weiss syndrome and peptic ulcer bleeding remained unchanged during the observational five-year period. The majority of patients with bleeding Mallory-Weiss syndrome were male patients with significant overall comorbidities (ASA class 3-4). Overall 30-day mortality rate was 5.3% for patients with bleeding Mallory-Weiss syndrome and 4.6% for patients with peptic ulcer bleeding (p = 0.578). In both patients with bleeding Mallory-Weiss syndrome and peptic ulcer bleeding, mortality was significantly higher in patients over 65 years of age and those with significant overall comorbidities (ASA class 3-4). The incidence of bleeding Mallory-Weiss syndrome and peptic ulcer bleeding has not changed over a five-year observational period. The overall 30-day mortality was almost equal for both bleeding Mallory-Weiss syndrome and peptic ulcer bleeding and was positively correlated to older age and underlying comorbid illnesses.

  8. Bleeding Jejunal Diverticulosis in a Patient with Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Zuber-Jerger

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A seventy-year-old male presented with severe myasthenia gravis and an episode of obscure bleeding. There was a history of gastric ulcer leading to Billroth II surgery twenty-five years ago. Upper endoscopy revealed no pathology. Colonoscopy showed a few solitary diverticula and traces of old blood in the terminal ileum. Capsule endoscopy pictured red smear in the upper jejunum. Diverticula were seen as well. Suspecting bleeding jejunal diverticulosis double balloon enteroscopy was performed. The complete jejunal ascending loop and about 100 cm of the jejunum through the descending jejunal loop could be inspected. Large diverticula with fecoliths were found in both loops. Bleeding had ceased. The patient was discharged to neurology for optimizing therapy for myasthenia gravis.

  9. No impact of fish oil supplements on bleeding risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Begtrup, Katrine Munk; Krag, Andreas Engel; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Fish oil supplementation may inhibit platelet aggregation and can potentially increase the risk of bleeding. The aim of the present systematic review was to evaluate the effect of fish oil supplements on haemostasis and bleeding risk, and to provide recommendations on whether...... it is necessary to discontinue fish oil supplementation prior to surgery. Methods: Studies were identified through PubMed and Embase searches and by reviewing the reference lists of the included papers. The Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines were used. Included...... of the included studies were randomised controlled trials or included a control group. Overall, fish oil supplements reduced platelet aggregation in healthy subjects. Fish oil exposure in surgical patients did not increase bleeding or blood transfusions either during or after surgery. Conclusion: Fish oil...

  10. Computed tomography diagnosis of active bleeding into the thyroid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veverková, Lucia; Bakaj-Zbrožková, Lenka; Hallamová, Lucie; Heřman, Miroslav

    2013-10-01

    Fine-needle biopsy of the thyroid gland is the most common interventional procedure used to diagnose thyroid diseases. Serious complications are rare in this procedure. They comprise an infection with abscess formation and hemorrhage. To date, only a few case reports have described an ultrasound diagnosis of active bleeding into the thyroid gland. We established such a diagnosis using computed tomography (CT). A 74-year-old woman presented to the emergency department of our hospital with complications after fine-needle biopsy of the thyroid gland. Ultrasound revealed a large hematoma surrounding the gland. A subsequent CT scan confirmed the presence of hematoma and, moreover, showed active bleeding. This finding prompted rapid surgical intervention. CT has the capability to show active bleeding into the thyroid gland.

  11. Reduced bleed air extraction for DC-10 cabin air conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, W. H.; Viele, M. R.; Hrach, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    It is noted that a significant fuel savings can be achieved by reducing bleed air used for cabin air conditioning. Air in the cabin can be recirculated to maintain comfortable ventilation rates but the quality of the air tends to decrease due to entrainment of smoke and odors. Attention is given to a development system designed and fabricated under the NASA Engine Component Improvement Program to define the recirculation limit for the DC-10. It is shown that with the system, a wide range of bleed air reductions and recirculation rates is possible. A goal of 0.8% fuel savings has been achieved which results from a 50% reduction in bleed extraction from the engine.

  12. Effects of Aglumin on the rectal bleeding following radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Michitaka; Tanaka, Motoshi; Yoshimura, Osamu; Matsubayashi, Shigeru

    1978-01-01

    Aglumin was administered to 20 cases which had rectal bleeding following radiotherapy. The results were as follows. Rectal bleeding decreased in 16 of 20 cases (80%): remarkably effective, 15%; effective, 25%; slightly effective, 40%. Bleeding time decreased in 11 cases (55%). Rumpel-Leede test gave remarkable improvement in 10 of 14 cases which had been abnormal (71.4%). Platelet increased in 18 of 20 cases (90%). Liver function test and peripheral blood findings showed no remarkable changes. No side effects such as intestinal disturbance etc were noted. In the series of symptomatic treatment for rectal disturbance resulting from radiotherapy, this drug had considerable effect of hemostasis. It was concluded that this drug is useful in combined use with other antiphlogistics, analgesic, and hematinic etc. (Ueda, J.)

  13. PALM-COEIN Nomenclature for Abnormal Uterine Bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deneris, Angela

    2016-05-01

    Approximately 30% of women will experience abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) during their life time. Previous terms defining AUB have been confusing and imprecisely applied. As a consequence, both clinical management and research on this common problem have been negatively impacted. In 2011, the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Menstrual Disorders Group (FMDG) published PALM-COEIN, a new classification system for abnormal bleeding in the reproductive years. Terms such as menorrhagia, menometrorrhagia, metrorrhagia, dysfunctional uterine bleeding, polymenorrhea, oligomenorrhea, and uterine hemorrhage are no longer recommended. The PALM-COEIN system was developed to standardize nomenclature to describe the etiology and severity of AUB. A brief description of the PALM-COEIN nomenclature is presented as well as treatment options for each etiology. Clinicians will frequently encounter women with AUB and should report findings utilizing the PALM-COEIN system. © 2016 by the American College of Nurse-Midwives.

  14. What to do when she's bleeding through: the recognition, evaluation, and management of abnormal uterine bleeding in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Alyssa R; Gray, Susan H

    2014-08-01

    This article reviews the current understanding and management of abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB) in adolescents. The readers will learn a practical approach to the evaluation and treatment of mild-to-severe uterine bleeding. In 2011, a new classification system was proposed to standardize the terminology used to describe AUB. This system is based on the pattern and etiology of bleeding and has been adopted by other organizations. The term dysfunctional uterine bleeding has been replaced by AUB. The negative effect of AUB on adolescents' quality of life is now well established. The levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system is considered a first-line treatment for heavy menstrual bleeding and should be considered, especially in those adolescents who may also need contraception. AUB is a common adolescent complaint that can vary from mild to life-threatening if not recognized and treated promptly. This article reviews the appropriate assessment and management of AUB and proposes a practical algorithm that can be used in an office or hospital setting.

  15. Apixaban Plus Mono Versus Dual Antiplatelet Therapy in Acute Coronary Syndromes: Insights From the APPRAISE-2 Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hess, C.N.; James, S.; Lopes, R.D.; Wojdyla, D.M.; Neely, M.L.; Liaw, D.; Hagstrom, E.; Bhatt, D.L.; Husted, S.; Goodman, S.G.; Lewis, B.S.; Verheugt, F.W.A.; Caterina, R. De; Ogawa, H.; Wallentin, L.; Alexander, J.H.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bleeding limits anticoagulant treatment in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). OBJECTIVES: We investigated whether background concomitant antiplatelet therapy influences the effects of apixaban after ACS. METHODS: This study examined high-risk ACS patients who were treated with

  16. The timing of neovascularization in fingertip replantation by external bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seung-Kyu; Chung, Heung-Soo; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2002-09-15

    To overcome venous congestion in fingertip replantation with no venous anastomosis, the authors have used a salvage procedure that consists of continuous external bleeding through a stab incision on the paraungual area and dripping a heparinized saline solution at the incision site to maintain external bleeding. Because this method requires continuous bleeding for a certain period of time, it may be a great burden on the patient; therefore, it is most important to minimize the duration of bleeding. Many authors have studied the timing of the new venous channel formation of the flap. However, to our knowledge, a study on fingertip replantations has not yet been performed. From June of 1985 to November of 1999, the authors performed fingertip replantations on 144 fingers of 137 patients using our salvage procedure at Korea University Guro Hospital. Among the 144 fingers, 101 fingers of 96 patients were successfully transplanted, including those with partial necrosis. The authors reviewed the medical records of these 101 fingers retrospectively; they compared and analyzed the necessary duration of external bleeding according to sex, age, level of injury, cause of amputation, and the type of injury. The average period of the salvage procedure was 7.6 days. Regarding age, the shortest period (5.5 days) was required for patients younger than 10 years. On the basis of the types of injuries, the duration of bleeding was shortest for the guillotine injury group (5.9 days) compared with crush (8.2 days) or avulsion (8.0 days) injuries. Sex and level of injury did not make much difference in the duration of the procedure.

  17. Therapeutic and Diagnostic Tactics for Bleedings from Esophagogastric Varices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. G. Nazyrov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to elaborate therapeutic and diagnostic tactics for bleedings from esophagogastric varices (EGV in an intensive care unit (ICU. Subjects and methods: The experience in treating 102 patients with profuse bleeding from EGV, admitted to the ICU, Acad. V. Vakhidov Republican Specialized Center of Surgery, in 2000—2008, was summarized. Results. The findings show that just less than 40% of the patients with hepatic cirrhosis are admitted for the clinical manifestations of active bleeding from EGV, the latter being profuse in 17.6%. These indicate that the noticeable admission preponderance of patients with first-degree blood loss and the low proportion of those with critical third-degree blood loss are noteworthy. Retrospective analysis demonstrated that hemostasis was achieved in 97 (95.1% patients, by applying solely conservative measures using a Blakemore tube (in both variants of its use. After removal of the Blakemore tube, stable hemostasis retained in 88.9% of the patients with bleedings from the veins of the middle third of the esophagus, in 71.8% of cases of those from its lower third and only in 24.1% of the patients with those from the cardiac stomach. Conclusion. According to the results of the study, we propose the therapeutic and diagnostic tactics for patients with profuse bleedings from EGV, which involve the use of a Blakemore tube and a complex of conservative measures with traditional hemostatic therapy, the administration of portal pressure-reducing agents to prevent or treat hepatic failure. Key words: bleeding, esophagogastric varices, hepatic failure, intensive therapy.

  18. Mifepristone-induced abortion and vaginal bleeding in subsequent pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hong; Gao, Er-sheng; Chen, Ai-min; Luo, Lin; Cheng, Yi-min; Yuan, Wei

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the effect of first-trimester mifepristone-induced abortion on vaginal bleeding in subsequent pregnancy. This observational cohort study was conducted during 1998-2001 at antenatal clinics in Beijing, Chengdu, and Shanghai, China. The study enrolled 4,931 women with one previous mifepristone-induced abortion, 4,925 women with no history of induced abortion, and 4,800 women with one previous surgical abortion and followed them through pregnancy and childbirth. The rates of vaginal bleeding in pregnant women with a history of medical abortion, no abortion, and surgical abortion were 16.5%, 13.9%, and 17.3%, respectively. The women with medical abortion had a higher risk (adjusted relative risk (aRR)=1.17, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07, 1.29) of vaginal bleeding compared with those with no abortion but similar risk to prior surgical abortion. When the correlation between medical abortion and vaginal bleeding was examined by period, increased risk was observed only in the early period (abortion and no abortion showed that the observed risks increased particularly in those with abortion at gestational age ≤ 7 weeks (aRR=1.33, 95% CI: 1.18, 1.49), those followed by a postabortion curettage (aRR=1.58, 95% CI: 1.37, 1.84) or complications (aRR=1.99, 95% CI: 1.67, 2.37). There was no difference between women with medical abortion and women with surgical abortion in the occurrence of vaginal bleeding for either period. One previous mifepristone-induced abortion increased the risk of vaginal bleeding in early gestation period of subsequent pregnancy compared with no abortion, especially if abortion occurred before 7 weeks of gestation and was followed by a curettage or complications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Emergency management of lower gastrointestinal bleed in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Binesh; Singhi, Sunit

    2013-03-01

    Lower gastro intestinal bleed (LGIB) is defined as any bleeding that occurs distal to the ligament of Treitz (situated at the duodeno jejunal junction). It constitutes the chief complaint of about 0.3 % of children presenting to the pediatric emergency department(ED). Among Indian children the most common causes are colitis and polyps. In most of the cases of LGIB the bleeding is small and self limiting, but conditions like Meckel's diverticulum often presents with life threatening bleeds. The approach in ED should include in order of priority-assessment and maintenance of hemodynamic stability, confirmation of LGIB and then to attempt for specific diagnoses and their management. This is achieved with help of rapid cardiopulmonary assessment, focused history and examination. The management of all serious hemodynamically significant bleeds includes, rapid IV access, volume replacement with normal saline 20 ml/kg, blood sampling (for cross matching, hematocrit, platelet, coagulogram and liver function tests), Inj. Vit K 5-10 mg IV, acid suppression with H2 antagonists/PPI and nasogastric lavage to rule out upper gastrointestinal bleed. Continuous ongoing monitoring of vital signs is important after stabilization. In ill looking infant, infectious colitis, Necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), Hirschsprung enterocolitis and volvulus and in older infants and children, intussusceptions, typhoid fever, volvulus should be looked for. Proctosigmoidoscopy remains the first investigation to be done and reveals majority of etiology. Multidetector CT scan, Tc 99 m RBC scan, angiography and Push enteroscopy are the further investigation choices according to the clinical condition of the child. Intra operative enteroscopy is reserved for refractory cases with an obscure etiology.

  20. An unusual case of vaginal myoma presenting with postmenopausal bleeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lajya Devi Goyal

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Vaginal leiomyomas are uncommon benign tumour with variable clinical presentation. These tumours arise most commonly from anterior vaginal wall. We report a case of 50-year old postmenopausal woman who presented with urinary retention, profuse vaginal bleeding and mass protruding into vagina. Local examination revealed a pedunculated mass attached to the posterior vaginal wall with vascular stalk one cm below the cervix. Mass was hanging outside vulva and vascular pedicle was profusely bleeding. The pedicle was ligated and tumour was excised. Subsequent histopathology revealed a vaginal myoma.

  1. Prolonged bleeding on the neck in leech therapy: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atakan Savrun

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Superficial skin bleeding can usually be stopped by applying short-time compression, unless the patient suffers from coagulation disorders or uses anticoagulant. Because of the anticoagulant component of leech saliva, a leech bite may cause long-time bleeding, which cannot be stopped via compression. In this study, the case of a patient who applied leech therapy on her neck for the treatment of migraine has been presented. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2015; 4(4.000: 234-237

  2. Systematic review: tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klingenberg, S.L.; Langholz, S.E.; Gluud, Lise Lotte

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tranexamic acid may reduce upper gastrointestinal bleeding and stabilize patients before endoscopic treatments. AIM: To review randomized trials on tranexamic acid for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. METHODS: Manual and electronic searches of The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE...... were unclearly reported. Data from three of the included trials suggested that tranexamic acid did not significantly increase the risk of thromboembolic disease. CONCLUSIONS: The present review suggests that tranexamic acid may reduce all-cause mortality. However, because of limitations in the internal...... and external validity of included trials, additional evidence is needed before treatment recommendations can be made Udgivelsesdato: 2008/5...

  3. Premenopausal abnormal uterine bleeding and risk of endometrial cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennant, M E; Mehta, R; Moody, P; Hackett, G; Prentice, A; Sharp, S J; Lakshman, R

    2017-02-01

    Endometrial biopsies are undertaken in premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding but the risk of endometrial cancer or atypical hyperplasia is unclear. To conduct a systematic literature review to establish the risk of endometrial cancer and atypical hyperplasia in premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding. Search of PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library from database inception to August 2015. Studies reporting rates of endometrial cancer and/or atypical hyperplasia in women with premenopausal abnormal uterine bleeding. Data were independently extracted by two reviewers and cross-checked. For each outcome, the risk and a 95% CI were estimated using logistic regression with robust standard errors to account for clustering by study. Sixty-five articles contributed to the analysis. Risk of endometrial cancer was 0.33% (95% CI 0.23-0.48%, n = 29 059; 97 cases) and risk of endometrial cancer or atypical hyperplasia was 1.31% (95% CI 0.96-1.80, n = 15 772; 207 cases). Risk of endometrial cancer was lower in women with heavy menstrual bleeding (HMB) (0.11%, 95% CI 0.04-0.32%, n = 8352; 9 cases) compared with inter-menstrual bleeding (IMB) (0.52%, 95% CI 0.23-1.16%, n = 3109; 14 cases). Of five studies reporting the rate of atypical hyperplasia in women with HMB, none identified any cases. The risk of endometrial cancer or atypical hyperplasia in premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding is low. Premenopausal women with abnormal uterine bleeding should first undergo conventional medical management. Where this fails, the presence of IMB and older age may be indicators for further investigation. Further research into the risks associated with age and the cumulative risk of co-morbidities is needed. Contrary to practice, premenopausal women with heavy periods or inter-menstrual bleeding rarely require biopsy. © 2016 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Royal

  4. Prolonged effect of a new O-glycoPEGylated FVIII (N8-GP) in a murine saphenous vein bleeding model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pastoft, Anne Engedahl; Ezban, M.; Tranholm, M.

    2013-01-01

    Prophylaxis in severe haemophilia significantly increases health-related quality of life for patients, but the dosing frequency still constitutes a challenge. Thus, there is a need for new treatment options, utilizing compounds with longer duration of action, while still maintaining potency....... The objective of this study was to evaluate the acute and prolonged effects of a new glycoPEGylated recombinant factor VIII (rFVIII) (N8-GP) in a venous bleeding model in haemophilia A mice and to compare the efficacy and potency to turoctocog alfa (rFVIII). Following intravenous administration of turoctocog...... with haemophilia A by reducing dosing frequency....

  5. Femoral neuropathy due to retroperitoneal bleeding. A red herring in medicine complicates anticoagulant therapy and influences the Russian Communist Revolution (Crown Prince Alexis, Rasputin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willbanks, O L; Willbanks, S E

    1983-02-01

    Femoral neuropathy occurs when occult retroperitoneal bleeding impinges on the appropriate nerve roots. The syndrome involves the acute onset of groin and thigh pain with characteristic flexion and external rotation of the hip. It may mimic other conditions such as acute arterial occlusion. Thorough knowledge of the anatomy of the femoral nerve explains the clinical features and leads the clinician to suspect the occurrence of this syndrome. Three cases have been reviewed that exhibited this condition as a result of retroperitoneal bleeding, a complication of systemic heparin therapy. The hemophilia that afflicted Alexis, the Crown Prince of Russia and son of Tsar Nicholas and Tsarina Alexandra, resulted in this clinical syndrome. The consequences enabled the sinister starets, Gregory Rasputin, to become intimately involved with the royal family, influencing the response of the Tsar to the political events in Russia, thereby playing an important role in setting the stage for the 1917 Russian communist revolution.

  6. Henoch-Schönlein purpura in an older man presenting as rectal bleeding and IgA mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheungpasitporn, Wisit; Jirajariyavej, Teeranun; Howarth, Charles B; Rosen, Raquel M

    2011-08-10

    Henoch-Schönlein purpura is the most common systemic vasculitis in children. Typical presentations are palpable purpura, abdominal pain, arthritis, and hematuria. This vasculitic syndrome can present as an uncommon cause of rectal bleeding in older patients. We report a case of an older man with Henoch-Schönlein purpura. He presented with rectal bleeding and acute kidney injury secondary to IgA mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis. A 75-year-old Polish man with a history of diverticulosis presented with a five-day history of rectal bleeding. He had first noticed colicky left lower abdominal pain two months previously. At that time he was treated with a 10-day course of ciprofloxacin and metronidazole for possible diverticulitis. He subsequently presented with rectal bleeding to our emergency department. Physical examination revealed generalized palpable purpuric rash and tenderness on his left lower abdomen. Laboratory testing showed a mildly elevated serum creatinine of 1.3. Computed tomography of his abdomen revealed a diffusely edematous and thickened sigmoid colon. Flexible sigmoidoscopy showed severe petechiae throughout the colon. Colonic biopsy showed small vessel acute inflammation. Skin biopsy resulted in a diagnosis of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Due to worsening kidney function, microscopic hematuria and new onset proteinuria, he underwent a kidney biopsy which demonstrated IgA mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis. A diagnosis of Henoch-Schönlein purpura was made. Intravenous methylprednisolone was initially started and transitioned to prednisone tapering orally to complete six months of therapy. There was marked improvement of abdominal pain. Skin lesions gradually faded and gastrointestinal bleeding stopped. Acute kidney injury also improved. Henoch-Schönlein purpura, an uncommon vasculitic syndrome in older patients, can present with lower gastrointestinal bleeding, extensive skin lesions and renal involvement which responds well to

  7. Henoch-Schönlein purpura in an older man presenting as rectal bleeding and IgA mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howarth Charles B

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Henoch-Schönlein purpura is the most common systemic vasculitis in children. Typical presentations are palpable purpura, abdominal pain, arthritis, and hematuria. This vasculitic syndrome can present as an uncommon cause of rectal bleeding in older patients. We report a case of an older man with Henoch-Schönlein purpura. He presented with rectal bleeding and acute kidney injury secondary to IgA mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis. Case presentation A 75-year-old Polish man with a history of diverticulosis presented with a five-day history of rectal bleeding. He had first noticed colicky left lower abdominal pain two months previously. At that time he was treated with a 10-day course of ciprofloxacin and metronidazole for possible diverticulitis. He subsequently presented with rectal bleeding to our emergency department. Physical examination revealed generalized palpable purpuric rash and tenderness on his left lower abdomen. Laboratory testing showed a mildly elevated serum creatinine of 1.3. Computed tomography of his abdomen revealed a diffusely edematous and thickened sigmoid colon. Flexible sigmoidoscopy showed severe petechiae throughout the colon. Colonic biopsy showed small vessel acute inflammation. Skin biopsy resulted in a diagnosis of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Due to worsening kidney function, microscopic hematuria and new onset proteinuria, he underwent a kidney biopsy which demonstrated IgA mesangioproliferative glomerulonephritis. A diagnosis of Henoch-Schönlein purpura was made. Intravenous methylprednisolone was initially started and transitioned to prednisone tapering orally to complete six months of therapy. There was marked improvement of abdominal pain. Skin lesions gradually faded and gastrointestinal bleeding stopped. Acute kidney injury also improved. Conclusion Henoch-Schönlein purpura, an uncommon vasculitic syndrome in older patients, can present with lower gastrointestinal bleeding

  8. Rectal Dieulafoy Lesions: A Rare Etiology of Chronic Lower Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ugur Dogan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dieulafoy lesion is rarely seen, yet it can be life-threatening. This lesion makes up to 1-2% of gastrointestinal bleedings and must definitely be considered in gastrointestinal bleedings whose source cannot be identified. In this case study, the 75-year-old woman was suffering from active, fresh, and massive rectal bleeding. Colonoscopy was applied in order to find out the source of bleeding. In the typical endoscopic appearance of the lesion a single round mucosal defect in the rectum and arterial bleeding were observed. To procure hemostasis, epinephrine was injected into the lesion and the bleeding vein was sutured.

  9. Anaesthesia care for emergency endoscopy for peptic ulcer bleeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch, Patricia; Haahr, Camilla; Møller, Morten Hylander

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Currently, no standard approach exists to the level of monitoring or presence of staff with anaesthetic expertise required during emergency esophago-gastro-duodenoscopy (EGD) for peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB). We assess the association between anaesthesia care and mortality. We further...

  10. Duodenal Diverticulum Co-Existing with a Bleeding Duodenal Ulcer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Duodenal diverticula are characterized by the presence of sac-like mucosal herniations through weak points in the duodenal wall. Duodenal diverticula co-existing with a bleeding duodenal ulcer is rare. Objective: The objective of this case report is to illustrate an uncommon case of two duodenal diverticula ...

  11. Embolotherapy using N-butyl cyanoacrylate for abdominal wall bleeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Young Ho; Koh, Young Hwan; Han, Dae Hee; Kim, Ji Hoon; Cha, Joo Hee; Lee, Eun Hye; Song, Chi Sung [Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    We describe our experience with the use of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of abdominal wall bleeding and we evaluate the clinical effectiveness of the procedure. Embolization was performed in nine patients with abdominal wall bleeding. The sites of embolization were the left first lumbar (n = 1), left second lumbar (n = 1), right inferior epigastric (n 2), left inferior epigastric (n = 3), right circumflex iliac (n = 1), and left circumflex iliac artery (n = 1). A coil was used with NBCA in one patient due to difficulty in selecting only a bleeding focus and anticipated reflux. NBCA was mixed with Lipiodol at the ratio of 1:1 to 1:4. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured before and after the embolization procedure, and the serial hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and transfusion requirements were reviewed to evaluate hemostasis and rebleeding. Hemostasis was obtained in six out of the nine patients and technical success was achieved in all patients. There were no procedure-related complications. Four out of the nine patients died due to rebleeding of a subarachnoid hemorrhage (n = 1), multiorgan failure (n = 1), and hepatic failure (n =2) that occurred two to nine days after the embolization procedure. One patient had rebleeding. The five surviving patients had no rebleeding, and the patients continue to visit the clinical on an outpatient basis. NBCA embolization is a clinically safe procedure and is effective for abdominal wall bleeding.

  12. Predictors of post operative bleeding and blood transfusion in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    blood requirements. Objective: To evaluate the impact of some perioperative predictors of post-operative bleeding, and blood transfusion after heart surgery and offer suggestions on preventive measures. Design and Methods: A prospective analytical study. The perioperative factors studied were haemoglobin level, ...

  13. Colorectal polyps: an important cause of rectal bleeding.

    OpenAIRE

    Perisic, V N

    1987-01-01

    Seventy one children with rectal bleeding were examined by total fibreoptic colonoscopy. Large bowel polyps were found in 45; 27 (60%) had solitary rectal polyps. Altogether, 83% of resected polyps were juvenile. No complication of colonoscopic polypectomy occurred. New polyps reoccurred in four (9%) treated children.

  14. Kleinke's "Bleeding Edge" sees utility role for providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D E

    1998-10-01

    Hospitals will evolve into units of health care delivery systems that will eventually resemble utilities, like water and the telephone, according to a new book. Donald E.L. Johnson reviews Bleeding Edge: The Business View of Health Care in the New Century, by J.D. Kleinke, and discusses the strategic implications of Kleinke's predictions.

  15. Prophylactic Dosing of Vitamin K to Prevent Bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witt, Mauri; Kvist, Nina; Jorgensen, Marianne Horby; Hulscher, Jan B.F.; Verkade, Henkjan J.

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Based on a high incidence of Vitamin K deficiency bleeding (VKDB) in breastfed infants with thus far unrecognized cholestasis, such as biliary atresia (BA), the Dutch regimen to prevent VKDB in breastfed infants was changed from a daily oral dosage of 25 mu g to 150 mu g

  16. Oral contraception and menstrual bleeding during treatment of venous thromboembolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klok, F A; Schreiber, K; Stach, K

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The optimal management of oral contraception and menstrual bleeding during treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) is largely unknown. We aimed to elicit expert opinion and compare that to current practice as assessed by a world-wide international web-based survey among physicians...

  17. Attitude of Nigerian women to abnormal menstrual bleeding from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Depot Medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA) and Norethisterone Enanthate (Net-En) are frequently used progestogen-only injectable contraceptives in many developing countries including Nigeria. Their use is often complicated by abnormal and unpredictable menstrual bleeding patterns. This has often been ...

  18. Abnormal Uterine Bleeding: Current Classification and Clinical Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Janice L

    2017-06-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is now classified and categorized according to the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics classification system: PALM-COEIN. This applies to nongravid women during their reproductive years and allows more clear designation of causes, thus aiding clinical care and future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Challenges in the management of bleeding disorders in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Only 39.1% centers had factor concentrates available. Conclusion: Facilities required for diagnosing and treating BD are significantly deficient in most centers in Nigeria. Funding to provide facility and training is required to improve on this inadequacy. Keywords: Bleeding, hemophilia, thrombocytopenia, whole blood ...

  20. Upper GI bleeding among neonates admitted to Mulago Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These conditions are risk factors for upper GI bleeding (UGIB) in sick neonates. UGIB is associated with poor neonatal outcomes such as prolonged hospitalisation and poor weight gain. The magnitude of UGIB and its contribution to neonatal morbidity has not been described in most low income countries. Objective: To ...

  1. Risk stratification in upper gastrointestinal bleeding; prediction, prevention and prognosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, N.L.

    2013-01-01

    In the first part of this thesis we developed a novel prediction score for predicting upper gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding in both NSAID and low-dose aspirin users. Both for NSAIDs and low-dose aspirin use risk scores were developed by identifying the five most dominant predictors. The risk of upper

  2. Profiling lifetime episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Profiling lifetime episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding among patients from rural Sub-Saharan Africa where schistosoma mansoni is endemic. ... female sex, history of blood transfusion, abdominal collaterals, esophageal varices, pattern x periportal fibrosis, anemia, and thrombocytopenia) significantly associated ...

  3. Localization and Treatment of Small and Large Bowel Bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard H Hunt

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Bleeding from the small or large bowel may present a diagnostic dilemma for the clinician, requiring careful consideration and multidisciplinary consultation before the problem is located. Careful selection of the appropriate investigations in the most logical order is important to minimize delay to diagnosis, inconvenience, discomfort and risk to the patient and costs to health care delivery.

  4. A sensitive venous bleeding model in haemophilia A mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pastoft, Anne Engedahl; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Ezban, M.

    2012-01-01

    for evaluation of pro-coagulant compounds for treatment of haemophilia. Interestingly, the vena saphena model proved to be sensitive towards FVIII in plasma levels that approach the levels preventing bleeding in haemophilia patients, and may, thus, in particular be valuable for testing of new long...

  5. Oral misoprostol in the prevention of uterine bleeding after surgical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-13

    Mar 13, 2013 ... Oral misoprostol in the prevention of uterine bleeding after surgical evacuation of first trimester abortion: A comparative study of three uterotonic agents. TM Aramide, AK Olusegun1, AC Akinfolarin2, DF Oriola. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, LAUTECH Teaching Hospital, Ogbomoso, Oyo State, ...

  6. Bleeding in children with cancer | Dippenaar | Continuing Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Before the success story of leukaemia treatment started in the 1950s, many patients succumbed to the disease because of severe haemorrhage. A bleeding tendency is one of the hallmarks of haematological malignancies such as leukaemia, since together with anaemia and an increased susceptibility to infection it ...

  7. The role of acid suppressants in upper gastrointestinal ulcer bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leerdam, M. E.; Rauws, E. A.

    2001-01-01

    Re-bleeding and mortality remain significant in peptic ulcer haemorrhage despite the widespread use of endoscopic therapy. The acidic gastric environment interferes with coagulation. In vitro studies show that an intragastric pH of above 6 results in normal blood coagulation and platelet function.

  8. Endocrine carcinoma of the pancreatic tail exhibiting gastric variceal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Yuan Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonfunctional endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas is uncommon. Without excess hormone secretion, it is clinically silent until the enlarging or metastatic tumor causes compressive symptoms. Epigastric pain, dyspepsia, jaundice, and abdominal mass are the usual symptoms, whereas upper gastrointestinal (GI bleeding is rare. Here, we describe the case of a 24-year-old man with the chief complaint of hematemesis. Upper GI panendoscopy revealed isolated gastric varices at the fundus and upper body. Ultrasonography and computed tomography showed a tumor mass at the pancreatic tail causing a splenic vein obstruction, engorged vessels near the fundus of the stomach, and splenomegaly. After distal pancreatectomy and splenectomy, the bleeding did not recur. The final pathologic diagnosis was endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas. Gastric variceal bleeding is a possible manifestation of nonfunctional endocrine carcinoma of the pancreas if the splenic vein is affected by a tumor. In non-cirrhotic patients with isolated gastric variceal bleeding, the differential diagnosis should include pancreatic disorders.

  9. Clinical approach to a patient with abnormal uterine bleeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abnormal excessive uterine bleeding forms a large proportion of gynaecological complaints. Of postpubertal girls who experience excessive menstrual loss, about one quarter will never regain a normal cycle and flow. As she grows older many other factors may arise causing menstrual abnormalities. South African Family ...

  10. Primary prevention and management of variceal bleeding: Review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Prevention and control of active bleeding caused by portal hypertension is still a challenge. Surgery used to be the only option in the earlier days, but now many options exist. Choice of the correct mode of treatment is important and is determined by many factors dictated by the condition of each patient and the

  11. Endoscopic Evaluation of Upper and Lower Gastro‑Intestinal Bleeding

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Injection sclerotherapy was successfully performed in the hemorrhoids and a case of gastric varices. The mortality recorded was 0%. Conclusion: Endoscopy is vital in the diagnosis and treatment of GIB. Gastritis and Haemorrhoid are the most common causes of upper and lower GI bleeding respectively, in our environment.

  12. The characteristics of adults with upper gastrointestinal bleeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    53.9 years, p=0.001). The most common cause of UGIB was peptic ulcer (37.1%) of which duodenal ulcer was the most common (30.7% of all UGIB), especially amongst male patients (36.4%). The second most common cause was bleeding due to varices (29.8%), especially amongst females (35.1%). Additionally, smoking ...

  13. Open heart surgery: management of nonsurgical bleeding in the peri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The data analyzed were patients' demographics, the total number of open heart surgery cases, the number that had perioperative nonsurgical bleeding,clinical detection strategies,treatment and preventive modalities as well as the outcome. RESULTS: During the period,a total number of 78 cases of open heart surgery ...

  14. Therapeutic Plasma Transfusion in Bleeding Patients: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Jerrold H; Grottke, Oliver; Fries, Dietmar; Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle

    2017-04-01

    Plasma products, including fresh frozen plasma, are administered extensively in a variety of settings from massive transfusion to vitamin K antagonist reversal. Despite the widespread use of plasma as a hemostatic agent in bleeding patients, its effect in comparison with other available choices of hemostatic therapies is unclear. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, PubMed Central, and databases of ongoing trials for randomized controlled trials that assessed the efficacy and/or safety of therapeutic plasma as an intervention to treat bleeding patients compared with other interventions or placebo. Of 1243 unique publications retrieved in our initial search, no randomized controlled trials were identified. Four nonrandomized studies described the effect of therapeutic plasma in bleeding patients; however, data gathered from these studies did not allow for comparison with other therapeutic interventions primarily as a result of the low number of patients and the use of different (or lack of) comparators. We identified two ongoing trials investigating the efficacy and safety of therapeutic plasma, respectively; however, no data have been released as yet. Although plasma is used extensively in the treatment of bleeding patients, evidence from randomized controlled trials comparing its effect with those of other therapeutic interventions is currently lacking.

  15. A longitudinal study of the prevalence of gingival bleeding among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To assess the prevalence of gingival bleeding following gentle periodontal probing during pregnancy as compared to after child birth in the same set of women. Method: Three hundred and eighty-four consecutive pregnant women in third trimester were selected at the antenatal clinics of Adeoyo Maternity ...

  16. The diagnostic work-up of women with postmenopausal bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hanegem, N.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis we describe the diagnostic work-up that can be used to diagnose or exclude endometrial cancer in women with postmenopausal bleeding. Despite the many studies investigating this, there is no consensus in literature. The diagnostic steps vary in different guidelines, depending on the

  17. Massive bleeding from colonic diverticular disease in an elderly ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Colonic diverticular disease is one of the most common and costly gastrointestinal disorders among industrialized countries. The disease was thought to be rare in the African population, but is being increasingly diagnosed with the advent of modern imaging techniques and colonoscopy. Diverticular bleeding is a common ...

  18. Postmenopausal bleeding: causes and risk of genital tract malignancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawood, N.S.; Peter, K.; Ibrar, F.; Dawood, A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Postmenopausal bleeding (PMB) is bleeding occurring after 6-12 months of amenorrhea in a woman of age where the menopause can be expected. Objectives of this study were to ascertain various causes and prevalence of genital organ malignancy in patients presenting with postmenopausal bleeding. Methods: A prospective observational study carried out in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Fauji Foundation Hospital, Rawalpindi comprising of 167 consecutive cases presenting with postmenopausal bleeding one year after menopause. Women having undergone hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, receiving radiotherapy or chemotherapy, suffered trauma to the genital tract, having coagulation disorder or on anticoagulant or hormone replacement therapy were excluded. Detailed history was obtained and a thorough clinical examination was conducted. Data were entered into hospital computer database (Medix) system. Mean +- SD were calculated for age, percentage was calculated for types of histopathological findings. Results: The commonest cause of PMB was atrophic endometritis and vaginitis 33 (21.2%). Overall incidence of various genital tract malignancies was 25 (16.0%). Conclusion: The overall incidence of genital tract malignancies in patients presenting with PMB is high (16.0%), therefore, it needs to be taken seriously and requires prompt and thorough investigations. (author)

  19. Gynecologic bleeding revealing vaginal metastasis of renal cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tumour was classified pT3bN0M0 and grade III of Furhmann grading. One year later, scanner discovered mediastinal and lombo-aortic lymph nodes. She received 2 months of immunotherapy associated with bevacizumab, but stopped because of intolerance. She was readmitted in our institute for vaginal bleeding. Clinical ...

  20. Non-bleeding Spontaneous Rupture of Hepatocellular Carcinoma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Non-bleeding Spontaneous Rupture of Hepatocellular Carcinoma. M Islam, P Deka, R Kapur, AM Ansari. Abstract. Rupture of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is not uncommon and most ruptured HCC present with hemoperitoneum and hemorrhagic shock. Management of ruptured HCC is different than non.ruptured one.

  1. Nodular Purpura and Intracranial Bleeding due to Late Onset ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    She developed nodular purpuric spots for about three days prior to the intracranial bleeding. She was unconscious and responding only to pain, and was severely pale. She was transfused with two units of whole blood and underwent a craniotomy for draining the hemorrhage. She was treated with Vitamin K supplements.

  2. Does any relationship exist between self reported gingival bleeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Individuals with gingival bleeding were significantly more likely to rate their dental and gingival health as fair/poor, use strong brushing stroke during tooth brushing and report worsening condition of teeth despite daily tooth brushing, express worry about the gingival color and less likely to be satisfied about the appearance ...

  3. The effect of different interdental cleaning devices on gingival bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosema, Nanning A M; Hennequin-Hoenderdos, Nienke L; Berchier, Claire E; Slot, Dagmar E; Lyle, Deborah M; van der Weijden, Godefridus A

    2011-01-01

    To compare the effectiveness of an oral irrigator (OI) with a prototype jet tip or a standard jet tip to floss as adjunct to daily toothbrushing on gingival bleeding. In this single masked, 3-group parallel, 4-week home use experiment, 108 subjects were randomly assigned to one of three groups: 1) 01 with a prototype jet tip; 2) OI with a standard jet tip; 3) waxed dental floss. All groups used their assigned product once a day as adjunct to twice daily toothbrushing for two minutes with a standard ADA reference toothbrush. Professional instructions were given by a dental hygienist in 01 use or floss use according to written instructions. All subjects also received a toothbrush instruction leaflet (Bass technique). Subjects were assessed for both bleeding and plaque at baseline and after two weeks and four weeks and were instructed to brush their teeth approximately 2 to 3 hours prior to their assessment. With respect to mean bleeding scores the ANCOVA analysis with baseline as covariate and week 4 as dependent variable showed a significant difference between groups in favor of both the oral irrigator groups. For plaque, however, no significant difference among groups was observed. When combined with manual toothbrushing the daily use of an oral irrigator, either with prototype or standard jet tip, is significantly more effective in reducing gingival bleeding scores than is the use of dental floss, as determined within the limits of this 4-week study design.

  4. Vaginal Bleeding In 6 Years Old Young Female: Diagnostic Challenge

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 6 year old young girl was referred to Mendefera (Zoba Debub Referral) Hospital with vaginal bleeding of 4 days duration. She had a history of swimming in a river prior to the incident. An aquatic leech bloated with blood detached from the vagina after 100 milliliters of normal saline flushing into the vagina. The patient was ...

  5. The effect of different interdental cleaning devices on gingival bleeding

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosema, N.A.M.; Hennequin-Hoenderdos, N.L.; Berchier, C.E.; Slot, D.E.; Lyle, D.M.; van der Weijden, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To compare the effectiveness of an oral irrigator (OI) with a prototype jet tip or a standard jet tip to floss as adjunct to daily toothbrushing on gingival bleeding. Methods: In this single masked, 3-group parallel, 4-week home use experiment, 108 subjects were randomly assigned to one

  6. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and risk for gastrointestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batić-Mujanović Olivera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The most of the known effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, beneficial or harmful, are associated with the inhibitory action of the serotonin reuptake transporter. This mechanism is present not only in neurons, but also in other cells such as platelets. Serotoninergic mechanism seems to have an important role in hemostasis, which has long been underestimated. Abnormal activation may lead to a prothrombotic state in patients treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. On one hand there may be an increased risk of bleeding, and on the other hand reduction in thrombotic risk may be possible. Serotonin is critical to maintain a platelet haemostatic function, such as platelet aggregation. Evidences from the studies support the hypothesis that antidepressants with a relevant blockade of action of serotonin reuptake mechanism may increase the risk of bleeding, which can occur anywhere in the body. Epidemiological evidences are, however, the most robust for upper gastrointestinal bleeding. It is estimated that this bleeding can occur in 1 in 100 to 1 in 1.000 patient-years of exposure to the high-affinity selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, with very old patients at the highest risk. The increased risk may be of particular relevance when selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are taken simultaneously with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, low dose of aspirin or warfarin.

  7. Risk of bleeding after dentoalveolar surgery in patients taking anticoagulants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekema, Ferdinand I.; van Minnen, Baucke; Jansma, Johan; Bos, Rudolf R. M.

    To avoid increasing the risk of thromboembolic events, it is recommended that treatment with anticoagulants should be continued during dentoalveolar operations. We have evaluated the incidence of bleeding after dentoalveolar operations in a prospective study of 206 patients, 103 who were, and 103

  8. Gastrointestinal bleeding due to an erosion of the superior ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The erosion of a pancreatic pseudocyst into an adjacent artery is a rare and highly lethal complication of pancreatitis with reported death rates of 12% to 40%. The majority of patients had bleeding from the splenic artery, the gastroduodenal artery and the anterior pacreaticoduodenal artery. Exceptionally, some cases with ...

  9. Embolotherapy using N-butyl cyanoacrylate for abdominal wall bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Young Ho; Koh, Young Hwan; Han, Dae Hee; Kim, Ji Hoon; Cha, Joo Hee; Lee, Eun Hye; Song, Chi Sung

    2008-01-01

    We describe our experience with the use of N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) embolization of abdominal wall bleeding and we evaluate the clinical effectiveness of the procedure. Embolization was performed in nine patients with abdominal wall bleeding. The sites of embolization were the left first lumbar (n = 1), left second lumbar (n = 1), right inferior epigastric (n 2), left inferior epigastric (n = 3), right circumflex iliac (n = 1), and left circumflex iliac artery (n = 1). A coil was used with NBCA in one patient due to difficulty in selecting only a bleeding focus and anticipated reflux. NBCA was mixed with Lipiodol at the ratio of 1:1 to 1:4. Blood pressure and heart rate were measured before and after the embolization procedure, and the serial hemoglobin and hematocrit levels and transfusion requirements were reviewed to evaluate hemostasis and rebleeding. Hemostasis was obtained in six out of the nine patients and technical success was achieved in all patients. There were no procedure-related complications. Four out of the nine patients died due to rebleeding of a subarachnoid hemorrhage (n = 1), multiorgan failure (n = 1), and hepatic failure (n =2) that occurred two to nine days after the embolization procedure. One patient had rebleeding. The five surviving patients had no rebleeding, and the patients continue to visit the clinical on an outpatient basis. NBCA embolization is a clinically safe procedure and is effective for abdominal wall bleeding

  10. Frequency of endometrial carcinoma in patients with postmenopausal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousaf, S.; Shaheen, M.; Rana, T.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Postmenopausal bleeding (PMB) is defined as bleeding that occurs after 1 year of amenorrhea in a woman who is not receiving hormone replacement therapy (HRT). About 10% of women with postmenopausal bleeding have a primary or secondary malignancy. Common malignancies among them are endometrial cancer (80%), cervical cancer or an ovarian tumour. Endometrial cancer is the second most common cancer associated with hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer. Ninety percent of patients have benign causes. Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the frequency of endometrial carcinoma in patients with post-menopausal bleeding. Study Design: Descriptive case series study. Setting: Department of obstetrics and gynaecology, Lady Willingdon, Lahore. Duration of Study: This study was conducted over a period of six months from January, 1 2009 to June 30, 2009. Subjects and Methods: 50 cases with postmenopausal bleeding. Results: During the period of this study a total number of 50 consecutive patients who met inclusion criteria were enrolled in the study. Ages of the patients who presented with PMB ranged between 48 years and 80 years with a mean age of 59 years. Malignancy was found in 18 out of 50 cases (36%).Cases with endometrial CA were 14 out of 50 cases (28%) and CA cervix constituted 4 out of 50 cases (8%). Benign pathology was more frequent (64%). 13 of 50 cases (26%) had hyperplasia out of which 1 case (2%) was of atypical hyperplasia. Endometrial polyp was found in 4 of 50 cases (8%). 3 of 50 cases (6%) had chronic endometritis. 5 of 50 cases (10%) had chronic cervicitis. While 7 cases (14%) had postmenopausal bleeding due to decubitus ulcer of uterovaginal prolapse. Among malignancies (36%), endometrial cancer is the most frequent malignancy in women with postmenopausal bleeding with mean age of 65 years. Conclusion: In this study it was concluded that the majority of cases of PMB would be expected to be suffering from benign problems

  11. [Embolization of carotid arteria branch in stanching of nasal bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzewnicki, Ireneusz; Kordecki, Kazimierz; Łukasiewicz, Adam; Puławska-Stalmach, Magdalena; Lewszuk, Andrzej; Bondyra, Zofia; Rogowski, Marek; Łebkowska, Urszula

    2013-01-01

    Epistaxis is a common clinical problem, especially in otolaryngology. This disorder affects equally both genders. Most cases manifest as spontaneous nasal bleeding. It can also appear as a result of trauma, high blood pressure, Osler-Rendu-Weber disease. When the bleeding is massive it can be potentially life-threatening. A great majority of epistaxis can be treated conservatively, if not it sometimes requires endovascular treatment. It is specially reserved for extensive, dangerous epistaxis. Angiography with selective embolization has become an accepted method of treating epistaxis that is not controlled with conservative methods. Authors analyzed the efficacy of selective embolization treatment of epistaxis. 61 patients treated in the Department of Otolaryngology in Bialystok in years 1999-2011 were examined. There were 39 men and 22 women aged 24-48 years. Patients were referred for endovascular treatment when primary management was ineffective. Arteries suspected of bleeding were embolized superselectively. Immediate, complete control of bleeding was achieved in 100% patients. After few hours recurrent nasal bleeding occurred in 4 (7%) patients who underwent successful reembolization. There were no severe complications after procedure. Nine patients experienced few days lasting mild headache which disappeared after medicament treatment. Five patients suffered from unaided removing facial oedema. Out of 61 patients, 56 were available for 12-month follow-up evaluation. No neurological or otolaryngological complications were certified. There was also no relapse of epistaxis. Selective angiographic embolization is an effective method that should be considered in the treatment of refractory epistaxis. It is safe and not traumatic for patients. Copyright © 2012 Polish Otorhinolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z.o.o. All rights reserved.

  12. Therapeutic management of acute pulmonary embolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tromeur, Cécile; Van Der Pol, Liselotte M; Couturaud, Francis; Klok, Frederikus A; Huisman, Menno V

    2017-08-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a potentially fatal manifestation of venous thromboembolism. Prompt anticoagulant treatment is crucial for PE patients, which can decrease morbidity and mortality. Risk assessment is the cornerstone of the therapeutic management of PE. It guides physicians to the most appropriate treatment and selects patients for early discharge or home treatment. Areas covered: Here, we review the current treatments of acute PE according to contemporary risk stratification strategies, highlighting each step of PE therapeutic management. Expert commentary: Currently, direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) represent the first-line therapy of patients presenting with non-high risk PE with a better risk-benefit ratios than vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) due to lower risk of major bleeding. Only high-risk patients with PE who present in shock should be treated with systematic thrombolysis, while surgical thrombectomy or catheter direct thrombolysis (CDT) should only be considered when thrombolysis is contraindicated because of too high bleeding risk.

  13. Is non-Helicobacter pylori, non-NSAID peptic ulcer a common cause of upper GI bleeding? A prospective study of 977 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, H L; Wu, J C; Chan, F K; Choi, C L; Ching, J Y; Lee, Y T; Leung, W K; Lau, J Y; Chung, S C; Sung, J J

    2001-04-01

    Non-Helicobacter pylori, non-NSAID ulcer is relatively common in Western countries. Whether it is a significant problem in the Orient is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of non-H pylori, non-NSAID ulcers presenting with GI bleeding. A prospective study was done of 1675 consecutive patients presenting with upper GI bleeding over a period of 12 months. Upper endoscopy was performed with biopsy specimens taken from the antrum and body of the stomach for a biopsy urease test (BUT) and histology for detection of H pylori. Exposure to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) or aspirin within 4 weeks of hospitalization was carefully scrutinized. A 6-week course of treatment with an H2-receptor antagonist was prescribed for patients who did not use an NSAID and had a negative BUT result. Follow-up endoscopy was performed to confirm H pylori status with a BUT and histology. Positive histology at either initial or follow-up endoscopy was used as the standard for diagnosing H pylori infection. Among 977 patients who were found to have ulcer bleeding, 434 (44%) had exposure to aspirin or an NSAID. Of the 543 non-NSAID users, 431 (79.4%) had a positive BUT and 112 (20.6%) were BUT negative on initial endoscopy. Eighty-nine of 112 patients who were NSAID negative, BUT negative returned for follow-up endoscopy. Forty-nine of 89 (55.1%) were found to have a positive BUT and positive histology at follow-up endoscopy. Only 40 of 977 (4.1%) patients admitted with ulcer bleeding were confirmed to have non-H pylori, non-NSAID ulcers. Non-H pylori, non-NSAID bleeding ulcer is uncommon. A negative BUT is unreliable for exclusion of H pylori infection during the acute phase of ulcer bleeding.

  14. Positive predictive value of the International Classification of Diseases, 10th edition diagnosis codes for anemia caused by bleeding in the Danish National Registry of Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalfani, Jihen; Frøslev, Trine; Olsen, Morten; Ben Ghezala, Inès; Gammelager, Henrik; Arendt, Johan Fb; Erichsen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    Valid data on anemia caused by bleeding are needed for epidemiological research and monitoring health care. The Danish National Registry of Patients (DNRP) is a nationwide medical database with information on all Danish residents' hospital history. We aimed to assess the positive predictive value (PPV) of the diagnostic coding of anemia caused by bleeding in the DNRP. In the DNRP, we identified all patients with International Classification of Disease, 10th edition codes for anemia caused by bleeding (acute: D50.0; chronic: D62.6) at three Danish hospitals from 2000 through 2009. For these patients we computed the PPV using hemoglobin level data, from Aarhus University laboratory database, as reference standard. Anemia was defined by a hemoglobin level less than 7.0 mmol/L for women and less than 8.0 mmol/L for men. We identified 3391 patients in the DNRP with a diagnosis of anemia caused by bleeding. The overall PPV was 95.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 94.6%-96.0%). The PPV was 97.6% (95% CI: 96.6%-98.3%) for men and 94.0% (95% CI: 92.9%-94.9%) for women, and the PPV increased with age at diagnosis. The PPV varied according to type of discharging departments, from 89.2% (95% CI: 83.4%-93.4%) in gynecology to 96.8% (95% CI: 94.9%-98.2%) in surgery, and was lower for outpatients compared with inpatients. We found a high PPV of the coding for anemia caused by bleeding in the DNRP. The registry is a valid source of data on anemia caused by bleeding for various purposes including research and monitoring health care.

  15. Repeat colonoscopy’s value in gastrointestinal bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekaroonkamol, Parit; Chaput, Kimberly Jegel; Chae, Young Kwang; Davis, Michael L; Mekaroonkamol, Pojnicha; Pomerantz, Sherry; Katz, Philip O

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To assess the diagnostic yield and clinical value of early repeat colonoscopies for indications other than colorectal cancer (CRC) screening/surveillance. METHODS: A retrospective review of patients who had more than one colonoscopy performed for the same indication within a three year time frame at our tertiary care referral hospital between January 1, 2000 and January 1, 2010 was conducted. Exclusion criteria included repeat colonoscopies performed for CRC screening/surveillance, poor bowel preparation, suspected complications from the index procedure, and incomplete initial procedure. Primary outcome was new endoscopic finding that led to an endoscopic therapeutic intervention or any change in clinical management. Clinical parameters including age, sex, race, interval between procedures, indication of the procedure, presenting symptoms, severity of symptoms, hemodynamic instability, duration between onset of symptoms and when the procedure was performed, change in endoscopist, withdrawal time, location of colonic lesions and improvement of quality of bowel preparation were analyzed using bivariate analysis and logistic regression analysis to examine correlation with this primary outcome. RESULTS: Among 19  772 colonoscopies performed during the above mentioned period, 947 colonoscopies (4.79%) were repeat colonoscopies performed within 3 years from the index procedure. Out of these repeat colonoscopies, 139 patient pairs met the inclusion criteria. The majority of repeat colonoscopies were for lower gastrointestinal bleeding (88.4%), change in bowel habits (6.4%) and abdominal pain (5%). Among 139 eligible patient pairs of colonoscopies, only repeat colonoscopies that were done for lower gastrointestinal bleeding and abdominal pain produced endoscopic findings that led to a change in management [25 out of 123 (20.33%) and 2 out of 7 (28.57%), respectively]. When looking at only recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding cases, new endoscopic findings

  16. Colonoscopic examination of rectal bleeding in children: A report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulfatai B Olokoba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rectal bleeding in children is a frightening and cause of great concern, and of parental anxiety. In this report, we present the value of colonoscopy to unravel the diagnostic conundrum often associated with rectal bleeding in children.

  17. Maintenance Solutions for Bleeding and Flushed Pavements Surfaced with a Seal Coat or Surface Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-01

    This report summarizes the findings of research directed at identifying maintenance solutions for bleeding and : flushed asphalt pavements surfaced with seal coats or surface treatments. Although the basic mechanism associated with : both bleeding an...

  18. Acute Bronchitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Table of Contents1. Overview2. Symptoms3. Diagnosis4. Prevention5. Treatment6. Everyday Life7. Questions8. Resources What is acute bronchitis? Acute ... heartburn, you can get acute bronchitis when stomach acid gets into the bronchial tree. How is acute ...

  19. [Hysteroscopy clinic: diagnostic and therapeutic method in abnormal uterine bleeding].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alanis Fuentes, José; Obregón Zegarra, Eva Haydee

    2012-12-01

    Abnormal uterine bleeding is a public health problem prevalence exceeded only by abnormal vaginal discharge as a reason for medical consultation. To describe the findings reported by the Hysteroscopy clinic of the Hospital GEA Gonzalez on patients with Abnormal Uterine bleeding diagnosis. Retrospective, transversal, descriptive study. The total 2546 records of those patient that were evaluated by Office Hysteroscopic between January 2007 and December 2008 on the Hysteroscopy Clinic of Hospital Manuel GEA Gonzalez, then we selected the 1482 records of those patients that were sended because of an Abnormal Uterine bleeding condition. We descrive the frequencies of the diagnosis and its interrelation with the age of the patients. We also report the therapeutical interventions during office hysteroscopy. The mean age of the patients was 42.15 +/- 9.30 years (from 12 a 92 years); the age groups of patients that belonged to 40-44 years and 45-49 years are the most frequent patient and they represent the 25% y el 23.3% of the records. The abnormal findings occurred on the 66% de of the patients. Those patients of 65 years old and older do not have any report of normal cavities, all of then have abnormal findings. The leiomyoma (26.9%) and the endometrial polyps (27.3%) were the most frequent findings. The postmenopausal bleeding had a rate of 90.9% abnormal findings and in this group of patients the most frequent diagnosis was atrophic endometrium (32.2%) and polyps (24.3%). Besides that the office hysteroscopy show its therapeutical usefulness because of the 67% and 77.5% of polipectomy perform for endometrial and cervical polyps respectively The office Hysteroscopy is a well tolerated diagnosis and therapeutic method that is useful for any women with abnormal uterine bleeding condition and it is the ideal technique for the examination of abnormal uterine bleeding in postmenopausal women... The office hysteroscopy is a efficient cost-effective and cost-benefic method for

  20. Recent pharmacological management of oral bleeding in hemophilic patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Widyawati Setiawan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hemophilia is a hereditary bleeding disorder that can increase the risk of disease in oral cavity. Sometimes hemophilia is not always established already in a patient. The lack of awareness of hemophilia presence can cause serious problem. Purpose: The purpose of this review is to explain about dental bleeding manifestation and management in hemophilic patient. Reviews: Hemophilia can be manifested as dental bleeding that cannot stop spontaneously. It should be treated with factor VIIII either by giving whole blood, fresh plasma, fresh frozen plasma, cryoprecipitate, and factor VIII concentrate. Factor VIII dose for hemophilia treatment can be calculated based on factor VIII present in hemophilia patient’s body. Factor VIII can also be given as prophylaxis to prevent bleeding. Complications that can be caused by factor VIII replacement therapy are the presence of factor VIII inhibitor and transfusion related diseases. Treatment of dental bleeding due to hemophilia consists of factor replacement therapy and supportive therapy. Conclusion: Treatment of dental bleeding due to hemophilia consists of factor replacement therapy and supportive therapy. There are complications that can happen due to factor VIII replacement therapy that should be considered and anticipated.Latar belakang: Hemofilia adalah kelainan pembekuan darah yang diturunkan. Hemophilia dapat meningkatkan resiko penyakit rongga mulut. Hemofilia tidak selalu sudah terdiagnosa saat penderita melakukan kunjungan ke dokter gigi. Kurangnya kewaspadaan akan adanya hemofilia dapat menyebabkan masalah serius. Tujuan: Tujuan dari kajian pustaka ini adalah memaparkan tentang manifestasi dan penanganan perdarahan gigi pada penderita hemofilia. Tinjauan pustaka: hemofilia dapat bermanifestasi sebagai perdarahan gigi yang tidak dapat berhenti secara spontan. Pada keadaan perdarahan tersebut, pemberian faktor VIII yang diberikan sebagai whole blood, fresh plasma, fresh frozen plasma

  1. Preoperative hemostatic testing and the risk of postoperative bleeding in coronary artery bypass surgery patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafiq, Sulman; Johansson, Pär I; Kofoed, Klaus F

    2016-01-01

    enrolled in this prospective observational study. TEG, Multiplate aggregometry, and coagulation tests were sampled on the day before surgery. Excessive bleeding was defined as >1000 mL over 18 hours. RESULTS: Multiplate-adenosine diphosphate (ADP) measurements were significantly lower in patients...... impedance aggregometry identified patients at risk for excessive bleeding after CABG. Low fibrinogen levels were associated with increased bleeding. Neither routine TEG parameters nor conventional coagulation tests were correlated with bleeding....

  2. Spontaneous acute subdural hematoma in a patient with multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abrar Ahad Wani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute spontaneous subdural hematoma in a patient of multiple myeloma receiving chemotherapy is an unknown event, needing an urgent neurosurgical management. We report this patient who presented with progressive neurological deterioration and a low platelet count. She was successfully managed by craniotomy and evacuation of subdural hematoma with intraoperative transfusion of platelets. The acute spontaneous subdural hematoma in her was probably related to the bleeding diathesis due to thrombocytopenia associated with chemotherapy.

  3. Von Willebrand disease and other bleeding disorders in women: consensus on diagnosis and management from an international expert panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    James, Andra H.; Kouides, Peter A.; Abdul-Kadir, Rezan; Edlund, Mans; Federici, Augusto B.; Halimeh, Susan; Kamphuisen, Pieter W.; Konkle, Barbara A.; Martínez-Perez, Oscar; McLintock, Claire; Peyvandi, Flora; Winikoff, Rochelle

    2009-01-01

    Reproductive tract bleeding in women is a naturally occurring event during menstruation and childbirth. In women with menorrhagia, however, congenital bleeding disorders historically have been underdiagnosed. This consensus is intended to allow physicians to better recognize bleeding disorders as a

  4. Effect of acute hyperglycemia on clotting time and relative plasma ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Menstruating females seem to bleed more when they ingest sugar or sugar containing substances. This study was carried out to determine the effect of acute hyperglycemia on clotting time and relative plasma viscosity during menstruation. Forty menstruating females from the St. Philomena School of Midwifery, Benin, ...

  5. Clinical management and outcome of major bleeding in patients on treatment with vitamin K antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becattini, C; Franco, L; Masotti, L; Nitti, C; Cattinelli, S; Cappelli, R; Manina, G; Sbrojavacca, R; Pomero, F; Agnelli, G

    2016-09-01

    The optimal management of major bleeding associated with vitamin K antagonists remains unclear. The aim of the study was to assess the determinants of outcome of vitamin K antagonists-associated major bleeding and the outcome of bleeding in relation with the therapeutic management. Patients hospitalized for major bleeding while on vitamin K antagonists were included in a prospective, cohort study. Major bleeding was defined according to the criteria of the International Society of Thrombosis Haemostasis. The primary study outcome was death at 30days from major bleeding. 544 patients were included in this study, of which 282 with intracranial hemorrhage. Prothrombin complex concentrates were used in 51% and in 23% of patients with intracranial hemorrhage or non-intracranial major bleeding, respectively (ppatients with intracranial hemorrhage or non-intracranial major bleeding (ppatients (18%), 72 patients with intracranial hemorrhage and 28 patients with non-intracranial major bleeding. Age over 85years, low Glasgow Coma Scale score and shock were independent predictors of death at 30days. Invasive procedures were associated with decreased risk of death. Among the patients hospitalized for major bleeding while on vitamin K antagonists, the risk for death is substantial. The risk for death is associated with the clinical severity of major bleeding as assessed by the GCS score and by the presence of shock more than with the initial localization of major bleeding (ICH vs other sites). Copyright © 2016 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. An experimental model for measuring gastrointestinal bleeding rate using Tc-99m DTPA in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owunwanne, A.; Abdel-Dayem, H.M.; Sadek, S.; Yakoub, T.; Mahajan, K.K.; Ericsson, S.B.

    1987-01-01

    An animal experimental model to measure the rate of gastrointestinal bleeding rate in a rabbit using Tc-99m DTPA is described. It was possible to detect a bleeding rate of 0.1 ml/min. However, the model could not be used to calculate the minimum amount of radioactivity needed to detect the bleeding site. (orig.) [de

  7. Gynaecological and obstetrical bleeding in women with factor XI deficiency - a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiewel-Verschueren, S.; Arendz, I. J.; Knol, H. M.; Meijer, Karina

    Menstrual bleeding, pregnancy and delivery present an intrinsic haemostatic challenge to women with bleeding disorders such as factor XI (FXI) deficiency. Aim: To provide a systematic overview of studies on gynaecological and obstetrical bleeding problems in women with FXI deficiency. Methods: We

  8. Clinical approach to obscure GI bleeding - Diagnostic testing and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Prabakaran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (OGIB can present as a diagnostic dilemma and management can be challenging. The search for causes of OGIB is usually centered on visualizing the small bowel, and in the past decade, the technology to visualize the entire small bowel has significantly advanced. Moreover, small bowel endoscopic imaging has replaced, in many instances, prior radiographic evaluation for obscure GI bleeding. These new modalities, such as small bowel capsule endoscopy (CE, balloon-assisted deep enteroscopy [double balloon enteroscopy (DBE and single balloon enteroscopy (SBE], and overtube-assisted deep enteroscopy (spiral enteroscopy, are paving the way toward more accurately identifying and treating patients with OGIB. We will review the diagnostic modalities available in evaluating a patient with OGIB and also propose the management based on clinical and endoscopic findings.

  9. Animal Models of Hemophilia and Related Bleeding Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozier, Jay N.; Nichols, Timothy C.

    2013-01-01

    Animal models of hemophilia and related diseases are important for development of novel treatments and to understand the pathophysiology of bleeding disorders in humans. Testing in animals with the equivalent human disorder provides informed estimates of doses and measures of efficacy, which aids in design of human trials. Many models of hemophilia A, hemophilia B, and von Willebrand disease have been developed from animals with spontaneous mutations (hemophilia A dogs, rats, sheep; hemophilia B dogs; and von Willebrand disease pigs and dogs), or by targeted gene disruption in mice to create hemophilia A, B, or VWD models. Animal models have been used to generate new insights into the pathophysiology of each bleeding disorder and also to perform pre-clinical assessments of standard protein replacement therapies as well as novel gene transfer technology. Both the differences between species and differences in underlying causative mutations must be considered in choosing the best animal for a specific scientific study PMID:23956467

  10. TV sonographic assessment in postmenopausal women with bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsikouras, P; Liberis, V; Galazios, G; Grapsas, X; Kantari, P; Papageorgiou, S; Maroulis, G

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the usefulness of transvaginal sonography for the detection of endometrial disease in postmenopausal women with bleeding. This study involved 275 postmenopausal women aged 47-81 years (median 62). None of them were on hormone replacement therapy and all had had amenorrhea for more than one year. Concerning the age of the study patients, we confirm that endometrial cancer occurs at any age, but more commonly in ages above 58 years. Transvaginal sonography was performed in all women. About 89.2% of malignant diseases were discovered in the study women whose endometrial thickness was above 4 mm, but we also found endometrial cancer in 10.2% of the cases in women whose endometrial thickness was below 4 mm. In postmenopausal symptomatic women premalignant or malignant causes of bleeding can not be excluded with just transvaginal ultrasound.

  11. [Endoscopic hemostasis in the treatment of bleeding peptic ulcer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisani, Lucio; Chiamenti, Carlo M; Gaudenzi, Piergiorgio; Alvisi, Vittorio; Sartori, Sergio; Abbasciano, Vincenzo

    2002-09-01

    Upper gastrointestinal bleeding is still an important clinical problem, even though about 80% of bleedings due to peptic lesions stop spontaneously. Starting from 1970, a lot of endoscopic hemostatic procedures has been developed and employed with good results, but, at present, the key problem is represented by the selection and management of the patients at highest risk of rebleeding. This work reviews both techniques and devices most commonly used, but at present none of them can be considered actually better than the other ones. According to the SIED (Società Italiana di Endoscopia Digestiva) guidelines, the techniques of choice should be cheap, effective, safe and easy to perform, the pivotal role in determining the success rate of endoscopic hemostasis being played by the endoscopist's experience.

  12. Haemorrhagic cholecystitis: an unusual cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Natalie

    2014-01-17

    Haemorrhagic cholecystitis is a rare cause of upper gastrointestinal bleeding and is a difficult diagnosis to make. This case report describes an orthopaedic patient, who developed deranged liver function tests and anaemia after a hemiarthroplasty of the hip. The patient had upper abdominal pain and black stools which clinically appeared to be melaena. An ultrasound scan of the abdomen was inconclusive, and therefore a CT was performed and the potential diagnosis of haemorrhagic cholecystitis was raised. An endoscopic evaluation of the upper gastrointestinal tract showed no evidence of other causes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Following an emergency laparotomy and cholecystectomy, she recovered well. This report aims to increase awareness about the uncommon condition of haemorrhagic cholecystitis, and to educate regarding clinical and radiological signs which lead to this diagnosis.

  13. Emerging role of thalidomide in the treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarlane, Michael; O'Flynn, Lauren; Ventre, Rachel; Disney, Benjamin R

    2018-04-01

    Thalidomide was initially synthesised in 1954 and marketed as a sedative and antiemetic for morning sickness. It was withdrawn in 1961 due to the realisation that it was teratogenic with over 10 000 children born with congenital abnormalities. Since then it has been used for treatment of dermatological and oncological conditions, including myeloma. In 1994, it was found to have a potent antiangiogenic effect via downregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). This has led to its use in gastrointestinal bleeding, as vascular abnormalities such as angiodysplasia have been found to have elevated VEGF levels. This article will review the current evidence of the use of thalidomide in bleeding associated with gastrointestinal vascular malformations, including angiodysplasia, gastric cancer and radiation-induced proctitis.

  14. Rectal bleeding after hypofractionated radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Correlation between clinical and dosimetric parameters and the incidence of grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Mitsuhiro; Saito, Jun-ichi; Kitamoto, Yoshizumi; Harashima, Koichi; Miyazawa, Yasushi; Yamada, Masami; Ito, Kazuto; Kurokawa, Kouhei; Yamanaka, Hidetoshi; Nakano, Takashi; Mitsuhashi, Norio; Niibe, Hideo

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the incidence and severity of rectal bleeding after high-dose hypofractionated radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer, and to explore the factors affecting the incidence of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding. Methods and materials: The data of 52 patients who had been treated by external beam RT for localized prostate cancer between 1999 and 2002 were analyzed. All the patients had received hypofractionated external beam RT to a total dose of 69 Gy in 3-Gy fractions, three fractions weekly. The clinical and dosimetric factors affecting the incidence of Grade 2 or worse late rectal bleeding were analyzed by univariate and multivariate analyses. The effect of the percentage of the whole rectal volume receiving 30%, 50%, 80%, and 90% of the prescribed radiation dose (V 30 , V 50 , V 80 , and V 90 , respectively) on the incidence of rectal bleeding was evaluated. Results: Of the 52 patients, 13 (25%) developed Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding. One patient who needed laser coagulation and blood transfusion for the treatment of rectal bleeding was classified as having Grade 3 rectal bleeding. The median time to the development of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding was 11 months. The results of the univariate analysis revealed that the presence of a history of diabetes mellitus (p 30 ≥ 60%, V 50 ≥ 40% (p 80 ≥ 25%, and V 90 ≥ 15% (p < 0.001) were statistically significant risk factors for the occurrence of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding. The results of the multivariate analysis revealed that a history of diabetes mellitus was the most statistically significant risk factor for the occurrence of rectal bleeding after hypofractionated RT for prostate cancer (p < 0.05). Conclusion: A history of diabetes mellitus was the most statistically significant risk factor for the occurrence of Grade 2 or worse rectal bleeding after high-dose hypofractionated RT, although dosimetric factors were also closely associated with the risk of rectal bleeding

  15. Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis Followed by Duodenal Necrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Hierro, Piedad Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    Acute Necrotizing Esophagitis is an uncommon pathology, characterized by endoscopic finding of diffuse black coloration in esophageal mucosa and histological presence of necrosis in patients with upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The first case of acute necrotizing esophagitis followed by duodenal necrosis, in 81 years old woman with a positive history of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, Hypertension, and usual intake of Nonsteroidal Anti-inflammatory drugs, is reported. Although its etiology remains unknown, the duodenal necrosis suggests that ischemia could be the main cause given that the branches off the celiac axis provide common blood supply to the distal esophageal and duodenal tissue. The massive gastroesophagic reflux and NSAID intake could be involved. PMID:27957030

  16. ENDOVASCULAR HEMOSTASIS IN UTERINE BLEEDING IN PATIENTS WITH UTERINE LEIOMYOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Damirov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report results of treatment for 72 patients with uterine leiomyoma (LM of various sizes and location, who had arrived with excessive uterine bleeding. All patients underwent urgent or urgently-delayed endovascular hemostasis by performing uterine arteries embolization (UAE. We analyzed clinical features of the disease after UAE in various sizes of tumors and studied immediate and long-term results of UAE in patients with LM.

  17. ABNORMAL UTERINE BLEEDING IN ADOLESCENTS — ENDOCRINE PROFILE CONDITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Sibirskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the endocrine profile condition in adolescent girls with abnormal uterine bleeding. Patients and methods: The participants of the study were 110 adolescent girls in the age between 11 and 15 years taken to hospital by emergency indication in the period between 2010–2013 years with dysfunctional uterine bleeding for the term from 3 to 48 days. In the first day of hospitalization before starting the hormonal therapy all patients underwent the physical examination, ultrasonic examination of pelvic organs and endocrine profile assessment. Concentration of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH and luteinizing hormone (LH and the levels of mammotropic hormone, thyrotropic hormone, estradiol, progesterone and testosterone in their blood were determined. Besides that physicians assessed the complete blood count indices: hemoglobin concentration, erythrocyte number and hematocrits. Results: It was determined that the predisposing causes of abnormal uterine bleeding development in adolescents: high somatic pathology frequency, abnormalities of neuroendocrinal system and menstrual cycle. Gynecological pathology in adolescents is represented by significant disorders of menstrual function establishment expressed in the later beginning of menstruation, its intensity and duration. The authors also note the higher frequency of inflammatory diseases such as adnexitis, edeitis, vulvovaginitis and coleitis in comparison with the control group (37.3 and 30%, respectively. Another tendency was observed while studying the endocrine profile: in patients with hyperestrogenism the normal or increased content of FSH at the normal or lowered LH concentration is observed. At the same time, in patients with hypestrogenism FSH concentration at the lower limits of the age group is lowered, while LH concentration is lowered or normal. Conclusion: Abnormal uterine bleeding in adolescents in the most cases is developing in the setting

  18. Unanticipated bleeding with the etonogestrel implant: advice and therapeutic interventions.

    OpenAIRE

    Dickson, Jane; Hoggart, Lesley; Newton, Victoria Louise

    2014-01-01

    A common problem with etonogestrel contraceptive implants is irregular bleeding, for which women are often unprepared despite adequate pre-insertion advice. Dickson et al.’s commentary is a useful summary of management options. It will refresh readers’ ability to deal with this problem and it's a reminder to avoid ‘watchful waiting’, which risks women losing confidence in this highly effective contraceptive method.

  19. Outcome of acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal haemorrhage after nontherapeutic arteriography compared with embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defreyne, Luc; Vanlangenhove, Peter; Decruyenaere, Johan; Van Maele, Georges; De Vos, Martine; Troisi, Roberto; Pattyn, Piet

    2003-01-01

    In acute nonvariceal gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, immediate arteriographic haemostasis is presently assumed to be a therapeutic advantage. This study assesses whether the risk of a delayed haemostasis, caused by arteriographic findings precluding embolization, might influence patient outcome. We performed a 5.5-year retrospective database search to find all patients referred for arteriography to arrest acute nonvariceal GI bleeding with embolization. The embolized and nonembolized patients were compared for differences in baseline characteristics and bleeding parameters. In both groups the outcome of all endoscopic or surgical interventions after catheterization was included in the follow-up. Clinical success (at 30 days, after all therapy) and in-hospital mortality in the embolized and nonembolized group were compared. We retrieved 63 nonembolized bleedings in 58 patients and 49 embolized bleedings in 49 patients. In the nonembolized group, transfusion need and haemodynamic instability were significantly less severe. Forty-two of 63 (66%) nonembolized bleedings persisted requiring haemostasis by surgery (n=23), endoscopy (n=13) or supportive transfusions. Thirteen of 49 (27%) embolized bleedings recurred and were managed by surgery (n=7), endoscopy (n=3) or transfusion. Overall clinical success rate was 88.9% (56 of 63) in the nonembolized and 87.8% (43 of 49) in the embolized group. Mortality rate was 17.2% (10 of 58) in the nonembolized vs 30.6% (15 of 49) in the embolized patients (P=0.115). Whether or not arteriographic findings afforded the opportunity to embolize, outcome of acute nonvariceal GI bleeding did not differ significantly; however, patients undergoing embolization were more critically bleeding and ill. (orig.)

  20. Let's Talk Period! Preliminary results of an online bleeding awareness knowledge translation project and bleeding assessment tool promoted on social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynen, E; Grabell, J; Ellis, A K; James, P

    2017-07-01

    Undiagnosed bleeding disorders are common and can pose significant health risks, especially for women. Recently, a self-administered bleeding assessment tool (Self-BAT) was validated in von Willebrand disease. To increase awareness of undiagnosed bleeding disorders through the use of an informational website (http://letstalkperiod.ca) targeted at women in their reproductive years. The Let's Talk Period website was built in consultation with a medical communications company and focus groups of women, with the aim of clearly presenting key messages around menstrual bleeding. The website was promoted through social media and local and national interviews. Upon completion of the online Self-BAT available at http://letstalkperiod.ca, the result is displayed to the user along with a recommendation to seek medical attention if the score is abnormal. During the initial 3-month period, there were 5158 page views from 64 countries. A total of 489 individuals, 95% female, completed the online Self-BAT. The mean Self-BAT score was 6, range 0-44. Abnormal Self-BAT scores were reported in 45% of the respondents, of whom 96% were female. The most commonly reported bleeding symptoms were menorrhagia (98%) and postpartum haemorrhage (82%). Bleeding symptoms were similar across different geographical areas. An online screening tool is an effective method of identifying individuals concerned with abnormal bleeding. A significant portion of the general population report experiencing symptoms of abnormal bleeding. In women, the most frequently reported bleeding symptoms were menorrhagia and postpartum haemorrhage. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Damage control surgery and open abdomen in trauma patients with exsanguinating bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutafchiĭski, V; Popivanov, G

    2014-01-01

    Acute coagulopathy with exsanguinating bleeding occurs in 2-5% of all trauma cases carrying mortality rate near 100% after conventional management. In the last few decades, the development of damage control surgery (DCS) in combination with the technique of open abdomen led to significantly improved survival among these patients. A descriptive study based on a retrospective analysis of 12 consecutive blast victims with exsanguinating bleeding underwent DCS and open abdomen management. All patients were soldiers injured during their deployment in Iraq and Afghanistan during 2002-2007, treated by our deployed surgical teams. Vacuum Assisted Closure (V.A.C., KCI) and vacuum pack (VP) was used for a temporary closure of abdomen. A cumulative analysis of all relevant series used these methods during the period 2000-2013 was performed. DCS was applied in 12 of 114 consecutive blast victims (10.5%) with survival rate 66.7% (8/12). Eleven had open abdomen with temporary closure with V.A.C. in 6 and VP in 5. Four patients died before the definitive closure (36.4%). The survivors (n = 8) were with a mean age 28.5 years, suffered from a critical trauma with a mean Injury Severity Score 35.5. V.A.C was used in 4 of them, VP in 3. Primary closure of abdomen was achieved in 6 (85.7%) within 3.5 days and mean 1.3 dressing changes. Due to ACS, the abdomen was closed through skin suture only and a creation of planned ventral hernia in 1 patient treated with VP (1/7, 14.3%). Wound infection was observed in 1 case (14.3%). Despite the small sample size, our series clearly demonstrate the benefits of DCS and open abdomen in trauma patients with exsangiunating bleeding. The survival rate is highly dependent on the rapid implementation of DCS in properly selected patients. V.A.C. and VP provide a high rate of primary fascial closure in trauma.

  2. Dual antiplatelet therapy and the severity risk of lower intestinal bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neal Carlin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dual antiplatelet (Plt therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel is recommended for up to 1 year following acute coronary syndrome. Many of these cardiac patients are also on anithrombotic therapy like warfarin. Lower gastrointestinal bleeding (LGIB is the main adverse event of this treatment. Aims: The main purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship of dual anti-Plt therapy and the risk of LGIB. Methods: Patients' electronic charts were reviewed to include a total of 19 variables, which included age, sex, ethnicity, daily use aspirin of any dose, daily use of clopidogrel, use of nonsteroidal anti-infl ammatory drugs (NSAIDs at least twice in the last week prior to admission and the daily use of anticoagulants (warfarin, heparin, and were obtained from history and physical examination reports, lab transcripts and procedural reports. Settings/Design: A retrospective cohort study of the records of 3436 patients admitted to our hospital from January 1, 2009, to December 31, 2011, was evaluated. All the patients included were admitted through the emergency department with complaints of or relating to LGIB. The primary outcome studied was severe LGIB as defined by the requirement of at least two units of packed red blood cells and/or a decrease in the hematocrit of 20% or more or recurrent bleeding after 24 h of clinical stability with additional transfusions required. Other outcomes included surgical intervention. Statistical Methods/Analysis: Univariate analysis using t-test on continuous variables and Chi-square test on categorical variables were done before carrying out logistic regression analysis. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to measures of association between the variables and LGIB. Logistic regression analysis was not carried for surgical intervention and death because none of the variables was significant from univariate tests. Results: A total of 511 patients were found to have true LGIB. Among these

  3. Meatspace is Cyberspace: The Pynchonian Posthuman in Bleeding Edge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Siegel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines Thomas Pynchon’s indirect critique of utopian posthumanism in 'Bleeding Edge' by analyzing the deleterious effects that an emerging Internet culture has on the novel’s characters. By seeping into every aspect of their lives, embedding itself in their minds, and becoming a prosthetic consciousness, the Internet has transformed the characters into posthumans and altered their subject positions within a technological global capitalist culture. Contrasting the novel’s take on the posthuman with the posthuman theories of Donna Harraway, N. Katherine Hayles, Robert Pepperell, Rosi Braidotti, David Roden and Seb Franklin, I argue that, while the dominant utopian strain in posthuman theory imagines the advent of posthumanism as an opportunity for liberation from the sexism, racism, and colonial oppression that are enabled by the positing of the classical humanist subject, Pynchon demonstrates that because the Internet technology that brought about the posthuman condition is controlled by governments and corporations, it has become just one more lost chance at freedom that was converted into an instrument of increased control and surveillance. Reading 'Bleeding Edge' against William Gibson’s prototypical posthuman novel Neuromancer, I also contend that while Gibson, despite challenging the ontological primacy of meatspace over cyberspace, keeps the two realms separate, Pynchon, who borrows Gibson’s terms, shows that cyberspace has already merged with meatspace. As a result, Maxine Tarnow, the protagonist of 'Bleeding Edge', has nowhere to run in her attempt to find a provisional refuge for herself and her family.

  4. The effect of factor XIII on bleeding in coronary surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gödje, O; Haushofer, M; Lamm, P; Reichart, B

    1998-10-01

    One cause of diffuse bleeding after cardiac operations may be a low plasma concentration of Factor XIII, which is essential for coagulation, but is not covered by standard coagulation monitoring. In a prospective pilot study, Factor XIII levels before and after extracorporeal circulation were investigated, and drain volumes and blood transfusions of a control group of 11 patients were compared with a group of 11 patients who received 2500 units Factor XIII postoperatively. Factor XIII fell significantly from preoperative values of 96.1% and 88.7% (control) to 55.7% and 51.8% (control) postoperatively. By administration of Factor XIII, plasma level rose significantly from 55.7% to 103.1%; in the control group the value remained low. Drain volumes on the first and second postoperative day were significantly lower in the Factor XIII group. In the control group 1.9 units of red blood cells and 1.6 units fresh frozen plasma were administered, in the Factor XIII group 0.9 and 0.6 units were necessary. Factor XIII influences bleeding after coronary surgery and can reduce the need for blood transfusions. In patients with prolonged diffuse bleeding, we therefore recommend substitution of Factor XIII.

  5. Critical gastrointestinal bleed due to secondary aortoenteric fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad U. Malik

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Secondary aortoenteric fistula (SAEF is a rare yet lethal cause of gastrointestinal bleeding and occurs as a complication of an abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. Clinical presentation may vary from herald bleeding to overt sepsis and requires high index of suspicion and clinical judgment to establish diagnosis. Initial diagnostic tests may include computerized tomography scan and esophagogastroduodenoscopy. Each test has variable sensitivity and specificity. Maintaining the hemodynamic status, control of bleeding, removal of the infected graft, and infection control may improve clinical outcomes. This review entails the updated literature on diagnosis and management of SAEF. A literature search was conducted for articles published in English, on PubMed and Scopus using the following search terms: secondary, aortoenteric, aorto-enteric, aortoduodenal, aorto-duodenal, aortoesophageal, and aorto-esophageal. A combination of MeSH terms and Boolean operators were used to device search strategy. In addition, a bibliography of clinically relevant articles was searched to find additional articles (Appendix A. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive update on the diagnosis, management, and prognosis of SAEF.

  6. Detection of small colon bleeding in wireless capsule endoscopy videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usman, Muhammad Arslan; Satrya, G B; Usman, Muhammad Rehan; Shin, Soo Young

    2016-12-01

    In the recent years, wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) technology has played a very important role in diagnosing diseases within the gastro intestinal (GI) tract of human beings. The WCE device captures images of the GI tract of patient with a certain frame rate. Physicians examine these images in order to find abnormalities in the GI tract. This examination process is very time consuming and hectic for the physician as a WCE device captures around 60,000 images on the average. At present, there are no standards defined for the WCE image classification. Computer aided methods help reducing the burden on the physicians by automatically detecting the abnormalities in the GI tract such as small colon bleeding. In this paper, a pixel based approach to detect bleeding regions in the WCE videos by using a support vector classifier is proposed. Threshold analysis in HSV color space is performed to compute the features for training an optimal support vector machine. The HSV features of the WCE images are fed to the trained support vector classifier for classification. Also, our method includes image enhancement and edge removal in WCE images, which is done prior to classification, for robust results. The method offers high sensitivity, specificity and accuracy in terms of correctly classifying images that contain bleeding regions as compared to another contemporary method. A detailed experimental analysis is also provided for the purpose of method evaluation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Duration of increased bleeding tendency after cessation of aspirin therapy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, Ronan A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Aspirin has a significant effect on hemostasis, so it is often recommended that patients taking aspirin discontinue treatment before elective surgery. While off aspirin, these patients may be at risk of thrombosis. The optimum period of time that aspirin should be withheld is controversial. The aim of this study was to establish the duration of the antihemostatic effect of prolonged aspirin therapy. STUDY DESIGN: In a prospective study, 51 healthy volunteers were randomly assigned into 3 groups, each receiving an identical tablet for 14 days. One group received a placebo tablet; individuals in the other two groups received either 75 mg or 300 mg of aspirin once a day. Template bleeding times and specific platelet function testing (using the PFA-100; Dade Behring) were carried out on subjects before therapy and again after its completion until they returned to baseline. RESULTS: Thirty-eight volunteers complied sufficiently with the protocol to provide useful results. All bleeding times normalized within 96 hours and all platelet function tests within 144 hours after stopping aspirin. There was no demonstrable hemostatic defect in any volunteer persisting by or beyond the sixth day after treatment cessation. There was no apparent difference in duration of effect between those taking either 75 mg or 300 mg of aspirin. CONCLUSIONS: This study uses sensitive measures of platelet function to demonstrate the duration of increased bleeding tendency after withdrawal of aspirin therapy. It supports discontinuation of aspirin therapy 5 days before elective surgery (with the operation being performed on the sixth day).

  8. Physical activity and risk of bleeding in elderly patients taking anticoagulants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, P M; Méan, M; Limacher, A; Jaeger, K; Beer, H-J; Frauchiger, B; Aschwanden, M; Rodondi, N; Righini, M; Egloff, M; Osterwalder, J; Kucher, N; Angelillo-Scherrer, A; Husmann, M; Banyai, M; Matter, C M; Aujesky, D

    2015-02-01

    Although the possibility of bleeding during anticoagulant treatment may limit patients from taking part in physical activity, the association between physical activity and anticoagulation-related bleeding is uncertain. To determine whether physical activity is associated with bleeding in elderly patients taking anticoagulants. In a prospective multicenter cohort study of 988 patients aged ≥ 65 years receiving anticoagulants for venous thromboembolism, we assessed patients' self-reported physical activity level. The primary outcome was the time to a first major bleeding, defined as fatal bleeding, symptomatic bleeding in a critical site, or bleeding causing a fall in hemoglobin or leading to transfusions. The secondary outcome was the time to a first clinically relevant non-major bleeding. We examined the association between physical activity level and time to a first bleeding by using competing risk regression, accounting for death as a competing event. We adjusted for known bleeding risk factors and anticoagulation as a time-varying covariate. During a mean follow-up of 22 months, patients with a low, moderate, and high physical activity level had an incidence of major bleeding of 11.6, 6.3, and 3.1 events per 100 patient-years and an incidence of clinically relevant non-major bleeding of 14.0, 10.3, and 7.7 events per 100 patient-years, respectively. A high physical activity level was significantly associated with a lower risk of major bleeding (adjusted sub-hazard ratio 0.40, 95% confidence interval 0.22-0.72). There was no association between physical activity and non-major bleeding. A high level of physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of major bleeding in elderly patients receiving anticoagulant therapy. © 2014 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  9. Double blind, placebo-controlled trial of Tranexamic acid on recent internal hemorrhoid bleeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul A. Rani

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Double blind randomized placebo controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Tranexamic acid in 54 patients with recent hemorrhoid bleeding. Age, gender, body weight, height, grade of hemorrhoid, time of onset of recent bleeding were comparable between two groups. Analysis of haemostatic effect or stop bleeding as an immediate outcome of this study revealed that in the grade 2 patients, 23/23 (100% of tranexamic group and 18/23(78.26% of placebo group the bleeding stop. After 3 days of observation, there was statistically significant different for the rate of stop bleeding as well as at the end of observation. Bleeding stop earlier in the Tranexamic group with median 4 days (3-5 days, compare to placebo, median 11(9.55-12.45. Analysis of recurrent bleeding as an outcome of this study revealed that in the placebo group 9/18(50% of grade 2 patients and all grade 3 (100%patients suffered from recurrent bleeding. Since the days 4, both group have significant different time for recurrent bleeding and at the end of observation, cumulative probability of free of bleeding between two groups significantly different. Median still stop bleeding in the placebo group was 36 days, and the tranexamic group never reaches the median until the end of observation. Conclusion: tranexamic acid was an effective drug to stop recent hemorrhoid bleeding and prevent further recurrent bleeding, significantly better than placebo. (Med J Indones 2002;11: 215-21Keywords: Tranexamic acid, hemorrhoid bleeding, haemostatic effect, recurrent bleeding.

  10. Acute periodontal lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, David; Alonso, Bettina; de Arriba, Lorenzo; Santa Cruz, Isabel; Serrano, Cristina; Sanz, Mariano

    2014-06-01

    This review provides updates on acute conditions affecting the periodontal tissues, including abscesses in the periodontium, necrotizing periodontal diseases and other acute conditions that cause gingival lesions with acute presentation, such as infectious processes not associated with oral bacterial biofilms, mucocutaneous disorders and traumatic and allergic lesions. A periodontal abscess is clinically important because it is a relatively frequent dental emergency, it can compromise the periodontal prognosis of the affected tooth and bacteria within the abscess can spread and cause infections in other body sites. Different types of abscesses have been identified, mainly classified by their etiology, and there are clear differences between those affecting a pre-existing periodontal pocket and those affecting healthy sites. Therapy for this acute condition consists of drainage and tissue debridement, while an evaluation of the need for systemic antimicrobial therapy will be made for each case, based on local and systemic factors. The definitive treatment of the pre-existing condition should be accomplished after the acute phase is controlled. Necrotizing periodontal diseases present three typical clinical features: papilla necrosis, gingival bleeding and pain. Although the prevalence of these diseases is not high, their importance is clear because they represent the most severe conditions associated with the dental biofilm, with very rapid tissue destruction. In addition to bacteria, the etiology of necrotizing periodontal disease includes numerous factors that alter the host response and predispose to these diseases, namely HIV infection, malnutrition, stress or tobacco smoking. The treatment consists of superficial debridement, careful mechanical oral hygiene, rinsing with chlorhexidine and daily re-evaluation. Systemic antimicrobials may be used adjunctively in severe cases or in nonresponding conditions, being the first option metronidazole. Once the acute

  11. Acute Pericarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Issues Symptoms General Abdomen & Digestive Bleeding Brain & Nervous System Chest & Respiratory Children's Symptoms Eye Genital & Urinary ALL SYMPTOMS > Emergencies Cardiac Arrest Choking ALL EMERGENCIES ... By Brian D. Hoit, MD, Professor of Medicine and Physiology and Biophysics, Case Western Reserve University; Director of ...

  12. The technetium-99m-sulfur colloid angiogram in suspected gastrointestinal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, R.B.; Zeman, R.K.; Gottschalk, A.

    1983-01-01

    Dynamic radionuclide angiography (5-sec. images) with technetium-99m-sulfur colloid proved to be helpful in 5 patients who presented with gastrointestinal bleeding. In 2, intermittently bleeding hypervascular lesions were seen on dynamic but not on static images; in 2 others, the dynamic images demonstrated hypervascular lesions better than the static scans; and in 1, the radionuclide angiogram localized colonic bleeding more accurately because of rapid peristalsis of extravasated tracer. The addition of the radionuclide angiogram to routine scintigraphy for gastrointestinal bleeding may be crucial for identification of hypervascular lesions and precise localization of bleeding sites

  13. Hyaluronic acid solution injection for upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding after failed conventional endoscopic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jin Wook; Kim, Hyung Hun

    2014-03-01

    Hyaluronic acid solution injection can be an additional endoscopic modality for controlling bleeding in difficult cases when other techniques have failed. We evaluated 12 cases in which we used hyaluronic acid solution injection for stopping bleeding. Immediately following hyaluronic acid solution injection, bleeding was controlled in 11 out of 12 cases. There was no clinical evidence of renewed bleeding in 11 cases during follow up.Hyaluronic acid solution injection can be a simple and efficient additional method for controlling upper and lower gastrointestinal bleeding after failed endoscopic therapy. © 2013 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2013 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  14. Antibiotic Prophylaxis Using Third Generation Cephalosporins Can Reduce the Risk of Early Rebleeding in the First Acute Gastroesophageal Variceal Hemorrhage: A Prospective Randomized Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jun, Chung-Hwan; Park, Chang-Hwan; Lee, Wan-Sik; Joo, Young-Eun; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Choi, Sung-Kyu; Rew, Jong-Sun; Kim, Sei-Jong; Kim, Young-Dae

    2006-01-01

    Bacterial infection may be a critical trigger for variceal bleeding. Antibiotic prophylaxis can prevent rebleeding in patients with acute gastroesophageal variceal bleeding (GEVB). The aim of the study was to compare prophylactic third generation cephalosporins with on-demand antibiotics for the prevention of gastroesophageal variceal rebleeding. In a prospective trial, patients with the first acute GEVB were randomly assigned to receive prophylactic antibiotics (intravenous cefotaxime 2 g q ...

  15. Clinical Outcomes of the Marginal Ulcer Bleeding after Gastrectomy: As Compared to the Peptic Ulcer Bleeding with Nonoperated Stomach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Chul Chung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Marginal ulcer is a well-known complication after gastrectomy. Its bleeding can be severe, but the severity has rarely been reported. We aim to evaluate the clinical outcomes of marginal ulcer bleeding (MUB as compared to peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB with nonoperated stomach. Methods. A consecutive series of patients who had nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding and admitted to the hospital between 2005 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 530 patients were enrolled in this study, and we compared the clinical characteristics between 70 patients with MUB and 460 patients with PUB. Results. Patients with MUB were older (mean age: 62.86±10.59 years versus 53.33±16.68 years, P=0.01. The initial hemoglobin was lower (8.16±3.05 g/dL versus 9.38±2.49 g/dL, P=0.01, and the duration of admission was longer in MUB (7.14±4.10 days versus 5.90±2.97 days, P=0.03. After initial hemostasis, the rebleeding rate during admission was higher (16.2% versus 6.5%, P=0.01 in MUB. However, the mortality rate did not differ statistically between MUB and PUB groups. Helicobacter pylori-positive rate with MUB was lower than that of PUB (19.4% versus 54.4%, P=0.01. Conclusions. Clinically, MUB after gastrectomy is more severe than PUB with nonoperated stomach. Infection with H. pylori might not appear to play an important role in MUB after gastrectomy.

  16. Clinical Outcomes of the Marginal Ulcer Bleeding after Gastrectomy: As Compared to the Peptic Ulcer Bleeding with Nonoperated Stomach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Woo Chul; Jeon, Eun Jung; Lee, Kang-Moon; Paik, Chang Nyol; Oh, You Suk; Lee, Yang Woon; Kim, Sang Bae; Jun, Kyong-Hwa; Chin, Hyung Min

    2012-01-01

    Background. Marginal ulcer is a well-known complication after gastrectomy. Its bleeding can be severe, but the severity has rarely been reported. We aim to evaluate the clinical outcomes of marginal ulcer bleeding (MUB) as compared to peptic ulcer bleeding (PUB) with nonoperated stomach. Methods. A consecutive series of patients who had nonvariceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding and admitted to the hospital between 2005 and 2011 were retrospectively analyzed. A total of 530 patients were enrolled in this study, and we compared the clinical characteristics between 70 patients with MUB and 460 patients with PUB. Results. Patients with MUB were older (mean age: 62.86 ± 10.59 years versus 53.33 ± 16.68 years, P = 0.01). The initial hemoglobin was lower (8.16 ± 3.05 g/dL versus 9.38 ± 2.49 g/dL, P = 0.01), and the duration of admission was longer in MUB (7.14 ± 4.10 days versus 5.90 ± 2.97 days, P = 0.03). After initial hemostasis, the rebleeding rate during admission was higher (16.2% versus 6.5%, P = 0.01) in MUB. However, the mortality rate did not differ statistically between MUB and PUB groups. Helicobacter pylori-positive rate with MUB was lower than that of PUB (19.4% versus 54.4%, P = 0.01). Conclusions. Clinically, MUB after gastrectomy is more severe than PUB with nonoperated stomach. Infection with H. pylori might not appear to play an important role in MUB after gastrectomy. PMID:23304127

  17. Effect of High-Dose Oral Rabeprazole on Recurrent Bleeding after Endoscopic Treatment of Bleeding Peptic Ulcers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung-Keun Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of high-dose oral rabeprazole versus high-dose IV PPI on rebleeding after endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcers. Methods. This was a two-center, prospective, randomized, controlled trial. Patients with a high-risk bleeding peptic ulcer had endoscopic hemostasis and were randomly assigned to the high-dose oral rabeprazole group (20 mg twice daily for 72 hours or the high-dose IV omeprazole group (80 mg as a bolus injection followed by continuous infusion at 8 mg/h for 72 hours. Results. The study was stopped because of slow enrollment (total n=106. The rebleeding rates within 3 days were 3.7% (2 of 54 patients given oral rabeprazole and 1.9% (1 of 52 patients given IV omeprazole (P=1.000. The rebleeding rates after 3 days were 1.9% and 0% (P=1.000, respectively. The surgical intervention rates were 3.7% and 0% (P=0.495, and the mortality rates were 1.9% and 0% (P=1.000, respectively. Conclusions. The effect of high-dose oral rabeprazole did not differ significantly from that of high-dose IV omeprazole on rebleeding, surgical intervention, or mortality after endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcers, but this requires further evaluation.

  18. Effect of high-dose oral rabeprazole on recurrent bleeding after endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung-Keun; Kim, Jin-Soo; Kim, Tae-Ho; Kim, Chang-Whan; Cho, Young-Seok; Kim, Sung-Soo; Chae, Hiun-Suk; Han, Sok-Won; Park, Yong-Wan; Son, Hye-Suk; Min, Jeong-Yo; Cho, Guen-Jong; Bag, Jung-Sun; Choi, Son-Ook

    2012-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of high-dose oral rabeprazole versus high-dose IV PPI on rebleeding after endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcers. Methods. This was a two-center, prospective, randomized, controlled trial. Patients with a high-risk bleeding peptic ulcer had endoscopic hemostasis and were randomly assigned to the high-dose oral rabeprazole group (20 mg twice daily for 72 hours) or the high-dose IV omeprazole group (80 mg as a bolus injection followed by continuous infusion at 8 mg/h for 72 hours). Results. The study was stopped because of slow enrollment (total n = 106). The rebleeding rates within 3 days were 3.7% (2 of 54 patients) given oral rabeprazole and 1.9% (1 of 52 patients) given IV omeprazole (P = 1.000). The rebleeding rates after 3 days were 1.9% and 0% (P = 1.000), respectively. The surgical intervention rates were 3.7% and 0% (P = 0.495), and the mortality rates were 1.9% and 0% (P = 1.000), respectively. Conclusions. The effect of high-dose oral rabeprazole did not differ significantly from that of high-dose IV omeprazole on rebleeding, surgical intervention, or mortality after endoscopic treatment of bleeding peptic ulcers, but this requires further evaluation.

  19. Risk factors for bleeding complications in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stępińska, Janina; Czerwińska, Katarzyna; Witkowski, Adam; Dąbrowski, Maciej; Chmielak, Zbigniew; Kuśmierski, Krzysztof; Hryniewiecki, Tomasz; Demkow, Marcin

    2013-01-01

    The risk of bleedings in transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI) patients increases due to age and concomitant diseases. The aim of the study was to assess the risk of bleedings, their influence on early prognosis of TAVI patients and utility of the TIMI and GUSTO scales in the evaluation of bleeding and in prediction of blood transfusion. This was a single center study of in-hospital bleedings in 56 consecutive TAVI patients. Bleedings were classified according to the GUSTO and TIMI scales. HASBLED's scale risk factors, diabetes mellitus, female sex, the route of bioprosthesis implantation and inhospital antithrombotic treatment were analyzed. Statistical analysis consisted of c2, Fisher's exact, Wilcoxon tests and logistic regression analysis. Serious bleedings occurred in 35 (62.5%) patients. There was no significant correlation with HASBLED score. History of anemia was a significant predictor of bleeding in GUSTO (p = 0.0013) and TIMI (p = 0.048) scales. No bleedings in patients receiving vitamin K antagonists (VKA) pre- and VKA plus clopidogrel post intervention were observed. Patients with bleedings according to the GUSTO scale more often required blood tranfusion than in TIMI scale (p = 0.03). History of anemia is the strongest predictor of serious bleedings. VKA before and VKA with clopidogrel after TAVI are safer than dual antiplatelet or triple therapy. The TIMI and GUSTO scales can adequately classify bleeding after TAVI, however the GUSTO better predicts transfusions.

  20. Coagulation is more affected by quick than slow bleeding in patients with massive blood loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Juan; Yang, Dejuan; Zheng, Dongyou

    2017-03-01

    Profuse blood loss affects blood coagulation to various degrees. However, whether bleeding speed affects coagulation remains uncertain. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of bleeding speed on coagulation function. A total of 141 patients in the Department of Thoracic Surgery of our hospital were evaluated between January 2007 and February 2014. There are two groups of patients, those who received decortication for chronic encapsulated empyema were called the slow-bleeding group, and those who received thoracoscopic upper lobectomy were called the fast bleeding group; each group was further subdivided into three: group A, 1000 ml ≤ bleeding amount coagulation function was assessed in all patients before and during surgery and at 1, 2, and 24 h after surgery, measuring prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen, blood pressure, hematocrit, hemoglobin, and platelets. Bleeding duration was overtly longer in the slow-bleeding group than that in quick bleeding individuals (2.3 ± 0.25 h vs. 0.41 ± 0.13 h, P coagulation indices at each time point and bleeding amounts had significant differences in the quick bleeding group.Increased consumption of coagulation factors in quick bleeding may have greater impact on coagulation function.