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Sample records for acute bipolar mania

  1. Pharmacoeconomics of quetiapine for the management of acute mania in bipolar I disorder

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    Klok, Rogier M; Al Hadithy, Asmar Fy; van Schayk, Nathalie Pjt; Antonisse, Ad Jj; Caro, Jaime J; Brouwers, Jacobus Rbj; Postma, Maarten J

    2007-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (or manic depression) is a lifelong, severe and complex psychiatric illness characterized by recurrent episodes of depression and mania. The aim of this study is to explore the cost-effectiveness of quetiapine compared with other alternatives for the treatment of acute manic

  2. Psychopharmacological treatment of psychotic mania and psychotic bipolar depression compared to non-psychotic mania and non-psychotic bipolar depression.

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    Bjørklund, Louise B; Horsdal, Henriette T; Mors, Ole; Gasse, Christiane; Østergaard, Søren D

    2017-09-01

    An evidence base for the treatment of mania and bipolar depression with psychotic symptoms is lacking. Nevertheless, clinicians may have a preference for treating episodes of bipolar disorder with or without psychotic symptoms in different ways, which is likely to reflect notions of differential efficacy of treatments between these subtypes. This study aimed to investigate whether the psychopharmacological treatment of psychotic and non-psychotic episodes of mania and bipolar depression, respectively, differs in clinical practice. We conducted a register-based study assessing the psychopharmacological treatment of all individuals receiving their first diagnosis of mania or bipolar depression between 2010 and 2012. The psychopharmacological treatment within 3 months following the time of diagnosis was considered. Potential differences in psychopharmacological treatment between the psychotic and non-psychotic subtypes of mania and bipolar depression, respectively, were investigated by means of Pearson's χ 2 test and logistic regression adjusted for sex and age at diagnosis of bipolar disorder. A total of 827 patients were included in the analyses. The adjusted odds ratio (aOR) for treatment with an antipsychotic was 1.71 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.18-2.48, Pbipolar depression. The aOR for treatment with the combination of an antipsychotic and an anticonvulsant was 1.60 (95% CI: 1.06-2.43, Pbipolar psychotic depression. It would be of interest to conduct studies evaluating whether antipsychotics represent the superior pharmacological treatment for psychotic mania and psychotic bipolar depression. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Olanzapine monotherapy and olanzapine combination therapy in the treatment of mania: 12-week results from the European Mania in Bipolar Longitudinal Evaluation of Medication (EMBLEM) observational study.

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    Vieta, Eduard; Panicali, Francesco; Goetz, Iris; Reed, Catherine; Comes, Merce; Tohen, Mauricio

    2008-02-01

    To evaluate the 12-week outcomes (effectiveness, tolerability, and patterns of medication use) of olanzapine (either in antimanic monotherapy or in combination with other antipsychotics, anticonvulsants, and/or lithium) in patients with bipolar mania or mixed mania. EMBLEM (European Mania in Bipolar Longitudinal Evaluation of Medication) is a 24-month prospective observational study of in- and outpatients with acute mania/mixed mania conducted in 14 European countries. Primary outcome measures included Clinical Global Impressions-Bipolar Disorder scale (overall, mania, and depression); 5-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale; and Young Mania Rating Scale. Tolerability measures included a questionnaire to assess patients' symptomatic complaints. Overall, 2004 patients received olanzapine (olanzapine monotherapy, n=673; olanzapine combination, n=1331). Concomitant therapy with antidepressants and/or anxiolytics was possible in both groups. The countries significantly differed in the use of olanzapine monotherapy versus olanzapine combination (pEMBLEM results suggest that in naturalistic settings, olanzapine (both as monotherapy and combination) may be effective in treating patients with bipolar mania. The use of olanzapine monotherapy or combination varies significantly across countries, but combination is generally the rule, rather than the exception.

  4. The management of bipolar mania: a national survey of baseline data from the EMBLEM study in Italy

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    Barraco Alessandra

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although a number of studies have assessed the management of mania in routine clinical practice, no studies have so far evaluated the short- and long-term management and outcome of patients affected by bipolar mania in different European countries. The objective of the study is to present, in the context of a large multicenter survey (EMBLEM study, an overview of the baseline data on the acute management of a representative sample of manic bipolar patients treated in the Italian psychiatric hospital and community settings. EMBLEM is a 2-year observational longitudinal study that evaluates across 14 European countries the patterns of the drug prescribed in patients with bipolar mania, their socio-demographic and clinical features and the outcomes of the treatment. Methods The study consists of a 12-week acute phase and a ≤ 24-month maintenance phase. Bipolar patients were included into the study as in- or out-patients, if they initiated or changed, according to the decision of their psychiatrist, oral antipsychotics, anticonvulsants and/or lithium for the treatment of an episode of mania. Data concerning socio-demographic characteristics, psychiatric and medical history, severity of mania, prescribed medications, functional status and quality of life were collected at baseline and during the follow-up period. Results In Italy, 563 patients were recruited in 56 sites: 376 were outpatients and 187 inpatients. The mean age was 45.8 years. The mean CGI-BP was 4.4 (± 0.9 for overall score and mania, 1.9 (± 1.2 for depression and 2.6 (± 1.6 for hallucinations/delusions. The YMRS showed that 14.4% had a total score Conclusion Data collected at baseline in the Italian cohort of the EMBLEM study represent a relevant source of information to start addressing the short and long-term therapeutic strategies for improving the clinical as well as the socio-economic outcomes of patients affected by bipolar mania. Although it's not an

  5. Regulation of glycogen synthase kinase-3 during bipolar mania treatment.

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    Li, Xiaohong; Liu, Min; Cai, Zhuoji; Wang, Gang; Li, Xiaohua

    2010-11-01

    Bipolar disorder is a debilitating psychiatric illness presenting with recurrent mania and depression. The pathophysiology of bipolar disorder is poorly understood, and molecular targets in the treatment of bipolar disorder remain to be identified. Preclinical studies have suggested that glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) is a potential therapeutic target in bipolar disorder, but evidence of abnormal GSK3 in human bipolar disorder and its response to treatment is still lacking. This study was conducted in acutely ill type I bipolar disorder subjects who were hospitalized for a manic episode. The protein level and the inhibitory serine phosphorylation of GSK3 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of bipolar manic and healthy control subjects were compared, and the response of GSK3 to antimanic treatment was evaluated. The levels of GSK3α and GSK3β in this group of bipolar manic subjects were higher than healthy controls. Symptom improvement during an eight-week antimanic treatment with lithium, valproate, and atypical antipsychotics was accompanied by a significant increase in the inhibitory serine phosphorylation of GSK3, but not the total level of GSK3, whereas concomitant electroconvulsive therapy treatment during a manic episode appeared to dampen the response of GSK3 to pharmacological treatment. Results of this study suggest that GSK3 can be modified during the treatment of bipolar mania. This finding in human bipolar disorder is in agreement with preclinical data suggesting that inhibition of GSK3 by increasing serine phosphorylation is a response of GSK3 to psychotropics used in bipolar disorder, supporting the notion that GSK3 is a promising molecular target in the pharmacological treatment of bipolar disorder. © 2010 John Wiley and Sons A/S.

  6. The Risk of Treatment-Emergent Mania With Methylphenidate in Bipolar Disorder.

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    Viktorin, Alexander; Rydén, Eleonore; Thase, Michael E; Chang, Zheng; Lundholm, Cecilia; D'Onofrio, Brian M; Almqvist, Catarina; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Lichtenstein, Paul; Larsson, Henrik; Landén, Mikael

    2017-04-01

    The authors sought to determine the risk of treatment-emergent mania associated with methylphenidate, used in monotherapy or with a concomitant mood-stabilizing medication, in patients with bipolar disorder. Using linked Swedish national registries, the authors identified 2,307 adults with bipolar disorder who initiated therapy with methylphenidate between 2006 and 2014. The cohort was divided into two groups: those with and those without concomitant mood-stabilizing treatment. To adjust for individual-specific confounders, including disorder severity, genetic makeup, and early environmental factors, Cox regression analyses were used, conditioning on individual to compare the rate of mania (defined as hospitalization for mania or a new dispensation of stabilizing medication) 0-3 months and 3-6 months after medication start following nontreated periods. Patients on methylphenidate monotherapy displayed an increased rate of manic episodes within 3 months of medication initiation (hazard ratio=6.7, 95% CI=2.0-22.4), with similar results for the subsequent 3 months. By contrast, for patients taking mood stabilizers, the risk of mania was lower after starting methylphenidate (hazard ratio=0.6, 95% CI=0.4-0.9). Comparable results were observed when only hospitalizations for mania were counted. No evidence was found for a positive association between methylphenidate and treatment-emergent mania among patients with bipolar disorder who were concomitantly receiving a mood-stabilizing medication. This is clinically important given that up to 20% of people with bipolar disorder suffer from comorbid ADHD. Given the markedly increased hazard ratio of mania following methylphenidate initiation in bipolar patients not taking mood stabilizers, careful assessment to rule out bipolar disorder is indicated before initiating monotherapy with psychostimulants.

  7. Recognizing thyrotoxicosis in a patient with bipolar mania: a case report

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    Lee Catherine

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A thyroid stimulating hormone level is commonly measured in patients presenting with symptoms of mania in order to rule out an underlying general medical condition such as hyperthyroidism or thyrotoxicosis. Indeed, many cases have been reported in which a patient is initially treated for bipolar mania, but is later found to have a thyroid condition. Several case reports have noted the development of a thyroid condition in bipolar patients either on lithium maintenance treatment or recently on lithium treatment. Case presentation We review a case in which a patient with a long history of bipolar disorder presents with comorbid hyperthyroidism and bipolar mania after recent discontinuation of lithium treatment. Conclusion Physicians should consider a comorbid hyperthyroidism in bipolar manic patients only partially responsive to standard care treatment with a mood stabilizer and antipsychotic.

  8. Novel antipsychotics in bipolar and schizoaffective mania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slooff, CJ

    Objective: Novel antipsychotics are increasingly used in the treatment of bipolar and schizoaffective mania. This paper presents an overview of the controlled studies in this field. Method: Using cross-references, a computerized search was performed on MEDLINE and EMBASE psychiatry covering the

  9. Assessment of white matter abnormalities in paranoid schizophrenia and bipolar mania patients.

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    Cui, Liqian; Chen, Zhuangfei; Deng, Wei; Huang, Xiaoqi; Li, Mingli; Ma, Xiaohong; Huang, Chaohua; Jiang, Lijun; Wang, Yingcheng; Wang, Qiang; Collier, David A; Gong, Qiyong; Li, Tao

    2011-12-30

    White matter abnormalities have been repeatedly reported in both schizophrenia and bipolar disorder (BD) in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies, but the empirical evidence about the diagnostic specificity of white matter abnormalities in these disorders is still limited. This study sought to investigate the alterations in fractional anisotropy (FA) in white matter throughout the entire brain of patients from Chengdu, China with paranoid schizophrenia and bipolar mania. For this purpose, DTI was used to assess white matter integrity in patients with paranoid schizophrenia (n=25) and psychotic bipolar mania (n=18) who had been treated with standard pharmacotherapy for fewer than 5 days at the time of study, as well as in normal controls (n=30). The differences in FA were measured by use of voxel-based analysis. The results show that reduced FA was found in the left posterior corona radiata (PCR) in patients with psychotic bipolar mania and paranoid schizophrenia compared to the controls. Patients with psychotic bipolar mania also showed a significant reduction in FA in right posterior corona radiata and in right anterior thalamic radiation (ATR). A direct comparison between the two patient groups found no significant differences in any regions, and none of the findings were associated with illness duration. Correlation analysis indicated that FA values showed a significant negative correlation with positive symptom scores on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale in the left frontal-parietal lobe in the paranoid schizophrenia. It was concluded that common abnormalities in the left PCR might imply an overlap in white matter pathology in the two disorders and might be related to shared risk factors for the two disorders. 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Insight in bipolar mania: evaluation of its heterogeneity and correlation with clinical symptoms.

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    Silva, Rafael de Assis da; Mograbi, Daniel C; Bifano, Jaqueline; Santana, Cristina M T; Cheniaux, Elie

    2016-07-15

    Studies on insight in bipolar mania are not numerous and usually consider insight as a unitary construct. Evaluate how different facets of insight are affected in bipolar mania and investigate correlations between insight for each specific object in bipolar disorder and manic symptomatology. A group of 165 bipolar patients were followed during a year, with 51 patients having manic episodes according to DSM-IV-TR criteria. Patients underwent a clinical assessment and insight was evaluated through the Insight Scale for Affective Disorders. The study found that insight regarding symptoms is worse than insight of having bipolar disorder, social relationships and self esteem. Moreover, poor global insight (total ISAD) correlates with more severe changes in mood, speech and thought structure, with worse insight about symptoms correlating with the same alterations and also with more severe symptoms of agitation/energy. Although a large sample of bipolar patients was followed up, the final sample composed of patients with at least one manic episode was relatively smaller. Moreover, the fact that the study was performed in a university hospital may have led to selection biases. Results suggest that patients with BD are reasonably capable of identifying that their condition implies consequences but have more impaired awareness of their energy and activity levels. A lower level of insight specifically about symptoms correlates with more severe symptoms of agitation/energy, which suggests a psychomotor nucleus able to impair insight in mania. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. GANGGUAN AFEKTIF BIPOLAR MANIA DENGAN PSIKOTIK: SEBUAH LAPORAN KASUS

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    Hendrikus Gede Surya Adhi Putra

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Gangguan bipolar merupakan gangguan yang terdiri dari afek yang meningkat, dan jugaaktivitas yang berlebih (mania atau hipomania, dan dalam jangka waktu yang berbedaterjadi penurunan afek yang disertai dengan penurunan aktivitas (depresi. Kejadianpada  gangguan  bipolar  berkisar  antara  0,3-1,5%.  Prevalensi  serupa  pada  pria  danwanita.Gejala gangguan bipolar episode manik meliputi perasaan sensitif, kurangistirahat, harga diri melonjak naik, dan pada episode depresi meliputi kehilanganminat, tidur lebih atau kurang dari normal, gelisah, merasa tidak berharga, dan kurangkonsentrasi. Laporan ini membahas kasus gangguan bipolar episode kini manik yangterjadi pada seorang laki-laki berusia 45 tahun. Pasien ini mendapatkan psikoterapi,haloperidol 1 x 5 mg, dan trihexyphenidyl 1 x 2 mg per oral.

  12. Does Insight Affect the Efficacy of Antipsychotics in Acute Mania?: An Individual Patient Data Regression Meta-Analysis.

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    Welten, Carlijn C M; Koeter, Maarten W J; Wohlfarth, Tamar D; Storosum, Jitschak G; van den Brink, Wim; Gispen-de Wied, Christine C; Leufkens, Hubert G M; Denys, Damiaan A J P

    2016-02-01

    Patients having an acute manic episode of bipolar disorder often lack insight into their condition. Because little is known about the possible effect of insight on treatment efficacy, we examined whether insight at the start of treatment affects the efficacy of antipsychotic treatment in patients with acute mania. We used individual patient data from 7 randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled registration studies of 4 antipsychotics in patients with acute mania (N = 1904). Insight was measured with item 11 of the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) at baseline and study endpoint 3 weeks later. Treatment outcome was defined by (a) mean change score, (b) response defined as 50% or more improvement on YMRS, and (c) remission defined as YMRS score less than 8 at study endpoint. We used multilevel mixed effect linear (or logistic) regression analyses of individual patient data to assess the interaction between baseline insight and treatment outcomes. At treatment initiation, 1207 (63.5%) patients had impaired or no insight into their condition. Level of insight significantly modified the efficacy of treatment by mean change score (P = 0.039), response rate (P = 0.033), and remission rate (P = 0.043), with greater improvement in patients with more impaired insight. We therefore recommend that patients experiencing acute mania should be treated immediately and not be delayed until patients regain insight.

  13. Decreased medial prefrontal cortex activation during self-referential processing in bipolar mania.

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    Herold, Dorrit; Usnich, Tatiana; Spengler, Stephanie; Sajonz, Bastian; Bauer, Michael; Bermpohl, Felix

    2017-09-01

    Patients with bipolar disorder in mania exhibit symptoms pointing towards altered self-referential processing, such as decreased self-focus, flight of ideas and high distractibility. In depression, the opposite pattern of symptoms has been connected to increased activation of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) during self-referential processing. In this study, we hypothesized that (1) patients with mania will exhibit decreased activation in the mPFC during self-referential processing and (2) will be more alexithymic and that levels of alexithymia will correlate negatively with mPFC activation. The neural response to standardized pictures was compared in 14 patients with bipolar I disorder in mania to 14 healthy controls using blood oxygen level dependent contrast magnetic resonance imaging. Participants were asked to indicate with button press during the scanning session for each picture whether the pictures personally related to them or not. Toronto alexithymia scale (TAS) scores were recorded from all participants. In the group analysis, patients with mania exhibited decreased activation in a predefined region of interest in the mPFC during self-referential processing compared to healthy controls. Patients with mania showed significantly higher levels of alexithymia, attributable to difficulties in identifying and describing emotions. Activation in the mPFC correlated negatively with levels of alexithymia. Results presented here should be replicated in a larger group, potentially including unmedicated patients. The finding of decreased mPFC activation during self-referential processing in mania may reflect decreased self-focus and high distractibility. Support for this view comes from the negative correlation between higher alexithymia scores and decreased mPFC activation. These findings represent an opposite clinical and neuroimaging pattern to findings in depression. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. New approaches for the management of bipolar disorder: role of sublingual asenapine in the treatment of mania

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    Warren CG

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Calvert G Warren,1 Steven L Dubovsky1,21Department of Psychiatry, State University of New York at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA; 2Departments of Psychiatry and Medicine, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, USAAbstract: Bipolar disorder is a prevalent disorder that tends to become progressive without treatment and with inadequate treatment. Second generation (atypical antipsychotic drugs have increasingly been used as adjunctive treatment or monotherapy for mania, but they have the potential for significant adverse effects and their role in maintenance treatment remains unclear. Asenapine is a new atypical antipsychotic medication formulated in a sublingual preparation that has been studied for mania but not maintenance therapy. Evidence indicating efficacy, adverse effects, and potential benefits and drawbacks of using asenapine in the treatment of bipolar disorder based on currently available published data are summarized.Keywords: bipolar disorder, antipsychotic drug, mania, maintenance, sublingual

  15. Does recent mania affect response to antidepressants in bipolar disorder? A re-analysis of STEP-BD data.

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    Mousavi, Zahra; Johnson, Sheri; Li, Descartes

    2018-08-15

    One previous study suggested that the presence of a manic episode before bipolar depression is related to worse response to antidepressants. To examine this effect in a larger sample, we used data from the large, multi-site STEP-BD study. We hypothesized that among persons treated with antidepressants for bipolar depression, manic or mixed episodes before depression onset (as compared to euthymia) would predict lower rate of recovery, more sustained depressive symptoms and higher rate of switching into mania/hypomania after antidepressant treatment of bipolar depression. 320 participants were available for analyses (140 male) diagnosed with bipolar I, bipolar II, cyclothymia, bipolar disorder not otherwise specified, or schizoaffective disorder bipolar subtype. Patients were randomly assigned to 3 treatment randomization strata (placebo, bupropion, and paroxetine) as adjuncts to mood stabilizers. Analyses were conducted to examine the effect of episode status before the depressive episode on the degree of change in depressive symptoms at 3 and 6 months, the likelihood of depression recovery and the likelihood of anti-depressant induced switching. Presence of a manic episode before depression in patients with bipolar disorder did not significantly predict response to antidepressants. The study was limited by a high rate of attrition, and consideration of only two antidepressant medications. Our findings are in agreement with other past studies suggesting that mania and depression may operate separately for those with bipolar disorder, with differential predictors of the onset and offset of mania versus depression. Future directions may consider vulnerability for these episodes separately. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Decreased plasma neurotrophin-4/5 levels in bipolar disorder patients in mania.

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    Barbosa, Izabela G; Morato, Isabela B; Huguet, Rodrigo B; Rocha, Fabio L; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Teixeira, Antônio L

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate two poorly explored neurotrophins (NT), NT-3 and NT-4/5, in bipolar disorder (BD). Forty patients with type I BD (18 in remission and 22 in mania) and 25 healthy controls matched for age, gender, and educational attainment were enrolled in this study. All subjects were assessed by the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview; the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale were used to evaluate severity of symptoms in BD patients. Plasma levels of NT-3 and NT-4/5 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). BD patients in mania presented decreased NT-4/5 plasma levels in comparison with controls (p neurotrophin dysfunction is associated with mood states in patients with BD.

  17. Indução de mania durante o tratamento com antidepressivos no transtorno bipolar

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    Tamada Renata S

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: Realizar uma revisão da literatura sobre a mania induzida por antidepressivos, sua incidência, quadro clínico, fatores de risco e tratamento. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado um levantamento no Medline dos artigos publicados entre 1970 e 2001. Foram incluídos estudos abertos e controlados bem como relatos de caso com casuística maior que cinco pacientes. RESULTADOS: Mania induzida e mania espontânea parecem ter apresentações clínicas distintas, sendo a mania induzida mais leve e breve. Os fatores de risco para mania induzida ainda não estão bem estabelecidos. CONCLUSÃO: Existe um número muito limitado de estudos controlados e prospectivos sobre a mania induzida. Os antidepressivos estão associados a um aumento no risco de indução de mania. Este risco pode variar dependendo da droga utilizada. Portanto, os antidepressivos devem ser utilizados em pacientes bipolares considerado-se tanto a eficácia clínica como os potenciais efeitos sobre o curso da doença.

  18. Class effect of pharmacotherapy in bipolar disorder: fact or misbelief?

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    Vieta Eduard

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anecdotal reports suggests that most clinicians treat medications as belonging to a class with regard to all therapeutic indications; this means that the whole 'class' of drugs is considered to possesses a specific therapeutic action. The present article explores the possible existence of a true 'class effect' for agents available for the treatment of bipolar disorder. Methods We reviewed the available treatment data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs and explored 16 'agent class'/'treatment issue' cases for bipolar disorder. Four classes of agents were examined: first-generation antipsychotics (FGAs, second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs, antiepileptics and antidepressants, with respect to their efficacy on four treatment issues of bipolar disorder (BD (acute mania, acute bipolar depression, maintenance against mania, maintenance against depression. Results From the 16 'agent class'/' treatment issue' cases, only 3 possible class effects were detected, and they all concerned acute mania and antipsychotics. Four effect cases have not been adequately studied (FGAs against acute bipolar depression and in maintenance protection from depression, and antidepressants against acute mania and protection from mania and they all concern treatment cases with a high risk of switching to the opposite pole, thus research in these areas is poor. There is no 'class effect' at all concerning antiepileptics. Conclusions The available data suggest that a 'class effect' is the exception rather than the rule in the treatment of BD. However, the possible presence of a 'class effect' concept discourages clinicians from continued scientific training and reading. Focused educational intervention might be necessary to change this attitude.

  19. State-dependent alterations of lipid profiles in patients with bipolar disorder.

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    Huang, Yu-Jui; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Chung, Kuo-Hsuan; Chen, Pao-Huan; Huang, Shou-Hung; Kuo, Chian-Jue

    2018-07-01

    Objective Serum lipid levels may be associated with the affective severity of bipolar disorder, but data on lipid profiles in Asian patients with bipolar disorder and the lipid alterations in different states of opposite polarities are scant. We investigated the lipid profiles of patients in the acute affective, partial, and full remission state in bipolar mania and depression. Methods The physically healthy patients aged between 18 and 45 years with bipolar I disorder, as well as age-matched healthy normal controls were enrolled. We compared the fasting blood levels of glucose, cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein of manic or depressed patients in the acute phase and subsequent partial and full remission with those of their normal controls. Results A total of 32 bipolar manic patients (12 women and 20 men), 32 bipolar depressed participants (18 women and 14 men), and 64 healthy control participants took part in this study. The mean cholesterol level in acute mania was significantly lower than that in acute depression (p bipolar mania. Conclusion Circulating lipid profiles may be easily affected by affective states. The acute manic state may be accompanied by state-dependent lower cholesterol and triglyceride levels relative to that in other mood states.

  20. Adjunctive Treatment of Acute Mania with Risperidone versus Typical Antipsychotics: A Retrospective Study

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    Jui-Hsiu Tsai

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Few studies have directly compared atypical antipsychotics (e.g. risperidone with typical antipsychotics as adjunctive therapy in patients hospitalized for acute mania, especially during a lengthy hospital stay. Our retrospective, case-controlled study is a chart review of 64 patients with Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, defined bipolar I disorder (current episode, mania. Patients were divided into two groups according to the adjunctive medications used: the risperidone group (mood stabilizers plus risperidone and the control group (mood stabilizers plus typical antipsychotics. Outcome at discharge, medications, adverse drug effects, and length of hospital stay were compared between groups, controlling for gender, age, number of prior admissions, and duration of illness. Results indicated no statistically significant differences between groups in the controlled factors, Global Assessment of Functioning and Clinical Global Impression-Improvement scores, and adverse drug events. Patients in the risperidone group used significantly lower doses of trihexyphenidyl than those in the control group (p < 0.05. Patients treated with risperidone had a shorter hospital stay than those treated with typical antipsychotics (p < 0.01. In conclusion, antipsychotics are effective as adjunctive agents in the treatment of acute mania. The use of risperidone, in particular, decreases the need for anticholinergics and may lead to a shorter hospital stay compared with typical antipsychotics.

  1. Oxcarbazepine for acute affective episodes in bipolar disorder.

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    Vasudev, Akshya; Macritchie, Karine; Vasudev, Kamini; Watson, Stuart; Geddes, John; Young, Allan H

    2011-12-07

    Oxcarbazepine, a keto derivative of the 'mood stabiliser' carbamazepine, may have efficacy in the treatment of acute episodes of bipolar disorder. Potentially, it may offer pharmacokinetic advantages over carbamazepine. To review the efficacy and acceptability of oxcarbazepine compared to placebo and other agents in the treatment of acute bipolar episodes including mania, mixed episodes and depression. Electronic databases were searched up to 2 September 2011. Specialist journals and conference proceedings were handsearched. Authors, experts in the field and pharmaceutical companies were contacted requesting information on published and unpublished trials. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) which compared oxcarbazepine with placebo or alternative agents, where the stated intent of intervention was the acute treatment of bipolar affective disorder were sought. Participants with bipolar disorder of either sex and of all ages were included. Data were extracted from the original reports individually by two review authors. For dichotomous data, odds ratios (ORs) were calculated with 95% confidence intervals (CI). Continuous data were analysed using standardised mean differences (with 95% CI). Seven studies were included in the analysis (368 participants in total). All were on mania, hypomania, mixed episodes or rapid-cycling disorder. Overall, their methodological quality was relatively low.There was no difference in the primary outcome analysis - a fall of  50% or more on the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) - between oxcarbazepine and placebo (N=1, n=110, OR =2.10, 95% CI 0.94 to 4.73) in one study, conducted in children; no studies were available in adult participants.In comparison with other mood stabilisers, there was no difference between oxcarbazepine and valproate as an antimanic agent using the primary outcome (50% or more fall in YMRS, OR=0.44, 95% CI 0.10 to 1.97, 1 study, n=60, P=0.273) or the secondary outcome measure (differences in YMRS between the two

  2. Mood self-assessment in bipolar disorder: a comparison between patients in mania, depression, and euthymia

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    Rafael de Assis da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Some studies indicate that mood self-assessment is more severely impaired in patients with bipolar disorder in a manic episode than in depression. OBJECTIVES: To investigate variations in mood self-assessment in relation to current affective state in a group of individuals with bipolar disorder. METHODS: A total of 165 patients with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder type I or type II had their affective state assessed using the Clinical Global Impressions Scale for use in bipolar illness (CGI-BP, the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS, and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF. In addition, participants completed a self-report visual analog mood scale (VAMS. Patients were divided into three groups (euthymia, mania, and depression and compared with regard to VAMS results. RESULTS: Manic patients rated their mood similarly to patients in euthymia in 14 out of 16 items in the VAMS. By contrast, depressed patients rated only two items similarly to euthymic patients. CONCLUSION: Patients with bipolar disorder in mania, but not those in depression, poorly evaluate their affective state, reinforcing the occurrence of insight impairment in the manic syndrome.

  3. Quetiapine for the continuation treatment of bipolar depression : naturalistic prospective case series from the Stanley Bipolar Treatment Network

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    Suppes, Trisha; Kelly, Dorothy I.; Keck, Paul E.; McElroy, Susan L.; Altshuler, Lori L.; Mintz, Jim; Frye, Mark A.; Nolen, Willem A.; Luckenbaugh, David A.; Post, Robert M.; Leverich, Gabriele S.; Kupka, Ralph W.; Grunze, Heinz

    Continuation treatment for bipolar disorder often consists of a mood stabilizer and a second-generation antipsychotic. Quetiapine has been shown to be an effective treatment for acute mania and acute bipolar depression, but there are limited data for its use in continuation treatment. This study

  4. Mania in the Nordic countries: patients and treatment in the acute phase of the EMBLEM study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jens Knud; Porsdal, Vibeke; Aarre, Trond F

    2009-01-01

    countries with other European countries during the first 12 weeks of the EMBLEM (European Mania in Bipolar Longitudinal Evaluation of Medication) study. Adult patients with bipolar disorder were enrolled within standard course of care as in/outpatients if they initiated/changed oral medication...... status, functional status and pharmacological treatment. Psychiatric status at inclusion measured by the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and the Clinical Global Impression-Bipolar Disorder (CGI-BP) were similar in the Nordic and European patient groups, which is surprising as 73% of the Nordic patients...

  5. Asenapine effects on individual Young Mania Rating Scale items in bipolar disorder patients with acute manic or mixed episodes: a pooled analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cazorla P

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Pilar Cazorla, Jun Zhao, Mary Mackle, Armin Szegedi Merck, Rahway, NJ, USA Background: An exploratory post hoc analysis was conducted to evaluate the potential differential effects over time of asenapine and olanzapine compared with placebo on the eleven individual items comprising the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS in patients with manic or mixed episodes in bipolar I disorder. Methods: Data were pooled from two 3-week randomized, controlled trials in which the eleven individual items comprising the YMRS were measured over 21 days. An analysis of covariance model adjusted by baseline value was used to test for differences in changes from baseline in YMRS scores between groups. Results: Each of the eleven individual YMRS item scores was significantly reduced compared with placebo at day 21. After 2 days of treatment, asenapine and olanzapine were superior to placebo for six of the YMRS items: disruptive/aggressive behavior, content, irritability, elevated mood, sleep, and speech. Conclusion: Reduction in manic symptoms over 21 days was associated with a broad-based improvement across all symptom domains with no subset of symptoms predominating. Keywords: asenapine, Young Mania Rating Scale, bipolar disorder, YMRS, antipsychotic, olanzapine

  6. Effectiveness of olanzapine monotherapy and olanzapine combination treatment in the long term following acute mania--results of a two year observational study in bipolar disorder (EMBLEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Vieta, Eduard; Reed, Catherine; Novick, Diego; Barraco, Alessandra; Aguado, Jaume; Haro, Josep Maria

    2011-06-01

    This study compared the 2-year outcomes of patients with a manic/mixed episode of bipolar disorder taking olanzapine monotherapy or olanzapine in combination with other agents. EMBLEM (European Mania in Bipolar Longitudinal Evaluation of Medication) is a 2-year, prospective, observational study of clinical and functional outcomes of bipolar patients with an index manic/mixed episode. The study consisted of two phases: acute (12 weeks) and maintenance (follow-up over 2 years). The longitudinal outcome measure was the Clinical Global Impression-Bipolar Disorder scale. Cox regression models compared outcomes of both therapy groups using intention-to-treat and switching medication analysis. Treatment-emergent adverse events were also assessed. 1076 patients were included in this analysis. 29% took olanzapine as monotherapy (n = 313) and 71% as combination (n = 763) at 12-weeks post-baseline (end of study acute phase). After adjusting for patient characteristics using switching medication analysis, only relapse rates differed (p = 0.01) in favour of monotherapy-treated patients. There was no significant difference in rates of improvement, remission, and recovery. Patients treated with combination therapy reported more tremor (OR 2.37, 95%CI 1.44-3.89) and polyuria (OR 3.08, 95%CI 1.45-6.54) treatment-emergent events than monotherapy, although weight change was greater in the monotherapy group. Unknown confounding and potential selection bias may differentially impact treatment outcomes. EMBLEM patients benefitted from the selected therapy to a similar extent. Differences in patient characteristics between those prescribed monotherapy and combination therapy appear to be clinically relevant in the treatment decision. Physicians must balance the benefits and risks when determining appropriate treatment for individual patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The Role of Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) in Bipolar Disorder: Effectiveness in 522 Patients with Bipolar Depression, Mixed-state, Mania and Catatonic Features.

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    Perugi, Giulio; Medda, Pierpaolo; Toni, Cristina; Mariani, Michela Giorgi; Socci, Chiara; Mauri, Mauro

    2017-04-01

    We evaluated the effectiveness of Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) in the treatment of Bipolar Disorder (BD) in a large sample of bipolar patients with drug resistant depression, mania, mixed state and catatonic features. 522 consecutive patients with DSM-IV-TR BD were evaluated prior to and after the ECT course. Responders and nonresponders were compared in subsamples of depressed and mixed patients. Descriptive analyses were reported for patients with mania and with catatonic features. Of the original sample only 22 patients were excluded for the occurrence of side effects or consent withdrawal. After the ECT course, 344 (68.8%) patients were considered responders (final CGIi score ≤2) and 156 (31.2%) nonresponders. Response rates were respectively 68.1% for BD depression, 72.9% for mixed state, 75% for mania and 80.8% for catatonic features. Length of current episode and global severity of the illness were the only statistically significant predictors of nonresponse. ECT resulted to be an effective and safe treatment for all the phases of severe and drug-resistant BD. Positive response was observed in approximately two-thirds of the cases and in 80% of the catatonic patients. The duration of the current episode was the major predictor of nonresponse. The risk of ECT-induced mania is virtually absent and mood destabilization very unlikely. Our results clearly indicate that current algorithms for the treatment of depressive, mixed, manic and catatonic states should be modified and, at least for the most severe patients, ECT should not be considered as a "last resort".

  8. Effect of clinical response to active drugs and placebo on antipsychotics and mood stabilizers relative efficacy for bipolar depression and mania: A meta-regression analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoli, Francesco; Clerici, Massimo; Di Brita, Carmen; Riboldi, Ilaria; Crocamo, Cristina; Carrà, Giuseppe

    2018-04-01

    Randomised placebo-controlled trials investigating treatments for bipolar disorder have been hampered by wide variations of active drugs and placebo clinical response rates. It is important to estimate whether the active drug or placebo response has a greater influence in determining the relative efficacy of drugs for psychosis (antipsychotics) and relapse prevention (mood stabilisers) for bipolar depression and mania. We identified 53 randomised, placebo-controlled trials assessing antipsychotic or mood stabiliser monotherapy ('active drugs') for bipolar depression or mania. We carried out random-effects meta-regressions, estimating the influence of active drugs and placebo response rates on treatment relative efficacy. Meta-regressions showed that treatment relative efficacy for bipolar mania was influenced by the magnitude of clinical response to active drugs ( p=0.002), but not to placebo ( p=0.60). On the other hand, treatment relative efficacy for bipolar depression was influenced by response to placebo ( p=0.047), but not to active drugs ( p=0.98). Despite several limitations, our unexpected findings showed that antipsychotics / mood stabilisers relative efficacy for bipolar depression seems unrelated to active drugs response rates, depending only on clinical response to placebo. Future research should explore strategies to reduce placebo-related issues in randomised, placebo-controlled trials for bipolar depression.

  9. Korean Medication Algorithm Project for Bipolar Disorder: third revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Young Sup; Lee, Jung Goo; Jeong, Jong-Hyun; Kim, Moon-Doo; Sohn, Inki; Shim, Se-Hoon; Jon, Duk-In; Seo, Jeong Seok; Shin, Young-Chul; Min, Kyung Joon; Yoon, Bo-Hyun; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2015-01-01

    To constitute the third revision of the guidelines for the treatment of bipolar disorder issued by the Korean Medication Algorithm Project for Bipolar Disorder (KMAP-BP 2014). A 56-item questionnaire was used to obtain the consensus of experts regarding pharmacological treatment strategies for the various phases of bipolar disorder and for special populations. The review committee included 110 Korean psychiatrists and 38 experts for child and adolescent psychiatry. Of the committee members, 64 general psychiatrists and 23 child and adolescent psychiatrists responded to the survey. The treatment of choice (TOC) for euphoric, mixed, and psychotic mania was the combination of a mood stabilizer (MS) and an atypical antipsychotic (AAP); the TOC for acute mild depression was monotherapy with MS or AAP; and the TOC for moderate or severe depression was MS plus AAP/antidepressant. The first-line maintenance treatment following mania or depression was MS monotherapy or MS plus AAP; the first-line treatment after mania was AAP monotherapy; and the first-line treatment after depression was lamotrigine (LTG) monotherapy, LTG plus MS/AAP, or MS plus AAP plus LTG. The first-line treatment strategy for mania in children and adolescents was MS plus AAP or AAP monotherapy. For geriatric bipolar patients, the TOC for mania was AAP/MS monotherapy, and the TOC for depression was AAP plus MS or AAP monotherapy. The expert consensus in the KMAP-BP 2014 differed from that in previous publications; most notably, the preference for AAP was increased in the treatment of acute mania, depression, and maintenance treatment. There was increased expert preference for the use of AAP and LTG. The major limitation of the present study is that it was based on the consensus of Korean experts rather than on experimental evidence.

  10. Aripiprazole for acute mania in an elderly person

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    Balaji Bharadwaj

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available New-onset bipolar disorder is rare in the elderly. Symptom profile is similar to that in young adults but the elderly are more likely to have neurological co-morbidities. There are no case reports of elderly mania being treated with aripiprazole, an atypical antipsychotic. A 78-year-old gentleman presented to us with symptoms suggestive of mania of 1 month′s duration. He had similar history 3 years ago and a family history of postpartum psychosis in his mother. There were no neurological signs on examination and work-up for an organic etiology was negative except for age-related cerebral atrophy. He improved with aripiprazole and tolerated the medications well. The use of psychotropic medications in the elderly is associated with side-effects of sedation, increased cardiovascular risk, and greater risk of extra-pyramidal side-effects. The use of partial dopaminergic antagonists like aripiprazole may be useful in the balancing of effects and side-effects.

  11. Electroconvulsive therapy in treatment-resistant mania: case reports A Eletroconvulsoterapia no tratamento da mania resistente: relatos de casos

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    Marcia Britto de Macedo Soares

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy is known to be effective in the treatment of mood disorders, more specifically for depression and mania. Although a large body of evidence confirms the efficacy of electroconvulsive therapy in the treatment of mania, few prospective studies have been done to assess its effectiveness in treatment-resistant manic episodes. These case reports describe the initial results of a study that is being conducted to evaluate the efficacy of Electroconvulsive therapy among treatment-resistant bipolar patients. METHODS: Three manic patients (according to DSM-IV criteria who were considered treatment-resistant underwent a series of 12 bilateral Electroconvulsive therapy sessions. Before the treatment and then weekly, they were evaluated with the following rating scales: Young Mania Rating Scale, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, and Clinical Global Impressions-Bipolar Version. RESULTS: The 3 patients showed a satisfactory response to Electroconvulsive therapy, although some differences in the course of response were observed. CONCLUSION: These case reports suggest that Electroconvulsive therapy needs further evaluation for the treatment of resistant bipolar patients.A Eletroconvulsoterapia é uma alternativa reconhecidamente eficaz no tratamento dos transtornos do humor. Embora vários estudos tenham confirmado a eficácia desta modalidade terapêutica no tratamento da mania aguda, poucos estudos foram realizados em pacientes maníacos resistentes à farmacoterapia. Esses relatos de casos descrevem resultados preliminares de um projeto de pesquisa que tem por objetivo avaliar a eficácia da Eletroconvulsoterapia no tratamento de transtornos bipolares resistentes. MÉTODOS: Três pacientes com diagnóstico de mania (de acordo com os critérios do DSM-IV, considerados resistentes ao tratamento medicamentoso, foram submetidos a 12 aplicações bilaterais de Eletroconvulsoterapia. Antes do tratamento e

  12. Anticonvulsivantes e antipsicóticos no tratamento do transtorno bipolar Anticonvulsants and antipsychotics in the treatment of Bipolar Disorder

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    Ricardo Alberto Moreno

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available O transtorno bipolar é uma condição médica complexa e até o momento não há um tratamento único comprovadamente eficaz no controle de todos aspectos da doença. Foram revisadas a literatura disponível sobre o uso de anticonvulsivantes (valproato, carbamazepina, oxcarbazepina, lamotrigina, gabapentina, topiramato, clonazepam e antipsicóticos atípicos (clozapina, risperidona, olanzapina, quetiapina, ziprasidona e aripiprazole no tratamento agudo e profilático do transtorno bipolar. Existe um acúmulo de evidências acerca da eficácia do lítio na profilaxia e de ser melhor no tratamento da mania aguda do que nos episódios depressivos. Outros dados indicam que a carbamazepina e o valproato são eficazes na mania aguda. A lamotrigina parece reduzir ciclagem e ser eficaz em episódios depressivos. Baseado nas informações disponíveis, as evidências apontam a olanzapina como o antipsicótico atípico mais apropriado no tratamento de pacientes bipolares em mania, embora existam estudos sugerindo a eficácia da risperidona, aripiprazol e da clozapina. Resultados preliminares avaliando a eficácia de ziprasidona e quetiapina no transtorno bipolar ainda são bastante limitadas. Não há dados consistentes apoiando o uso profilático dos novos antipsicóticos.Bipolar disorder is a complex medical condition, and up to the date there is no single treatment with proven efficacy in the control of all aspects of the illness. The available literature on the use of anticonvulsants (valproate, carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, lamotrigine, gabapentin, topiramate, clonazepam and atypical antipsychotics (clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone, and aripiprazole for acute and prophylactic treatment of bipolar disorder was reviewed. There is a large amount of evidence that lithium is efficacious in the prophylaxis of episodes and better for acute mania than for depressive episodes. Other data show that carbamazepine and valproate are

  13. Acute mania after thyroxin supplementation in hypothyroid state

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    Rohit Verma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The current literature variedly ascribes depressive and manic symptoms to hypo- and hyperthyroid state, respectively, reporting mania in hypothyroidism as an unusual entity. More unusual is precipitation of manic state in hypothyroid subjects after thyroxine supplementation for which studies report otherwise treating manic symptoms in hypothyroid state with thyroxine. We report a case of a patient whose acute mania appears to have been precipitated by thyroxine supplementation in hypothyroidism state. This case underscores the importance of thyroid screening in patients with mood and psychotic disorders, as well as the potency of thyroxine in producing manic symptoms.

  14. Early warning signs checklists for relapse in bipolar depression and mania: utility, reliability and validity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobban, Fiona; Solis-Trapala, Ivonne; Symes, Wendy; Morriss, Richard

    2011-10-01

    Recognising early warning signs (EWS) of mood changes is a key part of many effective interventions for people with Bipolar Disorder (BD). This study describes the development of valid and reliable checklists required to assess these signs of depression and mania. Checklists of EWS based on previous research and participant feedback were designed for depression and mania and compared with spontaneous reporting of EWS. Psychometric properties and utility were examined in 96 participants with BD. The majority of participants did not spontaneously monitor EWS regularly prior to use of the checklists. The checklists identified most spontaneously generated EWS and led to a ten fold increase in the identification of EWS for depression and an eight fold increase for mania. The scales were generally reliable over time and responses were not associated with current mood. Frequency of monitoring for EWS correlated positively with social and occupational functioning for depression (beta=3.80, p=0.015) and mania (beta=3.92, p=0.008). The study is limited by a small sample size and the fact that raters were not blind to measures of mood and function. EWS checklists are useful and reliable clinical and research tools helping to generate enough EWS for an effective EWS intervention. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The efficacy of Li in bipolar disorder

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    Lozano R

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available R Lozano,1 R Marín,2 MJ Santacruz,2 I Freire,2 R Gomez21Department of Pharmacy, 2Department of Psychiatry, Hospital Real Nuestra Señora de Gracia, Zaragoza, SpainThe efficacy of lithium (Li for acute mania and as prophylaxis against recurrent episodes of mania in bipolar disorder has been well established, with the minimum effective Li serum concentration for acute mania in the range of 0.6–1.2 mEq/L, although lower maintenance concentrations can prove effective in some patients.1–5Thyroid disorders are also associated with alterations in mood, and patients with hypothyroidism may present with depression and cognitive dysfunction,6–8 while patients with hyperthyroidism may present with anxiety, depression, mood lability,7,9 and manic symptoms.10 However, considering that overt hyperthyroidism is uncommon in bipolar disorder, with a prevalence ≤2% across different studies,11,12 this has been largely attributed to lithium,13 with rates varying from 0 to 47% (average of about 10% among patients on long-term treatment with lithium.13–16

  16. The psychopharmacology algorithm project at the Harvard South Shore Program: an algorithm for acute mania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, Othman; Osser, David N

    2014-01-01

    This new algorithm for the pharmacotherapy of acute mania was developed by the Psychopharmacology Algorithm Project at the Harvard South Shore Program. The authors conducted a literature search in PubMed and reviewed key studies, other algorithms and guidelines, and their references. Treatments were prioritized considering three main considerations: (1) effectiveness in treating the current episode, (2) preventing potential relapses to depression, and (3) minimizing side effects over the short and long term. The algorithm presupposes that clinicians have made an accurate diagnosis, decided how to manage contributing medical causes (including substance misuse), discontinued antidepressants, and considered the patient's childbearing potential. We propose different algorithms for mixed and nonmixed mania. Patients with mixed mania may be treated first with a second-generation antipsychotic, of which the first choice is quetiapine because of its greater efficacy for depressive symptoms and episodes in bipolar disorder. Valproate and then either lithium or carbamazepine may be added. For nonmixed mania, lithium is the first-line recommendation. A second-generation antipsychotic can be added. Again, quetiapine is favored, but if quetiapine is unacceptable, risperidone is the next choice. Olanzapine is not considered a first-line treatment due to its long-term side effects, but it could be second-line. If the patient, whether mixed or nonmixed, is still refractory to the above medications, then depending on what has already been tried, consider carbamazepine, haloperidol, olanzapine, risperidone, and valproate first tier; aripiprazole, asenapine, and ziprasidone second tier; and clozapine third tier (because of its weaker evidence base and greater side effects). Electroconvulsive therapy may be considered at any point in the algorithm if the patient has a history of positive response or is intolerant of medications.

  17. Guidelines disconcordance in acute bipolar depression: data from the national Bipolar Mania Pathway Survey (BIPAS) in mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zuowei; Gao, Keming; Hong, Wu; Xing, Mengjuan; Wu, Zhiguo; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Chen; Yuan, Chengmei; Huang, Jia; Peng, Daihui; Wang, Yong; Lu, Weihong; Yi, Zhenghui; Yu, Xin; Zhao, Jingping; Fang, Yiru

    2014-01-01

    With the recent attention to the importance of evidence-based medicine in psychiatry, a number of treatment guidelines have been published. This survey investigated prescribing pattern and predictors for guideline disconcordance in the acute treatment of bipolar depression across mainland China. Pharmacological treatments of 1078 patients with bipolar depression were examined. Guidelines disconcordance was determined by comparing the medication(s) patients were prescribed with the recommendation(s) in the guidelines of the Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments. Predictors for guidelines discordance were analyzed with logistic regression. Of the 1078 patients, 50.2% patients were treated against treatment guidelines recommendations. The patients who were treated in general hospitals (OR = 1.53, 95% CI 1.18-1.97), with a depressive episode (OR = 1.67, 95% CI 1.27-2.19) and an older age at first onset (OR = 1.62, 95% CI 1.15-2.28) were more likely to receive guideline-disconcordant treatment than their counterparts. In contrast, the patients with current mental comorbidity, an older age at study entry, a longer duration of disease, and more frequent episodes in past year were less likely to receive guideline-disconcordant treatments than their counterparts with an OR of 0.43 (95% CI 0.24-0.77), 0.52 (95CI% 0.36-0.75), 0.48 (95% CI 0.36-0.65), and 0.50 (95% CI 0.38-0.64), respectively. Our finding suggested the disconcordance with treatment guidelines in patients with an acute bipolar depression is common under naturalistic conditions in mainland China, and the predicting factors correlated with guidelines disconcordance include both psychiatrist-specific (clinicians from general hospitals) and patient-specific features (a depressive episode at first onset, no current co-morbidity with mental disorders, a younger age at study entry, an older age at first onset, shorter duration of disease, and non-frequent episodes in past year).

  18. The acute mania of King George III: A computational linguistic analysis.

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    Vassiliki Rentoumi

    Full Text Available We used a computational linguistic approach, exploiting machine learning techniques, to examine the letters written by King George III during mentally healthy and apparently mentally ill periods of his life. The aims of the study were: first, to establish the existence of alterations in the King's written language at the onset of his first manic episode; and secondly to identify salient sources of variation contributing to the changes. Effects on language were sought in two control conditions (politically stressful vs. politically tranquil periods and seasonal variation. We found clear differences in the letter corpus, across a range of different features, in association with the onset of mental derangement, which were driven by a combination of linguistic and information theory features that appeared to be specific to the contrast between acute mania and mental stability. The paucity of existing data relevant to changes in written language in the presence of acute mania suggests that lexical, syntactic and stylometric descriptions of written discourse produced by a cohort of patients with a diagnosis of acute mania will be necessary to support the diagnosis independently and to look for other periods of mental illness of the course of the King's life, and in other historically significant figures with similarly large archives of handwritten documents.

  19. Olanzapine-Induced Mania in Bipolar Spectrum Disorder:A Case Report

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    Mehrdad Eftekhar

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To report the case of a 46-year old male with major depressive disorder, who represented manic symptoms, when olanzapine was added to his treatment. Method: A 46-year old female, with a diagnosis of treatment resistant depression was referred to the authors. He had past history of depression for more than 20 years. The symptoms were present nearly every day since 1981, without any distinct period of remission, nor any noticeable fluctuation. His irritability had been disruptive to his family all these years. His doctor had prescribed maprotiline 25 mg/day, and lorazepam, 2mg/day, in addition to fluoxetine for the last 5 months. He is also a father of two children with methylphenidateresistant and sodium valproate-responsive attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Considering the antidepressant effects of olanzapine and its positive effects on irritability, the authors added olanzapine, to the patient’s previous medications. Results: After one week, he showed new problems such as talkativeness and beginning to smoke for the first time in his life, elevated mood, grandiosity about his intelligence and abilities, talkativeness, and shopping sprees. The score on the mania rating scale was 14. Fluoxetine was discontinued and sodium valproate, were prescribed. It took around 2 months to completely control the manic symptoms. Conclusions: In the patients with depression who show bipolar spectrum disorder features, adding mood stabilizers may be preferred to the drugs as olanzapine which could induce mania.

  20. Three times more days depressed than manic or hypomanic in both bipolar I and bipolar II disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kupka, Ralph W.; Altshuler, Lori L.; Nolen, Willem A.; Suppes, Trisha; Luckenbaugh, David A.; Leverich, Gabriele S.; Frye, Mark A.; Keck, Paul E.; McElroy, Susan L.; Grunze, Heinz; Post, Robert M.

    Objectives: To assess the proportion of time spent in mania, depression and euthymia in a large cohort of bipolar subjects studied longitudinally, and to investigate depression/mania ratios in patients with bipolar I versus bipolar II disorder. Methods: Clinician-adjusted self-ratings of mood were

  1. Do antidepressants increase the risk of mania and bipolar disorder in people with depression? A retrospective electronic case register cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patel, Rashmi; Reiss, Peter; Shetty, Hitesh; Broadbent, Matthew; Stewart, Robert; McGuire, Philip; Taylor, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between antidepressant therapy and the later onset of mania/bipolar disorder. Design Retrospective cohort study using an anonymised electronic health record case register. Setting South London and Maudsley National Health Service (NHS) Trust (SLaM), a large

  2. Tratamento farmacológico do transtorno bipolar: as evidências de ensaios clínicos randomizados Pharmacological treatment of bipolar disorder: evidence from randomized clinical trials

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    Flávio Kapczinski

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo é uma síntese das evidências provenientes de ensaios clínicos randomizados sobre o tratamento do transtorno bipolar. A metodologia para a busca do material disponível é descrita, e os resultados são apresentados. Com o melhor nível de evidência disponível, ou seja, revisões sistemáticas de mais de um ensaio clínico randomizado ou pelo menos um ensaio clínico randomizado, temos as seguintes recomendações: 1 a mania aguda pode ser tratada com Lítio, Valproato, Carbamazepina, e antipsicóticos; 2 a depressão bipolar pode ser tratada com antidepressivos (com risco aumentado de virada para mania, com lamotrigina e a associação fluoxetina/olanzapina e 3 a manutenção do transtorno bipolar pode ser realizada com o lítio, valproato, carbamazepina, olanzapina e lamotrigina (quando o objetivo for a profilaxia da depressão bipolar. A não existência de ensaios clínicos publicados não significa que determinadas intervenções não sejam úteis.The present article is a synthesis of the published clinical trials about the treatment of Bipolar disorder (BD. The methodology used to search the literature is described and results are presented. Using the best available evidence (systematic reviews of clinical trials or at lest one randomized clinical trial the following is recommended: 1 acute mania can be treated with lithium, carbamazepine, valrpoate and antipsychotics; 2 acute depression can be treated with lamotrigine, olanzapine/fluoxetine combination and with antidepressants (with an increased risk of switch into mania; 3 maintenance can be performed using lithium, valproate, olanzapine and lamotrigine (when the aim is prophylaxis of bipolar depression. The absence of published results about certain interventions does not mean that such interventions are not useful.

  3. Evaluating depressive symptoms in mania: a naturalistic study of patients with bipolar disorder

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    Young AH

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Allan H Young,1 Jonas Eberhard1,21Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, London, UK; 2Corporate Medical Affairs, H. Lundbeck A/S, Copenhagen, DenmarkObjective: This study aimed to evaluate patients with bipolar I disorder (BD-I who have mania with depressive symptoms and who meet the new “with mixed features” specifier of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5.Method: This prospective, multinational, naturalistic study surveyed psychiatrists and their patients with BD-I from October 2013 to March 2014. Eligible patients had BD-I, had a (current manic episode, and had experienced onset of a manic episode within the previous 3 months. Psychiatrists provided patient information on depressive symptoms (DSM-5 criteria; symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation; suicide attempts; and physician satisfaction with treatment response. Data were stratified according to whether patients met the criteria for the BD-I “with mixed features” specifier of DSM-5 (≥3 depressive symptoms or not, and characteristics were compared between the two subgroups. Patients also self-reported on depressive symptoms using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview module questionnaire.Results: Overall, 34% of 1,035 patients met the criteria for BD-I “with mixed features,” exhibiting ≥3 depressive symptoms during their current manic episode. This correlated with the matched patient self-reports of depressive symptoms. During their current manic episode, BD-I patients “with mixed features” had more severe symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation (average composite severity score of 4.1 vs 3.4, a higher incidence of suicide attempts (38% vs 9%, and more physician dissatisfaction with treatment response (22% vs 14%, compared to patients with 0–2 depressive symptoms (all P<0.05.Conclusion: This study found that patients with BD-I “with mixed features” (ie, ≥3 depressive symptoms

  4. Level of response and safety of pharmacological monotherapy in the treatment of acute bipolar I disorder phases: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo, Jorge M.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Vieta, Eduard; Vázquez, Gustavo; Tohen, Mauricio

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, combinations of pharmacological treatments have become common for the treatment of bipolar disorder type I (BP I); however, this practice is usually not evidence-based and rarely considers monotherapy drug regimen (MDR) as an option in the treatment of acute phases of BP I. Therefore, we evaluated comparative data of commonly prescribed MDRs for both manic and depressive phases of BP I. Medline, PsycINFO, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library, the ClinicalStudyResults.org and other data sources were searched from 1949 to March 2009 for placebo and active controlled randomized clinical trials (RCTs). Risk ratios (RRs) for response, remission, and discontinuation rates due to adverse events (AEs), lack of efficacy, or discontinuation due to any cause, and the number needed to treat or harm (NNT or NNH) were calculated for each medication individually and for all evaluable trials combined. The authors included 31 RCTs in the analyses comparing a MDR with placebo or with active treatment for acute mania, and 9 RCTs comparing a MDR with placebo or with active treatment for bipolar depression. According to the collected evidence, most of the MDRs when compared to placebo showed significant response and remission rates in acute mania. In the case of bipolar depression only quetiapine and, to a lesser extent, olanzapine showed efficacy as MDR. Overall, MDRs were well tolerated with low discontinuation rates due to any cause or AE, although AE profiles differed among treatments. We concluded that most MDRs were efficacious and safe in the treatment of manic episodes, but very few MDRs have demonstrated being efficacious for bipolar depressive episodes. PMID:20128953

  5. Pharmacotherapy for acute mania and disconcordance with treatment guidelines: bipolar mania pathway survey (BIPAS) in mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zuowei; Gao, Keming; Hong, Wu; Xing, Mengjuan; Wu, Zhiguo; Chen, Jun; Zhang, Chen; Yuan, Chengmei; Huang, Jia; Peng, Daihui; Wang, Yong; Lu, Weihong; Yi, Zhenghui; Yu, Xin; Zhao, Jingping; Fang, Yiru

    2014-06-05

    With the recent attention to evidence-based medicine in psychiatry, a number of treatment guidelines for bipolar disorders have been published. This survey investigated prescribing patterns and predictors for guideline disconcordance in the acute treatment of a manic and mixed episode across mainland China. The pharmacological treatments of 2828 patients with a recent hypomanic/manic episode or mixed state were examined. Guidelines disconcordance was determined by comparing the medication(s) patients were prescribed with the recommendation(s) in the guidelines of the Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments. The most common pattern of pharmacological treatments for an acute manic or mixed episode was a mood stabilizer plus an atypical antipsychotic (n = 1345, 47.6%), and the rate of guideline-disconcordant treatments was 11.1%. The patients who were treated in general hospitals were more likely to receive guideline-disconcordant treatments than those who were treated in psychiatric hospitals, with an OR of 1.84 (95% CI 1.44-2.36). Similarly, the patients with a mixed episode at study entry were more likely to receive guideline-disconcordant treatments than those with a manic episode, with an OR of 1.69 (95% CI 1.22-2.35). In contrast, the patients with a longer duration of disease (>5 years) were less likely to receive guideline-disconcordant treatments than those with a short duration, with an OR of 0.47 (95% CI 0.36-0.60). In mainland China, the disconcordance with treatment guidelines for a most recent acute manic or mixed episode was modest under naturalistic conditions. The higher risk for disconcordance in general hospitals than in psychiatric hospitals suggests that special education based on treatment guidelines to practitioners in general hospitals is necessary in order to reduce the risk for disconcordant treatments.

  6. Gender differences in subtypes of late-onset depression and mania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2006-01-01

    illness. No gender differences were found in the prevalence of depression with or without melancholic or psychotic symptoms. Men more often presented with mania/bipolar disorder with comorbid substance abuse. CONCLUSIONS: The distributions of the subtypes of a single depressive episode or mania...

  7. Mixed states vs. pure mania in the french sample of the EMBLEM study: results at baseline and 24 months – European mania in bipolar longitudinal evaluation of medication

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    Azorin Jean-Michel

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To describe the clinical course and treatment patterns over 24 months of patients experiencing an acute manic/mixed episode within the standard course of care. Methods EMBLEM was a 2-year European prospective, observational study on outcomes of patients experiencing a manic/mixed episode. Adults with bipolar disorder were enrolled within the standard course of care as in/outpatients if they initiated or changed oral medication for treatment of acute mania. After completing 12 weeks of acute phase, patients were assessed every 3–6 months during the maintenance phase. We present the 24 month results, with subgroup analysis for mixed states (MS and pure mania (PM. These subgroup analyses are driven by the high proportion of antidepressants prescribed in this cohort. Results In France, 771 patients were eligible for the maintenance phase. 69% of patients completed the follow up over 24 months. The mean age was 45.5 years (sd = 13.6 with 57% of women. 504 (66% patients were experiencing a PM and 262 (34% a MS at baseline. The main significant differences in MS vs. PM at baseline were: a higher rate of women, and in the previous 12 months, a higher frequency of episodes (manic/mixed and depressive, more suicide attempts, more rapid cycling, fewer social activities and more work impairment. Over the 24 months of follow-up the MS group had a significantly lower recovery than PM (36% vs. 46%, p = 0.006. Overall, 42% of all patients were started on monotherapy and 58% on combination therapy; of those 35% and 30% respectively remained on their initial medication throughout the 24 months. At baseline, 36% were treated with an antidepressant, this proportion remains high throughout the follow-up period, with a significantly higher rate for MS vs. PM at 24 months (55% vs. 27%, p Conclusion In this large sample, MS occur frequently (34%, they are more severe at baseline and have a worse functional prognosis than PM. Although

  8. Biological treatment of acute agitation or aggression with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder in the inpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correll, Christoph U; Yu, Xin; Xiang, Yutao; Kane, John M; Masand, Prakash

    2017-05-01

    Schizophrenia and bipolar disorders are chronic illnesses that commonly present with symptoms of acute agitation and aggression. These symptoms must be managed rapidly to prevent potential harm to the patient and others, including their caregivers, peers, and health care workers. A number of treatment options are available to clinicians to manage acute agitation and aggression, including non-pharmacologic behavioral and environmental de-escalation strategies, as well as biological treatment options such as pharmacologic agents and electroconvulsive therapy. We summarize the available biological treatment options for patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder presenting with acute agitation or aggression in the inpatient setting, focusing on antipsychotics. The following searches were used in PubMed to obtain the most relevant advances in treating schizophrenia or bipolar disorder with acute agitation and aggression: (agitation, agitated, aggression, aggressive, hostile, hostility, violent, or violence) and (schizophr*, psychosis, psychot*, psychos*, mania, manic, or bipolar) and (*pharmacologic, antipsychotic*, neuroleptic*, antiepileptic*, anti-seizure*, mood stabilizer*, lithium, benzodiazepine*, beta blocker, beta-blocker, alpha2, alpha-2, *histamine*, electroconvulsive, ECT, shock, or transcranial). Individual searches were performed for each drug class. The studies were limited to peer-reviewed, English-language, and human studies. Most were placebo-controlled randomized controlled trials (RCTs) or meta-analyses. Among pharmacologic agents, antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, anticonvulsants, and lithium have been studied in randomized trials. Some typical and, more recently, atypical antipsychotics are available as both oral and short-acting intramuscular (IM) formulations, with 1 typical antipsychotic also available as an inhalable formulation. Among the pharmacologic agents studied in RCTs, atypical antipsychotics have the best evidence to support

  9. Young Mania Rating Scale: how to interpret the numbers? Determination of a severity threshold and of the minimal clinically significant difference in the EMBLEM cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukasiewicz, Michael; Gerard, Stephanie; Besnard, Adeline; Falissard, Bruno; Perrin, Elena; Sapin, Helene; Tohen, Mauricio; Reed, Catherine; Azorin, Jean-Michel

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this analysis was to identify Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) meaningful benchmarks for clinicians (severity threshold, minimal clinically significant difference [MCSD]) using the Clinical Global Impressions Bipolar (CGI-BP) mania scale, to provide a clinical perspective to randomized clinical trials (RCTs) results. We used the cohort of patients with acute manic/mixed state of bipolar disorders (N = 3459) included in the European Mania in Bipolar Longitudinal Evaluation of Medication (EMBLEM) study. A receiver-operating characteristic analysis was performed on randomly selected patients to determine the YMRS optimal severity threshold with CGI-BP mania score ≥ "Markedly ill" defining severity. The MCSD (clinically meaningful change in score relative to one point difference in CGI-BP mania for outcome measures) of YMRS, was assessed with a linear regression on baseline data. At baseline, YMRS mean score was 26.4 (±9.9), CGI-BP mania mean score was 4.8 (±1.0) and 61.7% of patients had a score ≥ 5. The optimal YMRS severity threshold of 25 (positive predictive value [PPV] = 83.0%; negative predictive value [NPV] = 66.0%) was determined. In this cohort, a YMRS score of 20 (typical cutoff for RCTs inclusion criteria) corresponds to a PPV of 74.6% and to a NPV of 77.6%, meaning that the majority of patients included would be classified as severely ill. The YMRS minimal clinically significant difference was 6.6 points. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Amisulpride plus valproate vs haloperidol plus valproate in the treatment of acute mania of bipolar I patients: a multicenter, open-label, randomized, comparative trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Thomas

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Pierre Thomas1, Eduard Vieta2 for the SOLMANIA study group1Department of Psychiatry, Fontan Hospital CHRU Lille, University of Lille 2, France; 2Bipolar Disorders Program, Hospital Clinic, University of Barcelona, IDIBAPS, CIBERSAM, Barcelona, SpainAbstract: The primary objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of combination treatment of valproate and amisulpride with that of valproate and haloperidol in bipolar I disorder. Adult inpatients with a current manic episode fulfilling DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for bipolar type I disorder were included. Patients were randomized to amisulpride (400–800 mg/day or haloperidol (5–15 mg/day for 3 months and all received valproate. The primary effectiveness criterion was the percentage of responders (defined by a decrease of ≥50% of the Y-MRS in patients completing the study. Safety was evaluated by adverse event reporting, determination of extrapyramidal function and clinical examination. Sixty-two patients were randomized to receive valproate-amisulpride, and 61 to receive valproate-haloperidol. At study end, responder rates were 72.6% in the amisulpride group and 65.5% in the haloperidol group. Remission rates were 83.9% and 89.7%, respectively. At study end, neither response rates nor remission rates differed significantly between groups. Treatment-emergent adverse events occurred significantly (p = 0.009 more frequently in the haloperidol group (86.4% than in the amisulpride group (66.1%. In conclusion, the valproate–amisulpride combination was as effective as the valproate – haloperidol combination in bipolar I patients, with a better safety profile.Keywords: amisulpride, valproate, haloperidol, clinical trial, mania, bipolar disorder

  11. Pediatric Mania: The Controversy between Euphoria and Irritability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Giulia; Uchida, Mai; Battaglia, Claudia; Casini, Maria Pia; De Chiara, Lavinia; Biederman, Joseph; Vicari, Stefano; Wozniak, Janet

    2017-01-01

    Abstract: Pediatric Bipolar Disorder (BD) is a highly morbid pediatric psychiatric disease, consistently associated with family psychiatric history of mood disorders and associated with high levels of morbidity and disability and with a great risk of suicide. While there is a general consensus on the symptomatology of depression in childhood, the phenomenology of pediatric mania is still highly debated and the course and long-term outcome of pediatric BD still need to be clarified. We reviewed the available studies on the phenomenology of pediatric mania with the aim of summarizing the prevalence, demographics, clinical correlates and course of these two types of pediatric mania. Eighteen studies reported the number of subjects presenting with either irritable or elated mood during mania. Irritability has been reported to be the most frequent clinical feature of pediatric mania reaching a sensitivity of 95–100% in several samples. Only half the studies reviewed reported on number of episodes or cycling patterns and the described course was mostly chronic and ultra-rapid whereas the classical episodic presentation was less common. Few long-term outcome studies have reported a diagnostic stability of mania from childhood to young adult age. Future research should focus on the heterogeneity of irritability aiming at differentiating distinct subtypes of pediatric psychiatric disorders with distinct phenomenology, course, outcome and biomarkers. Longitudinal studies of samples attending to mood presentation, irritable versus elated, and course, chronic versus episodic, may help clarify whether these are meaningful distinctions in the course, treatment and outcome of pediatric onset bipolar disorder. PMID:28503110

  12. Pediatric Mania: The Controversy between Euphoria and Irritability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Giulia; Uchida, Mai; Battaglia, Claudia; Casini, Maria Pia; De Chiara, Lavinia; Biederman, Joseph; Vicari, Stefano; Wozniak, Janet

    2017-04-01

    Pediatric Bipolar Disorder (BD) is a highly morbid pediatric psychiatric disease, consistently associated with family psychiatric history of mood disorders and associated with high levels of morbidity and disability and with a great risk of suicide. While there is a general consensus on the symptomatology of depression in childhood, the phenomenology of pediatric mania is still highly debated and the course and long-term outcome of pediatric BD still need to be clarified. We reviewed the available studies on the phenomenology of pediatric mania with the aim of summarizing the prevalence, demographics, clinical correlates and course of these two types of pediatric mania. Eighteen studies reported the number of subjects presenting with either irritable or elated mood during mania. Irritability has been reported to be the most frequent clinical feature of pediatric mania reaching a sensitivity of 95-100% in several samples. Only half the studies reviewed reported on number of episodes or cycling patterns and the described course was mostly chronic and ultra-rapid whereas the classical episodic presentation was less common. Few long-term outcome studies have reported a diagnostic stability of mania from childhood to young adult age. Future research should focus on the heterogeneity of irritability aiming at differentiating distinct subtypes of pediatric psychiatric disorders with distinct phenomenology, course, outcome and biomarkers. Longitudinal studies of samples attending to mood presentation, irritable versus elated, and course, chronic versus episodic, may help clarify whether these are meaningful distinctions in the course, treatment and outcome of pediatric onset bipolar disorder.

  13. Adjunctive agomelatine therapy in the treatment of acute bipolar II depression: a preliminary open label study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fornaro M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Michele Fornaro,1 Michael J McCarthy,2,3 Domenico De Berardis,4 Concetta De Pasquale,1 Massimo Tabaton,5 Matteo Martino,6 Salvatore Colicchio,7 Carlo Ignazio Cattaneo,8 Emanuela D'Angelo,9 Pantaleo Fornaro61Department of Formative Sciences, University of Catania, Catania, Italy; 2Department of Psychiatry, Veteran's Affairs San Diego Healthcare System, 3University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA; 4Department of Mental Health, Psychiatric Service of Diagnosis and Treatment, "ASL 4", Teramo, Italy; 5Department of Internal Medicine and Medical Specialties, University of Genova, Genoa, Italy; 6Department of Neurosciences, Section of Psychiatry, University of Genova, Genoa, Italy; 7Unit of Sleep Medicine, Department of Neuroscience, Catholic University, Rome, Italy; 8National Health System, "ASL 13", Novara, Italy; 9National Health System, "ASL 3", Genoa, ItalyPurpose: The circadian rhythm hypothesis of bipolar disorder (BD suggests a role for melatonin in regulating mood, thus extending the interest toward the melatonergic antidepressant agomelatine as well as type I (acute or II cases of bipolar depression.Patients and methods: Twenty-eight depressed BD-II patients received open label agomelatine (25 mg/bedtime for 6 consecutive weeks as an adjunct to treatment with lithium or valproate, followed by an optional treatment extension of 30 weeks. Measures included the Hamilton depression scale, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Clinical Global Impression Scale–Bipolar Version, Young Mania Rating Scale, and body mass index.Results: Intent to treat analysis results demonstrated that 18 of the 28 subjects (64% showed medication response after 6 weeks (primary study endpoint, while 24 of the 28 subjects (86% responded by 36 weeks. When examining primary mood stabilizer treatment, 12 of the 17 (70.6% valproate and six of the 11 (54.5% lithium patients responded by the first endpoint. At 36 weeks, 14 valproate treated (82.4% and 10 lithium

  14. Discrepancies between explicit and implicit self-esteem and their relationship to symptoms of depression and mania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlickova, Hana; Turnbull, Oliver H; Bentall, Richard P

    2014-09-01

    Self-esteem is a key feature of bipolar symptomatology. However, so far no study has examined the interaction between explicit and implicit self-esteem in individuals vulnerable to bipolar disorder. Cross-sectional design was employed. Thirty children of parents with bipolar disorder and 30 offspring of control parents completed Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, the Bech-Rafaelson Mania Scale, the Self-esteem Rating Scale and the Implicit Association Test. No differences between groups were revealed in levels of explicit or implicit self-esteem. However, bipolar offspring showed increased levels of symptoms of depression and mania. Furthermore, depressive symptoms were associated with low explicit self-esteem, whilst symptoms of mania were associated with low implicit self-esteem. When self-esteem discrepancies were examined, damaged self-esteem (i.e., low explicit but high implicit self-esteem) was associated with depression, whilst no associations between mania and self-esteem discrepancies were found. Not only explicit, but also implicit self-esteem, and the interactions between the two are of relevance in bipolar symptoms. Clinical implications and future research directions are discussed. Explicit as well as implicit SE, and particularly their relationship, are relevant for mental health. Fluctuations in implicit SE may serve as an early indicator for risk of bipolarity. Psychotherapeutic approaches may be more suitable for one kind of SE challenge than the other. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  15. Predictors of switching from mania to depression in a large observational study across Europe (EMBLEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieta, Eduard; Angst, Jules; Reed, Catherine; Bertsch, Jordan; Haro, Josep Maria

    2009-11-01

    The risk of switching from mania to depression in bipolar disorder has been poorly studied. Large observational studies may be useful in identifying variables that predict switch to depression after mania and provide data on medication use and outcomes in "real world" patients. EMBLEM (European Mania in Bipolar Longitudinal Evaluation of Medication) is a 2-year, prospective, observational study of patients with a manic/mixed episode. Symptom severity measures included Clinical Global Impression-Bipolar Disorder scale (CGI-BP), Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and 5-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale. Switching was defined using CGI-BP mania and depression such that patients changed from manic and not depressed to depressed but not manic over two consecutive observations within the first 12 weeks of follow-up. Cox proportional hazards models identified baseline variables independently associated with switch to depression. Of 2390 patients who participated in the maintenance phase (i.e. up to 24 months), 120 (5.0%) switched to depression within the first 12 weeks. Factors associated with greater switching to depression include previous depressive episodes, substance abuse, greater CGI-BP overall severity and benzodiazepine use. Factors associated with lower switching rates were greater CGI-BP depression, lower YMRS severity and atypical antipsychotic use. The definition of switching biased against patients with mixed episodes being likely to switch. Strictly defined, switch to depression from mania occurs in a small proportion of bipolar patients. Clinical history, illness severity, co-morbidities and treatment patterns are associated with switching to depression. Atypical antipsychotics may protect against switch to depression.

  16. [Lithium and anticonvulsants in the treatment of mania and in the prophylaxis of recurrences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvi, Virginio; Cat Berro, Alberto; Bechon, Elisa; Bogetto, Filippo; Maina, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    A mood stabilizer is an agent effective in treating both poles of the illness and at the same time being able to prevent both manic and depressive episodes in bipolar disorder. According to a broader definition, a mood stabilizer should be effective in decreasing the frequency or severity of any type of episode in bipolar disorder, without worsening the frequency or severity of episodes of opposite polarity. According to this, anticonvulsants and atypical antipsychotics can be considered as mood stabilizers. In this paper we review the use of lithium and other anticonvulsants that have proved effective in randomized controlled trials of the treatment of manic episodes and prevention of recurrences of bipolar disorder. Lithium and valproate are considered as first-line treatment options for acute mania while evidence regarding carbamazepine is insufficient to consider it as a first-line agent. Patients who fail to respond to first-line treatments may benefit from the adjunct of an atypical antipsychotic such as olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone or aripiprazole. Lithium retains the strongest evidence of efficacy in the prophylaxis of manic episodes, lamotrigine in the prevention of depressive episodes. Valproate and carbamazepine have no indication for long-term treatment of bipolar disorder. Lithium can still be considered a gold standard in the treatment of manic episodes as well as in the prophylaxis of recurrences. Other anticonvulsants should be employed in particular situations, such as valproic acid in the treatment of mania and lamotrigine in the prevention of depressive recurrences.

  17. Creatine kinase levels in patients with bipolar disorder: depressive, manic, and euthymic phases Comparação das fases de depressão, mania e eutimia sobre os níveis de creatina quinase em pacientes bipolares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Feier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Bipolar disorder is a severe, recurrent, and often chronic psychiatric illness associated with significant functional impairment, morbidity, and mortality. Creatine kinase is an important enzyme, particularly for cells with high and fluctuating energy requirements, such as neurons, and is a potential marker of brain injury. The aim of the present study was to compare serum creatine kinase levels between bipolar disorder patients, in the various phases (depressive, manic, and euthymic, and healthy volunteers. METHOD: Forty-eight bipolar patients were recruited: 18 in the euthymic phase; 17 in the manic phase; and 13 in the depressive phase. The control group comprised 41 healthy volunteers. The phases of bipolar disorder were defined as follows: euthymic-not meeting the DSM-IV criteria for a mood episode and scoring 7 on the YMRS; depressive-scoring > 7 on the HDRS and OBJETIVO: O transtorno do humor bipolar é uma doença psiquiátrica grave, recorrente e crônica associada a significativo prejuízo funcional, morbidade e mortalidade. A creatina quinase tem sido proposta como um marcador de dano cerebral. A creatina quinase é uma enzima importante principalmente para células que necessitam de uma grande quantidade de energia, como os neurônios. O objetivo do presente estudo foi comparar os níveis de creatina quinase entre as fases depressiva, maníaca e eutímica de pacientes com transtorno do humor bipolar. MÉTODO: Para avaliação dos níveis de creatina quinase no soro, 48 pacientes bipolares foram recrutados; 18 estavam eutímicos, 17 estavam em mania e 13 em episódio depressivo. Foi feita também uma comparação com um grupo controle que incluiu 41 voluntários saudáveis. Grupo eutimia: foram incluídos os pacientes que não cumpriam os critérios do DSM-IV para episódios de humor e deveriam ter a pontuação inferior a oito nas escalas de avaliação de mania (YMRS e depressão (HDRS; grupo mania: foram incluídos os

  18. Creatine kinase levels in patients with bipolar disorder: depressive, manic, and euthymic phases Comparação das fases de depressão, mania e eutimia sobre os níveis de creatina quinase em pacientes bipolares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Feier

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Bipolar disorder is a severe, recurrent, and often chronic psychiatric illness associated with significant functional impairment, morbidity, and mortality. Creatine kinase is an important enzyme, particularly for cells with high and fluctuating energy requirements, such as neurons, and is a potential marker of brain injury. The aim of the present study was to compare serum creatine kinase levels between bipolar disorder patients, in the various phases (depressive, manic, and euthymic, and healthy volunteers. METHOD: Forty-eight bipolar patients were recruited: 18 in the euthymic phase; 17 in the manic phase; and 13 in the depressive phase. The control group comprised 41 healthy volunteers. The phases of bipolar disorder were defined as follows: euthymic-not meeting the DSM-IV criteria for a mood episode and scoring 7 on the YMRS; depressive-scoring > 7 on the HDRS and OBJETIVO: O transtorno do humor bipolar é uma doença psiquiátrica grave, recorrente e crônica associada a significativo prejuízo funcional, morbidade e mortalidade. A creatina quinase tem sido proposta como um marcador de dano cerebral. A creatina quinase é uma enzima importante principalmente para células que necessitam de uma grande quantidade de energia, como os neurônios. O objetivo do presente estudo foi comparar os níveis de creatina quinase entre as fases depressiva, maníaca e eutímica de pacientes com transtorno do humor bipolar. MÉTODO: Para avaliação dos níveis de creatina quinase no soro, 48 pacientes bipolares foram recrutados; 18 estavam eutímicos, 17 estavam em mania e 13 em episódio depressivo. Foi feita também uma comparação com um grupo controle que incluiu 41 voluntários saudáveis. Grupo eutimia: foram incluídos os pacientes que não cumpriam os critérios do DSM-IV para episódios de humor e deveriam ter a pontuação inferior a oito nas escalas de avaliação de mania (YMRS e depressão (HDRS; grupo mania: foram incluídos os

  19. Early Nonresponse in the Antipsychotic Treatment of Acute Mania: A Criterion for Reconsidering Treatment? Results From an Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welten, Carlijn C M; Koeter, Maarten W J; Wohlfarth, Tamar D; Storosum, Jitschak G; van den Brink, Wim; Gispen-de Wied, Christine C; Leufkens, Hubert G M; Denys, Damiaan A J P

    2016-09-01

    To investigate whether early nonresponse to antipsychotic treatment of acute mania predicts treatment failure and, if so, to establish the best definition or criterion of an early nonresponse. Short-term efficacy studies assessing antipsychotics that were submitted to the Dutch Medicines Evaluation Board during an 11-year period as part of the marketing authorization application for the indication of acute manic episode of bipolar disorder. Pharmaceutical companies provided their raw patient data, which enabled us to perform an individual patient data meta-analysis. All double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trials assessing the efficacy of antipsychotics for acute manic episode of bipolar disorder were included (10 trials). All patients with data available for completer analysis (N = 1,243), symptom severity scores on the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) at weeks 0, 1, and 2 and at study end point (week 3 or 4). The a priori chances of nonresponse and nonremission at study end point were 40.9% (95% CI, 38.2%-43.6%) and 65.3% (95% CI, 62.0%-68.6%), respectively. Early nonresponse in weeks 1 and 2, defined by cutoff scores ranging from a ≤ 10% to a ≤ 50% reduction in symptoms compared to baseline on the YMRS, significantly predicted nonresponse (≤ 0% symptom reduction) and nonremission (YMRS score higher than 8) in week 3. The predictive value of early nonresponse (PVnr_se) at week 1 for both nonresponse and nonremission at study end point declined linearly with increasing cutoff scores of early nonresponse; nonresponse: 76.0% (95% CI, 69.7%-82.3%) for a ≤ 10% response to 48.7% (95% CI, 45.5%-51.9%) for a ≤ 50% response; nonremission: 92.2% (95% CI, 88.3%-96.1%) for a ≤ 10% response to 76.8% (95% CI, 74.4%-79.5%) for a ≤ 50% response. A similar linear decline was observed for increasing cutoff scores of early nonresponse at week 2 for nonresponse, but not for nonremission at end point: nonresponse 90.3% (95% CI, 84.6%-96.0%) for a ≤ 10% response

  20. Clozapine Can Be the Good Option in Resistant Mania

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    S. M. Yasir Arafat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar mood disorder is a mental disorder with a lifetime prevalence rate of about 1% in the general population and there are still a proportion of individuals who suffer from bipolar mood disorders that are resistant to standard treatment. Reporting clozapine responsive mania that was not responding to two previous consecutive atypical antipsychotics and one typical antipsychotic was aimed at. A 17-year-old male manic patient was admitted into the psychiatry inpatient department and was nonresponsive to Risperidone 12 mg daily for 4 weeks, Olanzapine 30 mg daily for 3 weeks, and Haloperidol 30 mg daily for 3 weeks, along with valproate preparation 1500 mg daily. He was started on clozapine as he was nonresponsive to Lithium in previous episodes and did not consent to starting Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT. He responded adequately to 100 mg clozapine and 1500 mg valproate preparation and remission happened within 2 weeks of starting clozapine. Clozapine can be a good option for resistant mania and further RCT based evidences will strengthen the options in treating resistant mania.

  1. [Bipolar disorder in adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunelle, Julie; Milhet, Vanessa; Consoli, Angèle; Cohen, David

    2014-04-01

    Juvenile mania is a concept widely developed but also highly debated since the 1990s. In the heart of this debate, Severe Mood Dysregulation (SMD) and "Temper Dysregulation disorder with Dysphoria" (recently integrated in DSM-5) showed their interest. Actually, the objective is to distinguish two clinical phenotypes in order to avoid confusion between (1) what would raise more of mood dysregulation with chronic manic like symptoms, and (2) bipolar disorder type I with episodic and acute manic episodes. Therapeutic stakes are major. In adolescents, even if DSM adult diagnostic criteria can be used and bipolar disorder type I clearly established, differential diagnostic at onset between acute manic episode and schizophrenia onset remain sometimes difficult to assess. Furthermore, it is crucial to better assess outcome of these adolescents, in terms of morbidity and potential prognosis factors, knowing that a younger age at onset is associated with a poorer outcome according to several adult studies. Therapeutic implications could then be drawn.

  2. Do antidepressants increase the risk of mania and bipolar disorder in people with depression? A retrospective electronic case register cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Rashmi; Reiss, Peter; Shetty, Hitesh; Broadbent, Matthew; Stewart, Robert; McGuire, Philip; Taylor, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the association between antidepressant therapy and the later onset of mania/bipolar disorder.Design Retrospective cohort study using an anonymised electronic health record case register.Setting South London and Maudsley National Health Service (NHS) Trust (SLaM), a large provider of inpatient and community mental healthcare in the UK.Participants 21 012 adults presenting to SLaM between 1 April 2006 and 31 March 2013 with unipolar depression.Exposure Prior antidepres...

  3. Diagnóstico, tratamento e prevenção da mania e da hipomania no transtorno bipolar Diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mania and hipomania within the bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Alberto Moreno

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Pelo menos 5% (Moreno, 2004 e Angst et al., 2003 da população geral já apresentou mania ou hipomania. A irritabilidade e sintomas depressivos durante episódios de hiperatividade breves e a heterogeneidade de sintomas complicam o diagnóstico. Doenças neurológicas, endócrinas, metabólicas e inflamatórias podem causar uma síndrome maníaca. Às vezes, a hipomania ou a mania são diagnosticadas de forma errada como normalidade, depressão maior, esquizofrenia ou transtornos de personalidade, ansiosos ou de controle de impulsos. O lítio é a primeira escolha no tratamento da mania, mas ácido valpróico, carbamazepina e antipsicóticos atípicos são também freqüentemente utilizados. A eletroconvulsoterapia está indicada na mania grave, psicótica ou gestacional. A maioria dos estudos controlados para a profilaxia de episódios maníacos foi realizada com lítio e mais estudos são necessários para investigar a eficácia profilática do valproato, da olanzapina e de outras medicações. O tratamento e a profilaxia da hipomania foram pouco estudados e, de modo geral, seguem as mesmas diretrizes usadas para a mania.At least 5% (Moreno, 2004 e Angst et al., 2003 of the general population have presented mania or hypomania. Irritability and depressive symptoms during brief hyperactivity episodes and the heterogeneity of symptoms complicate the diagnosis. Neurological, metabolic, endocrine, inflammatory diseases, besides drugs intoxication and abstinence can cause a manic syndrome. Sometimes hypomania or mania are misdiagnosed as normality, major depression, schizophrenia, personality, anxiety and impulse control disorders. Lithium is the first treatment choice for episodes of mania. Valproic acid, carbamazepine and atypical antipsychotics are frequently used as well. Electroconvulsive therapy should be used in severe, psychotic or gestational mania. For the prophylaxy of manic episodes, lithium is the medication with most controlled

  4. Predictors of switching from mania to depression in a large observational study across Europe (EMBLEM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieta, Eduard; Angst, Jules; Reed, Catherine; Bertsch, Jordan; Maria Haro, Josep

    Background: The risk of switching from mania to depression in bipolar disorder has been poorly studied. Large observational studies may be useful in identifying variables that predict switch to depression after mania and provide data on medication use and outcomes in "real world" patients. Method:

  5. Predictors of switching from mania to depression in a large observational study across Europe (EMBLEM)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vieta, Eduard; Angst, Jules; Reed, Catherine; Bertsch, Jordan; Maria Haro, Josep

    2009-01-01

    Background: The risk of switching from mania to depression in bipolar disorder has been poorly studied. Large observational studies may be useful in identifying variables that predict switch to depression after mania and provide data on medication use and outcomes in "real world" patients. Method:

  6. Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) and International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) 2018 guidelines for the management of patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatham, Lakshmi N; Kennedy, Sidney H; Parikh, Sagar V; Schaffer, Ayal; Bond, David J; Frey, Benicio N; Sharma, Verinder; Goldstein, Benjamin I; Rej, Soham; Beaulieu, Serge; Alda, Martin; MacQueen, Glenda; Milev, Roumen V; Ravindran, Arun; O'Donovan, Claire; McIntosh, Diane; Lam, Raymond W; Vazquez, Gustavo; Kapczinski, Flavio; McIntyre, Roger S; Kozicky, Jan; Kanba, Shigenobu; Lafer, Beny; Suppes, Trisha; Calabrese, Joseph R; Vieta, Eduard; Malhi, Gin; Post, Robert M; Berk, Michael

    2018-03-01

    The Canadian Network for Mood and Anxiety Treatments (CANMAT) previously published treatment guidelines for bipolar disorder in 2005, along with international commentaries and subsequent updates in 2007, 2009, and 2013. The last two updates were published in collaboration with the International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD). These 2018 CANMAT and ISBD Bipolar Treatment Guidelines represent the significant advances in the field since the last full edition was published in 2005, including updates to diagnosis and management as well as new research into pharmacological and psychological treatments. These advances have been translated into clear and easy to use recommendations for first, second, and third- line treatments, with consideration given to levels of evidence for efficacy, clinical support based on experience, and consensus ratings of safety, tolerability, and treatment-emergent switch risk. New to these guidelines, hierarchical rankings were created for first and second- line treatments recommended for acute mania, acute depression, and maintenance treatment in bipolar I disorder. Created by considering the impact of each treatment across all phases of illness, this hierarchy will further assist clinicians in making evidence-based treatment decisions. Lithium, quetiapine, divalproex, asenapine, aripiprazole, paliperidone, risperidone, and cariprazine alone or in combination are recommended as first-line treatments for acute mania. First-line options for bipolar I depression include quetiapine, lurasidone plus lithium or divalproex, lithium, lamotrigine, lurasidone, or adjunctive lamotrigine. While medications that have been shown to be effective for the acute phase should generally be continued for the maintenance phase in bipolar I disorder, there are some exceptions (such as with antidepressants); and available data suggest that lithium, quetiapine, divalproex, lamotrigine, asenapine, and aripiprazole monotherapy or combination treatments should be

  7. Treatment of bipolar disorder: a complex treatment for a multi-faceted disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fresno David

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Manic-depression or bipolar disorder (BD is a multi-faceted illness with an inevitably complex treatment. Methods This article summarizes the current status of our knowledge and practice of its treatment. Results It is widely accepted that lithium is moderately useful during all phases of bipolar illness and it might possess a specific effectiveness on suicidal prevention. Both first and second generation antipsychotics are widely used and the FDA has approved olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine, ziprasidone and aripiprazole for the treatment of acute mania. These could also be useful in the treatment of bipolar depression, but only limited data exists so far to support the use of quetiapine monotherapy or the olanzapine-fluoxetine combination. Some, but not all, anticonvulsants possess a broad spectrum of effectiveness, including mixed dysphoric and rapid-cycling forms. Lamotrigine may be effective in the treatment of depression but not mania. Antidepressant use is controversial. Guidelines suggest their cautious use in combination with an antimanic agent, because they are supposed to induce switching to mania or hypomania, mixed episodes and rapid cycling. Conclusion The first-line psychosocial intervention in BD is psychoeducation, followed by cognitive-behavioral therapy. Other treatment options include Electroconvulsive therapy and transcranial magnetic stimulation. There is a gap between the evidence base, which comes mostly from monotherapy trials, and clinical practice, where complex treatment regimens are the rule.

  8. Clinical and psychopathological features associated with treatment-emergent mania in bipolar-II depressed outpatients exposed to antidepressants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaro, Michele; Anastasia, Annalisa; Monaco, Francesco; Novello, Stefano; Fusco, Andrea; Iasevoli, Felice; De Berardis, Domenico; Veronese, Nicola; Solmi, Marco; de Bartolomeis, Andrea

    2018-07-01

    Treatment-emergent affective switch (TEAS), including treatment-emergent mania (TEM), carry significant burden in the clinical management of bipolar depression, whereas the use of antidepressants raises both efficacy, safety and tolerability concerns. The present study assesses the prevalence and clinical correlates of TEM in selected sample of Bipolar Disorder (BD) Type-II (BD-II) acute depression outpatients. Post-hoc analysis of the clinical and psychopathological features associated with TEM among 91 BD-II depressed outpatients exposed to antidepressants. Second-generation antipsychotics (SGA) (p = .005), lithium (≤ .001), cyclothymic/irritable/hyperthymic temperaments (p = ≤ .001; p = .001; p = .003, respectively), rapid-cycling (p = .005) and depressive mixed features (p = .003) differed between TEM + cases vs. TEM - controls. Upon multinomial logistic regression, the accounted psychopathological features correctly classified as much as 88.6% of TEM + cases (35/91 overall sample, or 38.46% of the sample), yet not statistically significantly [Exp(B) = .032; p = ns]. Specifically, lithium [B = - 2.385; p = .001], SGAs [B = - 2.354; p = .002] predicted lower rates of TEM + in contrast to the number of lifetime previous psychiatric hospitalizations [B = 2.380; p = .002], whereas mixed features did not [B = 1.267; p = ns]. Post-hoc analysis. Lack of systematic pharmacological history record; chance of recall bias and Berkson's biases. Permissive operational criterion for TEM. Relatively small sample size. Cyclothymic temperament and mixed depression discriminated TEM + between TEM - cases, although only lithium and the SGAs reliably predicted TEM +/- grouping. Larger-sampled/powered longitudinal replication studies are warranted to allow firm conclusions on the matter, ideally contributing to the identification of clear-cut sub-phenotypes of BD towards patient-tailored-pharmacotherapy. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Lower switch rate in depressed patients with bipolar II than bipolar I disorder treated adjunctively with second-generation antidepressants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Altshuler, LL; Suppes, T; Nolen, WA; Leverich, G; Keck, PE; Frye, MA; Kupka, R; McElroy, SL; Grunze, H; Kitchen, CMR; Post, R; Black, D.O.

    Objectives: The authors compared the switch rate into hypomania/mania in depressed patients treated with second-generation antidepressants who had either bipolar I or bipolar II disorder. Method: In a 10-week trial, 184 outpatients with bipolar depression (134 with bipolar I disorder, 48 with

  10. Mania risk and creativity: a multi-method study of the role of motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiter, Margina; Johnson, Sheri L

    2015-01-01

    Substantial literature has linked bipolar disorder and risk for bipolar disorder with creative accomplishment, but few multimodal studies of creativity are available, and little is known about mechanisms. We use a multi-method approach to test the association of bipolar risk with several creativity measures, including creative accomplishments, creative personality traits, and a laboratory index of insight. We also examined whether multiple facets of motivation accounted for the links of bipolar risk with creativity. Among 297 undergraduates, mania risk, as measured with the Hypomanic Personality Scale was related to lifetime creativity and creative personality, but not to performance on the insight task. Motivational traits appeared to mediate the links of mania risk with both lifetime creative accomplishments and self-rated creativity. The study relied on a cross-sectional design and a convenience sample. Future studies would benefit from exploring motivation as a positive aspect of manic vulnerability that may foster greater creativity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mentalization deficit in bipolar patients during an acute depressive and manic episode: association with cognitive functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodnar, Anna; Rybakowski, Janusz K

    2017-12-06

    A number of studies in bipolar patients have shown a deficit in mentalization (theory of mind), one of the main aspects of social cognition. The aim of current study was to assess both cognitive and affective mentalization in well-defined groups of depressed and manic bipolar patients, compared to healthy control subjects, using a battery of tests measuring mentalization processes. The second aim was to investigate a possible relationship between cognitive and affective mentalization and cognitive functions in bipolar patients during a depressive and manic episode. The study involved 25 bipolar disorder type I patients (10 male, 15 female) during a depressive episode (mean 24 ± 2 points in the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale) and 25 patients (10 male, 15 female) during a manic episode (mean 27 ± 4 points in the Young Mania Rating Scale). The control group consisted of 25 healthy subjects (10 male, 15 female) without psychiatric disorders. To measure mentalization, a revised version of the Reading the Mind in the Eyes (R-MET), the Strange Stories (SS), the Faux Pas Recognition (FPR), and the Moving Shapes Paradigm (MSP) tests were used. Assessment of cognitive functioning was made using the Digit Span, Trail Making, and Wisconsin Card Sorting Tests. In bipolar patients significant deficits in both cognitive and affective mentalization were demonstrated during both acute depressive and manic episodes. The impairment in FPR in manic patients was more severe than that in the depressive ones. On the other hand, in MSP, manic patients showed significantly increased intentionality for non-mentalization animations, compared with depressive patients and for "cause and effect" animations compared with control subjects. A significant relationship was found between the decrease in cognitive and affective mentalization and deficits of cognitive functions during both the depressive and manic episodes. The results obtained confirm the deficits of mentalization in

  12. Korean Medication Algorithm Project for Bipolar Disorder: third revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo YS

    2015-02-01

    acute mild depression was monotherapy with MS or AAP; and the TOC for moderate or severe depression was MS plus AAP/antidepressant. The first-line maintenance treatment following mania or depression was MS monotherapy or MS plus AAP; the first-line treatment after mania was AAP monotherapy; and the first-line treatment after depression was lamotrigine (LTG monotherapy, LTG plus MS/AAP, or MS plus AAP plus LTG. The first-line treatment strategy for mania in children and adolescents was MS plus AAP or AAP monotherapy. For geriatric bipolar patients, the TOC for mania was AAP/MS monotherapy, and the TOC for depression was AAP plus MS or AAP monotherapy. Conclusion: The expert consensus in the KMAP-BP 2014 differed from that in previous publications; most notably, the preference for AAP was increased in the treatment of acute mania, depression, and maintenance treatment. There was increased expert preference for the use of AAP and LTG. The major limitation of the present study is that it was based on the consensus of Korean experts rather than on experimental evidence. Keywords: pharmacological treatment, treatment guideline, expert consensus

  13. 5. CASE SERIES OF MANIA SECONDARY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    meeting the criteria for DSM IV- TR is increasing. What is not clear with this increase is whether it is primary mania or secondary mania linked with HIV. METHODS. This study design was a case series in which patients with acute manic episodes were admitted to. Chainama Hills College Hospital and University. Teaching ...

  14. A randomized, 4-week double-blind placebo control study on the efficacy of donepezil augmentation of lithium for treatment of acute mania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen J

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Jing Chen,1 Zheng Lu,1,2 Mingyuan Zhang,1 Jie Zhang,1 Xiaodong Ni,1 Xuefeng Jiang,1 Heding Xu,1 Anisha Heeramun-Aubeeluck,2 Qiaoyan Hu,3 Hua Jin,4 John M Davis31Shanghai Mental Health Center, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Psychiatry, Tongji Hospital of Tongji University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; 4University of California at San Diego, San Diego, CA, USAIntroduction: A significant number of mania patients fail to respond to current pharmacotherapy, thereby there is need for novel augmentation strategies. The results of some early studies showed the effectiveness of cholinomimetics in the treatment of mania. One open case series suggested the efficacy of donepezil in the treatment of bipolar disorder. Our aim was to explore whether an oral cholinesterase inhibitor, donepezil, administered during a 4-week treatment period,would benefit patients with acute mania.Methods: We conducted a 4-week double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of donepezil as an adjunctive treatment to lithium in patients with acute mania. Eligible subjects were randomly assigned to receive donepezil or placebo in addition to lithium. Donepezil was started at 5 mg/day, and increased to 10 mg/day in the first week. Patients were rated with the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS at baseline, day 1, week 1, week 2, and week 4.Results: Out of the 30 patients who were enrolled, 15 were on donepezil and 15 were on placebo. All patients completed the 4-week trial. On the first day, there was a difference of 1.97 units on the psychomotor symptoms scale of the YMRS in the donepezil group as compared to the placebo group (t = 2.39, P = 0.02. There was a difference of 0.57 units (t = 2.09, P = 0.04 in the speech item and a difference of 0.29 units in the sexual interest item (t = 2.11, P = 0.04 in the donepezil

  15. Abnormal functional-structural cingulum connectivity in mania: combined functional magnetic resonance imaging-diffusion tensor imaging investigation in different phases of bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, M; Magioncalda, P; Saiote, C; Conio, B; Escelsior, A; Rocchi, G; Piaggio, N; Marozzi, V; Huang, Z; Ferri, F; Amore, M; Inglese, M; Northoff, G

    2016-10-01

    The objective of the study was to investigate the relationship between structural connectivity (SC) and functional connectivity (FC) in the cingulum in bipolar disorder (BD) and its various phases. We combined resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging and probabilistic tractographic diffusion tensor imaging to investigate FC and SC of the cingulum and its portions, the SC-FC relationship, and their correlations with clinical and neurocognitive measures on sustained attention in manic (n = 21), depressed (n = 20), and euthymic (n = 20) bipolar patients and healthy controls (HC) (n = 42). First, we found decreased FC between the anterior and posterior parts of the cingulum in manic patients when compared to depressed patients and HC. Second, we observed decreased SC of the cingulum bundle, particularly in its anterior part, in manic patients when compared to HC. Finally, alterations in the cingulum FC (but not SC) correlated with clinical severity scores while changes in the cingulum SC (but not FC) were related with neurocognitive deficits in sustained attention in BD. We demonstrate for the first time a reduction in FC and concomitantly in SC of the cingulum in mania, which correlated with psychopathological and neurocognitive parameters, respectively, in BD. This supports the central role of cingulum connectivity specifically in mania. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Bipolar mixed features - Results from the comparative effectiveness for bipolar disorder (Bipolar CHOICE) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohen, Mauricio; Gold, Alexandra K; Sylvia, Louisa G; Montana, Rebecca E; McElroy, Susan L; Thase, Michael E; Rabideau, Dustin J; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A; Friedman, Edward S; Shelton, Richard C; Bowden, Charles L; Singh, Vivek; Deckersbach, Thilo; Ketter, Terence A; Calabrese, Joseph R; Bobo, William V; McInnis, Melvin G

    2017-08-01

    DSM-5 changed the criteria from DSM-IV for mixed features in mood disorder episodes to include non-overlapping symptoms of depression and hypomania/mania. It is unknown if, by changing these criteria, the same group would qualify for mixed features. We assessed how those meeting DSM-5 criteria for mixed features compare to those meeting DSM-IV criteria. We analyzed data from 482 adult bipolar patients in Bipolar CHOICE, a randomized comparative effectiveness trial. Bipolar diagnoses were confirmed through the MINI International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Presence and severity of mood symptoms were collected with the Bipolar Inventory of Symptoms Scale (BISS) and linked to DSM-5 and DSM-IV mixed features criteria. Baseline demographics and clinical variables were compared between mood episode groups using ANOVA for continuous variables and chi-square tests for categorical variables. At baseline, the frequency of DSM-IV mixed episodes diagnoses obtained with the MINI was 17% and with the BISS was 20%. Using DSM-5 criteria, 9% of participants met criteria for hypomania/mania with mixed features and 12% met criteria for a depressive episode with mixed features. Symptom severity was also associated with increased mixed features with a high rate of mixed features in patients with mania/hypomania (63.8%) relative to those with depression (8.0%). Data on mixed features were collected at baseline only and thus do not reflect potential patterns in mixed features within this sample across the study duration. The DSM-5 narrower, non-overlapping definition of mixed episodes resulted in fewer patients who met mixed criteria compared to DSM-IV. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Unipolar Mania: Recent Updates and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubham Mehta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Unipolar mania (UM has received less than the expected attention, when compared to its contemporary mood disorders, unipolar depression (UD and bipolar disorder (BD. Method. The literature search included PUBMED and PSYCINFO databases. Cross-searches of key references were made to identify other articles of importance. Results. There seems to be a bipolar subgroup with a stable, unipolar recurrent manic course. Although UM does not have significant differences from bipolar mania in terms of sociodemographic variables, there are certain significant differences in clinical features. UM is reported to have more grandiosity, psychotic symptoms, and premorbid hyperthymic temperament, but less rapid cycling, suicidality, seasonality, and comorbid anxiety disorders. It seems to have a better course of illness with better social and professional adjustment. However, its response to lithium prophylaxis is found to be poor as compared to classical BD and valproate could be a better choice in this case. Conclusion. The available literature suggests that UM has certain differences from classical BD. The evidence, however, is insufficient to categorize it as separate diagnostic entity. However, considering UM as a course specifier of BD would be a reasonable step.

  18. Clinical and psychometric characterization of depression in mixed mania: a report from the French National Cohort of 1090 manic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hantouche, E G; Akiskal, H S; Azorin, J M; Châtenet-Duchêne, L; Lancrenon, S

    2006-12-01

    Despite extensive research recently focused on mixed mania, it is uncertain as how best to define it clinically, psychometrically (which has major bearing on its prevalence), and the methodology needed for future research. This topic is also of historical interest, because Magnan (1890) [Magnan, V., 1890. La Folie Intermittente. G Masson, Paris.] suggested that "combined [mixed] states" linked Falret's "circular insanity" with Baillarger's "dual insanity" (both described in 1854). This work eventually led to the Kraepelinian synthesis of all manic, mixed, and depressive states into the unitary rubric of "manic-depressive insanity (1899/1921). EPIMAN-II Thousand" (EPIMAN-II MILLE) is a French national collaborative study, which involved training 317 psychiatrists working in different sites representative of psychiatric practice in France. We recruited 1090 patients hospitalized for acute DSM-IV mania. assessed at index admission by the following measures: the Mania Rating Scale (MRS), the Beigel-Murphy Scale (MSRS), a newly derived checklist of depressive symptoms least contaminated by mania, MADRS for severity of depression, and the SAPS for psychotic features. The rate of mixed mania, as defined by at least 2 depressive symptoms, was 30%. Even with this broad definition, we found significantly higher female representation. This clinical sub-type of mania was characterized by high frequency of past diagnostic errors, particularly those of anxiety and personality disorders. Refined definition of co-exiting depression was obtained from an abbreviated version of the MADRS (6 items), with distinct "emotional-cognitive" symptoms, and "psychomotor inhibition" factors, both of which were separable from an "irritable" factor linked to lability and poor judgment. Mixed mania was psychometrically best identified by a MADRS score of 6 (80% sensitivity, 94% specificity) and validated by a mixed polarity of first episodes, a higher rate of recurrence, psychotic features, and

  19. Diagnostic stability in bipolar disorder in clinical practise as according to ICD-10

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The diagnostic stability of the ICD-10 diagnosis of mania/bipolar disorder has not been investigated in clinical practice. METHODS: All patients who got a diagnosis of mania/bipolar disorder at least once in a period from 1994 to 2002 at outpatient treatment or at discharge from...... psychiatric hospitalisation in Denmark were identified in a nationwide register. RESULTS: Totally, 4116 patients got a diagnosis of mania/bipolar disorder at least once; among these, 2315 patients (56.2%) got the diagnosis at the first contact, whereas the remaining patients (43.8%) got the diagnosis at later...... and behavioural disorder due to psychoactive substance use and got a diagnosis of bipolar disorder later on. Especially younger but also female patients were at increased risk of delay of the diagnosis of bipolar disorder. LIMITATIONS: Only patients from psychiatric settings were included. CONCLUSIONS: Clinicians...

  20. Evaluating depressive symptoms in mania: a naturalistic study of patients with bipolar disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Allan H; Eberhard, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate patients with bipolar I disorder (BD-I) who have mania with depressive symptoms and who meet the new “with mixed features” specifier of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5). Method This prospective, multinational, naturalistic study surveyed psychiatrists and their patients with BD-I from October 2013 to March 2014. Eligible patients had BD-I, had a (current) manic episode, and had experienced onset of a manic episode within the previous 3 months. Psychiatrists provided patient information on depressive symptoms (DSM-5 criteria); symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation; suicide attempts; and physician satisfaction with treatment response. Data were stratified according to whether patients met the criteria for the BD-I “with mixed features” specifier of DSM-5 (≥3 depressive symptoms) or not, and characteristics were compared between the two subgroups. Patients also self-reported on depressive symptoms using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview module questionnaire. Results Overall, 34% of 1,035 patients met the criteria for BD-I “with mixed features,” exhibiting ≥3 depressive symptoms during their current manic episode. This correlated with the matched patient self-reports of depressive symptoms. During their current manic episode, BD-I patients “with mixed features” had more severe symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation (average composite severity score of 4.1 vs 3.4), a higher incidence of suicide attempts (38% vs 9%), and more physician dissatisfaction with treatment response (22% vs 14%), compared to patients with 0–2 depressive symptoms (all P<0.05). Conclusion This study found that patients with BD-I “with mixed features” (ie, ≥3 depressive symptoms during a manic episode), suffered, on average, from a greater burden of disease than patients with pure mania. Improved identification of these patients may help to optimize

  1. Evaluating depressive symptoms in mania: a naturalistic study of patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Allan H; Eberhard, Jonas

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate patients with bipolar I disorder (BD-I) who have mania with depressive symptoms and who meet the new "with mixed features" specifier of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fifth edition (DSM-5). This prospective, multinational, naturalistic study surveyed psychiatrists and their patients with BD-I from October 2013 to March 2014. Eligible patients had BD-I, had a (current) manic episode, and had experienced onset of a manic episode within the previous 3 months. Psychiatrists provided patient information on depressive symptoms (DSM-5 criteria); symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation; suicide attempts; and physician satisfaction with treatment response. Data were stratified according to whether patients met the criteria for the BD-I "with mixed features" specifier of DSM-5 (≥3 depressive symptoms) or not, and characteristics were compared between the two subgroups. Patients also self-reported on depressive symptoms using the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview module questionnaire. Overall, 34% of 1,035 patients met the criteria for BD-I "with mixed features," exhibiting ≥3 depressive symptoms during their current manic episode. This correlated with the matched patient self-reports of depressive symptoms. During their current manic episode, BD-I patients "with mixed features" had more severe symptoms of anxiety, irritability, and agitation (average composite severity score of 4.1 vs 3.4), a higher incidence of suicide attempts (38% vs 9%), and more physician dissatisfaction with treatment response (22% vs 14%), compared to patients with 0-2 depressive symptoms (all Pmixed features" (ie, ≥3 depressive symptoms during a manic episode), suffered, on average, from a greater burden of disease than patients with pure mania. Improved identification of these patients may help to optimize treatment outcomes.

  2. The International College of Neuro-Psychopharmacology (CINP) Treatment Guidelines for Bipolar Disorder in Adults (CINP-BD-2017), Part 2: Review, Grading of the Evidence, and a Precise Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatham, Lakshmi; Grunze, Heinz; Vieta, Eduard; Young, Allan; Blier, Pierre; Kasper, Siegfried; Moeller, Hans Jurgen

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The current paper includes a systematic search of the literature, a detailed presentation of the results, and a grading of treatment options in terms of efficacy and tolerability/safety. Material and Methods: The PRISMA method was used in the literature search with the combination of the words ‘bipolar,’ ‘manic,’ ‘mania,’ ‘manic depression,’ and ‘manic depressive’ with ‘randomized,’ and ‘algorithms’ with ‘mania,’ ‘manic,’ ‘bipolar,’ ‘manic-depressive,’ or ‘manic depression.’ Relevant web pages and review articles were also reviewed. Results: The current report is based on the analysis of 57 guideline papers and 531 published papers related to RCTs, reviews, posthoc, or meta-analysis papers to March 25, 2016. The specific treatment options for acute mania, mixed episodes, acute bipolar depression, maintenance phase, psychotic and mixed features, anxiety, and rapid cycling were evaluated with regards to efficacy. Existing treatment guidelines were also reviewed. Finally, Tables reflecting efficacy and recommendation levels were created that led to the development of a precise algorithm that still has to prove its feasibility in everyday clinical practice. Conclusions: A systematic literature search was conducted on the pharmacological treatment of bipolar disorder to identify all relevant random controlled trials pertaining to all aspects of bipolar disorder and graded the data according to a predetermined method to develop a precise treatment algorithm for management of various phases of bipolar disorder. It is important to note that the some of the recommendations in the treatment algorithm were based on the secondary outcome data from posthoc analyses. PMID:27816941

  3. A Case of Mania Presenting with Hypersexual Behavior and Gender Dysphoria that Resolved with Valproic Acid

    OpenAIRE

    Heare, Michelle R.; Barsky, Maria; Faziola, Lawrence R.

    2016-01-01

    Hypersexuality and gender dysphoria have both been described in the literature as symptoms of mania. Hypersexuality is listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5 as part of the diagnostic criteria for bipolar disorder. Gender dysphoria is less often described and its relation to mania remains unclear. This case report describes a young homosexual man presenting in a manic episode with co-morbid amphetamine abuse whose mania was marked by hypersexuality and the new o...

  4. Add-on treatment with N-acetylcysteine for bipolar depression:a 24-week randomized double-blind parallel group placebo-controlled multicentre trial (NACOS-study protocol)

    OpenAIRE

    Ellegaard, Pernille Kempel; Licht, Rasmus Wentzer; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Nielsen, René Ernst; Berk, Michael; Dean, Olivia May; Mohebbi, Mohammadreza; Nielsen, Connie Thuroee

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress and inflammation may be involved in the development and progression of mood disorders, including bipolar disorder. Currently, there is a scarcity of useful treatment options for bipolar depressive episodes, especially compared with the efficacy of treatment for acute mania. N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) has been explored for psychiatric disorders for some time given its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The current trial aims at testing the clinical effects o...

  5. Validity of the Mania Subscale of the Diagnostic Assessment for the Severely Handicapped-II (DASH-II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, Johnny L.; Smiroldo, Brandi B.

    1997-01-01

    A study tested the validity of the Diagnostic Assessment for the Severely Handicapped-II (DASH-II) for determining the presence of mania (bipolar disorder) in 22 individuals with severe mental retardation. Results found the mania subscale to be internally consistent and able to be used to classify manic and control subjects accurately. (Author/CR)

  6. Effects of asenapine on agitation and hostility in adults with acute manic or mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Citrome L

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Leslie Citrome,1 Ronald Landbloom,2 Cheng-Tao Chang,3 Willie Earley4 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY, USA; 2Department of Neuroscience, Merck, Whitehouse Station, NJ, USA; 3Biostatistics, Allergan, Jersey City, NJ, USA; 4Clinical Development, Allergan, Jersey City, NJ, USA Background: Bipolar disorder is associated with an increased risk of aggression. However, effective management of hostility and/or agitation symptoms may prevent patients from becoming violent. This analysis investigated the efficacy of the antipsychotic asenapine on hostility and agitation in patients with bipolar I disorder.Methods: Data were pooled from three randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, Phase III trials of asenapine in adults with manic or mixed episodes of bipolar I disorder (NCT00159744, NCT00159796, and NCT00764478. Post hoc analyses assessed the changes from baseline to day 21 on the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS and the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS hostility-related item scores in asenapine- or placebo-treated patients with at least minimal or mild symptom severity and on the PANSS-excited component (PANSS-EC total score in agitated patients. Changes were adjusted for improvements in overall mania symptoms to investigate direct effects on hostility.Results: Significantly greater changes in favor of asenapine versus placebo were observed in YMRS hostility-related item scores (irritability: least squares mean difference [95% confidence interval] =–0.5 [–0.87, –0.22], P=0.001; disruptive–aggressive behavior: –0.7 [–0.99, –0.37], P<0.0001, PANSS hostility item score (–0.2 [–0.44, –0.04]; P=0.0181, and PANSS-EC total score (–1.4 [–2.4, –0.4]; P=0.0055. Changes in the YMRS disruptive–aggressive behavior score and the sum of the hostility-related items remained significant after adjusting for improvements in other YMRS item scores.Conclusion: Asenapine

  7. Climatic factors and bipolar affective disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ellen Margrethe; Larsen, Jens Knud; Gjerris, Annette

    2008-01-01

    In bipolar disorder, the factors provoking a new episode are unknown. As a seasonal variation has been noticed, it has been suggested that weather conditions may play a role. The aim of the study was to elucidate whether meteorological parameters influence the development of new bipolar phases....... A group of patients with at least three previous hospitalizations for bipolar disorder was examined every 3 months for up to 3 years. At each examination an evaluation of the affective phase was made according to the Hamilton Depression Scale (HAM-D(17)), and the Bech-Rafaelsen Mania Rating Scale (MAS......). In the same period, daily recordings from the Danish Meteorological Institute were received. We found no correlations between onset of bipolar episodes [defined as MAS score of 11 or more (mania) and as HAM-D(17) score of 12 or more (depression)] and any meteorological parameters. We found a statistical...

  8. A Case Report of Mania and Psychosis Five Months after Traumatic Brain Injury Successfully Treated Using Olanzapine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giordano F. Cittolin-Santos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. There are few published pharmacologic trials for the treatment of acute mania following traumatic brain injury (TBI. To our knowledge, we present the first case report of an individual being treated and stabilized with olanzapine monotherapy for this condition. Case Presentation. We describe the case of a 53-year-old African American male admitted to an inpatient psychiatric hospital with one month of behavioral changes including irritability, decreased need for sleep, hyperverbal speech, hypergraphia, and paranoia five months after TBI. Using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 5th edition (DSM-5 criteria, he was diagnosed with bipolar disorder due to traumatic brain injury, with manic features. He was serially evaluated with clinical rating scales to measure symptom severity. The Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS score upon admission was 31, and the Clinician-Rated Dimensions of Psychosis Symptom Severity (CRDPSS score was initially 9. After eight days of milieu treatment and gradual titration of olanzapine to 15 mg nightly, his symptoms completely abated, with YMRS and CRDPSS scores at zero on the day of discharge. Conclusion. Olanzapine was effective and well tolerated for the treatment of mania following TBI.

  9. Pharmacological Hypotension as a Cause of Delirious Mania in a Patient with Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Glauco Carbone

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Delirious mania is a severe but often underrecognized syndrome characterized by rapid onset of delirium, mania, and psychosis, not associated with a prior toxicity, physical illness, or mental disorder. We discuss the case of a delirious mania potentially triggered and maintained by a systemic hypotension induced by antihypertensive drugs. Symptoms recovered completely after the discontinuation of antihypertensive medications and the normalization of blood pressure levels.

  10. Effect of HIV infection on time to recovery from an acute manic episode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Nakimuli-Mpungu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available E Nakimuli-Mpungu1,2,3, B Mutamba2,3, S Nshemerirwe2,3, MS Kiwuwa4, S Musisi21Mental Health Department, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry, Makerere College of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Kampala; 3Butabika National Referral Mental Hospital, Ministry of Health, Kampala; 4Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Makerere College of Health Sciences, School of Medicine, Kampala, UgandaIntroduction: Understanding factors affecting the time to recovery from acute mania is critical in the management of manic syndromes. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of HIV infection on time to recovery from acute mania.Methods: We performed a retrospective study in which medical charts of individuals who were treated for acute mania were reviewed. Survival analysis with Cox regression models were used to compare time to recovery from an acute manic episode between human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive individuals and HIV-negative individuals.Results: Median survival time was one week for HIV-positive individuals and more than four weeks for HIV-negative individuals (Χ2 = 18.4, P value = 0.000. HIV infection was the only marginally significant independent predictor of survival probability on the acute admission ward (hazards ratio 2.87, P = 0.06.Conclusion: Acute mania in HIV-infected persons responds faster to psychotropic drugs compared with that in HIV-negative persons.Keywords: HIV-related mania, bipolar disorder, HIV infection, Uganda, immunodeficiency virus

  11. A combined marker of inflammation in individuals with mania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faith Dickerson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Markers of immune activation have been associated with mania but have not been examined in combination. We studied the association between mania and an inflammation score based on four immune markers. METHODS: A total of 57 individuals with mania were assessed at up to three time points: the day of hospital admission, evaluation several days later, and six-month follow-up. Also assessed were 207 non-psychiatric controls and 330 individuals with recent onset psychosis, multi-episode schizophrenia, or bipolar disorder depression. A combined inflammation score was calculated by factor analysis of the levels of class-specific antibodies to the NR peptide of the NMDA receptor; gliadin; Mason-Pfizer monkey virus protein 24; and Toxoplasma gondii. Inflammation scores among groups were compared by multivariate analyses. The inflammation score of the mania group at evaluation was studied as a predictor of re-hospitalization in the follow-up period. RESULTS: The combined inflammation score of the mania group at hospital admission and at evaluation differed significantly from that of the non-psychiatric controls (t=3.95, 4.10, p<.001. The inflammation score was significantly decreased at six month follow-up (F=5.85, p=0.004. There were not any significant differences in the inflammation scores of any of the other psychiatric groups and that of the controls. Within the mania group, an elevated inflammation score at evaluation predicted re-hospitalization (Hazard ratio=7.12, p=.005. CONCLUSIONS: Hospitalization for mania is associated with immune activation. The level of this activation is predictive of subsequent re-hospitalization. Interventions for the modulation of inflammation should be evaluated for the therapy of individuals with mania.

  12. [Lithium and anticonvulsants in bipolar depression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samalin, L; Nourry, A; Llorca, P-M

    2011-12-01

    For decades, lithium and anticonvulsants have been widely used in the treatment of bipolar disorder. Their efficacy in the treatment of mania is recognized. These drugs have been initially evaluated in old and methodologically heterogeneous studies. Their efficacy in bipolar depression has not always been confirmed in more recent and methodologically more reliable studies. Thus, lithium's efficacy as monotherapy was challenged by the study of Young (2008) that showed a lack of efficacy compared with placebo in the treatment of bipolar depression. In two recent meta-analyses, valproate has shown a modest efficacy in the treatment of bipolar depression. As for lithium, valproate appeared to have a larger antimanic effect for acute phase and prophylaxis of bipolar disorder. In contrast, lamotrigine is more effective on the depressive pole of bipolar disorder with better evidence for the prevention of depressive recurrences. The guidelines include these recent studies and recommend lamotrigine as a first-line treatment of bipolar depression and for maintenance treatment. Because of more discordant data concerning lithium and valproate, these two drugs are placed either as first or as second line treatment of bipolar depression. The different safety/efficacy ratios of mood stabilizers underlie the complementarity and the importance of combination between them, or with some second-generation antipsychotics, in the treatment of patients with bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2011 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  13. Are rates of pediatric bipolar disorder increasing?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Vradi, Eleni; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2014-01-01

    Studies from the USA suggest that rates of pediatric bipolar disorder have increased since the mid-90s, but no study outside the USA has been published on the rates of pediatric bipolar disorder. Further, it is unclear whether an increase in rates reflects a true increase in the illness or more...... diagnostic attention. Using nationwide registers of all inpatients and outpatients contacts to all psychiatric hospitals in Denmark, we investigated (1) gender-specific rates of incident pediatric mania/bipolar disorder during a period from 1995 to 2012, (2) whether age and other characteristics...... for pediatric mania/bipolar disorder changed during the calendar period (1995 to 2003 versus 2004 to 2012), and (3) whether the diagnosis is more often made at first psychiatric contact in recent time compared to earlier according to gender. Totally, 346 patients got a main diagnosis of a manic episode (F30...

  14. Symptom-specific self-referential cognitive processes in bipolar disorder: a longitudinal analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlickova, H; Varese, F; Turnbull, O; Scott, J; Morriss, R; Kinderman, P; Paykel, E; Bentall, R P

    2013-09-01

    Although depression and mania are often assumed to be polar opposites, studies have shown that, in patients with bipolar disorder, they are weakly positively correlated and vary somewhat independently over time. Thus, when investigating relationships between specific psychological processes and specific symptoms (mania and depression), co-morbidity between the symptoms and changes over time must be taken into account. Method A total of 253 bipolar disorder patients were assessed every 24 weeks for 18 months using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD), the Bech-Rafaelsen Mania Assessment Scale (MAS), the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Questionnaire (RSEQ), the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale (DAS), the Internal, Personal and Situational Attributions Questionnaire (IPSAQ) and the Personal Qualities Questionnaire (PQQ). We calculated multilevel models using the xtreg module of Stata 9.1, with psychological and clinical measures nested within each participant. Mania and depression were weakly, yet significantly, associated; each was related to distinct psychological processes. Cross-sectionally, self-esteem showed the most robust associations with depression and mania: depression was associated with low positive and high negative self-esteem, and mania with high positive self-esteem. Depression was significantly associated with most of the other self-referential measures, whereas mania was weakly associated only with the externalizing bias of the IPSAQ and the achievement scale of the DAS. Prospectively, low self-esteem predicted future depression. The associations between different self-referential thinking processes and different phases of bipolar disorder, and the presence of the negative self-concept in both depression and mania, have implications for therapeutic management, and also for future directions of research.

  15. Recognizing mania in children and adolescents-age does not matter, but decreased need for sleep does.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Thomas D; Fuhr, Kristina; Hautzinger, Martin; Schlarb, Angelika A

    2011-01-01

    The diagnosis of pediatric bipolar disorders is a controversial topic. If this is mainly due to a bias against a diagnosis in younger children, then just changing the information about the age of a patient should influence the likelihood of a diagnosis despite otherwise identical symptoms. Therefore, we designed a study to test if the age of a patient will influence diagnostic decisions. We further attempted to replicate an earlier result with regard to "decreased need for sleep" as a salient symptom for mania. We randomly sent 1 of 4 case vignettes describing a person with current mania to child/adolescents psychiatrists in Germany. This vignette was systematically varied with respect to age of the patient (6 vs 16 years) and the presence/absence of decreased need for sleep but always included sufficient criteria to diagnose a mania. One hundred sixteen responded and, overall, 63.8% of the respondents diagnosed a bipolar disorder in the person described in the vignette. Although age did not affect the likelihood of a bipolar diagnosis, the presence of decreased need for sleep did increase its likelihood. Furthermore, the number of core symptoms identified by the clinicians was closely linked to the likelihood of assigning a bipolar diagnosis. Certain symptoms such as the decreased need for sleep, and also elated mood and grandiosity, seem to be salient for some clinicians and influence their diagnoses. Biological age of the patient, however, does not seem to cause a systematic bias against a diagnosis of bipolar disorder in children. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Storm in My Brain: Kids and Mood Disorders (Bipolar Disorder and Depression)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Brain Kids and Mood Disorders (Bipolar Disorder and Depression) What is a mood disorder? Everyone feels sad, ... one part of bipolar disorder, also called manic depression. In bipolar disorder, moods change between mania (excited ...

  17. A different perspective on bipolar disorder? : epidemiology, consequences, concept, and recognition of bipolar spectrum disorder in the general population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Regeer, Eline Janet

    2008-01-01

    Bipolar disorder, or manic-depressive illness, is a mood disorder in which episodes of mania, hypomania and depression occur in alternation with intervals of normal mood. Bipolar disorder is typically a recurrent illness and may have serious consequences such as poor social and occupational

  18. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis

    OpenAIRE

    Raghavendra B Nayak; Govind S Bhogale; Nanasaheb M Patil; Aditya A Pandurangi

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints ...

  19. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra B Nayak

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints of excessive happiness, irritability, increased self-esteem and decreased sleep since 1 month. The patient also had complex partial seizure ever since he had features of HSP. The patient′s father and younger sister suffer from pure HSP. The patient was diagnosed to have first episode mania with complicated HSP. The details of treatment and possible neurobiology are discussed in this case report.

  20. Mania associated with complicated hereditary spastic paraparesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Raghavendra B; Bhogale, Govind S; Patil, Nanasaheb M; Pandurangi, Aditya A

    2011-07-01

    Hereditary spastic paraparesis (HSP) is an inherited group of neurological disorders with progressive lower limb spasticity. HSP can be clinically grouped into pure and complicated forms. Pure HSP is one without any associated neurological/psychiatric comorbidity. Depression is the most common psychiatric comorbidity. Presence of mania or bipolar affective illness with HSP is a rare phenomenon. We report a case of a 17-year-old boy who presented with classical features of HSP with complaints of excessive happiness, irritability, increased self-esteem and decreased sleep since 1 month. The patient also had complex partial seizure ever since he had features of HSP. The patient's father and younger sister suffer from pure HSP. The patient was diagnosed to have first episode mania with complicated HSP. The details of treatment and possible neurobiology are discussed in this case report.

  1. Bipolar mood state reflected in cortico-amygdala resting state connectivity: A cohort and longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Roscoe O; Margolis, Allison; Masters, Grace A; Keshavan, Matcheri; Öngür, Dost

    2017-08-01

    Using resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rsfMRI), we previously compared cohorts of bipolar I subjects in a manic state to those in a euthymic state to identify mood state-specific patterns of cortico-amygdala connectivity. Our results suggested that mania is reflected in the disruption of emotion regulation circuits. We sought to replicate this finding in a group of subjects with bipolar disorder imaged longitudinally across states of mania and euthymia METHODS: We divided our subjects into three groups: 26 subjects imaged in a manic state, 21 subjects imaged in a euthymic state, and 10 subjects imaged longitudinally across both mood states. We measured differences in amygdala connectivity between the mania and euthymia cohorts. We then used these regions of altered connectivity to examine connectivity in the longitudinal bipolar group using a within-subjects design. Our findings in the mania vs euthymia cohort comparison were replicated in the longitudinal analysis. Bipolar mania was differentiated from euthymia by decreased connectivity between the amygdala and pre-genual anterior cingulate cortex. Mania was also characterized by increased connectivity between amygdala and the supplemental motor area, a region normally anti-correlated to the amygdala in emotion regulation tasks. Stringent controls for movement effects limited the number of subjects in the longitudinal sample. In this first report of rsfMRI conducted longitudinally across mood states, we find that previously observed between-group differences in amygdala connectivity are also found longitudinally within subjects. These results suggest resting state cortico-amygdala connectivity is a biomarker of mood state in bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Bipolar disorder: an update | Outhoff | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bipolar disorder, characterised by alternating discrete episodes of (hypo)mania and depression, provides unique diagnostic and treatment challenges. Updated diagnostic (DSM-5) and current pharmacological treatment recommendations are briefly reviewed here. Keywords: bipolar disorder; diagnosis; evidence-based ...

  3. Alternatives to lithium and divalproex in the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanadesikan, Mukund; Freeman, Marlene P; Gelenberg, Alan J

    2003-06-01

    The role of lithium carbonate in the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder is well established. Unfortunately, many patients fail to respond adequately to this agent or are unable to tolerate its adverse effects. Divalproex has become a commonly used alternative to lithium, but it also is ineffective or poorly tolerated in many patients. This article attempts to review the available data on maintenance therapy in bipolar disorder with a variety of anticonvulsants and antipsychotics (both conventional and novel), with reference to relevant studies in acute mania and bipolar depression as well. Evidence on maintenance therapy and relevant acute-phase data were collected using MEDLINE database searches. Data on maintenance therapy with agents other than lithium and divalproex are sparse, and often derived from open, uncontrolled studies. Implications and flaws of available data are discussed. Other than lithium, there are few robust double-blind data to support the use of a variety of agents in the maintenance phase. However, uncontrolled data suggest that a number of agents merit further study.

  4. Texas Medication Algorithm Project, phase 3 (TMAP-3): clinical results for patients with a history of mania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppes, Trisha; Rush, A John; Dennehy, Ellen B; Crismon, M Lynn; Kashner, T Michael; Toprac, Marcia G; Carmody, Thomas J; Brown, E Sherwood; Biggs, Melanie M; Shores-Wilson, Kathy; Witte, Bradley P; Trivedi, Madhukar H; Miller, Alexander L; Altshuler, Kenneth Z; Shon, Steven P

    2003-04-01

    The Texas Medication Algorithm Project (TMAP) assessed the clinical and economic impact of algorithm-driven treatment (ALGO) as compared with treatment-as-usual (TAU) in patients served in public mental health centers. This report presents clinical outcomes in patients with a history of mania (BD), including bipolar I and schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type, during 12 months of treatment beginning March 1998 and ending with the final active patient visit in April 2000. Patients were diagnosed with bipolar I disorder or schizoaffective disorder, bipolar type, according to DSM-IV criteria. ALGO was comprised of a medication algorithm and manual to guide treatment decisions. Physicians and clinical coordinators received training and expert consultation throughout the project. ALGO also provided a disorder-specific patient and family education package. TAU clinics had no exposure to the medication algorithms. Quarterly outcome evaluations were obtained by independent raters. Hierarchical linear modeling, based on a declining effects model, was used to assess clinical outcome of ALGO versus TAU. ALGO and TAU patients showed significant initial decreases in symptoms (p =.03 and p <.001, respectively) measured by the 24-item Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS-24) at the 3-month assessment interval, with significantly greater effects for the ALGO group. Limited catch-up by TAU was observed over the remaining 3 quarters. Differences were also observed in measures of mania and psychosis but not in depression, side-effect burden, or functioning. For patients with a history of mania, relative to TAU, the ALGO intervention package was associated with greater initial and sustained improvement on the primary clinical outcome measure, the BPRS-24, and the secondary outcome measure, the Clinician-Administered Rating Scale for Mania (CARS-M). Further research is planned to clarify which elements of the ALGO package contributed to this between-group difference.

  5. Diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder in the course of bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Żerdziński

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the coexistence of obsessive-compulsive symptoms with bipolar disorder (during the manic phase, depressive phase and remission. Method: The subjects were 70 patients previously diagnosed with and treated for bipolar disorder. For the purposes of this study, three subgroups were created: patients in the manic phase, depressive phase and in remission. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale and Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale were diagnostic tools used for the evaluation of patients’ mental health. Results: The data indicate high likelihood of co-occurrence of obsessive-compulsive disorder (28.6% and obsessive-compulsive syndromes (32.8% with bipolar disorder. Obsessions and compulsions were observed irrespectively of the type of bipolar disorder (type 1 and 2 and phase of the illness (depression, mania, remission. The results in the three subgroups were similar. The severity of anankastic symptoms depended both on the severity of depression and mania. The subjects confirmed the presence of obsessive-compulsive symptoms in the interview, although they were usually undiagnosed and untreated. Conclusions: Obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms often coexist with bipolar disorder, both in its two phases and in remission. The severity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms in the course of bipolar condition varies, ranging from mild to extremely severe forms. The obsessive-compulsive disorder presentation in the course of bipolar disorder increases with the severity of depressive and manic symptoms. Obsessive-compulsive disorder can be primary to bipolar disorder. Obsessive-compulsive disorder coexisting with bipolar disorder is not diagnosed or treated properly.

  6. A case of mania presenting with hypersexual behavior and gender dysphoria that resolved with valproic acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle R. Heare

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Hypersexuality and gender dysphoria have both been described in the literature as symptoms of mania. Hypersexuality is listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5 as part of the diagnostic criteria for bipolar disorder. Gender dysphoria is less often described and its relation to mania remains unclear. This case report describes a young homosexual man presenting in a manic episode with co-morbid amphetamine abuse whose mania was marked by hypersexuality and the new onset desire to be a woman. Both of these symptoms resolved with the addition of valproic acid to antipsychotics. This case report presents the existing literature on hypersexuality and gender dysphoria in mania and describes a treatment option that has not been previously reported.

  7. Clinical efficacy, onset time and safety of bright light therapy in acute bipolar depression as an adjunctive therapy: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tian-Hang; Dang, Wei-Min; Ma, Yan-Tao; Hu, Chang-Qing; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Guo-Yi; Wang, Gang; Shi, Chuan; Zhang, Hua; Guo, Bin; Zhou, Shu-Zhe; Feng, Lei; Geng, Shu-Xia; Tong, Yu-Zhen; Tang, Guan-Wen; He, Zhong-Kai; Zhen, Long; Yu, Xin

    2018-02-01

    Bright light therapy (BLT) is an effective treatment for seasonal affective disorder and non- seasonal depression. The efficacy of BLT in treating patients with bipolar disorder is still unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the efficacy, onset time and clinical safety of BLT in treating patients with acute bipolar depression as an adjunctive therapy (trial registration at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02009371). This was a multi-center, single blind, randomized clinical trial. Seventy-four participants were randomized in one of two treatment conditions: BLT and control (dim red light therapy, dRLT). Sixty-three participants completed the study (33 BLT, 30 dRLT). Light therapy lasted for two weeks, one hour every morning. All participants were required to complete several scales assessments at baseline, and at the end of weeks 1 and 2. The primary outcome measures were the clinical efficacy of BLT which was assessed by the reduction rate of HAMD-17 scores, and the onset time of BLT which was assessed by the reduction rate of QIDS-SR16 scores. The secondary outcome measures were rates of switch into hypomania or mania and adverse events. 1) Clinical efficacy: BLT showed a greater ameliorative effect on bipolar depression than the control, with response rates of 78.19% vs. 43.33% respectively (p < 0.01). 2) Onset day: Median onset day was 4.33 days in BLT group. 3) BLT-emergent hypomania: No participants experienced symptoms of hypomania. 4) Side effects: No serious adverse events were reported. BLT can be considered as an effective and safe adjunctive treatment for patients with acute bipolar depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Concurrent hypokalemic periodic paralysis and bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Lin Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary periodic paralysis is a rare autosomal dominant disorder of ion-channel dysfunction, manifested by episodic flaccid paresis secondary to abnormal sarcolemma excitability. Membrane destabilization involving Na, K-ATPase has been hypothesized to be a biological etiology of the bipolar disorder (BD and the mechanisms underlying lithium therapy have been linked to it. To date, there has been only one reported case of BD comorbid with periodic paralysis. Herein, we reported another case of concurrent bipolar mania and hypokalemic periodic paralysis (HPP, one special form of periodic paralysis. Consistent with the previous case, our patient responded well to lithium treatment for both bipolar mania and HPP. This might provide some support to the hypothesis that the therapeutic effects of lithium in both BD and HPP could be due to the correction of the underlying common pathophysiology.

  9. Major stressful life events and other risk factors for first admission with mania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, L.V.; Agerbo, E.; Mortensen, P.B.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether first admission with mania is associated with the occurrence of death in the family or with major stressful life events and to explore whether the associations change with age. METHODS: Case register study with linkage of the Danish Psychiatric Central Research...... was found on the association between life events and the first admission with mania, totally, or for men or women, separately regarding ageing. CONCLUSIONS: The occurrence of death in the family and the experience of major life events are associated with increased risk of first admission with bipolar...

  10. Bipolar (spectrum) disorder and mood stabilization: standing at the crossroads?

    OpenAIRE

    De Fruyt, Jurgen; Demyttenaere, Koen

    2007-01-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of bipolar disorder has long been a neglected discipline. Recent years have shown an upsurge in bipolar research. When compared to major depressive disorder, bipolar research still remains limited and more expert based than evidence based. In bipolar diagnosis the focus is shifting from classic mania to bipolar depression and hypomania. There is a search for bipolar signatures in symptoms and course of major depressive episodes. The criteria for hypomania are softened,...

  11. The effects of reduced dopamine transporter function and chronic lithium on motivation, probabilistic learning, and neurochemistry in mice: Modeling bipolar mania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milienne-Petiot, Morgane; Kesby, James P; Graves, Mary; van Enkhuizen, Jordy; Semenova, Svetlana; Minassian, Arpi; Markou, Athina; Geyer, Mark A; Young, Jared W

    2017-02-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) mania patients exhibit poor cognition and reward-seeking/hypermotivation, negatively impacting a patient's quality of life. Current treatments (e.g., lithium), do not treat such deficits. Treatment development has been limited due to a poor understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying these behaviors. Here, we investigated putative mechanisms underlying cognition and reward-seeking/motivational changes relevant to BD mania patients using two validated mouse models and neurochemical analyses. The effects of reducing dopamine transporter (DAT) functioning via genetic (knockdown vs. wild-type littermates), or pharmacological (GBR12909- vs. vehicle-treated C57BL/6J mice) means were assessed in the probabilistic reversal learning task (PRLT), and progressive ratio breakpoint (PRB) test, during either water or chronic lithium treatment. These tasks quantify reward learning and effortful motivation, respectively. Neurochemistry was performed on brain samples of DAT mutants ± chronic lithium using high performance liquid chromatography. Reduced DAT functioning increased reversals in the PRLT, an effect partially attenuated by chronic lithium. Chronic lithium alone slowed PRLT acquisition. Reduced DAT functioning increased motivation (PRB), an effect attenuated by lithium in GBR12909-treated mice. Neurochemical analyses revealed that DAT knockdown mice exhibited elevated homovanillic acid levels, but that lithium had no effect on these elevated levels. Reducing DAT functioning recreates many aspects of BD mania including hypermotivation and improved reversal learning (switching), as well as elevated homovanillic acid levels. Chronic lithium only exerted main effects, impairing learning and elevating norepinephrine and serotonin levels of mice, not specifically treating the underlying mechanisms identified in these models. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. The Reciprocal Relationship between Bipolar Disorder and Social Interaction: A Qualitative Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Rebecca; Gooding, Patricia; Dempsey, Robert; Jones, Steven

    2017-07-01

    Evidence suggests that social support can influence relapse rates, functioning and various clinical outcomes in people with bipolar disorder. Yet 'social support' is a poorly defined construct, and the mechanisms by which it affects illness course in bipolar disorder remain largely unknown. Key aims of this study were to ascertain which facets of social interaction affect mood management in bipolar disorder, and how symptoms of bipolar disorder can influence the level of support received. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 20 individuals with bipolar disorder. Questions were designed to elicit: the effects of social interaction upon the management and course of bipolar disorder; and the impact of bipolar disorder upon social relationships. An inductive thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Empathy and understanding from another person can make it easier to cope with bipolar disorder. Social interaction can also provide opportunities to challenge negative ruminative thoughts and prevent the onset of a major mood episode. The loss of social support, particularly through bereavement, creates a loss of control and can trigger mania or depression. Hypomanic symptoms can facilitate new social connections, whereas disinhibited and risky behaviour exhibited during mania can cause the breakdown of vital relationships. An in-depth clinical formulation of an individual's perceptions of how their illness affects and is affected by social interaction is crucial to understanding psychosocial factors which influence mood management. These results have clear application in interventions which aim to promote improved wellbeing and social functioning in bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. The relationship between bipolar-related experiences and social interaction is complex and multi-faceted. Bipolar disorder can damage social relationships and create a loss of social control via extreme mood states, but it can also offer a

  13. Tiagabine in treatment refractory bipolar disorder : a clinical case series

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suppes, T; Chisholm, KA; Dhavale, D; Frye, MA; Atshuler, LL; McElroy, SL; Keck, PE; Nolen, WA; Kupka, R; Denicoff, KD; Leverich, GS; Rush, AJ; Post, RM

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Anticonvulsants have provided major treatment advances for patients with bipolar disorder. Many of these drugs, including several with proven efficacy in bipolar mania or depression, enhance the activity of the gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA) neurotransmitter system. A new

  14. The effect of Group Cognitive-Behaviour Therapy in combination with Pharmacotherapy on Mania and Depression Symptoms and Awareness of warming signs of relapse in patients with Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Ali Ghanbari Hashemabadi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available "n Objective: This research has been done according to the cognitivebehavioral theories and biochemical model in order to evaluate the efficiency of Group Cognitive-Behavior Therapy in combination with Pharmacotherapy on Mania and Depression Symptoms and Awareness of warning signs of relapse in patients with Bipolar Disorder. "n "nMethods:In this study with the experimental pretest- posttest- follow up plan , 30 women suffering from bipolar disorder, randomly assigned to receive either the group cognitive-behavior therapy (experimental group, n=15 or usual treatment (control group, n=15;and were follow-up for a six months. patients in both groups were prescribed standard Pharmacotherapy. First all subjects were put to a pretest in equal conditions with measures of scale 2 and 9 of MMPI Test, and warning signs checklist. Then the experimental group received group cognitive-behavior therapy for 8 sessions in addition to their medication therapy. The control group only received medicine. At the end of the experiment, all subjects were tested under equal conditions. After completion of the treatment process, the subjects of both groups were supervised for 6 months. The findings of the study were analyzed by the statistical method of Multi-variable analysis of variance with repetitive measurements. "nResults:The findings showed that the group cognitive-behavior therapy had been significantly more efficient in reduction of mania symptoms {p=0/03} and increment of awareness of warning signs of relapse {p=0/00} in comparison with control group; but there is no significantly differences in depression symptoms between two groups. "nConclusion: The findings of this study suggest the beneficial effect of Group cognitive-behavior therapy in reducing of mania symptoms and increment of awareness of warning signs of relapse. Therefore, it can be used as a complementary treatment by clinicians

  15. Comorbidity and Phenomenology of Bipolar Disorder in Children with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Eduardo; Ezpeleta, Lourdes; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To assess the comorbidity of bipolar disorder (BPD) in children with ADHD and to study the psychopathological profile of ADHD children with and without mania. Method: A total of 100 children with ADHD were assessed with a semistructured diagnostic interview and questionnaires of mania, ADHD, and general psychopathology. Results: 8% of…

  16. Treatments for acute bipolar depression: meta-analyses of placebo-controlled, monotherapy trials of anticonvulsants, lithium and antipsychotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selle, V; Schalkwijk, S; Vázquez, G H; Baldessarini, R J

    2014-03-01

    Optimal treatments for bipolar depression, and the relative value of specific drugs for that purpose, remain uncertain, including agents other than antidepressants. We searched for reports of placebo-controlled, monotherapy trials of mood-stabilizing anticonvulsants, second-generation antipsychotics, or lithium for acute major depressive episodes in patients diagnosed with type I or II bipolar disorder and applied random-effects meta-analysis to evaluate their efficacy, comparing outcomes based on standardized mean drug-placebo differences (SMD) in improvement, relative response rates (RR), and number-needed-to-treat (NNT). We identified 24 trials of 10 treatments (lasting 7.5 weeks, with ≥ 50 collaborating sites/trial) that met eligibility criteria: lamotrigine (5 trials), quetiapine (5), valproate (4), 2 each for aripiprazole, olanzapine, ziprasidone, and 1 each for carbamazepine, lithium, lurasidone, and olanzapine-fluoxetine. Overall, pooled drug-over-placebo responder-rate superiority (RR) was moderate (29% [CI: 19-40%]), and NNT was 8.2 (CI: 6.4-11). By SMD, apparent efficacy ranked: olanzapine + fluoxetine ≥ valproate > quetiapine > lurasidone > olanzapine, aripiprazole, and carbamazepine; ziprasidone was ineffective, and lithium remains inadequately studied. Notably, drugs were superior to placebo in only 11/24 trials (5/5 with quetiapine, 2/4 with valproate), and only lamotrigine, quetiapine and valproate had > 2 trials. Treatment-associated mania-like reactions were uncommon (drugs: 3.7%; placebo: 4.7%). Controlled trials of non-antidepressant treatments for bipolar depression remain scarce, but findings with olanzapine-fluoxetine, lurasidone, quetiapine, and perhaps carbamazepine and valproate were encouraging; lithium requires adequate testing. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Risk for mania and positive emotional responding: too much of a good thing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, June; Johnson, Sheri L; Oveis, Christopher; Keltner, Dacher

    2008-02-01

    Although positive emotion research has begun to flourish, the extremes of positive emotion remain understudied. The present research used a multimethod approach to examine positive emotional disturbance by comparing participants at high and low risk for episodes of mania, which involves elevations in positive emotionality. Ninety participants were recruited into a high or low mania risk group according to responses on the Hypomanic Personality Scale. Participants' subjective, expressive, and physiological emotional responses were gathered while they watched two positive, two negative, and one neutral film clip. Results suggested that participants at high risk for mania reported elevated positive emotion and irritability and also exhibited elevated cardiac vagal tone across positive, negative, and neutral films. Discussion focuses on the implications these findings have for the diagnosis and prevention of bipolar disorder, as well as for the general study of positive emotion.

  18. The catecholaminergic-cholinergic balance hypothesis of bipolar disorder revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Enkhuizen, Jordy; Janowsky, David S; Olivier, Berend; Minassian, Arpi; Perry, William; Young, Jared W; Geyer, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a unique illness characterized by fluctuations between mood states of depression and mania. Originally, an adrenergic-cholinergic balance hypothesis was postulated to underlie these different affective states. In this review, we update this hypothesis with recent findings from human and animal studies, suggesting that a catecholaminergic-cholinergic hypothesis may be more relevant. Evidence from neuroimaging studies, neuropharmacological interventions, and genetic associations support the notion that increased cholinergic functioning underlies depression, whereas increased activations of the catecholamines (dopamine and norepinephrine) underlie mania. Elevated functional acetylcholine during depression may affect both muscarinic and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in a compensatory fashion. Increased functional dopamine and norepinephrine during mania on the other hand may affect receptor expression and functioning of dopamine reuptake transporters. Despite increasing evidence supporting this hypothesis, a relationship between these two neurotransmitter systems that could explain cycling between states of depression and mania is missing. Future studies should focus on the influence of environmental stimuli and genetic susceptibilities that may affect the catecholaminergic-cholinergic balance underlying cycling between the affective states. Overall, observations from recent studies add important data to this revised balance theory of bipolar disorder, renewing interest in this field of research. PMID:25107282

  19. Toward a Valid Animal Model of Bipolar Disorder: How the Research Domain Criteria Help Bridge the Clinical-Basic Science Divide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosgrove, Victoria E; Kelsoe, John R; Suppes, Trisha

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a diagnostically heterogeneous disorder, although mania emerges as a distinct phenotype characterized by elevated mood and increased activity or energy. While bipolar disorder's cyclicity is difficult to represent in animals, models of mania have begun to decode its fundamental underlying neurobiology. When psychostimulants such as amphetamine or cocaine are administered to rodents, a resulting upsurge of motor activity is thought to share face and predictive validity with mania in humans. Studying black Swiss mice, which inherently exhibit proclivity for reward seeking and risk taking, also has yielded some insight. Further, translating the biology of bipolar disorder in humans into animal models has led to greater understanding of roles for candidate biological systems such as the GRIK2 and CLOCK genes, as well as the extracellular signal-related kinase pathway involved in the pathophysiology of the illness. The National Institute of Mental Health Research Domain Criteria initiative seeks to identify building blocks of complex illnesses like bipolar disorder in hopes of uncovering the neurobiology of each, as well as how each fits together to produce syndromes like bipolar disorder or why so many mental illnesses co-occur together. Research Domain Criteria-driven preclinical models of isolated behaviors and domains involved in mania and bipolar disorder will ultimately inform movement toward nosology supported by neurobiology. Copyright © 2016 Society of Biological Psychiatry. All rights reserved.

  20. Differentiating risk for mania and borderline personality disorder: The nature of goal regulation and impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulford, Daniel; Eisner, Lori R; Johnson, Sheri L

    2015-06-30

    Researchers and clinicians have long noted the overlap among features and high comorbidity of bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder. The shared features of impulsivity and labile mood in both disorders make them challenging to distinguish. We tested the hypothesis that variables related to goal dysregulation would be uniquely related to risk for mania, while emotion-relevant impulsivity would be related to risk for both disorders. We administered a broad range of measures related to goal regulation traits and impulsivity to 214 undergraduates. Findings confirmed that risk for mania, but not for borderline personality disorder, was related to higher sensitivity to reward and intense pursuit of goals. In contrast, borderline personality disorder symptoms related more strongly than did mania risk with threat sensitivity and with impulsivity in the context of negative affect. Results highlight potential differences and commonalities in mania risk versus borderline personality disorder risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. [Circadian markers and genes in bipolar disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeim, S; Boudebesse, C; Etain, B; Belliviera, F

    2015-09-01

    Bipolar disorder is a severe and complex multifactorial disease, characterized by alternance of acute episodes of depression and mania/hypomania, interspaced by euthymic periods. The etiological determinants of bipolar disorder yet, are still poorly understood. For the last 30 years, chronobiology is an important field of investigation to better understand the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. We conducted a review using Medline, ISI Database, EMBase, PsyInfo up to January 2015, using the following keywords combinations: "mood disorder", "bipolar disorder", "depression", "unipolar disorder", "major depressive disorder", "affective disorder", for psychiatric conditions; and "circadian rhythms", "circadian markers", "circadian gene", "clock gene", "melatonin" for circadian rhythms. The search critera was presence of word in any field of the article. Quantitative and qualitative circadian abnormalities are associated with bipolar disorders both during acute episodes and euthymic periods, suggesting that these altered circadian rhythms may represent biological trait markers of the disorder. These circadian dysfunctions were assessed by various validated tools including polysomnography, actigraphy, sleep diaries, chronotype assessments and blood melatonin/cortisol measures. Other altered endogenous circadian activities have also been reported in bipolar patients, such as hormones secretion, core body temperature or fibroblasts activity. Moreover, these markers were also altered in healthy relatives of bipolar patients, suggesting a degree of heritability. Several genetic association studies have also showed associations between multiple circadian genes and bipolar disorder, such as CLOCK, ARTNL1, GSK3β, PER3, NPAS2, NR1D1, TIMELESS, RORA, RORB, and CSNK1ε. Thus, these circadian gene variants may contribute to the genetic susceptibility of the disease. Furthermore, the study of the clock system may help to better understand some phenotypic aspects like the

  2. Blockade of dopamine D1-family receptors attenuates the mania-like hyperactive, risk-preferring, and high motivation behavioral profile of mice with low dopamine transporter levels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milienne-Petiot, Morgane; Groenink, Lucianne; Minassian, Arpi; Young, Jared W

    2017-01-01

    Background: Patients with bipolar disorder mania exhibit poor cognition, impulsivity, risk-taking, and goal-directed activity that negatively impact their quality of life. To date, existing treatments for bipolar disorder do not adequately remediate cognitive dysfunction. Reducing dopamine

  3. Predictors of switching from mania to depression in a large observational study across Europe (EMBLEM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vieta, Eduard; Angst, Jules; Reed, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The risk of switching from mania to depression in bipolar disorder has been poorly studied. Large observational studies may be useful in identifying variables that predict switch to depression after mania and provide data on medication use and outcomes in "real world" patients. METHOD...... Depression Rating Scale. Switching was defined using CGI-BP mania and depression such that patients changed from manic and not depressed to depressed but not manic over two consecutive observations within the first 12 weeks of follow-up. Cox proportional hazards models identified baseline variables...... independently associated with switch to depression. RESULTS: Of 2390 patients who participated in the maintenance phase (i.e. up to 24 months), 120 (5.0%) switched to depression within the first 12 weeks. Factors associated with greater switching to depression include previous depressive episodes, substance...

  4. Diagnosis and Treatment of Bipolar Disorders in Adults: A Review of the Evidence on Pharmacologic Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jann, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    stabilizers are the cornerstone of treatment of bipolar disorder, but atypical antipsychotics are broadly as effective; however, differences in efficacy exist between individual agents in the treatment of the various phases of bipolar disorder, including treatment of acute mania or acute depression symptoms, and in the prevention of relapse. Conclusion The challenges involved in managing bipolar disorder over a patient's lifetime are the result of the dynamic, chronic, and fluctuating nature of this disease. Diligent selection of a treatment that takes into account its efficacy in the various phases of the disorder, along with the safety profile identified in clinical trials and in the real world can help ameliorate the impact of this devastating condition. PMID:25610528

  5. Adjunctive nutraceuticals with standard pharmacotherapies in bipolar disorder: a systematic review of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Jerome; Mischoulon, David; Schweitzer, Isaac

    2011-01-01

      Studies using augmentation of pharmacotherapies with nutraceuticals in bipolar disorder (BD) have been conducted and preliminary evidence in many cases appears positive. To date, however, no specialized systematic review of this area has been conducted. We present the first systematic review of clinical trials using nutrient-based nutraceuticals in combination with standard pharmacotherapies to treat BD. A subsequent aim of this report was to discuss posited underlying mechanisms of action.   PubMed, CINAHL, Web of Science, and Cochrane Library databases, and grey literature were searched during mid-2010 for human clinical trials in English using nutraceuticals such as omega-3, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), inositol, and vitamins and minerals, in combination with pharmacotherapies to treat bipolar mania and bipolar depression. A review of the results including an effect size analysis (Cohen's d) was subsequently conducted.   In treating bipolar depression, positive evidence with large effect sizes were found for NAC (d=1.04) and a chelated mineral and vitamin formula (d=1.70). On the outcome of bipolar mania, several nutraceuticals reduced mania with strong clinical effects: a chelated mineral formula (d=0.83), L-tryptophan (d=1.47), magnesium (d=1.44), folic acid (d=0.40), and branched-chain amino acids (d=1.60). Mixed, but mainly positive, evidence was found for omega-3 for bipolar depression, while no evidentiary support was found for use in mania. No significant effect on BD outcome scales was found for inositol (possibly due to small samples).   BD treatment outcomes may potentially be improved by additional use of certain nutraceuticals with conventional pharmacotherapies. However, caution should be extended in interpreting the large effects of several isolated studies, as they have not yet been replicated in larger trials. © 2011 John Wiley and Sons A/S.

  6. Bipolar Affective Disorder and Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birk Engmann

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper consists of a case history and an overview of the relationship, aetiology, and treatment of comorbid bipolar disorder migraine patients. A MEDLINE literature search was used. Terms for the search were bipolar disorder bipolar depression, mania, migraine, mood stabilizer. Bipolar disorder and migraine cooccur at a relatively high rate. Bipolar II patients seem to have a higher risk of comorbid migraine than bipolar I patients have. The literature on the common roots of migraine and bipolar disorder, including both genetic and neuropathological approaches, is broadly discussed. Moreover, bipolar disorder and migraine are often combined with a variety of other affective disorders, and, furthermore, behavioural factors also play a role in the origin and course of the diseases. Approach to treatment options is also difficult. Several papers point out possible remedies, for example, valproate, topiramate, which acts on both diseases, but no first-choice treatments have been agreed upon yet.

  7. Imunologia do transtorno bipolar Immunology of bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Guimarães Barbosa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Pesquisas recentes têm implicado fatores imunes na patogênese de diversos transtornos neuropsiquiátricos. O objetivo do presente trabalho é revisar os trabalhos que investigaram a associação entre transtorno bipolar e alterações em parâmetros imunes. MÉTODOS: Artigos que incluíam as palavras-chave: "bipolar disorder", "mania", "immunology", "cytokines", "chemokines", "interleukins", "interferon" e "tumor necrosis factor" foram selecionados em uma revisão sistemática da literatura. As bases de dados avaliadas foram MedLine e Scopus, entre os anos de 1980 e 2008. RESULTADOS: Foram identificados 28 trabalhos que estudaram alterações imunes em pacientes com transtorno bipolar. Seis artigos investigaram genes relacionados à resposta imune; cinco, autoanticorpos; quatro, populações leucocitárias; 13, citocinas e/ou moléculas relacionadas à resposta imune e seis, leucócitos de pacientes in vitro. CONCLUSÕES: Embora haja evidências na literatura correlacionando o transtorno bipolar a alterações imunes, os dados não são conclusivos. O transtorno bipolar parece estar associado a níveis mais elevados de autoanticorpos circulantes, assim como à tendência à ativação imune com produção de citocinas pró-inflamatórias e redução de parâmetros anti-inflamatórios.OBJECTIVE: Emerging research has implicated immune factors in the pathogenesis of a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders. The objective of the present paper is to review the studies that investigated the association between bipolar disorder and immune parameters. METHODS: Papers that included the keywords "bipolar to disorder", "mania", "immunology", "cytokines", "chemokines", "interleukins", "interferon" and "tumor necrosis factor" were selected in a systematic review of the literature. The evaluated databases were MedLine and Scopus in the period between 1980 and 2008. RESULTS: Twenty eight works were found. Six studies investigated immune response

  8. A Canadian naturalistic study of a community-based cohort treated for bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandresena Ranjith

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bipolar illness is associated with significant psychosocial morbidity and health resource utilization. Second generation antipsychotics, used alone or in combination with mood stabilizers are effective in treating acute mania in community settings. This study was designed to compare the change in clinical parameters and resource utilization at one month in a group of patients who required treatment intervention for exacerbation of mania. The clinical response at one year was also evaluated. Methods 496 patients were enrolled at 75 psychiatric practices across Canada. The Olanzapine cohort (n = 287 included patients who had olanzapine added to their medication regimen or the dose of olanzapine increased. The Other cohort (n = 209 had a medication other than olanzapine added or the dose adjusted. Changes from baseline in the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS, Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale, Beck Anxiety Inventory and SF-12 Health Survey were compared at one month using ANCOVA. Categorical variables at one month for health resource utilization, employment status, abuse/dependency, and the number of suicide attempts were compared using Fisher's Exact test. Patients were followed for one year and a subgroup was evaluated. Results At one month, patients in the Olanzapine cohort recorded a mean reduction in the YMRS of 11.5, significantly greater than the mean reduction in the Other cohort of 9.7 (ANCOVA P = 0.002. The Olanzapine cohort was significantly improved compared to the Other cohort on the scales for depression and anxiety and did not experience the deterioration in physical functioning seen in the Other cohort. No significant differences were detected in health-related quality-of-life measures, employment status, drug abuse/dependency, number of suicide attempts, mental functioning, emergency room visits or inpatient psychiatric hospitalizations. In a subgroup treated for 12 months with a single second generation

  9. The influence of current mood state, number of previous affective episodes and predominant polarity on insight in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assis da Silva, Rafael; Mograbi, Daniel C; Camelo, Evelyn Vieira Miranda; Peixoto, Ursula; Santana, Cristina Maria Teixeira; Landeira-Fernandez, Jesus; Morris, Robin G; Cheniaux, Elie

    2017-11-01

    Although many studies have explored the effect of current affective episodes on insight into bipolar disorder, the potential interaction between current mood state and previous affective episodes has not been consistently investigated. To explore the influence of dominant polarity, number of previous affective episodes and current affective state on insight in bipolar disorder patients in euthymia or mania. A total of 101 patients with bipolar disorder were recruited for the study, including 58 patients in euthymia (30 with no defined predominant polarity and 28 with manic predominant polarity) and 43 in mania (26 with no defined predominant polarity and 17 with manic predominant polarity). Patients underwent a clinical assessment and insight was evaluated through the Insight Scale for Affective Disorders. Bipolar disorder patients in mania had worse insight than those in euthymia, with no effect of dominant polarity. In addition, positive psychotic symptoms showed a significant effect on insight and its inclusion as a covariate eliminated differences related to mood state. Finally, the number of previous manic or depressive episodes did not correlate with insight level. Mania is a predictor of loss of insight into bipolar disorder. However, it is possible that its contribution is linked to the more frequent presence of psychotic symptoms in this state. Dominant polarity and number/type of previous affective episodes have a limited impact on insight.

  10. A lamotrigina pode induzir virada maníaca? ¿Lamotrigina puede inducir manía? Can lamotrigine induce switch into mania?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie Cheniaux

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Em ensaios clínicos controlados com pacientes bipolares, a lamotrigina tem demonstrado eficácia no tratamento da fase aguda da depressão e, principalmente, na prevenção de novos episódios depressivos. É relatado o caso de um paciente bipolar tipo II, ciclador rápido, que, durante um episódio depressivo, fez uso dessa substância, em monoterapia, e passou a apresentar um quadro maníaco disfórico. Este remitiu logo após a retirada da medicação e foi sucedido por um novo episódio depressivo. Essa ocorrência foi bastante inesperada diante dos dados clínicos da literatura científica, os quais associam a lamotrigina a uma taxa muito baixa de virada para a mania.En los ensayos clínicos controlados con pacientes bipolares, la lamotrigina mostró eficacia en el tratamiento de la fase aguda de la depresión y, principalmente, en la prevención de nuevos episodios depresivos. Describimos un caso de un paciente bipolar de tipo II, con un curso de ciclos rápidos, que, durante un episodio depresivo, tomó lamotrigina en monoterapia, desarrollando un episodio maníaco disfórico. Este episodio remitió pronto después de la suspensión de la medicina y fue seguido por un nuevo episodio depresivo. Esa ocurrencia fue bastante inesperada si comparada a los datos clínicos de la literatura científica, que muestran la lamotrigina con una tasa muy baja de "viraje" para la manía.Controlled clinical trials involving bipolar patients have shown that lamotrigine is effective in acute phase treatment of depression and mainly in the prevention of new depressive episodes. We report the case of a bipolar II, rapid cycling patient who used lamotrigine (in monotherapy during a depressive episode and developed a dysphoric manic episode. This episode resolved soon after discontinuation of the drug and was followed by a new depressive episode. The occurrence of the dysphoric manic episode was much unexpected, based on the clinical data found in the

  11. Work impairment in bipolar disorder patients--results from a two-year observational study (EMBLEM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, C; Goetz, I; Vieta, E; Bassi, M; Haro, J M

    2010-10-01

    To explore factors associated with work impairment at 2 years following an acute episode. European Mania in Bipolar disorder Longitudinal Evaluation of Medication (EMBLEM) is a prospective, observational study on the outcomes of patients with a manic/mixed episode. Work impairment was measured using a Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation (slice of LIFE) item and patients were categorised with either low or high work impairment at each observation. Baseline factors associated with work impairment at 2 years were assessed using multivariate modelling. At baseline (n=2289), 69% of patients had high work impairment. At 2 years (n=1393), high impairment reduced to 41%. Modelling identified rapid cycling as the strongest disease-related factor associated with high work impairment at 2 years, although high work impairment at baseline had the strongest association overall. Lower levels of education, recent admissions, CGI-BP overall severity in the 12 months prior to baseline and CGI-BP mania at baseline all predicted higher work impairment. Living together in a relationship and independent housing were both significantly associated with having low work impairment at 2 years. Work impairment in bipolar disorder is maintained over long periods, and is strongly associated with relationship status, living conditions and various disease-related factors. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Early Nonresponse in the Antipsychotic Treatment of Acute Mania : A Criterion for Reconsidering Treatment? Results From an Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welten, Carlijn C M; Koeter, Maarten W J; Wohlfarth, Tamar D; Storosum, Jitschak G; van den Brink, Wim; Gispen-de Wied, Christine C; Leufkens, Hubert G M; Denys, Damiaan A J P

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether early nonresponse to antipsychotic treatment of acute mania predicts treatment failure and, if so, to establish the best definition or criterion of an early nonresponse. DATA SOURCES: Short-term efficacy studies assessing antipsychotics that were submitted to the

  13. Conversion (dissociative) symptoms as a presenting feature in early onset bipolar disorder: a case series

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosal, Malay Kumar; Guha, Prathama; Sinha, Mausumi; Majumdar, Debabrata; Sengupta, Payel

    2009-01-01

    We present three cases of early onset bipolar disorder where dissociative (conversion) symptoms preceded the onset of mania. This case series underscores the significance of dissociative/conversion symptoms as an early atypical presentation in juvenile bipolar disorder.

  14. Antidepressant Treatment for Acute Bipolar Depression: An Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben H. Amit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While studies in the past have focused more on treatment of the manic phase of bipolar disorder (BD, recent findings demonstrate the depressive phase to be at least as debilitating. However, in contrast to unipolar depression, depression in bipolar patients exhibits a varying response to antidepressants, raising questions regarding their efficacy and tolerability. Methods. We conducted a MEDLINE and Cochrane Collaboration Library search for papers published between 2005 and 2011 on the subject of antidepressant treatment of bipolar depression. Sixty-eight articles were included in the present review. Results. While a few studies did advocate the use of antidepressants, most well-controlled studies failed to show a robust effect of antidepressants in bipolar depression, regardless of antidepressant class or bipolar subtype. There was no significant increase in the rate of manic/hypomanic switch, especially with concurrent use of mood stabilizers. Prescribing guidelines published in recent years rely more on atypical antipsychotics, especially quetiapine, as a first-line therapy. Conclusions. Antidepressants probably have no substantial role in acute bipolar depression. However, in light of conflicting results between studies, more well-designed trials are warranted.

  15. Correlates of current suicide risk among Thai patients with bipolar I disorder: findings from the Thai Bipolar Disorder Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suttajit S

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Sirijit Suttajit,1 Suchat Paholpak,2 Somrak Choovanicvong,3 Khanogwan Kittiwattanagul,4 Wetid Pratoomsri,5 Manit Srisurapanont1On behalf of the Thai Bipolar Registry Group1Department of Psychiatry, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, 2Department of Psychiatry, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 3Srithanya Hospital, Nonthaburi, 4Khon Kaen Rajanagarindra Psychiatric Hospital, Khon Kaen, 5Chachoengsao Hospital, Chachoengsao, ThailandBackground: The Thai Bipolar Disorder Registry was a prospective, multisite, naturalistic study conducted in 24 hospitals across Thailand. This study aimed to examine the correlates of current suicide risk in Thai patients with bipolar I disorder.Methods: Participants were adult inpatients or outpatients with bipolar disorder, based on the Diagnosis and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition. All were assessed by using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI, version 5. The severity of current suicide risk was determined by using the total score of the MINI suicidality module. Mood symptoms were assessed by using the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale.Results: The data of 383 bipolar I disorder patients were included in the analyses. Of these, 363 (94.8% were outpatients. The mean (standard deviation of the MINI suicide risk score was 1.88 (5.0. The demographic/clinical variables significantly associated with the MINI suicide risk scores included age, number of overall previous episodes, the Young Mania Rating Scale score, the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale scores, and the Clinical Global Impression Severity of Illness Scale for Bipolar Disorder mania score, depression score, and overall score. The variables affecting the differences of suicide risk scores between or among groups were type of first mood episode, a history of rapid cycling, anxiety disorders, and alcohol use disorders. The stepwise multiple linear regression model revealed

  16. Carbon dioxide induces erratic respiratory responses in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackinnon, Dean F; Craighead, Brandie; Lorenz, Laura

    2009-01-01

    CO(2) respiration stimulates both anxiety and dyspnea ("air hunger") and has long been used to study panic vulnerability and respiratory control. High comorbidity with panic attacks suggests individuals with bipolar disorder may also mount a heightened anxiety response to CO(2). Moreover, problems in the arousal and modulation of appetites are central to the clinical syndromes of mania and depression; hence CO(2) may arouse an abnormal respiratory response to "air hunger". 72 individuals (34 bipolar I, 25 depressive and bipolar spectrum, 13 with no major affective diagnosis) breathed air and air with 5% CO(2) via facemask for up to 15 min each; subjective and respiratory responses were recorded. Nearly half the subjects diverged from the typical response to a fixed, mildly hypercapneic environment, which is to increase breathing acutely, and then maintain a hyperpneic plateau. The best predictors of an abnormal pattern were bipolar diagnosis and anxiety from air alone. 25 individuals had a panic response; panic responses from CO(2) were more likely in subjects with bipolar I compared to other subjects, however the best predictors of a panic response overall were anxiety from air alone and prior history of panic attacks. Heterogeneous sample, liberal definition of panic attack. Carbon dioxide produces abnormal respiratory and heightened anxiety responses among individuals with bipolar and depressive disorders. These may be due to deficits in emotional conditioning related to fear and appetite. Although preliminary, this work suggests a potentially useful test of a specific functional deficit in bipolar disorder.

  17. Treatment patterns of youth with bipolar disorder: results from the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement (NCS-A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, Gabriela Kattan; Cui, Lihong; Merikangas, Kathleen Ries; Angst, Jules

    2015-02-01

    Despite growing evidence that bipolar disorder often emerges in adolescence, there are limited data regarding treatment patterns of youth with bipolar disorder in community samples. Our objective was to present the prevalence and clinical correlates of treatment utilization for a nationally representative sample of US adolescents with bipolar disorder. Analyses are based on data from the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement, a face-to-face survey of 10,123 adolescents (ages 13-18) identified in household and school settings. We found that of adolescents meeting DSM-IV criteria for bipolar I or II disorder (N = 250), 49 % were treated for depression or mania, 13 % were treated for conditions other than depression or mania, and 38 % did not report receiving treatment. Treatment for depression or mania was associated with increased rates of suicide attempts, as well as greater role disability and more comorbid alcohol use relative to those who had not received treatment. Treated adolescents had triple the rate of ADHD and double the rates of behavior disorders than those without treatment. Our findings demonstrate that a substantial proportion of youth with bipolar disorder do not receive treatment, and of those who do, many receive treatment for comorbid conditions rather than for their mood-related symptoms. Treatment was more common among youth with severe manifestations and consequences of bipolar disorder and those with behavior problems. These trends highlight the need to identify barriers to treatment for adolescents with bipolar disorder and demonstrate that those in treatment are not representative of youth with bipolar disorder in the general population.

  18. Translation of randomised controlled trial findings into clinical practice: comparison of olanzapine and valproate in the EMBLEM study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novick, D; Gonzalez-Pinto, A; Haro, J M

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of olanzapine- and valproate-treated patients in an observational study of acute mania with the results of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) assessing the same treatments. METHODS: EMBLEM (European Mania in Bipolar Evaluation......: The EMBLEM results support those of the RCT, which suggest that olanzapine monotherapy seems to be more effective than valproate monotherapy in the treatment of acute mania....

  19. Historical Underpinnings of Bipolar Disorder Diagnostic Criteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany L. Mason

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mood is the changing expression of emotion and can be described as a spectrum. The outermost ends of this spectrum highlight two states, the lowest low, melancholia, and the highest high, mania. These mood extremes have been documented repeatedly in human history, being first systematically described by Hippocrates. Nineteenth century contemporaries Falret and Baillarger described two forms of an extreme mood disorder, with the validity and accuracy of both debated. Regardless, the concept of a cycling mood disease was accepted before the end of the 19th century. Kraepelin then described “manic depressive insanity” and presented his description of a full spectrum of mood dysfunction which could be exhibited through single episodes of mania or depression or a complement of many episodes of each. It was this concept which was incorporated into the first DSM and carried out until DSM-III, in which the description of episodic mood dysfunction was used to build a diagnosis of bipolar disorder. Criticism of this approach is explored through discussion of the bipolar spectrum concept and some recent examinations of the clinical validity of these DSM diagnoses are presented. The concept of bipolar disorder in children is also explored.

  20. Modification of the Clinical Global Impressions (CGI) Scale for use in bipolar illness (BP): the CGI-BP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearing, M K; Post, R M; Leverich, G S; Brandt, D; Nolen, W

    1997-12-05

    The Clinical Global Impressions Scale (CGI) was modified specifically for use in assessing global illness severity and change in patients with bipolar disorder. Criticisms of the original CGI were addressed by correcting inconsistencies in scaling, identifying time frames for comparison, clarifying definitions of illness severity and change, and separating out assessment of treatment side effects from illness improvement during treatment. A Detailed User's Guide was developed to train clinicians in the use of the new CGI-Bipolar Version (CGI-BP) for rating severity of manic and depressive episodes and the degree of change from the immediately preceding phase and from the worst phase of illness. The revised scale and manual provide a focused set of instructions to facilitate the reliability of these ratings of mania, depression, and overall bipolar illness during treatment of an acute episode or in longer-term illness prophylaxis. Interrater reliability of the scale was demonstrated in preliminary analyses. Thus, the modified CGI-BP is anticipated to be more useful than the original CGI in studies of bipolar disorder.

  1. What Symptoms Predict the Diagnosis of Mania in Persons with Severe/Profound Intellectual Disability In Clinical Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matson, J. L.; Gonzalez, M. L.; Terlonge, C.; Thorson, R. T.; Laud, R. B.

    2007-01-01

    Background: While researchers have attempted to address the difficulties of diagnosing affective disorders in the intellectually disabled population, diagnosing bipolar disorder in an individual with severe intellectual disability (ID) remains a challenge. The aim of this study was to identify what symptoms can predict a diagnosis of mania in the…

  2. Atypical Antipsychotics in the Treatment of Acute Bipolar Depression with Mixed Features: A Systematic Review and Exploratory Meta-Analysis of Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials

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    Michele Fornaro

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Evidence supporting the use of second generation antipsychotics (SGAs in the treatment of acute depression with mixed features (MFs associated with bipolar disorder (BD is scarce and equivocal. Therefore, we conducted a systematic review and preliminary meta-analysis investigating SGAs in the treatment of acute BD depression with MFs. Two authors independently searched major electronic databases from 1990 until September 2015 for randomized (placebo- controlled trials (RCTs or open-label clinical trials investigating the efficacy of SGAs in the treatment of acute bipolar depression with MFs. A random-effect meta-analysis calculating the standardized mean difference (SMD between SGA and placebo for the mean baseline to endpoint change in depression as well as manic symptoms score was computed based on 95% confidence intervals (CI. Six RCTs and one open-label placebo-controlled studies (including post-hoc reports representing 1023 patients were included. Participants received either ziprasidone, olanzapine, lurasidone, quetiapine or asenapine for an average of 6.5 weeks across the included studies. Meta-analysis with Duval and Tweedie adjustment for publication bias demonstrated that SGA resulted in significant improvements of (hypo-manic symptoms of bipolar mixed depression as assessed by the means of the total scores of the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS (SMD −0.74, 95% CI −1.20 to −0.28, n SGA = 907, control = 652. Meta-analysis demonstrated that participants in receipt of SGA (n = 979 experienced a large improvement in the Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS scores (SMD −1.08, 95% CI −1.35 to −0.81, p < 0.001 vs. placebo (n = 678. Publication and measurement biases and relative paucity of studies. Overall, SGAs appear to offer favorable improvements in MADRS and YMRS scores vs. placebo. Nevertheless, given the preliminary nature of the present report, additional original studies are required to allow more reliable

  3. Relato de caso: transtorno afetivo bipolar

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Von Krakauer Hübner; Edson Vinicius Milanello; Maria Fernanda Moro Barbieri; Marcelo Ricardo de Oliveira Barcelos; Lucas Augusto Ayres Ribas

    2016-01-01

    Introdução: O transtorno afetivo bipolar (TAB) é uma doença crônica e grave, marcada pela variância de episódios depressivos com episódios de mania ou hipomania, podendo haver sintomas psicóticos. É classificado em dois tipos, I e II. Sua etiologia é desconhecida, mas supõe-se que envolva influências genéticas e ambientais, variando a cada indivíduo afetado. As apresentações clínicas do TAB podem variar de episódios leves de depressão ou hipomania até episódios depressivos graves ou mania aco...

  4. Group interpersonal and social rhythm therapy for bipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoberg, Astrid A; Ponto, Julie; Nelson, Pamela J; Frye, Mark A

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of 2-week interpersonal and social rhythm therapy group (IPSRT-G) for bipolar depression. Participants with bipolar depression received two individual sessions, six IPSRT-G sessions, and a 12-week telephone call. The Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Clinician Rated (IDS-C), Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), and Clinical Global Impressions-Bipolar Version (CGI-BP) were used. IDS-C and SDS scores improved significantly at 12 weeks. YMRS and CGI-BP scores improved but did not reach statistical significance. The promising antidepressive response supports further study of IPSRT-G for bipolar depression. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Creativity is linked to ambition across the bipolar spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sheri L; Murray, Greg; Hou, Sharon; Staudenmaier, Paige J; Freeman, Michael A; Michalak, Erin E

    2015-06-01

    Beyond evidence for an association, little is known about the mechanism linking creativity bipolar spectrum conditions. Theory suggests that ambition, which is heightened in bipolar disorder (BD) and associated with creativity in the general population, might be an important variable. The overarching aim of this project was to evaluate whether ambition is related to creativity among those with bipolar spectrum conditions. Across two studies, we examined correlations between a validated self-report measure of ambition, the WASSUP, and creativity. In Study One, 22 individuals diagnosed with BD who self-identified as highly creative completed the WASSUP and a measure of lifetime creative accomplishment. In Study Two, 221 undergraduates completed the WASSUP, a measure of mania risk (the Hypomanic Personality Scale, HPS) and a measure designed to assess creativity in business projects and tasks. In Study One, WASSUP scores were significantly elevated compared to normative levels in BD, and WASSUP scores were correlated with lifetime creative accomplishment within the artistic sample. In Study Two, mania risk was related to greater ambition and creativity, and ambition was also directly related to greater creativity. Both studies were limited by the reliance on self-reported ambition. Ambition could be one important component of creative success across the bipolar spectrum. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Determining if Borderline Personality Disorder and Bipolar Disorder Are Alternative Expressions of the Same Disorder: Results From the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Rosa, Iris; Oquendo, María A; García, Gemma; Stanley, Barbara; González-Pinto, Ana; Liu, Shang-Min; Blanco, Carlos

    To examine whether bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder represent 2 different disorders or alternative manifestations of the same disorder. The data were collected between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2005. The analyses were conducted between December 21 and December 27, 2010. Exploratory factor analysis (EFA) and confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) were performed on 25 symptoms assessing depression, mania, and borderline personality disorder from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, a large nationally representative sample of the US adult population (N = 34,653). DSM-IV criteria were used for diagnosis of bipolar disorder and borderline personality disorder. A 3-factor solution provided an excellent fit in both the EFA (root mean square error of approximation [RMSEA] = 0.017, comparative fix index [CFI] = 0.997) and the CFA (RMSEA = 0.024, CFI = 0.993). Factor 1 (Borderline Personality Disorder) loaded on all 9 borderline personality disorder symptoms, factor 2 (Depression) loaded on 8 symptoms of depression, and factor 3 (Mania) loaded on 7 symptoms of mania plus the psychomotor agitation item of the depression section. The correlations between the Borderline Personality Disorder and Depression factors (r = 0.328) and between the Borderline Personality Disorder and Mania factors (r = 0.394) were lower than the correlation between Depression and Mania factors (r = 0.538). A model with 3 positively correlated factors provided an excellent fit for the latent structure of borderline personality disorder and bipolar disorder symptoms. The pattern of pairwise correlations between the 3 factors is consistent with the clinical presentation of 2 syndromes (depression and mania) that can be characterized as a unitary psychiatric entity (bipolar disorder) and a third syndrome (borderline personality disorder) that is often comorbid with bipolar disorder. The findings converge in suggesting that bipolar disorder and

  7. Blockade of dopamine D1-family receptors attenuates the mania-like hyperactive, risk-preferring, and high motivation behavioral profile of mice with low dopamine transporter levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milienne-Petiot, Morgane; Groenink, Lucianne; Minassian, Arpi; Young, Jared W

    2017-10-01

    Patients with bipolar disorder mania exhibit poor cognition, impulsivity, risk-taking, and goal-directed activity that negatively impact their quality of life. To date, existing treatments for bipolar disorder do not adequately remediate cognitive dysfunction. Reducing dopamine transporter expression recreates many bipolar disorder mania-relevant behaviors (i.e. hyperactivity and risk-taking). The current study investigated whether dopamine D 1 -family receptor blockade would attenuate the risk-taking, hypermotivation, and hyperactivity of dopamine transporter knockdown mice. Dopamine transporter knockdown and wild-type littermate mice were tested in mouse versions of the Iowa Gambling Task (risk-taking), Progressive Ratio Breakpoint Test (effortful motivation), and Behavioral Pattern Monitor (activity). Prior to testing, the mice were treated with the dopamine D 1 -family receptor antagonist SCH 23390 hydrochloride (0.03, 0.1, or 0.3 mg/kg), or vehicle. Dopamine transporter knockdown mice exhibited hyperactivity and hyperexploration, hypermotivation, and risk-taking preference compared with wild-type littermates. SCH 23390 hydrochloride treatment decreased premature responding in dopamine transporter knockdown mice and attenuated their hypermotivation. SCH 23390 hydrochloride flattened the safe/risk preference, while reducing activity and exploratory levels of both genotypes similarly. Dopamine transporter knockdown mice exhibited mania-relevant behavior compared to wild-type mice. Systemic dopamine D 1 -family receptor antagonism attenuated these behaviors in dopamine transporter knockdown, but not all effects were specific to only the knockdown mice. The normalization of behavior via blockade of dopamine D 1 -family receptors supports the hypothesis that D 1 and/or D 5 receptors could contribute to the mania-relevant behaviors of dopamine transporter knockdown mice.

  8. A systematic review on the role of anticonvulsants in the treatment of acute bipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinares, María; Rosa, Adriane R; Franco, Carolina; Goikolea, José Manuel; Fountoulakis, Kostas; Siamouli, Melina; Gonda, Xenia; Frangou, Sophia; Vieta, Eduard

    2013-03-01

    Despite the high morbidity and mortality associated with bipolar depression, the optimal treatment for this phase is still a matter of debate. The aim of the current review was to provide updated evidence about the efficacy and tolerability of anticonvulsants in the treatment of acute bipolar depression. A comprehensive review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the use of anticonvulsants for the treatment of acute bipolar depression up to June 2011 was conducted by means of the PubMed-Medline database. Eligibility criteria included active comparator-controlled or placebo-controlled randomized studies involving monotherapy or combination therapy. A total of 18 RCTs fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Studies supported the efficacy of divalproex as monotherapy in acute bipolar depression but small sample size was a common methodological limitation. Findings were inconclusive for lamotrigine and carbamazepine although overall lamotrigine may have a beneficial but modest effect. Negative results were found for levetiracetam and gabapentin but the evidence base on these agents is scant. All anticonvulsants were generally well tolerated. No double-blind RCTs were found for the use of other anticonvulsants such as oxcarbazepine, licarbazepine, zonisamide, retigabine, pregabalin, tiagabine, felbamate and vigabatrine in the acute treatment of bipolar depression. To sum up, taking into consideration the efficacy and tolerability profiles of anticonvulsants, current evidence supports the use of divalproex and lamotrigine in the treatment of acute bipolar depression. However, available data for most other anticonvulsants are inconclusive and further RCTs with larger sample sizes are needed before drawing firm conclusions.

  9. Stressful life events predict delayed functional recovery following treatment for mania in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan-Meier, Leslie; Eberhart, Nicole K; Hammen, Constance L; Gitlin, Michael; Sokolski, Kenneth; Altshuler, Lori

    2011-04-30

    Identifying predictors of functional recovery in bipolar disorder is critical to treatment efforts to help patients re-establish premorbid levels of role adjustment following an acute manic episode. The current study examined the role of stressful life events as potential obstacles to recovery of functioning in various roles. 65 patients with bipolar I disorder participated in a longitudinal study of functional recovery following clinical recovery from a manic episode. Stressful life events were assessed as predictors of concurrent vs. delayed recovery of role functioning in 4 domains (friends, family, home duties, work/school). Despite clinical recovery, a subset of patients experienced delayed functional recovery in various role domains. Moreover, delayed functional recovery was significantly associated with presence of one or more stressors in the prior 3 months, even after controlling for mood symptoms. Presence of a stressor predicted longer time to functional recovery in life domains, up to 112 days in work/school. Interventions that provide monitoring, support, and problem-solving may be needed to help prevent or mitigate the effects of stress on functional recovery. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Asenapine for bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scheidemantel T

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Thomas Scheidemantel,1 Irina Korobkova,2 Soham Rej,3,4 Martha Sajatovic1,2 1University Hospitals Case Medical Center, 2Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 3Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, 4Geri PARTy Research Group, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, QC, Canada Abstract: Asenapine (Saphris® is an atypical antipsychotic drug which has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of schizophrenia in adults, as well as the treatment of acute manic or mixed episodes of bipolar I in both adult and pediatric populations. Asenapine is a tetracyclic drug with antidopaminergic and antiserotonergic activity with a unique sublingual route of administration. In this review, we examine and summarize the available literature on the safety, efficacy, and tolerability of asenapine in the treatment of bipolar disorder (BD. Data from randomized, double-blind trials comparing asenapine to placebo or olanzapine in the treatment of acute manic or mixed episodes showed asenapine to be an effective monotherapy treatment in clinical settings; asenapine outperformed placebo and showed noninferior performance to olanzapine based on improvement in the Young Mania Rating Scale scores. There are limited data available on the use of asenapine in the treatment of depressive symptoms of BD, or in the maintenance phase of BD. The available data are inconclusive, suggesting the need for more robust data from prospective trials in these clinical domains. The most commonly reported adverse effect associated with use of asenapine is somnolence. However, the somnolence associated with asenapine use did not cause significant rates of discontinuation. While asenapine was associated with weight gain when compared to placebo, it appeared to be modest when compared to other atypical antipsychotics, and its propensity to cause increases in hemoglobin A1c or serum lipid levels appeared to be

  11. A new mouse model for mania shares genetic correlates with human bipolar disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C Saul

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder (BPD is a debilitating heritable psychiatric disorder. Contemporary rodent models for the manic pole of BPD have primarily utilized either single locus transgenics or treatment with psychostimulants. Our lab recently characterized a mouse strain termed Madison (MSN that naturally displays a manic phenotype, exhibiting elevated locomotor activity, increased sexual behavior, and higher forced swimming relative to control strains. Lithium chloride and olanzapine treatments attenuate this phenotype. In this study, we replicated our locomotor activity experiment, showing that MSN mice display generationally-stable mania relative to their outbred ancestral strain, hsd:ICR (ICR. We then performed a gene expression microarray experiment to compare hippocampus of MSN and ICR mice. We found dysregulation of multiple transcripts whose human orthologs are associated with BPD and other psychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and ADHD, including: Epor, Smarca4, Cmklr1, Cat, Tac1, Npsr1, Fhit, and P2rx7. RT-qPCR confirmed dysregulation for all of seven transcripts tested. Using a novel genome enrichment algorithm, we found enrichment in genome regions homologous to human loci implicated in BPD in replicated linkage studies including homologs of human cytobands 1p36, 3p14, 3q29, 6p21-22, 12q24, 16q24, and 17q25. Using a functional network analysis, we found dysregulation of a gene system related to chromatin packaging, a result convergent with recent human findings on BPD. Our findings suggest that MSN mice represent a polygenic model for the manic pole of BPD showing much of the genetic systems complexity of the corresponding human disorder. Further, the high degree of convergence between our findings and the human literature on BPD brings up novel questions about evolution by analogy in mammalian genomes.

  12. Lithium in drinking water and the incidence of bipolar disorder: A nation-wide population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessing, Lars V; Gerds, Thomas A; Knudsen, Nikoline N; Jørgensen, Lisbeth F; Kristiansen, Søren M; Voutchkova, Denitza; Ernstsen, Vibeke; Schullehner, Jörg; Hansen, Birgitte; Andersen, Per K; Ersbøll, Annette K

    2017-11-01

    Animal data suggest that subtherapeutic doses, including micro doses, of lithium may influence mood, and lithium levels in drinking water have been found to correlate with the rate of suicide. It has never been investigated whether consumption of lithium may prevent the development of bipolar disorder (primary prophylaxis). In a nation-wide population-based study, we investigated whether long-term exposure to micro levels of lithium in drinking water correlates with the incidence of bipolar disorder in the general population, hypothesizing an inverse association in which higher long-term lithium exposure is associated with lower incidences of bipolar disorder. We included longitudinal individual geographical data on municipality of residence, data from drinking water lithium measurements and time-specific data from all cases with a hospital contact with a diagnosis of mania/bipolar disorder from 1995 to 2013 (N=14 820) and 10 age- and gender-matched controls from the Danish population (N= 140 311). Average drinking water lithium exposure was estimated for all study individuals. The median of the average lithium exposure did not differ between cases with a diagnosis of mania/bipolar disorder (12.7 μg/L; interquartile range [IQR]: 7.9-15.5 μg/L) and controls (12.5 μg/L; IQR: 7.6-15.7 μg/L; P=.2). Further, the incidence rate ratio of mania/bipolar disorder did not decrease with higher long-term lithium exposure, overall, or within age categories (0-40, 41-60 and 61-100 years of age). Higher long-term lithium exposure from drinking water was not associated with a lower incidence of bipolar disorder. The association should be investigated in areas with higher lithium levels than in Denmark. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Family influences on mania-relevant cognitions and beliefs: a cognitive model of mania and reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Stephen H; Johnson, Sheri L

    2012-07-01

    The present study proposed and tested a cognitive model of mania and reward. Undergraduates (N = 284; 68.4% female; mean age = 20.99 years, standard deviation ± 3.37) completed measures of family goal setting and achievement values, personal reward-related beliefs, cognitive symptoms of mania, and risk for mania. Correlational analyses and structural equation modeling supported two distinct, but related facets of mania-relevant cognition: stably present reward-related beliefs and state-dependent cognitive symptoms in response to success and positive emotion. Results also indicated that family emphasis on achievement and highly ambitious extrinsic goals were associated with these mania-relevant cognitions. Finally, controlling for other factors, cognitive symptoms in response to success and positive emotion were uniquely associated with lifetime propensity towards mania symptoms. Results support the merit of distinguishing between facets of mania-relevant cognition and the importance of the family in shaping both aspects of cognition. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Expression of matrix metalloproteinases in patients with bipolar disorder

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    Fábria Chiarani

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: High cardiovascular mortality rates have been reported in patients with bipolar disorder (BD. Studies indicate that matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are implicated in cardiovascular diseases. We evaluated the expression pattern of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in blood from patients with BD during acute mania and after euthymia, in comparison with healthy controls. Methods: Twenty patients and 20 controls were recruited and matched for sex and age. MMP messenger RNA (mRNA levels were measured using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Body mass index (BMI was calculated for all subjects. Results: There were no significant differences in MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA expression between patients and controls. mRNA levels were not significantly different during mania and euthymia. However, MMP-2 mRNA levels were negatively associated with BMI in BD patients and positively associated with BMI in controls. There was no difference in the pattern of MMP-9 expression between patients and controls. Conclusions: Our results suggest a different pattern of association between MMP-2 and BMI in BD patients as compared with controls. Despite some study limitations, we believe that the role of MMPs in BD should be further investigated to elucidate its relationship with cardiovascular risk.

  15. Cognitive reactivity to success and failure relate uniquely to manic and depression tendencies and combine in bipolar tendencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raes, Filip; Ghesquière, Ine; Van Gucht, Dinska

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined simultaneously the relations between cognitive reactivity to success and failure, on the one hand, and depression, manic, and bipolar tendencies, on the other hand. Participants (161 students) completed measures of success and failure reactivity, current manic and depressive symptoms, and tendencies towards depression, mania, and bipolarity. Results showed that respondents with a greater tendency towards depression evidenced greater (negative) reactivity to failure, whereas those with a greater tendency toward mania evidenced greater (positive) reactivity to success. Depression vulnerability was unrelated to success reactivity, and manic vulnerability was unrelated to failure reactivity. Tendencies toward bipolarity correlated significantly with both failure and success reactivity in a negative and positive manner, respectively. These findings add to the growing body of literature, suggesting that different features or cognitive tendencies are related to depression vulnerability versus manic vulnerability and imply that these "mirrored" cognitive features both form part of vulnerability to bipolar disorder.

  16. Cognitive Reactivity to Success and Failure Relate Uniquely to Manic and Depression Tendencies and Combine in Bipolar Tendencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filip Raes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined simultaneously the relations between cognitive reactivity to success and failure, on the one hand, and depression, manic, and bipolar tendencies, on the other hand. Participants (161 students completed measures of success and failure reactivity, current manic and depressive symptoms, and tendencies towards depression, mania, and bipolarity. Results showed that respondents with a greater tendency towards depression evidenced greater (negative reactivity to failure, whereas those with a greater tendency toward mania evidenced greater (positive reactivity to success. Depression vulnerability was unrelated to success reactivity, and manic vulnerability was unrelated to failure reactivity. Tendencies toward bipolarity correlated significantly with both failure and success reactivity in a negative and positive manner, respectively. These findings add to the growing body of literature, suggesting that different features or cognitive tendencies are related to depression vulnerability versus manic vulnerability and imply that these “mirrored” cognitive features both form part of vulnerability to bipolar disorder.

  17. Translation of randomised controlled trial findings into clinical practice: comparison of olanzapine and valproate in the EMBLEM study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novick, D; Gonzalez-Pinto, A; Haro, J M

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of olanzapine- and valproate-treated patients in an observational study of acute mania with the results of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) assessing the same treatments. METHODS: EMBLEM (European Mania in Bipolar Evaluation of Medi...

  18. Antidepressant treatment-emergent affective switch in bipolar disorder: a prospective case-control study of outcome Ciclagem afetiva associada a tratamento com antidepressivo no transtorno bipolar: estudo caso-controle prospectivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Sayuri Tamada

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Treatment-emergent affective switch has been associated to cycle acceleration and poorer outcome, but there are few studies addressing this issue. The aim of this study was to prospectively compare the outcome of patients presenting treatment-emergent affective switch with patients with spontaneous mania, regarding presence and polarity of a new episode and time to relapse. METHOD: Twenty-four patients with bipolar disorder according to the DSM-IV were followed for 12 months. Twelve patients had treatment-emergent affective switch and twelve had spontaneous mania. Patients were evaluated weekly with the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Hamilton Depression Scale until remission of the index episode, and monthly until completion of the 12-month follow-up. RESULTS: Eleven patients with treatment-emergent affective switch had a recurrence on follow-up, all of them with major depressive episodes. In the group with spontaneous mania, six patients had a recurrence: two had a depressive episode, and four had a manic episode (p = 0.069 for new episode, p = 0.006 for polarity of the episode. Patients with treatment-emergent affective switch relapsed in a shorter period than patients with spontaneous mania (p = 0.016. CONCLUSIONS: In this first prospective study, treatment-emergent affective switch patients were at greater risk of relapses, especially depressive episodes, and presented a shorter duration of remission when compared with patients with spontaneous mania.OBJETIVO: A ciclagem para mania associada ao antidepressivo tem sido relacionada à aceleração do ciclo e pior evolução, mas há poucos estudos na literatura sobre este assunto. O objetivo deste estudo foi comparar prospectivamente a evolução de pacientes com mania associada a antidepressivo com pacientes com mania espontânea, em relação a tempo para recaída e polaridade do novo episódio. MÉTODO: Vinte e quatro pacientes com transtorno bipolar, de acordo com os crit

  19. Obsessive-Compulsive-Bipolar Disorder Comorbidity: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Pedro Ribeiro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders have been described as features of Bipolar Disorder (BD, and Obsessive-compulsive-bipolar disorder (OCBD may occur in as many as 56% of obsessive-compulsive patients. Mania in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD can occur either as an independent comorbidity or as a result of an antidepressant-induced switch. We report the case of a 38-year-old male with a 3 year diagnosis of OCD treated with antidepressants, admitted due to a manic episode, and describe diagnostic and treatment challenges of this comorbidity.

  20. The enduring psychosocial consequences of mania and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coryell, W; Scheftner, W; Keller, M; Endicott, J; Maser, J; Klerman, G L

    1993-05-01

    The authors sought to determine the scope, severity, and persistence of psychosocial impairment arising from bipolar and unipolar affective disorder. Patients with bipolar (N = 148) or unipolar (N = 240) major affective disorder were assessed as they sought treatment and again after a 5-year follow-up. Concurrently, parents, siblings, and adult children underwent similar assessments and were followed for 6 years. To quantify the impact of affective disorder, probands were individually matched to relatives who had no lifetime history of affective disorder. Sixty-nine relatives who were depressed at intake constituted a separate, nonclinical study group and were also matched to relatives who were well. Both unipolar and bipolar patients began follow-up with deficits in annual income. Relative to comparison subjects, affective disorder groups were significantly more likely to report declines in job status and income at the end of follow-up and significantly less likely to report improvements. Similarly, both bipolar and unipolar patients showed significant deficits in nearly all other areas of psychosocial functioning measured at follow-up. Except for relationships with spouses, deficits did not differ significantly by polarity. Surprisingly, probands with recovery sustained throughout the final 2 years of follow-up also showed severe and widespread impairment. Relatives with major depression exhibited substantial deficits on follow-up, but job status and income were not significantly affected. The psychosocial impairment associated with mania and major depression extends to essentially all areas of functioning and persists for years, even among individuals who experience sustained resolution of clinical symptoms.

  1. A Case of ChroniC Mania in a Patient with A Double Diagnosis of Bipolar I and Delusional Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Teles Martins

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe the case of a 62 year old woman without any significant personal or family psychiatric history prior to being 52, when after a minor head trauma occurring during worktime, she started showing delusional ideas of hypochondri- ac and somatic content believing to have developed a “problem in the head”. Two years later she was admitted to a Psychiatric inpatient unit and diagnosed with a delusional disorder of the somatic subtype. At discharge she maintained the delusional ideas, which, however, were encapsulated from her personality and quiescent, while exhibiting no insight into her psychopatho- logical state. Very shortly thereafter, at follow-up in the outpatient clinic, she stopped all drug therapy (oral antipsychotic drugs. One year later, she was readmitted to the inpatient unit upon worsening of the hypochondriac and somatic delusional ideas. The prescribed medication was switched to depot injection, which she also stopped shortly thereafter. Three years later, being 58 years of age, she began to show manic symptoms of crescendo severity (grandiose delusion-like ideas, elated mood, overactivity, disinhibition, acceleration of thinking, reduced need for sleep and increased pres- sure of speech. This clinical condition gets worse, with persecutory delusional ideas and complex auditory hallucinations and she was admitted to the inpatient unit once more. This time she presents a full manic episode and a Bipolar I affective disorder diagnosis was made. She had a hyperthymic pre-morbid temperament. For the next 4 years, the patient remained somewhat stable with elation of mood, grandiose ideas, increased pressure of speech, eccen- tric clothing and lack of insight to her psychopathological state. Since the beginning of follow up, the patient always kept poor treatment compliance. The authors discuss the evolution and clinical significance of a particular and infrequent type of Bipolar Disorder, chronic mania.

  2. O transtorno bipolar na mulher Bipolar disorder in women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandro de Borja Gonçalves Guerra

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Diferenças sexuais, descritas em vários transtornos psiquiátricos, também parecem estar presentes no transtorno afetivo bipolar (TAB. A prevalência do TAB tipo I se distribui igualmente entre mulheres e homens. Mulheres parecem estar sujeitas a um risco maior de ciclagem rápida e mania mista, condições que fariam do TAB um transtorno com curso mais prejudicial no sexo feminino. Uma diátese depressiva mais marcante, uso excessivo de antidepressivos e diferenças hormonais surgem como hipóteses para explicar essas diferenças fenomenológicas, apesar das quais, mulheres e homens parecem responder igualmente ao tratamento medicamentoso. A indicação de anticonvulsivantes como primeira escolha em mulheres é controversa, a não ser para o tratamento da mania mista e, talvez, da ciclagem rápida. O tratamento do TAB na gravidez deve levar em conta tanto os riscos de exposição aos medicamentos quanto à doença materna. A profilaxia do TAB no puerpério está fortemente indicada em decorrência do grande risco de recorrência da doença nesse período. Embora, de modo geral, as medicações psicotrópicas estejam contra-indicadas durante a amamentação, entre os estabilizadores do humor, a carbamazepina e o valproato são mais seguros do que o lítio. Mais estudos são necessários para a confirmação das diferenças de curso do TAB entre mulheres e homens e a investigação de possíveis diferenças na efetividade dos tratamentos.Gender differences, described in several psychiatric disorders, seem to be also present in bipolar disorder (BD. The prevalence of bipolar I disorder is equally distributed between women and men. Women seem to be at higher risk for rapid cycling and mixed mania, conditions that could make BD a disorder with a more severe course in the female sex. A marked depressive diathesis among women, greatest use of antidepressants and hormonal differences have been mentioned as hypotheses to explain these

  3. Differences in clinical presentation between bipolar I and II disorders in the early stages of bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinberg, Maj; Mikkelsen, Rie Lambaek; Kirkegaard, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Aim In a naturalistic clinical study of patients in the early stages of bipolar disorders the aim was to assess differences between patients with bipolar I (BD I) and bipolar II (BD II) disorders on clinical characteristics including affective symptoms, subjective cognitive complaints, functional...... level, the presence of comorbid personality disorders and coping strategies. Methods Diagnoses were confirmed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders. Clinical symptoms were rated with the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and functional status using...... Inventory for Stressful Situations. Results In total, 344 patients were included (BD I (n=163) and BD II (n=181). Patients with BD II presented with significantly more depressive symptoms, more cognitive complaints, lower overall functioning, and a higher prevalence of comorbid personality disorders...

  4. Is the Higher Number of Suicide Attempts in Bipolar Disorder vs. Major Depressive Disorder Attributable to Illness Severity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Matthew S; Balthrop, Tia; Pulido, Alejandro; Rudd, M David; Joiner, Thomas E

    2018-01-01

    The present study represents an early stage investigation into the phenomenon whereby those with bipolar disorder attempt suicide more frequently than those with unipolar depression, but do not tend to attempt suicide during mania. Data for this study were obtained from baseline measurements collected in a randomized treatment study at a major southwestern United States military medical center. We demonstrated the rarity of suicide attempts during mania, the higher frequency of suicide attempts in those with bipolar disorder compared to those with depression, and the persistence of effects after accounting for severity of illness. These results provide the impetus for the development and testing of theoretical explanations.

  5. The manic phase of Bipolar disorder significantly impairs theory of mind decoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawken, Emily R; Harkness, Kate L; Lazowski, Lauren K; Summers, David; Khoja, Nida; Gregory, James Gardner; Milev, Roumen

    2016-05-30

    Bipolar disorder is associated with significant deficits in the decoding of others' mental states in comparison to healthy participants. However, differences in theory of mind decoding ability among patients in manic, depressed, and euthymic phases of bipolar disorder is currently unknown. Fifty-nine patients with bipolar I or II disorder (13 manic, 25 depressed, 20 euthymic) completed the "Reading the Mind in the Eyes" Task (Eyes task) and the Animals Task developed to control for non-mentalistic response demands of the Eyes Task. Patients also completed self-report and clinician-rated measures of depression, mania, and anxiety symptoms. Patients in the manic phase were significantly less accurate than those in the depressed and euthymic phases at decoding mental states in the Eyes task, and this effect was strongest for eyes of a positive or neutral valence. Further Eyes task performance was negatively correlated with the symptoms of language/thought disorder, pressured speech, and disorganized thoughts and appearance. These effects held when controlling for accuracy on the Animals task, response times, and relevant demographic and clinical covariates. Results suggest that the state of mania, and particularly psychotic symptoms that may overlap with the schizophrenia spectrum, are most strongly related to social cognitive deficits in bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Electroconvulsive therapy for manic state with mixed and psychotic features in a teenager with bipolar disorder and comorbid episodic obsessive-compulsive disorder: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rask, Olof; Suneson, Klara; Holmström, Eva; Bäckström, Beata; Johansson, Björn Axel

    2017-12-12

    Comorbidity of bipolar disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder is common in adolescence. Obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms may be episodic and secondary to alterations in mood, and display specific features. Management of pediatric bipolar disorder-obsessive-compulsive disorder is challenging, as pharmacotherapy of obsessive-compulsive disorder may induce or exacerbate manic episodes and there is limited evidence of treatment efficacy. Electroconvulsive therapy is sparsely used in children and adolescents, but is documented to be a safe and efficacious intervention in adults with bipolar disorder. In view of the severity of symptoms in juvenile mania, studies on treatment strategies are warranted. We report a case of an adolescent with bipolar disorder-obsessive-compulsive disorder who was successfully treated with electroconvulsive therapy during an episode of severe mania. A 16-year-old girl of Middle East origin first presented to us with depressed mood, irritability, and increased obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms, which were initially interpreted in the context of acute stress secondary to migration. She had been diagnosed with bipolar disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder in her previous home country, but had difficulties in accounting for earlier psychiatric history. During hospitalization her mood switched to a manic state with mixed and psychotic features, at times showing aggression toward others. Interruption in her lithium treatment for a short period and possibly the introduction of an atypical antipsychotic could in part have been triggering factors. After 8 weeks of in-patient care and psychotropic drug trials, electroconvulsive therapy was initiated and administered every second or third day for 4 weeks, with marked positive response. No apparent side effects were reported. This case demonstrates the need for a detailed medical history, taking special note of periodicity and character of obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms, in

  7. Sibutramine-induced mania as the first manifestation of bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Simonienko, Katarzyna; Zalewska, Anna; Szulc, Agata; Ładny, Jerzy Robert; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2012-05-18

    Sibutramine, used in obesity treatment, has been associated with many neuropsychiatric side effects including hypomanic and manic episodes. Hypomanic/manic episodes related to sibutramine treatment were earlier reported in patients who had previous history of bipolar disorder, after sibutramine overdose, after over-the-counter product illegally containing very high dose of sibutramine, together with psychotic symptoms, in organic patient, or after interaction of sibutramine with other drugs. We report the first case of a patient with clear manic episode, after treatment with recommended dose of sibutramine, without previous history of mood disorders, organic changes or drug interactions, that was followed by episode of depression. Minimal recommended dose of sibutramine induced manic episode that was the first manifestation of bipolar disorder. The manic episode, associated with sibutramine treatment, was induced in a person without previous history of mood disorders. Potential risks associated with the treatment of obesity using sibutramine warn physicians to be alert not only to common and cardiovascular but also to psychiatric adverse effects. A careful assessment of patient's mental state and detailed psychiatric family history should be done before sibutramine treatment. In patients with a family history for bipolar disorder the use of even minimal dose of sibutramine should be contraindicated.

  8. Sibutramine-induced mania as the first manifestation of bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waszkiewicz Napoleon

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sibutramine, used in obesity treatment, has been associated with many neuropsychiatric side effects including hypomanic and manic episodes. Hypomanic/manic episodes related to sibutramine treatment were earlier reported in patients who had previous history of bipolar disorder, after sibutramine overdose, after over-the-counter product illegally containing very high dose of sibutramine, together with psychotic symptoms, in organic patient, or after interaction of sibutramine with other drugs. Case presentation We report the first case of a patient with clear manic episode, after treatment with recommended dose of sibutramine, without previous history of mood disorders, organic changes or drug interactions, that was followed by episode of depression. Conclusion Minimal recommended dose of sibutramine induced manic episode that was the first manifestation of bipolar disorder. The manic episode, associated with sibutramine treatment, was induced in a person without previous history of mood disorders. Potential risks associated with the treatment of obesity using sibutramine warn physicians to be alert not only to common and cardiovascular but also to psychiatric adverse effects. A careful assessment of patient’s mental state and detailed psychiatric family history should be done before sibutramine treatment. In patients with a family history for bipolar disorder the use of even minimal dose of sibutramine should be contraindicated.

  9. Antidepressants for bipolar disorder A meta-analysis of randomized, double-blind, controlled trials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yingli Zhang; Huan Yang; Shichang Yang; Wei Liang; Ping Dai; Changhong Wang; Yalin Zhang

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the efficacy and safety of short-term and long-term use of antidepres-sants in the treatment of bipolar disorder. DATA SOURCES:A literature search of randomized, double-blind, control ed trials published until December 2012 was performed using the PubMed, ISI Web of Science, Medline and Cochrane Central Register of Control ed Trials databases. The keywords“bipolar disorder, bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, bipolar mania, bipolar depression, cyclothymia, mixed mania and depression, rapid cycling and bipolar disorder”, AND “antidepressant agent, antidepressive agents second-generation, antidepressive agents tricyclic, monoamine oxidase inhibitor, noradrenaline uptake in-hibitor, serotonin uptake inhibitor, and tricyclic antidepressant agent” were used. The studies that were listed in the reference list of the published papers but were not retrieved in the above-mentioned databases were supplemented. STUDY SELECTION: Studies selected were double-blind randomized control ed trials assessing the efficacy and safety of antidepressants in patients with bipolar disorder. Al participants were aged 18 years or older, and were diagnosed as having primary bipolar disorder. Antidepressants or antidepressants combined with mood stabilizers were used in experimental interventions. Placebos, mood stabilizers, antipsychotics and other antide pressants were used in the control interventions. Studies that were quasi-randomized studies, or used antidepressants in combination with antipsy-chotics in the experimental group were excluded. Al analyses were conducted using Review Man-ager 5.1 provided by the Cochrane Col aboration. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:The primary outcome was the response and switching to mania. The secondary outcomes included remission, discontinuation rate, and suicidality. RESULTS: Among 5 001 treatment studies published, 14 double-blind randomized control ed trials involving 1 244 patients were included in the meta

  10. Voice analysis as an objective state marker in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, M.; Busk, Jonas; Frost, M.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in speech have been suggested as sensitive and valid measures of depression and mania in bipolar disorder. The present study aimed at investigating (1) voice features collected during phone calls as objective markers of affective states in bipolar disorder and (2) if combining voice...... features, automatically generated objective smartphone data on behavioral activities and electronic self-monitored data were collected from 28 outpatients with bipolar disorder in naturalistic settings on a daily basis during a period of 12 weeks. Depressive and manic symptoms were assessed using...... and electronic self-monitored data increased the accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of classification of affective states slightly. Voice features collected in naturalistic settings using smartphones may be used as objective state markers in patients with bipolar disorder....

  11. Effect of the new antiepileptic drug retigabine in a rodent model of mania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dencker, Ditte; Dias, Rebecca; Pedersen, Mette Lund

    2008-01-01

    Bipolar spectrum disorders are severe chronic mood disorders that are characterized by episodes of mania or hypomania and depression. Because patients with manic symptoms often experience clinical benefit from treatment with anticonvulsant drugs, it was hypothesized that retigabine, a novel...... compound with anticonvulsant efficacy, may also possess antimanic activity. The amphetamine (AMPH)+chlordiazepoxide (CDP)-induced hyperactivity model has been proposed as a suitable model for studying antimanic-like activity of novel compounds in mice and rats. The aims of the present study in rats were...

  12. Nationwide and population-based prescription patterns in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Vradi, Eleni; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to describe prescription patterns and changes in these patterns over the last decade for patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder in mental healthcare, using population-based and nationwide data, and to relate the findings to recommendations from...... international guidelines. METHODS: A population-based, nationwide study was carried out. It included register-based longitudinal data on all patients with a first-ever contact with mental healthcare with a diagnosis of mania/bipolar disorder from the entire Danish population, and all prescription data...

  13. Fluctuating capacity and advance decision-making in Bipolar Affective Disorder - Self-binding directives and self-determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergel, Tania; Owen, Gareth S

    2015-01-01

    For people with Bipolar Affective Disorder, a self-binding (advance) directive (SBD), by which they commit themselves to treatment during future episodes of mania, even if unwilling, can seem the most rational way to deal with an imperfect predicament. Knowing that mania will almost certainly cause enormous damage to themselves, their preferred solution may well be to allow trusted others to enforce treatment and constraint, traumatic though this may be. No adequate provision exists for drafting a truly effective SBD and efforts to establish such provision are hampered by very valid, but also paralysing ethical, clinical and legal concerns. Effectively, the autonomy and rights of people with bipolar are being 'protected' through being denied an opportunity to protect themselves. From a standpoint firmly rooted in the clinical context and experience of mania, this article argues that an SBD, based on a patient-centred evaluation of capacity to make treatment decisions (DMC-T) and grounded within the clinician-patient relationship, could represent a legitimate and ethically coherent form of self-determination. After setting out background information on fluctuating capacity, mania and advance directives, this article proposes a framework for constructing such an SBD, and considers common objections, possible solutions and suggestions for future research. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Improving Clinical Prediction of Bipolar Spectrum Disorders in Youth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas W. Frazier

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This report evaluates whether classification tree algorithms (CTA may improve the identification of individuals at risk for bipolar spectrum disorders (BPSD. Analyses used the Longitudinal Assessment of Manic Symptoms (LAMS cohort (629 youth, 148 with BPSD and 481 without BPSD. Parent ratings of mania symptoms, stressful life events, parenting stress, and parental history of mania were included as risk factors. Comparable overall accuracy was observed for CTA (75.4% relative to logistic regression (77.6%. However, CTA showed increased sensitivity (0.28 vs. 0.18 at the expense of slightly decreased specificity and positive predictive power. The advantage of CTA algorithms for clinical decision making is demonstrated by the combinations of predictors most useful for altering the probability of BPSD. The 24% sample probability of BPSD was substantially decreased in youth with low screening and baseline parent ratings of mania, negative parental history of mania, and low levels of stressful life events (2%. High screening plus high baseline parent-rated mania nearly doubled the BPSD probability (46%. Future work will benefit from examining additional, powerful predictors, such as alternative data sources (e.g., clinician ratings, neurocognitive test data; these may increase the clinical utility of CTA models further.

  15. Superior anti-suicidal effects of electroconvulsive therapy in unipolar disorder and bipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chih-Sung; Chung, Chi-Hsiang; Ho, Pei-Shen; Tsai, Chia-Kuang; Chien, Wu-Chien

    2017-12-11

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has long been believed to reduce suicidal tendencies in patients with affective disorders; however, ECT recipients, who constitute the most severely ill and suicidal patients, are not eligible to participate in head-to-head randomized controlled trials. Large-scale studies are required to investigate the anti-suicidal effects of ECT vs psychopharmacotherapy. A nationwide retrospective cohort study design was used. Data were obtained from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. Inpatients with unipolar disorder or bipolar disorder who received ECT (n = 487) were observed from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2013 for suicide events. The non-ECT control cohort consisted of inpatients with psychopharmacotherapy randomly matched (ratio, 1:4) by age, sex, and diagnosis. After potential confounds had been accounted for, the adjusted hazard ratio (HR) was 0.803, indicating that ECT recipients showed a 19.7% lower risk of suicide than control individuals. The stratum-specific adjusted HR was 0.79 in patients with unipolar disorder (P = .041) and 0.923 in patients with bipolar disorder (P = .254). Upon further stratification of the patients with bipolar disorder by their affective states, the adjusted HR was 0.805 (P = .046) for bipolar depression, 1.048 for bipolar mania (P = .538), and 0.976 for mixed bipolar state (P = .126). Compared with psychopharmacotherapy, ECT exerted superior anti-suicidal effects in patients with unipolar disorder and bipolar depression; however, there was a lack of superior anti-suicidal effects of ECT in the treatment of patients with bipolar mania and mixed state. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Incidence, prevalence and clinical correlates of antidepressant-emergent mania in bipolar depression: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornaro, Michele; Anastasia, Annalisa; Novello, Stefano; Fusco, Andrea; Solmi, Marco; Monaco, Francesco; Veronese, Nicola; De Berardis, Domenico; de Bartolomeis, Andrea

    2018-05-01

    Treatment-emergent mania (TEM) represents a common phenomenon inconsistently reported across primary studies, warranting further assessment. A systematic review and meta-analysis following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) and Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (MOOSE) guidelines were conducted. Major electronic databases were searched from inception to May 2017 to assess the incidence and prevalence rates and clinical features associated with manic switch among bipolar depressed patients receiving antidepressants, using meta-regression and subgroup analysis. Overall, 10 098 depressed patients with bipolar disorder (BD) across 51 studies/arms were included in the quantitative analysis. The cumulative incidence of cases (TEM + ) among 4767 patients with BD over 15 retrospective studies was 30.9% (95% confidence interval [CI] 19.6-45.0%, I 2  = 97.9%). The cumulative incidence of TEM + among 1929 patients with BD over 12 prospective open studies was 14.4% (95% CI 7.4-26.1%, I 2  = 93.7%). The cumulative incidence of TEM + among 1316 patients with BD over 20 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) was 11.8% (95% CI 8.4-16.34%, I 2  = 73.46%). The pooled prevalence of TEM + among 2086 patients with BD over four cross-sectional studies was 30.9% (95% CI 18.1-47.4%, I 2  = 95.6%). Overall, concurrent lithium therapy predicted the lowest TEM rates. Inconsistent operational definitions of TEM were recorded, and the lack of information about age, sex, co-occurring anxiety, and other clinically relevant moderators precluded further stratification of the results. Rates of TEM vary primarily depending on study setting, which is concordant with the high degree of heterogeneity of the included records. Forthcoming RCT studies should adopt consistent operational definitions of TEM and broaden the number of moderators, in order to contribute most effectively to the identification of clear-cut sub-phenotypes of

  17. The influence of genes and environment on the development of bipolar disorder: A twin study

    OpenAIRE

    Vonk, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (or manic-depressive disorder) is a severe mood disorder in which episodes of (hypo) mania (e.g. elevated mood en hyperactivity) and depression (e.g. decreased mood and reduced activity) alternate with periods of normal mood and functioning. Genetic factors as well as environmental factors play a role in the development of bipolar disorder. A serious problem for bipolar disorder is a delay of several years between the first mood episode(s) and the diagnosis. Afterwards it can...

  18. Pharmacotherapy of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Lauxen Peruzzolo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To review the options for acute and maintenance pharmacological treatment of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents, including the treatment of bipolar depression and comorbid attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Methods: Narrative review of randomized clinical trials and open-label studies published from 2000 to 2012. The PubMed and PsycINFO websites were queried. Case series were included when a higher level of evidence was not available. Results: Published data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs in acute mania/hypomania with significant responses are available for lithium, topiramate, risperidone, olanzapine, and aripiprazole. Open trials of lithium and lamotrigine show that these drugs may be effective in the treatment of depressive episodes. No trials of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs have been conducted. In the treatment of comorbid ADHD, there are encouraging findings with mixed amphetamine salts and atomoxetine; conflicting results are observed with methylphenidate. Conclusions: Published RCTs of traditional mood stabilizers are scarce, but the best available evidence (results from meta-analytic regression suggests that second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs as a group are more effective in reducing manic symptoms. Risperidone was the only one included in head-to-head comparisons (vs. lithium and divalproex, showing superiority in terms of efficacy, but with more metabolic side effects, which were also more common in most of the SGAs. There are few studies addressing the treatment of ADHD and depression. Brazilian guidelines for the treatment of pediatric bipolar disorder should also include some SGAs (especially risperidone and aripiprazole as first-line treatment, and these drugs should be provided by the public health services.

  19. Cell therapy in the treatment of bipolar mania in an animal model: a proof of concept study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna M. Ascoli

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The rationale of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs as a novel therapeutic approach in certain neurodegenerative diseases is based on their ability to promote neurogenesis. Hippocampal atrophy has been related to bipolar disorder (BD in preclinical, imaging and postmortem studies. Therefore, the development of new strategies to stimulate the neurogenesis process in BD is crucial. Objectives To investigate the behavioral and neurochemical changes induced by transplantation of MSCs in a model of mania-like behavior induced by lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX. Methods Wistar rats (n=65 received one oral daily dose of LDX (10 mg/kg or saline for 14 days. On the 8th day of treatment, the animals additionally received intrahippocampal saline or MSC (1 µL containing 25,000 cells or lithium (47.5 mg/kg as an internal experimental control. Two hours after the last administration, behavioral and neurochemical analyses were performed. Results LDX-treated rats had increased locomotor activity compared to saline-saline rats (p=0.004, and lithium reversed LDX-related hyperactive behavior (p0.05 in the hippocampus of rats. Conclusion Even though these results suggest that a single intrahippocampal injection of MSCs was not helpful to treat hyperactivity induced by LDX and neither influenced BDNF secretion, we cannot rule out the possible therapeutic effects of MSCs. Further research is required to determine direct effects of LDX on brain structures as well as in other pathophysiological targets related to BD.

  20. Risperidone and Divalproex Differentially Engage the Fronto-Striato-Temporal Circuitry in Pediatric Mania: A Pharmacological Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavuluri, Mani N.; Passarotti, Alessandra M.; Fitzgerald, Jacklynn M.; Wegbreit, Ezra; Sweeney, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The current study examined the impact of risperidone and divalproex on affective and working memory circuitry in patients with pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD). Method: This was a six-week, double-blind, randomized trial of risperidone plus placebo versus divalproex plus placebo for patients with mania (n = 21; 13.6 [plus or minus] 2.5…

  1. Diagnosis and characterization of mania: Quantifying increased energy and activity in the human behavioral pattern monitor

    OpenAIRE

    Perry, William; McIlwain, Meghan; Kloezeman, Karen; Henry, Brook L.; Minassian, Arpi

    2016-01-01

    Increased energy or activity is now an essential feature of the mania of Bipolar Disorder (BD) according to DSM-5. This study examined whether objective measures of increased energy can differentiate manic BD individuals and provide greater diagnostic accuracy compared to rating scales, extending the work of previous studies with smaller samples. We also tested the relationship between objective measures of energy and rating scales. 50 hospitalized manic BD patients were compared to healthy s...

  2. [The epidemiology of suicide in bipolar disorder in the manic episode--preliminary reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzbiński, Piotr; Zdanowicz, Anna; Klekowska, Justyna; Broniarczyk-Czarniak, Marta; Zboralski, Krzysztof

    2014-04-01

    Suicide is among ten leading causes of death in each country and the third most common cause of death in the age group 16-35. The presence of mental illness is the most important risk factor for suicide. Affective disorders contribute to 15-25% of deaths due to suicide attempts. Depression is the most likely cause of the patients attempt on his life. Contrary to popular opinion, manic episode can also increase the risk of suicide, especially if the patient dominates by productive symptoms in the form of delusions. The aim of study was to determine the frequency of suicide attempts and their determinants in an episode of mania in bipolar disorder. The study included 16 people with a diagnosed bipolar disorder, hospitalized with manic episode at the age of 28-76. Patients hospitalized in the Department of Adult Psychiatry were selected randomly. The number of suicide attempts, comorbid conditions, and basic epidemiological data were estimated. Five patients declared suicide attempt, one of which wanted to make more than one attempt at suicide. 3 people took it during an episode of depression, two in an episode of mania. The methods of suicide were associated with an overdose of medication and this was accompanied by a greater amount of alcohol intake. 11 persons did not declare any willingness to attempt suicide. A mania episode did not increase the risk of suicide in bipolar disorder compared to an episode of depression in the study conducted. The importance of somatic illness in patients with bipolar disorder is increased if the suicide attempt occurs in an episode of depression. Alcohol abuse showed no negative effects on suicidal behavior of patients. During abuse was the most common way of commit suicide.

  3. The relationship of manic episodes and drug abuse to sexual risk behavior in patients with co-occurring bipolar and substance use disorders: a 15-month prospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Christina S; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; Sanchez, Amy K; Griffin, Margaret L; McDonald, Leah J; Weiss, Roger D

    2011-11-01

    Risky sexual behavior is common among individuals with bipolar and substance use disorders. This 15-month prospective study examined the effects of between-subject differences and within-subject changes in mood symptoms and drug use on sexual risk behavior among 61 patients with both disorders. Participants completed five post-treatment follow-up assessments at 3-month intervals. Using a multivariate mixed-effects model analysis, more average weeks of mania (between-subject difference) was associated with greater sexual risk, but change in weeks of mania (within-subject change) was not; depression was unrelated to sexual risk. In addition, within-subject increases in days of cocaine use predicted increases in sexual risk. Results underscore the importance of substance abuse treatment and suggest that bipolar patients with active and/or recurrent mania are in need of targeted HIV prevention services. Further research is needed to test whether individual differences in impulsivity may explain the association between mania and sexual risk.

  4. Do young adults with bipolar disorder benefit from early intervention?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Hansen, Hanne Vibe; Christensen, Ellen Margrethe

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is unknown whether young adults with bipolar disorder are able to benefit from early intervention combining optimised pharmacological treatment and group psychoeducation. The aim of the present report was to compare the effects of early intervention among patients with bipolar...... disorder aged 18-25 years to that of patients aged 26 years or older. METHODS: Patients were randomised to early treatment in a specialised outpatient mood disorder clinic versus standard care. The primary outcome was risk of psychiatric re-hospitalisation. RESULTS: A total of 158 patients with mania/bipolar...... different, the observed differences of the point estimates was surprisingly larger for young adults suggesting that young adults with bipolar disorder may benefit even more than older adults from early intervention combining pharmacological treatment and group psychoeducation....

  5. Early Intervention for Symptomatic Youth at Risk for Bipolar Disorder: A Randomized Trial of Family-Focused Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklowitz, David J.; Schneck, Christopher D.; Singh, Manpreet K.; Taylor, Dawn O.; George, Elizabeth L.; Cosgrove, Victoria E.; Howe, Meghan E.; Dickinson, L. Miriam; Garber, Judy; Chang, Kiki D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Depression and brief periods of (hypo)mania are linked to an increased risk of progression to bipolar I or II disorder (BD) in children of bipolar parents. This randomized trial examined the effects of a 4-month family-focused therapy (FFT) program on the 1-year course of mood symptoms in youth at high familial risk for BD, and explored…

  6. Transtorno bipolar do humor e gênero Bipolar affective disorder and gender

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo da Silva Dias

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Embora o transtorno bipolar (TB ocorra quase igualmente em ambos os sexos, a fenomenologia e o curso da doença diferem no homem e na mulher. No entanto, há evidências de que mulheres bipolares, mais que os homens, apresentariam início mais tardio (em especial na quinta década de vida, ciclagem rápida, mais episódios depressivos, mais mania disfórica que eufórica, estados mistos e evolução do tipo bipolar II, ainda que os achados nem sempre sejam consistentes. Embora o risco de comorbidades no TB inclua, para ambos os gêneros, abuso de álcool e drogas, homens bipolares teriam maior probabilidade de ser alcoolistas, não procurar tratamento e de se suicidar. Hipóteses sugeridas para explicar tais diferenças variam daquelas centradas em aspectos culturais ou psicológicos para as que focalizam os sistemas hormonais, como os esteróides gonadais ou o eixo tireoidiano, e até mesmo a anatomia cerebral. A influência do ciclo reprodutivo (ciclo menstrual, gravidez e menopausa sobre as opções terapêuticas no tratamento do TB é apresentada na última parte desta revisão.Although the bipolar disorder (BD occurs almost with the same frequency in both genders, the phenomenology and the outcome of the illness differ between them. Nevertheless, there is evidence that women with BD show, more than men, delayed beginning, especially in their fifth decade, more rapid cycling outcome, more depressive episodes, more dysphoric mania, more mixed states and more BD type II. Even so, the findings are not always consistent. Although the risk of comorbidities in BD includes, for both the sorts, excessive alcoholic consumption and drugs, bipolar men would have greater probability of being alcohol dependent, of not seeking treatment and of committing suicide. Suggested hypotheses to explain such differences vary from those centered in cultural or psychological aspects to those that focus on the steroids hormones, and other hormones such as cortisol

  7. Distinctions of bipolar disorder symptoms in adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudiene, Devika; Leskauskas, Darius; Markeviciūte, Aurelija; Klimavicius, Dalius; Adomaitiene, Virginija

    2008-01-01

    Bipolar disorder in adolescents is a serious mental illness with problematic diagnosis that adversely affects social, academic, emotional, and family functioning. The objective of this study was to analyze features of premorbid and clinical symptoms, comorbidity, and course of bipolar disorder in adolescence. Data for analysis were collected from all case histories (N=6) of 14-18-year-old patients, hospitalized with diagnosis of bipolar disorder in the Unit of Children's and Adolescents' Psychiatry, Department of Psychiatry, Hospital of Kaunas University of Medicine, during the period from 2000 to 2005. Analysis of bipolar disorder course showed that five patients previously had been diagnosed with an episode of depression. The most frequent symptoms typical to bipolar disorder were disobedience and impulsive behavior, rapid changes of mood. The most common premorbid features were frequent changes of mood, being active in communication, hyperactive behavior. Adolescence-onset bipolar disorder was frequently comorbid with emotionally instable personality disorder, borderline type. Findings of the study confirm the notion that oppositional or impulsive behavior, rapid changes of mood without any reason, dysphoric mood and euphoric mood episodes with increased energy were cardinal symptoms of bipolar disorder with mania in adolescents. Most frequent premorbid features of these patients were quite similar to attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder making differential diagnosis problematic.

  8. A composite peripheral blood gene expression measure as a potential diagnostic biomarker in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Klaus; Peijs, L; Vinberg, M

    2015-01-01

    as a diagnostic and state biomarker in bipolar disorder. First, messenger RNA levels of 19 candidate genes were assessed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 37 rapid cycling bipolar disorder patients in different affective states (depression, mania and euthymia) during a 6-12-month period and in 40 age...... subjects. In patients with bipolar disorder, upregulation of NDUFV2 was observed in a depressed state compared with a euthymic state. The composite gene expression measure for discrimination between patients and healthy control subjects on the basis of 19 genes generated an area under the receiver...

  9. Efficacy of cognitive-behavioral therapy in patients with bipolar disorder: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Kai-Jo; Tsai, Jui-Chen; Liu, Doresses; Lin, Chueh-Ho; Chiu, Huei-Ling; Chou, Kuei-Ru

    2017-01-01

    Although cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is considered a promising adjuvant to pharmacotherapy for treating bipolar disorder (BD), its efficacy is unproven. The present review and meta-analysis evaluated the treatment outcomes of patients with BD treated with CBT plus medication and compared these data with the outcomes of those who received standard care alone. Electronic searches from inception to July 31, 2016, were performed using PubMed, Medline OVID, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, CINAHL plus, and PsycINFO. In the extensive electronic literature search, keywords such as "bipolar disorder," "manic-depressive psychosis," "bipolar affective disorder," "bipolar depression," "cognitive therapy," "cognitive-behavioral therapy," and "psychotherapy" were transformed into MeSH terms, and only randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were included. The pooled odds ratios (ORs) of relapse rates and Hedges's g, along with 95% confidence intervals (CIs), for the mean differences in the levels of depression, mania, and psychosocial functioning were calculated. Further subgroup analyses were conducted according to the characteristics of the CBT approaches, patients, and therapists, if the data were available. A total of 19 RCTs comprising 1384 patients with type I or II BD were enrolled in our systematic review and meta-analysis. The main analysis revealed that CBT could lower the relapse rate (pooled OR = 0.506; 95% CI = 0.278 -0.921) and improve depressive symptoms (g = -0.494; 95% CI = -0.963 to -0.026), mania severity (g = -0.581; 95% CI = -1.127 to -0.035), and psychosocial functioning (g = 0.457; 95% CI = 0.106-0.809). CBT is effective in decreasing the relapse rate and improving depressive symptoms, mania severity, and psychosocial functioning, with a mild-to-moderate effect size. Subgroup analyses indicated that improvements in depression or mania are more potent with a CBT treatment duration of ≥90 min per session, and the relapse rate is much lower among patients with

  10. Bipolar disorder and related mood states are not associated with endothelial function of small arteries in adults without heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Brian; Abosi, Oluchi; Schmitz, Samantha; Myers, Janie; Pierce, Gary L; Fiedorowicz, Jess G

    Individuals with bipolar disorder are at increased risk for adverse cardiovascular disease (CVD) events. This study aimed to assess endothelial function and wave reflection, a risk factor for CVD, as measured by finger plethysmography in bipolar disorder to investigate whether CVD risk was higher in bipolar disorder and altered during acute mood episodes. We hypothesized that EndoPAT would detect a lower reactive hyperemia index (RHI) and higher augmentation index (AIX) in individuals with bipolar disorder compared with controls. Second, we predicted lower RHI and higher AIX during acute mood episodes. Reactive hyperemia index and augmentation index, measures of microvascular endothelial function and arterial pressure wave reflection respectively, were assessed using the EndoPAT 2000 device in a sample of 56 participants with a DSM-IV diagnosis of bipolar I disorder with 82 measures spanning different mood states (mania, depression, euthymia) and cross-sectionally in 26 healthy controls. RHI and AIX were not different between adults with and without bipolar disorder (mean age 40.3 vs. 41.2years; RHI: 2.04±0.67 vs. 2.05±0.51; AIX@75 (AIX adjusted for heart rate of 75): 1.4±19.7 vs. 0.8±22.4). When modeled in linear mixed models with a random intercept (to account for repeated observations of persons with bipolar disorder) and adjusting for age and sex, there were no significant differences between those with bipolar disorder and controls (p=0.89 for RHI; p=0.85 for AIX@75). Microvascular endothelial function and wave reflection estimated by finger plethysmography were unable to detect differences between adults with and without bipolar disorder or changes with mood states. Future research is necessary to identify more proximal and sensitive, yet relevant, biomarkers of abnormal mood-related influences on CVD risk or must target higher risk samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A Cross-sectional, Comparative Study of Insight in Schizophrenia and Bipolar Patients in Remission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Arul Saravanan; Ramanathan, Rajkumar; Praharaj, Samir Kumar; Kanradi, Haridas; Sharma, Podila Satya Venkata Narasimha

    2016-01-01

    To study insight correlates in schizophrenia and bipolar mood disorder in remission among out-patients attending the Psychiatry Department of a Tertiary Care Hospital. In a cross-sectional, naturalistic study, adult patients with schizophrenia and bipolar mood disorder in remission (n = 80; schizophrenia-40, mania-20, bipolar depression-20) were compared on insight measures and clinical correlates. Scale to Assess the Unawareness of Mental Disorders (SUMD) was used as the main tool to assess current and past measures of insight. Hogan's Drug Attitude Inventory was used to assess the drug attitude and compliance. Positive and Negative Symptom Scale for Schizophrenia, Young's Mania Rating Scale, and HAMD were used to rate psychopathology. Clinical Global Improvement was used as a screening tool for remission. For comparison of the three clinical groups, analysis of variance and Chi-square test were used. In the post-hoc analysis, the Ryan-Einot-Gabriel-Welsch test was used to find the group difference. About 40% in the schizophrenia group were unaware of their mental illness as against none in the bipolar group. The awareness of mental disorder for the current period, the awareness of the achieved effects of medications, and the awareness of social consequence was better in the bipolar group. The drug attitude (compliant positive attitude) increased as the SUMD item scale decreased or in other words, as the insight improved. Insight, both current and retrospect, showed significant differences between the schizophrenia and bipolar patients. Insight is significantly correlated with the observed compliance and drug attitude of the patient groups.

  12. Reassessing carbamazepine in the treatment of bipolar disorder: clinical implications of new data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiskal, Hagop S; Fuller, Matthew A; Hirschfeld, Robert M A; Keck, Paul E; Ketter, Terence A; Weisler, Richard H

    2005-06-01

    This monograph summarizes the proceedings of a roundtable meeting convened to discuss the role of carbamazepine in the treatment of bipolar disorder, in light of new data and the recent indication of carbamazepine extended-release capsules (CBZ ERC) for use in the treatment of acute manic and mixed episodes. Two lectures were presented, followed by a panel discussion among all 6 participants. A summary of the two pivotal trials of CBZ ERC and their pooled data along with other relevant data is presented first. Next, historical trends of carbamazepine and the agent's use in acute mania, bipolar depression, and maintenance are reviewed, emphasizing clinical implications of efficacy, safety, tolerability, and drug interactions. Finally, the panel discussion provides recommendations for the use of carbamazepine in different phases of the illness, taking into account adverse effects and drug-drug interactions. Panel discussants agree that current data confirm the utility of CBZ ERC as an effective treatment for acute manic and mixed episodes in bipolar disorder. Carbamazepine may also prove to be an option for maintenance treatment. Tolerability of the drug is related to dose and titration, and overall safety limitations regarding carbamazepine usage are comparable to other medications. For some patients, the main challenges to use of carbamazepine may be common drug-drug interactions and increased side effects related to aggressive introduction during treatment of acute manic and mixed episodes. Thus, carbamazepine may be a lower priority option for patients who are taking multiple medications, such as elderly individuals with medical comorbidity, due to the potential for drug interactions. Important benefits of carbamazepine include the low propensity toward weight gain and evidence of good tolerability with long-term treatment. (At present there are no available data from long-term, placebo-controlled studies evaluating the effects of carbamazepine or CBZ ERC on

  13. Hypersexuality and couple relationships in bipolar disorder: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeykina, Irina; Kim, Hae-Joon; Khatun, Tasnia; Boland, Jennifer; Haeri, Sophia; Cohen, Lisa J; Galynker, Igor I

    2016-05-01

    Although change in sexual behavior is recognized as an integral part of bipolar disorder, most of the relevant literature on sexual issues in patients with this illness concerns medication side effects and does not differentiate bipolar disorder from other serious mental disorders. Surprisingly, little has been published on mania-induced hypersexuality and the effects of mood cycling on couple relationships. In this review, we examine the extant literature on both of these subjects and propose a framework for future research. A search of PsycINFO and PubMed was conducted using keywords pertaining to bipolar disorder, hypersexuality and couple relationships. A total of 27 articles were selected for review. Despite lack of uniformity in diagnosis of bipolar disorder and no formal definition of hypersexuality, the literature points to an increased incidence of risky sexual behaviors in bipolar patients during manic episodes compared to patients with other psychiatric diagnoses. Further, it appears that bipolar patients are more similar to healthy controls than to other psychiatric patients when it comes to establishing and maintaining couple relationships. Nonetheless, the studies that examined sexuality in couples with one bipolar partner found decreased levels of sexual satisfaction associated with the diagnosis, varying levels of sexual interest across polarities, increased incidence of sexual dysfunction during depressive episodes, and disparate levels of satisfaction in general between patients and their partners. Due to changes in diagnostic criteria over time, there is a lack of uniformity in the definition of bipolar disorder across studies. Hypersexuality is not systematically defined and therefore the construct was not consistent across studies. Some of the older articles date back more than 30 years, making them subject to the biases of sexual and gender norms that have since become outdated. Finally, the heterogeneity of the samples, which include patients

  14. Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial of Asenapine Maintenance Therapy in Adults With an Acute Manic or Mixed Episode Associated With Bipolar I Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szegedi, Armin; Durgam, Suresh; Mackle, Mary; Yu, Sung Yun; Wu, Xiao; Mathews, Maju; Landbloom, Ronald P

    2018-01-01

    The authors determined the efficacy and safety of asenapine in preventing recurrence of any mood episode in adults with bipolar I disorder. Adults with an acute manic or mixed episode per DSM-IV-TR criteria were enrolled in this randomized, placebo-controlled trial consisting of an initial 12- to 16-week open-label period and a 26-week double-blind randomized withdrawal period. The target asenapine dosage was 10 mg b.i.d. in the open-label period but could be titrated down to 5 mg b.i.d. After completing the open-label period, subjects meeting stabilization/stable-responder criteria were randomized to asenapine or placebo treatment in the double-blind period. The primary efficacy endpoint was time to recurrence of any mood event during the double-blind period. Kaplan-Meier estimation was performed, and 95% confidence intervals were determined. Safety was assessed throughout. A total of 549 subjects entered the open-label period, of whom 253 enrolled in the double-blind randomized withdrawal period (127 in the placebo group; 126 in the asenapine group). Time to recurrence of any mood episode was statistically significantly longer for asenapine- than placebo-treated subjects. In post hoc analyses, significant differences in favor of asenapine over placebo were seen in time to recurrence of manic and depressive episodes. The most common treatment-emergent adverse events were somnolence (10.0%), akathisia (7.7%), and sedation (7.7%) in the open-label period and mania (11.9% of the placebo group compared with 4.0% of the asenapine group) and bipolar I disorder (6.3% compared with 1.6%) in the double-blind period. Long-term treatment with asenapine was more effective than placebo in preventing recurrence of mood events in adults with bipolar I disorder and was generally well-tolerated.

  15. Add-on treatment with N-acetylcysteine for bipolar depression: a 24-week randomized double-blind parallel group placebo-controlled multicentre trial (NACOS-study protocol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellegaard, Pernille Kempel; Licht, Rasmus Wentzer; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Nielsen, René Ernst; Berk, Michael; Dean, Olivia May; Mohebbi, Mohammadreza; Nielsen, Connie Thuroee

    2018-04-05

    Oxidative stress and inflammation may be involved in the development and progression of mood disorders, including bipolar disorder. Currently, there is a scarcity of useful treatment options for bipolar depressive episodes, especially compared with the efficacy of treatment for acute mania. N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) has been explored for psychiatric disorders for some time given its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. The current trial aims at testing the clinical effects of adjunctive NAC treatment (compared to placebo) for bipolar depression. We will also explore the biological effects of NAC in this context. We hypothesize that adjunctive NAC treatment will reduce symptoms of depression, which will be reflected by changes in selected markers of oxidative stress. In the study, we will include adults diagnosed with bipolar disorder, in a currently depressive episode. Participants will undertake a 20-week, adjunctive, randomized, double-blinded, parallel group placebo-controlled trial comparing 3 grams of adjunctive NAC daily with placebo. The primary outcome is the mean change over time from baseline to end of study on the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS). Among the secondary outcomes are mean changes from baseline to end of study on the Bech-Rafaelsen Melancholia Scale (MES), the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), the WHO-Five Well-being Index (WHO-5), the Global Assessment of Functioning scale (GAF-F), the Global Assessment of Symptoms scale (GAF-S) and the Clinical Global Impression-Severity scale (CGI-S). The potential effects on oxidative stress by NAC treatment will be measured through urine and blood samples. DNA will be examined for potential polymorphisms related to oxidative defences. Registered at The European Clinical Trials Database, ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02294591 and The Danish Data Protection Agency: 2008-58-0035.

  16. Revelation, delusion or disillusion: subjective interpretation of religious and spiritual experiences in bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwehand, E.; Wong, K.; Boeije, H.R.; Braam, A.W.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the interpretation of religious and spiritual experiences during mania, depression and recovery, from the perspective of bipolar clients and to inquire into their expectations of treatment in relation to these experiences. For this purpose, a qualitative

  17. Revelation, delusion or disillusion : subjective interpretation of religious and spiritual experiences in bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwehand, Eva; Wong, Kwok; Boeije, Hennie; Braam, Arjan

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the interpretation of religious and spiritual experiences during mania, depression and recovery, from the perspective of bipolar clients and to inquire into their expectations of treatment in relation to these experiences. For this purpose, a qualitative

  18. Revelation, delusion or disillusion: subjective interpretation of religious and spiritual experiences in bipolar disorder.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwehand, E.; Wong, K.; Boeije, H.; Braam, A.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is to explore the interpretation of religious and spiritual experiences during mania, depression and recovery, from the perspective of bipolar clients and to inquire into their expectations of treatment in relation to these experiences. For this purpose, a qualitative

  19. Measurement equivalence of the BDSx scale with young and older adults with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Norm; Bachner, Yaacov G; Canham, Sarah L; Sixsmith, Andrew; Study Team, Badas

    2018-05-01

    Instruments developed for mental health research are commonly devised and validated with young adults only. However, the measurement properties of these scales may differ over the lifespan. For this study, we set out to demonstrate the psychometric equivalence of the BDSx scale with an international sample of young and older adults with bipolar disorder (BD). We independently replicated the 4-factor model of BDSx responses with young and older participants (M = 45.63, range 19-87 years of age); we then compared the psychometric properties between models. This allowed us to compare responses to each BDSx item between groups, and the strength of association among depression and hypo/mania factors (cognitive depressive symptoms, somatic depressive symptoms, affrontive symptoms of hypo/mania, elation/loss of insight). Young and older adults responded to 19 of 20 BDSx items in similar ways. Only responses to the 'talkative' item were significantly higher for younger adults. Correlations between depression and mania factors are statistically indistinguishable between age groups. This suggests that symptoms cluster and present similarly for young and older adults with BD. The BDSx is currently being used for ecological momentary sampling of mood by the BADAS (Bipolar Affective Disorder and older Adults) Study app for iPhone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Peripheral inflammation during abnormal mood states in bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiedorowicz, Jess G; Prossin, Alan R; Johnson, Casey P; Christensen, Gary E; Magnotta, Vincent A; Wemmie, John A

    2015-11-15

    Bipolar disorder carries a substantive morbidity and mortality burden, particularly related to cardiovascular disease. Abnormalities in peripheral inflammatory markers, which have been commonly reported in case-control studies, potentially link these co-morbidities. However, it is not clear whether inflammatory markers change episodically in response to mood states or are indicative of chronic pro-inflammatory activity, regardless of mood, in bipolar disorder. Investigations focused on comparing concentrations of specific inflammatory cytokines associated with immune activation status (primary outcome=tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)) in 37 participants with bipolar disorder across 3 mood states (mania N=15, depression N=9, normal mood N=13) and 29 controls without a psychiatric disorder (total N=66). Cytokine levels were also compared to T1ρ, a potential neuroimaging marker for inflammation, in select brain regions in a subsample (N=39). Participants with bipolar disorder and healthy controls did not differ significantly in inflammatory cytokine concentrations. However, compared to cases with normal mood, cases with abnormal mood states (mania and depression) had significantly elevated levels of TNF-α, its soluble receptors (sTNFR1/sTNFR2), other macrophage-derived cytokines (interleukin 1β (IL-1β), IL-6, IL-10, and IL-18) in addition to IL-4, interferon-γ, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, fibroblast growth factor β, and vascular endothelial growth factor. Cytokine levels were not correlated with signals from T1ρ imaging in selected structures (amygdalae, hippocampi, hypothalamus, anterior cingulate gyrus, and middle frontal gyrus). Participants were not followed prospectively across mood states. Activation of inflammatory markers was found in abnormal mood states of bipolar disorder. Longitudinal study of individuals with mood disorders is needed to confirm these findings and to elucidate the time course of any such changes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B

  1. A comparative study of olanzapine versus asenapine in acute treatment of manic episode: A 3-week prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajeet Sidana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Treatment of bipolar disorders has evolved over the years from conventional mood stabilizers to second-generation antipsychotics. Among the atypical antipsychotics, few have been approved by Food and Drug Administration as treatment of bipolar disorders. Aim: To study the efficacy and tolerability of olanzapine and asenapine in the acute treatment of bipolar disorder-manic episode in a 3-week randomized prospective study. Materials and Methods: A 3-week randomized, prospective, comparative, flexible doses of olanzapine (5-30 mg/day and asenapine (10-20 mg/day for acute treatment of bipolar disorder-current manic episode with or without psychotic symptoms in hospitalized patients. Results: The end-point reduction in mean score of Young Mania rating scale in the olanzapine group was 15.82 in comparison to 6.88 in the asenapine group. Mean score on clinical global impression for bipolar disorder and positive and negative syndrome scale was significantly less in the olanzapine group at the end of the study. 81.81% patients in olanzapine group and 17.60% patients in asenapine group had clinical response. There was significant average weight gain in the olanzapine group - 1.9 kg in comparison to 0.87 kg in asenapine group. Conclusion: The clinical response with olanzapine is significantly higher than the asenapine in the treatment of bipolar disorder-manic episode with or without psychotic symptoms. However, there is significant weight gain in olanzapine-treated patients.

  2. Antidepressant monotherapy in pre-bipolar depression; predictive value and inherent risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, Claire; Garnham, Julie S; Hajek, Tomas; Alda, Martin

    2008-04-01

    To identify specific treatment-emergent symptoms in response to antidepressant therapy in depression preceding bipolar disorder. Retrospective chart review of response to antidepressants in "pre-bipolar" depression, compared to a matched unipolar sample. Family history of completed suicide (p=0.0003) and bipolar disorder (p=0.004) were more common in the pre-bipolar subgroup. Earlier age of onset of diagnosed depression (p=0.005) as well as even earlier episodes of untreated retrospectively diagnosed major depression (p<0.0001) were associated with a future bipolar course. The pre-bipolar group was less likely to respond to antidepressant treatment (p=0.009). Treatment-emergent "mixed" symptoms (two or more symptoms of DSM IV mania, mood lability, irritability/rage with co-existing depression) and in particular, "serious symptoms" (treatment emergent or increased agitation, rage or suicidality) occurred more commonly in the bipolar group. The two variables that best accounted for the between-group differences in logistic regression, were early age at first symptoms of depression and treatment-emergent agitation. Family history of completed suicide and/or bipolar disorder, early onset of depressive symptoms as well as treatment-emergent "mixed" symptoms are common in depression preceding the diagnosis of bipolar disorder.

  3. Selective deficits in semantic verbal fluency in patients with a first affective episode with psychotic symptoms and a positive history of mania.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kravariti, Eugenia

    2009-05-01

    Neurocognitive dysfunction is likely to represent a trait characteristic of bipolar disorder, but the extent to which it comprises \\'core\\' deficits as opposed to those secondary to longstanding illness or intellectual decline is unclear. We investigated neuropsychological performance in an epidemiologically derived sample of patients with a first affective episode with psychotic symptoms and a positive history of mania, compared to community controls.

  4. Hypnotic susceptibility and affective states in bipolar I and II disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingren; Wang, Jiawei; Zhu, Qisha; Ma, Guorong; Shen, Chanchan; Fan, Hongying; Wang, Wei

    2017-11-09

    Highly hypnotizable individuals have impaired executive function, elevated motor impulsivity and increased emotional sensitivity, which are sometimes found in bipolar disorder patients. It is then reasonable to assume that certain aspects of hypnotic susceptibility differ with the types of bipolar disorder. The Stanford Hypnotic Susceptibility Scale: Form C (SHSS:C) test, the Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ), the Hypomanic Checklist-32 (HCL-32) and the Plutchick-van Praag Depression Inventory (PVP) were applied to 62 patients with bipolar I disorder, 33 bipolar II disorder, and 120 healthy volunteers. The passing rate of the SHSS:C 'Moving hands apart' item was higher in bipolar I patients than in controls, whereas for 'Mosquito hallucination' the rate was lower. Bipolar I and II patients scored significantly higher on MDQ, HCL-32 and PVP scales than controls. The passing rates of 'Mosquito hallucination' in controls, 'Arm rigidity' in bipolar I, and 'Age regression' in bipolar II predicted the respective MDQ scores. In contrast to cognitive suggestions, bipolar I patients followed motor suggestions more often under hypnosis. Furthermore, both bipolar disorder patients and healthy volunteers demonstrated associations between mania levels and certain hypnotic susceptibility features. Our study aids in better understanding the altered conscious states in bipolar disorders, and encourages the use of related psychotherapy for these patients.

  5. Cross-Species Studies on the Mechanisms Underlying Abnormal Behavior in Bipolar Disorder: A Dopaminergic Focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Enkhuizen, J.

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe neuropsychiatric disorder, affecting approximately 2% of the worldwide population. It is characterized by euphoric states of mania and opposite mood states of depression, which are devastating to the patients’ quality of life. Current treatment options are poor and

  6. Preliminary observations on the effectiveness of levetiracetam in the open adjunctive treatment of refractory bipolar disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, RM; Altshuler, LL; Frye, MA; Suppes, T; McElroy, SL; Keck, PE; Leverich, GS; Kupka, R; Nolen, WA; Luckenbaugh, DA; Walden, J; Grunze, H

    Objective: Levetiracetam is a recently approved, well-tolerated anticonvulsant with a unique mechanism of action yielding efficacy in treatment-refractory seizure disorders and positive effects in an animal model of mania. Given the effectiveness of a range of other anticonvulsants in bipolar

  7. Acute mania induced by hypothyroidism in a male patient after thyroidectomy

    OpenAIRE

    Morgado, Pedro; Gonçalves, Carla Marina Mendonça

    2016-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is a common hormone deficiency, associated with multiple causes and presenting with diverse clinical manifestations including neuropsychiatric disease. Hypothyroidism is commonly associated with depressive symptoms, and thyroid hormone screening is indicated in patients with a history of depression. Although other neuropsychiatric disorders could be induced by hypothyroidism, only 14 reports present clinical cases of mania related with this hormone deficiency.1,2 Autoimmune thy...

  8. Lithium in drinking water and the incidence of bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars V; Gerds, Thomas A; Knudsen, Nikoline N

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Animal data suggest that subtherapeutic doses, including micro doses, of lithium may influence mood, and lithium levels in drinking water have been found to correlate with the rate of suicide. It has never been investigated whether consumption of lithium may prevent the development...... of bipolar disorder (primary prophylaxis). In a nation-wide population-based study, we investigated whether long-term exposure to micro levels of lithium in drinking water correlates with the incidence of bipolar disorder in the general population, hypothesizing an inverse association in which higher long......-term lithium exposure is associated with lower incidences of bipolar disorder. METHODS: We included longitudinal individual geographical data on municipality of residence, data from drinking water lithium measurements and time-specific data from all cases with a hospital contact with a diagnosis of mania...

  9. Bipolar polygenic loading and bipolar spectrum features in major depressive disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiste, Anna; Robinson, Elise B; Milaneschi, Yuri; Meier, Sandra; Ripke, Stephan; Clements, Caitlin C; Fitzmaurice, Garrett M; Rietschel, Marcella; Penninx, Brenda W; Smoller, Jordan W; Perlis, Roy H

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Family and genetic studies indicate overlapping liability for major depressive disorder and bipolar disorder. The purpose of this study was to determine whether this shared genetic liability influences clinical presentation. Methods A polygenic risk score for bipolar disorder, derived from a large genome-wide association meta-analysis, was generated for each subject of European–American ancestry (n = 1,274) in the Sequential Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression study (STAR*D) outpatient major depressive disorder cohort. A hypothesis-driven approach was used to test for association between bipolar disorder risk score and features of depression associated with bipolar disorder in the literature. Follow-up analyses were performed in two additional cohorts. Results A generalized linear mixed model including seven features hypothesized to be associated with bipolar spectrum illness was significantly associated with bipolar polygenic risk score [F = 2.07, degrees of freedom (df) = 7, p = 0.04). Features included early onset, suicide attempt, recurrent depression, atypical depression, subclinical mania, subclinical psychosis, and severity. Post-hoc univariate analyses demonstrated that the major contributors to this omnibus association were onset of illness at age ≤ 18 years [odds ratio (OR) = 1.2, p = 0.003], history of suicide attempt (OR = 1.21, p = 0.03), and presence of at least one manic symptom (OR = 1.16, p = 0.02). The maximal variance in these traits explained by polygenic score ranged from 0.8–1.1%. However, analyses in two replication cohorts testing a five feature model did not support this association. Conclusions Bipolar genetic loading appeared to be associated with bipolar-like presentation in major depressive disorder in the primary analysis. However, results are at most inconclusive because of lack of replication. Replication efforts are challenged by different ascertainment and assessment strategies in the different cohorts

  10. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) Task Force Report on Antidepressant Use in Bipolar Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacchiarotti, Isabella; Bond, David J.; Baldessarini, Ross J.; Nolen, Willem A.; Grunze, Heinz; Licht, Rasmus W.; Post, Robert M.; Berk, Michael; Goodwin, Guy M.; Sachs, Gary S.; Tondo, Leonardo; Findling, Robert L.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Tohen, Mauricio; Undurraga, Juan; González-Pinto, Ana; Goldberg, Joseph F.; Yildiz, Ayşegül; Altshuler, Lori L.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Thase, Michael E.; Koukopoulos, Athanasios; Colom, Francesc; Frye, Mark A.; Malhi, Gin S.; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N.; Vázquez, Gustavo; Perlis, Roy H.; Ketter, Terence A.; Cassidy, Frederick; Akiskal, Hagop; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Valentí, Marc; Mazzei, Diego Hidalgo; Lafer, Beny; Kato, Tadafumi; Mazzarini, Lorenzo; Martínez-Aran, Anabel; Parker, Gordon; Souery, Daniel; Özerdem, Ayşegül; McElroy, Susan L.; Girardi, Paolo; Bauer, Michael; Yatham, Lakshmi N.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Birmaher, Boris; Kanba, Shigenobu; El-Mallakh, Rif S.; Serretti, Alessandro; Rihmer, Zoltan; Young, Allan H.; Kotzalidis, Georgios D.; MacQueen, Glenda M.; Bowden, Charles L.; Ghaemi, S. Nassir; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Rybakowski, Janusz; Ha, Kyooseob; Perugi, Giulio; Kasper, Siegfried; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Hirschfeld, Robert M.; Kapczinski, Flávio; Vieta, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Objective The risk-benefit profile of antidepressant medications in bipolar disorder is controversial. When conclusive evidence is lacking, expert consensus can guide treatment decisions. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) convened a task force to seek consensus recommendations on the use of antidepressants in bipolar disorders. Method An expert task force iteratively developed consensus through serial consensus-based revisions using the Delphi method. Initial survey items were based on systematic review of the literature. Subsequent surveys included new or reworded items and items that needed to be rerated. This process resulted in the final ISBD Task Force clinical recommendations on antidepressant use in bipolar disorder. Results There is striking incongruity between the wide use of and the weak evidence base for the efficacy and safety of antidepressant drugs in bipolar disorder. Few well-designed, long-term trials of prophylactic benefits have been conducted, and there is insufficient evidence for treatment benefits with antidepressants combined with mood stabilizers. A major concern is the risk for mood switch to hypomania, mania, and mixed states. Integrating the evidence and the experience of the task force members, a consensus was reached on 12 statements on the use of antidepressants in bipolar disorder. Conclusions Because of limited data, the task force could not make broad statements endorsing antidepressant use but acknowledged that individual bipolar patients may benefit from antidepressants. Regarding safety, serotonin reuptake inhibitors and bupropion may have lower rates of manic switch than tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants and norepinephrine-serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The frequency and severity of antidepressant-associated mood elevations appear to be greater in bipolar I than bipolar II disorder. Hence, in bipolar I patients antidepressants should be prescribed only as an adjunct to mood-stabilizing medications

  11. The bipolarity of light and dark: A review on Bipolar Disorder and circadian cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abreu, T; Bragança, M

    2015-10-01

    Bipolar Disorder is characterized by episodes running the full mood spectrum, from mania to depression. Between mood episodes, residual symptoms remain, as sleep alterations, circadian cycle disturbances, emotional deregulation, cognitive impairment and increased risk for comorbidities. The present review intends to reflect about the most recent and relevant information concerning the biunivocal relation between bipolar disorder and circadian cycles. It was conducted a literature search on PubMed database using the search terms "bipolar", "circadian", "melatonin", "cortisol", "body temperature", "Clock gene", "Bmal1 gene", "Per gene", "Cry gene", "GSK3β", "chronotype", "light therapy", "dark therapy", "sleep deprivation", "lithum" and "agomelatine". Search results were manually reviewed, and pertinent studies were selected for inclusion as appropriate. Several studies support the relationship between bipolar disorder and circadian cycles, discussing alterations in melatonin, body temperature and cortisol rhythms; disruption of sleep/wake cycle; variations of clock genes; and chronotype. Some therapeutics for bipolar disorder directed to the circadian cycles disturbances are also discussed, including lithium carbonate, agomelatine, light therapy, dark therapy, sleep deprivation and interpersonal and social rhythm therapy. This review provides a summary of an extensive research for the relevant literature on this theme, not a patient-wise meta-analysis. In the future, it is essential to achieve a better understanding of the relation between bipolar disorder and the circadian system. It is required to establish new treatment protocols, combining psychotherapy, therapies targeting the circadian rhythms and the latest drugs, in order to reduce the risk of relapse and improve affective behaviour. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evolução do conceito e controvérsias atuais sobre o transtorno bipolar do humor Bipolar disorder: evolution of the concept and current controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Del Porto

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available O autor revê o conceito de transtorno bipolar como um processo em evolução. Suas raízes podem ser encontradas no trabalho de Araeteus da Capadócia, que assumia serem a melancolia e a mania duas formas da mesma doença. A compreensão atual da doença bipolar começou na França, através dos trabalhos de Falret (1851 e Baillarguer (1854. Os conceitos fundamentais de Kraepelin mudaram as bases da nosologia psiquiátrica, e o conceito unitário de Kraepelin sobre a insanidade maníaco-depressiva passou a ser amplamente aceito. Depois de Kraepelin, no entanto, as idéias de Kleist e Leonhard, na Alemanha, e o trabalho subseqüente de Angst, Perris e Winokur enfatizaram a distinção entre as formas monopolares e bipolares da depressão. Mais recentemente a ênfase mudou novamente para o espectro bipolar, que em suas formas leves expande-se às bordas dos temperamentos normais. Finalizando, o autor sumariza os aspectos polêmicos da nosologia da doença bipolar e seus limites com as esquizofrenias, a doença esquizoafetiva e as psicoses ciclóides.The author reviews the evolution of the concept of bipolar disorder as an ongoing process. Its roots can be found in the work of Araeteus of Capadocia, who assumed that melancholia and mania were two forms of the same disease. The modern understanding of bipolar disorder began in France, through the work of Falret (1851 and Baillarger (1854. The pivotal concepts of Emil Kraepelin changed the basis of psychiatric nosology, and Kraepelin's unitary concept of manic-depressive insanity was largely accepted. Kraepelin and Weigandt's ideas on mixed states were the cornerstone of this unitary concept. After Kraepelin, however, the ideas of Kleist and Leonhard, in Germany, as well as the work of Angst, Perris and Winokur, emphasized the distinction between unipolar and bipolar forms of depression. More recently, the emphasis has shifted again to the bipolar spectrum, which, in its mild forms, expanded to the

  13. The World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for the Biological Treatment of Bipolar Disorders: Acute and long-term treatment of mixed states in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunze, Heinz; Vieta, Eduard; Goodwin, Guy M; Bowden, Charles; Licht, Rasmus W; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Yatham, Lakshmi; Mosolov, Sergey; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Kasper, Siegfried

    2018-02-01

    Although clinically highly relevant, the recognition and treatment of bipolar mixed states has played only an underpart in recent guidelines. This WFSBP guideline has been developed to supply a systematic overview of all scientific evidence pertaining to the acute and long-term treatment of bipolar mixed states in adults. Material used for these guidelines is based on a systematic literature search using various data bases. Their scientific rigour was categorised into six levels of evidence (A-F), and different grades of recommendation to ensure practicability were assigned. We examined data pertaining to the acute treatment of manic and depressive symptoms in bipolar mixed patients, as well as data pertaining to the prevention of mixed recurrences after an index episode of any type, or recurrence of any type after a mixed index episode. Manic symptoms in bipolar mixed states appeared responsive to treatment with several atypical antipsychotics, the best evidence resting with olanzapine. For depressive symptoms, addition of ziprasidone to treatment as usual may be beneficial; however, the evidence base is much more limited than for the treatment of manic symptoms. Besides olanzapine and quetiapine, valproate and lithium should also be considered for recurrence prevention. The concept of mixed states changed over time, and recently became much more comprehensive with the release of DSM-5. As a consequence, studies in bipolar mixed patients targeted slightly different bipolar subpopulations. In addition, trial designs in acute and maintenance treatment also advanced in recent years in response to regulatory demands. Current treatment recommendations are still based on limited evidence, and there is a clear demand for confirmative studies adopting the DSM-5 specifier with mixed features concept.

  14. The influence of genes and environment on the development of bipolar disorder : A twin study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vonk, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (or manic-depressive disorder) is a severe mood disorder in which episodes of (hypo) mania (e.g. elevated mood en hyperactivity) and depression (e.g. decreased mood and reduced activity) alternate with periods of normal mood and functioning. Genetic factors as well as environmental

  15. Sibutramine-induced mania as the first manifestation of bipolar disorder

    OpenAIRE

    Waszkiewicz, Napoleon; Zalewska-Szajda, Beata; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz; Simonienko, Katarzyna; Zalewska, Anna; Szulc, Agata; Ładny, Jerzy Robert; Zwierz, Krzysztof

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Sibutramine, used in obesity treatment, has been associated with many neuropsychiatric side effects including hypomanic and manic episodes. Hypomanic/manic episodes related to sibutramine treatment were earlier reported in patients who had previous history of bipolar disorder, after sibutramine overdose, after over-the-counter product illegally containing very high dose of sibutramine, together with psychotic symptoms, in organic patient, or after interaction of sibutramin...

  16. Treating patients with bipolar disorder and substance dependence: lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Roger D

    2004-12-01

    Although bipolar disorder is the Axis I psychiatric disorder associated with the highest rate of co-occurring substance use disorders, little research has focused on treatments specifically designed for these patients. The author and his colleagues have developed and studied Integrated Group Therapy (IGT) for this population. This paper describes common themes that have emerged in carrying out IGT for patients with bipolar disorder and substance dependence. These include the strong emphasis on depression, as opposed to mania; the predominance of hopelessness; specific patterns of medication noncompliance; and the implications of patients' labeling their substance use as self-medication. Therapeutic aspects involved in addressing these themes are discussed.

  17. Excess mortality of acute and transient psychotic disorders: comparison with bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castagnini, Augusto; Foldager, Leslie; Bertelsen, Aksel

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To investigate mortality and causes of death of short-lived psychotic disorders, by carrying out a comparison with bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Method: Record linkage study to the official register of causes of death of all cases aged 15–64 years who were listed for the first time...... in the Danish Psychiatric Register between 1995 and 2008 with an ICD-10 diagnosis of ‘acute and transient psychotic disorders’ (ATPDs; n = 4157), bipolar disorder (n = 3200) and schizophrenia (n = 4576). Results: A total of 232 patients (5.6%) with ATPDs, 172 (5.4%) with bipolar disorder and 233 (5...

  18. Pilot study of a culturally adapted psychoeducation (CaPE) intervention for bipolar disorder in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husain, Muhammad Ishrat; Chaudhry, Imran B; Rahman, Raza R; Hamirani, Munir M; Mehmood, Nasir; Haddad, Peter M; Hodsoll, John; Young, Allan H; Naeem, Farooq; Husain, Nusrat

    2017-12-01

    Despite the use of maintenance medication, recurrence rates in bipolar affective disorder (BPAD) are high. To date, there are no clinical trials that have investigated the use of psychological interventions in bipolar disorder in Pakistan. The purpose of the study was to assess the feasibility and acceptability of a culturally adapted bipolar psychoeducation programme (CaPE) in Pakistan. Thirty-four euthymic bipolar I and II outpatients were randomized to either 12 weekly sessions of individual psychoeducation plus Treatment As Usual (Intervention) or Treatment As Usual (TAU) (Control). Outcomes were assessed using the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), EuroQoL (EQ-5D), Bipolar Knowledge and Attitudes and Questionnaire (BKAQ), and a self-reported measure of medication adherence (Morisky Medication Adherence Scale-4 items, MMAS-4). Effect sizes were derived from baseline adjusted standardized regression coefficients. Retention in the study was good, 80% of patients in the TAU follow-up assessment and 100% of patients in the CaPE group attended all 12 sessions. Patient satisfaction was higher in the CaPE group relative to control (ES = 1.41). Further, there were large effect sizes shown for CaPE versus TAU for medication adherence (MMAS-4: ES = 0.81), knowledge and attitudes towards bipolar (BKAQ: ES = 0.68), mania (YMRS: ES = 1.18), depression (BDI: ES = 1.17) and quality of life measures (EQ-5D: ES ⇒ 0.88). Culturally adapted psychoeducation intervention is acceptable and feasible, and can be effective in improving mood symptoms and knowledge and attitudes to BPAD when compared with TAU. Larger scale studies are needed to confirm our findings. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT02210390.

  19. Course of illness in depressive and bipolar disorders. Naturalistic study, 1994-1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Hansen, Mette Gerster; Andersen, Per Kragh

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Newer antidepressants have increasingly been used during the past decade. These drugs may increase compliance and reduce the risk of cycle acceleration in affective disorders. AIMS: To investigate the naturalistic longitudinal course of illness in patients with depressive or bipolar d...... of episodes was not significant for men. The rate of relapse did not decline during the study period. CONCLUSIONS: The course of severe depressive and bipolar disorders has remained roughly the same despite introduction of new treatments.......BACKGROUND: Newer antidepressants have increasingly been used during the past decade. These drugs may increase compliance and reduce the risk of cycle acceleration in affective disorders. AIMS: To investigate the naturalistic longitudinal course of illness in patients with depressive or bipolar...... patients had a diagnosis of depressive disorder and 1106 patients had a diagnosis of mania or bipolar disorder, at first-ever discharge. RESULTS: The rate of relapse leading to hospitalisation increased with the number of previous episodes in both depressive and bipolar disorders. However, the effect...

  20. Transtorno bipolar : adesão ao tratamento e psicoeducação

    OpenAIRE

    Samir Vidal Mussi

    2012-01-01

    A psicoeducação é uma das estratégias que deve ser inserida no tratamento de pacientes com diagnóstico de transtorno bipolar e tem demonstrado eficácia para fomentar respostas relacionadas à adesão à medicação. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a efetividade de um programa de psicoeducação aplicado a 9 pacientes com diagnóstico de transtorno bipolar, em tratamento em um hospital público. Para avaliação foram aplicadas as escalas de depressão (Hamilton), de mania (Young) e de Qualidade de Vi...

  1. Electronic self-monitoring of mood using IT platforms in adult patients with bipolar disorder: A systematic review of the validity and evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria; Munkholm, Klaus; Frost, Mads; Bardram, Jakob E; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2016-01-15

    Various paper-based mood charting instruments are used in the monitoring of symptoms in bipolar disorder. During recent years an increasing number of electronic self-monitoring tools have been developed. The objectives of this systematic review were 1) to evaluate the validity of electronic self-monitoring tools as a method of evaluating mood compared to clinical rating scales for depression and mania and 2) to investigate the effect of electronic self-monitoring tools on clinically relevant outcomes in bipolar disorder. A systematic review of the scientific literature, reported according to the Preferred Reporting items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines was conducted. MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO and The Cochrane Library were searched and supplemented by hand search of reference lists. Databases were searched for 1) studies on electronic self-monitoring tools in patients with bipolar disorder reporting on validity of electronically self-reported mood ratings compared to clinical rating scales for depression and mania and 2) randomized controlled trials (RCT) evaluating electronic mood self-monitoring tools in patients with bipolar disorder. A total of 13 published articles were included. Seven articles were RCTs and six were longitudinal studies. Electronic self-monitoring of mood was considered valid compared to clinical rating scales for depression in six out of six studies, and in two out of seven studies compared to clinical rating scales for mania. The included RCTs primarily investigated the effect of heterogeneous electronically delivered interventions; none of the RCTs investigated the sole effect of electronic mood self-monitoring tools. Methodological issues with risk of bias at different levels limited the evidence in the majority of studies. Electronic self-monitoring of mood in depression appears to be a valid measure of mood in contrast to self-monitoring of mood in mania. There are yet few studies on the effect of electronic

  2. Relato de caso: transtorno afetivo bipolar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Von Krakauer Hübner

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introdução: O transtorno afetivo bipolar (TAB é uma doença crônica e grave, marcada pela variância de episódios depressivos com episódios de mania ou hipomania, podendo haver sintomas psicóticos. É classificado em dois tipos, I e II. Sua etiologia é desconhecida, mas supõe-se que envolva influências genéticas e ambientais, variando a cada indivíduo afetado. As apresentações clínicas do TAB podem variar de episódios leves de depressão ou hipomania até episódios depressivos graves ou mania acompanhados ou não de sintomas psicóticos. Objetivos: Relatar o caso de um paciente internado na enfermaria da psiquiatria do Conjunto Hospitalar de Sorocaba que foi diagnosticado com TAB. Metodologia: As informações foram obtidas por meio de revisão do prontuário, entrevista com o paciente e revisão da literatura. Relato de Caso: Homem de 20 anos encaminhado do serviço hospitalar de Itapetininga após alteração de comportamento, heteroagressividade e alucinações auditivas. Conclusões: Transtorno depressivo maior, de ansiedade generalizada, de estresse pós-traumático e esquizofrenia são diagnósticos diferenciais. O episódio maníaco provoca prejuízo no funcionamento social, profissional e até necessidade de hospitalização. O risco de suicídio em pessoas com TAB é estimado em pelo menos 15 vezes o da população em geral. A taxa de não adesão ao tratamento no TAB é de 47%. A conduta terapêutica medicamentosa mais eficaz para a mania é a associação do carbonato de lítio com risperidona, já para a depressão bipolar o carbonato de lítio é a primeira escolha.

  3. The validity and internal structure of the Bipolar Depression Rating Scale: data from a clinical trial of N-acetylcysteine as adjunctive therapy in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Michael; Dodd, Seetal; Dean, Olivia M; Kohlmann, Kristy; Berk, Lesley; Malhi, Gin S

    2010-10-01

    Berk M, Dodd S, Dean OM, Kohlmann K, Berk L, Malhi GS. The validity and internal structure of the Bipolar Depression Rating Scale: data from a clinical trial of N-acetylcysteine as adjunctive therapy in bipolar disorder. The phenomenology of unipolar and bipolar disorders differ in a number of ways, such as the presence of mixed states and atypical features. Conventional depression rating instruments are designed to capture the characteristics of unipolar depression and have limitations in capturing the breadth of bipolar disorder. The Bipolar Depression Rating Scale (BDRS) was administered together with the Montgomery Asberg Rating Scale (MADRS) and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) in a double-blind randomised placebo-controlled clinical trial of N-acetyl cysteine for bipolar disorder (N = 75). A factor analysis showed a two-factor solution: depression and mixed symptom clusters. The BDRS has strong internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.917), the depression cluster showed robust correlation with the MADRS (r = 0.865) and the mixed subscale correlated with the YMRS (r = 0.750). The BDRS has good internal validity and inter-rater reliability and is sensitive to change in the context of a clinical trial.

  4. Smartphone data as objective measures of bipolar disorder symptoms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria; Frost, Mads; Vinberg, Maj

    2014-01-01

    The daily electronic self-monitoring Smartphone software "MONARCA" was used by 17 patients with bipolar disorder for 3 consecutive months. Patients were rated fortnightly using Hamilton Depression rating Scale 17 items (HDRS-17) and Young Mania rating Scale (YMRS) (102 ratings) with blinding...... for Smartphone data. Objective Smartphone measures such as physical and social activity correlated with clinically rated depressive symptoms. Self-monitored depressive symptoms correlated significantly with HDRS-17 items score....

  5. The internalising and externalising dimensions of affective symptoms in depressed (unipolar) and bipolar patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, P; Hansen, H V; Kessing, L V

    2006-01-01

    for the measurement of both the internalising dimension of affective symptoms (depression including suicidal ideas, anxiety and asthenia) and the externalising dimension (mania). To supplement the latter dimension, the WHO-5 questionnaire was included. These questionnaires were mailed to a large population...... of patients with depressive (unipolar) or bipolar disorders, representative of patients treated in hospital settings in Denmark, approximately 2 years after discharge from hospital. RESULTS: In total, 244 unipolars and 214 bipolars were included in the study. Mokken analysis showed that depressive (unipolar...... hospitals in Denmark, depressive (unipolar) patients scored significantly higher than bipolar patients on the internalising dimension and suicidal ideas, and significantly lower on the externalising dimension of psychological well-being....

  6. Creativity and Bipolar Disorder: Igniting a Dialogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Sheri L; Moezpoor, Michelle; Murray, Greg; Hole, Rachelle; Barnes, Steven J; Michalak, Erin E

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) has been related to heightened creativity, yet core questions remain unaddressed about this association. We used qualitative methods to investigate how highly creative individuals with BD understand the role of symptoms and treatment in their creativity, and possible mechanisms underpinning this link. Twenty-two individuals self-identified as highly creative and living with BD took part in focus groups and completed quantitative measures of symptoms, quality of life (QoL), and creativity. Using thematic analysis, five themes emerged: the pros and cons of mania for creativity, benefits of altered thinking, the relationship between creativity and medication, creativity as central to one's identity, and creativity's importance in stigma reduction and treatment. Despite reliance on a small sample who self-identified as having BD, findings shed light on previously mixed results regarding the influence of mania and treatment and suggest new directions for the study of mechanisms driving the creative advantage in BD. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Religiosidade e espiritualidade no transtorno bipolar do humor Religiosity and spirituality in bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Stroppa

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXTO: Nos últimos vinte anos, estudos sistematizados têm identificado uma relação positiva entre espiritualidade/religiosidade (R/E e saúde, notadamente saúde mental. Entretanto, são escassas as informações sobre R/E e transtorno bipolar do humor (TBH. Este artigo objetiva revisar as evidências disponíveis sobre estas relações. MÉTODOS: Foram cruzadas as palavras "bipolar", "mania" e "manic" com as palavras "religio*" e "spiritu*" nas bases de dados PubMed e PsychINFO em novembro de 2008. Foram encontrados 122 artigos publicados entre os anos de 1957 e 2008. RESULTADO: Os estudos apontam que pacientes bipolares tendem a apresentar maior envolvimento religioso/espiritual, maior frequência de relatos de conversão e experiências de salvação e uso mais frequente de coping religioso e espiritual (CRE que pessoas com outros transtornos mentais. Indicam ainda, uma relação frequente e significativa entre sintomas maníacos e experiências místicas. Os estudos mais relevantes encontrados na literatura foram agrupados nesta revisão em cinco tópicos: delírios místicos, religiosidade e espiritualidade, coping religioso-espiritual, recursos comunitários e comunidades tradicionais. CONCLUSÃO: O TBH e a R/E possuem intensa e complexa inter-relação. Estudos sobre práticas religiosas saudáveis, espiritualidade e recursos de coping merecem ser ampliados, bem como sua relação com o cumprimento do tratamento e as recorrências da doença, as intervenções psicoterápicas e a psicoeducação de base espiritual.BACKGROUND: Over the past twenty years, systematic studies have identified a positive relationship between spirituality/religiosity (S/R and health, especially mental health. Although there is only scant information about S/R and BipolarDisorder. METHODS: The words "bipolar", "mania" and "manic" were crossed with the words "religio*" and "spiritu*" in the databases PubMed and PsychINFO in November 2008. It was found 122

  8. A complete genome screen for genes predisposing to severe bipolar disorder in two Costa Rican pedigrees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McInnes, LA; Escamilla, MA; Service, SK; Reus, [No Value; Leon, P; Silva, S; Rojas, E; Spesny, M; Baharloo, S; Blankenship, K; Peterson, A; Tyler, D; Shimayoshi, N; Tobey, C; Batki, S; Vinogradov, S; Meza, L; Gallegos, A; Fournier, E; Smith, LB; Barondes, SH; Sandkuijl, LA; Freimer, NB

    1996-01-01

    Bipolar mood disorder (BP) is a debilitating syndrome characterized by episodes of mania and depression. We designed a multistage study to detect all major loci predisposing to severe BP (termed BP-I) in two pedigrees drawn from the Central Valley of Costa Rica, where the population is largely

  9. Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy for Non-remitted Patients with Bipolar Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckersbach, Thilo; Hölzel, Britta K.; Eisner, Lori R.; Stange, Jonathan P.; Peckham, Andrew D.; Dougherty, Darin D.; Rauch, Scott L.; Lazar, Sara; Nierenberg, Andrew A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Bipolar disorder is characterized by recurrent episodes of depression and/or mania along with inter-episodic mood symptoms that interfere with psychosocial functioning. Despite periods of symptomatic recovery, many individuals with bipolar disorder continue to experience substantial residual mood symptoms that often lead to the recurrence of mood episodes. Aims The present study explored whether a new mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) for bipolar disorder would increase mindfulness, reduce residual mood symptoms, and increase emotion regulation abilities, psychological well-being, positive affect and psychosocial functioning. Following a baseline clinical assessment, 12 individuals with DSM-IV bipolar disorder were treated with 12 group sessions of MBCT. Results At the end of treatment, as well as at the 3-months follow-up, participants showed increased mindfulness, lower residual depressive mood symptoms, less attentional difficulties, and increased emotion regulation abilities, psychological well-being, positive affect and psychosocial functioning. Conclusions These findings suggest that treating residual mood symptoms with MBCT may be another avenue to improving mood, emotion regulation, well-being and functioning in individuals with bipolar disorder. PMID:22070469

  10. Translation of randomised controlled trial findings into clinical practice: comparison of olanzapine and valproate in the EMBLEM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, D; Gonzalez-Pinto, A; Haro, J M; Bertsch, J; Reed, C; Perrin, E; Tohen, M

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the outcomes of olanzapine- and valproate-treated patients in an observational study of acute mania with the results of a randomised controlled trial (RCT) assessing the same treatments. EMBLEM (European Mania in Bipolar Evaluation of Medication) was a 2-year, prospective, observational study of health outcomes associated with the treatment of mania. Severity of mania and depression were assessed at baseline and 6 weeks using the YMRS and the 5-item version of the HAMD, respectively. 621 patients were analysed (n=107 valproate, n=514 olanzapine). Both groups improved from baseline to 6 weeks in mean YMRS and HAMD-5 total scores, with greater mean improvements in the olanzapine compared with the valproate group. Olanzapine was associated with more weight gain and less gastrointestinal difficulties than valproate. The EMBLEM results support those of the RCT, which suggest that olanzapine monotherapy seems to be more effective than valproate monotherapy in the treatment of acute mania.

  11. Experiment-o-mania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drndarski, Marina

    2015-04-01

    Every 21st century student is expected to develop science literacy skills. As this is not part of Serbian national curriculum yet, we decided to introduce it with this project. Experiment-o-mania provides students to experience science in different and exciting way. It makes opportunity for personalized learning offering space and time to ask (why, where, how, what if) and to try. Therefore, we empower young people with skills of experimenting, and they love science back. They ask questions, make hypothesis, make problems and solve them, make mistakes, discuss about the results. Subsequently this raises the students' interest for school curriculum. This vision of science teaching is associated with inquiry-based learning. Experiment-o-mania is the unique and recognizable teaching methodology for the elementary school Drinka Pavlović, Belgrade, Serbia. Experiment-o-mania implies activities throughout the school year. They are held on extra class sessions, through science experiments, science projects or preparations for School's Days of science. Students learn to ask questions, make observations, classify data, communicate ideas, conduct experiments, analyse results and make conclusions. All science teachers participate in designing activities and experiments for students in Experiment-o-mania teaching method. But they are not alone. Teacher of fine arts, English teachers and others also take part. Students have their representatives in this team, too. This is a good way to blend knowledge among different school subject and popularize science in general. All the experiments are age appropriate and related to real life situations, local community, society and the world. We explore Fibonacci's arrays, saving energy, solar power, climate change, environmental problems, pollution, daily life situations in the country or worldwide. We introduce great scientists as Nikola Tesla, Milutin Milanković and sir Isaac Newton. We celebrate all relevant international days, weeks

  12. Systematic literature review on patterns of pharmacological treatment and adherence among patients with bipolar disorder type I in the USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greene M

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Mallik Greene,1 Luciano Paladini,2 Teresa Lemmer,2 Alexandra Piedade,2 Maelys Touya,3 Otavio Clark2 1Health Economics & Outcomes Research, Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization, Inc., Princeton, NJ, USA; 2Evidências – Kantar Health, Campinas, Brazil; 3Lundbeck Pharmaceuticals Services, LLC, Deerfield, IL, USA Background: Bipolar disorder type I (BD-I is a chronic condition characterized by mania episodes followed by syndromic recovery periods, usually permeated by depressive symptomatology and recurring acute manic episodes. It requires long-term pharmacological treatment; thus, it is critical to understand the patterns of drug therapy use and medication compliance to better plan health care policies and needs. This systematic literature review aims to study these data among patients with BD-I in the USA, focusing on medications to treat mania. Methods: Articles published in the last 10 years to October 2016 were searched on MEDLINE and Embase. Studies on patterns of drug therapy, concordance of prescription with clinical practice guidelines, and adherence and persistence with pharmacological treatments for BD-I in the USA under observational conditions, with focus on treatments for mania, were selected. Results: Treatment prevalence for BD-I is low in the USA, with the most current study showing a 46% 12-month rate. There is a lack of studies addressing the use of long-acting injectable (LAI antipsychotics. Second-generation antipsychotics (SGAs have been used by nearly all patients receiving oral antipsychotics since the 2000s. However, 30%–60% of individuals with BD do not receive appropriate treatment, and adherence to oral therapies is poor, with medication possession ratios ≥80% seen in only approximately 60% of patients. For persistence rates, results suggest that treatment duration is short for a condition with recommendation for at least 6 months of maintenance therapy. Literature indicates that LAI SGAs may be

  13. Attitudes toward antipsychotic treatment among patients with bipolar disorders and their clinicians: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajatovic M

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Martha Sajatovic,1 Faith DiBiasi,2 Susan N Legacy3 1Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH, USA; 2US Medical Affairs, Neuroscience, Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization, Inc., Rockville, MD, USA; 3US Medical Affairs, Neuroscience, Otsuka Pharmaceutical Development & Commercialization, Inc., Princeton, NJ, USA Introduction: Antipsychotics are recommended as first-line therapy for acute mania and maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder; however, published literature suggests their real-world use remains limited. Understanding attitudes toward these medications may help identify barriers and inform personalized therapy. This literature review evaluated patient and clinician attitudes toward the use of antipsychotics for treating bipolar disorder. Materials and methods: A systematic search of the Cochrane Library, Ovid MEDLINE, Embase, and BIOSIS Previews identified English language articles published between January 1, 2000, and June 15, 2016, that reported attitudinal data from patients, health care professionals, or caregivers; treatment decision-making; or patient characteristics that predicted antipsychotic use for bipolar disorder. Results were analyzed descriptively. Results: Of the 209 references identified, 11 met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated. These articles provided attitudinal information from 1,418 patients with bipolar disorder and 1,282 treating clinicians. Patients’ attitudes toward antipsychotics were generally positive. Longer duration of clinical stability was associated with positive attitudes. Implementation of psychoeducational and adherence enhancement strategies could improve patient attitudes. Limited data suggest clinicians’ perceptions of antipsychotic efficacy and tolerability may have the greatest impact on their prescribing patterns. Because the current real-world evidence base is inadequate, clinician attitudes

  14. The functional neuroanatomy of bipolar disorder: a consensus model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strakowski, Stephen M; Adler, Caleb M; Almeida, Jorge; Altshuler, Lori L; Blumberg, Hilary P; Chang, Kiki D; DelBello, Melissa P; Frangou, Sophia; McIntosh, Andrew; Phillips, Mary L; Sussman, Jessika E; Townsend, Jennifer D

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Functional neuroimaging methods have proliferated in recent years, such that functional magnetic resonance imaging, in particular, is now widely used to study bipolar disorder. However, discrepant findings are common. A workgroup was organized by the Department of Psychiatry, University of Cincinnati (Cincinnati, OH, USA) to develop a consensus functional neuroanatomic model of bipolar I disorder based upon the participants’ work as well as that of others. Methods Representatives from several leading bipolar disorder neuroimaging groups were organized to present an overview of their areas of expertise as well as focused reviews of existing data. The workgroup then developed a consensus model of the functional neuroanatomy of bipolar disorder based upon these data. Results Among the participants, a general consensus emerged that bipolar I disorder arises from abnormalities in the structure and function of key emotional control networks in the human brain. Namely, disruption in early development (e.g., white matter connectivity, prefrontal pruning) within brain networks that modulate emotional behavior leads to decreased connectivity among ventral prefrontal networks and limbic brain regions, especially amygdala. This developmental failure to establish healthy ventral prefrontal–limbic modulation underlies the onset of mania and ultimately, with progressive changes throughout these networks over time and with affective episodes, a bipolar course of illness. Conclusions This model provides a potential substrate to guide future investigations and areas needing additional focus are identified. PMID:22631617

  15. Customization in prescribing for bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkin, Dominic; Volpe-Vartanian, Joanna; Merrick, Elizabeth L; Horgan, Constance M; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Frank, Richard G; Lee, Sue

    2012-06-01

    For many disorders, patient heterogeneity requires physicians to customize their treatment to each patient's needs. We test for the existence of customization in physicians' prescribing for bipolar disorder, using data from a naturalistic clinical effectiveness trial of bipolar disorder treatment (STEP-BD), which did not constrain physician prescribing. Multinomial logit is used to model the physician's choice among five combinations of drug classes. We find that our observed measure of the patient's clinical status played only a limited role in the choice among drug class combinations, even for conditions such as mania that are expected to affect class choice. However, treatment of a patient with given characteristics differed widely depending on which physician was seen. The explanatory power of the model was low. There was variation within each physician's prescribing, but the results do not suggest a high degree of customization in physicians' prescribing, based on our measure of clinical status. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Diagnosis, Epidemiology and Management of Mixed States in Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagiolini, Andrea; Coluccia, Anna; Maina, Giuseppe; Forgione, Rocco N; Goracci, Arianna; Cuomo, Alessandro; Young, Allan H

    2015-09-01

    Approximately 40% of patients with bipolar disorder experience mixed episodes, defined as a manic state with depressive features, or manic symptoms in a patient with bipolar depression. Compared with bipolar patients without mixed features, patients with bipolar mixed states generally have more severe symptomatology, more lifetime episodes of illness, worse clinical outcomes and higher rates of comorbidities, and thus present a significant clinical challenge. Most clinical trials have investigated second-generation neuroleptic monotherapy, monotherapy with anticonvulsants or lithium, combination therapy, and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). Neuroleptic drugs are often used alone or in combination with anticonvulsants or lithium for preventive treatment, and ECT is an effective treatment for mixed manic episodes in situations where medication fails or cannot be used. Common antidepressants have been shown to worsen mania symptoms during mixed episodes without necessarily improving depressive symptoms; thus, they are not recommended during mixed episodes. A greater understanding of pathophysiological processes in bipolar disorder is now required to provide a more accurate diagnosis and new personalised treatment approaches. Targeted, specific treatments developed through a greater understanding of bipolar disorder pathophysiology, capable of affecting the underlying disease processes, could well prove to be more effective, faster acting, and better tolerated than existing therapies, therefore providing better outcomes for individuals affected by bipolar disorder. Until such time as targeted agents are available, second-generation neuroleptics are emerging as the treatment of choice in the management of mixed states in bipolar disorder.

  17. Capacity to consent to research among patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Sahana; Ganzini, Linda

    2004-06-01

    Experts have debated the influence of mental illness on decision-making capacity. This paper reviews concepts of decision-making capacity and existing research on the influence of mental illness on capacity to consent to research. We propose how bipolar disorder, especially mania, may have an effect on consent capacity. The current conceptualization of capacity utilizes legal standards of 'choice', 'understanding', 'appreciation' and 'rational reasoning', as well as voluntarism, or the assurance that the patient is free to agree or to decline to participate in research. Studies of patients with schizophrenia suggest impaired cognition influences 'understanding' and is more important than severity of psychosis in affecting decision-making abilities. There are no studies of sources and extent of impairment to consent to research among manic patients. Mania may influence a patient's understanding of the research protocol, but also alter the patient's views, values and level of insight, thus impairing decision-making abilities at the 'appreciation' standard even when the patient understands the relevant information. Mania may impact freedom to decide, yet paradoxically, manic patients may be less influenced by others and less vulnerable to coercion, undue influence and undue incentives compared to patients without mental illness. We suggest that in patients with mood disorders, the legal standard of appreciation be thoroughly probed during the consent procedure. Studies of the effect of mania and depression on consent capacity and voluntarism are needed in order to develop processes that increase safeguards in the informed consent process.

  18. Comparison of mania patients suitable for treatment trials versus clinical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talamo, Alessandra; Baldessarini, Ross J; Centorrino, Franca

    2008-08-01

    It remains uncertain whether bipolar disorder (BPD) patients in randomized-controlled trials (RCTs) are sufficiently representative of clinically encountered patients as to guide clinical-therapeutic practice. We complied inclusion/exclusion criteria by frequency from reports of 21 RCTs for mania, and applied them in a pilot study of patients hospitalized for DSM-IV BPD manic/mixed states to compare characteristics and clinical responses of patients who did versus did not meet exclusion criteria. From 27 initially identified inclusion/exclusion criteria ranked by citation frequency, we derived six inclusion, and 10 non-redundant-exclusion factors. Of 67 consecutive patients meeting inclusion criteria, 15 (22.4%) potential "research subjects" met all 10 exclusion criteria. The remaining 52 "clinical patients" differed markedly on exclusion criteria, including more psychiatric co-morbidity, substance abuse, involuntary hospitalization, and suicide attempts or violence, but were otherwise similar. In both groups responses to clinically determined inpatient treatments were similar, including improvement in mania ratings. Based on applying reported inclusion/exclusion criteria for RCTs to a pilot sample of hospitalized-manic patients, those likely to be included in modern RCTs were similar to patients who would be excluded, most notably in short-term antimanic-treatment responses. The findings encourage further comparisons of subjects included/excluded from RCTs to test potential clinical generalizability of research findings. The pilot study is limited in numbers and exposure times with which to test for the minor differences between "research subjects" and "clinical patients." (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Relationship between suicidality and impulsivity in bipolar I disorder: a diffusion tensor imaging study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Katie; Burdick, Katherine E; Wu, Jinghui; Ardekani, Babak A; Szeszko, Philip R

    2012-01-01

    Background Impulsivity is characteristic of individuals with bipolar disorder and may be a contributing factor to the high rate of suicide in patients with this disorder. Although white matter abnormalities have been implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder, their relationship to impulsivity and suicidality in this disorder has not been well-investigated. Methods Diffusion tensor imaging scans were acquired in 14 bipolar disorder patients with a prior suicide attempt, 15 bipolar disorder patients with no prior suicide attempt, and 15 healthy volunteers. Bipolar disorder patients received clinical assessments including measures of impulsivity, depression, mania, and anxiety. Images were processed using the Tract-Based Spatial Statistics method in the FSL software package. Results Bipolar disorder patients with a prior suicide attempt had lower fractional anisotropy (FA) within the left orbital frontal white matter (p impulsivity compared to patients without a previous suicide attempt. Among patients with a prior suicide attempt, FA in the orbital frontal white matter region correlated inversely with motor impulsivity. Conclusions Abnormal orbital frontal white matter may play a role in impulsive and suicidal behavior among patients with bipolar disorder. PMID:22329475

  20. "MOOC Mania"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisenhelder, Susan

    2013-01-01

    The push for increased use of online teaching in colleges and universities has been gaining momentum for some time, but even in that context the recent enthusiasm for MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses), free online courses that often enroll tens of thousands of students, is remarkable and rightly dubbed "MOOC Mania." As with so many…

  1. A pilot study differentiating recurrent major depression from bipolar disorder cycling on the depressive pole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marty Hinz

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Marty Hinz1, Alvin Stein2, Thomas Uncini31Clinical Research, NeuroResearch Clinics, Inc., Cape Coral, FL, USA; 2Stein Orthopedic Associates, Plantation, FL, USA; 3DBS Labs, Duluth, MN, USAPurpose: A novel method for differentiating and treating bipolar disorder cycling on the depressive pole from patients who are suffering a major depressive episode is explored in this work. To confirm the diagnosis of type 1 or type 2 bipolar disorder, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV criteria require that at least one manic or hypomanic episode be identified. History of one or more manic or hypomanic episodes may be impossible to obtain, representing a potential blind spot in the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. Many bipolar patients who cycle primarily on the depressive side for many years carry a misdiagnosis of recurrent major depression, leading to treatment with antidepressants that achieve little or no relief of symptoms. This article discusses a novel approach for diagnosing and treating patients with bipolar disorder cycling on the depressive pole versus patients with recurrent major depression.Patients and methods: Patients involved in this study were formally diagnosed with recurrent major depression under DSM-IV criteria and had no medical history of mania or hypomania to support the diagnosis of bipolar disorder. All patients had suffered multiple depression treatment failures in the past, when evaluated under DSM-IV guidelines, secondary to administration of antidepressant drugs and/or serotonin with dopamine amino acid precursors.Results: This study contained 1600 patients who were diagnosed with recurrent major depression under the DSM-IV criteria. All patients had no medical history of mania or hypomania. All patients experienced no relief of depression symptoms on level 3 amino acid dosing values of the amino acid precursor dosing protocol. Of 1600 patients studied, 117 (7.3% nonresponder patients were identified

  2. Validity of a Farsi translation of the composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI to diagnose schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Amini

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI is a comprehensive, standardized diagnostic interview for the assessment of psychiatric disorders. There have been few studies on the validity of the CIDI. The objective of present study was to assess the validity of a Farsi translation of the complete CIDI and its psychosis/mania module in five referral clinical psychiatric settings. Methods: Two hundred and three as well as 104 consecutive admissions were interviewed using the complete and the psychosis/mania module, respectively. Within two days of the CIDI interview, two last year residents of psychiatry or psychiatrist who were blind to the CIDI diagnosis completed the Clinical diagnostic checklists (based on DSM-IV and ICD-10 criteria simultaneously and reached the consensus diagnosis. Data analysis was performed using SPSS 11 to determine the validity of CIDI. Results: The sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of schizophrenia was 0.12 and 0.96 using DSM-IV criteria. According to ICD-10 criteria, the results were the same with 0.19% sensitivity and 0.96% specificity. The sensitivity for the diagnosis of bipolar I disorder was low (0.21 using DSM-IV criteria and 0.17% using ICD-10 and specificity, high (0.90 compared to DSM-IV and 0.89 compared to ICD-10 criteria. The results were rather similar for the psychosis/mania module of CIDI. Conclusion: This study suggests that the Farsi translation of both the complete CIDI and the psychosis/mania module of CIDI have good specificity, but poor sensitivity for the diagnosis of schizophrenia and of bipolar I disorder.

  3. O papel dos antipsicóticos atípicos no tratamento do transtorno bipolar: revisão da literatura The role of atypical antipsychotic agents in the treatment of bipolar disorder: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acioly LT Lacerda

    2002-03-01

    disorder, especially in the acute manic phase. Recently new alternatives have become available with the development of newer atypical antipsychotic agents. A comprehensive Medline search was conducted, and all available literature concerning the role of atypical antipsychotics in the treatment of bipolar patients was retrieved. Olanzapine showed to be quite effective in the treatment of acute mania, and it was found that an average of 63.5% of the patients had a significant improvement in double blind controlled studies, with weight gain as the major side effect. Data was less robust for clozapine and risperidone, mainly due to methodological limitations of the few available studies. It was also found a considerable interest in future investigating the efficacy of these pharmacological agents in refractory cases and in the treatment of the disorder's depressive phase. Additionally, there has been extensive interest in evaluating their potential action as mood stabilizers, for which there will be a need of longer-term longitudinal studies.

  4. Treatment moderators of child- and family-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy for pediatric bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Sally M; Henry, David B; Katz, Andrea C; Peters, Amy T; West, Amy E

    2015-02-01

    Prior work has demonstrated the efficacy of child- and family-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy (CFF-CBT) versus enhanced treatment as usual (TAU; unstructured psychotherapy) for pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD). The current study builds on primary findings by examining baseline child, parent, and family characteristics as moderators of symptom response trajectories. A total of 69 youth aged 7 to 13 years (mean = 9.19 years, SD = 1.61 years) with DSM-IV-TR bipolar I, II, or not otherwise specified (NOS) were randomly assigned, with family members, to CFF-CBT or TAU. Both treatments consisted of 12 weekly sessions and 6 monthly booster sessions. Participants were assessed at baseline, 4, 8, and 12 weeks, and 6-month follow-up on mania and depression symptoms and overall psychiatric severity. Parents and youth also provided self-report data on baseline characteristics. CFF-CBT demonstrated greater efficacy for youth depressive symptoms relative to TAU for parents with higher baseline depressive symptoms and lower income, and marginally for families with higher cohesion. In addition, youth with lower baseline depression and youth with higher self-esteem showed a poorer response to TAU versus CFF-CBT on mania symptom outcomes. Age, sex, baseline mania symptoms, comorbidity, and suicidality did not moderate treatment response. Results indicate that CFF-CBT was relatively immune to the presence of treatment moderators. Findings suggest the need for specialized treatment to address symptoms of PBD in the context of parental symptomatology and financial stress. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. The Dancing Manias: Psychogenic Illness as a Social Phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanska, Douglas J

    2018-01-01

    The dancing mania erupted in the 14th century in the wake of the Black Death, and recurred for centuries in central Europe - particularly Germany, the Netherlands, and Belgium - finally abating in the early 17th century. The term "dancing mania" was derived from "choreomania," a concatenation of choros (dance) and mania (madness). A variant, tarantism, was prevalent in southern Italy from the 15th to the 17th centuries, and was attributed at the time to bites from the tarantula spider. Affected individuals participated in continuous, prolonged, erratic, often frenzied and sometimes erotic, dancing. In the 14th century, the dancing mania was linked to a corruption of the festival of St. John's Day by ancient pagan customs, but by the 16th century it was commonly considered an ordeal sent by a saint, or a punishment from God for people's sins. Consequently, during outbreaks in the 14th and 15th centuries, the dancing mania was considered an issue for magistrates and priests, not physicians, even though the disorder proved intractable to decrees and exorcisms. However, in the 16th century Paracelsus discounted the idea that the saints caused or interceded in the cure of the dancing mania; he instead suggested a psychogenic or malingered etiology, and this reformulation brought the dancing mania within the purview of physicians. Paracelsus advocated various mystical, psychological, and pharmacological approaches, depending on the presumptive etiologic factors with individual patients. Only music provided any relief for tarantism. Later authors suggested that the dancing mania was a mass stress-induced psychosis, a mass psychogenic illness, a culturally determined form of ritualized behavior, a manifestation of religious ecstasy, or even the result of food poisoning caused by the toxic and psychoactive chemical products of ergot fungi. In reality, dancing manias did not have a single cause, but component causes likely included psychogenic illness, malingering, and

  6. Genetic mapping using haplotype, association and linkage methods suggests a locus for severe bipolar disorder (BPI) at 18q22-q23

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.B. Freimer (Nelson); V.I. Reus (Victor); M.A. Escamilla (Michael); L. Alison McInnes (L.); M. Spesny (Mitzi); P. Leon (Pedro); S. Service (Susan); L.B. Smith (Lauren); S. Silva (Sandra); E. Rojas; M. Gallegos (Michael); L. Meza (Luis); E. Fournier (Eduardo); S. Baharloo (Siamak); K. Blankenship (Kathleen); D.J. Tyler (David); S. Batki (Steven); S. Vinogradov (Sophia); J. Weissenbach (Jean); S.H. Barondes (Samuel); L.A. Sandkuijl (Lodewijk)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractManic-depressive illness, or bipolar disorder (BP), is characterized by episodes of elevated mood (mania) and depression. We designed a multistage study in the genetically isolated population of the Central Valley of Costa Rica to identify genes that promote susceptibility to severe BP

  7. Patient preferences for medicine administration for acute agitation: results from an internet-based survey of patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia in two Nordic countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Tine Rikke; Emborg, Charlotte; Dahlen, Karianne; Bøgelund, Mette; Carlborg, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    The objective was to elicit patient preferences for medicine administration method in the management of acute agitation episodes among patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. The patients' experiences of acute agitation episodes and their management of episodes were also explored. Data were collected via an anonymous, internet-based survey of residents in Denmark or Sweden with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder (October 2014 to December 2014). Inclusion criteria were having a diagnosis of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, and being above 18 years of age. The questionnaire included questions about preferences for medication attributes, experiences with pharmacological treatment for agitation and involvement in treatment plans. A total of 237 diagnosed patients (61 with schizophrenia; 176 with bipolar disorder) completed the questionnaire. Agitation episodes were experienced by 90% of the respondents. In total, 83% of the respondents reported having received treatment with tablets. When patients were presented with the attributes of an inhalation method, respondents stated that the fast onset of action, low risk of adverse reactions and least invasive form of drug delivery were positive attributes of treatment with inhalation. Inhalation is a new delivery route for treatment of acute agitation in patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Inhalation is the preferred treatment method for acute agitation among Danish and Swedish patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia.

  8. Clinical expression of obsessive-compulsive disorder in women with bipolar disorder Expressão clínica do transtorno obsessivo-compulsivo em uma amostra de mulheres com transtorno de humor bipolar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cilly Klüger Issler

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To study clinical and psychopathological features of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD in women with bipolar disorder (BD. METHODS: Fifteen outpatients with concurrent bipolar disorder I (80.0% or II (20.0% and obsessive-compulsive disorder were studied. Most of them (80.0% sought treatment for bipolar disorder. They were ascertained by means of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID/P, semi-structured interviews to investigate obsessions, compulsions and sensory phenomena that may precede compulsions and an additional module for the diagnosis of chronic motor and vocal tics. Severity of symptoms was assessed by the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Rating Scale, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Young Mania Rating Scale. RESULTS: Obsessive-compulsive disorder presented early onset (before the age of 10 in 9 (60% cases, preceded bipolar disorder in 10 (66.7% and displayed chronic waxing and waning course in 13 (86.7% of them. There was wide overlap between types of obsessive-compulsive symptoms and all patients experienced sensory phenomena preceding the compulsions. There was no clear-cut impact of depressive and manic episodes on the intensity of obsessive-compulsive symptoms, which increased in depression and decreased in mania in 40.0% of the cases, had the opposite pattern in 26.7% of the patients and fluctuated inconsistently in the rest of them. Tics disorders were diagnosed in 5 (33.3% patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that in women with comorbid bipolar disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder the latter presents features that may be typical of the association of the two disorders, such as early onset and sensory phenomena preceding compulsions. A prospective controlled study is necessary to confirm these observations, due to some limitations of our study: small exclusively female sample, heterogeneity concerning the type of bipolar disorder and the disorder that determined sought of treatment and

  9. Executive function and attention span in euthymic patients with bipolar 1 disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normala, I; Abdul, Hamid A R; Azlin, B; Nik Ruzyanei, N J; Hazli, Z; Shah, S A

    2010-09-01

    This is a cross sectional comparison study to assess executive function and attention span in euthymic patients with bipolar 1 disorder. It compares the performance of these two cognitive domains in 40 patients with bipolar 1 disorder to that of 40 healthy normal subjects using Trail Making (TMT), Digit Span (Forward and Backward) and Verbal Fluency (VF) tests. The association between demographic, clinical characteristics and performance in all tests were examined. Patients with bipolar illness showed significant impairment with moderate to large effect sizes (VF = 0.67, TMT A = 0.52, TMT B = 0.81, Digit Forward = 0.97, Digit backward = 1.10) in all tasks of executive and attention functioning. These impairments are observed in the absence of active mood symptoms while duration and severity of illness are not found to have an effect on both cognitive domains. Medications received by patients with bipolar disorder have significant association with performance on executive tasks. The results of this study add on to the existing global evidence of cognitive impairment in bipolar illness despite its cross cultural differences. Its presence in the absence of mania, depression or mixed episode indicates that cognitive impairment is stable even after symptoms recovery.

  10. [Search association between cannabis abuse and bipolar disorder: A study on a sample of patients hospitalized for bipolar disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazour, F; Awaida, C; Souaiby, L; Richa, S

    2018-02-01

    Cannabis use is very frequent in bipolar disorder and has been found to increase the duration and frequency of manic symptoms while decreasing those of depression. Bipolar patients who use cannabis were shown to have poorer compliance to treatment, more symptoms that are psychotic and a worse prognosis than patients who do not. In this study, we have evaluated the importance of cannabis use among bipolar patients admitted to the Psychiatric Hospital of the Cross, Lebanon (Hôpital Psychiatrique de la Croix [HPC]) as well as the clinical differences between cannabis users and non-users. Over a period of 13 months, we recruited the patients admitted to HPC for bipolar disorder according to the MINI DSM-IV criteria. These patients were screened for substance abuse/dependence and were accordingly divided into 2 groups: cannabis users and cannabis non-users. Both groups were interviewed by a medical student and asked to answer the following questionnaires: the MINI DSM-IV, the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) for evaluating manic episodes, the Montgomery and Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) for evaluating depressive episodes, the Scale for the Assessment of Positive Symptoms (SAPS) to assess psychotic symptoms associated to the bipolar disorder, and the Cannabis Abuse Screening Test (CAST) for evaluating the importance of cannabis consumption. The study's exclusion criteria were the following: diagnosis of a confusional state, schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders, dementia, age less than 18 years old or superior to 85 years old, and non-cooperation. Among the 100 bipolar patients included in the study, 27 (27 %) were cannabis users. Eight of these 27 patients were first admitted to HPC for substance abuse and then included in the study after a bipolar disorder was diagnosed according to the MINI DSM-IV criteria. Cannabis use was found to be more prevalent in young males with a mean age of 20.3 years old at the first contact with the substance

  11. Diagnosis and Treatment of Comorbidities of Tourette's Syndrome and Bipolar Disorder in A 10-Year-Old Boy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Wei Wang

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes in moods are one of the comorbid psychiatric manifestations that frequently occur in patients with Tourette's syndrome. The assessment of a manic episode in children with Tourette's syndrome is challenging. Furthermore, the treatment of children with comorbid mania and Tourette's syndrome has not been extensively studied. We present a 10-year-old boy who suffered from both Tourette's syndrome and mania, whose symptoms improved after using lithium and risperidone. The child was diagnosed with Tourette's syndrome at 7 years of age when he suffered from tics and experienced his first manic episode. He received monotherapy, including haloperidol, risperidone and aripiprazole, and the response was poor. When the combination of lithium and risperidone was used, the tics and mania subsided. It is important to assess individuals with Tourette's syndrome for associated bipolar disorder. The treatment of children with both disorders is a major clinical issue, and our case may serve as an example for successful treatment strategies.

  12. A diagnosis of bipolar spectrum disorder predicts diagnostic conversion from unipolar depression to bipolar disorder: a 5-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Young Sup; Shim, In Hee; Wang, Hee-Ryung; Song, Hoo Rim; Jun, Tae-Youn; Bahk, Won-Myong

    2015-03-15

    The major aims of this study were to identify factors that may predict the diagnostic conversion from major depressive disorder (MDD) to bipolar disorder (BP) and to evaluate the predictive performance of the bipolar spectrum disorder (BPSD) diagnostic criteria. The medical records of 250 patients with a diagnosis of MDD for at least 5 years were retrospectively reviewed for this study. The diagnostic conversion from MDD to BP was observed in 18.4% of 250 MDD patients, and the diagnostic criteria for BPSD predicted this conversion with high sensitivity (0.870) and specificity (0.917). A family history of BP, antidepressant-induced mania/hypomania, brief major depressive episodes, early age of onset, antidepressant wear-off, and antidepressant resistance were also independent predictors of this conversion. This study was conducted using a retrospective design and did not include structured diagnostic interviews. The diagnostic criteria for BPSD were highly predictive of the conversion from MDD to BP, and conversion was associated with several clinical features of BPSD. Thus, the BPSD diagnostic criteria may be useful for the prediction of bipolar diathesis in MDD patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Predicting Mood Changes in Bipolar Disorder through Heartbeat Nonlinear Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, Gaetano; Nardelli, Mimma; Lanata', Antonio; Gentili, Claudio; Bertschy, Gilles; Kosel, Markus; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale

    2016-04-20

    Bipolar Disorder (BD) is characterized by an alternation of mood states from depression to (hypo)mania. Mixed states, i.e., a combination of depression and mania symptoms at the same time, can also be present. The diagnosis of this disorder in the current clinical practice is based only on subjective interviews and questionnaires, while no reliable objective psychophysiological markers are available. Furthermore, there are no biological markers predicting BD outcomes, or providing information about the future clinical course of the phenomenon. To overcome this limitation, here we propose a methodology predicting mood changes in BD using heartbeat nonlinear dynamics exclusively, derived from the ECG. Mood changes are here intended as transitioning between two mental states: euthymic state (EUT), i.e., the good affective balance, and non-euthymic (non-EUT) states. Heart Rate Variability (HRV) series from 14 bipolar spectrum patients (age: 33.439.76, age range: 23-54; 6 females) involved in the European project PSYCHE, undergoing whole night ECG monitoring were analyzed. Data were gathered from a wearable system comprised of a comfortable t-shirt with integrated fabric electrodes and sensors able to acquire ECGs. Each patient was monitored twice a week, for 14 weeks, being able to perform normal (unstructured) activities. From each acquisition, the longest artifact-free segment of heartbeat dynamics was selected for further analyses. Sub-segments of 5 minutes of this segment were used to estimate trends of HRV linear and nonlinear dynamics. Considering data from a current observation at day t0, and past observations at days (t1, t2,...,), personalized prediction accuracies in forecasting a mood state (EUT/non-EUT) at day t+1 were 69% on average, reaching values as high as 83.3%. This approach opens to the possibility of predicting mood states in bipolar patients through heartbeat nonlinear dynamics exclusively.

  14. Bipolar affective disorder: A review of novel forms of therapy

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    Dziwota Ewelina

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Normothymic, antidepressant and antipsychotic pharmaceutics are, in accordance with international guidelines, employed both in the therapy and the prevention of bipolar disorder (BD. Long-term studies on the mechanisms of action of such medications, as well as on the pathogenetic background of BD, have led to the discovery of effective, albeit unconventional pharmacotherapeutic approaches. These methods have the potential to successfully treat mania and depression, as well as to counter affective episode relapse. Allopurinol - commonly used to treat gout, secondary hyperuricemia and Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, acts by inhibiting the synthesis of uric acid, levels of which are often increased in manic patients. Due to this, an evaluation of the potential effect of allopurinol on the reduction of mania symptoms seems to be reasonable. Additionally, the numerable research papers coming out of research regarding the role of purine neurotransmitters in mood alterations, indicate that adenosine agonists act analogously to dopamine antagonists.

  15. Quantifying over-activity in bipolar and schizophrenia patients in a human open field Paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Perry, William; Minassian, Arpi; Henry, Brook; Kincaid, Meegin; Young, Jared W.; Geyer, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that a cardinal symptom of mania is over-activity and exaggerated goal-directed behavior. Nevertheless, few attempts have been made to quantify this behavior objectively in a laboratory environment. Having a methodology to assess over-activity reliably might be useful in distinguishing manic bipolar disorder (BD) from schizophrenia (SCZ) during highly activated states. In the current study, quantifiable measures of object-interaction were assessed using a multivariate ...

  16. Mania associated with paliperidone treatment in schizophrenia: A case report

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    Süleyman Demir

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Paliperidone is an atypical antipsychotic drug used to treat schizophrenia. Paliperidone can cause some rare side effects during treatment. Despite many publications of mania and hypomania induced by antipsychotics, mania cases induced by paliperidone are few in the literature. In this case a schizophrenia patient showing symptoms of mania during usage of paliperidone with a dose of 9 mg/day in which the symptoms rapidly disappeared after discontinuation of paliperidone and initiation of aripiprazole was reported. Clinicians should be aware of that Paliperidone treatment may trigger mania symptoms. J Clin Exp Invest 2015; 6 (3: 321-323

  17. Quetiapine monotherapy for bipolar depression

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    Michael E Thase

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Michael E ThaseDepartments of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, USA; and the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: Bipolar depression is more common, disabling, and difficult-to-treat than the manic and hypomanic phases that define bipolar disorder. Unlike the treatment of so-called “unipolar” depressions, antidepressants generally are not indicated as monotherapies for bipolar depressions and recent studies suggest that - even when used in combination with traditional mood stabilizers – antidepressants may have questionable value for bipolar depression. The current practice is that mood stabilizers are initiated first as monotherapies; however, the antidepressant efficacy of lithium and valproate is modest at best. Within this context the role of atypical antipsychotics is being evaluated. The combination of olanzapine and the antidepressant fluoxetine was the first treatment to receive regulatory approval in the US specifically for bipolar I depression. Quetiapine was the second medication to be approved for this indication, largely as the result of two pivotal trials known by the acronyms of BOLDER (BipOLar DEpRession I and II. Both studies demonstrated that two doses of quetiapine (300 mg and 600 mg given once daily at bedtime were significantly more effective than placebo, with no increased risk of patients switching into mania. Pooling the two studies, quetiapine was effective for both bipolar I and bipolar II depressions and for patients with (and without a history of rapid cycling. The two doses were comparably effective in both studies. Although the efficacy of quetiapine monotherapy has been established, much additional research is necessary. Further studies are needed to more fully investigate dose-response relationships and comparing quetiapine monotherapy to other mood stabilizers

  18. Early Maladaptive Schemas Related to Unipolar and Bipolar Depression: Similarities and Differences

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    Nergis LAPSEKİLİ

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective and methodology: Cognitive theory of depression has begun to examine the difference between bipolar and unipolar depression in the context of thinking features. Yet, little is known about the same and seperated points of bipolar and unipolar depression. The objective is evaluating relationship between cognitive schemas of bipolar and unipolar patients. Bipolar and unipolar depression patients and a control group were enrolled in the study. Beck Depression Inventory, Young Mania Scale and Young Schema Questionnaire were administered to the groups. Results: There was significant difference between unipolar and control groups in “Abandonment/instability”. In “mistrust/ abuse” significant difference was between unipolar and bipolar and between unipolar and control groups. ln “entitlement/self-centeredness” difference was between unipolar and control groups. In all other schemas, difference was between unipolar and control and bipolar and control groups. In these schemas, control group had significantly lower scores than others. Unipolar and bipolar groups were similar. Conclusion: In patient groups, schemas like defectiveness, incompetence, failure, vulnerability to danger and undeveloped self were indicative of low self-perception. This case draws attention to distortions in self-perception. When the absence of difference between bipolar and controls in “mistrust/abuse” and “abandonment/instability” schemas is evaluated in terms of cognitive triad, it is suggested that environmental perspective in this group of patients did not exhibit pessimistic features. The only significantly different schema between unipolar and bipolar groups was “mistrust/ abuse”. This suggests that bipolar group didn’t have negative thoughts like unipolar patients about the perception of the enviroment.

  19. Relationship between Chinese adjective descriptors of personality and emotional symptoms in young Chinese patients with bipolar disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Enyan; Li, Huihui; Fan, Hongying; Gao, Qianqian; Tan, Yunfei; Lou, Junyao; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Wei

    2015-12-01

    To investigate whether personality traits are related to emotional symptoms (mania, hypomania, and depression) in Chinese patients with bipolar disorders. Patients with bipolar I and II disorders, and healthy volunteers, were assessed using the Chinese Adjective Descriptors of Personality (CADP) questionnaire, Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ), Hypomanic Checklist (HCL-32), and Plutchik-van Praag Depression Inventory (PVP). Seventy-three patients with bipolar I disorder, 35 with bipolar II disorder and 216 healthy controls were included. Bipolar I and II groups scored significantly higher on MDQ, HCL-32 and PVP scales than controls; the bipolar II group scored lower on the MDQ, but higher on the HCL-32 and PVP than bipolar I. In the bipolar I group, the CADP Intelligent trait (β, 0.25) predicted MDQ; Intelligent (β, -0.24), Agreeable (β, 0.22) and Emotional (β, 0.34) traits predicted PVP. In the bipolar II group, Intelligent (β, 0.22), Agreeable (β, -0.24) and Unsocial (β, 0.31) traits predicted MDQ; Intelligent (β, -0.20), Agreeable (β, -0.31) and Emotional (β, -0.26) traits predicted HCL-32. Four out of five Chinese personality traits were associated with emotional symptoms in patients with bipolar I or II disorder, but displayed different associations depending on disorder type. © The Author(s) 2015.

  20. Racial disparities in bipolar disorder treatment and research: a call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akinhanmi, Margaret O; Biernacka, Joanna M; Strakowski, Stephen M; McElroy, Susan L; Balls Berry, Joyce E; Merikangas, Kathleen R; Assari, Shervin; McInnis, Melvin G; Schulze, Thomas G; LeBoyer, Marion; Tamminga, Carol; Patten, Christi; Frye, Mark A

    2018-03-12

    Health disparities between individuals of African and European ancestry are well documented. The disparities in bipolar disorder may be driven by racial bias superimposed on established factors contributing to misdiagnosis, including: evolving empirically based diagnostic criteria (International Classification of Diseases [ICD], Research Diagnostic Criteria [RDC] and Diagnostic and Statistical Manual [DSM]), multiple symptom domains (i.e. mania, depression and psychosis), and multimodal medical and additional psychiatric comorbidity. For this paper, we reviewed the phenomenological differences between bipolar individuals of African and European ancestry in the context of diagnostic criteria and clinical factors that may contribute to a potential racial bias. Published data show that bipolar persons of African ancestry, compared with bipolar persons of non-African ancestry, are more often misdiagnosed with a disease other than bipolar disorder (i.e. schizophrenia). Additionally, studies show that there are disparities in recruiting patients of African ancestry to participate in important genomic studies. This gap in biological research in this underrepresented minority may represent a missed opportunity to address potential racial differences in the risk and course of bipolar illness. A concerted effort by the research community to increase inclusion of diverse persons in studies of bipolar disorder through community engagement may facilitate fully addressing these diagnostic and treatment disparities in bipolar individuals of African ancestry. Published 2018. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  1. Hyperthyroidism and risk for bipolar disorders: a nationwide population-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li-Yu; Shen, Cheng-Che; Hu, Yu-Wen; Chen, Mu-Hong; Tsai, Chia-Fen; Chiang, Huey-Ling; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Wang, Wei-Shu; Chen, Pan-Ming; Hu, Tsung-Ming; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Su, Tung-Ping; Liu, Chia-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Thyroid disorders have long been associated with psychiatric illness, often with symptoms suggestive of mood disorders. The most common clinical features associated with hyperthyroidism are anxiety and depression. The risk of bipolar disorders, especially bipolar mania, among patients with thyroid disorders has not been well characterized. We explored the relationship of hyperthyroidism and the subsequent development of bipolar disorders, and examined the risk factors for bipolar disorders in patients with hyperthyroidism. We identified patients who were diagnosed with hyperthyroidism between 2000 and 2010 in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A comparison cohort without hyperthyroidism was matched based on age, sex, and comorbidities. The occurrence of bipolar disorders was evaluated in both cohorts based on diagnosis and the use of mood stabilizer drugs. The hyperthyroidism cohort consisted of 21, 574 patients, and the comparison cohort consisted of 21, 574 matched control patients without hyperthyroidism. The incidence of bipolar disorders (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 2.31, 95% CI 1.80-2.99, Phyperthyroidism patients than the control patients. Multivariate, matched regression models showed that women (HR 2.02, 95% CI 1.34-3.05, P = .001), patients with alcohol use disorders (HR 3.03, 95% CI 1.58-5.79, P = .001), and those with asthma (HR 1.70, 95% CI 1.18-2.43, P = .004) were independent risk factors for the development of bipolar disorders in hyperthyroidism patients. Although a possibility that the diagnosis of bipolar disorders in this study actually includes "bipolar disorders due to hyperthyroidism" cannot be excluded, this study suggests that hyperthyroidism may increase the risk of developing bipolar disorders.

  2. Hyperthyroidism and Risk for Bipolar Disorders: A Nationwide Population-Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu-Wen; Chen, Mu-Hong; Tsai, Chia-Fen; Chiang, Huey-Ling; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Wang, Wei-Shu; Chen, Pan-Ming; Hu, Tsung-Ming; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Su, Tung-Ping; Liu, Chia-Jen

    2013-01-01

    Background Thyroid disorders have long been associated with psychiatric illness, often with symptoms suggestive of mood disorders. The most common clinical features associated with hyperthyroidism are anxiety and depression. The risk of bipolar disorders, especially bipolar mania, among patients with thyroid disorders has not been well characterized. Objective We explored the relationship of hyperthyroidism and the subsequent development of bipolar disorders, and examined the risk factors for bipolar disorders in patients with hyperthyroidism. Methods We identified patients who were diagnosed with hyperthyroidism between 2000 and 2010 in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. A comparison cohort without hyperthyroidism was matched based on age, sex, and comorbidities. The occurrence of bipolar disorders was evaluated in both cohorts based on diagnosis and the use of mood stabilizer drugs. Results The hyperthyroidism cohort consisted of 21, 574 patients, and the comparison cohort consisted of 21, 574 matched control patients without hyperthyroidism. The incidence of bipolar disorders (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 2.31, 95% CI 1.80–2.99, Phyperthyroidism patients than the control patients. Multivariate, matched regression models showed that women (HR 2.02, 95% CI 1.34–3.05, P = .001), patients with alcohol use disorders (HR 3.03, 95% CI 1.58–5.79, P = .001), and those with asthma (HR 1.70, 95% CI 1.18–2.43, P = .004) were independent risk factors for the development of bipolar disorders in hyperthyroidism patients. Conclusions Although a possibility that the diagnosis of bipolar disorders in this study actually includes "bipolar disorders due to hyperthyroidism" cannot be excluded, this study suggests that hyperthyroidism may increase the risk of developing bipolar disorders. PMID:24023669

  3. Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) for bipolar depression: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondé, Clément; Amad, Ali; Nieto, Isabel; Brunoni, André Russowsky; Neufeld, Nicholas H; Bellivier, Frank; Poulet, Emmanuel; Geoffroy, Pierre-Alexis

    2017-08-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a severe and recurrent brain disorder that can manifest in manic or depressive episodes. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) has been proposed as a novel therapeutic modality for patients experiencing bipolar depression, for which standard treatments are often inefficient. While several studies have been conducted in this patient group, there has been no systematic review or meta-analysis that specifically examines bipolar depression. We aimed to address this gap in the literature and evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of tDCS in patients fulfilling DSM-IV-TR criteria for BD I, II, or BD not otherwise specified (NOS). We systematically searched the literature from April 2002 to November 2016 to identify relevant publications for inclusion in our systematic review and meta-analysis. Effect sizes for depression rating-scale scores were expressed as the standardized mean difference (SMD) before and after tDCS. Thirteen of 382 identified studies met eligibility criteria for our systematic review. The meta-analysis included 46 patients from 7 studies with depression rating-scale scores pre- and post-tDCS. Parameters of tDCS procedures were heterogeneous. Depression scores decreased significantly with a medium effect size after acute-phase of treatment (SMD 0.71 [0.25-1.18], z=3.00, p=0.003) and at the furthest endpoint (SMD 1.27 [0.57-1.97], z=3.57, p=0.0004). Six cases of affective switching under tDCS treatment protocols were observed. Depressive symptoms respond to tDCS in patients with BD. Additional studies, and particularly randomized controlled trials, are needed to clarify the effectiveness of tDCS in bipolar depression, the frequency of tDCS-emergent hypomania/mania, and which tDCS modalities are most efficient. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. First-episode types in bipolar disorder: predictive associations with later illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldessarini, R J; Tondo, L; Visioli, C

    2014-05-01

    Characteristics of initial illness in bipolar disorder (BD) may predict later morbidity. We reviewed computerized clinical records and life charts of DSM-IV-TR BD-I or BD-II patients at affiliated mood-disorder centers to ascertain relationships of initial major illnesses to later morbidity and other clinical characteristics. Adult BD patient-subjects (N=1081; 59.8% BD-I; 58.1% women; 43% ever hospitalized) were followed 15.7±12.8 years after onsets ranking: depression (59%)>mania (13%)>psychosis (8.0%)≥anxiety (7.6%)≥hypomania (6.7%)>mixed states (5.5%). Onset types differed in clinical characteristics and strongly predicted later morbidity. By initial episode types, total time-ill ranked: mania≥hypomania≥mixed-states≥psychosis>depression>anxiety. Depression was most prevalent long-term, overall; its ratio to mania-like illness (D/M, by per cent-time-ill) ranked by onset type: anxiety (4.75)>depression (3.27)>mixed states (1.39)>others (allanxiety (38.8%), depression (30.8%), or mixed onsets (13.3%); both were predicted by initial mania depression sequences. First-lifetime illnesses and cycles predicted later morbidity patterns among BD patients, indicating value of early morbidity for prognosis and long-term planning. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Histone deacetylase activity and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF levels in a pharmacological model of mania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Stertz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the present study, we aimed to examine the effects of repeated D-amphetamine (AMPH exposure, a well-accepted animal model of acute mania in bipolar disorder (BD, and histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors on locomotor behavior and HDAC activity in the prefrontal cortex (PFC and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of rats. Moreover, we aimed to assess brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF protein and mRNA levels in these samples. Methods: We treated adult male Wistar rats with 2 mg/kg AMPH or saline intraperitoneally for 14 days. Between the 8th and 14th days, rats also received 47.5 mg/kg lithium (Li, 200 mg/kg sodium valproate (VPT, 2 mg/kg sodium butyrate (SB, or saline. We evaluated locomotor activity in the open-field task and assessed HDAC activity in the PFC and PBMCs, and BDNF levels in the PFC and plasma. Results: AMPH significantly increased locomotor activity, which was reversed by all drugs. This hyperactivity was associated with increased HDAC activity in the PFC, which was partially reversed by Li, VPT, and SB. No differences were found in BDNF levels. Conclusion: Repeated AMPH administration increases HDAC activity in the PFC without altering BDNF levels. The partial reversal of HDAC increase by Li, VPT, and SB may account for their ability to reverse AMPH-induced hyperactivity.

  6. O tratamento farmacológico do transtorno bipolar: uma revisão sistemática e crítica dos aspectos metodológicos dos estudos clínicos modernos The pharmacological treatment of bipolar disorder: a systematic and critical review of the methodological aspects of modern clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elie Cheniaux

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Revisar sistematicamente os principais estudos clínicos sobre o tratamento farmacológico do transtorno bipolar e fazer uma análise crítica de seus aspectos metodológicos. MÉTODO: Realizou-se uma busca nas bases de dados Medline, ISI e PsycINFO, utilizando-se os seguintes termos de busca: "bipolar", "randomized", "placebo" e "controlled". Foram selecionados estudos clínicos randomizados, duplo-cegos e controlados por placebo sobre o tratamento farmacológico do transtorno bipolar. Além disso, de acordo com os nossos critérios, as amostras deveriam ser de no mínimo 100 pacientes e a substância testada deveria ser usada como monoterapia. RESULTADOS: 34 artigos se adequaram aos critérios de seleção. Todas as substâncias atualmente indicadas para mania, depressão bipolar e para o tratamento de manutenção foram mais eficazes que o placebo em pelo menos um estudo. Todavia, esses estudos tiveram amostras altamente selecionadas, altas taxas de abandono e baixas taxas de resposta clínica. CONCLUSÃO: Os modernos estudos clínicos sobre o tratamento farmacológico do transtorno bipolar apresentam algumas importantes limitações metodológicas. Assim, seus resultados devem ser considerados com cautela.OBJECTIVE: To review systematically the main clinical trials on the pharmacological treatment of bipolar disorder and to make a critical analysis of their methodological aspects. METHOD: A search in Medline, ISI and PsycINFO databases was conducted, using the following search terms: "bipolar", "randomized", "placebo" e "controlled". Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials on the pharmacological treatment of bipolar disorder were selected. Besides, according to our criteria, samples had to consist of at least 100 patients and experimental drug had to be used as monotherapy. RESULTS: 34 articles met our selection criteria. All drugs currently indicated for mania, bipolar depression and maintenance treatment of

  7. Treatment in a specialised out-patient mood disorder clinic v. standard out-patient treatment in the early course of bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Hansen, Hanne Vibe; Hvenegaard, Anne

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about whether treatment in a specialised out-patient mood disorder clinic improves long-term prognosis for patients discharged from initial psychiatric hospital admissions for bipolar disorder. AIMS: To assess the effect of treatment in a specialised out-patient mood...... disorder clinic v. standard decentralised psychiatric treatment among patients discharged from one of their first three psychiatric hospital admissions for bipolar disorder. METHOD: Patients discharged from their first, second or third hospital admission with a single manic episode or bipolar disorder were...... randomised to treatment in a specialised out-patient mood disorder clinic or standard care (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00253071). The primary outcome measure was readmission to hospital, which was obtained from the Danish Psychiatric Central Register. RESULTS: A total of 158 patients with mania/bipolar disorder...

  8. The association between mood state and chronobiological characteristics in bipolar I disorder: a naturalistic, variable cluster analysis-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Robert; Suppes, Trisha; Zeitzer, Jamie; McClung, Colleen; Tamminga, Carol; Tohen, Mauricio; Forero, Angelica; Dwivedi, Alok; Alvarado, Andres

    2018-02-19

    Multiple types of chronobiological disturbances have been reported in bipolar disorder, including characteristics associated with general activity levels, sleep, and rhythmicity. Previous studies have focused on examining the individual relationships between affective state and chronobiological characteristics. The aim of this study was to conduct a variable cluster analysis in order to ascertain how mood states are associated with chronobiological traits in bipolar I disorder (BDI). We hypothesized that manic symptomatology would be associated with disturbances of rhythm. Variable cluster analysis identified five chronobiological clusters in 105 BDI subjects. Cluster 1, comprising subjective sleep quality was associated with both mania and depression. Cluster 2, which comprised variables describing the degree of rhythmicity, was associated with mania. Significant associations between mood state and cluster analysis-identified chronobiological variables were noted. Disturbances of mood were associated with subjectively assessed sleep disturbances as opposed to objectively determined, actigraphy-based sleep variables. No associations with general activity variables were noted. Relationships between gender and medication classes in use and cluster analysis-identified chronobiological characteristics were noted. Exploratory analyses noted that medication class had a larger impact on these relationships than the number of psychiatric medications in use. In a BDI sample, variable cluster analysis was able to group related chronobiological variables. The results support our primary hypothesis that mood state, particularly mania, is associated with chronobiological disturbances. Further research is required in order to define these relationships and to determine the directionality of the associations between mood state and chronobiological characteristics.

  9. Prevalence and clinical impact of eating disorders in bipolar patients Prevalência e impacto clínico dos transtornos alimentares sobre os pacientes bipolares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Seixas

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To study the impact of eating disorders (EDs on the severity of bipolar disorder (BD. METHODS: The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I (SCID-I, Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D-17, Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A, Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF, Clinical Global Impression (CGI, and the World Health Organization Quality of Life Assessment (WHOQOL-BREF were used. Clinical and sociodemographic data were also collected. RESULTS: Among the 356 bipolar patients included in this study, 19 (5.3% were also diagnosed with ED. Of these, 57.9% had bulimia nervosa (BN and 42.1% had anorexia nervosa (AN. Among ED patients, 94.7% were female. Bipolar patients with EDs presented with lower scores in the mental health domain of the WHOQOL-BREF, higher scores of depressive symptoms, and more psychiatric comorbidities. CONCLUSIONS: ED comorbidities imposed important negative outcomes in bipolar patients. This finding suggests that attention should be given to the presence of EDs in BD patients and that better treatments focused on this population should be developed.OBJETIVO: Estudar a influência dos transtornos alimentares (TA na gravidade do transtorno bipolar (TB. MÉTODOS: Foram utilizadas a Entrevista Clínica Estruturada para o Eixo I do DSM-IV (SCID-I, a Escala de Young para Avaliação da Mania (YMRS, a Escala de Hamilton para Avaliação da Depressão (HAM-D-17, a Escala de Hamilton para Avaliação da Ansiedade (HAM-A, a Avaliação do Funcionamento Global (GAF e a Escala Breve de Avaliação da Qualidade de Vida da Organização Mundial da Saúde (WHOQOL-BREF. Os dados clínicos e sociodemográficos também foram coletados. RESULTADOS: Entre os 355 pacientes com TB incluídos neste estudo, 19 (5,3% também foram diagnosticados como portadores de TA. Destes, 57,9% tinham bulimia nervosa (BN e 42,1% anorexia nervosa (AN. Dentre os pacientes com TA, 94,7% eram do gênero feminino

  10. [The concept of mania in Greek medical and philosophical literature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corleto, L M

    1992-01-01

    Coverage of the concept of mania in late archaic Greek culture displays a clear difference between its use in medical and philosophical works. Medical literature uses the terms [Greek] and [Greek] to describe mania, with the condition seen largely associated with physical illness. Specific treatment for this attered psychic state is not advanced. The philosophical view sees mania as a divine folly and thus possessing positive as well as negative aspects. Plate identifies four types of mania and treatment is closely associated with the divinity seen as responsible for that particular type. The radical rationalism found in the medical literature is a counterpoint to moderation as shown by Plato with his interest on regulations of society.

  11. Review of risperidone for the treatment of pediatric and adolescent bipolar disorder and schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey R Bishop

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey R Bishop1,2, Mani N Pavuluri21Department of Pharmacy Practice, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy, Chicago, IL, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry, Pediatric Mood Disorders Program and Center for Cognitive Medicine, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Risperidone is a commonly used medication for the treatment of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in children and adolescents. It has been studied as a monotherapy treatment in early onset schizophrenia and as both monotherapy and combination therapy for pediatric bipolar disorder. Studies to date indicate that risperidone is an effective treatment for positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia and mania symptoms of bipolar disorder. In young patient populations, side effects such as weight gain, extrapyramidal side effects, and prolactin elevation require consideration when evaluating the risk benefit ratio for individual patients. Here we review published studies of risperidone for the treatment of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia in children and adolescents to provide practitioners with an overview of published data on the efficacy and safety of risperidone in these patient populations.Keywords: risperidone, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, children, adolescents

  12. Family functioning and the course of adolescent bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Aimee E; Judd, Charles M; Axelson, David A; Miklowitz, David J

    2012-12-01

    The symptoms of bipolar disorder affect and are affected by the functioning of family environments. Little is known, however, about the stability of family functioning among youth with bipolar disorder as they cycle in and out of mood episodes. This study examined family functioning and its relationship to symptoms of adolescent bipolar disorder, using longitudinal measures of family cohesion, adaptability, and conflict. Parent- and adolescent-reported symptom and family functioning data were collected from 58 families of adolescents with bipolar disorder (mean age =14.48±1.60; 33 female, 25 male) who participated in a 2-year randomized trial of family-focused treatment for adolescents (FFT-A). Cohesion and adaptability scores did not significantly change over the course of the study. Parent-reported conflict prior to psychosocial treatment moderated the treatment responses of families, such that high-conflict families participating in FFT-A demonstrated greater reductions in conflict over time than low-conflict families. Moreover, adolescent mania symptoms improved more rapidly in low-conflict than in high-conflict families. For all respondents, cohesion, adaptability, and conflict were longitudinally correlated with adolescents' depression scores. Finally, decreases in parent-reported conflict also predicted decreases in adolescents' manic symptoms over the 2-year study. Findings suggest that family cohesion, adaptability, and conflict may be useful predictors of the course of adolescent mood symptoms. Family conflict may be an important target for family intervention in early onset bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Quantifying over-activity in bipolar and schizophrenia patients in a human open field paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, William; Minassian, Arpi; Henry, Brook; Kincaid, Meegin; Young, Jared W; Geyer, Mark A

    2010-06-30

    It has been suggested that a cardinal symptom of mania is over-activity and exaggerated goal-directed behavior. Nevertheless, few attempts have been made to quantify this behavior objectively in a laboratory environment. Having a methodology to assess over-activity reliably might be useful in distinguishing manic bipolar disorder (BD) from schizophrenia (SCZ) during highly activated states. In the current study, quantifiable measures of object interaction were assessed using a multivariate approach. Additionally, symptom correlates of over-activity were assessed. Patients admitted to an acute care psychiatric hospital for either BD with mania or SCZ (paranoid and non-paranoid subtypes) as well as non-patient comparison (NC) participants were assessed in an open field setting referred to as the human Behavioral Pattern Monitor (hBPM). Activity and interactions with novel and engaging objects were recorded for 15min via a concealed video camera and rated for exploratory behavior. Both BD and SCZ patients spent more time near the objects and exhibited more overall walking compared to NC. In contrast, BD patients exhibited greater physical contact with objects (number of object interactions and time spent with objects) relative to SCZ patients or NC participants, as well as more perseverative and socially disinhibited behaviors, indicating a unique pattern of over-activity and goal-directed behavior. Further analyses revealed a distinction between SCZ patients according to their subtype. The current study extends our methodology for quantifying exploration and over-activity in a controlled laboratory setting and aids in assessing the overlap and distinguishing characteristics of BD and SCZ.

  14. Alterations in BDNF (brain derived neurotrophic factor) and GDNF (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor) serum levels in bipolar disorder: The role of lithium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunca, Zeliha; Ozerdem, Aysegul; Ceylan, Deniz; Yalçın, Yaprak; Can, Güneş; Resmi, Halil; Akan, Pınar; Ergör, Gül; Aydemir, Omer; Cengisiz, Cengiz; Kerim, Doyuran

    2014-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been consistently reported to be decreased in mania or depression in bipolar disorders. Evidence suggests that Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) has a role in the pathogenesis of mood disorders. Whether GDNF and BDNF act in the same way across different episodes in bipolar disorders is unclear. BDNF and GDNF serum levels were measured simultaneously by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method in 96 patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder according to DSM-IV (37 euthymic, 33 manic, 26 depressed) in comparison to 61 healthy volunteers. SCID- I and SCID-non patient version were used for clinical evaluation of the patients and healthy volunteers respectively. Correlations between the two trophic factor levels, and medication dose, duration and serum levels of lithium or valproate were studied across different episodes of illness. Patients had significantly lower BDNF levels during mania and depression compared to euthymic patients and healthy controls. GDNF levels were not distinctive. However GDNF/BDNF ratio was higher in manic state compared to euthymia and healthy controls. Significant negative correlation was observed between BDNF and GDNF levels in euthymic patients. While BDNF levels correlated positively, GDNF levels correlated negatively with lithium levels. Regression analysis confirmed that lithium levels predicted only GDNF levels positively in mania, and negatively in euthymia. Small sample size in different episodes and drug-free patients was the limitation of thestudy. Current data suggests that lithium exerts its therapeutic action by an inverse effect on BDNF and GDNF levels, possibly by up-regulating BDNF and down-regulating GDNF to achieve euthymia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Addressing the need for rapid treatment of agitation in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: focus on inhaled loxapine as an alternative to injectable agents

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    Citrome L

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Leslie CitromeDepartment of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY, USAAbstract: Agitation (excessive motor or verbal activity can be associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania, and can further escalate into aggressive behavior and potentially lead to injuries in patients and staff. Medications used to treat agitation include antipsychotics and benzodiazepines, usually administered intramuscularly when rapid action is desired. Loxapine, a first-generation antipsychotic, has recently been reformulated into an inhaled powder that allows for direct administration to the lungs, resulting in rapid absorption into the systemic circulation. Administered via a single-use device, inhaled loxapine was tested in randomized controlled trials in agitation associated with schizophrenia or bipolar mania; doses of 5 mg and 10 mg were found to be efficacious, with an apparent dose response. In the Phase III studies, number needed to treat versus placebo for a ≥40% reduction from baseline on the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale – Excited Component (PANSS-EC at 2 hours was three for patients with bipolar disorder, and five for 5 mg and four for 10 mg for patients with schizophrenia, with effect sizes comparable to what has been observed in analogous studies of intramuscular injection of antipsychotics or lorazepam. Separation from placebo on the PANSS-EC was as early as 10 minutes postinhalation, the first time point where this was measured. Dysgeusia was the most commonly encountered spontaneously reported adverse event. Adverse events related to extrapyramidal symptoms and akathisia were relatively rare. Spirometry studies identified the potential for bronchospasm particularly in persons with asthma. Because of concerns over pulmonary safety, inhaled loxapine is restricted to use in hospitals and patients need to be prescreened for the presence of pulmonary disease, as well as monitored for signs and symptoms of

  16. Elevated left mid-frontal cortical activity prospectively predicts conversion to bipolar I disorder

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    Nusslock, Robin; Harmon-Jones, Eddie; Alloy, Lauren B.; Urosevic, Snezana; Goldstein, Kim; Abramson, Lyn Y.

    2013-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is characterized by a hypersensitivity to reward-relevant cues and a propensity to experience an excessive increase in approach-related affect, which may be reflected in hypo/manic symptoms. The present study examined the relationship between relative left-frontal electroencephalographic (EEG) activity, a proposed neurophysiological index of approach-system sensitivity and approach/reward-related affect, and bipolar course and state-related variables. Fifty-eight individuals with cyclothymia or bipolar II disorder and 59 healthy control participants with no affective psychopathology completed resting EEG recordings. Alpha power was obtained and asymmetry indices computed for homologous electrodes. Bipolar spectrum participants were classified as being in a major/minor depressive episode, a hypomanic episode, or a euthymic/remitted state at EEG recording. Participants were then followed prospectively for an average 4.7 year follow-up period with diagnostic interview assessments every four-months. Sixteen bipolar spectrum participants converted to bipolar I disorder during follow-up. Consistent with hypotheses, elevated relative left-frontal EEG activity at baseline 1) prospectively predicted a greater likelihood of converting from cyclothymia or bipolar II disorder to bipolar I disorder over the 4.7 year follow-up period, 2) was associated with an earlier age-of-onset of first bipolar spectrum episode, and 3) was significantly elevated in bipolar spectrum individuals in a hypomanic episode at EEG recording. This is the first study to identify a neurophysiological marker that prospectively predicts conversion to bipolar I disorder. The fact that unipolar depression is characterized by decreased relative left-frontal EEG activity suggests that unipolar depression and vulnerability to hypo/mania may be characterized by different profiles of frontal EEG asymmetry. PMID:22775582

  17. Is subclinical anxiety an endophenotype for bipolar I patients? A study from a Costa Rican sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Javier; Hare, Elizabeth; Pacheco, Adriana; Escamilla, Michael; Raventos, Henriette

    2010-05-01

    Although genetic influences on bipolar I disorder are well established, localization of genes that predispose to the illness has been difficult. Some genes predisposing to bipolar I disorder may be transmitted without expression of the categorical clinical phenotype. One strategy to overcome this obstacle is the use of quantitative endophenotypes, as has been done for other medical disorders. We analyzed 30 bipolar I extended families (300 subjects, average family size 10.34 members, range: 2-31) and 20 unrelated healthy controls from a Costa Rican sample. Heritability and genetic correlation of the state and trait scale from the Anxiety State and Trait Inventory was computed by using the general linear model (SOLAR package software). We also assessed variation of both scores among groups (patients, relatives and controls) and tested independence of affection status. Heritability for state is 0.45 (SE=0.11, p=0.0000001) and for trait is 0.89 (SE=0.06, p=6.22e-29). Genetic correlation for state and trait is 0.29, (SE=0.12, p=0.038-3.19e-8). Bipolar I patients showed the highest trait score (F=12.17 [5,24], p=0.002), (bipolar I patients>relatives with other pathologies, >healthy relatives>unrelated healthy controls) with normal distribution in healthy individuals and no difference regarding depression and mania current status, (F=0.230, df=1, p=0.632 and F=1.401, df=1, p=0.238, respectively), contrary to the state score. Confounding factors such as comorbid disorders could affect the interaction of subclinical anxiety with mania. Due to our limited budget we were not able to re-evaluate the subjects and conduct a test retest to assess the STAI reliability and mood state independence of anxiety traits over different times. Further research is needed to evaluate if anxiety traits are specially related to bipolar I disorder in comparison with other traits such as anger, attention or response inhibition deficit, pathological impulsivity or low self-directedness. Anxiety

  18. Mixed mania associated with cessation of breastfeeding

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    Schmidt, Kristen A.; Palmer, Brian A.; Frye, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Background This case chronicles the unique presentation of psychotic mixed mania in a female 5?months after parturition and 1?week following breastfeeding discontinuation, highlighting a rarely recognized mania risk factor that is temporally delayed from parturition: breastfeeding discontinuation. Case presentation A 25-year-old G1P1 female with a past psychiatric history of a depressive episode in adolescence presented to the Emergency Department with her 5-month-old daughter, fianc?e, and f...

  19. Bipolar mood cycles and lunar tidal cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehr, T A

    2018-04-01

    In 17 patients with rapid cycling bipolar disorder, time-series analyses detected synchronies between mood cycles and three lunar cycles that modulate the amplitude of the moon's semi-diurnal gravimetric tides: the 14.8-day spring-neap cycle, the 13.7-day declination cycle and the 206-day cycle of perigee-syzygies ('supermoons'). The analyses also revealed shifts among 1:2, 1:3, 2:3 and other modes of coupling of mood cycles to the two bi-weekly lunar cycles. These shifts appear to be responses to the conflicting demands of the mood cycles' being entrained simultaneously to two different bi-weekly lunar cycles with slightly different periods. Measurements of circadian rhythms in body temperature suggest a biological mechanism through which transits of one of the moon's semi-diurnal gravimetric tides might have driven the patients' bipolar cycles, by periodically entraining the circadian pacemaker to its 24.84-h rhythm and altering the pacemaker's phase-relationship to sleep in a manner that is known to cause switches from depression to mania.

  20. Increased prospective health service use for depression among adults with childhood onset bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Regina; Goldstein, Benjamin I; Wang, Shuai; Flórez-Salamanca, Ludwing; Iza, Miren; Blanco, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    To examine the prospective relationship between age of onset of bipolar disorder and the demographic and clinical characteristics, treatment, new onset of psychiatric comorbidity, and psychosocial functioning among adults with bipolar disorder. As part of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions, 1600 adults who met lifetime Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition criteria for bipolar disorder-I (n = 1172) and bipolar disorder-II (n = 428) were included. Individuals were evaluated using the Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-IV version for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition, and data were analyzed from Waves 1 and 2, approximately 3 years apart. Individuals with bipolar disorder were divided into three age at onset groups: childhood (adolescence (13-18 years old, n = 396), and adulthood (>19 year old, n = 1017). After adjusting for confounding factors, adults with childhood-onset bipolar disorder were more likely to see a counselor, have been hospitalized, and have received emergency room treatment for depression compared with those with adulthood-onset bipolar disorder. By contrast, there were no differences in the severity of mania or hypomania, new onset of comorbidity, and psychosocial functioning by age of bipolar disorder onset. Childhood-onset bipolar disorder is prospectively associated with seeking treatment for depression, an important proxy for depressive severity. Longitudinal studies are needed in order to determine whether prompt identification, accurate diagnosis, and early intervention can serve to mitigate the burden of childhood onset on the long-term depressive burden of bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Bipolar disorder and complementary medicine: current evidence, safety issues, and clinical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarris, Jerome; Lake, James; Hoenders, Rogier

    2011-10-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a debilitating syndrome that is often undiagnosed and undertreated. Population surveys show that persons with BD often self-medicate with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) or integrative therapies in spite of limited research evidence supporting their use. To date, no review has focused specifically on nonconventional treatments of BD. The study objectives were to present a review of nonconventional (complementary and integrative) interventions examined in clinical trials on BD, and to offer provisional guidelines for the judicious integrative use of CAM in the management of BD. PubMed, CINAHL,(®) Web of Science, and Cochrane Library databases were searched for human clinical trials in English during mid-2010 using Bipolar Disorder and CAM therapy and CAM medicine search terms. Effect sizes (Cohen's d) were also calculated where data were available. Several positive high-quality studies on nutrients in combination with conventional mood stabilizers and antipsychotic medications in BD depression were identified, while branched-chain amino acids and magnesium were effective (small studies) in attenuating mania in BD. In the treatment of bipolar depression, evidence was mixed regarding omega-3, while isolated studies provide provisional support for a multinutrient formula, n-acetylcysteine, and l-tryptophan. In one study, acupuncture was found to have favorable but nonsignificant effects on mania and depression outcomes. Current evidence supports the integrative treatment of BD using combinations of mood stabilizers and select nutrients. Other CAM or integrative modalities used to treat BD have not been adequately explored to date; however, some early findings are promising. Select CAM and integrative interventions add to established conventional treatment of BD and may be considered when formulating a treatment plan. It is hoped that the safety issues and clinical considerations addressed in this article may encourage the practice

  2. Bipolar disorder and metabolic syndrome: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Czepielewski

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Summarize data on metabolic syndrome (MS in bipolar disorder (BD. METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was conducted using the Medline, Embase and PsycInfo databases, using the keywords "metabolic syndrome", "insulin resistance" and "metabolic X syndrome" and cross-referencing them with "bipolar disorder" or "mania". The following types of publications were candidates for review: (i clinical trials, (ii studies involving patients diagnosed with bipolar disorder or (iii data about metabolic syndrome. A 5-point quality scale was used to assess the methodological weight of the studies. RESULTS: Thirty-nine articles were selected. None of studies reached the maximum quality score of 5 points. The prevalence of MS was significantly higher in BD individuals when compared to a control group. The analysis of MS subcomponents showed that abdominal obesity was heterogeneous. Individuals with BD had significantly higher rates of hypertriglyceridemia than healthy controls. When compared to the general population, there were no significant differences in the prevalence of low HDL-c in individuals with BD. Data on hypertension were also inconclusive. Rates of hyperglycemia were significantly greater in patients with BD compared to the general population. CONCLUSIONS: The overall results point to the presence of an association between BD and MS, as well as between their subcomponents.

  3. Treatment outcomes of acute bipolar depressive episode with psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldieraro, Marco Antonio; Dufour, Steven; Sylvia, Louisa G; Gao, Keming; Ketter, Terence A; Bobo, William V; Walsh, Samantha; Janos, Jessica; Tohen, Mauricio; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A; McElroy, Susan L; Shelton, Richard C; Bowden, Charles L; Deckersbach, Thilo; Nierenberg, Andrew A

    2018-05-01

    The impact of psychosis on the treatment of bipolar depression is remarkably understudied. The primary aim of this study was to compare treatment outcomes of bipolar depressed individuals with and without psychosis. The secondary aim was to compare the effect of lithium and quetiapine, each with adjunctive personalized treatments (APTs), in the psychotic subgroup. We assessed participants with DSM-IV bipolar depression included in a comparative effectiveness study of lithium and quetiapine with APTs (the Bipolar CHOICE study). Severity was assessed by the Bipolar Inventory of Symptoms Scale (BISS) and by the Clinical Global Impression Scale-Severity-Bipolar Version (CGI-S-BP). Mixed models were used to assess the course of symptom change, and Cox regression survival analysis was used to assess the time to remission. Psychotic features were present in 10.6% (n = 32) of the depressed participants (n = 303). Those with psychotic features had higher scores on the BISS before (75.2 ± 17.6 vs. 54.9 ± 16.3; P Bipolar depressive episodes with psychotic features are more severe, and compared to nonpsychotic depressions, present a similar course of improvement. Given the small number of participants presenting psychosis, the lack of statistically significant difference between lithium- and quetiapine-based treatment of psychotic bipolar depressive episodes needs replication in a larger sample. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Glia and immune cell signaling in bipolar disorder: insights from neuropharmacology and molecular imaging to clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, C C; Sawa, A; Pomper, M G

    2014-01-21

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a debilitating mental illness characterized by severe fluctuations in mood, sleep, energy and executive functioning. Pharmacological studies of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and the monoamine system have helped us to clinically understand bipolar depression. Mood stabilizers such as lithium and valproic acid, the first-line treatments for bipolar mania and depression, inhibit glycogen synthase kinase-3 beta (GSK-3β) and regulate the Wnt pathway. Recent investigations suggest that microglia, the resident immune cells of the brain, provide a physiological link between the serotonin system and the GSK-3β/Wnt pathway through neuroinflammation. We review the pharmacological, translational and brain imaging studies that support a role for microglia in regulating neurotransmitter synthesis and immune cell activation. These investigations provide a model for microglia involvement in the pathophysiology and phenotype of BD that may translate into improved therapies.

  5. Mechanisms underlying the benefits of anticonvulsants over lithium in the treatment of bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrado, Alisa C; Walsh, John P

    2016-02-10

    Close to 3% of the world's population suffers from bipolar disease (I and II). Of this 3%, bipolar disease affects largely women (∼ 3 : 2 compared with men). The median age of diagnosis is 25 in women and even lower in men. A diagnosis of bipolar disease is an expensive psychiatric diagnosis, costing patients more than twice as much money as a diagnosis of unipolar depression. Bipolar I is characterized by one or more manic or mixed episodes, with both mania and depression occurring each day for at least 1 week, whereas bipolar II is characterized by one or more major depressive episode and at least one episode of hypomania. Bipolar I is the more severe diagnosis. A wide range of medications are available to help patients maintain a healthy lifestyle, including lithium, antidepressants, and anticonvulsants. Improved methods for identifying bipolar disease, including a more structured approach and a more complete use of medical records, have increased the rate of diagnosis, especially in children, which underscores the need for innovation in development and in practice of new treatment options for treating bipolar disease. Although lithium has been the 'gold standard' for treating bipolar disorder for decades, new research into other forms of treatment has shown anticonvulsants to be a particularly useful therapy for treating bipolar disease. Anticonvulsants have remarkable mood-stabilization abilities and they do not lead to serious side effects, which increases the tolerability, and consequently, patient adherence to this form of treatment. Recent studies have shown that anticonvulsants improve behavior in bipolar disease by modulating the balance of excitatory and inhibitory synapses through a number of complementary molecular cascades that affect gene expression and cell survival.

  6. Psychological interventions for adults with bipolar disorder: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oud, Matthijs; Mayo-Wilson, Evan; Braidwood, Ruth; Schulte, Peter; Jones, Steven H; Morriss, Richard; Kupka, Ralph; Cuijpers, Pim; Kendall, Tim

    2016-03-01

    Psychological interventions may be beneficial in bipolar disorder. To evaluate the efficacy of psychological interventions for adults with bipolar disorder. A systematic review of randomised controlled trials was conducted. Outcomes were meta-analysed using RevMan and confidence assessed using the GRADE method. We included 55 trials with 6010 participants. Moderate-quality evidence associated individual psychological interventions with reduced relapses at post-treatment (risk ratio (RR) = 0.66, 95% CI 0.48-0.92) and follow-up (RR = 0.74, 95% CI 0.63-0.87), and collaborative care with a reduction in hospital admissions (RR = 0.68, 95% CI 0.49-0.94). Low-quality evidence associated group interventions with fewer depression relapses at post-treatment and follow-up, and family psychoeducation with reduced symptoms of depression and mania. There is evidence that psychological interventions are effective for people with bipolar disorder. Much of the evidence was of low or very low quality thereby limiting our conclusions. Further research should identify the most effective (and cost-effective) interventions for each phase of this disorder. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016.

  7. Risk factors for an anxiety disorder comorbidity among Thai patients with bipolar disorder: results from the Thai Bipolar Disorder Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paholpak S

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Suchat Paholpak,1 Ronnachai Kongsakon,2 Wasana Pattanakumjorn,3 Roongsang Kanokvut,4 Wiroj Wongsuriyadech,5 Manit Srisurapanont6 On behalf of the Thai Bipolar Disorder Registry Study Group1Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen, 2Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, 3Department of Psychiatry, Ratchaburi Hospital, Ratchaburi, 4Department of Psychiatry, Buddhachinaraj Hospital, Phitsanulok, 5Department of Psychiatry, Udonthani Hospital, Udonthani, 6Department of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand Background: The aim of the study was to determine in a clinical setting the risk factors for current anxiety disorder (AD comorbidity among Thai patients with bipolar disorder (BD, being treated under the Thai Bipolar Disorder Registry Project (TBDR. Methods: The TBDR was a multisite naturalistic study conducted at 24 psychiatric units (ie, at university, provincial mental, and government general hospitals between February 2009 and January 2011. Participants were in- or out-patients over 18 years of age who were diagnosed with BD according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. Instruments used in this study included the Thai Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview version 5; Thai Montgomery–Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS; Thai Young Mania Rating Scale; Clinical Global Impression of Bipolar Disorder-Severity (CGI-BP-S, CGI-BP-S-mania, CGI-BP-S-depression, and CGI-BP-S-overall BP illness; and the Thai SF-36 quality of life questionnaire. Results: Among the 424 BD patients, 404 (95.3% had BD type I. The respective mean ± standard deviation of age of onset of mood disturbance, first diagnosis of BD, and first treatment of BD was 32.0±11.9, 36.1±12.2, and 36.2±12.2 years. The duration of illness was 10.7±9.0 years. Fifty-three (12.5% of the 424 participants had

  8. Religiosity, mood symptoms, and quality of life in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroppa, André; Moreira-Almeida, Alexander

    2013-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between religiosity and mood, quality of life, number of hospitalizations, and number of severe suicide attempts among bipolar disorder patients. In a cross-sectional study of bipolar disorder outpatients (N = 168), we assessed symptoms of mania [Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS)], depression [Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS)], religiosity (Duke Religious Index), religious coping (Brief RCOPE), and quality of life [World Health Organization Quality of Life-Brief Version (WHOQOL-BREF)]. Sociodemographic data, number of suicide attempts, and number of hospitalizations were obtained through an interview with the individual and analysis of the patient's medical records. Logistical and linear regressions of the association between the religious indicators and clinical variables were conducted, controlling for sociodemographic variables. A total of 148 (88.1%) individuals reported some type of religious affiliation. Intrinsic religiosity [odds ratio (OR) = 0.19, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.06-0.57, p = 0.003] and positive religious coping strategies (OR = 0.25, CI: 0.09-0.71, p = 0.01) were associated with fewer depressive symptoms. All four domains of quality of life were directly and significantly correlated with intrinsic religiosity. Positive religious coping was correlated with higher levels of the psychological (β = 0.216, p = 0.002) and environmental (β = 0.178, p = 0.028) quality-of-life domains. Negative religious coping was associated with lower scores on the psychological domain of quality of life (β = -0.182, p = 0.025). Intrinsic religiosity and positive religious coping are strongly associated with fewer depressive symptoms and improved quality of life. Negative religious coping is associated with worse quality of life. Religiosity is a relevant aspect of patients' lives and should be taken into consideration by physicians when assessing and managing bipolar disorder

  9. A clinical measure of suicidal ideation, suicidal behavior, and associated symptoms in bipolar disorder: Psychometric properties of the Concise Health Risk Tracking Self-Report (CHRT-SR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostacher, Michael J; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Rabideau, Dustin; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A; Sylvia, Louisa G; Gold, Alexandra K; Shesler, Leah W; Ketter, Terence A; Bowden, Charles L; Calabrese, Joseph R; Friedman, Edward S; Iosifescu, Dan V; Thase, Michael E; Leon, Andrew C; Trivedi, Madhukar H

    2015-12-01

    People with bipolar disorder are at high risk of suicide, but no clinically useful scale has been validated in this population. The aim of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties in bipolar disorder of the 7- and 12-item versions of the Concise Health Risk Tracking Self-Report (CHRT-SR), a scale measuring suicidal ideation, suicidal behavior, and associated symptoms. The CHRT was administered to 283 symptomatic outpatients with bipolar I or II disorder who were randomized to receive lithium plus optimized personalized treatment (OPT), or OPT without lithium in a six month longitudinal comparative effectiveness trial. Participants were assessed using structured diagnostic interviews, clinician-rated assessments, and self-report questionnaires. The internal consistency (Cronbach α) was 0.80 for the 7-item CHRT-SR and 0.90 for the 12-item CHRT-SR with a consistent factor structure, and three independent factors (current suicidal thoughts and plans, hopelessness, and perceived lack of social support) for the 7-item version. CHRT-SR scores are correlated with measures of depression, functioning, and quality of life, but not with mania scores. The 7- and 12-item CHRT-SR both had excellent psychometric properties in a sample of symptomatic subjects with bipolar disorder. The scale is highly correlated with depression, functioning, and quality of life, but not with mania. Future research is needed to determine whether the CHRT-SR will be able to predict suicide attempts in clinical practice. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. Cognition following acute tryptophan depletion : Difference between first-degree relatives of bipolar disorder patients and matched healthy control volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sobczak, S; Riedel, W J; Booij, I; Aan Het Rot, M; Deutz, N E P; Honig, A

    BACKGROUND: Serotonergic circuits have been proposed to mediate cognitive processes, particularly learning and memory. Cognitive impairment is often seen in bipolar disorders in relation to a possible lowered serotonergic turnover. METHODS: We investigated the effects of acute tryptophan depletion

  11. A twin study of schizoaffective-mania, schizoaffective-depression, and other psychotic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardno, Alastair G; Rijsdijk, Frühling V; West, Robert M; Gottesman, Irving I; Craddock, Nick; Murray, Robin M; McGuffin, Peter

    2012-03-01

    The nosological status of schizoaffective disorders remains controversial. Twin studies are potentially valuable for investigating relationships between schizoaffective-mania, schizoaffective-depression, and other psychotic syndromes, but no such study has yet been reported. We ascertained 224 probandwise twin pairs [106 monozygotic (MZ), 118 same-sex dizygotic (DZ)], where probands had psychotic or manic symptoms, from the Maudsley Twin Register in London (1948-1993). We investigated Research Diagnostic Criteria schizoaffective-mania, schizoaffective-depression, schizophrenia, mania and depressive psychosis primarily using a non-hierarchical classification, and additionally using hierarchical and data-derived classifications, and a classification featuring broad schizophrenic and manic syndromes without separate schizoaffective syndromes. We investigated inter-rater reliability and co-occurrence of syndromes within twin probands and twin pairs. The schizoaffective syndromes showed only moderate inter-rater reliability. There was general significant co-occurrence between syndromes within twin probands and MZ pairs, and a trend for schizoaffective-mania and mania to have the greatest co-occurrence. Schizoaffective syndromes in MZ probands were associated with relatively high risk of a psychotic syndrome occurring in their co-twins. The classification of broad schizophrenic and manic syndromes without separate schizoaffective syndromes showed improved inter-rater reliability, but high genetic and environmental correlations between the two broad syndromes. The results are consistent with regarding schizoaffective-mania as due to co-occurring elevated liability to schizophrenia, mania, and depression; and schizoaffective-depression as due to co-occurring elevated liability to schizophrenia and depression, but with less elevation of liability to mania. If in due course schizoaffective syndromes show satisfactory inter-rater reliability and some specific etiological

  12. The Bipolar Interactive Psychoeducation (BIPED study: trial design and protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Ian

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bipolar disorders affect between 3–5% of the population and are associated with considerable lifelong impairment. Since much of the morbidity associated with bipolar disorder is caused by recurrent depressive symptoms, which are often only poorly responsive to antidepressants, there is a need to develop alternative, non-pharmacological interventions. Psychoeducational interventions have emerged as promising long-term therapeutic options for bipolar disorder. Methods/design The study is an exploratory, individually randomised controlled trial. The intervention known as 'Beating Bipolar' is a psychoeducational programme which is delivered via a novel web-based system. We will recruit 100 patients with a diagnosis of DSM-IV bipolar disorder (including type I and type II currently in clinical remission. The primary outcome is quality of life. This will be compared for those patients who have participated in the psychoeducational programme with those who received treatment as usual. Quality of life will be assessed immediately following the intervention as well as 10 months after randomisation. Secondary outcomes include current depressive and manic symptoms, number of episodes of depression and mania/hypomania experienced during the follow-up period, global functioning, functional impairment and insight. An assessment of costs and a process evaluation will also be conducted which will explore the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention as well as potential barriers to effectiveness. Discussion Bipolar disorder is common, under-recognised and often poorly managed. It is a chronic, life-long, relapsing condition which has an enormous impact on the individual and the economy. This trial will be the first to explore the effectiveness of a novel web-based psychoeducational intervention for patients with bipolar disorder which has potential to be easily rolled out to patients. Trial registration Current Controlled Trials

  13. The impact of childhood trauma on cognitive functioning in patients recently recovered from a first manic episode: data from the Systematic Treatment Optimization Program for Early Mania (STOP-EM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bücker, J; Kozicky, J; Torres, I J; Kauer-Sant'anna, M; Silveira, L E; Bond, D J; Lam, R W; Yatham, L N

    2013-06-01

    Both bipolar disorder (BD) and childhood trauma are associated with cognitive impairment. People with BD have high rates of childhood trauma, which confer greater overall disease severity, but, it is unknown if childhood trauma is associated with greater neurocognitive impairment in BD patients early in the course of their illnesses. In this study, we investigated the impact of childhood trauma on specific cognitive dysfunction in patients who recently recovered from their first episode of mania. Data were available for 64 patients and 28 healthy subjects matched by age, gender and pre-morbid IQ, recruited from a large university medical center. History of childhood trauma was measured using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire. Cognitive function was assessed through a comprehensive neuropsychological test battery. Trauma was associated with poorer cognitive performance in patients on cognitive measures of IQ, auditory attention and verbal and working memory, and a different pattern was observed in healthy subjects. We had a modest sample size, particularly in the group of healthy subjects with trauma. Childhood trauma was associated with poorer cognition in BD patients who recently recovered from a first episode of mania compared to healthy subjects. The results require replication, but suggest that the co-occurrence of trauma and bipolar disorder can affect those cognitive areas that are already more susceptible in patients with BD. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Child- and family-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy for pediatric bipolar disorder: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Amy E; Weinstein, Sally M; Peters, Amy T; Katz, Andrea C; Henry, David B; Cruz, Rick A; Pavuluri, Mani N

    2014-11-01

    Previous studies have found that family-based psychosocial treatments are effective adjuncts to pharmacotherapy among adults and adolescents with bipolar disorder (BD). The objective of this study was to compare the efficacy of adjunctive child- and family-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy (CFF-CBT) to psychotherapy as usual (control) for mood symptom severity and global functioning in children with BD. Sixty-nine youth, aged 7 to 13 years (mean = 9.19, SD = 1.61) with DSM-IV-TR bipolar I, II, or not otherwise specified (NOS) disorder were randomly assigned to CFF-CBT or control groups. Both treatments consisted of 12 weekly sessions followed by 6 monthly booster sessions delivered over a total of 9 months. Independent evaluators assessed participants at baseline, week 4, week 8, week 12 (posttreatment), and week 39 (6-month follow-up). Participants in CFF-CBT attended more sessions, were less likely to drop out, and reported greater satisfaction with treatment than controls. CFF-CBT demonstrated efficacy compared to the control treatment in reducing parent-reported mania at posttreatment and depression symptoms at posttreatment and follow-up. Global functioning did not differ at posttreatment but was higher among CFF-CBT participants at follow-up. CFF-CBT may be efficacious in reducing acute mood symptoms and improving long-term psychosocial functioning among children with BD. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Strain-specific battery of tests for domains of mania: effects of valproate, lithium and imipramine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shlomit Flaisher-Grinberg

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The lack of efficient animal models for bipolar disorder (BPD, especially for the manic pole, is a major factor hindering the research of its pathophysiology and the development of improved drug treatments. The present study was designed to identify an appropriate mouse strain for modeling some behavioral domains of mania and to evaluate the effects of drugs using this strain. The study compared the behavior of four strains: Black Swiss, C57Bl/6, CBA/J and A/J mice in a battery of tests that included spontaneous activity; sweet solution preference; light/dark box; resident-intruder; forced-swim and amphetamine-induced hyperactivity. Based on the ‘manic-like’ behavior demonstrated by the Black Swiss strain, the study evaluated the effects of the mood stabilizers valproate and lithium and of the antidepressant imipramine in the same tests using this strain. Results indicated that lithium and valproate attenuate the ‘manic-like’ behavior of Black Swiss mice whereas imipramine had no effects. These findings suggest that Black Swiss mice might be a good choice for modeling several domains of mania and distinguishing the effects of drugs on these specific domains. However, the relevance of the behavioral phenotype of Black Swiss mice to the biology of BPD is unknown at this time and future studies will investigate molecular differences between Black Swiss mice and other strains and asess the interaction between strain and mood stabilizing treatment.

  16. Bipolar disorder and Premenstrual Syndrome or Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder comorbidity: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirillo, Patricia Carvalho; Passos, Roberta Benitez Freitas; Bevilaqua, Mario Cesar do Nascimento; López, Jose Ramón Rodriguez Arras; Nardi, Antônio Egidio

    2012-12-01

    This article aims to review the comorbidity of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) or premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) and bipolar disorder (BD), identify variables requiring further investigation and to remind physicians that special care is required for diagnosis and therapy. A systematic review of articles published from 1987 to February 2012 was conducted in the Medline database with the following terms: (premenstrual syndrome OR premenstrual dysphoric disorder OR premenstrual) AND (bipolar OR mania OR manic). Seventeen articles were analyzed. PMS and PMDD were most often comorbid among BD-II patients and vice versa. Moreover, patients with PMS or PMDD also have an increased risk of having BD-I. In addition, bipolar women susceptible to hormonal changes exhibit more severe symptoms, more frequent relapses and a worse therapeutic response. Future investigations should attempt to stabilize hormonal levels through the continuous use of contraceptives to target a reduction in symptom severity. In addition, psychiatrists should note menstrual period dates and compare symptom intensity between the luteal and follicular phases. Finally, PMS and PMDD patients should be studied separately.

  17. Clinical and cognitive factors affecting psychosocial functioning in remitted patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantakopoulos, G; Ioannidi, N; Typaldou, M; Sakkas, D; Oulis, P

    2016-01-01

    Impaired interpersonal, social, and occupational functioning is very often observed in patients with bipolar disorder, not only at the acute stages of the illness but in remission as well. This finding raises the question of multiple factors that might affect psychosocial functioning in bipolar patients, such as residual subsyndromal symptoms and neuropsychological deficits. Social cognition impairment, especially impaired Theory of Mind (ToM), might also play an important role in bipolar patients' every-day functioning, similarly to what was found in patients with schizophrenia. The present study aimed to investigate the potential effect of clinical and cognitive factors on the psychosocial functioning of patients with bipolar disorder during remission, assessing ToM along with a broad range of basic cognitive functions. Forty-nine patients with bipolar disorder type I in remission and 53 healthy participants were assessed in general intelligence, working memory, attention, speed processing, verbal learning and memory, and executive functions using a comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests. The Faux Pas Recognition Test was used to assess ToM. The two groups were matched for gender, age and education level. The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HDRS), the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) were also administered to the patients. Every-day functioning was assessed with the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). In order to examine the contribution of many factors in psychosocial functioning, we used hierarchical multiple regression analysis. Bipolar patients presented significant impairment compared to healthy participants in all the basic cognitive functions tested with the exception of verbal memory. Moreover, patients had significant poorer performance than healthy controls in overall psyand cognitive ToM but not in affective ToM as measured by Faux Pas. Psychosocial functioning in patient group was

  18. Role of extended release quetiapine in the management of bipolar disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rayan K Al Jurdi

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Rayan K Al Jurdi1,2, Lena A Dixit1, Martha Sajatovic3 1Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Psychiatry, Houston, Texas, USA; 2South Central Mental Illness Research and Clinical Core, Department of Veterans Affairs, Houston, Texas; 3Department of Psychiatry, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio, USAAbstract: Atypical antipsychotics have become a widely utilized component of the bipolar disorder treatment armamentarium, with approximately 45% of bipolar patients prescribed atypicals. Over the last decade all atypical drugs except for clozapine have received a Food and Drug Administration (FDA bipolar indication. In October 2008, the FDA approved quetiapine XR monotherapy for the treatment of acute depressive episodes of bipolar disorder and acute manic or mixed episodes in bipolar I disorder based on two placebo-control trials. Quetiapine was also approved as adjunct therapy with lithium and divalproex for the treatment of acute manic or mixed episodes as well as maintenance of bipolar I disorder. In contrast to immediate release quetiapine which may require a twice-daily regimen, the XR formulation is intended for once-daily administration. This drug profile of quetiapine XR will address chemistry, pharmacodynamics, pharmacokinetics, metabolism, safety and tolerability and clinical trials in bipolar disorder.Keywords: quetiapine XR, bipolar disorder

  19. Social phobia, panic disorder and suicidality in subjects with pure and depressive mania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilsaver, Steven C; Chen, Yuan-Who

    2003-11-01

    The objective of this study is to ascertain the rates of social phobia, panic disorder and suicidality in the midst of the manic state among subjects with pure and depressive mania. Subjects received evaluations entailing the use of serial standard clinical interviews, the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia (SADS) and a structured interview to determine whether they met the criteria for intra-episode social phobia (IESP) and panic disorder (IEPD). The diagnoses of major depressive disorder and mania were rendered using the Research Diagnostic Criteria. The diagnoses of IESP and IEPD were rendered using DSM-III-R criteria. Categorization as being suicidal was based on the SADS suicide subscale score. Twenty-five (56.8%) subjects had pure and 19 (43.2%) subjects had depressive mania. None of the subjects with pure and 13 (68.4%) with depressive mania had IESP (Pdepressive mania had IEPD (Pdepressive were suicidal. Twelve of 13 (92.3%) subjects with depressive mania met the criteria for IESP and IEPD concurrently (Pdepressive but not pure mania exhibited high rates of both IESP and IEPD. Concurrence of the disorders is the rule. The findings suggest that databases disclosing a relationship between panic disorder and suicidality merit, where possible, reanalysis directed at controlling for the effect of social phobia.

  20. Treatment and outcomes of an Australian cohort of outpatients with bipolar I or schizoaffective disorder over twenty-four months: implications for clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulkarni Jayashri

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Bipolar Comprehensive Outcomes Study (BCOS is a 2-year, prospective, non-interventional, observational study designed to explore the clinical and functional outcomes associated with ‘real-world’ treatment of participants with bipolar I or schizoaffective disorder. All participants received treatment as usual. There was no study medication. Methods Participants prescribed either conventional mood stabilizers (CMS; n = 155 alone, or olanzapine with, or without, CMS (olanzapine ± CMS; n = 84 were assessed every 3 months using several measures, including the Young Mania Rating Scale, 21-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, Clinical Global Impressions Scale – Bipolar Version, and the EuroQol Instrument. This paper reports 24-month longitudinal clinical, pharmacological, functional, and socioeconomic data. Results On average, participants were 42 (range 18 to 79 years of age, 58%; were female, and 73%; had a diagnosis of bipolar I. Polypharmacy was the usual approach to pharmacological treatment; participants took a median of 5 different psychotropic medications over the course of the study, and spent a median proportion of time of 100%; of the study on mood stabilizers, 90%; on antipsychotics, 9%; on antidepressants, and 5%; on benzodiazepines/hypnotics. By 24 months, the majority of participants had achieved both symptomatic and syndromal remission of both mania and depression. Symptomatic relapse rates were similar for both the CMS alone (65%; and the olanzapine ± CMS (61%; cohorts. Conclusions Participants with bipolar I or schizoaffective disorder in this study were receiving complex medication treatments that were often discordant with recommendations made in contemporary major treatment guidelines. The majority of study participants demonstrated some clinical and functional improvements, but not all achieved remission of symptoms or syndrome.

  1. A reverse translational study of dysfunctional exploration in psychiatric disorders: from mice to men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, William; Minassian, Arpi; Paulus, Martin P.; Young, Jared W.; Kincaid, Meegin J.; Ferguson, Eliza J.; Henry, Brook L.; Zhuang, Xiaoxi; Masten, Virginia L.; Sharp, Richard F.; Geyer, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Context Bipolar mania and schizophrenia are recognized as separate disorders but share many commonalities, raising the question of whether they are in fact the same disorder on different ends of a continuum. The lack of distinct endophenotypes of bipolar mania and schizophrenia has complicated the development of animal models that are specific to these disorders. Exploration is fundamental to survival and is dysregulated in these two disorders. Although exploratory behavior in rodents has been widely studied, surprisingly little work has examined this critical function in humans. Objective We used a novel human open field paradigm, the human Behavioral Pattern Monitor (BPM), to quantify exploratory behavior of individuals with bipolar mania and schizophrenia and to identify distinctive phenotypes of these illnesses. Design Static group comparison. Setting Psychiatric hospital. Participants 15 bipolar mania and 16 schizophrenia subjects were compared to 26 healthy volunteers in the human BPM. The effects of amphetamine, the selective dopamine transporter (DAT) inhibitor GBR12909, and genetic knockdown of the DAT were compared to controls in the mouse BPM. Measures The amount of motor activity, spatial patterns of activity, and exploration of novel stimuli were quantified in both the human and mouse BPMs. Results Bipolar manic subjects demonstrated a unique exploratory pattern, characterized by high motor activity and increased object exploration. Schizophrenia subjects did not show the expected habituation of motor activity. Selective genetic or pharmacological inhibition of the DAT matched the mania phenotype better than the “gold standard” model of mania (amphetamine). Conclusion These findings validate the human open field paradigm and identify defining characteristics of bipolar mania that are distinct from schizophrenia. This cross-species study of exploration calls into question an accepted animal model of mania and should help to develop more accurate

  2. Affective temperaments are associated with specific clusters of symptoms and psychopathology: a cross-sectional study on bipolar disorder inpatients in acute manic, mixed, or depressive relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iasevoli, Felice; Valchera, Alessandro; Di Giovambattista, Emanuela; Marconi, Massimo; Rapagnani, Maria Paola; De Berardis, Domenico; Martinotti, Giovanni; Fornaro, Michele; Mazza, Monica; Tomasetti, Carmine; Buonaguro, Elisabetta F; Di Giannantonio, Massimo; Perugi, Giulio; de Bartolomeis, Andrea

    2013-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether different affective temperaments could be related to a specific mood disorder diagnosis and/or to different therapeutic choices in inpatients admitted for an acute relapse of their primary mood disorder. Hundred and twenty-nine inpatients were consecutively assessed by means of the Structured and Clinical Interview for axis-I disorders/Patient edition and by the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego auto-questionnaire, Young Mania Rating Scale, Hamilton Scale for Depression and for Anxiety, Brief Psychiatry Rating Scale, Clinical Global impression, Drug Attitude Inventory, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, Toronto Alexithymia Scale, and Symptoms Checklist-90 items version, along with records of clinical and demographic data. The following prevalence rates for axis-I mood diagnoses were detected: bipolar disorder type I (BD-I, 28%), type II (31%), type not otherwise specified (BD-NOS, 33%), major depressive disorder (4%), and schizoaffective disorder (4%). Mean scores on the hyperthymic temperament scale were significantly higher in BD-I and BD-NOS, and in mixed and manic acute states. Hyperthymic temperament was significantly more frequent in BD-I and BD-NOS patients, whereas depressive temperament in BD-II ones. Hyperthymic and irritable temperaments were found more frequently in mixed episodes, while patients with depressive and mixed episodes more frequently exhibited anxious and depressive temperaments. Affective temperaments were associated with specific symptom and psychopathology clusters, with an orthogonal subdivision between hyperthymic temperament and anxious/cyclothymic/depressive/irritable temperaments. Therapeutic choices were often poorly differentiated among temperaments and mood states. Cross-sectional design; sample size. Although replication studies are needed, current results suggest that temperament-specific clusters of symptoms severity and psychopathology domains could be

  3. Psychotherapy use in bipolar disorder: Association with functioning and illness severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvia, Louisa G; Thase, Michael E; Reilly-Harrington, Noreen A; Salcedo, Stephanie; Brody, Benjamin; Kinrys, Gustavo; Kemp, David; Shelton, Richard C; McElroy, Susan L; Kocsis, James H; Bobo, William V; Kamali, Masoud; McInnis, Melvin; Friedman, Edward; Tohen, Mauricio; Bowden, Charles L; Ketter, Terence A; Singh, Vivek; Calabrese, Joseph; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Rabideau, Dustin J; Elson, Constance M; Deckersbach, Thilo

    2015-05-01

    This study examines characteristics of individuals with bipolar disorder who sought psychotherapy versus those who did not. Bipolar CHOICE was an 11-site comparative effectiveness study of lithium versus quetiapine in symptomatic outpatients (N = 482) with bipolar disorder. At baseline, participants' psychotherapy use within the past 3 months, mood, functioning, and overall health were assessed. Logistic regressions were used to test whether psychotherapy users and non-users differed on various demographic and clinical variables at baseline. Mixed-effects regression was used to determine whether psychotherapy groups differed on response to treatment over the 6-month study. Kaplan-Meier plots and log-rank tests were employed to test whether there were any differences in time to recovery (CGI-BP ≤ 2 for at least 8 weeks) between the groups. Thirty one percent of participants reported using psychotherapy services. Psychotherapy users reported greater medication side effect burden than non-users and were more likely to have moderate to high suicide risk and at least one anxiety disorder. Participants not utilizing medications or psychotherapy had greater mania symptom severity, were younger, and less educated than medication only users. Medication only users were more likely to be married than the other participants. These data suggest that a minority of individuals with bipolar disorder attend psychotherapy services, and those that do have greater illness burden. © The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists 2015.

  4. An evolutionary approach to mania studying Sardinian immigrants to Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carta, Mauro G; Perra, Alessandra; Atzeni, Michela; D'Oca, Silvia; Moro, Maria F; Kurotschka, Peter K; Moro, Daniela; Sancassiani, Federica; Minerba, Luigi; Brasesco, Maria V; Mausel, Gustavo; Nardi, Antonio E; Tondo, Leonardo

    2017-01-01

    To ascertain lifetime prevalence of positivity to a screening questionnaire for bipolar disorders (BD) in Sardinian immigrants to Argentina and residents of Sardinia and assess whether such positivity affects quality of life (QoL) in either group. Our hypothesis is that screen positivity for BD may be more frequent in immigrants. Observational study. Subjects were randomly selected from the membership lists of associations of Sardinian immigrants in Argentina. A study carried out in Sardinia using the same methodology was used for comparison. The Mood Disorder Questionnaire was used to screen for mania/hypomania and the Short-Form Health Survey-12 to measure QoL. A higher prevalence of manic/hypomanic episodes was found in Sardinian immigrants to Argentina (p immigrants to Argentina and in residents of Sardinia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to show a higher lifetime prevalence of manic/hypomanic episodes in a general-population sample of individuals who migrated to a foreign country. Our results are in agreement with the hypothesis that hyperactive/novelty-seeking features may represent an adaptive substrate in certain conditions of social change.

  5. Cardiometabolic risks and omega-3 index in recent-onset bipolar I disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulsin, Lawson R; Blom, Thomas J; Durling, Michelle; Welge, Jeffrey A; DelBello, Melissa P; Adler, Caleb M; McNamara, Robert K; Strakowski, Stephen M

    2018-02-26

    The aims of the present study were to characterize cardiometabolic risk factors in a cohort of bipolar disorder patients with limited exposure to psychotropic medications, and to evaluate their associations with mood symptoms and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) blood levels. Cardiometabolic risk assessments were compared in individuals with bipolar I disorder experiencing a first manic or mixed episode or an early depressive episode (n=117) and healthy subjects (n=56). Patients were medication free at assessment and had no or limited exposure to mood-stabilizer or antipsychotic medications prior to the current admission. Associations among cardiometabolic parameters and Clinical Global Impression-Severity scale (CGI-S), manic (Young Mania Rating Scale [YMRS]), and depressive (Hamilton Depression Rating Scale [HDRS]) symptom ratings were evaluated within the bipolar group. Following adjustment for demographic variables (i.e., age, gender, and parental education), significantly higher fasting triglyceride levels were observed in the bipolar group compared to the healthy group (121.7 mg/dL vs 87.0 mg/dL; Pbipolar group and 6% of the healthy group met the criteria for metabolic syndrome (P=.23). The omega-3 index was lower in the bipolar group (3.4% vs 3.9%; Pbipolar group, no associations were found between the cardiometabolic parameters and CGI-S, YMRS, and HDRS symptom ratings. Recent-onset medication-free bipolar disorder is associated with higher triglyceride levels. These findings are suggestive of early metabolic dysregulation prior to long-term psychotropic medication exposure. Lower omega-3 PUFA levels in individuals with bipolar I disorder represent a potential therapeutic target for additional investigation. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The circadian system of patients with bipolar disorder differs in episodes of mania and depression

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nováková, Marta; Praško, J.; Látalová, K.; Sládek, Martin; Sumová, Alena

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 3 (2015), s. 303-314 ISSN 1398-5647 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NT11474 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : bipolar disorder * circadian * clock gene * melatonin * Nr1d1 * Per1 Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.882, year: 2015

  7. A reverse-translational study of dysfunctional exploration in psychiatric disorders: from mice to men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, William; Minassian, Arpi; Paulus, Martin P; Young, Jared W; Kincaid, Meegin J; Ferguson, Eliza J; Henry, Brook L; Zhuang, Xiaoxi; Masten, Virginia L; Sharp, Richard F; Geyer, Mark A

    2009-10-01

    Bipolar mania and schizophrenia are recognized as separate disorders but share many commonalities, which raises the question of whether they are the same disorder on different ends of a continuum. The lack of distinct endophenotypes of bipolar mania and schizophrenia has complicated the development of animal models that are specific to these disorders. Exploration is fundamental to survival and is dysregulated in these 2 disorders. Although exploratory behavior in rodents has been widely studied, surprisingly little work has examined this critical function in humans. To quantify the exploratory behavior of individuals with bipolar mania and schizophrenia and to identify distinctive phenotypes of these illnesses. Static group comparison by the use of a novel human open field paradigm, the human Behavioral Pattern Monitor (BPM). Psychiatric hospital. Fifteen patients with bipolar mania and 16 patients with schizophrenia were compared with 26 healthy volunteers in the human BPM. The effects of amphetamine sulfate, the selective dopamine transporter inhibitor GBR12909, and the genetic knockdown of the dopamine transporter were compared with controls in the mouse BPM. The amount of motor activity, spatial patterns of activity, and exploration of novel stimuli were quantified in both the human and mouse BPMs. Patients with bipolar mania demonstrated a unique exploratory pattern, characterized by high motor activity and increased object exploration. Patients with schizophrenia did not show the expected habituation of motor activity. Selective genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of the dopamine transporter matched the mania phenotype better than the effects of amphetamine, which has been the criterion standard for animal models of mania. These findings validate the human open field paradigm and identify defining characteristics of bipolar mania that are distinct from those of schizophrenia. This cross-species study of exploration calls into question an accepted animal

  8. Comparison of olanzapine and risperidone in the EMBLEM Study: translation of randomized controlled trial findings into clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novick, Diego; Reed, Catherine; Haro, Josep Maria; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Perrin, Elena; Aguado, Jaume; Tohen, Mauricio

    2010-09-01

    Data from the EMBLEM Study, a 2-year, prospective, observational study of health outcomes associated with acute treatment of patients experiencing a manic/mixed episode of bipolar disorder, was used to compare the effectiveness of olanzapine monotherapy versus risperidone monotherapy, and to investigate whether the treatment effects were similar to those reported in a 3-week, randomized controlled trial assessing the same treatments. Symptom severity measures included the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS), the 5-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and the Clinical Global Impression-Bipolar Disorder Scale. A total of 245 EMBLEM inpatients were analyzed with YMRS >or=20: olanzapine (n=209), risperidone (n=36). Both the treatment groups had similar improvements in YMRS from baseline to 6 weeks, but there was a significantly greater improvement in 5-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale in the olanzapine group. There was a similar improvement in Clinical Global Impression-Bipolar Disorder Scale in both the groups and the occurrence of treatment-emergent adverse events and weight gain did not differ between the treatment groups. The EMBLEM results partly support those of the randomized controlled trial, which suggests olanzapine and risperidone have similar improvements in mania but that olanzapine monotherapy may be more effective than risperidone monotherapy in the treatment of depressive symptoms associated with mania. Limitations include differences in study design, patient population, and length of follow-up.

  9. Care satisfaction, hope, and life functioning among adults with bipolar disorder: data from the first 1000 participants in the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Chad D; Miklowitz, David J; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Giese, Alexis A; Thomas, Marshall R; Allen, Michael H

    2005-01-01

    The Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for Bipolar Disorder (STEP-BD) is designed to evaluate the longitudinal outcome of patients with bipolar disorder. The STEP-BD disease-management model is built on evidence-based practices and a collaborative care approach designed to maximize specific and nonspecific treatment mechanisms. This prospective study examined the longitudinal relationships between patients' satisfaction with care, levels of hope, and life functioning in the first 1000 patients to enter STEP-BD. The study used scores from the Care Satisfaction Questionnaire, Beck Hopelessness Scale, Range of Impaired Functioning Tool, Young Mania Rating Scale, and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale at 5 time points during a 1-year interval. Analyses tested mediational pathways between care satisfaction, hope, and life functioning, depression, and mania using mixed-effects (random and fixed) regression models. Increases in care satisfaction were associated with decreased hopelessness (P hopelessness was associated with better life functioning (P hopelessness, and life functioning. Findings suggest that providing care that maximizes patient hope may be important. By so doing, patients might overcome the learned helplessness/hopelessness that often accompanies a cyclical illness and build a realistic illness-management strategy.

  10. Contact high: Mania proneness and positive perception of emotional touches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piff, Paul K; Purcell, Amanda; Gruber, June; Hertenstein, Matthew J; Keltner, Dacher

    2012-01-01

    How do extreme degrees of positive emotion-such as those characteristic of mania-influence emotion perception? The present study investigated how mania proneness, assessed using the Hypomanic Personality Scale, influences the perception of emotion via touch. Using a validated dyadic interaction paradigm for communicating emotion through touch (Hertenstein, Keltner, App, Bulleit, & Jaskolka, 2006), participants (N=53) received eight different touches to their forearm from a stranger and then identified the emotion via forced-choice methodology. Mania proneness predicted increased overall accuracy in touch perception, particularly for positive emotion touches, as well as the over-attribution of positive and under-attribution of negative emotions across all touches. These findings highlight the effects of positive emotion extremes on the perception of emotion in social interactions.

  11. Does psychomotor agitation in major depressive episodes indicate bipolarity? Evidence from the Zurich Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angst, Jules; Gamma, Alex; Benazzi, Franco; Ajdacic, Vladeta; Rössler, Wulf

    2009-02-01

    Kraepelin's partial interpretation of agitated depression as a mixed state of "manic-depressive insanity" (including the current concept of bipolar disorder) has recently been the focus of much research. This paper tested whether, how, and to what extent both psychomotor symptoms, agitation and retardation in depression are related to bipolarity and anxiety. The prospective Zurich Study assessed psychiatric and somatic syndromes in a community sample of young adults (N = 591) (aged 20 at first interview) by six interviews over 20 years (1979-1999). Psychomotor symptoms of agitation and retardation were assessed by professional interviewers from age 22 to 40 (five interviews) on the basis of the observed and reported behaviour within the interview section on depression. Psychiatric diagnoses were strictly operationalised and, in the case of bipolar-II disorder, were broader than proposed by DSM-IV-TR and ICD-10. As indicators of bipolarity, the association with bipolar disorder, a family history of mania/hypomania/cyclothymia, together with hypomanic and cyclothymic temperament as assessed by the general behavior inventory (GBI) [15], and mood lability (an element of cyclothymic temperament) were used. Agitated and retarded depressive states were equally associated with the indicators of bipolarity and with anxiety. Longitudinally, agitation and retardation were significantly associated with each other (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.0-3.2), and this combined group of major depressives showed stronger associations with bipolarity, with both hypomanic/cyclothymic and depressive temperamental traits, and with anxiety. Among agitated, non-retarded depressives, unipolar mood disorder was even twice as common as bipolar mood disorder. Combined agitated and retarded major depressive states are more often bipolar than unipolar, but, in general, agitated depression (with or without retardation) is not more frequently bipolar than retarded depression (with or without agitation), and

  12. Carbamazepine treatment of bipolar disorder: a retrospective evaluation of naturalistic long-term outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chia-Hui

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carbamazepine (CBZ has been used in the treatment of bipolar disorder, both in acute mania and maintenance therapy, since the early 1970s. Here, we report a follow-up study of CBZ-treated bipolar patients in the Taipei City Psychiatric Centre. Methods Bipolar patients diagnosed according to the DSM-IV system and treated with CBZ at the Taipei City Psychiatric Centre had their charts reviewed to evaluate the efficacy and side effects of this medication during an average follow-up period of 10 years. Results A total of 129 bipolar patients (45 males, mean age: 45.7 ± 10.9 year were included in the analysis of CBZ efficacy used alone (n = 63 or as an add-on after lithium (n = 50 or valproic acid (n = 11, or the both of them (n = 5. The mean age of disease onset was 24.6 ± 9.5 years. The mean duration of CBZ use was 10.4 ± 5.2 year. The mean dose used was 571.3 ± 212.6 mg/day with a mean plasma level of 7.8 ± 5.9 μg/mL. Mean body weight increased from 62.0 ± 13.4 kg to 66.7 ± 13.1 kg during treatment. The frequencies of admission per year before and after CBZ treatment were 0.33 ± 0.46 and 0.14 ± 0.30, respectively. The most common side effects targeted the central nervous system (24%, including dizziness, ataxia and cognitive impairment. Other common side effects were gastrointestinal disturbances (3.6%, tremor (3.6%, skin rash (2.9%, and blurred vision (2.9%. Eighty-eight patients (68.2% were taking antipsychotics concomitantly. Ninety-six patients (74.4% needed to use benzodiazepines concomitantly. Sixty-three (48.8% patients had zero episodes in a 10-year follow-up period, compared to all patients having episodes prior to treatment. Using variable analysis, we found better response to CBZ in males than in females. Conclusions CBZ is efficacious in the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder in naturalistic clinical practice, either as monotherapy

  13. Atypical antipsychotics in bipolar disorder: systematic review of randomised trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore R Andrew

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Atypical antipsychotics are increasingly used for treatment of mental illnesses like schizophrenia and bipolar disorder, and considered to have fewer extrapyramidal effects than older antipsychotics. Methods We examined efficacy in randomised trials of bipolar disorder where the presenting episode was either depression, or manic/mixed, comparing atypical antipsychotic with placebo or active comparator, examined withdrawals for any cause, or due to lack of efficacy or adverse events, and combined all phases for adverse event analysis. Studies were found through systematic search (PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and data combined for analysis where there was clinical homogeneity, with especial reference to trial duration. Results In five trials (2,206 patients participants presented with a depressive episode, and in 25 trials (6,174 patients the presenting episode was manic or mixed. In 8-week studies presenting with depression, quetiapine and olanzapine produced significantly better rates of response and symptomatic remission than placebo, with NNTs of 5–6, but more adverse event withdrawals (NNH 12. With mania or mixed presentation atypical antipsychotics produced significantly better rates of response and symptomatic remission than placebo, with NNTs of about 5 up to six weeks, and 4 at 6–12 weeks, but more adverse event withdrawals (NNH of about 22 in studies of 6–12 weeks. In comparisons with established treatments, atypical antipsychotics had similar efficacy, but significantly fewer adverse event withdrawals (NNT to prevent one withdrawal about 10. In maintenance trials atypical antipsychotics had significantly fewer relapses to depression or mania than placebo or active comparator. In placebo-controlled trials, atypical antipsychotics were associated with higher rates of weight gain of ≥7% (mainly olanzapine trials, somnolence, and extrapyramidal symptoms. In active controlled trials, atypical antipsychotics

  14. Relative Risk of Acute Myocardial Infarction in People with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

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    Shu-I Wu

    Full Text Available Despite high mortality associated with serious mental illness, risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI remains unclear, especially for patients with bipolar disorder. The main objective was to investigate the relative risk of AMI associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders in a national sample.Using nationwide administrative data, an 11-year historic cohort study was assembled, comprised of cases aged 18 and above who had received a diagnosis of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, compared to a random sample of all other adults excluding those with diagnoses of serious mental illness. Incident AMI as a primary diagnosis was ascertained. Hazard ratios stratified by age and gender were calculated and Cox regression models were used to adjust for other covariates.A total of 70,225 people with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder and 207,592 people without serious mental illness were compared. Hazard ratios in men adjusted for age, income and urbanization were 1.15 (95% CI 1.01~1.32 for schizophrenia and 1.37 (1.08~1.73for bipolar disorder, and in women, 1.85 (1.58~2.18 and 1.88(1.47~2.41 respectively. Further adjustment for treated hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidaemia attenuated the hazard ratio for men with schizophrenia but not the other comparison groups. Hazard ratios were significantly stronger in women than men and were stronger in younger compared to older age groups for both disorders; however, gender modification was only significant in people with schizophrenia, and age modification only significant in people with bipolar disorder.In this large national sample, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder were associated with raised risk of AMI in women and in the younger age groups although showed differences in potential confounding and modifying factors.

  15. Relative Risk of Acute Myocardial Infarction in People with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-I; Chen, Su-Chiu; Liu, Shen-Ing; Sun, Fang-Ju; Juang, Jimmy J M; Lee, Hsin-Chien; Kao, Kai-Liang; Dewey, Michael E; Prince, Martin; Stewart, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Despite high mortality associated with serious mental illness, risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remains unclear, especially for patients with bipolar disorder. The main objective was to investigate the relative risk of AMI associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders in a national sample. Using nationwide administrative data, an 11-year historic cohort study was assembled, comprised of cases aged 18 and above who had received a diagnosis of schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, compared to a random sample of all other adults excluding those with diagnoses of serious mental illness. Incident AMI as a primary diagnosis was ascertained. Hazard ratios stratified by age and gender were calculated and Cox regression models were used to adjust for other covariates. A total of 70,225 people with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder and 207,592 people without serious mental illness were compared. Hazard ratios in men adjusted for age, income and urbanization were 1.15 (95% CI 1.01~1.32) for schizophrenia and 1.37 (1.08~1.73)for bipolar disorder, and in women, 1.85 (1.58~2.18) and 1.88(1.47~2.41) respectively. Further adjustment for treated hypertension, diabetes and hyperlipidaemia attenuated the hazard ratio for men with schizophrenia but not the other comparison groups. Hazard ratios were significantly stronger in women than men and were stronger in younger compared to older age groups for both disorders; however, gender modification was only significant in people with schizophrenia, and age modification only significant in people with bipolar disorder. In this large national sample, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder were associated with raised risk of AMI in women and in the younger age groups although showed differences in potential confounding and modifying factors.

  16. Fenproporex increases locomotor activity and alters energy metabolism, and mood stabilizers reverse these changes: a proposal for a new animal model of mania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezin, Gislaine T; Furlanetto, Camila B; Scaini, Giselli; Valvassori, Samira S; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Ferreira, Gabriela K; Jeremias, Isabela C; Resende, Wilson R; Cardoso, Mariane R; Varela, Roger B; Quevedo, João; Streck, Emilio L

    2014-04-01

    Fenproporex (Fen) is converted in vivo into amphetamine, which is used to induce mania-like behaviors in animals. In the present study, we intend to present a new animal model of mania. In order to prove through face, construct, and predictive validities, we evaluated behavioral parameters (locomotor activity, stereotypy activity, and fecal boli amount) and brain energy metabolism (enzymes citrate synthase; malate dehydrogenase; succinate dehydrogenase; complexes I, II, II-III, and IV of the mitochondrial respiratory chain; and creatine kinase) in rats submitted to acute and chronic administration of fenproporex, treated with lithium (Li) and valproate (VPA). The administration of Fen increased locomotor activity and decreased the activity of Krebs cycle enzymes, mitochondrial respiratory chain complexes, and creatine kinase, in most brain structures evaluated. In addition, treatment with mood stabilizers prevented and reversed this effect. Our results are consistent with the literature that demonstrates behavioral changes and mitochondrial dysfunction caused by psychostimulants. These findings suggest that chronic administration of Fen may be a potential animal model of mania.

  17. The burden on informal caregivers of people with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogilvie, Alan D; Morant, Nicola; Goodwin, Guy M

    2005-01-01

    Caregivers of people with bipolar disorder may experience a different quality of burden than is seen with other illnesses. A better understanding of their concerns is necessary to improve the training of professionals working with this population. Conceptualizing caregiver burden in a conventional medical framework may not focus enough on issues important to caregivers, or on cultural and social issues. Perceptions of caregivers about bipolar disorder have important effects on levels of burden experienced. It is important to distinguish between caregivers' experience of this subjective burden and objective burden as externally appraised. Caregivers' previous experiences of health services may influence their beliefs about the illness. Caregiver burden is associated with depression, which affects patient recovery by adding stress to the living environment. The objective burden on caregivers of patients with bipolar disorder is significantly higher than for those with unipolar depression. Caregivers of bipolar patients have high levels of expressed emotion, including critical, hostile, or over-involved attitudes. Several measures have been developed to assess the care burden of patients with depressive disorders, but may be inappropriate for patients with bipolar disorder because of its cyclical nature and the stresses arising from manic and hypomanic episodes. Inter-episode symptoms pose another potential of burden in patients with bipolar disorder. Subsyndromal depressive symptoms are common in this phase of the illness, resulting in severe and widespread impairment of function. Despite the importance of assessing caregiver burden in bipolar disorder, relevant literature is scarce. The specific effects of mania and inter-episode symptoms have not been adequately addressed, and there is a lack of existing measures to assess burden adequately, causing uncertainty regarding how best to structure family interventions to optimally alleviate burden. The relatively few

  18. Peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) as a biomarker in bipolar disorder: a meta-analysis of 52 studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Brisa S; Molendijk, Marc L; Köhler, Cristiano A; Soares, Jair C; Leite, Cláudio Manuel G S; Machado-Vieira, Rodrigo; Ribeiro, Thamara L; Silva, Jéssica C; Sales, Paulo M G; Quevedo, João; Oertel-Knöchel, Viola; Vieta, Eduard; González-Pinto, Ana; Berk, Michael; Carvalho, André F

    2015-11-30

    The neurotrophic hypothesis postulates that mood disorders such as bipolar disorder (BD) are associated with a lower expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). However, its role in peripheral blood as a biomarker of disease activity and of stage for BD, transcending pathophysiology, is still disputed. In the last few years an increasing number of clinical studies assessing BDNF in serum and plasma have been published. Therefore, it is now possible to analyse the association between BDNF levels and the severity of affective symptoms in BD as well as the effects of acute drug treatment of mood episodes on BDNF levels. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of all studies on serum and plasma BDNF levels in bipolar disorder. Through a series of meta-analyses including a total of 52 studies with 6,481 participants, we show that, compared to healthy controls, peripheral BDNF levels are reduced to the same extent in manic (Hedges' g = -0.57, P = 0.010) and depressive (Hedges' g = -0.93, P = 0.001) episodes, while BDNF levels are not significantly altered in euthymia. In meta-regression analyses, BDNF levels additionally negatively correlate with the severity of both manic and depressive symptoms. We found no evidence for a significant impact of illness duration on BDNF levels. In addition, in plasma, but not serum, peripheral BDNF levels increase after the successful treatment of an acute mania episode, but not of a depressive one. In summary, our data suggest that peripheral BDNF levels, more clearly in plasma than in serum, is a potential biomarker of disease activity in BD, but not a biomarker of stage. We suggest that peripheral BDNF may, in future, be used as a part of a blood protein composite measure to assess disease activity in BD.

  19. Comorbidity of Anxiety Disorders and Substance Abusewith Bipolar Mood Disorders and Relationship with ClinicalCourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Shafiee-Kandjani

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "n Objective: Patients with bipolar mood disorder constitute a relatively large number of individuals hospitalized in psychiatric hospitals. This disorder is highly co-morbid with other psychiatric disorders and may effect their clinical course. The goal of this study was to determine the co-occurrence rate of anxiety disorders and substance abuse with bipolar mood disorders and their impact on clinical course. "n Methods: 153 bipolar patients (type I were selected among the hospitalized patients at Razi Psychiatric Hospital in Tabriz, Iran, from September 2007 to October 2008 through convenience sampling method. The participants were evaluated by a structured clinical interview based on DSM-IV criteria (SCID, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS. Results: Co-morbidity of anxiety disorders was 43% . Occurrence of anxiety disorders was 26% for obsessive-compulsive disorder, 24.8% for generalized anxiety disorder, 3.9% for phobia and 2% for panic disorder. Co-morbidity of substance abuse was 7.2% and the highest occurrence of substance abuse was 5.2% for alcoholism and 3.9% for opium. No significant difference was observed between the severity of disease and duration of hospitalization in bipolar patients with or without anxiety disorder. The severity of disease and duration of hospitalization in bipolar patients with substance abuse was higher compared to bipolar patients without substance abuse (P<0.05. "nConclusions: This study suggests that there is a high co-morbidity between anxiety disorders and substance abuse with bipolar disorder. Further, this study suggests that co-occurrence of substance abuse disorder with bipolar disorder increases the severity of the disease and duration of hospitalization.

  20. Facial emotion recognition in bipolar disorder: a critical review Reconhecimento de emoções faciais: artigo de revisão

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    Cristiana Castanho de Almeida Rocca

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Literature review of the controlled studies in the last 18 years in emotion recognition deficits in bipolar disorder. METHOD: A bibliographical research of controlled studies with samples larger than 10 participants from 1990 to June 2008 was completed in Medline, Lilacs, PubMed and ISI. Thirty-two papers were evaluated. RESULTS: Euthymic bipolar disorder presented impairment in recognizing disgust and fear. Manic BD showed difficult to recognize fearful and sad faces. Pediatric bipolar disorder patients and children at risk presented impairment in their capacity to recognize emotions in adults and children faces. Bipolar disorder patients were more accurate in recognizing facial emotions than schizophrenic patients. DISCUSSION: Bipolar disorder patients present impaired recognition of disgust, fear and sadness that can be partially attributed to mood-state. In mania, they have difficult to recognize fear and disgust. Bipolar disorder patients were more accurate in recognizing emotions than depressive and schizophrenic patients. Bipolar disorder children present a tendency to misjudge extreme facial expressions as being moderate or mild in intensity. CONCLUSION: Affective and cognitive deficits in bipolar disorder vary according to the mood states. Follow-up studies re-testing bipolar disorder patients after recovery are needed in order to investigate if these abnormalities reflect a state or trait marker and can be considered an endophenotype. Future studies should aim at standardizing task and designs.OBJETIVO: Revisão da literatura de estudos controlados publicados nos últimos 18 anos sobre déficits no reconhecimento de emoções no transtorno bipolar. MÉTODO: Foi realizada uma pesquisa bibliográfica no Medline, Lilacs, PubMed e ISI, selecionando-se o período de 1990 a junho de 2008. Foram incluídos apenas estudos controlados, que tivessem uma das amostras com mais de 10 participantes, totalizando 32 artigos. RESULTADOS

  1. A case report on very late onset mania

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    Manjunadh Muraleedharan

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosing primary psychiatric disorder in elderly is a challenge considering the high prevalence of neurological and other medical diseases presenting with psychiatric manifestation. The first episode of mania occurring after the age of 80 years is extremely rare. We report a case of an 88-year-old married Hindu male educated up to fifth standard from rural background and lower socioeconomic status presenting with first episode mania, diagnosed using the tenth revision of the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD-10 criteria. Secondary causes were ruled out and successfully treated with low dose olanzapine.

  2. Add-on treatment with N-acetylcysteine for bipolar depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Pernille Kempel; Licht, Rasmus Wentzer; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Oxidative stress and inflammation may be involved in the development and progression of mood disorders, including bipolar disorder. Currently, there is a scarcity of useful treatment options for bipolar depressive episodes, especially compared with the efficacy of treatment for acute ...

  3. Association of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met polymorphism with early-onset bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassan, Malik; Croarkin, Paul E; Luby, Joan L; Veldic, Marin; Joshi, Paramjit T; McElroy, Susan L; Post, Robert M; Walkup, John T; Cercy, Kelly; Geske, Jennifer R; Wagner, Karen D; Cuellar-Barboza, Alfredo B; Casuto, Leah; Lavebratt, Catharina; Schalling, Martin; Jensen, Peter S; Biernacka, Joanna M; Frye, Mark A

    2015-09-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) Val66Met (rs6265) functional polymorphism has been implicated in early-onset bipolar disorder. However, results of studies are inconsistent. We aimed to further explore this association. DNA samples from the Treatment of Early Age Mania (TEAM) and Mayo Clinic Bipolar Disorder Biobank were investigated for association of rs6265 with early-onset bipolar disorder. Bipolar cases were classified as early onset if the first manic or depressive episode occurred at age ≤19 years (versus adult-onset cases at age >19 years). After quality control, 69 TEAM early-onset bipolar disorder cases, 725 Mayo Clinic bipolar disorder cases (including 189 early-onset cases), and 764 controls were included in the analysis of association, assessed with logistic regression assuming log-additive allele effects. Comparison of TEAM cases with controls suggested association of early-onset bipolar disorder with the rs6265 minor allele [odds ratio (OR) = 1.55, p = 0.04]. Although comparison of early-onset adult bipolar disorder cases from the Mayo Clinic versus controls was not statistically significant, the OR estimate indicated the same direction of effect (OR = 1.21, p = 0.19). When the early-onset TEAM and Mayo Clinic early-onset adult groups were combined and compared with the control group, the association of the minor allele rs6265 was statistically significant (OR = 1.30, p = 0.04). These preliminary analyses of a relatively small sample with early-onset bipolar disorder are suggestive that functional variation in BDNF is implicated in bipolar disorder risk and may have a more significant role in early-onset expression of the disorder. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Relationship between personality traits and perceived internalized stigma in bipolar patients and their treatment partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassirnia, Anahita; Briggs, Jessica; Kopeykina, Irina; Mednick, Amy; Yaseen, Zimri; Galynker, Igor

    2015-12-15

    Internalized stigma of mental disorders has significant negative outcomes for patients with bipolar disorder and their families. The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between personality traits and internalized stigma of mental disorders in bipolar patients and their treatment partners. Five different questionnaires were utilized in this study: (1) Demographic data questionnaire, (2) Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III) for personality traits, (3) Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness (ISMI) for stigma, (4) Self Report Manic Inventory (SRMI) for mania and (5) Center for Epidemiological Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D) for depression. The scores of personality traits were combined to create externalizing and internalizing personality trait scores. Results showed that patients with bipolar disorder and their treatment partners both experienced internalized stigma of mental health disorders. There was a significant positive correlation between internalized stigma and internalizing personality traits, but not externalizing traits. In a multi-variate regression analysis, internalizing personality trait score was found to be a significant predictor of internalized stigma. In conclusion, patients with bipolar disorder and their treatment partners perceive higher level of internalized stigma of mental disorders if they have internalizing personality traits. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A pilot study differentiating recurrent major depression from bipolar disorder cycling on the depressive pole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinz, Marty; Stein, Alvin; Uncini, Thomas

    2010-11-09

    A novel method for differentiating and treating bipolar disorder cycling on the depressive pole from patients who are suffering a major depressive episode is explored in this work. To confirm the diagnosis of type 1 or type 2 bipolar disorder, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV) criteria require that at least one manic or hypomanic episode be identified. History of one or more manic or hypomanic episodes may be impossible to obtain, representing a potential blind spot in the DSM-IV diagnostic criteria. Many bipolar patients who cycle primarily on the depressive side for many years carry a misdiagnosis of recurrent major depression, leading to treatment with antidepressants that achieve little or no relief of symptoms. This article discusses a novel approach for diagnosing and treating patients with bipolar disorder cycling on the depressive pole versus patients with recurrent major depression. Patients involved in this study were formally diagnosed with recurrent major depression under DSM-IV criteria and had no medical history of mania or hypomania to support the diagnosis of bipolar disorder. All patients had suffered multiple depression treatment failures in the past, when evaluated under DSM-IV guidelines, secondary to administration of antidepressant drugs and/or serotonin with dopamine amino acid precursors. This study contained 1600 patients who were diagnosed with recurrent major depression under the DSM-IV criteria. All patients had no medical history of mania or hypomania. All patients experienced no relief of depression symptoms on level 3 amino acid dosing values of the amino acid precursor dosing protocol. Of 1600 patients studied, 117 (7.3%) nonresponder patients were identified who experienced no relief of depression symptoms when the serotonin and dopamine amino acid precursor dosing values were adjusted to establish urinary serotonin and urinary dopamine levels in the Phase III therapeutic ranges. All of the 117

  6. Increased oxidative stress as a mechanism for decreased BDNF levels in acute manic episodes Aumento do estresse oxidativo como um mecanismo para a diminuição dos níveis de BDNF em episódios maníacos agudos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Kapczinski

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE AND METHOD: There is a growing amount of data indicating that alterations in brain-derived neurotrophic factor and increased oxidative stress may play a role in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder. In light of recent evidence demonstrating that brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels are decreased in situations of increased oxidative stress, we have examined the correlation between serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, a measure of lipid peroxidation, and serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels in bipolar disorder patients during acute mania and in healthy controls. RESULTS: Serum thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and brain-derived neurotrophic factor levels were negatively correlated in bipolar disorder patients (r = -0.56; p = 0.001, whereas no significant correlation was observed in the control group.. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that alterations in oxidative status may be mechanistically associated with abnormal low levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor observed in individuals with bipolar disorder.OBJETIVO E MÉTODO: Existem crescentes evidências indicando que alterações no fator neurotrófico derivado do cérebro e aumento do estresse oxidativo podem estar envolvidos na fisiopatologia do transtorno bipolar. Considerando os achados recentes de que os níveis de fator neurotrófico derivado do cérebro estão diminuídos em situações de aumento de estresse oxidativo, nós testamos a correlação entre os níveis séricos de substâncias reativas do ácido tiobarbitúrico, um índice de peroxidação lipídica, e os níveis séricos de fator neurotrófico derivado do cérebro em pacientes portadores de transtorno bipolar durante mania aguda e em controles saudáveis. RESULTADOS: Os níveis séricos de substâncias reativas do ácido tiobarbitúrico e fator neurotrófico derivado do cérebro apresentaram uma correlação negativa em pacientes bipolares (r = -0,56; p = 0,001, enquanto n

  7. A Test of the Transdiagnostic Dopamine Hypothesis of Psychosis Using Positron Emission Tomographic Imaging in Bipolar Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauhar, Sameer; Nour, Matthew M; Veronese, Mattia; Rogdaki, Maria; Bonoldi, Ilaria; Azis, Matilda; Turkheimer, Federico; McGuire, Philip; Young, Allan H; Howes, Oliver D

    2017-12-01

    The dopamine hypothesis suggests that dopamine abnormalities underlie psychosis, irrespective of diagnosis, implicating dopamine dysregulation in bipolar affective disorder and schizophrenia, in line with the research domain criteria approach. However, this hypothesis has not been directly examined in individuals diagnosed with bipolar disorder with psychosis. To test whether dopamine synthesis capacity is elevated in bipolar disorder with psychosis and how this compares with schizophrenia and matched controls and to examine whether dopamine synthesis capacity is associated with psychotic symptom severity, irrespective of diagnostic class. This cross-sectional case-control positron emission tomographic study was performed in the setting of first-episode psychosis services in an inner-city area (London, England). Sixty individuals participated in the study (22 with bipolar psychosis [18 antipsychotic naive or free], 16 with schizophrenia [14 antipsychotic naive or free], and 22 matched controls) and underwent fluorodihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine ([18F]-DOPA) positron emission tomography to examine dopamine synthesis capacity. Standardized clinical measures, including the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, and Global Assessment of Functioning, were administered. The study dates were March 2013 to November 2016. Dopamine synthesis capacity (Kicer) and clinical measures (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, and Global Assessment of Functioning). The mean (SD) ages of participants were 23.6 (3.6) years in 22 individuals with bipolar psychosis (13 male), 26.3 (4.4) years in 16 individuals with schizophrenia (14 male), and 24.5 (4.5) years in controls (14 male). There was a significant group difference in striatal dopamine synthesis capacity (Kicer) (F2,57 = 6.80, P = .002). Kicer was significantly elevated in both the bipolar group (mean [SD], 13.18 [1.08] × 10-3 min-1; P = .002) and the schizophrenia

  8. Comparison of Risperidone and Olanzapine in Bipolar and Schizoaffective Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masand, Prakash S.; Wang, Xiaohong; Gupta, Sanjay; Schwartz, Thomas L.; Virk, Subhdeep; Hameed, Ahmad

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To compare risperidone and olanzapine for efficacy, tolerability, need for concomitant mood stabilizers, and cost of treatment in bipolar and schizoaffective disorders. Method: We conducted a retrospective chart review of 36 consecutive outpatients with DSM-IV bipolar or schizoaffective disorder seen in 3 settings who received risperidone or olanzapine for at least 1 month between May and August 1997. Results: The mean ± SD doses were 3.7 ± 3.5 mg/day of risperidone and 12.0 ± 5.4 mg/day of olanzapine. Between-treatment differences in patient characteristics, psychiatric history, Clinical Global Impressions scale ratings, and duration of treatment were not significant. Similar proportions of patients in the 2 groups reported side effects, including extrapyramidal symptoms, akathisia, tardive dyskinesia, and precipitation of mania by the respective drug. Patients in the olanzapine group received a significantly higher dose of concomitant lithium than those receiving risperidone (mean daily lithium doses: risperidone group, 750 ± 150 mg; olanzapine group, 1211 ± 186 mg; p = .006). The total daily acquisition cost per patient was $11.84 for olanzapine versus $5.81 for risperidone. Conclusion: Olanzapine and risperidone were equally efficacious and safe in the treatment of patients with bipolar or schizoaffective disorder, but treatment costs and dose of concomitant lithium were lower in risperidone-treated patients. PMID:15014747

  9. Chronotype and circadian rhythm in bipolar disorder: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Matias C A; Abreu, Rafael L C; Linhares Neto, Vicente B; de Bruin, Pedro F C; de Bruin, Veralice M S

    2017-08-01

    Despite a complex relationship between mood, sleep and rhythm, the impact of circadian disruptions on bipolar disorder (BD) has not been clarified. The purpose of this systematic review was to define current evidence regarding chronotype and circadian rhythm patterns in BD patients. 42 studies were included, involving 3432 BD patients. Disruption of the biological rhythm was identified, even in drug-naïve BD patients and independently of mood status. Daily profiles of melatonin levels and cortisol indicated a delayed phase. Depression was more frequently associated with circadian alterations than euthymia. Few studies evaluated mania, demonstrating irregular rhythms. Evening type was more common in BD adults. Studies about the influence of chronotype on depressive symptoms showed conflicting results. Only one investigation observed the influences of chronotype in mania, revealing no significant association. Effects of psychoeducation and lithium on rhythm in BD patients were poorly studied, demonstrating no improvement of rhythm parameters. Studies about genetics are incipient. In conclusion, disruption in circadian rhythm and eveningness are common in BD. Prospective research evaluating the impact of circadian disruption on mood symptoms, metabolism, seasonality, the influence of age and the effects of mood stabilizers are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Perceptions and impact of bipolar disorder in Japan: results of an Internet survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe K

    2016-11-01

    with bipolar disorder. Keywords: bipolar disorder, mania, depression, perception, diagnosis, cost of illness

  11. Comorbid sleep disorders and suicide risk among children and adolescents with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Ian H; Hom, Melanie A; Luby, Joan L; Joshi, Paramjit T; Wagner, Karen D; Emslie, Graham J; Walkup, John T; Axelson, David A; Joiner, Thomas E

    2017-12-01

    Children and adolescents with bipolar disorder are at increased risk for suicide. Sleep disturbances are common among youth with bipolar disorder and are also independently implicated in suicide risk; thus, comorbid sleep disorders may amplify suicide risk in this clinical population. This study examined the effects of comorbid sleep disorders on suicide risk among youth with bipolar disorder. We conducted secondary analyses of baseline data from the Treatment of Early Age Mania (TEAM) study, a randomized controlled trial of individuals aged 6-15 years (mean ± SD = 10.2 ± 2.7 years) with DSM-IV bipolar I disorder (N = 379). Sleep disorders (i.e., nightmare, sleep terror, and sleepwalking disorders) and suicide risk were assessed via the WASH-U-KSADS and the CDRS-R, respectively. We constructed uncontrolled logistic regression models as well as models controlling for trauma history, a generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) diagnosis, and depression symptoms. Participants with a current comorbid nightmare disorder versus those without were nearly twice as likely to screen positive for suicide risk in an uncontrolled model and models controlling for trauma history, a GAD diagnosis, and depression symptoms. Neither a current comorbid sleep terror disorder nor a sleepwalking disorder was significantly associated with suicide risk. This pattern of findings remained consistent for both current and lifetime sleep disorder diagnoses. Youth with bipolar I disorder and a comorbid nightmare disorder appear to be at heightened suicide risk. Implications for assessment and treatment are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Waiting to win: elevated striatal and orbitofrontal cortical activity during reward anticipation in euthymic bipolar disorder adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusslock, Robin; Almeida, Jorge RC; Forbes, Erika E; Versace, Amelia; Frank, Ellen; LaBarbara, Edmund J; Klein, Crystal R; Phillips, Mary L

    2012-01-01

    Objective Bipolar disorder may be characterized by a hypersensitivity to reward-relevant stimuli, potentially underlying the emotional lability and dysregulation that characterizes the illness. In parallel, research highlights the predominant role of striatal and orbitofrontal cortical (OFC) regions in reward-processing and approach-related affect. We aimed to examine whether bipolar disorder, relative to healthy, participants displayed elevated activity in these regions during reward processing. Methods Twenty-one euthymic bipolar I disorder and 20 healthy control participants with no lifetime history of psychiatric disorder underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning during a card-guessing paradigm designed to examine reward-related brain function to anticipation and receipt of monetary reward and loss. Data were collected using a 3T Siemens Trio scanner. Results Region-of-interest analyses revealed that bipolar disorder participants displayed greater ventral striatal and right-sided orbitofrontal [Brodmann area (BA) 11] activity during anticipation, but not outcome, of monetary reward, relative to healthy controls (p anticipation (p anticipation may represent a neural mechanism for predisposition to expansive mood and hypo/mania in response to reward-relevant cues that characterizes bipolar disorder. Our findings contrast with research reporting blunted activity in the ventral striatum during reward processing in unipolar depressed individuals, relative to healthy controls. Examination of reward-related neural activity in bipolar disorder is a promising research focus to facilitate identification of biological markers of the illness. PMID:22548898

  13. Differences in clinical presentation between bipolar I and II disorders in the early stages of bipolar disorder: A naturalistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinberg, Maj; Mikkelsen, Rie Lambaek; Kirkegaard, Thomas; Christensen, Ellen Margrethe; Kessing, Lars Vedel

    2017-01-15

    In a naturalistic clinical study of patients in the early stages of bipolar disorders the aim was to assess differences between patients with bipolar I (BD I) and bipolar II (BD II) disorders on clinical characteristics including affective symptoms, subjective cognitive complaints, functional level, the presence of comorbid personality disorders and coping strategies. Diagnoses were confirmed using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Disorders. Clinical symptoms were rated with the Young Mania Rating Scale and the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, and functional status using the Functional Assessment Short Test. Cognitive complaints were assessed using the Massachusetts General Hospital Cognitive and Physical Functioning Questionnaire, the presence of comorbid personality disorders using the Standardized Assessment of Personality - Abbreviated Scale and coping style using the Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations. In total, 344 patients were included (BD I (n=163) and BD II (n=181). Patients with BD II presented with significantly more depressive symptoms, more cognitive complaints, lower overall functioning, and a higher prevalence of comorbid personality disorders. Finally, they exhibited a trend towards using less adaptive coping styles. It cannot be omitted that some patients may have progressed from BD II to BD I. Most measures were based on patient self report. Overall, BD II was associated with a higher disease burden. Clinically, it is important to differentiate BD II from BD I and research wise, there is a need for tailoring and testing specific interventions towards BD II. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. No strong evidence for abnormal levels of dysfunctional attitudes, automatic thoughts, and emotional information-processing biases in remitted bipolar I affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lex, Claudia; Meyer, Thomas D; Marquart, Barbara; Thau, Kenneth

    2008-03-01

    Beck extended his original cognitive theory of depression by suggesting that mania was a mirror image of depression characterized by extreme positive cognition about the self, the world, and the future. However, there were no suggestions what might be special regarding cognitive features in bipolar patients (Mansell & Scott, 2006). We therefore used different indicators to evaluate cognitive processes in bipolar patients and healthy controls. We compared 19 remitted bipolar I patients (BPs) without any Axis I comorbidity with 19 healthy individuals (CG). All participants completed the Beck Depression Inventory, the Dysfunctional Attitude Scale, the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire, the Emotional Stroop Test, and an incidental recall task. No significant group differences were found in automatic thinking and the information-processing styles (Emotional Stroop Test, incidental recall task). Regarding dysfunctional attitudes, we obtained ambiguous results. It appears that individuals with remitted bipolar affective disorder do not show cognitive vulnerability as proposed in Beck's theory of depression if they only report subthreshold levels of depressive symptoms. Perhaps, the cognitive vulnerability might only be observable if mood induction procedures are used.

  15. Clinical correlates of loss of insight in bipolar depression

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    Rafael de Assis da Silva

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Affective state may influence insight, especially regarding mania. Nevertheless, studies have so far suggested that depression seems not to significantly impair insight. To the best of our knowledge, this study pioneers the evaluation of how insight variations in bipolar depression correlate with clinical variables. Method A group of 165 bipolar patients, 52 of whom had depressive episodes according to DSM-5 criteria, were followed during a year. All patients underwent clinical assessment, and insight was evaluated through the Insight Scale for Affective Disorders (ISAD. Repeated-measures ANOVA was calculated comparing scores on the four ISAD factors (insight into symptoms, the condition itself, self-esteem and social relationships in order to investigate differences in insight according to different objects. Correlational analysis explored which clinical symptoms were linked to reduced insight. Results Worse total insight correlated with suicide attempt/ideation and fewer subsyndromal manic symptoms such as mood elevation, increased energy and sexual interest. Worse self-esteem insight was associated with not only suicide ideation/attempt but also with activity reduction and psychomotor retardation. Worse symptom insight also correlated with psychomotor retardation. Better insight into having an affective disorder was associated with more intense hypochondria symptoms. Finally, worse insight into having an illness was associated with psychotic episodes. Conclusion Our study found that symptoms other than psychosis – suicide ideation, psychomotor retardation and reduction of activity and work – correlate with insight impairment in bipolar depression.

  16. Rapid onset of treatment effects on psychosis, depression, and mania in patients with acute exacerbation of schizoaffective disorder following treatment with oral extended-release paliperidone.

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    Fu, Dong-Jing; Turkoz, Ibrahim; Bossie, Cynthia A; Patel, Hiren; Alphs, Larry

    2016-03-15

    Patients with schizoaffective disorder (SCA) experience complicated interplays of psychotic, depressive, and manic symptoms. Paliperidone extended-release (pali ER) tablets have been shown to be efficacious in these patients, but treatment response has not been studied relative to the onset of effects for these symptom domains. In a pooled analysis of data from two 6-week, randomized, placebo-controlled studies, the onset of treatment effects with oral pali ER was evaluated by symptom domain (psychosis, depression, mania) in patients with an acute SCA exacerbation. Subjects were categorized as having prominent psychotic (Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale score >70), depressive (Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression-21 score ≥16), or manic (Young Mania Rating Scale score ≥16) symptoms at baseline. Of the 614 patients in these analyses, 597 (97.2%), 411 (66.9%), and 488 (79.5%) had prominent psychotic, depressive, and manic symptoms at baseline, respectively. Pali ER treatment was associated with rapid and significant improvement of all three symptom domains versus placebo within 1 week of initiation, regardless of whether treatment was given as monotherapy or in combination with mood stabilizers and/or antidepressants. Adverse events were similar to those reported in the original published studies. This post hoc analysis of two phase 3 trials requires confirmation in prospective studies. This pooled analysis suggests that treatment with pali ER is associated with rapid control of psychotic, depressive, and manic symptoms in patients with SCA. Its findings support the benefit of pali ER as a primary treatment for the management of SCA. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A randomized clinical trial of high eicosapentaenoic acid omega-3 fatty acids and inositol as monotherapy and in combination in the treatment of pediatric bipolar spectrum disorders: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wozniak, Janet; Faraone, Stephen V; Chan, James; Tarko, Laura; Hernandez, Mariely; Davis, Jacqueline; Woodworth, K Yvonne; Biederman, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    We conducted a 12-week, randomized, double-blind, controlled clinical trial to evaluate the effectiveness and tolerability of high eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)/docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) omega-3 fatty acids and inositol as monotherapy and in combination in children with bipolar spectrum disorders. Participants were children 5-12 years of age meeting DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for bipolar spectrum disorders (bipolar I or II disorder or bipolar disorder not otherwise specified [NOS]) and displaying mixed, manic, or hypomanic symptoms. Subjects with severe illness were excluded. Subjects were randomized to 1 of 3 treatment arms: inositol plus placebo, omega-3 fatty acids plus placebo, and the combined active treatment of omega-3 fatty acids plus inositol. Data were collected from February 2012 to November 2013. Twenty-four subjects were exposed to treatment (≥ 1 week of study completed) (inositol [n = 7], omega-3 fatty acids [n = 7], and omega-3 fatty acids plus inositol [n =10]). Fifty-four percent of the subjects completed the study. Subjects randomized to the omega-3 fatty acids plus inositol arm had the largest score decrease comparing improvement from baseline to end point with respect to the Young Mania Rating Scale (P < .05). Similar results were found for the Children's Depression Rating Scale (P < .05) and the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (P <.05). Results of this pilot randomized, double-blind, controlled trial suggest that the combined treatment of omega-3 fatty acids plus inositol reduced symptoms of mania and depression in prepubertal children with mild to moderate bipolar spectrum disorders. Results should be interpreted in light of limitations, which include exclusion of severely ill subjects, 54% completion rate, and small sample size. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01396486. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  18. Amygdalar, hippocampal, and thalamic volumes in youth at high risk for development of bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karchemskiy, Asya; Garrett, Amy; Howe, Meghan; Adleman, Nancy; Simeonova, Diana I; Alegria, Dylan; Reiss, Allan; Chang, Kiki

    2011-12-30

    Children of parents with bipolar disorder (BD), especially those with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and symptoms of depression or mania, are at significantly high risk for developing BD. As we have previously shown amygdalar reductions in pediatric BD, the current study examined amygdalar volumes in offspring of parents (BD offspring) who have not yet developed a full manic episode. Youth participating in the study included 22 BD offspring and 22 healthy controls of comparable age, gender, handedness, and IQ. Subjects had no history of a manic episode, but met criteria for ADHD and moderate mood symptoms. MRI was performed on a 3T GE scanner, using a 3D volumetric spoiled gradient echo series. Amygdalae were manually traced using BrainImage Java software on positionally normalized brain stacks. Bipolar offspring had similar amygdalar volumes compared to the control group. Exploratory analyses yielded no differences in hippocampal or thalamic volumes. Bipolar offspring do not show decreased amygdalar volume, possibly because these abnormalities occur after more prolonged illness rather than as a preexisting risk factor. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether amygdalar volumes change during and after the development of BD. 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Is Bipolar Disorder the Most Common Diagnostic Entity in Hospitalized Adolescents and Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, George

    1995-01-01

    An evaluation of all children and adolescents (n=57) admitted to an acute psychiatric unit over a 3-month period was undertaken to determine the presence of bipolar disorder. Findings indicated that bipolar disorder was the most common diagnosis; thus, this disorder has to be ruled out in all youth admitted to acute care psychiatric units. (JPS)

  20. Treating insomnia improves mood state, sleep, and functioning in bipolar disorder: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Allison G; Soehner, Adriane M; Kaplan, Kate A; Hein, Kerrie; Lee, Jason; Kanady, Jennifer; Li, Descartes; Rabe-Hesketh, Sophia; Ketter, Terence A; Neylan, Thomas C; Buysse, Daniel J

    2015-06-01

    To determine if a treatment for interepisode bipolar disorder I patients with insomnia improves mood state, sleep, and functioning. Alongside psychiatric care, interepisode bipolar disorder I participants with insomnia were randomly allocated to a bipolar disorder-specific modification of cognitive behavior therapy for insomnia (CBTI-BP; n = 30) or psychoeducation (PE; n = 28) as a comparison condition. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, the end of 8 sessions of treatment, and 6 months later. This pilot was conducted to determine initial feasibility and generate effect size estimates. During the 6-month follow-up, the CBTI-BP group had fewer days in a bipolar episode relative to the PE group (3.3 days vs. 25.5 days). The CBTI-BP group also experienced a significantly lower hypomania/mania relapse rate (4.6% vs. 31.6%) and a marginally lower overall mood episode relapse rate (13.6% vs. 42.1%) compared with the PE group. Relative to PE, CBTI-BP reduced insomnia severity and led to higher rates of insomnia remission at posttreatment and marginally higher rates at 6 months. Both CBTI-BP and PE showed statistically significant improvement on selected sleep and functional impairment measures. The effects of treatment were well sustained through follow-up for most outcomes, although some decline on secondary sleep benefits was observed. CBTI-BP was associated with reduced risk of mood episode relapse and improved sleep and functioning on certain outcomes in bipolar disorder. Hence, sleep disturbance appears to be an important pathway contributing to bipolar disorder. The need to develop bipolar disorder-specific sleep diary scoring standards is highlighted. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia in euthymic bipolar disorder: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinan, Mette Kvisten; Krane-Gartiser, Karoline; Langsrud, Knut; Sand, Trond; Kallestad, Håvard; Morken, Gunnar

    2014-01-16

    Patients with bipolar disorder experience sleep disturbance, even in euthymic phases. Changes in sleep pattern are frequent signs of a new episode of (hypo)mania or depression. Cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is an effective treatment for primary insomnia, but there are no published results on the effects of CBT-I in patients with bipolar disorder. In this randomized controlled trial, we wish to compare CBT-I and treatment as usual with treatment as usual alone to determine its effect in improving quality of sleep, stabilizing minor mood variations and preventing new mood episodes in euthymic patients with bipolar disorder and comorbid insomnia. Patients with euthymic bipolar I or II disorder and insomnia, as verified by the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM Disorders (SCID-1) assessment, will be included. The patients enter a three-week run-in phase in which they complete a sleep diary and a mood diary, are monitored for seven consecutive days with an actigraph and on two of these nights with polysomnography in addition before randomization to an eight-week treatment trial. Treatment as usual consists of pharmacological and supportive psychosocial treatment. In this trial, CBT-I will consist of sleep restriction, psychoeducation about sleep, stabilization of the circadian rhythm, and challenging and correcting sleep state misperception, in three to eight sessions. This trial could document a new treatment for insomnia in bipolar disorder with possible effects on sleep and on stability of mood. In addition, more precise information can be obtained about the character of sleep disturbance in bipolar disorder. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01704352.

  2. Review of the use of Topiramate for treatment of psychiatric disorders

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    Arnone Danilo

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Topiramate is a new antiepileptic drug, originally designed as an oral hypoglycaemic subsequently approved as anticonvulsant. It has increasingly been used in the treatment of numerous psychiatric conditions and it has also been associated with weight loss potentially relevant in reversing weight gain induced by psychotropic medications. This article reviews pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of topiramate, its biological putative role in treating psychiatric disorders and its relevance in clinical practice. Methods A comprehensive search from a range of databases was conducted and papers addressing the topic were selected. Results Thirty-two published reports met criteria for inclusion, 4 controlled and 28 uncontrolled studies. Five unpublished controlled studies were also identified in the treatment of acute mania. Conclusions Topiramate lacks efficacy in the treatment of acute mania. Increasing evidence, based on controlled studies, supports the use of topiramate in binge eating disorders, bulimia nervosa, alcohol dependence and possibly in bipolar disorders in depressive phase. In the treatment of rapid cycling bipolar disorders, as adjunctive treatment in refractory bipolar disorder in adults and children, schizophrenia, posttraumatic stress disorder, unipolar depression, emotionally unstable personality disorder and Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome the evidence is entirely based on open label studies, case reports and case series. Regarding weight loss, findings are encouraging and have potential implications in reversing increased body weight, normalisation of glycemic control and blood pressure. Topiramate was generally well tolerated and serious adverse events were rare.

  3. The Bipolar Illness Onset study: research protocol for the BIO cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Munkholm, Klaus; Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria; Miskowiak, Kamilla Woznica; Nielsen, Lars Bo; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Ekstrøm, Claus; Winther, Ole; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; McIntyre, Roger S; Kapczinski, Flavio; Gattaz, Wagner F; Bardram, Jakob; Frost, Mads; Mayora, Oscar; Knudsen, Gitte Moos; Phillips, Mary; Vinberg, Maj

    2017-06-23

    Bipolar disorder is an often disabling mental illness with a lifetime prevalence of 1%-2%, a high risk of recurrence of manic and depressive episodes, a lifelong elevated risk of suicide and a substantial heritability. The course of illness is frequently characterised by progressive shortening of interepisode intervals with each recurrence and increasing cognitive dysfunction in a subset of individuals with this condition. Clinically, diagnostic boundaries between bipolar disorder and other psychiatric disorders such as unipolar depression are unclear although pharmacological and psychological treatment strategies differ substantially. Patients with bipolar disorder are often misdiagnosed and the mean delay between onset and diagnosis is 5-10 years. Although the risk of relapse of depression and mania is high it is for most patients impossible to predict and consequently prevent upcoming episodes in an individual tailored way. The identification of objective biomarkers can both inform bipolar disorder diagnosis and provide biological targets for the development of new and personalised treatments. Accurate diagnosis of bipolar disorder in its early stages could help prevent the long-term detrimental effects of the illness.The present Bipolar Illness Onset study aims to identify (1) a composite blood-based biomarker, (2) a composite electronic smartphone-based biomarker and (3) a neurocognitive and neuroimaging-based signature for bipolar disorder. The study will include 300 patients with newly diagnosed/first-episode bipolar disorder, 200 of their healthy siblings or offspring and 100 healthy individuals without a family history of affective disorder. All participants will be followed longitudinally with repeated blood samples and other biological tissues, self-monitored and automatically generated smartphone data, neuropsychological tests and a subset of the cohort with neuroimaging during a 5 to 10-year study period. The study has been approved by the Local

  4. The Bipolar Illness Onset study: research protocol for the BIO cohort study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munkholm, Klaus; Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria; Miskowiak, Kamilla Woznica; Nielsen, Lars Bo; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Ekstrøm, Claus; Winther, Ole; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; McIntyre, Roger S; Kapczinski, Flavio; Gattaz, Wagner F; Bardram, Jakob; Frost, Mads; Mayora, Oscar; Knudsen, Gitte Moos; Phillips, Mary; Vinberg, Maj

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Bipolar disorder is an often disabling mental illness with a lifetime prevalence of 1%–2%, a high risk of recurrence of manic and depressive episodes, a lifelong elevated risk of suicide and a substantial heritability. The course of illness is frequently characterised by progressive shortening of interepisode intervals with each recurrence and increasing cognitive dysfunction in a subset of individuals with this condition. Clinically, diagnostic boundaries between bipolar disorder and other psychiatric disorders such as unipolar depression are unclear although pharmacological and psychological treatment strategies differ substantially. Patients with bipolar disorder are often misdiagnosed and the mean delay between onset and diagnosis is 5–10 years. Although the risk of relapse of depression and mania is high it is for most patients impossible to predict and consequently prevent upcoming episodes in an individual tailored way. The identification of objective biomarkers can both inform bipolar disorder diagnosis and provide biological targets for the development of new and personalised treatments. Accurate diagnosis of bipolar disorder in its early stages could help prevent the long-term detrimental effects of the illness. The present Bipolar Illness Onset study aims to identify (1) a composite blood-based biomarker, (2) a composite electronic smartphone-based biomarker and (3) a neurocognitive and neuroimaging-based signature for bipolar disorder. Methods and analysis The study will include 300 patients with newly diagnosed/first-episode bipolar disorder, 200 of their healthy siblings or offspring and 100 healthy individuals without a family history of affective disorder. All participants will be followed longitudinally with repeated blood samples and other biological tissues, self-monitored and automatically generated smartphone data, neuropsychological tests and a subset of the cohort with neuroimaging during a 5 to 10-year study period. Ethics

  5. Bipolar disorder and Premenstrual Syndrome or Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder comorbidity: a systematic review Comorbidade entre o Transtorno Bipolar e Síndrome Pré-menstrual ou Transtorno Disfórico Pré-menstrual: uma revisão sistemática

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Carvalho Cirillo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This article aims to review the comorbidity of premenstrual syndrome (PMS or premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD and bipolar disorder (BD, identify variables requiring further investigation and to remind physicians that special care is required for diagnosis and therapy. METHOD: A systematic review of articles published from 1987 to February 2012 was conducted in the Medline database with the following terms: (premenstrual syndrome OR premenstrual dysphoric disorder OR premenstrual AND (bipolar OR mania OR manic. Seventeen articles were analyzed. RESULTS: PMS and PMDD were most often comorbid among BD-II patients and vice versa. Moreover, patients with PMS or PMDD also have an increased risk of having BD-I. In addition, bipolar women susceptible to hormonal changes exhibit more severe symptoms, more frequent relapses and a worse therapeutic response. CONCLUSION: Future investigations should attempt to stabilize hormonal levels through the continuous use of contraceptives to target a reduction in symptom severity. In addition, psychiatrists should note menstrual period dates and compare symptom intensity between the luteal and follicular phases. Finally, PMS and PMDD patients should be studied separately.OBJETIVO: Esse artigo tem como objetivo revisar a comorbidade entre a Síndrome Pré-Menstrual (SPM ou Transtorno Disfórico Pré-Menstrual (TDPM e o Transtorno Bipolar (TB, identificar as variáveis que exigem uma investigação mais aprofundada e lembrar os médicos que as mulheres necessitam de cuidados especiais para diagnóstico e tratamento. MÉTODO: Foi realizada uma revisão sistemática de 1987 a fevereiro de 2012 através da base de dados Medline utilizando os seguintes descritores: (premenstrual syndrome OR premenstrual dysphoric disorder OR premenstrual AND (bipolar OR mania OR manic. Dezessete artigos foram analisados. RESULTADOS: Pacientes com SPM ou TDPM possuem comorbidade com TB-II com maior frequência e vice

  6. Co-morbid disorders and sexual risk behavior in Nigerian adolescents with bipolar disorder

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    Bakare Muideen O

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adolescent onset bipolar disorder often presents with co-morbid disorders of which psychoactive substance use disorders are notable. Mania symptoms and co-morbid psychoactive substance use disorders prone adolescents with bipolar disorder to impulsivity, impaired judgment, and risk taking behavior which often includes sexual risk behavior. There are dearth of information on pattern of co-morbid disorders and sexual risk behavior in adolescent onset bipolar disorder in Nigeria. This study assessed the prevalence and pattern of co-morbid disorders and determined associated factors of sexual risk behavior among adolescents with bipolar disorder. Methods Socio-demographic information was obtained from the adolescents using socio-demographic questionnaire. Clinical interview, physical examination and laboratory investigations were employed to establish co-morbid disorders in these adolescents during the outpatient follow up visits over a one year period. Results A total of forty six (46 adolescents with bipolar disorder were followed up over a one year period. Twenty two (47.8% of the adolescents had co-morbid disorders with cannabis use disorders, alcohol use disorders, conduct disorder with or without other psychoactive substance use accounting for 23.9%, 8.7%, 13.0% respectively and HIV infection, though a chance finding accounting for 2.2%. Twenty one (45.7% of the adolescents had positive history of sexual risk behavior, which was significantly associated with presence of co-morbid disorders (p = 0.003, level of religion activities in the adolescents (p = 0.000, and marital status of the parents (p = 0.021. Conclusion When planning interventions for children and adolescents with bipolar disorder, special attention may need to be focused on group of adolescents with co-morbid disorders and propensity towards impulsivity and sexual risk behavior. This may help in improving long term outcome in this group of adolescents.

  7. The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral group therapy in treating bipolar disorder: a randomized controlled study A eficácia da terapia cognitivo-comportamental para o tratamento do transtorno bipolar: um estudo controlado e randomizado

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    Rafael Thomaz da Costa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Recent studies suggest that, when combined with pharmacotherapy, structured psychotherapy may modify the course of bipolar disorder. However, there are few studies that have examined the effects of cognitive behavioral group therapy on the course of this disorder. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of 14 sessions of cognitive behavioral group therapy, combined with pharmacotherapy, on the treatment of patients with bipolar disorder, and to compare our results against those from the use of pharmacotherapy alone. METHOD: Forty-one patients with bipolar I and II disorder participated in the study and were randomly allocated to one of two treatment groups; thirty-seven patients remained in the study until its completion. Mood and anxiety symptoms were measured in all subjects. Statistical analysis was used to investigate if the groups differed with respect to demographic characteristics and the scores recorded in the pre- and post-treatment stages, as well as during treatment (intra/inter groups. RESULTS: Patients showed statistically similar population characteristics. The association of cognitive behavioral group therapy and pharmacological treatment proved to be effective. Patients who had undergone cognitive behavioral group therapy presented fewer symptoms of mania, depression and anxiety, as well as fewer and shorter mood change episodes. CONCLUSION: Cognitive behavioral group therapy sessions substantially contributed to the improvement of depression symptoms.OBJETIVO: Estudos recentes sugerem que uma psicoterapia estruturada aplicada junto com a farmacoterapia pode alterar o curso do transtorno afetivo bipolar. Entretanto, poucos estudos investigam os resultados da terapia cognitivo-comportamental em grupo sobre este transtorno psiquiátrico. O objetivo desta pesquisa foi avaliar a eficácia de 14 sessões de terapia cognitivo-comportamental em grupo concomitante à farmacoterapia para bipolares e

  8. The effectiveness of cognitive behavioral group therapy in treating bipolar disorder: a randomized controlled study A eficácia da terapia cognitivo-comportamental para o tratamento do transtorno bipolar: um estudo controlado e randomizado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Thomaz da Costa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Recent studies suggest that, when combined with pharmacotherapy, structured psychotherapy may modify the course of bipolar disorder. However, there are few studies that have examined the effects of cognitive behavioral group therapy on the course of this disorder. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of 14 sessions of cognitive behavioral group therapy, combined with pharmacotherapy, on the treatment of patients with bipolar disorder, and to compare our results against those from the use of pharmacotherapy alone. METHOD: Forty-one patients with bipolar I and II disorder participated in the study and were randomly allocated to one of two treatment groups; thirty-seven patients remained in the study until its completion. Mood and anxiety symptoms were measured in all subjects. Statistical analysis was used to investigate if the groups differed with respect to demographic characteristics and the scores recorded in the pre- and post-treatment stages, as well as during treatment (intra/inter groups. RESULTS: Patients showed statistically similar population characteristics. The association of cognitive behavioral group therapy and pharmacological treatment proved to be effective. Patients who had undergone cognitive behavioral group therapy presented fewer symptoms of mania, depression and anxiety, as well as fewer and shorter mood change episodes. CONCLUSION: Cognitive behavioral group therapy sessions substantially contributed to the improvement of depression symptoms.OBJETIVO: Estudos recentes sugerem que uma psicoterapia estruturada aplicada junto com a farmacoterapia pode alterar o curso do transtorno afetivo bipolar. Entretanto, poucos estudos investigam os resultados da terapia cognitivo-comportamental em grupo sobre este transtorno psiquiátrico. O objetivo desta pesquisa foi avaliar a eficácia de 14 sessões de terapia cognitivo-comportamental em grupo concomitante à farmacoterapia para bipolares e

  9. The serum concentration of copper in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwek, Marcin; Styczeń, Krzysztof; Sowa-Kućma, Magdalena; Dudek, Dominika; Reczyński, Witold; Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Misztak, Paulina; Opoka, Włodzimierz; Topór-Mądry, Roman; Nowak, Gabriel; Rybakowski, Janusz K

    2017-06-18

    Some scientific reports indicate the changes in the concentration of serum copper in patients with bipolar disorder (BD), however the data are inconclusive. The aim of this study was to assess the concentration of copper in the blood serum of patients in various phases of BD compared to healthy volunteers, taking into consideration the specific clinical features, and the stage of illness. The study enrolled 133 patients with a diagnosis of BD (type I, II and NOS), including 61 people in depressive episode, 23 in mania or hypomania and 49 in remission. The control group consisted of 50 people. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to measure the concentration of copper. There were no statistically significant differences in the serum copper concentration between patients in various phases of BD (mania/hypomania, depression, remission), sub-types (Type I, Type II + NOS) or stages and healthy volunteers. However, serum copper concentrations in patients in stage 1 was significantly higher than in advanced stages (2+3+4), (ß = 0.22; p = 0.02). Serum copper concentration was also the higher, the later the age of onset was (ß = 0.33; p < 0.001), and the lower, the greater the number of illness episodes (ß = - 0.23; p = 0.02) (multiple regression model, adj R2 = 0.19, p = 0.0001). The dependencies demonstrated above may reflect pathophysiological processes that occur in the course of BD (e.g., inflammatory response and oxidative stress) with a different intensity depending on its stage.

  10. Design and rationale of a 16-week adjunctive randomized placebo-controlled trial of mitochondrial agents for the treatment of bipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Olivia M; Turner, Alyna; Malhi, Gin S; Ng, Chee; Cotton, Sue M; Dodd, Seetal; Sarris, Jerome; Samuni, Yuval; Tanious, Michelle; Dowling, Nathan; Waterdrinker, Astrid; Smith, Deidre; Berk, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder places a significant burden on individuals, caregivers and family, and the broader community. Current treatments are believed to be more effective against manic symptoms, leaving a shortfall in recovery during the depressive phase of the illness. The current study draws on recent evidence suggesting that, in addition to increased oxidative load, alterations in mitochondrial function occur in bipolar disorder. This 16-week study aims to explore the potential benefits of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) alone or in combination (CT) with selected nutraceuticals believed to enhance mitochondrial function. The study includes adults diagnosed with bipolar disorder currently experiencing an episode of depression. Participants are asked to take NAC, CT, or placebo in addition to any usual treatments. A post-discontinuation visit is conducted 4 weeks following the treatment phase. The primary outcome of the study will be mean change on the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale. Secondary outcomes include functioning, substance use, mania ratings, and quality of life. Blood samples will be collected at baseline and week 16 to explore biochemical alterations following treatment. This study may provide a novel adjunctive treatment for bipolar depression. Analysis of biological samples may assist in understanding the therapeutic benefits and the underlying etiology of bipolar depression. Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry ACTRN12612000830897.

  11. Randomized, controlled trial of Interpersonal and Social Rhythm Therapy for young people with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inder, Maree L; Crowe, Marie T; Luty, Suzanne E; Carter, Janet D; Moor, Stephanie; Frampton, Christopher M; Joyce, Peter R

    2015-03-01

    This randomized, controlled clinical trial compared the effect of interpersonal and social rhythm therapy (IPSRT) to that of specialist supportive care (SSC) on depressive outcomes (primary), social functioning, and mania outcomes over 26-78 weeks in young people with bipolar disorder receiving psychopharmacological treatment. Subjects were aged 15-36 years, recruited from a range of sources, and the patient groups included bipolar I disorder, bipolar II disorder, and bipolar disorder not otherwise specified. Exclusion criteria were minimal. Outcome measures were the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation and the Social Adjustment Scale. Paired-sample t-tests were used to determine the significance of change from baseline to outcome period. Analyses of covariance were used to determine the impact of therapy, impact of lifetime and current comorbidity, interaction between comorbidity and therapy, and impact of age at study entry on depression. A group of 100 participants were randomized to IPSRT (n = 49) or SSC (n = 51). The majority had bipolar I disorder (78%) and were female (76%), with high levels of comorbidity. After treatment, both groups had improved depressive symptoms, social functioning, and manic symptoms. Contrary to our hypothesis, there was no significant difference between therapies. There was no impact of lifetime or current Axis I comorbidity or age at study entry. There was a relative impact of SSC for patients with current substance use disorder. IPSRT and SSC used as an adjunct to pharmacotherapy appear to be effective in reducing depressive and manic symptoms and improving social functioning in adolescents and young adults with bipolar disorder and high rates of comorbidity. Identifying effective treatments that particularly address depressive symptoms is important in reducing the burden of bipolar disorder. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Profile of aripiprazole in the treatment of bipolar disorder in children and adolescents

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    Kirino E

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Eiji Kirino1–3 1Department of Psychiatry, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2Department of Psychiatry, Juntendo University Shizuoka Hospital, 3Juntendo Institute of Mental Health, Shizuoka, Japan Abstract: Bipolar disorder is a pernicious illness. Compared with the later-onset form, early onset bipolar disorder is associated with worse psychosocial outcomes, and is characterized by rapid cycling and increased risks of substance abuse and suicide attempts. Controlling mood episodes and preventing relapse in this group of pediatric patients requires careful treatment. Here, we review the effectiveness of aripiprazole for bipolar disorder in children and adolescents, with discussion of this drug's unique pharmacological profile and various clinical study outcomes. Aripiprazole acts as a serotonin 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, as well as a partial agonist of the serotonin 5-HT1A and dopamine D2 receptors. It can be safely used in children and adolescents, as it is highly tolerated and shows lower rates of the side effects typically observed with other antipsychotic drugs, including sedation, weight gain, hyperprolactinemia, and extrapyramidal syndrome. The presently reviewed randomized controlled trials (RCTs and non-RCTs generally reported aripiprazole to be effective and well-tolerated in children and adolescents with bipolar disorder. However, due to the limited number of RCTs, the present conclusions must be evaluated cautiously. Furthermore, aripiprazole cannot yet be considered a preferred treatment for children and adolescents with bipolar disorder, as there is not yet evidence that aripiprazole shows greater efficacy compared to other second-generation antipsychotics. Additional data are needed from future head-to-head comparison studies. Keywords: child, mania, mixed state

  13. Highs and lows, ups and downs: Meteorology and mood in bipolar disorder.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Bullock

    Full Text Available Seasonal variation of manic and depressive symptoms is a controversial topic in bipolar disorder research. Several studies report seasonal patterns of hospital admissions for depression and mania and variation in symptoms that appear to follow a seasonal pattern, whereas others fail to report such patterns. Differences in research methodologies, data analysis strategies, and temporal resolution of data may partly explain the variation in findings between studies. The current study adds a novel perspective to the literature by investigating specific meteorological factors such as atmospheric pressure, hours of sunshine, relative humidity, and daily maximum and minimum temperatures as more proximal predictors of self-reported daily mood change in people diagnosed with bipolar disorder. The results showed that daily maximum temperature was the only meteorological variable to predict clinically-relevant mood change, with increases in temperature associated with greater odds of a transition into manic mood states. The mediating effects of sleep and activity were also investigated and suggest at least partial influence on the prospective relationship between maximum temperature and mood. Limitations include the small sample size and the fact that the number and valence of social interactions and exposure to natural light were not investigated as potentially important mediators of relationships between meteorological factors and mood. The current data make an important contribution to the literature, serving to clarify the specific meteorological factors that influence mood change in bipolar disorder. From a clinical perspective, greater understanding of seasonal patterns of symptoms in bipolar disorder will help mood episode prophylaxis in vulnerable individuals.

  14. Neuroprotective and antioxidant effects of curcumin in a ketamine-induced model of mania in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazal, Marta; Valente, Matheus R; Acosta, Bruna A; Kaufmann, Fernanda N; Braganhol, Elizandra; Lencina, Claiton L; Stefanello, Francieli M; Ghisleni, Gabriele; Kaster, Manuella P

    2014-02-05

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic and debilitating illness characterized by recurrent manic and depressive episodes. Our research investigates the protective effects of curcumin, the main curcuminoid of the Indian spice turmeric, in a model of mania induced by ketamine administration in rats. Our results indicated that ketamine treatment (25 mg/kg, for 8 days) induced hyperlocomotion in the open-field test and oxidative damage in prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (HP), evaluated by increased lipid peroxidation and decreased total thiol content. Moreover, ketamine treatment reduced the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase in the HP. Pretreatment of rats with curcumin (20 and 50 mg/kg, for 14 days) or with lithium chloride (45 mg/kg, positive control) prevented behavioral and pro-oxidant effects induced by ketamine. These findings suggest that curcumin might be a good compound for preventive intervention in BD, reducing the episode relapse and the oxidative damage associated with the manic phase of this disorder. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Genomic view of bipolar disorder revealed by whole genome sequencing in a genetic isolate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Georgi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar disorder is a common, heritable mental illness characterized by recurrent episodes of mania and depression. Despite considerable effort to elucidate the genetic underpinnings of bipolar disorder, causative genetic risk factors remain elusive. We conducted a comprehensive genomic analysis of bipolar disorder in a large Old Order Amish pedigree. Microsatellite genotypes and high-density SNP-array genotypes of 388 family members were combined with whole genome sequence data for 50 of these subjects, comprising 18 parent-child trios. This study design permitted evaluation of candidate variants within the context of haplotype structure by resolving the phase in sequenced parent-child trios and by imputation of variants into multiple unsequenced siblings. Non-parametric and parametric linkage analysis of the entire pedigree as well as on smaller clusters of families identified several nominally significant linkage peaks, each of which included dozens of predicted deleterious variants. Close inspection of exonic and regulatory variants in genes under the linkage peaks using family-based association tests revealed additional credible candidate genes for functional studies and further replication in population-based cohorts. However, despite the in-depth genomic characterization of this unique, large and multigenerational pedigree from a genetic isolate, there was no convergence of evidence implicating a particular set of risk loci or common pathways. The striking haplotype and locus heterogeneity we observed has profound implications for the design of studies of bipolar and other related disorders.

  16. Genomic View of Bipolar Disorder Revealed by Whole Genome Sequencing in a Genetic Isolate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgi, Benjamin; Craig, David; Kember, Rachel L.; Liu, Wencheng; Lindquist, Ingrid; Nasser, Sara; Brown, Christopher; Egeland, Janice A.; Paul, Steven M.; Bućan, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder is a common, heritable mental illness characterized by recurrent episodes of mania and depression. Despite considerable effort to elucidate the genetic underpinnings of bipolar disorder, causative genetic risk factors remain elusive. We conducted a comprehensive genomic analysis of bipolar disorder in a large Old Order Amish pedigree. Microsatellite genotypes and high-density SNP-array genotypes of 388 family members were combined with whole genome sequence data for 50 of these subjects, comprising 18 parent-child trios. This study design permitted evaluation of candidate variants within the context of haplotype structure by resolving the phase in sequenced parent-child trios and by imputation of variants into multiple unsequenced siblings. Non-parametric and parametric linkage analysis of the entire pedigree as well as on smaller clusters of families identified several nominally significant linkage peaks, each of which included dozens of predicted deleterious variants. Close inspection of exonic and regulatory variants in genes under the linkage peaks using family-based association tests revealed additional credible candidate genes for functional studies and further replication in population-based cohorts. However, despite the in-depth genomic characterization of this unique, large and multigenerational pedigree from a genetic isolate, there was no convergence of evidence implicating a particular set of risk loci or common pathways. The striking haplotype and locus heterogeneity we observed has profound implications for the design of studies of bipolar and other related disorders. PMID:24625924

  17. Comorbid medical illness in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forty, Liz; Ulanova, Anna; Jones, Lisa; Jones, Ian; Gordon-Smith, Katherine; Fraser, Christine; Farmer, Anne; McGuffin, Peter; Lewis, Cathryn M; Hosang, Georgina M; Rivera, Margarita; Craddock, Nick

    2014-12-01

    Individuals with a mental health disorder appear to be at increased risk of medical illness. To examine rates of medical illnesses in patients with bipolar disorder (n = 1720) and to examine the clinical course of the bipolar illness according to lifetime medical illness burden. Participants recruited within the UK were asked about the lifetime occurrence of 20 medical illnesses, interviewed using the Schedules for Clinical Assessment in Neuropsychiatry (SCAN) and diagnosed according to DSM-IV criteria. We found significantly increased rates of several medical illnesses in our bipolar sample. A high medical illness burden was associated with a history of anxiety disorder, rapid cycling mood episodes, suicide attempts and mood episodes with a typically acute onset. Bipolar disorder is associated with high rates of medical illness. This comorbidity needs to be taken into account by services in order to improve outcomes for patients with bipolar disorder and also in research investigating the aetiology of affective disorder where shared biological pathways may play a role. Royal College of Psychiatrists.

  18. Analysis of Misdiagnosis of Bipolar Disorder in An Outpatient Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui; Zhang, Li; Xu, Chuchen; Zhu, Jinling; Chen, Meijuan; Fang, Yiru

    2018-04-25

    Bipolar disorder is a mental illness with a high misdiagnosis rate and commonly misdiagnosed as other mental disorders including depression, schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorders, and personality disorders, resulting in the mistreatment of clinical symptoms and increasing of recurrent episodes. To understand the reasons for misdiagnosis of bipolar disorder in an outpatient setting in order to help clinicians more clearly identify the disease and avoid diagnostic errors. Data from an outpatient clinic included two groups: those with a confirmed diagnosis of bipolar disorder (CD group) and those who were misdiagnosed (i.e. those who did in fact have bipolar disorder but received a different diagnoses and those without bipolar disorder who received a bipolar diagnosis [MD group]). Information between these two groups was compared. There were a total of 177 cases that met the inclusion criteria for this study. Among them, 136 cases (76.8%) were in the MD group and 41 cases (23.2%) were in the CD group. Patents with depression had the most cases of misdiagnosis (70.6%). The first episode of the patients in the MD group was more likely to be a depressive episode (χ 2 =5.206, p =0.023) and these patients had a greater number of depressive episodes during the course of the disease ( Z =-2.268, p =0.023); the time from the onset of the disease to the first treatment was comparatively short ( Z =-2.612, p =0.009) in the group with misdiagnosis; the time from the onset of disease to a confirmed diagnosis was longer ( Z =-3.685, p bipolar and other related disorders in the misdiagnosis group than in the confirmed diagnosis group (11.0% v. 4.9%) and there were more patients in the MD group diagnosed with depressive episodes who had a recent episode (78.7% v. 65.9%). The rate of misdiagnosis of patients with bipolar receiving outpatient treatment was quite high and they often received a misdiagnosis of depression. In the misdiagnosis group the first

  19. Appraisals to affect: Testing the integrative cognitive model of bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmier-Claus, Jasper E; Dodd, Alyson; Tai, Sara; Emsley, Richard; Mansell, Warren

    2016-09-01

    Cognitive models have suggested that extreme appraisals of affective states and maladaptive affect regulation strategies are important in the development of bipolar symptomatology. Little is known about the pathway by which these appraisals and behaviours interact in the formation of activated and depressed affective states. This study tested the predictions that (1) ascent behaviours mediate the relationship between positive appraisals of activated mood and activation; and (2) descent behaviours mediate the relationship between negative appraisals of activated mood and depression. A total of 52 individuals with a DSM-IV diagnosis of bipolar I or II disorder (confirmed by structured interview) completed biweekly assessments of affect regulation behaviours and mood for 4 weeks. Positive and negative appraisals of affective states were assessed at baseline through the Hypomanic Attitudes and Positive Prediction Inventory. Multilevel mediation analysis was used to explore the data. Ascent behaviours partially mediated the relationship between positive appraisals of activated mood and activation. Descent behaviours, but not negative appraisals of activated mood, predicted levels of depression indicating the absence of a mediation effect. The results suggest that positive appraisals of activated mood can escalate activation in individuals with bipolar disorder. Such appraisals may be inherently rewarding and reinforcing directly elevating levels of activation, whilst increasing individuals' use of ascent behaviours. The results are consistent with the view that appraisals and behaviours should be targeted during cognitive behavioural therapy for bipolar disorder. It may be beneficial to target positive appraisals of activated mood in cognitive behavioural therapy for mania. Cognitive behavioural therapists may also wish to focus on identifying and targeting individuals' use of ascent behaviours to reduce highly activated states. © 2015 The British Psychological

  20. Electronic self-monitoring of mood using IT platforms in adult patients with bipolar disorder: A systematic review of the validity and evidence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurholt-Jepsen, Maria; Munkholm, Klaus; Frost, Mads

    2016-01-01

    -monitoring is limited by methodological issues and by a lack of RCTs. Although the idea of electronic self-monitoring of mood seems appealing, studies using rigorous methodology investigating the beneficial as well as possible harmful effects of electronic self-monitoring are needed.......Background: Various paper-based mood charting instruments are used in the monitoring of symptoms in bipolar disorder. During recent years an increasing number of electronic self-monitoring tools have been developed. The objectives of this systematic review were 1) to evaluate the validity...... of electronic self-monitoring tools as a method of evaluating mood compared to clinical rating scales for depression and mania and 2) to investigate the effect of electronic self-monitoring tools on clinically relevant outcomes in bipolar disorder. Methods: A systematic review of the scientific literature...

  1. An item response theory evaluation of the young mania rating scale and the montgomery-asberg depression rating scale in the systematic treatment enhancement program for bipolar disorder (STEP-BD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prisciandaro, James J; Tolliver, Bryan K

    2016-11-15

    The Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) are among the most widely used outcome measures for clinical trials of medications for Bipolar Disorder (BD). Nonetheless, very few studies have examined the measurement characteristics of the YMRS and MADRS in individuals with BD using modern psychometric methods. The present study evaluated the YMRS and MADRS in the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for BD (STEP-BD) study using Item Response Theory (IRT). Baseline data from 3716 STEP-BD participants were available for the present analysis. The Graded Response Model (GRM) was fit separately to YMRS and MADRS item responses. Differential item functioning (DIF) was examined by regressing a variety of clinically relevant covariates (e.g., sex, substance dependence) on all test items and on the latent symptom severity dimension, within each scale. Both scales: 1) contained several items that provided little or no psychometric information, 2) were inefficient, in that the majority of item response categories did not provide incremental psychometric information, 3) poorly measured participants outside of a narrow band of severity, 4) evidenced DIF for nearly all items, suggesting that item responses were, in part, determined by factors other than symptom severity. Limited to outpatients; DIF analysis only sensitive to certain forms of DIF. The present study provides evidence for significant measurement problems involving the YMRS and MADRS. More work is needed to refine these measures and/or develop suitable alternative measures of BD symptomatology for clinical trials research. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Circuits Regulating Pleasure and Happiness in Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton J. M. Loonen

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available According to our model, the motivation for appetitive-searching vs. distress-avoiding behaviors is regulated by two parallel cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC re-entry circuits that include the core and the shell parts of the nucleus accumbens, respectively. An entire series of basal ganglia, running from the caudate nucleus on one side to the centromedial amygdala on the other side, control the intensity of these reward-seeking and misery-fleeing behaviors by stimulating the activity of the (prefrontal and limbic cortices. Hyperactive motivation to display behavior that potentially results in reward induces feelings of hankering (relief leads to pleasure; while, hyperactive motivation to exhibit behavior related to avoidance of aversive states results in dysphoria (relief leads to happiness. These two systems collaborate in a reciprocal fashion. We hypothesized that the mechanism inducing the switch from bipolar depression to mania is the most essential characteristic of bipolar disorder. This switch is attributed to a dysfunction of the lateral habenula, which regulates the activity of midbrain centers, including the dopaminergic ventral tegmental area (VTA. From an evolutionary perspective, the activity of the lateral habenula should be regulated by the human homolog of the habenula-projecting globus pallidus, which in turn might be directed by the amygdaloid complex and the phylogenetically old part of the limbic cortex. In bipolar disorder, it is possible that the system regulating the activity of this reward-driven behavior is damaged or the interaction between the medial and lateral habenula may be dysfunctional. This may lead to an adverse coupling between the activities of the misery-fleeing and reward-seeking circuits, which results in independently varying activities.

  3. Impact of irritability: a 2-year observational study of outpatients with bipolar I or schizoaffective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Lesley; Hallam, Karen T; Venugopal, Kamalesh; Lewis, Andrew James; Austin, David W; Kulkarni, Jayashri; Dodd, Seetal; de Castella, Anthony; Fitzgerald, Paul B; Berk, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Many people experience irritability when manic, hypomanic, or depressed, yet its impact on illness severity and quality of life in bipolar and schizoaffective disorders is poorly understood. This study aimed to examine the relationship between irritability and symptom burden, functioning, quality of life, social support, suicidality, and overall illness severity in a naturalistic cohort of people with bipolar I or schizoaffective disorder. We used data from 239 adult outpatients with bipolar I or schizoaffective disorder in the Bipolar Comprehensive Outcomes Study (BCOS) - a non-interventional observational study with a 2-year follow-up period. Baseline demographic and clinical characteristics of participants with and without irritability were compared. A mixed-model repeated measures analysis was conducted to examine the longitudinal effect of irritability on clinical and quality-of-life variables over follow-up using significant baseline variables. At baseline, 54% of participants were irritable. Baseline irritability was associated with illness severity, mania, depression, psychotic symptoms, suicidality, poor functioning, and quality of life, but not diagnosis (schizoaffective/bipolar disorder). Participants with irritability were less likely to have a partner and perceived less adequate social support. On average, over follow-up, those with irritability reported more symptoms, functional impairment, and suicidality. Furthermore, the effects of irritability could not be fully explained by illness severity. Irritability was associated with more negative symptomatic, functional, and quality-of-life outcomes and suicidality. The identification, monitoring, and targeted treatment of irritability may be worth considering, to enhance health and wellbeing outcomes for adults with bipolar and schizoaffective disorders. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Bipolar soft connected, bipolar soft disconnected and bipolar soft compact spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Shabir

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar soft topological spaces are mathematical expressions to estimate interpretation of data frameworks. Bipolar soft theory considers the core features of data granules. Bipolarity is important to distinguish between positive information which is guaranteed to be possible and negative information which is forbidden or surely false. Connectedness and compactness are the most important fundamental topological properties. These properties highlight the main features of topological spaces and distinguish one topology from another. Taking this into account, we explore the bipolar soft connectedness, bipolar soft disconnectedness and bipolar soft compactness properties for bipolar soft topological spaces. Moreover, we introduce the notion of bipolar soft disjoint sets, bipolar soft separation, and bipolar soft hereditary property and study on bipolar soft connected and disconnected spaces. By giving the detailed picture of bipolar soft connected and disconnected spaces we investigate bipolar soft compact spaces and derive some results related to this concept.

  5. [Everyday stress, routines and bipolar spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gindre, C; Swendsen, J

    2010-06-01

    alpha levels within each category of activity, social interaction or environmental context. A total of 2777 valid ESM assessments were provided by the final sample concerning their behaviour and activities across diverse daily life contexts. Individuals having a lifetime history of mania or hypomania were significantly less likely than normal controls to have daily life routines relative to being at work, in class, having social contact with work colleagues or students, and to be performing personal hygiene activities. However, such individuals were more likely to be in the company of a romantic partner at the same moment each day. Time-lagged analyses demonstrated that, following conditions perceived as stressful, individuals with a history of mania or hypomania were less likely to repeat the same activities or behaviour of previous days concerning being at parents' or family's house, being at friends, and travelling or commuting, but more likely to be in a work environment, and in a bar or restaurant. The findings provide support for the notion of differences in daily life rhythms and routines among individuals with bipolar spectrum conditions, as well as the possibility of increased stress vulnerability in this population. Although a conservative analytic strategy was employed to minimize chance associations, the present findings can be considered only as preliminary and should be interpreted with caution in light of the moderate sample size, young age and non treatment-seeking nature of the sample. Future controlled investigations using ambulatory monitoring techniques are needed to pursue the investigation of these questions in treated samples. Copyright (c) 2009 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Sleep in Adolescents With Bipolar I Disorder: Stability and Relation to Symptom Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershon, Anda; Singh, Manpreet K

    2017-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are common features of bipolar disorder (BD), yet little is known about trajectories of sleep disturbances in youth with BD. Using longitudinal data, this study assessed the stability of sleep disturbances and their ability to predict symptom progression in adolescents diagnosed with BD compared to controls. Thirteen- to 19-year-olds meeting diagnostic criteria for BD I (n = 19, 16.2 ± 1.75 years, 57.9 % female, 68.4% Caucasian) and psychiatrically healthy age-comparable controls (n = 21, 15.7 ± 1.48 years. 52.4% female, 57.1% Caucasian) were assessed for sleep onset latency, number of awakenings, and wake time, separately for weekdays and weekends using a self-report questionnaire. Sleep indices and symptoms of mania (Young Mania Rating Scale) and depression (Children's Depression Rating Scale) were assessed at two time points, T1 and T2, approximately 12 months apart. Correlations were used to examine stability of sleep indices across time points and regression models to examine the effects of T1 sleep on T2 symptoms. Adolescents with BD showed low stability on most sleep indices, whereas controls showed high stability on all sleep indices. After controlling for T1 depression symptoms, more T1 weekend awakenings and weekend wake time predicted significantly greater T2 depression symptoms in youth with BD but not in controls. No significant associations were found between T1 sleep and T2 mania symptoms. These findings suggest that increased awakenings and wakefulness on weekends may represent an important therapeutic target for reducing depression in adolescents with BD.

  7. Enduring increased risk of developing depression and mania in patients with dementia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Flemming Mørkeberg; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Sørensen, Tine Møller

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the time relation between dementia and major affective disorders (major depression and mania). METHODS: Register linkage study of the Danish Hospital Register and the Danish Psychiatric Central Research Register, to establish study cohorts of patients with dementia...... and control groups (osteoarthritis or diabetes) on first discharge from hospital. Follow up of cohorts was for up to 21 years. Hazard of death was allowed for by the use of competing risks models. RESULTS: Patients with dementia had an increased risk of being admitted to hospital for major depression or mania...... during the course of the illness. The incidence remained elevated throughout the rest of the patient's life. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with dementia have an increased risk of developing depression or mania. Proper treatment of affective disorders in patients with dementia is important in reducing suffering...

  8. Cognitive and family correlates of current suicidal ideation in children with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Sally M; Van Meter, Anna; Katz, Andrea C; Peters, Amy T; West, Amy E

    2015-03-01

    Suicidality among youth with bipolar disorder is an extreme, but largely unaddressed, public health problem. The current study examined the psychosocial characteristics differentiating youth with varying severities of suicidal ideation that may dictate targets for suicide prevention interventions. Participants included 72 youth aged 7-13 (M=9.19, SD=1.61) with DSM-IV-TR bipolar I, II, or NOS and a parent/caregiver. Current suicidal ideation and correlates were assessed at intake, including: demographics and clinical factors (diagnosis, symptom severity, psychiatric comorbidity); child factors (cognitive risk and quality of life); and family factors (parenting stress, family cohesion, and family rigidity). Current ideation was prevalent in this young sample: 41% endorsed any ideation, and 31% endorsed active forms. Depression symptoms, quality of life, hopelessness, self-esteem, and family rigidity differentiated youth with increasing ideation severity. Separate logistic regressions examined all significant child- and family-level factors, controlling for demographic and clinical variables. Greater family rigidity and lower self-esteem remained significant predictors of current planful ideation. Diagnosis, index episode, comorbidity, and mania severity did not differentiate non-ideators from those with current ideation. Limitations include the small sample to examine low base-rate severe ideation, cross-sectional analyses and generalizability of findings beyond the outpatient clinical sample. Findings underscore the importance of assessing and addressing suicidality in preadolescent youth with bipolar disorder, before youth progress to more severe suicidal behaviors. Results also highlight child self-esteem and family rigidity as key treatment targets to reduce suicide risk in pediatric bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Comparison of associated features and drug treatment between co-occurring unipolar and bipolar disorders in depressed eating disorder patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Mei-Chih Meg; Chang, Chin-Hao; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Chen, Hsi-Chung

    2017-02-27

    To examine the differences of associated characteristics and prescription drug use between co-occurring unipolar and bipolar disorders in patients with eating disorders (EDs). Patients with EDs and major depressive episode (MDE) were recruited from psychiatric outpatient clinics. They were interviewed and completed self-administered measures assessing eating and general psychopathology. The prescribed drugs at the index outpatient visit were recorded. Clinical characteristics and prescription drugs of groups with major depressive disorder (ED-MDD), MDE with lifetime mania (ED-BP I), and MDE with lifetime hypomania (ED-BP II) were compared. Continuous variables between groups were compared using generalized linear regression with adjustments of age, gender, and ED subtype for pair-wise comparisons. Multivariate logistic regression with adjustments of age, gender, and ED subtype was employed to estimate adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals between groups. Two hundred and twenty-seven patients with EDs had a current MDE. Among them, 17.2% and 24.2% experienced associated manic and hypomanic episodes, respectively. Bipolar I and II patients displayed significantly poorer weight regulation, more severe impulsivity and emotional lability, and higher rates of co-occurring alcohol use disorders than ED-MDD patients. ED-BP I patients were found to have the lowest IQ, poorest working memory, and the most severe depression, suicidality and functional impairment among all patients. Patients with ED-BP II shared affect and behavioral dysregulations with ED-BP I, but had less severe degrees of cognitive and functional impairments than ED-BP I. Patients with ED-BP I were significantly less likely than those in the ED-MDD and ED-BP II groups to be on antidepressant monotherapy, but a great rate (27%) of ED-BP I individuals taking antidepressant monotherapy had potential risk of mood switch during the course of treatment. Our study identified discriminative features

  10. Major stressful life events and other risk factors for first admission with mania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessing, Lars Vedel; Agerbo, Esben; Mortensen, Preben Bo

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether first admission with mania is associated with the occurrence of death in the family or with major stressful life events and to explore whether the associations change with age. METHODS: Case register study with linkage of the Danish Psychiatric Central Research ...... disorder. The susceptibility to major life stressors of inducing mania does not seem to change throughout life....

  11. Circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders as predictors for bipolar disorder in patients with remitted mood disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaesu, Yoshikazu; Inoue, Yuichi; Ono, Kotaro; Murakoshi, Akiko; Futenma, Kunihiro; Komada, Yoko; Inoue, Takeshi

    2017-10-01

    Circadian rhythm dysfunction is thought to play a key role in the pathogenesis of bipolar disorder (BD). We focused on circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders (CRSWD) as possible predictors for bipolar disorder in patients with remitted mood disorders. One hundred four BD (41 type I and 63 type II) outpatients and 73 age- and sex-matched major depressive disorder (MDD) outpatients participated in this study. The subjects were asked to answer questionnaires including demographic variables, clinical course of the disorder, and family history of psychiatric disorders. Severity of mood status was evaluated by the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale and Young Mania Rating Scale. CRSWD was diagnosed by clinical interview and sleep logs based on the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, third edition. The rate of CRSWD in BD subjects was significantly higher than that in MDD subjects (33.7% vs 9.6%; P < 0.001). A multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that comorbid CRSWD (OR = 3.35, 95% CI = 1.24 - 9.07; P = 0.018), two or more previous mood episodes within the past year (OR = 3.57, 95% CI = 1.10 - 11.63; P = 0.035), and antidepressant-related switch to mania/hypomania (OR = 10.01, 95% CI = 1.20 - 83.52; P = 0.033) were significantly associated with BD in patients with remitted mood disorders. CRSWD, as well as other factors, could be diagnostic predictors for BD in patients with remitted mood disorders. Combinations of these factors might be useful for predicting a BD diagnosis among the mood disorders in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. The process of recovery from bipolar I disorder: a qualitative analysis of personal accounts in relation to an integrative cognitive model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansell, Warren; Powell, Seth; Pedley, Rebecca; Thomas, Nia; Jones, Sarah Amelia

    2010-06-01

    This study explored the process of recovery from bipolar I disorder from a phenomenological and cognitive perspective. A semi-structured interview was coded and analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. Eleven individuals over the age of 30 with a history of bipolar disorder were selected on the basis of having remained free from relapse, and without hospitalization for at least 2 years, as confirmed by a diagnostic interview (Standardised Interview for DSM-IV; SCID-I). This arbitrary and equivocal criterion for 'recovery' provided an objective method of defining the sample for the study. The analysis revealed two overarching themes formed from four themes each. Ambivalent approaches referred to approaches that participants felt had both positive and negative consequences: avoidance of mania, taking medication, prior illness versus current wellness, and sense of identity following diagnosis. Helpful approaches referred to approaches that were seen as universally helpful: understanding, life-style fundamentals, social support and companionship, and social change. These themes were then interpreted in the light of the existing literature and an integrative cognitive model of bipolar disorder. Limitations and future research directions are discussed.

  13. The Influence of Comorbid Disorders on the Episodicity of Bipolar Disorder in Youth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Shirley; Stout, Robert; Hower, Heather; Killam, Matthew A.; Weinstock, Lauren M.; Topor, David R.; Dickstein, Daniel P.; Hunt, Jeffrey I.; Gill, Mary Kay; Goldstein, Tina R.; Goldstein, Benjamin I.; Ryan, Neal D.; Strober, Michael; Sala, Regina; Axelson, David A.; Birmaher, Boris; Keller, Martin B.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Bipolar Disorder (BP) frequently co-occurs with other psychiatric disorders. We examine whether course of anxiety disorders (ANX), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), disruptive behavior disorders (DBD), and substance use disorders (SUD) influence likelihood of recovery and recurrence of depression and mania in BP youth. Method Weekly ratings of psychiatric disorder intensity were obtained from 413 participants of the Course and Outcome of BP Youth project, followed for an average of 7.75 years. Multiple-event Cox proportional hazards regression analyses examined worsening of comorbid disorders as predictors of mood episode recovery and recurrence. Results Increased severity in ANX and SUD predicted longer time to recovery and less time to next depressive episode, and less time to next manic episode. Multivariate models with ANX and SUD found that significant effects of ANX remained, but SUD only predicted longer time to depression recovery. Increased severity of ADHD and DBD predicted shorter time to recurrence for depressive and manic episodes. Conclusion There are significant time-varying relationships between the course of comorbid disorders and episodicity of depression and mania in BP youth. Worsening of comorbid conditions may present as a precursor to mood episode recurrence or warn of mood episode protraction. PMID:26475572

  14. The influence of comorbid disorders on the episodicity of bipolar disorder in youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, S; Stout, R; Hower, H; Killam, M A; Weinstock, L M; Topor, D R; Dickstein, D P; Hunt, J I; Gill, M K; Goldstein, T R; Goldstein, B I; Ryan, N D; Strober, M; Sala, R; Axelson, D A; Birmaher, B; Keller, M B

    2016-04-01

    Bipolar disorder (BP) frequently co-occurs with other psychiatric disorders. We examine whether course of anxiety disorders (ANX), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), disruptive behavior disorders (DBD), and substance use disorders (SUD) influence likelihood of recovery and recurrence of depression and mania in BP youth. Weekly ratings of psychiatric disorder intensity were obtained from 413 participants of the Course and Outcome of BP Youth project, followed for an average of 7.75 years. Multiple-event Cox proportional hazards regression analyses examined worsening of comorbid disorders as predictors of mood episode recovery and recurrence. Increased severity in ANX and SUD predicted longer time to recovery and less time to next depressive episode, and less time to next manic episode. Multivariate models with ANX and SUD found that significant effects of ANX remained, but SUD only predicted longer time to depression recovery. Increased severity of ADHD and DBD predicted shorter time to recurrence for depressive and manic episodes. There are significant time-varying relationships between the course of comorbid disorders and episodicity of depression and mania in BP youth. Worsening of comorbid conditions may present as a precursor to mood episode recurrence or warn of mood episode protraction. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. VALPROATE, BIPOLAR DISORDER AND POLYCYSTIC OVARIAN SYNDROME.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okanović, Milana; Zivanović, Olga

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome is a syndrome of ovarian dysfunction with the principal features of hyperandrogenism and polycystic ovary morphology. A large number of studies conducted on this topic have suggested a possible role of anticonvulsants, particularly valproate, in the pathogenesis or risk factors associated with polycystic ovarian syndrome. Bipolar treatment guidelines from Canada and the United States of America recommend valproate as the first line strategy in the acute treatment of bipolar disorder. Most persons with bipolar disorder require maintenance treatment. Long-term administration of valproate in women with bipolar disorder or epilepsy is believed to result in the increased risk of hyperandrogenism, menstrual abnormalities and polycystic ovaries. Valproate may also increase the risk of infertility and other associated symptoms of polycystic ovarian syndrome. Therefore, particular caution is indicated in the use of valproate in women of reproductive age. The treatment of the female patients with bipolar disorder presents various challenges for the clinician. Every woman of reproductive age needs to know the risk and benefits of her pharmacologic treatment options. Bipolar disorder should be considered chronic disorder, whose development is largely affected by hormonal changes and reproductive cycle in women. These issues should be researched more thoroughly in order to opt for the most appropriate treatment in women with bipolar disorder.

  16. Reduced concentrations of N-acetylaspartate (NAA) and the NAA-creatine ratio in the basal ganglia in bipolar disorder: a study using 3-Tesla proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Mark A; Thomas, M Albert; Yue, Kenneth; Binesh, Nader; Davanzo, Pablo; Ventura, Joseph; O'Neill, Joseph; Guze, Barry; Curran, John G; Mintz, Jim

    2007-04-15

    The N-acetylaspartate (NAA) peak is prominent in the proton magnetic resonance spectrum and is thought to reflect neuron loss or dysfunction. This study was conducted to explore NAA biochemistry and its clinical correlates in mania. Subjects comprised 16 manic patients and 17 controls who underwent a structured diagnostic interview and (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) acquisition. STEAM (1)H MRS (TR/TE/TM=2000/20/8 ms) was acquired at 3 Tesla from 2 x 2 x 2 cm(3) voxels in anterior cingulate (AC), right basal ganglia (BG), and left occipital-parietal white matter (OP). Absolute metabolite concentrations and ratios to creatine were calculated using the LC Model. The mean absolute concentrations of NAA and NAA-creatine ratio in the BG were significantly lower in manic subjects than in controls. There was a significant inverse correlation between NAA in the BG and the number of prior hospitalizations for mania. These data suggest BG pathology in mania and that NAA decrements may mark prior manic episode burden. Limitations of this study include small sample size and lack of tissue segmentation. Further study is encouraged to clarify state vs. trait aspects of NAA in bipolar disorder.

  17. Design and rationale of a 16-week adjunctive randomized placebo-controlled trial of mitochondrial agents for the treatment of bipolar depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia M. Dean

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Bipolar disorder places a significant burden on individuals, caregivers and family, and the broader community. Current treatments are believed to be more effective against manic symptoms, leaving a shortfall in recovery during the depressive phase of the illness. The current study draws on recent evidence suggesting that, in addition to increased oxidative load, alterations in mitochondrial function occur in bipolar disorder. Methods: This 16-week study aims to explore the potential benefits of N-acetylcysteine (NAC alone or in combination (CT with selected nutraceuticals believed to enhance mitochondrial function. The study includes adults diagnosed with bipolar disorder currently experiencing an episode of depression. Participants are asked to take NAC, CT, or placebo in addition to any usual treatments. A post-discontinuation visit is conducted 4 weeks following the treatment phase. Results: The primary outcome of the study will be mean change on the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale. Secondary outcomes include functioning, substance use, mania ratings, and quality of life. Blood samples will be collected at baseline and week 16 to explore biochemical alterations following treatment. Conclusion: This study may provide a novel adjunctive treatment for bipolar depression. Analysis of biological samples may assist in understanding the therapeutic benefits and the underlying etiology of bipolar depression. Trial registration: Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry ACTRN12612000830897.

  18. Patient preferences for important attributes of bipolar depression treatments: a discrete choice experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng-Mak D

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Daisy Ng-Mak,1 Jiat-Ling Poon,2 Laurie Roberts,2 Leah Kleinman,2 Dennis A Revicki,2 Krithika Rajagopalan1 1Global Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc., Marlborough, MA, 2Patient-Centered Research, Evidera, Bethesda, MD, USA Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess patient preferences regarding pharmacological treatment attributes for bipolar depression using a discrete choice experiment (DCE.Methods: Adult members of an Internet survey panel with a self-reported diagnosis of bipolar depression were invited via e-mail to participate in a web-based DCE survey. Participants were asked to choose between hypothetical medication alternatives defined by attributes and levels that were varied systematically. The six treatment attributes included in the DCE were time to improvement, risk of becoming manic, weight gain, risk of sedation, increased blood sugar, and increased cholesterol. Attributes were supported by literature review, expert input, and results of focus groups with patients. Sawtooth CBC System for Choice-Based Conjoint Analysis was used to estimate the part-worth utilities for the DCE analyses.Results: The analytical sample included 185 participants (50.8% females from a total of 200 participants. The DCE analyses found weight gain to be the most important treatment attribute (relative importance =49.6%, followed by risk of sedation (20.2%, risk of mania (13.0%, increased blood sugar (8.3%, increased cholesterol (5.2%, and time to improvement (3.7%.Conclusion: Results from this DCE suggest that adults with bipolar depression considered risks of weight gain and sedation associated with pharmacotherapy as the most important attributes for the treatment of bipolar depression. Incorporating patient preferences in the treatment decision-making process may potentially have an impact on treatment adherence and satisfaction and, ultimately, patient outcomes. Keywords: bipolar depression, treatment

  19. Psychopathy and facial emotion recognition ability in patients with bipolar affective disorder with or without delinquent behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Husrev; Yesilbas, Dilek; Ozver, Ismail; Yuksek, Erhan; Sahin, Feyzi; Aliustaoglu, Suheyla; Emul, Murat

    2014-04-01

    It is well known that patients with bipolar disorder are more prone to violence and have more criminal behaviors than general population. A strong relationship between criminal behavior and inability to empathize and imperceptions to other person's feelings and facial expressions increases the risk of delinquent behaviors. In this study, we aimed to investigate the deficits of facial emotion recognition ability in euthymic bipolar patients who committed an offense and compare with non-delinquent euthymic patients with bipolar disorder. Fifty-five euthymic patients with delinquent behaviors and 54 non-delinquent euthymic bipolar patients as a control group were included in the study. Ekman's Facial Emotion Recognition Test, sociodemographic data, Hare Psychopathy Checklist, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale and Young Mania Rating Scale were applied to both groups. There were no significant differences between case and control groups in the meaning of average age, gender, level of education, mean age onset of disease and suicide attempt (p>0.05). The three types of most committed delinquent behaviors in patients with euthymic bipolar disorder were as follows: injury (30.8%), threat or insult (20%) and homicide (12.7%). The best accurate percentage of identified facial emotion was "happy" (>99%, for both) while the worst misidentified facial emotion was "fear" in both groups (delinquent behaviors than non-delinquent ones (pdelinquent behaviors. We have shown that patients with bipolar disorder who had delinquent behaviors may have some social interaction problems i.e., misrecognizing fearful and modestly anger facial emotions and need some more time to response facial emotions even in remission. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The use of lithium for the treatment of bipolar disorder: Recommendations from clinical practice guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhi, Gin S; Gessler, Danielle; Outhred, Tim

    2017-08-01

    Lithium is an effective mood stabilizer that is used principally for the management of bipolar disorder (BD). Its administration is complex and often requires sophisticated management and assiduous monitoring. When considering the use of lithium therapy for bipolar disorder, clinicians are advised to refer to recommendations outlined in clinical practice guidelines (CPGs); but because of varying emphases placed by different international CPGs, recommendations addressing the practical use of lithium lack consistency. In order to inform clinicians of optimal lithium therapy for bipolar disorder, we compared and synthesized recommendations for the treatment of bipolar disorder made by recognized CPGs internationally. We conducted a search of the literature and extracted guidance across multiple clinical issues, including clinical indications, disorder subtypes, additional uses, special populations, practical aspects, and side effects. Collectively, CPGs consider lithium most robustly as a first-line intervention for maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder and strongly for the treatment of mania, with relatively modest support for the management of acute bipolar depression. Additionally, there is consensus across the CPGs that lithium tangibly reduces the risk of suicide. Generally, CPGs provide guidance on the many facets of initiating and maintaining patients on lithium therapy, but individually the CPGs varied in terms of depth and practical guidance they provide across these areas. However, consensus was established across many key areas of practice such as the ideal lithium plasma concentration for maintenance and monitoring (0.6-0.8mmol/L), along with the need for regular monitoring of renal and endocrine function. However, with more complex aspects (e.g., atypical presentations) and in special populations (e.g., youth; pregnancy and post-partum; older adults), guidance varied considerably and clear consensus recommendations were more difficult to achieve. In

  1. A novel scale for measuring mixed states in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Jonathan; Schwannauer, Matthias; Power, Mick; Goodwin, Guy M

    2009-01-01

    Conventional descriptions of bipolar disorder tend to treat the mixed state as something of an afterthought. There is no scale that specifically measures the phenomena of the mixed state. This study aimed to test a novel scale for mixed state in a clinical and community population of bipolar patients. The scale included clinically relevant symptoms of both mania and depression in a bivariate scale. Recovered respondents were asked to recall their last manic episode. The scale allowed endorsement of one or more of the manic and depressive symptoms. Internal consistency analyses were carried out using Cronbach alpha. Factor analysis was carried out using a standard Principal Components Analysis followed by Varimax Rotation. A confirmatory factor analytic method was used to validate the scale structure in a representative clinical sample. The reliability analysis gave a Cronbach alpha value of 0.950, with a range of corrected-item-total-scale correlations from 0.546 (weight change) to 0.830 (mood). The factor analysis revealed a two-factor solution for the manic and depressed items which accounted for 61.2% of the variance in the data. Factor 1 represented physical activity, verbal activity, thought processes and mood. Factor 2 represented eating habits, weight change, passage of time and pain sensitivity. This novel scale appears to capture the key features of mixed states. The two-factor solution fits well with previous models of bipolar disorder and concurs with the view that mixed states may be more than the sum of their parts.

  2. Update on quetiapine in the treatment of bipolar disorder: results from the BOLDER studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Gajwani

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Prashant Gajwani1, David J Muzina2, David E Kemp3, Keming Gao1, Joseph R Calabrese11Case Western Reserve University (CWRU School of Medicine, 2Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine of CWRU, 3Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland OH, USAAbstract: The essential features of bipolar affective disorder involve the cyclical occurrence of high (manic or hypomanic episodes and low mood states. Depressive episodes in both bipolar I and II disorder are more numerous and last for longer duration than either manic or hypomanic episodes. In addition depressive episodes are associated with higher morbidity and mortality. While multiple agents, including all 5 atypical antipsychotics, have demonstrated efficacy and earned US FDA indication for manic phase of bipolar illness, the acute treatment of bipolar depression is less well-studied. The first treatment approved by the US FDA for acute bipolar depression was the combination of the atypical antipsychotic olanzapine and the antidepressant fluoxetine. Recently, quetiapine monotherapy has demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of depressive episodes associated with both bipolar I and II disorder and has earned US FDA indication for the same.Keywords: bipolar disorder, quetiapine, BOLDER studies

  3. Attentional biases toward emotional images in the different episodes of bipolar disorder: an eye-tracking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Blanco, Ana; Salmerón, Ladislao; Perea, Manuel; Livianos, Lorenzo

    2014-03-30

    Attentional biases toward emotional information may represent vulnerability and maintenance factors in bipolar disorder (BD). The present experimental study examined the processing of emotional information in BD patients using the eye-tracking technology. Bipolar patients in their different states (euthymia, mania, depression) simultaneously viewed four pictures with different emotional valence (happy, neutral, sad, threatening) for 20s while their eye movements were monitored. A group of healthy individuals served as the control. The data revealed the following: (i) a decrease in attention to happy images in BD patients in their depressive episodes compared to healthy individuals, and (ii) an increase in attention to threatening images in BD patients (regardless of their episode) relative to the healthy controls. These biases appeared in the late stages of information processing and were sustained over the 20s interval. Thus, the present findings reveal that attentional biases toward emotional information can be a key feature of BD, in that: (i) an anhedonic lack of sensitivity to positive stimuli during the bipolar depressive episode may be considered a maintaining factor of this clinical state, and (ii) the trait-bias toward threat, even in asymptomatic patients, may reflect a marker of vulnerability in BD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Increased impulsivity associated with severity of suicide attempt history in patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Alan C; Dougherty, Donald M; Pazzaglia, Peggy J; Pham, Mary; Steinberg, Joel L; Moeller, F Gerard

    2005-09-01

    Impulsivity is a prominent and measurable characteristic of bipolar disorder that can contribute to risk for suicidal behavior. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between impulsivity and severity of past suicidal behavior, a potential predictor of eventual suicide, in patients with bipolar disorder. In bipolar disorder subjects with either a definite history of attempted suicide or no such history, impulsivity was assessed with both a questionnaire (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale) and behavioral laboratory performance measures (immediate memory/delayed memory tasks). Diagnosis was determined with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Interviews of patients and review of records were used to determine the number of past suicide attempts and the medical severity of the most severe attempt. Subjects with a history of suicide attempts had more impulsive errors on the immediate memory task and had shorter response latencies, especially for impulsive responses. Impulsivity was highest in subjects with the most medically severe suicide attempts. Effects were not accounted for by presence of depression or mania at the time of testing. Barratt Impulsiveness Scale scores were numerically, but not significantly, higher in subjects with suicide attempts. A history of alcohol abuse was associated with greater probability of a suicide attempt. Multivariate analysis showed that ethanol abuse history and clinical state at the time of testing did not have a significant effect after impulsivity was taken into account. These results suggest that a history of severe suicidal behavior in patients with bipolar disorder is associated with impulsivity, manifested as a tendency toward rapid, unplanned responses.

  5. Risk for Mania and Positive Emotional Responding: Too Much of a Good Thing?

    OpenAIRE

    Gruber, June; Oveis, Christopher; Keltner, Dacher; Johnson, Sheri L.

    2008-01-01

    Although positive emotion research has begun to flourish, the extremes of positive emotion remain understudied. The present research used a multimethod approach to examine positive emotional disturbance by comparing participants at high and low risk for episodes of mania, which involves elevations in positive emotionality. Ninety participants were recruited into a high or low mania risk group according to responses on the Hypomanic Personality Scale. Participants’ subjective, expressive, and ...

  6. Combined treatment: impact of optimal psychotherapy and medication in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Sagar V; Hawke, Lisa D; Velyvis, Vytas; Zaretsky, Ari; Beaulieu, Serge; Patelis-Siotis, Irene; MacQueen, Glenda; Young, L Trevor; Yatham, Lakshmi N; Cervantes, Pablo

    2015-02-01

    The current study investigated the longitudinal course of symptoms in bipolar disorder among individuals receiving optimal treatment combining pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy, as well as predictors of the course of illness. A total of 160 participants with bipolar disorder (bipolar I disorder: n = 115; bipolar II disorder: n = 45) received regular pharmacological treatment, complemented by a manualized, evidence-based psychosocial treatment - that is, cognitive behavioral therapy or psychoeducation. Participants were assessed at baseline and prospectively for 72 weeks using the Longitudinal Interval Follow-up Evaluation (LIFE) scale scores for mania/hypomania and depression, as well as comparison measures (clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00188838). Over a 72-week period, patients spent a clear majority (about 65%) of time euthymic. Symptoms were experienced more than 50% of the time by only a quarter of the sample. Depressive symptoms strongly dominated over (hypo)manic symptoms, while subsyndromal symptoms were more common than full diagnosable episodes for both polarities. Mixed symptoms were rare, but present for a minority of participants. Individuals experienced approximately six significant mood changes per year, with a full relapse on average every 7.5 months. Participants who had fewer depressive symptoms at intake, a later age at onset, and no history of psychotic symptoms spent more weeks well over the course of the study. Combined pharmacological and adjunctive psychosocial treatments appeared to provide an improved course of illness compared to the results of previous studies. Efforts to further improve the course of illness beyond that provided by current optimal treatment regimens will require a substantial focus on both subsyndromal and syndromal depressive symptoms. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Recovery and its correlates among patients with bipolar disorder: A study from a tertiary care centre in North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sandeep; Hazari, Nandita; Aneja, Jitender; Chakrabarti, Subho; Sharma, Sunil; Avasthi, Ajit

    2016-12-01

    The goal of treatment in mental illness has evolved from a symptom-based approach to a personal recovery-based approach. The aim of this study was to evaluate the predictors of personal recovery among patients with bipolar disorder. A total of 185 patients with bipolar disorder, currently in remission, were evaluated on Recovery Assessment Scale (RAS), Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale (ISMIS), Brief Religious coping scale (RCOPE), Duke University Religiosity Index (DUREL), Religiousness Measures Scale, Hamilton depression rating scale (HDRS), Young Mania rating scale (YMRS) and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scale. The mean age of the sample was 40.5 (standard deviation (SD), 11.26) years. Majority of the participants were male, married, working, Hindu by religion and belonged to extended/joint families of urban background. In the regression analysis, RAS scores were predicted significantly by discrimination experience, stereotype endorsement and alienation domains of ISMIS, level of functioning as assessed by GAF, residual depressive symptoms as assessed by HDRS and occupational status. The level of variance explained for total RAS score and various RAS domains ranged from 36.2% to 46.9%. This study suggests that personal recovery among patients with bipolar disorder is affected by stigma, level of functioning, residual depressive symptoms and employment status of patients with bipolar disorder. © The Author(s) 2016.

  8. Does cannabis use affect treatment outcome in bipolar disorder? A longitudinal analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Rossum, Inge; Boomsma, Maarten; Tenback, Diederik

    2009-01-01

    Research suggests that cannabis use affects negatively on onset and outcome of schizophrenia, but less is known about possible effects in mood disorders. Bipolar in- and outpatients (N = 3459) were enrolled in an observational study. The influence of cannabis exposure on clinical and social...... treatment outcome measures was examined over the course of 1 year, as well as the effects on these associations of third mediating variables. Over 12 months of treatment, cannabis users exhibited less compliance and higher levels of overall illness severity, mania, and psychosis compared with nonusers....... Additionally, cannabis users experienced less satisfaction with life and had a lower probability of having a relationship compared with nonusers. There was little evidence that cannabis-outcome associations were mediated by third variables. An independent impact of cannabis use on psychopathologic outcomes...

  9. A impulsividade dos portadores de transtorno bipolar resulta em alta prevalência de comorbidade com transtornos do controle dos impulsos?

    OpenAIRE

    Caetano, Murilo Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    O Transtorno Bipolar (TB) é uma condição psiquiátrica crônica, potencialmente incapacitante, que se inicia geralmente na adolescência ou no início da na vida adulta, está marcado por risco aumentado de suicídio, incapacitação para o trabalho, uso de drogas e outros problemas. A impulsividade é uma característica marcante como um estado das fases agudas, sobretudo da mania e da hipomania, mas tem sido demonstrada como um traço, uma característica longitudinal do TB. Já os Trans...

  10. Sexual distress and quality of life among women with bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thea; Giraldi, A; Vinberg, M

    2017-01-01

    Self-Rating Mania Scale (ASRM), Major Depression Inventory (MDI) and The World Health Organisation Quality of Life-Brief. RESULTS: In total, 61 women (age range 19-63, mean 33.7 years) were recruited. Overall, 54% reported sexual distress (n = 33) and 39% were not satisfied with their sexual life (n......BACKGROUND: Information on the association between bipolar disorder (BD), sexual satisfaction, sexual function, sexual distress and quality of life (QoL) is sparse. This study aims, in women with BD, to (i) investigate sexual dysfunction, sexual distress, general sexual satisfaction and QoL; (ii......) explore whether sexual distress was related to affective symptoms and (iii) investigate whether QoL was associated with sexual distress. The study is a questionnaire survey in an outpatient cohort of women with BD using: Changes in Sexual Functioning Questionnaire, Female Sexual Distress Scale, Altman...

  11. Sexual distress and quality of life among women with bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Thea; Giraldi, A; Vinberg, M

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Information on the association between bipolar disorder (BD), sexual satisfaction, sexual function, sexual distress and quality of life (QoL) is sparse. This study aims, in women with BD, to (i) investigate sexual dysfunction, sexual distress, general sexual satisfaction and QoL; (ii......) explore whether sexual distress was related to affective symptoms and (iii) investigate whether QoL was associated with sexual distress. The study is a questionnaire survey in an outpatient cohort of women with BD using: Changes in Sexual Functioning Questionnaire, Female Sexual Distress Scale, Altman...... Self-Rating Mania Scale (ASRM), Major Depression Inventory (MDI) and The World Health Organisation Quality of Life-Brief. RESULTS: In total, 61 women (age range 19-63, mean 33.7 years) were recruited. Overall, 54% reported sexual distress (n = 33) and 39% were not satisfied with their sexual life (n...

  12. Identity, Bipolar Disorder, and the Problem of Self-Narration in Kay Redfield Jamison's An Unquiet Mind and Ellen Forney's Marbles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannon, Bethany Ober

    2018-03-06

    The field of narrative medicine holds that personal narratives about illness have the potential to give illness meaning and to create order out of disparate facets of experience, thereby aiding a patient's treatment and resisting universalizing medical discourse. Two narratives of bipolar disorder, Kay Redfield Jamison's prose memoir An Unquiet Mind (1995) and Ellen Forney's graphic memoir Marbles (2012) challenge these ideas. These writers demonstrate that one result of bipolar disorder is a rupture to their sense of identity, making straightforward and verbal forms of narrative impossible. During periods of relative mood stability, reliable memories of mania or depression are equally impossible. As a result, these memoirists seek to develop sources of self-knowledge other than memory and introspection, long the foundations of personal narrative. Finally, An Unquiet Mind and Marbles return attention to questions of selfhood at a time when scholarship on memoir rejects interpretations of life stories as clear and reliable expressions of identity.

  13. The relationship of Theory of Mind with symptoms and cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidi, N; Konstantakopoulos, G; Sakkas, D; Oulis, P

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies in bipolar disorder suggest patients' deficient performance in Theory of Mind tasks, both during manic or depressive episodes and in remission. However, most of the extant studies were cross-sectional and did not control for potential confounders such as residual symptoms or co-existent deficits in other cognitive functions. The present study is the first prospective study that assessed the effect of remission on Theory of Mind (ToM) in patients with Bipolar Disorder (BD) controlling for other cognitive deficits. ToM was assessed in 29 patients with BD type I during an episode of the illness and in remission as well as in 29 healthy controls. The two groups were pair-matched for gender, age and education level. Three tests with different levels of complexity were used to assess ToM: First Order False Belief Task, Hinting Task and Faux Pas Recognition Test. Concomitantly, a comprehensive battery of neuropsychological tests was administered to all participants assessing general intelligence, working memory, attention, speed processing, verbal learning, and memory and executive functions. The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Young Mania Rating Scale, Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, and GAF were also administered to the patients. Differences between patients--in acute phase and in remission--and the control group on neuropsychological tests were tested using one-way ANOVA with post hoc Bonferroni corrections. The effect of other cognitive deficits on patients' ToM dysfunction was controlled for using general linear models. The patients showed significantly lower performance in all ToM tests during the acute phases as compared to the control group (p values from 0.001 to 0.014). However, these impairments did not persist beyond acute mood episode, except patients' poor performance on Faux Pas (p=0.001). Additionally, patients had poorer performance compared to control group in verbal learning and memory (p<0.001) as well as visuospatial working

  14. Metacognitions and emotional schemas: a new cognitive perspective for the distinction between unipolar and bipolar depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batmaz, Sedat; Ulusoy Kaymak, Semra; Kocbiyik, Sibel; Turkcapar, Mehmet Hakan

    2014-10-01

    Clinicians need to make the differential diagnosis of unipolar and bipolar depression to guide their treatment choices. Looking at the differences observed in the metacognitions, and the emotional schemas, might help with this differentiation, and might provide information about the distinct psychotherapeutical targets. Three groups of subjects (166 unipolar depressed, 140 bipolar depressed, and 151 healthy controls) were asked to fill out the Metacognitions Questionnaire-30 (MCQ-30), and the Leahy Emotional Schema Scale (LESS). The clinicians diagnosed the volunteers according to the criteria of DSM-IV-TR with a structured clinical interview (MINI), and rated the moods of the subjects with the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), and the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS). Statistical analyses were undertaken to identify the group differences on the MCQ-30, and the LESS. The bipolar and unipolar depressed patients' scores on the MCQ-30 were significantly different from the healthy controls, but not from each other. On the LESS dimensions of guilt, duration, blame, validation, and acceptance of feelings, all three groups significantly differed from each other. There were no statistically different results on the LESS dimensions of comprehensibility, consensus, and expression. The mood disordered groups scored significantly different than the healthy controls on the LESS dimensions of simplistic view of emotions, numbness, rationality, rumination, higher values, and control. These results suggest that the metacognitive model of unipolar depression might be extrapolated for patients with bipolar depression. These results are also compatible to a great extent with the emotional schema theory of depression. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Transcultural adaption and validation of the Spanish version of the Bipolar Depression Rating Scale (BDRS-S).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarró, Salvador; Madre, Mercè; Fernández-Corcuera, Paloma; Valentí, Marc; Goikolea, José M; Pomarol-Clotet, Edith; Berk, Michael; Amann, Benedikt L

    2015-02-01

    The Bipolar Depression Rating Scale (BDRS) arguably better captures symptoms in bipolar depression especially depressive mixed states than traditional unipolar depression rating scales. The psychometric properties of the Spanish adapted version, BDRS-S, are reported. The BDRS was translated into Spanish by two independent psychiatrists fluent in English and Spanish. After its back-translation into English, the BDRS-S was administered to 69 DSMI-IV bipolar I and II patients who were recruited from two Spanish psychiatric hospitals. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS), the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) and the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) were concurrently administered. 42 patients were reviewed via video by four psychiatrists blind to the psychopathological status of those patients. In order to assess the BDRS-S intra-rater or test-retest validity, 22 subjects were assessed by the same investigator performing two evaluations within five days. The BDRS-S had a good internal consistency (Cronbach׳s α=0.870). We observed strong correlations between the BDRS-S and the HDRS (r=0.874) and MADRS (r=0.854) and also between the mixed symptom cluster score of the BDRS-S and the YMRS (r=0.803). Exploratory factor analysis revealed a three factor solution: psychological depressive symptoms cluster, somatic depressive symptoms cluster and mixed symptoms cluster. A relatively small sample size for a 20-item scale. The BDRS-S provides solid psychometric performance and in particular captures depressive or mixed symptoms in Spanish bipolar patients. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for the Biological Treatment of Bipolar Disorders: Update 2010 on the treatment of acute bipolar depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunze, Heinz; Vieta, Eduard; Goodwin, Guy M

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: These guidelines are based on a first edition that was published in 2002, and have been edited and updated with the available scientific evidence until September 2009. Their purpose is to supply a systematic overview of all scientific evidence pertaining to the treatment of acute bipo...... edition of this guideline in 2002, there are many areas which still need more intense research to optimize treatment. The majority of treatment recommendations is still based on limited data and leaves considerable areas of uncertainty.......OBJECTIVES: These guidelines are based on a first edition that was published in 2002, and have been edited and updated with the available scientific evidence until September 2009. Their purpose is to supply a systematic overview of all scientific evidence pertaining to the treatment of acute...... bipolar depression in adults. METHODS: The data used for these guidelines have been extracted from a MEDLINE and EMBASE search, from the clinical trial database clinicaltrials.gov, from recent proceedings of key conferences, and from various national and international treatment guidelines...

  17. Normal Metabolic Levels in Prefrontal Cortex in Euthymic Bipolar I Patients with and without Suicide Attempts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlos Vasconcelos Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction/Objective. Evidence suggests that the prefrontal cortex has been implicated in the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder (BD, but few neurochemical studies have evaluated this region in bipolar patients and there is no information from BD suicide attempters using Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (H+MRS. The objective was to evaluate the metabolic function of the medial orbital frontal cortex in euthymic BD type I suicide and nonsuicide attempters compared to healthy subjects by H+MRS. Methods. 40 euthymic bipolar I outpatients, 19 without and 21 with history of suicide attempt, and 22 healthy subjects were interviewed using the Structured Clinical Interview with the DSM-IV axis I, the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, the Young Mania Rating Scale, and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 and underwent H+MRS. Results. We did not find any metabolic abnormality in medial orbital frontal regions of suicide and nonsuicide BD patients and BD patients as a group compared to healthy subjects. Conclusions. The combined chronic use of psychotropic drugs with neuroprotective or neurotrophic effects leading to a euthymic state for longer periods of time may improve neurometabolic function, at least measured by H+MRS, even in suicide attempters. Besides, these results may implicate mood dependent alterations in brain metabolic activity. However, more studies with larger sample sizes of this heterogeneous disorder are warranted to clarify these data.

  18. Altered regional homogeneity in pediatric bipolar disorder during manic state: a resting-state fMRI study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Xiao

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: Pediatric bipolar disorder (PBD is a severely debilitating illness, which is characterized by episodes of mania and depression separated by periods of remission. Previous fMRI studies investigating PBD were mainly task-related. However, little is known about the abnormalities in PBD, especially during resting state. Resting state brain activity measured by fMRI might help to explore neurobiological biomarkers of the disorder. METHODS: Regional homogeneity (ReHo was examined with resting-state fMRI (RS-fMRI on 15 patients with PBD in manic state, with 15 age-and sex-matched healthy youth subjects as controls. RESULTS: Compared with the healthy controls, the patients with PBD showed altered ReHo in the cortical and subcortical structures. The ReHo measurement of the PBD group was negatively correlated with the score of Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS in the superior frontal gyrus. Positive correlations between the ReHo measurement and the score of YMRS were found in the hippocampus and the anterior cingulate cortex in the PBD group. CONCLUSIONS: Altered regional brain activity is present in patients with PBD during manic state. This study presents new evidence for abnormal ventral-affective and dorsal-cognitive circuits in PBD during resting state and may add fresh insights into the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying PBD.

  19. MANIA (276-3/4/5). Nuclear analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sciolla, C.M.

    1993-11-01

    This report contains the results of the nuclear calculations performed for the MANIA-276 experiment, sample holders 3, 4 and 5. The codes MICROFLUX-2, GAM, HFR-TEDDI and ORIGEN-S have been used for this analysis. Nuclear constants, dpa, reactivity effect and activity of the samples and of the structural materials have been calculated. The results are given in the tables and appendices of the present report. (orig.)

  20. Beyond the cliff of creativity: a novel key to Bipolar Disorder and creativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardiello, Luciana; Fornaro, Pantaleo

    2013-05-01

    How brain processes translate into creativity is still an unsolved puzzle in science. Although a number of conceptual models of creativity has been proposed to date, the exact nature of the process is still unknown. Recent findings support the idea that creativity may reside upon a continuum with psychopathology. If creativity is meant as "the capability of generating novel and appropriate ideas to solve problems", the missing pieces of the puzzle might be nested in the link between creativity and Bipolar Disorder. The existence of such a link is widely accepted by the Scientific Community. What still remains unknown is the nature of this link. An unconventional perspective is adopted during the investigation. Starting from the observation that depression in Bipolar Disorder might possibly trace back to ancient survival strategies in extreme climatic conditions - i.e. hibernation - the paper analyses old and recent findings in different disciplines: paleo-anthropology, information technology, neurobiology. Hints from the related research fields are linked together. The unified framework that emerges, still as a set of hypotheses, is reported in the conclusions. A novel key of interpretation of both creativity and Bipolar Disorder is thus provided. The core result is that normal people, creative individuals and patients affected by Bipolar Disorder share the same mind mechanism for problem-solving. The mechanism consists of two specific components, which are described in detail in the paper. Dysfunctions in brain myelination, making signal interference possible, hold a big role. The conclusions of the paper are in agreement with reports by patients affected by Bipolar Disorder concerning their subjective experience during mania, which is traditionally described as prone to creativity. To make readers aware of such an experience, a synthesis was elaborated by the first author, in the unusual shape of a short story. The short story is the narrative version of a real

  1. Cannabis use and first manic episode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bally, Nathalie; Zullino, Daniele; Aubry, Jean-Michel

    2014-08-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly abused drug among patients with bipolar disorder. Available data has shown that the risk of psychotic disorders increases with the frequency and intensity of cannabis abuse. The present purpose was to review relevant studies to investigate whether cannabis use can be linked to the onset of mania in bipolar disorder. Articles published between 1972 and December 2013 were searched on Medline and PsychInfo using the following keywords: first manic episode, or onset mania, or bipolar disorder and cannabis. Relevant papers cited in the references of selected articles were further considered for inclusion into the review. Lifetime use of cannabis among bipolar patients appears to be around 70% and approximately 30% of patients with a bipolar disorder present a comorbidity of cannabis abuse or dependence. Cannabis use is associated with younger age at onset of first mania and with more frequent depressive or manic episodes, although the evidence is somewhat inconsistent. Likewise cannabis consumption is related to poorer outcome and an increased risk of rapid cycling or mixed episodes. In contrast, neuro-cognitive functioning seems to be positively affected in patients with psychiatric comorbidity. While cannabis use often precedes first manic episodes, the causal direction remains to be determined. Variations in definition of cannabis use/dependence. Lack of controlled studies limiting definite conclusions about a putative causal relationship between cannabis and onset of mania. Further investigations are needed to clarify the relationships between cannabis use and first manic episode. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Influence of religion and supernatural beliefs on clinical manifestation and treatment practices in patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sandeep; Hazari, Nandita; Aneja, Jitender; Chakrabarti, Subho; Avasthi, Ajit

    2016-08-01

    Religious and supernatural beliefs influence help seeking and treatment practices in bipolar disorder, but these are rarely explored by clinicians. This study aimed to understand religiousness, magico-religious beliefs, prevalence of religious and supernatural psychopathology and treatment practices among patients with bipolar disorder in euthymic state. A total of 185 patients of bipolar disorder currently in remission were assessed cross-sectionally for their clinical profile, current clinical status on the Hamilton Depression Rating Sscale (HDRS), Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and the Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF). A semi structured instrument for magico-religious beliefs, aetiological models, treatment seeking and treatment practices was administered. More than a third of patients (37.8%) had psychopathology with either religious or supernatural content or both in their lifetime. Almost half (45.4%) the patients believed in a supernatural/religious aetiology for their illness. Among the specific causes, planetary influences (13.5%) and God's will (30.8%) were the most common supernatural and religious cause, respectively. Almost half (44.3%) of patients had first treatment contact with religious/supernatural treatment providers. More than 90% of patients reported belief in God, yet about 70% reported that their doctors did not ask them sufficient questions to understand their religiosity. Magico-religious beliefs are common in bipolar disorder and a large number of patients attribute these as aetiological factors for their illness. Consequently they tend to seek treatment from traditional practitioners prior to approaching medical practitioners and may continue treatment with them alongside medical management.

  3. Texas Medication Algorithm Project: development and feasibility testing of a treatment algorithm for patients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suppes, T; Swann, A C; Dennehy, E B; Habermacher, E D; Mason, M; Crismon, M L; Toprac, M G; Rush, A J; Shon, S P; Altshuler, K Z

    2001-06-01

    Use of treatment guidelines for treatment of major psychiatric illnesses has increased in recent years. The Texas Medication Algorithm Project (TMAP) was developed to study the feasibility and process of developing and implementing guidelines for bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and schizophrenia in the public mental health system of Texas. This article describes the consensus process used to develop the first set of TMAP algorithms for the Bipolar Disorder Module (Phase 1) and the trial testing the feasibility of their implementation in inpatient and outpatient psychiatric settings across Texas (Phase 2). The feasibility trial answered core questions regarding implementation of treatment guidelines for bipolar disorder. A total of 69 patients were treated with the original algorithms for bipolar disorder developed in Phase 1 of TMAP. Results support that physicians accepted the guidelines, followed recommendations to see patients at certain intervals, and utilized sequenced treatment steps differentially over the course of treatment. While improvements in clinical symptoms (24-item Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale) were observed over the course of enrollment in the trial, these conclusions are limited by the fact that physician volunteers were utilized for both treatment and ratings. and there was no control group. Results from Phases 1 and 2 indicate that it is possible to develop and implement a treatment guideline for patients with a history of mania in public mental health clinics in Texas. TMAP Phase 3, a recently completed larger and controlled trial assessing the clinical and economic impact of treatment guidelines and patient and family education in the public mental health system of Texas, improves upon this methodology.

  4. An overview of mice models: a key for understanding subtypes of mania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Mauricio Cuartas Arias

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Animal models have been broadly used in the study of pathophysiology and molecular and neurochemical pathways in neuropsychiatric diseases. Different approaches have used both consanguineous and non-consanguineous mice models to model behavioral patterns associated with the maniac spectrum. However, the disadvantages of validating clinical and experimental protocols have hindered the replication of these studies. In this article, the advantages and disadvantages of using consanguineous lines and non-consanguineous stocks in mice animal models for the study of mania and its subtypes are discussed. Additionally, new experimental alternatives to advance the pathogenesis and pharmacogenetics of mania using animal models are proposed and analyzed.

  5. A Case of Probable Amisulpride Induced Mania after Eight Months of Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prakash Thapa

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Development of manic symptoms during treatment with atypical antipsychotics can be a troublesome side effect that has been described with most atypical antipsychotics. However, reports of amisulpride induced mania have been rare. Here, we report the case of an 18-year-old male patient diagnosed with schizophrenia, who developed manic symptoms while on treatment with amisulpride. While previous reports have described occurrence of mania within days to three months of treatment with amisulpride, we report a case where manic symptoms occurred after around eight months of therapy. We have also attempted to describe the possible risk factors based on the available case studies.

  6. Effects of mood state on divided attention in patients with bipolar disorder: evidence for beneficial effects of subclinical manic symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenders, Manja A; Spijker, Annet T; Hoencamp, Erik; Haffmans, Judith P M; Zitman, Frans G; Giltay, Erik J

    2014-12-15

    A relatively small number of studies have been dedicated to the differential effects of the current mood state on cognition in patients with a bipolar disorder (BD). The aim of the current study was to investigate the effect of current mood state on divided attention (DA) performance, and specifically examine possible beneficial effects of the (hypo-) manic state. Over a maximum period of 24 months, medication use, divided attention test (a subtest of the Test for Attentional Performance (TAP)) was assessed every 6 months in 189 outpatients with BD. Data were analyzed with multilevel regression analysis (i.e. linear mixed models). DA performance varied considerable over time within patients. Corrected for psychotropic medication a significant quadratic relationship between manic symptoms and DA performance was found, with mild hypomanic symptoms having a positive influence on divided attention scores and moderate to severe manic symptoms having a negative influence. No association between depressive symptoms and DA performance was found. In future research on mania and cognition as well as in the clinical practice both the beneficial and negative effects of mania should be taken into account. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficacy of Group Cognitive-behavioral Therapy in Maintenance Treatment and Relapse Prevention for Bipolar Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arman, Soroor; Golmohammadi, Farnaz; Maracy, Mohammadreza; Molaeinezhad, Mitra

    2018-01-01

    Despite conducting wide-ranging of pharmacotherapy for bipolar adolescents, many of them are showing a deficit in functioning with high relapse rate. The aim of the current study was to develop a manual and investigate the efficacy of group cognitive-behavioral therapy (G-CBT) for female bipolar adolescents. During the first qualitative phase of a mixed-methods study, a manual of G-CBT was developed. Then, 32 female bipolar adolescents aged 12-19 years old, receiving usual maintenance medications (UMM), were selected. Participants were randomized to the control (UMM) and intervention group (5, 2 h weekly sessions based on G-CBT manual with UMM). The parents in intervention group participated in three parallel sessions. All participants filled the following questionnaires before 1, 3, and 6 months after the initiation of the study: Young Mania Rating Scale, Children Depression Inventory and Global Assessment of Functioning. The results were analyzed using SPSS 21 software. The concurrent qualitative phase was analyzed through thematic analysis. The results showed no significant differences in all questionnaires' scores through intervention and follow-up sessions ( P > 0.05). However, using cutoff point of CDI, G-CBT was effective for intervention group (relapse rate: 25% vs. 44.4%). Two themes were extracted from the second qualitative phase: emotion recognition and emotion regulation, especially in anger control. The results showed that the addition of G-CBT to UMM leads to decrease in the depressive scores but has no effect on manic symptoms and relapse rate.

  8. Comparative familial aggregation of bipolar disorder in patients with bipolar I and bipolar II disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Gordon B; Romano, Mia; Graham, Rebecca K; Ricciardi, Tahlia

    2018-05-01

    We sought to quantify the prevalence and differential prevalence of a bipolar disorder among family members of patients with a bipolar I or II disorder. The sample comprised 1165 bipolar and 1041 unipolar patients, with the former then sub-typed as having either a bipolar I or II condition. Family history data was obtained via an online self-report tool. Prevalence of a family member having a bipolar disorder (of either sub-type) was distinctive (36.8%). Patients with a bipolar I disorder reported a slightly higher family history (41.2%) compared to patients with a bipolar II disorder (36.3%), and with both significantly higher than the rate of bipolar disorder in family members of unipolar depressed patients (18.5%). Findings support the view that bipolar disorder is heritable. The comparable rates in the two bipolar sub-types support the positioning of bipolar II disorder as a valid condition with strong genetic underpinnings.

  9. Peripheral blood brain-derived neurotrophic factor in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, K; Vinberg, M; Kessing, L V

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral blood brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) has been proposed as a potential biomarker related to disease activity and neuroprogression in bipolar disorder, speculated to mirror alterations in brain expression of BDNF. The research area is rapidly evolving; however, recent...... investigations have yielded conflicting results with substantial variation in outcomes, highlighting the need to critically assess the state of current evidence. The aims of the study were to investigate differences in peripheral blood BDNF concentrations between bipolar disorder patients and healthy control...... subjects and between affective states in bipolar disorder patients, including assessment of the effect of treatment of acute episodes on BDNF levels. A systematic review of English language studies without considering publication status was conducted in PubMed (January 1950-November 2014), Embase (1974...

  10. Bipolar postpartum depression: An update and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Verinder; Doobay, Minakshi; Baczynski, Christine

    2017-09-01

    Over the past few years there has been a surge of interest in the study of bipolar postpartum depression (PPD); however, questions remain about its prevalence, screening, clinical features, and treatment. Three electronic databases, MEDLINE/PubMed (1966-2016), PsycINFO (1806-2016), and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, were searched using a combination of the keywords bipolar, depression, postpartum, peripartum, prevalence, screening, diagnosis, treatment, drugs, and psychotherapy. The reference lists of articles identified were also searched. All relevant articles published in English were included. Depending on the population studied, 21.4-54% of women with PPD have a diagnosis of bipolar disorder (BD). Characteristic clinical features include younger age at illness onset, first onset of depression after childbirth, onset immediately after delivery, atypical depressive symptoms, psychotic features, mixed features, and history of BD in first-degree family members. Treatment should be guided by symptom acuity, safety concerns, the patient's response to past treatments, drug tolerability, and breastfeeding preference. In the absence of controlled treatment data, preference should be given to drugs normally indicated for bipolar depression including lithium, quetiapine and lamotrigine. Although antidepressants have been studied in combination with mood stabilizers in bipolar depression, these drugs should be avoided due to likelihood of elevated risk of induction of manic symptoms in the postpartum period. In the postpartum period, bipolar PPD is common, can be differentiated from unipolar PPD, and needs to be identified promptly in order to expedite appropriate treatment. Future studies on pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy should focus on the acute and preventative treatment of bipolar PPD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Mania and depression explained

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    are thought to play a role in neuro-developmental processes, lending further ... Because serotonin, noradrenaline and dopamine are strongly implicated in the .... Genome-wide association study reveals two new risk loci for bipolar disorder.

  12. The World Federation of Societies of Biological Psychiatry (WFSBP) Guidelines for the Biological Treatment of Bipolar Disorders: Update 2010 on the treatment of acute bipolar depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunze, Heinz; Vieta, Eduard; Goodwin, Guy M

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: These guidelines are based on a first edition that was published in 2002, and have been edited and updated with the available scientific evidence until September 2009. Their purpose is to supply a systematic overview of all scientific evidence pertaining to the treatment of acute...... with at least limited positive evidence for efficacy in bipolar depression, several of them still experimental and backed up only by a single study. Only one medication was considered to be sufficiently studied to merit full positive evidence. CONCLUSIONS: Although major advances have been made since the first...... edition of this guideline in 2002, there are many areas which still need more intense research to optimize treatment. The majority of treatment recommendations is still based on limited data and leaves considerable areas of uncertainty....

  13. Olanzapine approved for the acute treatment of schizophrenia or manic/mixed episodes associated with bipolar I disorder in adolescent patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann E Maloney

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Ann E Maloney1,2, Linmarie Sikich31Maine Medical Center Research Institute, Scarborough, ME, USA; 2Department of Psychiatry, Tufts University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; 3Department of Psychiatry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USABackground: Severe and persistent mental illnesses in children and adolescents, such as early-onset schizophrenia spectrum (EOSS disorders and pediatric bipolar disorder (pedBP, are increasingly recognized. Few treatments have demonstrated efficacy in rigorous clinical trials. Enduring response to current medications appears limited. Recently, olanzapine was approved for the treatment of adolescents with schizophrenia or acute manic/mixed episodes in pedBP.Methods: PubMed searches were conducted for olanzapine combined with pharmacology, schizophrenia, or bipolar disorder. Searches related to schizophrenia and bipolar disorder were limited to children and adolescents. The bibliographies of the retrieved articles were hand-checked for additional relevant studies. The epidemiology, phenomenology, and treatment of EOSS and pedBP, and olanzapine’s pharmacology are reviewed. Studies of olanzapine treatment in youth with EOSS and pedBP are examined.Results: Olanzapine is efficacious for EOSS and pedBP. However, olanzapine is not more efficacious than risperidone, molindone, or haloperidol in EOSS and is less efficacious than clozapine in treatment-resistant EOSS. No comparative trials have been done in pedBP. Olanzapine is associated with weight gain, dyslipidemia, and transaminase elevations in youth. Extrapyramidal symptoms, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, and blood dyscrasias have also been reported but appear rare.Conclusions: The authors conclude that olanzapine should be considered a second-line agent in EOSS and pedBP due to its risks for significant weight gain and lipid dysregulation. Awareness of the consistent weight and metabolic changes observed in olanzapine

  14. A genetic network model of cellular responses to lithium treatment and cocaine abuse in bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keller Benjamin J

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lithium is an effective treatment for Bipolar Disorder (BD and significantly reduces suicide risk, though the molecular basis of lithium's effectiveness is not well understood. We seek to improve our understanding of this effectiveness by posing hypotheses based on new experimental data as well as published data, testing these hypotheses in silico, and posing new hypotheses for validation in future studies. We initially hypothesized a gene-by-environment interaction where lithium, acting as an environmental influence, impacts signal transduction pathways leading to differential expression of genes important in the etiology of BD mania. Results Using microarray and rt-QPCR assays, we identified candidate genes that are differentially expressed with lithium treatment. We used a systems biology approach to identify interactions among these candidate genes and develop a network of genes that interact with the differentially expressed candidates. Notably, we also identified cocaine as having a potential influence on the network, consistent with the observed high rate of comorbidity for BD and cocaine abuse. The resulting network represents a novel hypothesis on how multiple genetic influences on bipolar disorder are impacted by both lithium treatment and cocaine use. Testing this network for association with BD and related phenotypes, we find that it is significantly over-represented for genes that participate in signal transduction, consistent with our hypothesized-gene-by environment interaction. In addition, it models related pharmacogenomic, psychiatric, and chemical dependence phenotypes. Conclusions We offer a network model of gene-by-environment interaction associated with lithium's effectiveness in treating BD mania, as well as the observed high rate of comorbidity of BD and cocaine abuse. We identified drug targets within this network that represent immediate candidates for therapeutic drug testing. Posing novel

  15. Utility of Washington Early Recognition Center (WERC Self-Report Screening Questionnaires in the Assessment of Patients with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Jen-Chia Hsieh

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Early identification and treatment are associated with improved outcomes in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. Screening for the presence of these disorders usually involves time-intensive interviews that may not be practical in settings where mental health providers are limited. Thus, individuals at earlier stages of illness are often not identified. The Washington Early Recognition Center Affectivity and Psychosis (WERCAP Screen is a self-report questionnaire originally developed to identify clinical risk for developing bipolar or psychotic disorders. The goal of the current study was to investigate the utility of the WERCAP Screen and two complementary questionnaires, the WERC Stress Screen and the WERC Substance Screen, in identifying individuals with established schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. Participants consisted of 35 bipolar disorder (BPD and 34 schizophrenia (SCZ patients, as well as 32 controls (CON, aged 18-30 years. Univariate analyses were used to test for score differences between groups. Logistic regression and ROC curves were used to identify diagnostic predictors. Significant group differences were found for the psychosis section of the WERCAP (pWERCAP; p 20 (AUC: 0.87; sensitivity: 0.91; specificity: 1.0; while that for the pWERCAP to identify schizophrenia was a score of >13 (AUC: 0.89; sensitivity: 0.88; specificity: 0.88. These results indicate that the WERCAP Screen may be useful in screening individuals for bipolar disorder and schizophrenia, and that identifying stress and substance use severity can be rapidly done using self-report questionnaires. Larger studies in undiagnosed individuals will be needed to test the WERCAP Screen’s ability to identify mania or psychosis in the community.

  16. Evidence-Based Pharmacologic Treatment of Pediatric Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findling, Robert L

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacotherapy is an important component of treatment for children and adolescents with bipolar disorder. The body of evidence supporting safe and effective treatments in this population is growing. Available data provide information on the risks and benefits of pharmacologic agents used for acute manic, mixed, and depressive episodes as well as for maintenance treatment. Lithium, anticonvulsants, and antipsychotics comprise the armamentarium for treating pediatric bipolar disorder. When selecting treatment, clinicians must consider the efficacy and side effect profile of potential pharmacotherapies, as well as the patient's history, including the presence of comorbidities, in order to develop a treatment plan that will ensure optimal outcomes. © Copyright 2016 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  17. Effects of quetiapine on sleep architecture in patients with unipolar or bipolar depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gedge

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Laura Gedge1, Lauren Lazowski1, David Murray2, Ruzica Jokic2,3, Roumen Milev2,31Centre for Neuroscience Studies, 2Department of Psychiatry, Queen’s University, Kingston, 3Providence Care-Mental Health Services, Kingston, Ontario, CanadaObjective: To determine the effect of adjunctive quetiapine therapy on the sleep architecture of patients with bipolar or unipolar depression.Methods: This is a prospective, single-blind, repeated measures polysomnographic study. Sleep architecture was analyzed by overnight polysomnography, and subjective sleep quality was measured using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. The Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale, Young Mania Rating Scale, and Clinical Global Impression-Severity Scale were employed to quantify changes in illness severity with adjunctive quetiapine treatment. Polysomnographs and clinical measures were administered at baseline, after 2–4 days of treatment, and after 21–28 days of quetiapine treatment. The average dose of quetiapine was 155 mg, ranging from 100–200 mg.Results: Adjunctive quetiapine therapy did not significantly alter sleep efficiency, sleep continuity, or Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index scores. Respiratory Disturbance Index and percentage of total time in rapid eye movement (REM sleep significantly decreased and the percentage of total time in non-REM sleep, and duration of Stage 2 and non-REM sleep significantly increased after 2–4 days of quetiapine treatment. Illness severity significantly decreased over time.Conclusions: Adjunctive quetiapine treatment alters sleep architecture in patients with major depressive disorder or bipolar disorder, which may partially explain its early antidepressant properties. Changes in sleep architecture are more robust and significant within two to four days of starting treatment.Keywords: quetiapine, sleep architecture, depression, bipolar disorder

  18. Efficacy of Group Cognitive–behavioral Therapy in Maintenance Treatment and Relapse Prevention for Bipolar Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroor Arman

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Despite conducting wide-ranging of pharmacotherapy for bipolar adolescents, many of them are showing a deficit in functioning with high relapse rate. The aim of the current study was to develop a manual and investigate the efficacy of group cognitive–behavioral therapy (G-CBT for female bipolar adolescents. Materials and Methods: During the first qualitative phase of a mixed-methods study, a manual of G-CBT was developed. Then, 32 female bipolar adolescents aged 12–19 years old, receiving usual maintenance medications (UMM, were selected. Participants were randomized to the control (UMM and intervention group (5, 2 h weekly sessions based on G-CBT manual with UMM. The parents in intervention group participated in three parallel sessions. All participants filled the following questionnaires before 1, 3, and 6 months after the initiation of the study: Young Mania Rating Scale, Children Depression Inventory and Global Assessment of Functioning. The results were analyzed using SPSS 21 software. The concurrent qualitative phase was analyzed through thematic analysis. Results: The results showed no significant differences in all questionnaires' scores through intervention and follow-up sessions (P > 0.05. However, using cutoff point of CDI, G-CBT was effective for intervention group (relapse rate: 25% vs. 44.4%. Two themes were extracted from the second qualitative phase: emotion recognition and emotion regulation, especially in anger control. Conclusions: The results showed that the addition of G-CBT to UMM leads to decrease in the depressive scores but has no effect on manic symptoms and relapse rate.

  19. [Concordance between hospital prescriptions and recommendations in the treatment of mania].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laforgue, Edouard-Jules; Bulteau, Samuel; Cholet, Jennyfer; Victorri-Vigneau, Caroline; Guitteny, Marie; Mauduit, Nicolas; Vanelle, Jean-Marie; Sauvaget, Anne

    2017-06-01

    There are differences between recommendations and practice in the pharmacological treatment of acute mania. The objective was to assess conformity of the anti-manic prescription between national recommendations (Haute Autorité de santé [French health authority, HAS] and "résumé des caractéristiques du produit" [product characteristics, RCP]) and clinical practice. We observed the drug prescriptions of in-patients for a manic episode. The main outcome measure was the concordance rate with the recommendations of the drugs prescriptions at the 48th hour. The secondary outcome repeated the same process with the hospital discharge statement of switches, associations, the presence of symptomatic and antidepressant treatments. Sixty-six episodes were included, 40 patients (60%) had a prescription complies with RCP recommendations H48 and 46 patients (70%) to HAS. These rates fall at hospital discharge. Off-label prescriptions, drug combinations and choices of not listed molecules are the most common reasons for non-conformity. Copyright © 2016 Société française de pharmacologie et de thérapeutique. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Valproic acid, valproate and divalproex in the maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipriani, Andrea; Reid, Keith; Young, Allan H; Macritchie, Karine; Geddes, John

    2013-10-17

    Bipolar disorder is a recurrent illness that is amongst the top 30 causes of disability worldwide and is associated with significant healthcare costs. In the past, emphasis was placed solely on the treatment of acute episodes of bipolar disorder; recently, the importance of episode prevention and of minimisation of iatrogenicity has been recognised. For many years, lithium was the only mood stabiliser in common use, and it remains an agent of first choice in the preventative treatment of bipolar disorder. However, an estimated 20% to 40% of patients may not respond adequately to lithium. Valproate is an anticonvulsant drug that has been shown to be effective in acute mania and is frequently used in maintenance treatment of bipolar disorder. When the acceptability of long-term treatment is considered, together with efficacy, the adverse event profile of a medication is also important. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2001 and last updated in 2009. 1. To determine the efficacy of valproate continuation and maintenance treatment:a) in preventing or attenuating manic, depressive and mixed episodes of bipolar disorder;b) in preventing or attenuating episodes of bipolar disorder in patients with rapid cycling disorder; and; c) in improving patients' general health and social functioning, as measured by global clinical impression, employment and marital stability.2. To review the acceptability to patients of long-term valproate treatment, as measured by numbers of dropouts and reasons for dropping out, by compliance and by reference to patients' expressed views regarding treatment.3. To investigate the adverse effects of valproate treatment (including general prevalence of side effects) and overall mortality rates. Search of the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials and the Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Group Register (CCDANCTR) (to January 2013), which includes relevant randomised controlled trials from the following bibliographic

  1. Effect of fasting during Ramadan on serum lithium level and mental state in bipolar affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Saeed; Nazar, Zahid; Akhtar, Javaid; Akhter, Javed; Irfan, Muhammad; Irafn, Mohammad; Subhan, Fazal; Ahmed, Zia; Khan, Ejaz Hassan; Khatak, Ijaz Hassan; Naeem, Farooq

    2010-11-01

    The Muslims fast every year during the month of Ramadan. A fasting day can last 12-17 h. The effects of fasting on serum lithium levels and the mood changes in patients suffering from bipolar affective disorder during Ramadan are not well studied. We aimed to compare the serum lithium levels, side effects, toxicity and mental state in patients suffering from bipolar affective disorder and on prophylactic lithium therapy before, during and after Ramadan. Sixty-two patients meeting the International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Research Diagnostic Criteria of bipolar affective disorder receiving lithium treatment for prophylaxis were recruited in a tertiary care teaching hospital in Peshawar, Pakistan. Serum lithium, electrolytes, Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) were assessed at three points, 1 week before Ramadan, midRamadan and 1 week after Ramadan. The side effects and toxicity were measured by a symptoms and signs checklist. There was no significant difference in mean serum lithium levels at three time points (preRamadan=0.45±0.21, midRamadan=0.51±0.20 and postRamadan=0.44±0.23 milli equivalents/litre, P=0.116). The scores on HDRS and YMRS showed significant decrease during Ramadan (F=34.12, P=0.00, for HDRS and F=15.6, P=0.000 for YMRS). The side effects and toxicity also did not differ significantly at three points. In conclusion, the patients who have stable mental state and lithium levels before Ramadan can be maintained on lithium during Ramadan. Fasting in an average temperature of 28°C for up to 12 h per day did not result in elevated serum lithium levels or more side effects and did not have adverse effects on mental state of patients suffering from bipolar affective disorder.

  2. Disease: H01653 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available wn as manic depressive illness, is a severe chronic mood disorder, characterized by the recurrence of mania (hypomania), depression...patients with bipolar disorder present with a depressive episode that differs subtly from unipolar depression...d define the patient's mood state, because the therapeutic approach differs considerably for hypomania, mania, depression

  3. Self Stigma Among People with Bipolar-I Disorder in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gita Sadighi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Psychiatric stigma refers to systemic and internalized stereotypical negative attitudes against individual with mental illness. This article describes the level of self stigma, stereotype endorsement and perceived discrimination experienced by patients with Bipolar-I disorder in Tehran. Methods: Data were collected from a total of 126 patients with Bipolar-I disorder who responded to acute phase treatment using the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness scale. The ISMI scale has five subscales: Alienation, Stereotype Endorsement, Perceived Discrimination, Social Withdrawal and Stigma Resistance. Results: In this study 26.7% of participants reported moderate to high levels of self stigma, 57.49% moderate to high levels of stigma resistance and 18.3% moderate to high levels of Perceived discrimination. Discussion: The results suggest that, self stigma appears in over one fifth of individuals with Bipolar-I disorder in Iran. The symptoms of Bipolar-I disorder has profound impacts on the quality of life of affected patients. Psychosocial functioning and self-esteem is impaired in people with Bipolar-I disorder. Interventions are required to reduce the negative effects of internalized stigma in this group.

  4. Sodium valproate for the treatment of mania in a patient with Charcot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and the treatment thereof with sodium valproate. Mr. L, a 28 ... prolonged distal latencies, decreased compound muscle action ... 1000mg per day for treatment of mania. ... dystrophy, facio-scapulo-humeral dystrophy, and hereditary motor and.

  5. The KMO allele encoding Arg452 is associated with psychotic features in bipolar disorder type 1, and with increased CSF KYNA level and reduced KMO expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavebratt, C; Olsson, S; Backlund, L; Frisén, L; Sellgren, C; Priebe, L; Nikamo, P; Träskman-Bendz, L; Cichon, S; Vawter, M P; Osby, U; Engberg, G; Landén, M; Erhardt, S; Schalling, M

    2014-03-01

    The kynurenine pathway metabolite kynurenic acid (KYNA), modulating glutamatergic and cholinergic neurotransmission, is increased in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients with schizophrenia or bipolar disorder type 1 with psychotic features. KYNA production is critically dependent on kynurenine 3-monooxygenase (KMO). KMO mRNA levels and activity in prefrontal cortex (PFC) are reduced in schizophrenia. We hypothesized that KMO expression in PFC would be reduced in bipolar disorder with psychotic features and that a functional genetic variant of KMO would associate with this disease, CSF KYNA level and KMO expression. KMO mRNA levels were reduced in PFC of bipolar disorder patients with lifetime psychotic features (P=0.005, n=19) or schizophrenia (P=0.02, n=36) compared with nonpsychotic patients and controls. KMO genetic association to psychotic features in bipolar disorder type 1 was studied in 493 patients and 1044 controls from Sweden. The KMO Arg(452) allele was associated with psychotic features during manic episodes (P=0.003). KMO Arg(452) was studied for association to CSF KYNA levels in an independent sample of 55 Swedish patients, and to KMO expression in 717 lymphoblastoid cell lines and 138 hippocampal biopsies. KMO Arg(452) associated with increased levels of CSF KYNA (P=0.03) and reduced lymphoblastoid and hippocampal KMO expression (P≤0.05). Thus, findings from five independent cohorts suggest that genetic variation in KMO influences the risk for psychotic features in mania of bipolar disorder patients. This provides a possible mechanism for the previous findings of elevated CSF KYNA levels in those bipolar patients with lifetime psychotic features and positive association between KYNA levels and number of manic episodes.

  6. Bipolar Treatment: Are Bipolar I and Bipolar II Treated Differently?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The diagnosis and management of bipolar I and bipolar II disorders: Clinical practice update. Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2017;92:1532. Haynes PL, et al. Social rhythm therapies for mood disorders: An update. Current Psychiatry Reports. ...

  7. Characteristics and Service Use of Older Adults with Schizoaffective Disorder Versus Older Adults with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolin, Stephanie A; Aschbrenner, Kelly A; Whiteman, Karen L; Scherer, Emily; Bartels, Stephen J

    2017-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if schizoaffective disorder in older adults is differentiated from schizophrenia and bipolar disorder with respect to community functioning, cognitive functioning, psychiatric symptoms, and service use. Secondary analysis of baseline data collected from the Helping Older People Experience Success psychosocial skills training and health management study. Three community mental health centers in New Hampshire and Massachusetts. Adults over the age of 50 (N = 139, mean age: 59.7 years, SD: 7.4 years) with persistent functional impairment and a diagnosis of schizoaffective disorder (N = 52), schizophrenia (N = 51), or bipolar disorder (N = 36). Health status (36-Item Short Form Health Survey [SF-36]), performance-based community living skills (UCSD Performance-Based Skills Assessment), neuropsychological functioning (Delis-Kaplan Executive Functioning subtests), psychiatric symptoms (Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, Scale for the Assessment of Negative Symptoms), medical severity (Charlson comorbidity index), and acute service use. Older adults with schizoaffective disorder had depressive symptoms of similar severity to bipolar disorder, and thought disorder symptoms of similar severity to schizophrenia. Schizoaffective disorder compared with schizophrenia was associated with better community functioning, but poorer subjective physical and mental health functioning as measured by the SF-36. Older adults with schizoaffective disorder had greater acute hospitalization compared with adults with schizophrenia, though their use of acute care services was comparable to individuals with bipolar disorder. Findings from this study suggest that schizoaffective disorder in older adults occupies a distinct profile from either schizophrenia or bipolar disorder with respect to community functional status, symptom profile, and acute services utilization. Copyright © 2017

  8. The temporal course and clinical correlates of subjective impulsivity in bipolar disorder as revealed through ecological momentary assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depp, Colin A; Moore, Raeanne C; Dev, Sheena I; Mausbach, Brent T; Eyler, Lisa T; Granholm, Eric L

    2016-03-15

    Impulsivity is frequently linked with bipolar disorder and is associated with mania and negative outcomes. The temporal dynamics of subjective impulsivity are unclear, in particular whether impulsivity precedes or follows changes in positive or negative affect. A total of 41 outpatients with bipolar disorder (I or II) were provided with mobile devices for 11 weeks and completed twice-daily surveys about affective states and subjective impulsivity. We examined the association between aggregate subjective impulsivity with baseline global cognitive function, suicide risk ratings, and medication adherence, as well as concurrent and lagged associations with momentary positive and negative affect ratings. A total of 2902 ratings were available across study subjects. Higher aggregate mean ratings of impulsivity were associated with worse baseline global cognitive function, prior suicide attempts, and self-reported problems with medication adherence, as well as more severe manic (but not depressive) symptoms. Time-lagged models indicated that greater negative affect, but not positive affect, predicted subsequent increases in subjective impulsivity, which, in turn, predicted diminished positive affect. Other measures of impulsivity with which to validate subjective ratings were unavailable and the sample was restricted to generally clinically stable outpatients. Subjective impulsivity as measured by daily monitoring was associated with worse cognitive function and self-rated medication adherence, and higher suicide risk ratings. Impulsivity may be a maladaptive strategy to regulate negative affect in bipolar disorder. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Sodium butyrate has an antimanic effect and protects the brain against oxidative stress in an animal model of mania induced by ouabain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valvassori, Samira S; Dal-Pont, Gustavo C; Steckert, Amanda V; Varela, Roger B; Lopes-Borges, Jéssica; Mariot, Edemilson; Resende, Wilson R; Arent, Camila O; Carvalho, André F; Quevedo, João

    2016-01-30

    Studies have consistently reported the participation of oxidative stress in bipolar disorder (BD). Evidence indicates that epigenetic regulations have been implicated in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. Considering these evidences, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of sodium butyrate (SB), a histone deacetylase (HDAC)inhibitor, on manic-like behavior and oxidative stress parameters (TBARS and protein carbonyl content and SOD and CAT activities) in frontal cortex and hippocampus of rats subjected to the animal model of mania induced by intracerebroventricular (ICV) ouabain administration.The results showed that SB reversed ouabain-induced hyperactivity, which represents a manic-like behavior in rats. In addition, the ouabain ICV administration induced oxidative damage to lipid and protein and alters antioxidant enzymes activity in all brain structures analyzed. The treatment with SB was able to reversesboth behavioral and oxidative stress parameters alteration induced by ouabain.In conclusion, we suggest that SB can be considered a potential new mood stabilizer by acts on manic-like behavior and regulatesthe antioxidant enzyme activities, protecting the brain against oxidative damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Kraepelin’s description of chronic mania: a clinical picture that meets the behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Boson Gambogi

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Chronic mania is an under-investigated condition and few reports have associated this disorder with an organic background. The present work examines Kraepelin’s reliable description of chronic mania from a current behavioral neurology viewpoint. Kraepelin had described a cluster of symptoms that are now recognized as core manifestations of the behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD clinical phenotype. We also carried out additional reviews of original manuscripts from Kraepelin’s peers, in order to find any case reports that might fulfill the current diagnostic proposal for bvFTD. Even though we failed to find an ideal case, we found some scholars who seemed to agree that chronic mania should be considered a special form of dementia. The present work highlights, through historical data, the possible overlapping features between primary psychiatric disorders and neuropsychiatric symptoms secondary to neurodegenerative conditions.

  11. SPECIFIC MOOD SYMPTOMS CONFER RISK FOR SUBSEQUENT SUICIDAL IDEATION IN BIPOLAR DISORDER WITH AND WITHOUT SUICIDE ATTEMPT HISTORY: MULTI-WAVE DATA FROM STEP-BD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Jonathan P; Kleiman, Evan M; Sylvia, Louisa G; Magalhães, Pedro Vieira da Silva; Berk, Michael; Nierenberg, Andrew A; Deckersbach, Thilo

    2016-06-01

    Little is known about specific mood symptoms that may confer risk for suicidal ideation (SI) among patients with bipolar disorder (BD). We evaluated prospectively whether particular symptoms of depression and mania precede the onset or worsening of SI, among adults with or without a history of a suicide attempt. We examined prospective data from a large (N = 2,741) cohort of patients participating in the Systematic Treatment Enhancement Program for BD (STEP-BD). We evaluated history of suicide attempts at baseline, and symptoms of depression and mania at baseline and follow-up visits. Hierarchical linear modeling tested whether specific mood symptoms predicted subsequent levels of SI, and whether the strength of the associations differed based on suicide attempt history, after accounting for the influence of other mood symptoms and current SI. Beyond overall current depression and mania symptom severity, baseline SI, and illness characteristics, several mood symptoms, including guilt, reduced self-esteem, psychomotor retardation and agitation, increases in appetite, and distractibility predicted more severe levels of subsequent SI. Problems with concentration, distraction, sleep loss and decreased need for sleep predicted subsequent SI more strongly among individuals with a suicide attempt history. Several specific mood symptoms may confer risk for the onset or worsening of SI among treatment-seeking patients with BD. Individuals with a previous suicide attempt may be at greater risk in part due to greater reactivity to certain mood symptoms in the form of SI. However, overall, effect sizes were small, suggesting the need to identify additional proximal predictors of SI. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Episode forecasting in bipolar disorder: Is energy better than mood?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Abigail; Bradler, Kamil; Hintze, Arend

    2018-01-22

    Bipolar disorder is a severe mood disorder characterized by alternating episodes of mania and depression. Several interventions have been developed to decrease high admission rates and high suicides rates associated with the illness, including psychoeducation and early episode detection, with mixed results. More recently, machine learning approaches have been used to aid clinical diagnosis or to detect a particular clinical state; however, contradictory results arise from confusion around which of the several automatically generated data are the most contributory and useful to detect a particular clinical state. Our aim for this study was to apply machine learning techniques and nonlinear analyses to a physiological time series dataset in order to find the best predictor for forecasting episodes in mood disorders. We employed three different techniques: entropy calculations and two different machine learning approaches (genetic programming and Markov Brains as classifiers) to determine whether mood, energy or sleep was the best predictor to forecast a mood episode in a physiological time series. Evening energy was the best predictor for both manic and depressive episodes in each of the three aforementioned techniques. This suggests that energy might be a better predictor than mood for forecasting mood episodes in bipolar disorder and that these particular machine learning approaches are valuable tools to be used clinically. Energy should be considered as an important factor for episode prediction. Machine learning approaches provide better tools to forecast episodes and to increase our understanding of the processes that underlie mood regulation. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Correlation between the Efficacy of Lamotrigine and the Serum Lamotrigine Level during the Remission Phase of Acute Bipolar II Depression: A Naturalistic and Unblinded Prospective Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikkawa, Akiyoshi; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Aiba, Tetsuya; Hiraki, Koichi; Sendo, Toshiaki

    2017-01-01

    Lamotrigine has acute antidepressant effects in patients with bipolar disorder. However, there is little information regarding appropriate serum levels of lamotrigine and the time until remission after the start of lamotrigine therapy in patients with bipolar II depression. This was a naturalistic and unblinded prospective pilot study. Twelve patients' depressive symptoms were evaluated using the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) at the start of treatment and at the time of remission, and blood samples were obtained at the time of remission. Mahalanobis distance was used to analyze the relationship between the MADRS improvement rate and the serum lamotrigine level. Furthermore, we calculated the Spearman's rank correlation coefficient for the relationship between the MADRS improvement rate and the serum lamotrigine level, and produced box plots of the serum lamotrigine level at remission and the time until remission. The Mahalanobis distance for the patient that was co-administered lamotrigine and valproic acid differed significantly from those of the other patients (p<0.001). There was no linear relationship between the serum lamotrigine level and the MADRS improvement rate among the patients that did not receive valproic acid. The median time from the start of lamotrigine therapy until remission was 6 weeks. The serum lamotrigine level does not have an important impact on the acute therapeutic effects of lamotrigine on bipolar II depression. In addition, we consider that different treatment options should be considered for non-responders who do not exhibit any improvement after the administration of lamotrigine for approximately 6 weeks.

  14. Child behavior checklist profiles in adolescents with bipolar and depressive disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweon, Kukju; Lee, Hyun-Jeong; Park, Kee Jeong; Joo, Yeonho; Kim, Hyo-Won

    2016-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) profiles in youths with bipolar and depressive disorders. Seventy-four subjects with a mean age of 14.9±1.6years (36 boys) with mood disorders and their parents were recruited from September 2011 to June 2013 in the Department of Psychiatry, Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. Diagnosis of mood disorder and comorbid psychiatric disorder was confirmed by child psychiatrists using the Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School Age Children - Present and Lifetime version (K-SADS-PL). The parents of the subjects completed the Parent General Behavior Inventory-10-item Mania Scale (P-GBI-10M), Parent-version of Mood Disorder Questionnaire (P-MDQ), ADHD rating scale (ARS) and CBCL. The adolescents completed the 76-item Adolescent General Behavior Inventory (A-GBI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), and Adolescent-version of Mood Disorder Questionnaire (A-MDQ). When adjusted for gender and the comorbidity with ADHD, the Withdrawn and Anxious/Depressed subscale scores of the CBCL were higher in subjects with bipolar disorder than in those with depressive disorder. Higher scores of A-GBI Depressive subscale, A-MDQ and BDI were shown in subjects with bipolar disorder than in those with depressive disorder. There was no significant difference on CBCL-DP, P-GBI-10M, P-MDQ, A-GBI Hypomanic/Biphasic subscale and ARS between two groups. All eight subscales of the CBCL positively correlated with the P-GBI-10M and P-MDQ scores, and seven of all eight subscales of the CBCL positively correlated with A-GBI Depressive and Hypomanic/Biphasic subscales. The BDI score was positively associated with the Withdrawn, Somatic Complaints, Anxious/Depressed, and Social Problems subscale scores. CBCL-DP score was strongly correlated with manic/hypomanic symptoms measured by P-GBI-10M and P-MDQ (r=0.771 and 0.826). This study suggests that the CBCL could be used for measuring mood symptoms and combined psychopathology

  15. Pilot-project of implantation of pharmaceutical care close to the program of bipolar mood disorder of the Hospital of Clinics of Porto Alegre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keila Maria Mendes Ceresér

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The Bipolar Mood Disorder is characterized by the alternation of depressive crises with episodes of mania or euphoria, having these patients 15 to 35 times more chances of suicide, as compared with people without this disorder. The pharmacotherapy is fundamental for this disease, aiming to decrease the frequency of episodes and disease severity. In these patients, the polypharmacy has recently increased and one of the main difficulties is the adherence to treatment. The objective of this study was to contribute for the improvement of bipolar patients health conditions, developing their respective pharmacotherapeutic follow-up. Twenty eight adult bipolar patients who were participants of a specialized clinic within a tertiary hospital in Porto Alegre have been randomly selected, and the Dader Method of pharmacotherapeutic follow-up has been applied. The more common clinical comorbidities were: hypertension (50%, obesity (46.43%, and hypothyroidism (36.29%. The bipolar patients are more susceptible to clinical comorbidities, and many of them could be due to pharmacotherapy. Only 1.43% of patients presented Drug Related Problems, being all of them resolved along the study. It was also observed that 32.14% of evaluated patients presented low adherence to treatment, and between these patients, 55.56% passed to have good adherence after pharmacotherapeutic follow-up. The pharmacotherapeutic follow-up is fundamental for the improvement of patient's health. New studies, with higher number of patients and longer duration, are necessary to evaluate the percentage of patients that could be beneficiary of Pharmaceutical Care.O Transtorno do Humor Bipolar é caracterizando pela alternância de crises depressivas com episódios de mania ou euforia, tendo estes pacientes 15-35 vezes mais chances de suicídio em comparação com pessoas sem este transtorno. A farmacoterapia é fundamental, visando diminuir a freqüência dos episódios e a gravidade da doen

  16. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β in patients with bipolar I disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacoby, Anne S; Munkholm, Klaus; Vinberg, Maj

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The enzyme glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) is involved in the mechanisms of action of lithium and may play a role in relation to affective states in bipolar disorder. The objectives of the present study were to compare the activity of GSK-3β (measured as levels of phosphorylated GSK......-3β [p-GSK-3β]) between patients with bipolar disorder in the euthymic state and healthy control subjects, and to investigate whether GSK-3β activity varies with affective states in patients with bipolar I disorder. METHODS: In a prospective 6-12-month follow-up study, we investigated state......-specific, intraindividual alterations in the activity of GSK-3β in 60 patients with bipolar I disorder with an acute severe manic index episode and in subsequent euthymic, depressive and manic states and compared this with repeated measurements in healthy control subjects. Data were analyzed using linear mixed...

  17. FitzPatrick Lecture: King George III and the porphyria myth - causes, consequences and re-evaluation of his mental illness with computer diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Timothy

    2015-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that the claim that King George III suffered from acute porphyria is seriously at fault. This article explores some of the causes of this misdiagnosis and the consequences of the misleading claims, also reporting on the nature of the king's recurrent mental illness according to computer diagnostics. In addition, techniques of cognitive archaeology are used to investigate the nature of the king's final decade of mental illness, which resulted in the appointment of the Prince of Wales as Prince Regent. The results of this analysis confirm that the king suffered from bipolar disorder type I, with a final decade of dementia, due, in part, to the neurotoxicity of his recurrent episodes of acute mania. © 2015 Royal College of Physicians.

  18. Update on extended release quetiapine fumarate in schizophrenia and bipolar disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Khalili N

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Nizar El-KhaliliAlpine Clinic, Lafayette, IN, USAAbstract: The atypical antipsychotic quetiapine fumarate is available both as an immediate release (IR and as an extended release (XR formulation allowing flexibility of dosing for individual patients. Approved uses of quetiapine XR include the treatment of schizophrenia (including maintenance therapy for prevention of relapse, the treatment of bipolar disorder (manic and depressive episodes, and the prevention of recurrence in patients with bipolar disorder who respond to quetiapine XR. This narrative review provides an update on quetiapine XR in these indications. The pharmacological profile of quetiapine, including a moderate affinity for dopamine D2 receptors and higher affinity for serotonin 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HT2A receptors, may explain its broad efficacy and low propensity for extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS. The XR formulation has similar bioavailability but prolonged plasma levels compared with the IR formulation, allowing for less frequent (once-daily dosing. Clinical studies have confirmed the efficacy of quetiapine XR in relieving the acute symptoms of schizophrenia during short-term trials, and reducing the risk for relapse in long-term studies. Direct switching from the IR formulation to the same dose of the XR formulation did not reveal any loss of efficacy or tolerability issues, and switching patients to quetiapine XR from conventional or other atypical antipsychotics (for reasons of insufficient efficacy or tolerability also proved to be beneficial and generally well tolerated. In bipolar disorder, quetiapine XR has also proven effective in relieving acute depressive and manic symptoms. Adverse events with quetiapine XR in patients with either schizophrenia or bipolar disorder are similar to those associated with the IR formulation, the most common being sedation, dry mouth, somnolence, dizziness, and headache. The low propensity for EPS is maintained with the XR formulation