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Sample records for acute bacterial prostatitis

  1. Acute Bacterial Prostatitis: Diagnosis and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Timothy J; Dierfeldt, Daniel M

    2016-01-15

    Acute bacterial prostatitis is an acute infection of the prostate gland that causes pelvic pain and urinary tract symptoms, such as dysuria, urinary frequency, and urinary retention, and may lead to systemic symptoms, such as fevers, chills, nausea, emesis, and malaise. Although the true incidence is unknown, acute bacterial prostatitis is estimated to comprise approximately 10% of all cases of prostatitis. Most acute bacterial prostatitis infections are community acquired, but some occur after transurethral manipulation procedures, such as urethral catheterization and cystoscopy, or after transrectal prostate biopsy. The physical examination should include abdominal, genital, and digital rectal examination to assess for a tender, enlarged, or boggy prostate. Diagnosis is predominantly made based on history and physical examination, but may be aided by urinalysis. Urine cultures should be obtained in all patients who are suspected of having acute bacterial prostatitis to determine the responsible bacteria and its antibiotic sensitivity pattern. Additional laboratory studies can be obtained based on risk factors and severity of illness. Radiography is typically unnecessary. Most patients can be treated as outpatients with oral antibiotics and supportive measures. Hospitalization and broad-spectrum intravenous antibiotics should be considered in patients who are systemically ill, unable to voluntarily urinate, unable to tolerate oral intake, or have risk factors for antibiotic resistance. Typical antibiotic regimens include ceftriaxone and doxycycline, ciprofloxacin, and piperacillin/tazobactam. The risk of nosocomial bacterial prostatitis can be reduced by using antibiotics, such as ciprofloxacin, before transrectal prostate biopsy.

  2. Acute bacterial prostatitis and abscess formation.

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    Lee, Dong Sup; Choe, Hyun-Sop; Kim, Hee Youn; Kim, Sun Wook; Bae, Sang Rak; Yoon, Byung Il; Lee, Seung-Ju

    2016-07-07

    The purpose of this study was to identify risk factors for abscess formation in acute bacterial prostatitis, and to compare treatment outcomes between abscess group and non-abscess group. This is a multicenter, retrospective cohort study. All patients suspected of having an acute prostatic infection underwent computed tomography or transrectal ultrasonography to discriminate acute prostatic abscesses from acute prostatitis without abscess formation. A total of 31 prostate abscesses were reviewed among 142 patients with acute prostatitis. Univariate analysis revealed that symptom duration, diabetes mellitus and voiding disturbance were predisposing factors for abscess formation in acute prostatitis. However, diabetes mellitus was not related to prostate abscess in multivariate analysis. Patients with abscesses 20 mm who underwent transurethral resection had a shorter duration of antibiotic treatment than did those who did not have surgery. Regardless of surgical treatment, both the length of hospital stay and antibiotic treatment were longer in patients with prostatic abscesses than they were in those without abscesses. However, the incidence of septic shock was not different between the two groups. A wide spectrum of microorganisms was responsible for prostate abscesses. In contrast, Escherichia coli was the predominant organism responsible for acute prostatitis without abscess. Imaging studies should be considered when patients with acute prostatitis have delayed treatment and signs of voiding disturbance. Early diagnosis is beneficial because prostatic abscesses require prolonged treatment protocols, or even require surgical drainage. Surgical drainage procedures such as transurethral resection of the prostate were not necessary in all patients with prostate abscesses. However, surgical intervention may have potential merits that reduce the antibiotic exposure period and enhance voiding function in patients with prostatic abscess.

  3. Bacterial prostatitis.

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    Gill, Bradley C; Shoskes, Daniel A

    2016-02-01

    The review provides the infectious disease community with a urologic perspective on bacterial prostatitis. Specifically, the article briefly reviews the categorization of prostatitis by type and provides a distillation of new findings published on bacterial prostatitis over the past year. It also highlights key points from the established literature. Cross-sectional prostate imaging is becoming more common and may lead to more incidental diagnoses of acute bacterial prostatitis. As drug resistance remains problematic in this condition, the reemergence of older antibiotics such as fosfomycin, has proven beneficial. With regard to chronic bacterial prostatitis, no clear clinical risk factors emerged in a large epidemiological study. However, bacterial biofilm formation has been associated with more severe cases. Surgery has a limited role in bacterial prostatitis and should be reserved for draining of a prostatic abscess or the removal of infected prostatic stones. Prostatitis remains a common and bothersome clinical condition. Antibiotic therapy remains the basis of treatment for both acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis. Further research into improving prostatitis treatment is indicated.

  4. Clinical and microbiological characteristics of spontaneous acute prostatitis and transrectal prostate biopsy-related acute prostatitis: Is transrectal prostate biopsy-related acute prostatitis a distinct acute prostatitis category?

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    Kim, Jong Wook; Oh, Mi Mi; Bae, Jae Hyun; Kang, Seok Ho; Park, Hong Seok; Moon, Du Geon

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to compare the clinical and microbiological characteristics between acute bacterial prostatitis and transrectal biopsy-related acute prostatitis. We retrospectively reviewed the records of 135 patients hospitalized for acute prostatitis in three urological centers between 2004 and 2013. Acute bacterial prostatitis was diagnosed according to typical symptoms, findings of physical examination, and laboratory test results. Clinical variables, laboratory test results, and anti-microbial susceptibility results were reviewed. Patients were classified into the spontaneous acute prostatitis group (S-ABP) or biopsy-related acute prostatitis (Bx-ABP) for comparison of their clinical, laboratory, and microbiological findings. The mean age of all patients was 61.7 ± 12.9 years. Compared with S-ABP patients, Bx-ABP patients were significantly older, had larger prostate volumes, higher PSA values, higher peak fever temperatures, and higher incidence of septicemia and antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Overall, of the 135 patients, 57.8% had positive bacterial urine and/or blood cultures. Bx-ABP patients had a higher incidence of bacterial (urine and/or blood) positive cultures compared to S-ABP patients (66.7% versus 55.6%). Escherichia coli was the predominant organism in both groups, but it was more common in Bx-ABP (88.9%) than in S-ABP (66.7%). Extended spectrum beta-lactamase -producing bacteria accounted for 64.7% of culture-positive patients in the Bx-ABP group compared to 13.3% in the S-ABP group. Bx-ABP patients showed a higher incidence of septicemia and antibiotic-resistant bacteria than S-ABP patients. These results have important implications for the management and antimicrobial treatment of Bx-ABP, which may well deserve to be considered a distinct prostatitis category. Copyright © 2015 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Diagnosis and treatment of bacterial prostatitis.

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    Videčnik Zorman, Jerneja; Matičič, Mojca; Jeverica, Samo; Smrkolj, Tomaž

    2015-01-01

    Prostate inflammation is a common syndrome, especially in men under 50. It usually presents with voiding symptoms and pain in the genitourinary area, and sometimes as sexual dysfunction. Based on clinical and laboratory characteristics, prostatitis is classified as acute bacterial prostatitis, chronic bacterial prostatitis, chronic inflammatory and non-inflammatory prostatitis or chronic pelvic pain syndrome, and asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis. Bacterial prostatitis is most often caused by infection with uropathogens, mainly Gram-negative bacilli, but Gram-positive and atypical microorganisms have also been identified as causative organisms of chronic prostatitis. According to reports by several authors, Chlamydia trachomatis and Trichomonas vaginalis are some of the most common pathogens, making chronic prostatitis a sexually transmitted disease. Diagnosis and treatment of acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis in particular can be challenging.

  6. Bacterial Prostatitis: Bacterial Virulence, Clinical Outcomes, and New Directions.

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    Krieger, John N; Thumbikat, Praveen

    2016-02-01

    Four prostatitis syndromes are recognized clinically: acute bacterial prostatitis, chronic bacterial prostatitis, chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, and asymptomatic prostatitis. Because Escherichia coli represents the most common cause of bacterial prostatitis, we investigated the importance of bacterial virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance in E. coli strains causing prostatitis and the potential association of these characteristics with clinical outcomes. A structured literature review revealed that we have limited understanding of the virulence-associated characteristics of E. coli causing acute prostatitis. Therefore, we completed a comprehensive microbiological and molecular investigation of a unique strain collection isolated from healthy young men. We also considered new data from an animal model system suggesting certain E. coli might prove important in the etiology of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. Our human data suggest that E. coli needs multiple pathogenicity-associated traits to overcome anatomic and immune responses in healthy young men without urological risk factors. The phylogenetic background and accumulation of an exceptional repertoire of extraintestinal pathogenic virulence-associated genes indicate that these E. coli strains belong to a highly virulent subset of uropathogenic variants. In contrast, antibiotic resistance confers little added advantage to E. coli strains in these healthy outpatients. Our animal model data also suggest that certain pathogenic E. coli may be important in the etiology of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome through mechanisms that are dependent on the host genetic background and the virulence of the bacterial strain.

  7. Acute bacterial prostatitis after transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy: epidemiological, bacteria and treatment patterns from a 4-year prospective study.

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    Campeggi, Alexandre; Ouzaid, Idir; Xylinas, Evanguelos; Lesprit, Philippe; Hoznek, Andras; Vordos, Dimitri; Abbou, Claude-Clément; Salomon, Laurent; de la Taille, Alexandre

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the incidence, and clinical and bacterial features of iatrogenic prostatitis within 1 month after transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy for detection of prostate cancer. From January 2006 to December 2009, 3000 patients underwent a 21-core transrectal ultrasound-guided prostate biopsy at Henri Mondor Hospital (Créteil, France) and were prospectively followed. All patients had a fluoroquinolone antimicrobial prophylaxis for 7 days. The primary study end-point was to evaluate the incidence of iatrogenic acute prostatitis within 1 month after the biopsy. The secondary end-point was to analyze the clinical and the bacterial features of the prostatitis. Overall, 20 patients of the entire study population (0.67%) had an acute bacterial prostatitis within 2.90 ± 1.77 days (range 1-7 days) after the transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy. The groups of patients with (n = 20) and without (n = 2980) infection were similar in terms of age, prostate-specific antigen level and prostate volume. Escherichia coli was the only isolated bacteria. The subsequent tests for antibiotic susceptibility showed a 95% resistance for fluroquinolone and amoxicillin. Resistance to amoxiclav, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, third generation cephalosporin and amikacin was 70%, 70%, 25% and 5% respectively. No resistance to imipenem was reported. They were all admitted for treatment without the need of intensive care unit referral. Complete recovery was achieved after 21.4 ± 7 days of antibiotic treatment. A fluroquinolone-based regimen still represents an appropriate prophylaxis protocol to minimize the risk of acute prostatitis secondary to prostate biopsy. Patients should be provided the appropriate care soon after the onset of the symptoms. An intravenous third generation cephalosporin or imipenem-based therapy seem to provide satisfying results. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  8. Oral Fosfomycin for the Treatment of Acute and Chronic Bacterial Prostatitis Caused by Multidrug-Resistant Escherichia coli

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    George G. Zhanel

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis in outpatients is commonly treated with oral fluoroquinolones; however, the worldwide dissemination of multidrug-resistant (MDR Escherichia coli has resulted in therapeutic failures with fluoroquinolones. We reviewed the literature regarding the use of oral fosfomycin in the treatment of acute and chronic prostatitis caused by MDR E. coli. All English-language references on PubMed from 1986 to June 2017, inclusive, were reviewed from the search “fosfomycin prostatitis.” Fosfomycin demonstrates potent in vitro activity against a variety of antimicrobial-resistant E. coli genotypes/phenotypes including ciprofloxacin-resistant, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-resistant, extended-spectrum β-lactamase- (ESBL- producing, and MDR isolates. Fosfomycin attains therapeutic concentrations (≥4 μg/g in uninflamed prostatic tissue and maintains a high prostate/plasma ratio up to 17 hours after oral administration. Oral fosfomycin’s clinical cure rates in the treatment of bacterial prostatitis caused by antimicrobial-resistant E. coli ranged from 50 to 77% with microbiological eradication rates of >50%. An oral regimen of fosfomycin tromethamine of 3 g·q 24 h for one week followed by 3 g·q 48 h for a total treatment duration of 6–12 weeks appeared to be effective. Oral fosfomycin may represent an efficacious and safe treatment for acute and chronic prostatitis caused by MDR E. coli.

  9. Does a previous prostate biopsy-related acute bacterial prostatitis affect the results of radical prostatectomy?

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    Türk, Hakan; Ün, Sitki; Arslan, Erkan; Zorlu, Ferruh

    2018-01-01

    To The standard technique for obtaining a histologic diagnosis of prostatic carcinomas is transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. Acute prostatitis which might develop after prostate biopsy can cause periprostatic inflammation and fibrosis. In this study, we performed a retrospective review of our database to determine whether ABP history might affect the outcome of RP. 441 RP patients who were operated in our clinic from 2002 to 2014 were included in our study group. All patients' demographic values, PSA levels, biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimen pathology results and their perioperative/postoperative complications were evaluated. There were 41 patients in patients with acute prostatitis following biopsy and 397 patients that did not develop acute prostatitis. Mean blood loss, transfusion rate and operation period were found to be significantly higher in ABP patients. Hospitalization period and reoperation rates were similar in both groups. However, post-op complications were significantly higher in ABP group. Even though it does not affect oncological outcomes, we would like to warn the surgeons for potential complaints during surgery in ABP patients. Copyright® by the International Brazilian Journal of Urology.

  10. Does a previous prostate biopsy-related acute bacterial prostatitis affect the results of radical prostatectomy?

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    Hakan Türk

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective To The standard technique for obtaining a histologic diagnosis of prostatic carcinomas is transrectal ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. Acute prostatitis which might develop after prostate biopsy can cause periprostatic inflammation and fibrosis. In this study, we performed a retrospective review of our database to determine whether ABP history might affect the outcome of RP. Materials and Methods 441 RP patients who were operated in our clinic from 2002 to 2014 were included in our study group. All patients’ demographic values, PSA levels, biopsy and radical prostatectomy specimen pathology results and their perioperative/ postoperative complications were evaluated. Results There were 41 patients in patients with acute prostatitis following biopsy and 397 patients that did not develop acute prostatitis. Mean blood loss, transfusion rate and operation period were found to be significantly higher in ABP patients. Hospitalization period and reoperation rates were similar in both groups. However, post-op complications were significantly higher in ABP group. Conclusion Even though it does not affect oncological outcomes, we would like to warn the surgeons for potential complaints during surgery in ABP patients.

  11. Prostatitis-bacterial - self-care

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    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000395.htm Prostatitis - bacterial - self-care To use the sharing features ... enable JavaScript. You have been diagnosed with bacterial prostatitis . This is an infection of the prostate gland. ...

  12. Acute bacterial prostatitis: heterogeneity in diagnostic criteria and management. Retrospective multicentric analysis of 371 patients diagnosed with acute prostatitis

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    Doucet Jean

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is currently a lack of consensus for the diagnosis, investigations and treatments of acute bacterial prostatitis (AP. Methods The symptoms, investigations and treatments of 371 inpatients diagnosed with AP were analyzed through a retrospective study conducted in four departments – Urology (U, Infectious Diseases (ID, Internal Medicine (IM, Geriatrics (G – of two French university hospitals. Results The cause of admission, symptoms, investigations and treatments depended markedly on the department of admission but not on the hospital. In U, patients commonly presented with a bladder outlet obstruction, they had a large imaging and functional check-up, and received alpha-blockers and anti-inflammatory drugs. In ID, patients were febrile and received longer and more appropriate antibiotic treatments. In G, patients presented with cognitive disorders and commonly had post-void urine volume measurements. In IM, patients presented with a wide range of symptoms, and had very diverse investigations and antibiotic regimen. Overall, a 3:1 ratio of community-acquired AP (CA-AP to nosocomial AP (N-AP was observed. Urine culture isolated mainly E. coli (58% of AP, 68% of CA-AP, with venereal agents constituting less than 1%. The probabilistic antibiotic treatments were similar for N-AP and CA-AP (58% bi-therapy; 63% fluoroquinolone-based regimen. For N-AP, these treatments were more likely to be inadequate (42% vs. 8%, p vs. 19%, p Clinical failure at follow-up was more common than bacteriological failure (75% versus 24%, p Conclusion This study highlights the difficulties encountered on a daily basis by the physicians regarding the diagnosis and management of acute prostatitis.

  13. SEXUAL DYSFUNCTION ASSOCIATION WITH THE CHRONIC BACTERIAL PROSTATITIS

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    H. S. Ibishev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study involved 230 patients aged 20 to 45 years with a diagnosis of chronic bacterial prostatitis. The study found that in patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis clinical picture, in addition to pain, is a lower urinary tract symptoms, neuro-vegetative and sexual dysfunction. In patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis, recorded various sexual disorders, most of which are normalized after antibiotic therapy. Erectile dysfunction, which are recorded in patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis is psychogenic in nature dysfunction.

  14. [Bacterial prostatitis and prostatic fibrosis: modern view on the treatment and prophylaxis].

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    Zaitsev, A V; Pushkar, D Yu; Khodyreva, L A; Dudareva, A A

    2016-08-01

    Treatments of chronic bacterial prostatitis (CP) remain difficult problem. Bacterial prostatitis is a disease entity diagnosed clinically and by evidence of inflammation and infection localized to the prostate. Risk factors for UTI in men include urological interventions, such as transrectal prostate biopsy. Ensuing infections after prostate biopsy, such as UTI and bacterial prostatitis, are increasing due to increasing rates of fluoroquinolone resistance. The increasing global antibiotic resistance also significantly affects management of UTI in men, and therefore calls for alternative strategies. Prostatic inflammation has been suggested to contribute to the etiology of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) by inducing fibrosis. Several studies have shown that prostatic fibrosis is strongly associated with impaired urethral function and LUTS severity. Fibrosis resulting from excessive deposition of collagen is traditionally recognized as a progressive irreversible condition and an end stage of inflammatory diseases; however, there is compelling evidence in both animal and human studies to support that the development of fibrosis could potentially be a reversible process. Prostate inflammation may induce fibrotic changes in periurethral prostatic tissues, promote urethral stiffness and LUTS. Patients experiencing CP and prostate-related LUTS could benefit from anti-inflammatory therapies, especially used in combination with the currently prescribed enzyme treatment with Longidase. Treatment results showed that longidase is highly effective in bacterial and abacterial CP. Longidase addition to standard therapeutic methods significantly reduced the disease symptoms and regression of inflammatory-proliferative alterations in the prostate.

  15. Careful assessment key in managing prostatitis.

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    Gujadhur, Rahul; Aning, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    Prostatitis is a common condition estimated to affect up to 30% of men in their lifetime, it is most prevalent in men aged between 35 and 50. Prostatitis is subclassified into: acute bacterial prostatitis, chronic bacterial prostatitis, chronic pelvic pain and asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis. Acute bacterial prostatitis presents with acute onset pelvic pain which may or may not be related to voiding, lower urinary tract symptoms, sometimes haematuria or haematospermia and systemic symptoms such as fever and rigors. A documented history of recurrent urinary tract infections is the key feature of chronic bacterial prostatitis. Duration of symptoms > 3 months defines chronicity. The key symptom of chronic pelvic pain syndrome is pain. Patients may describe pain during or after ejaculation as their predominant symptom. Clinical assessment includes a thorough history and examination. A digital rectal examination should be performed after a midstream urine (MSU) sample has been collected for urine dipstick, microscopy and culture. The prostate should be checked for nodules. In acute bacterial prostatitis the MSU is the only laboratory investigation required. Chronic pelvic pain syndrome may be multifactorial and part of a more generalised pain disorder. Pelvic floor muscle abnormalities, altered neuroendocrine pathways, chemically induced inflammation, bacterial infection, autoimmune processes, dysfunctional voiding as well intraprostatic ductal reflux mechanisms have all been identified in men with chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

  16. Use of a solid-phase radioimmunoassay and formalin-fixed whole bacterial antigen in the detection of antigen-specific immunoglobulin in prostatic fluid.

    OpenAIRE

    Shortliffe, L M; Wehner, N; Stamey, T A

    1981-01-01

    The prostatic fluid of two patients with Escherichia coli bacterial prostatitis was analyzed for evidence of a local immune response to bacterial infection. A solid-phase radioimmunoassay was modified to measure the immunoglobulin (Ig)A and IgG antigen-specific antibody responses to infecting bacteria in serum and prostatic fluid from patient. Formalin-fixed whole E. coli were used as antigen. In one patient with acute E. coli prostatic infection, measurements of antigen-specific antibody con...

  17. Chronic bacterial prostatitis in men with spinal cord injury.

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    Krebs, Jörg; Bartel, Peter; Pannek, Jürgen

    2014-12-01

    Recurrent urinary tract infections (UTI) are a major problem affecting spinal cord injury (SCI) patients and may stem from chronic bacterial prostatitis. We have therefore investigated the presence of chronic bacterial prostatitis and its role in the development of recurrent symptomatic UTI in SCI men. This study is a prospective cross-sectional investigation of bacterial prostatitis in SCI men in a single SCI rehabilitation center. In 50 men with chronic SCI presenting for a routine urologic examination, urine samples before and after prostate massage were taken for microbiologic investigation and white blood cell counting. Furthermore, patient characteristics, bladder diary details, and the annual rate of symptomatic UTI were collected retrospectively. No participant reported current symptoms of UTI or prostatitis. In most men (39/50, 78 %), the microbiologic analysis of the post-massage urine sample revealed growth of pathogenic bacteria. The majority of these men (32/39, 82 %) also presented with mostly (27/39, 69 %) the same pathogenic bacteria in the pre-massage sample. There was no significant (p = 0.48) difference in the number of symptomatic UTI in men with a positive post-massage culture compared with those with a negative culture. No significant (p = 0.67) difference in the frequency distribution of positive versus negative post-massage cultures was detected between men with recurrent and sporadic UTI. Most SCI men are affected by asymptomatic bacterial prostatitis; however, bacterial prostatitis does not play a major role in the development of recurrent UTI. The indication for antibiotic treatment of chronic bacterial prostatitis in asymptomatic SCI men with recurrent UTI is questionable.

  18. Chronic bacterial prostatitis and chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

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    Bowen, Diana K; Dielubanza, Elodi; Schaeffer, Anthony J

    2015-08-27

    Chronic prostatitis can cause pain and urinary symptoms, and can occur either with an active infection (chronic bacterial prostatitis [CBP]) or with only pain and no evidence of bacterial causation (chronic pelvic pain syndrome [CPPS]). Bacterial prostatitis is characterised by recurrent urinary tract infections or infection in the prostate with the same bacterial strain, which often results from urinary tract instrumentation. However, the cause and natural history of CPPS are unknown and not associated with active infection. We conducted a systematic overview and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments for chronic bacterial prostatitis? What are the effects of treatments for chronic pelvic pain syndrome? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to February 2014 (Clinical Evidence overviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this overview). At this update, searching of electronic databases retrieved 131 studies. After deduplication and removal of conference abstracts, 67 records were screened for inclusion in the overview. Appraisal of titles and abstracts led to the exclusion of 51 studies and the further review of 16 full publications. Of the 16 full articles evaluated, three systematic reviews and one RCT were included at this update. We performed a GRADE evaluation for 14 PICO combinations. In this systematic overview, we categorised the efficacy for 12 interventions based on information relating to the effectiveness and safety of 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors, allopurinol, alpha-blockers, local injections of antimicrobial drugs, mepartricin, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), oral antimicrobial drugs, pentosan polysulfate, quercetin, sitz baths, transurethral microwave thermotherapy (TUMT), and transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP).

  19. A host defense mechanism involving CFTR-mediated bicarbonate secretion in bacterial prostatitis.

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    Chen Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostatitis is associated with a characteristic increase in prostatic fluid pH; however, the underlying mechanism and its physiological significance have not been elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study a primary culture of rat prostatic epithelial cells and a rat prostatitis model were used. Here we reported the involvement of CFTR, a cAMP-activated anion channel conducting both Cl(- and HCO(3(-, in mediating prostate HCO(3(- secretion and its possible role in bacterial killing. Upon Escherichia coli (E. coli-LPS challenge, the expression of CFTR and carbonic anhydrase II (CA II, along with several pro-inflammatory cytokines was up-regulated in the primary culture of rat prostate epithelial cells. Inhibiting CFTR function in vitro or in vivo resulted in reduced bacterial killing by prostate epithelial cells or the prostate. High HCO(3(- content (>50 mM, rather than alkaline pH, was found to be responsible for bacterial killing. The direct action of HCO(3(- on bacterial killing was confirmed by its ability to increase cAMP production and suppress bacterial initiation factors in E. coli. The relevance of the CFTR-mediated HCO(3(- secretion in humans was demonstrated by the upregulated expression of CFTR and CAII in human prostatitis tissues. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The CFTR and its mediated HCO(3(- secretion may be up-regulated in prostatitis as a host defense mechanism.

  20. Tomotherapy for prostate adenocarcinoma: A report on acute toxicity

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    Keiler, Louis; Dobbins, Donald; Kulasekere, Ravi; Einstein, Douglas

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: To analyze the impact of Tomotherapy (TOMO) intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) on acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity in prostate cancer. Materials and methods: The records of 55 consecutively treated TOMO patients were reviewed. Additionally a well-matched group of 43 patients treated with LINAC-based step and shoot IMRT (LINAC) was identified. Acute toxicity was scored according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute toxicity criterion. Results: The grade 2-3 acute GU toxicity rates for the TOMO vs. LINAC groups were 51% vs. 28% (p = 0.001). Acute grade 2 GI toxicity was 25% vs. 40% (p = 0.024), with no grade 3 GI toxicity in either group. In univariate analysis, androgen deprivation, prostate volume, pre-treatment urinary toxicity, and prostate dose homogeneity correlated with acute GI and GU toxicity. With multivariate analysis use of Tomotherapy, median bladder dose and bladder dose homogeneity remained significantly correlated with GU toxicity. Conclusions: Acute GI toxicity for prostate cancer is improved with Tomotherapy at a cost of increased acute GU toxicity possibly due to differences in bladder and prostate dose distribution

  1. Prostatic MR imaging. Accuracy in differentiating cancer from other prostatic disorders

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    Ikonen, S.; Kivisaari, L.; Tervahartiala, P. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept of Radiology; Vehmas, T. [Finnish Inst. of Occupational Health, Helsinki (Finland); Taari, K.; Rannikko, S. [Helsinki Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept of Urology

    2001-03-01

    Purpose: We assessed the accuracy of MR imaging in differentiating between cancer and other prostatic disorders, and evaluated the diagnostic criteria for various prostatic diseases. Material and Methods: A total of 74 endorectal coil MR studies were performed on 72 patients. Twenty patients had prostatic cancer, 20 benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), 4 acute bacterial prostatitis, 5 chronic bacterial prostatitis (2 also belonging to the previous category), 19 chronic non-bacterial prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, and 6 were symptomless voluntary controls. All studies were interpreted by two experienced radiologists in random order. Radiologists were blinded to all clinical data including the age of the patients. Based on MR findings, both radiologists filled in a form covering diagnostic criteria and diagnosis. Results: Accuracy in diagnosing prostate cancer was 74%. Sensitivity was 50% and specificity 83%, and positive and negative predictive values were 53 and 82%, respectively. Bacterial prostatitis showed some features similar to carcinoma. Abundant BPH rendered cancer detection more difficult. No diagnostic criterion was clearly better than the others. Interobserver agreement on the MR diagnosis ranged from moderate to good. Conclusion: Without knowledge of accurate clinical data, MR seems to be too insensitive in detecting prostate cancer to be used as a primary diagnostic tool.

  2. Treatment of recurrent chronic bacterial prostatitis by local injection of thiamphenicol into prostate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plomp, T.A.; Baert, L.; Maes, R.A.

    Twenty-nine patients were treated for recurrent chronic bacterial prostatitis by an injection of 2 Gm. thiamphenicol glycinate via the perineal route directly into the prostate. Escherichia coli was identified as the pathogen responsible for this infection in 83 per cent of the cases. Using this

  3. [Combination therapy of chronic bacterial prostatitis].

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    Khryanin, A A; Reshetnikov, O V

    2016-08-01

    The article discusses the possible etiological factors in the development of chronic bacterial prostatitis. The authors presented a comparative long-term analysis of morbidity from non-viral sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in Russia. Against the background of general decline in STIs incidence, a significant percentage of them is made up by urogenital trichomoniasis. The findings substantiated the advantages of combination therapy (ornidazole and ofloxacin) for bacterial urinary tract infections.

  4. Antibiotic Resistance and Virulence Phenotypes of Recent Bacterial Strains Isolated from Urinary Tract Infections in Elderly Patients with Prostatic Disease

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    Cristina Delcaru

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute bacterial prostatitis is one of the frequent complications of urinary tract infection (UTI. From the approximately 10% of men having prostatitis, 7% experience a bacterial prostatitis. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of uropathogens associated with UTIs in older patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and to assess their susceptibility to commonly prescribed antibiotics as well as the relationships between microbial virulence and resistance features. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli was found to be the most frequent bacterial strain isolated from patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia, followed by Enterococcus spp., Enterobacter spp., Klebsiella spp., Proteus spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Serratia marcescens. Increased resistance rates to tetracyclines, quinolones, and sulfonamides were registered. Besides their resistance profiles, the uropathogenic isolates produced various virulence factors with possible implications in the pathogenesis process. The great majority of the uropathogenic isolates revealed a high capacity to adhere to HEp-2 cell monolayer in vitro, mostly exhibiting a localized adherence pattern. Differences in the repertoire of soluble virulence factors that can affect bacterial growth and persistence within the urinary tract were detected. The Gram-negative strains produced pore-forming toxins—such as hemolysins, lecithinases, and lipases—proteases, siderophore-like molecules resulted from the esculin hydrolysis and amylases, while Enterococcus sp. strains were positive only for caseinase and esculin hydrolase. Our study demonstrates that necessity of investigating the etiology and local resistance patterns of uropathogenic organisms, which is crucial for determining appropriate empirical antibiotic treatment in elderly patients with UTI, while establishing correlations between resistance and virulence profiles could provide valuable input about the clinical evolution and

  5. The Impact of Pretreatment Prostate Volume on Severe Acute Genitourinary Toxicity in Prostate Cancer Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aizer, Ayal A.; Anderson, Nicole S.; Oh, Steven C.; Yu, James B.; McKeon, Anne M.; Decker, Roy H.; Peschel, Richard E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of pretreatment prostate volume on the development of severe acute genitourinary toxicity in patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between 2004 and 2007, a consecutive sample of 214 patients who underwent IMRT (75.6 Gy) for prostate cancer at two referral centers was analyzed. Prostate volumes were obtained from computed tomography scans taken during treatment simulation. Genitourinary toxicity was defined using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events Version 3.0 guidelines. Acute toxicity was defined as any toxicity originating within 90 days of the completion of radiation therapy. Patients were characterized as having a small or large prostate depending on whether their prostate volume was less than or greater than 50 cm 3 , respectively. Genitourinary toxicity was compared in these groups using the chi-square or Fisher's exact test, as appropriate. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to further assess the impact of prostate volume on severe (Grade 3) acute genitourinary toxicity. Results: Patients with large prostates (>50 cm 3 ) had a higher rate of acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity (p = .02). Prostate volume was predictive of the likelihood of developing acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity on bivariate (p = .004) and multivariate (p = .006) logistic regression. Every 27.0 cm 3 increase in prostate volume doubled the likelihood of acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity. Conclusions: Patients with larger prostates are at higher risk for the development of severe acute genitourinary toxicity when treated with IMRT for prostate cancer.

  6. Dosimetric Coverage of the Prostate, Normal Tissue Sparing, and Acute Toxicity with High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Large Prostate Volumes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Yang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurposeTo evaluate dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with HDR brachytherapy for large prostate volumes.Materials and MethodsOne hundred and two prostate cancer patients with prostate volumes >50 mL (range: 5-29 mL were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT to 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions between 2009 and 2013. HDR brachytherapy monotherapy doses consisted of two 1,350-1,400 cGy fractions separated by 2-3 weeks, and HDR brachytherapy boost doses consisted of two 950-1,150 cGy fractions separated by 4 weeks. Twelve of 32 (38% unfavorable intermediate risk, high risk, and very high risk patients received androgen deprivation therapy. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE version 4.ResultsMedian follow-up was 14 months. Dosimetric goals were achieved in over 90% of cases. Three of 102 (3% patients developed Grade 2 acute proctitis. No variables were significantly associated with Grade 2 acute proctitis. Seventeen of 102 (17% patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary retention. American Urological Association (AUA symptom score was the only variable significantly associated with Grade 2 acute urinary retention (p=0.04. There was no ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity.ConclusionsDosimetric coverage of the prostate and normal tissue sparing were adequate in patients with prostate volumes >50 mL. Higher pre-treatment AUA symptom scores increased the relative risk of Grade 2 acute urinary retention. However, the overall incidence of acute toxicity was acceptable in patients with large prostate volumes.

  7. Dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with high-dose-rate brachytherapy for large prostate volumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, George; Strom, Tobin J.; Shrinath, Kushagra; Mellon, Eric A.; Fernandez, Daniel C.; Biagioli, Matthew C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL (United States); Wilder, Richard B., E-mail: mcbiagioli@yahoo.com [Cancer Treatment Centers of America, Newnan, GA (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: to evaluate dosimetric coverage of the prostate, normal tissue sparing, and acute toxicity with HDR brachytherapy for large prostate volumes. Materials and methods: one hundred and two prostate cancer patients with prostate volumes >50 mL (range: 5-29 mL) were treated with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy ± intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to 4,500 cGy in 25 daily fractions between 2009 and 2013. HDR brachytherapy monotherapy doses consisted of two 1,350-1,400 cGy fractions separated by 2-3 weeks, and HDR brachytherapy boost doses consisted of two 950-1,150 cGy fractions separated by 4 weeks. Twelve of 32 (38%) unfavorable intermediate risk, high risk, and very high risk patients received androgen deprivation therapy. Acute toxicity was graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) version 4. Results: median follow-up was 14 months. Dosimetric goals were achieved in over 90% of cases. Three of 102 (3%) patients developed Grade 2 acute proctitis. No variables were significantly associated with Grade 2 acute proctitis. Seventeen of 102 (17%) patients developed Grade 2 acute urinary retention. American Urological Association (AUA) symptom score was the only variable significantly associated with Grade 2 acute urinary retention (p-0.04). There was no ≥ Grade 3 acute toxicity. Conclusions: dosimetric coverage of the prostate and normal tissue sparing were adequate in patients with prostate volumes >50 mL. Higher pre-treatment AUA symptom scores increased the relative risk of Grade 2 acute urinary retention. However, the overall incidence of acute toxicity was acceptable in patients with large prostate volumes. (author)

  8. [Prostatic localization revealing an acute myeloid leukemia. Apropos of a case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaoui, S; Lecomte, M J; Peraldi, R; Pernin, F

    1998-09-01

    The authors report an original case of acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) presenting in the form of acute urinary retention, confirmed by prostatic biopsy, with complete absence of any non-urological clinical features. Prostatic sites of leukaemia are frequent and classically reported, but often occur during the course of known leukaemia, and are rarely symptomatic, justifying biopsies in the presence of any prostatic symptoms. Immunolabelling represents the key to the diagnosis in the presence of undifferentiated cells demonstrated on prostatic biopsies. The outcome was fatal in this case, despite early chemotherapy. The clinical features, clinical course and therapeutic aspects of prostatic leukaemia are discussed.

  9. Comprehensive overview of prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Farhan Ullah; Ihsan, Awais Ullah; Khan, Hidayat Ullah; Jana, Ruby; Wazir, Junaid; Khongorzul, Puregmaa; Waqar, Muhammad; Zhou, Xiaohui

    2017-10-01

    Prostatitis is a common urinary tract syndrome that many doctors find problematic to treat effectively. It is the third most commonly found urinary tract disease in men after prostate cancer and Benign Prostate Hyperplasia (BPH). Prostatitis may account for 25% of all office visits made to the urological clinics complaining about the genital and urinary systems all over the world. In the present study, we classified prostatitis and comprehensively elaborated the etiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of acute bacterial prostatitis (category I), chronic bacterial prostatitis (category II), chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS) (category III), and asymptomatic prostatitis (category IV). In addition, we also tried to get some insights about other types of prostatitis-like fungal, viral and gonococcal prostatitis. The aim of this review is to present the detail current perspective of prostatitis in a single review. To the best of our knowledge currently, there is not a single comprehensive review, which can completely elaborate this important topic in an effective way. Furthermore, this review will provide a solid platform to conduct future studies on different aspects such as risk factors, mechanism of pathogenesis, proper diagnosis, and rational treatment plans for fungal, viral, and gonococcal prostatitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic studies and prostatic tissue distribution of fosfomycin tromethamine in bacterial prostatitis or normal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, L; Shang, X; Zhu, J; Ma, B; Zhang, Q

    2018-05-02

    In this study, we assessed the therapeutic effects of fosfomycin tromethamine (FT) in a bacterial prostatitis (BP) rat model. The BP model was induced by Escherichia coli and was demonstrated after 7 days microbiologically and histologically. Then, 25 BP rats selected were randomly divided into five treatment groups: model group, positive group, FT-3 day group, FT-7 day group and FT-14 day group. Ventral lobes of prostate from all animals were removed, and the serum samples were collected at the end of the experiments. Microbiological cultures and histological findings of the prostate samples demonstrated reduced bacterial growth and improved inflammatory responses in FT-treatment groups compared with the model group, indicating that FT against prostatic infection induced by E. coli showed good antibacterial effects. Moreover, plasma pharmacokinetics and prostatic distribution of fosfomycin were studied and compared in BP and normal rats. The concentrations of fosfomycin in samples were analysed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. There were no differences in plasma pharmacokinetic parameters between two groups. But significantly higher penetration of fosfomycin into prostatic tissues was found in BP rats. We therefore suggested that FT had a good therapeutic effect on BP and it might be used in curing masculine reproductive system diseases. © 2018 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  11. High frequency of chronic bacterial and non-inflammatory prostatitis in infertile patients with prostatitis syndrome plus irritable bowel syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo Vicari

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Although prostatitis syndrome (PS and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS are common disorders, information on the prevalence of IBS in infertile patients with PS is relatively scanty. Therefore, this study was undertaken to estimate the frequency of PS and IBS and to evaluate the prevalence of the various diagnostic categories of prostatitis.This study enrolled 152 patients with PS, diagnosed by the NIH-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI in an andrological setting, and 204 patients with IBS, diagnosed according to the Rome III diagnostic criteria in a gastroenterological setting. The patients with PS were asked to fulfill the Rome III questionnaire for IBS, whereas patients with IBS were asked to complete the NIH-CPSI. The simultaneous presence of PS and IBS was observed in 30.2% and 31.8% of the patients screened by andrologists and gastroenterologists, respectively. Altogether, 111 patients had PS plus IBS (31.2%. They had a total NIH-CPSI and pain subscale scores significantly higher than patients with PS alone. Gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with PS plus IBS were similar to those reported by patients with IBS alone and significantly greater in patients with PS alone. Patients with PS plus IBS had a significantly higher frequency of chronic bacterial prostatitis (category II and lower of non-inflammatory prostatitis (category IIIB, compared to patients with PS alone. The frequency of inflammatory prostatitis (category IIIA resulted similar.Prostatitis syndromes and IBS are frequently associated in patients with PS- or IBS-related symptoms. These patients have an increased prevalence of chronic bacterial and non-inflammatory prostatitis.

  12. Cholinesterase modulations in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Ofek, Keren; Qvist, Tavs

    2011-01-01

    The circulating cholinesterases acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase may be suppressed and subsequently released from the brain in acute bacterial meningitis.......The circulating cholinesterases acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase may be suppressed and subsequently released from the brain in acute bacterial meningitis....

  13. High Frequency of Chronic Bacterial and Non-Inflammatory Prostatitis in Infertile Patients with Prostatitis Syndrome Plus Irritable Bowel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicari, Enzo; La Vignera, Sandro; Arcoria, Domenico; Condorelli, Rosita; Vicari, Lucia O.; Castiglione, Roberto; Mangiameli, Andrea; Calogero, Aldo E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although prostatitis syndrome (PS) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are common disorders, information on the prevalence of IBS in infertile patients with PS is relatively scanty. Therefore, this study was undertaken to estimate the frequency of PS and IBS and to evaluate the prevalence of the various diagnostic categories of prostatitis. Methodology/Principal Findings This study enrolled 152 patients with PS, diagnosed by the NIH-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) in an andrological setting, and 204 patients with IBS, diagnosed according to the Rome III diagnostic criteria in a gastroenterological setting. The patients with PS were asked to fulfill the Rome III questionnaire for IBS, whereas patients with IBS were asked to complete the NIH-CPSI. The simultaneous presence of PS and IBS was observed in 30.2% and 31.8% of the patients screened by andrologists and gastroenterologists, respectively. Altogether, 111 patients had PS plus IBS (31.2%). They had a total NIH-CPSI and pain subscale scores significantly higher than patients with PS alone. Gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with PS plus IBS were similar to those reported by patients with IBS alone and significantly greater in patients with PS alone. Patients with PS plus IBS had a significantly higher frequency of chronic bacterial prostatitis (category II) and lower of non-inflammatory prostatitis (category IIIB), compared to patients with PS alone. The frequency of inflammatory prostatitis (category IIIA) resulted similar. Conclusions/Significance Prostatitis syndromes and IBS are frequently associated in patients with PS- or IBS-related symptoms. These patients have an increased prevalence of chronic bacterial and non-inflammatory prostatitis. PMID:21494624

  14. Acute bacterial rhinosinusitis in adults: part I. Evaluation | Scheid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute rhinosinusitis is one of the most common conditions that physicians treat in ambulatory practice. Although often caused by viruses, it sometimes is caused by bacteria, a condition that is called acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. The signs and symptoms of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis and prolonged viral upper respiratory ...

  15. Anterior Prostatic Cyst Causing Acute Urinary Retansion in a Young Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Celik

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Prostatic cysts are rare entities. Mostly, they originate from the posterior area of the prostate and asymptomatic. Anterior location of the prostatic cyst is rarer than posterior. The prostatic cyst in a 41 year-old man presenting with acute urinary retansion. Transurethral resection (TUR of the cyst was performed, which revealed a benign cyst lined with columnar epithelium and proliferative urothelial lining on histopathological evaluation. Prostatic cysts particularly in young men with obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms are rarely seen. Management of the prostatic cyst with TUR seems to be a minimally invasive approach with successful outcomes.

  16. Viral-bacterial associations in acute apical abscesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Dennis C; Rôças, Isabela N; Paiva, Simone S M; Carmo, Flávia L; Cavalcante, Fernanda S; Rosado, Alexandre S; Santos, Kátia R N; Siqueira, José F

    2011-08-01

    Viral-bacterial and bacterial synergism have been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of several human diseases. This study sought to investigate the possible associations between 9 candidate endodontic bacterial pathogens and 9 human viruses in samples from acute apical abscesses. DNA extracts from purulent exudate aspirates of 33 cases of acute apical abscess were surveyed for the presence of 9 selected bacterial species using a 16S ribosomal RNA gene-based nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) approach. Single or nested PCR assays were used for detection of the human papillomavirus (HPV) and herpesviruses types 1 to 8. Two-thirds of the abscess samples were positive for at least one of the target viruses. Specifically, the most frequently detected viruses were HHV-8 (54.5%); HPV (9%); and varicella zoster virus (VZV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and HHV-6 (6%). Bacterial DNA was present in all cases and the most prevalent bacterial species were Treponema denticola (70%), Tannerella forsythia (67%), Porphyromonas endodontalis (67%), Dialister invisus (61%), and Dialister pneumosintes (57.5%). HHV-8 was positively associated with 7 of the target bacterial species and HPV with 4, but all these associations were weak. Several bacterial pairs showed a moderate positive association. Viral coinfection was found in 6 abscess cases, but no significant viral association could be determined. Findings demonstrated that bacterial and viral DNA occurred concomitantly in two-thirds of the samples from endodontic abscesses. Although this may suggest a role for viruses in the etiology of apical abscesses, the possibility also exists that the presence of viruses in abscess samples is merely a consequence of the bacterially induced disease process. Further studies are necessary to clarify the role of these viral-bacterial interactions, if any, in the pathogenesis of acute apical abscesses. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Risk Factor Analysis of Ciprofloxacin-Resistant and Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamases Pathogen-Induced Acute Bacterial Prostatitis in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young; Lee, Dong Gi; Lee, Sang Hyub; Yoo, Koo Han

    2016-11-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate risk factors and the incidence of ciprofloxacin resistance and extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) in patients with acute bacterial prostatitis (ABP). We reviewed the medical records of 307 patients who were diagnosed with ABP between January 2006 and December 2015. The etiologic pathogens and risk factors for ciprofloxacin-resistant E. coli and ESBL-producing microbes, susceptibility to ciprofloxacin, and the incidence of ESBL in patients with ABP were described. History of prior urologic manipulation was an independent risk factor for ciprofloxacin-resistant (P = 0.005) and ESBL-producing microbes (P = 0.005). Advanced age (over 60 years) was an independent risk factor for ciprofloxacin-resistant microbes (P = 0.022). The ciprofloxacin susceptibility for Escherichia coli in groups without prior manipulation was documented 85.7%. For groups with prior manipulation, the susceptibility was 10.0%. Incidence of ESBL-producing microbes by pathogen was 3.8% for E. coli and 1.0% for Klebsiella pneumonia in the absence of manipulation group, and 20% and 33.3% in the presence of manipulation group, respectively. Initial treatment of ABP must consider patient's age and the possibility of prior manipulation to optimize patient treatment. With the high rate of resistance to fluoroquinolone, cephalosporins with amikacin, or carbapenems, or extended-spectrum penicillin with beta lactamase inhibitor should be considered as the preferred empirical ABP treatment in the patients with history of prior urologic manipulation.

  18. Epidemiology of prostatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, John N.; Lee, Shaun Wen Huey; Jeon, Jeonseong; Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Liong, Men Long; Riley, Donald E.

    2008-01-01

    Background Prostatitis describes a combination of infectious diseases (acute and chronic bacterial prostatitis), chronic pelvic pain syndrome, and asymptomatic inflammation. Materials and methods We employed evidence-based methods to review the epidemiology of prostatitis syndromes. Results The prevalence of prostatitis symptoms could be compared in five studies surveying 10 617 men. Overall, 873 participants met various criteria for prostatitis, representing an overall rate of 8.2%, with prevalence ranging from 2.2 to 9.7%. A history of sexually transmitted diseases was associated with an increased risk for prostatitis symptoms. Men reporting a history of prostatitis symptoms had a substantially increased rate of benign prostatic hyperplasia, lower urinary tract symptoms and prostate cancer. In one study, the incidence of physician-diagnosed prostatitis was 4.9 cases per 1000 person-years. Two studies suggest that about one-third of men reporting prostatitis symptoms had resolution after 1 year. Patients with previous episodes and more severe symptoms are at higher risk for chronic pelvic pain. Discussion The prevalence of prostatitis symptoms is high, comparable to rates of ischamic heart disease and diabetes. Clinical evaluation appears necessary to verify that prostatitis is responsible for patients’ symptoms. Prostatitis symptoms may increase a man’s risk for benign prostate hypertrophy, lower urinary tract symptoms and prostate cancer. We need to define natural history and consequences of prostatitis, develop better algorithms for diagnosis and treatment, and develop strategies for prevention. PMID:18164907

  19. Characterisation of the bacterial community in expressed prostatic secretions from patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome and infertile men: a preliminary investigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Sheng Hou; Wen-Min Long; Jian Shen; Li-Ping Zhao; Xiao-Yan Pang; Chen XU

    2012-01-01

    The expressed prostatic secretions (EPSs) of men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS),infertile men and normal men were subjected to microbiological study.EPSs were collected from the subjects,which included 26 normal men,11 infertile patients and 51 CP/CPPS patients.DNA was extracted from each specimen,and the V3 regions of the 16S rRNA genes were amplified using universal bacterial primers.The results showed that the EPS 16S rRNA gene-positive rate in the CP/CPPS and infertile patients was much higher than in the normal men,but without any difference among the three patient groups.The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method was used to characterize the EPS bacterial community structure of the prostate fluid from patients with CP/CPPS or infertility issues.Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) analyses of PCR-DGGE profiles revealed that the EPS bacterial community structure differed among the three groups.Three bands were identified as the key factors responsible for the discrepancy between CP/CPPS patients and infertile patients (P<0.05).Two bands were identified as priority factors in the discrepancy of category ⅢA and category ⅢB prostatitis patients (P<0.05).According to this research,the ecological balance of the prostate and low urethra tract,when considered as a microenvironment,might play an important role in the maintenance of a healthy male reproductive tract.

  20. Chronic bacterial seminal vesiculitis as a potential disease entity in men with chronic prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Soo-Hwan; Ryu, Ji-Kan; Choo, Gwoan-Youb; Chung, Yeun-Goo; Seong, Do-Hwan; Kim, Chang-Ho; Choe, Won-Sik; Ryu, Dong-Soo; Hyun, In Young; Suh, Jun-Kyu

    2015-05-01

    To investigate bacterial infection in the seminal vesicles by bacteriological examination and radionuclide imaging in men with chronic prostatitis. The study included 50 patients with chronic prostatitis who showed hot uptake in seminal vesicles on Tc-99m ciprofloxacin imaging and eight patients who did not show hot uptake. The evaluation included the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index and four-glass test. In all participants, transperineal aspiration of seminal vesicle fluid under the guidance of transrectal ultrasonography and bacteriological examination was carried out. Of the 50 patients who showed hot uptake in the seminal vesicles on the isotope study, microorganisms were isolated from the seminal vesicle fluid in 17 patients (positive predictive value, 34%). The most common causative organisms were Escherichia coli in 13 patients (26%), followed by coagulase-negative Staphylococcus species in two patients (4%), Enterococcus faecalis in one patient (2%) and Chlamydia trachomatis in one patient (2%). No microorganisms were isolated in the eight patients who did not show hot uptake in the seminal vesicles (negative predictive value, 100%). However, there were no significant differences in National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index total scores and subscores between the study groups. Chronic bacterial seminal vesiculitis might simultaneously affect a considerable portion of patients with chronic prostatitis, although the clinical implication of the disease remains to be further investigated. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  1. Acute toxicity profile in prostate cancer with conventional and hypofractionated treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viani, Gustavo Arruda; Zulliani, Giseli Correa; Stefano, Eduardo Jose; Silva, Lucas Bernardes Godoy da; Silva, Bruna Bueno da; Crempe, Yuri Bonicelli; Martins, Vinicius Spazzapan; Ferrari, Ricardo Jose Rambaiolo; Pólo, Mariana Colbachini; Rossi, Bruno Thiago; Suguikawa, Elton

    2013-01-01

    To compare the acute toxicities in radical treatment of prostate cancer between conventional schedule (C-ARM) with 78 Gy/39 fractions and hypofractionation conformal treatment (H-ARM) with 69 Gy/23 fractions. This prospective double arm study consisted of 217 patients with prostate cancer, 112 in H-ARM and 105 in C-ARM arm. C-ARM received conventional six- field conformal radiotherapy with 78 Gy in 39 fractions while H-ARM received hypofractionation with 69 Gy in 23 fractions. Weekly assessment of acute reactions was done during treatment and with one, and 3 months using RTOG scale. Univariated analysis was performed to evaluate differences between the incidences of acute reaction in the treatment arms. Variables with p value less than 0.1 were included in the multivariated logistic regression. There was no difference between H-ARM versus C-ARM for severity and incidence in genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) acute toxicity. During the treatment comparing H-ARM with C-ARM no differences was observed for GI toxicity (grade 0–3; H-ARM = 45.5%, 34%, 18.7% and 1.8% versus C-ARM = 47.6%, 35.2%, 17.2% and 0). For acute GU toxicity no difference was detected between H-ARM (grade 0–3; 22.3%, 54.5%, 18.7% and 4.5%) and C-ARM (grade 0–3; 25.8%, 53.3%, 17.1% and 3.8%). At the 3- months follow-up, persistent Grade > =2 acute GU and GI toxicity were 2.5% and 1.8% in H-ARM versus 5.7% and 3% in C-ARM (p > 0.05). In univariated and multivariated analyses, there was not any dosimetric predictor for GI and GU toxicity. Our data demonstrate that hypofractionated radiotherapy achieving high biological effective dose using conformal radiotherapy is feasible for prostate cancer, being well tolerated with minimal severe acute toxicity

  2. Chronic bacterial prostatitis and irritable bowel syndrome: effectiveness of treatment with rifaximin followed by the probiotic VSL#3

    OpenAIRE

    Enzo Vicari; Sandro La Vignera; Roberto Castiglione; Rosita A Condorelli; Lucia O Vicari; Aldo E Calogero

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of treatment with rifaximin followed by the probiotic VSL#3 versus no treatment on the progression of chronic prostatitis toward chronic microbial prostate-vesiculitis (PV) or prostate-vesiculo-epididymitis (PVE). A total of 106 selected infertile male patients with bacteriologically cured chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were randomly prescribed rifaximin (200 mg, 2 tablets bid, for 7 days monthly for 1...

  3. Common Questions About Chronic Prostatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, James D; Garrett, W Allan; McCurry, Tyler K; Teichman, Joel M H

    2016-02-15

    Chronic prostatitis is relatively common, with a lifetime prevalence of 1.8% to 8.2%. Risk factors include conditions that facilitate introduction of bacteria into the urethra and prostate (which also predispose the patient to urinary tract infections) and conditions that can lead to chronic neuropathic pain. Chronic prostatitis must be differentiated from other causes of chronic pelvic pain, such as interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and pelvic floor dysfunction; prostate and bladder cancers; benign prostatic hyperplasia; urolithiasis; and other causes of dysuria, urinary frequency, and nocturia. The National Institutes of Health divides prostatitis into four syndromes: acute bacterial prostatitis, chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP), chronic nonbacterial prostatitis (CNP)/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CPPS), and asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis. CBP and CNP/CPPS both lead to pelvic pain and lower urinary tract symptoms. CBP presents as recurrent urinary tract infections with the same organism identified on repeated cultures; it responds to a prolonged course of an antibiotic that adequately penetrates the prostate, if the urine culture suggests sensitivity. If four to six weeks of antibiotic therapy is effective but symptoms recur, another course may be prescribed, perhaps in combination with alpha blockers or nonopioid analgesics. CNP/CPPS, accounting for more than 90% of chronic prostatitis cases, presents as prostatic pain lasting at least three months without consistent culture results. Weak evidence supports the use of alpha blockers, pain medications, and a four- to six-week course of antibiotics for the treatment of CNP/CPPS. Patients may also be referred to a psychologist experienced in managing chronic pain. Experts on this condition recommend a combination of treatments tailored to the patient's phenotypic presentation. Urology referral should be considered when appropriate treatment is ineffective. Additional treatments include pelvic

  4. Prostatic stones: evidence of a specific chemistry related to infection and presence of bacterial imprints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Dessombz

    Full Text Available Prostatic stones are a common condition in older men in industrialized countries. However, aging appears not to be the unique pathogenesis of these calcifications. Our morpho-constitutional investigation of 23 stone samples suggested that infection has a significant role in the lithogenic process of prostate calcifications, even without detection of infection by clinical investigation. Most stones (83% showed bacterial imprints and/or chemical composition, suggestive of a long-term infection process. Chronic infection may induce persistent inflammation of the tissue and secondarily, a cancerization process within a few years. Thus, the discovery of prostate calcifications by computerized tomodensitometry, for example, might warrant further investigation and management to search for chronic infection of the prostate gland.

  5. Effect of levofloxacin treatment on semen hyperviscosity in chronic bacterial prostatitis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicari, L O; Castiglione, R; Salemi, M; Vicari, B O; Mazzarino, M C; Vicari, E

    2016-05-01

    Changes in seminal fluid viscosity (SFV), reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, cytokines and seminal leucocyte concentration related to microbiological outcome in patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) were studied. One hundred and ten infertile patients with CBP (positive sperm culture ≥10(5) colony-forming units [CFU] ml(-1), pathogens or Chlamydia in expressed prostatic secretions) were treated with levofloxacin 500 mg daily for 14 consecutive days per month for 3 months. In case of bacterial prostatitis, two conditions were examined: responders, eradication of 0 to 10(3) to <10(5) CFU ml(-1) (n = 32). Compared with poor responders, responders showed a significant increase of sperm progressive motility and a significant decrease in seminal leucocyte count, SFV, liquefaction time, ROS production (in all fractions and conditions), seminal tumour necrosis factor-α and interleukin 6. None of these variables showed significant differences compared with a control group of 37 fertile men. On the other hand, the poor responders showed significant changes in these variables compared with matched pretreatment values. In patients with CBP, antibiotic therapy alone leads to eradication in ≈71%, with improvement of sperm progressive motility, SFV and the framework of prooxidative factors. However, in the remaining ≈29% with poor antibiotic responsiveness, a deterioration of all variables is observed. © 2015 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Characterisation of the bacterial community in expressed prostatic secretions from patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome and infertile men: a preliminary investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Dong-Sheng; Long, Wen-Min; Shen, Jian; Zhao, Li-Ping; Pang, Xiao-Yan; Xu, Chen

    2012-01-01

    The expressed prostatic secretions (EPSs) of men with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), infertile men and normal men were subjected to microbiological study. EPSs were collected from the subjects, which included 26 normal men, 11 infertile patients and 51 CP/CPPS patients. DNA was extracted from each specimen, and the V3 regions of the 16S rRNA genes were amplified using universal bacterial primers. The results showed that the EPS 16S rRNA gene-positive rate in the CP/CPPS and infertile patients was much higher than in the normal men, but without any difference among the three patient groups. The denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) method was used to characterize the EPS bacterial community structure of the prostate fluid from patients with CP/CPPS or infertility issues. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) analyses of PCR-DGGE profiles revealed that the EPS bacterial community structure differed among the three groups. Three bands were identified as the key factors responsible for the discrepancy between CP/CPPS patients and infertile patients (Pprostatitis patients (Pprostate and low urethra tract, when considered as a microenvironment, might play an important role in the maintenance of a healthy male reproductive tract. PMID:22635162

  7. Cross-Linked Hyaluronan Gel Reduces the Acute Rectal Toxicity of Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilder, Richard B.; Barme, Greg A.; Gilbert, Ronald F.; Holevas, Richard E.; Kobashi, Luis I.; Reed, Richard R.; Solomon, Ronald S.; Walter, Nancy L.; Chittenden, Lucy; Mesa, Albert V.; Agustin, Jeffrey; Lizarde, Jessica; Macedo, Jorge; Ravera, John; Tokita, Kenneth M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively analyze whether cross-linked hyaluronan gel reduces the mean rectal dose and acute rectal toxicity of radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between September 2008 and March 2009, we transperitoneally injected 9mL of cross-linked hyaluronan gel (Hylaform; Genzyme Corporation, Cambridge, MA) into the anterior perirectal fat of 10 early-stage prostate cancer patients to increase the separation between the prostate and rectum by 8 to 18mm at the start of radiotherapy. Patients then underwent high-dose rate brachytherapy to 2,200cGy followed by intensity-modulated radiation therapy to 5,040cGy. We assessed acute rectal toxicity using the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 grading scheme. Results: Median follow-up was 3 months. The anteroposterior dimensions of Hylaform at the start and end of radiotherapy were 13 ± 3mm (mean ± SD) and 10 ± 4mm, respectively. At the start of intensity-modulated radiation therapy, daily mean rectal doses were 73 ± 13cGy with Hylaform vs. 106 ± 20cGy without Hylaform (p = 0.005). There was a 0% incidence of National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 Grade 1, 2, or 3 acute diarrhea in 10 patients who received Hylaform vs. a 29.7% incidence (n = 71) in 239 historical controls who did not receive Hylaform (p = 0.04). Conclusions: By increasing the separation between the prostate and rectum, Hylaform decreased the mean rectal dose. This led to a significant reduction in the acute rectal toxicity of radiotherapy for prostate cancer.

  8. Regional cerebral blood flow during mechanical hyperventilation in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten; Høgh, Peter; Larsen, Fin Stolze

    2000-01-01

    Mechanical hyperventilation is often instituted in patients with acute bacterial meningitis when increased intracranial pressure is suspected. However, the effect on regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) is unknown. In this study, we measured regional CBF (rCBF) in patients with acute bacterial...... meningitis before and during short-term hyperventilation. In 17 patients with acute bacterial meningitis, absolute rCBF (in ml/100 g min-1) was measured during baseline ventilation and hyperventilation by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) using intravenous 133Xe bolus injection. Intravenous...... in the frontal and parietal cortex as well as in the basal ganglia. Focal perfusion abnormalities were present in 10 of 12 patients. Regional cerebral blood flow abnormalities are frequent in patients with acute bacterial meningitis. Short-term hyperventilation does not enhance these abnormalities....

  9. Hypofractionated IMRT of the Prostate Bed After Radical Prostatectomy: Acute Toxicity in the PRIAMOS-1 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katayama, Sonja, E-mail: sonja.katayama@med.uni-heidelberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Striecker, Thorbjoern; Kessel, Kerstin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Sterzing, Florian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Habl, Gregor [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Edler, Lutz [Department of Biostatistics, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany); Herfarth, Klaus [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Heidelberg, Im Neuenheimer Feld, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy as primary treatment for prostate cancer is currently being investigated in large phase 3 trials. However, there are few data on postoperative hypofractionation. The Radiation therapy for the Prostate Bed With or Without the Pelvic Lymph Nodes (PRIAMOS 1) trial was initiated as a prospective phase 2 trial to assess treatment safety and toxicity of a hypofractionated intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) of the prostate bed. Methods and Materials: From February to September 2012, 40 patients with indications for adjuvant or salvage radiation therapy were enrolled. One patient dropped out before treatment. Patients received 54 Gy in 18 fractions to the prostate bed with IMRT and daily image guidance. Gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities (according to National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0) were recorded weekly during treatment and 10 weeks after radiation therapy. Results: Overall acute toxicity was favorable, with no recorded adverse events grade ≥3. Acute GI toxicity rates were 56.4% (grade 1) and 17.9% (grade 2). Acute GU toxicity was recorded in 35.9% of patients (maximum grade 1). Urinary stress incontinence was not influenced by radiation therapy. The incidence of grade 1 urinary urge incontinence increased from 2.6% before to 23.1% 10 weeks after therapy, but grade 2 urge incontinence remained unchanged. Conclusions: Postoperative hypofractionated IMRT of the prostate bed is tolerated well, with no severe acute side effects.

  10. Microbiological etiology of bacterial prostatitis in general hospital and primary care clinic in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Sun Choi

    2013-09-01

    Conclusions: The total portion of chronic bacterial prostatitis was 59.3% (174/293. Culture-positive patients in the PCC were significantly higher than in the general hospital, but the number of PCR positive patients in the PCC was the same as in the general hospital.

  11. [Acute states in gastroenterology: spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and the acute intestinal pseudoobstruction syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukás, K

    2001-07-19

    Our article concentrates on two acute states, which develop less dramatically but their after-effects may be very serious: Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and Ogilvie's syndrome. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis is a bacterial infection of the ascitic fluid without any intraperitoneal source of infection. Ascites is a condition of the disease but need not be clinically manifested. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis comes usually during heavy hepatic impairment. Diagnosis can be set according: 1. Positive cultivation of ascitic fluid, 2. PMN levels higher than 250/mm3, 3. No infection, which may require a surgical intervention is apparent. Liver disease, which brings about the spontaneous bacterial peritonitis can be: 1. Chronic (e.g. alcoholic cirrhosis), 2. Subacute (e.g. alcoholic hepatitis), 3. Acute (e.g. fulminant hepatic failure). Mortality of this form of peritonitis can reach up to 46%. The most frequent etiological factor is alcohol and viral hepatitis, the most frequent agents are E. coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The disease is most effectively cured by cefalosporins of the third generation. With inadequate treatment, prognosis may be poor. Intestinal pseudoobstruction syndrome has clinical symptomatology of a serious impairment with ileus without signs of any mechanical intestinal obstruction. Syndrome can be classified according to its development: 1. Acute form--acute intestinal pseudoobstruction syndrome--Ogilvie's syndrome, 2. Chronic form--chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction syndrome. Pathogenic mechanism of the syndrome is not known. The disease is related to immobility, administration of some drugs, electrolyte imbalance and concomitant diseases (most frequently malignant tumors). Clinical symptomatology dominates nausea, vomiting, diffuse abdominal pain, constipation or diarrhoea. For diagnostics the first step should be termination of all medication, which could have causing affects, then taking native abdominal X-ray picture where gaseous

  12. Grepafloxacin in Patients with Acute Bacterial Exacerbations of Chronic Bronchitis - a Question of Speed in Bacterial Killing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome J Schentag

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To characterize the population pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of oral grepafloxacin in patients with acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis (ABECB, with particular attention to the speed of bacterial killing. This was possible because the study design incorporated daily cultures of the patients’ sputum.

  13. Modern Aspects of the Treatment of Acute Bacterial Postoperative Endophthalmitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Kazajkin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute bacterial postoperative endophthalmitis (AE is a destructive intraocular infection with a tendency to an increase of morbidity and prevalence. This phenomenon is contributed by worldwide increase of surgical activity together with an increase of life expectancy. Nowadays AE prevalence in the best ophthalmic clinics of the world varies from 0.039% to 0.59%. Modern approaches to complex treatment of acute bacterial postoperative endophthalmitis are described in details in EVS 1995 and ESCRS 2013 investigations where the two main standards — “gold” and “silver” — are reflected. “Gold standard” includes 3-port vitrectomy with bacterial seeding of anterior chamber and vitreous cavity content and intravitreal antibiotics injection at the final step of operation within 1 hour after diagnosing acute endophthalmitis. Use of “silver standard” is acceptable in absence of vitreoretinal operation room and trained surgeon, that is, in case if full vitreoretinal surgery is impossible. In such cases surgical intervention is limited by taking vitreous cavity and anterior chamber content for bacterial seeding with intravitreal antibiotics injection at the final step of operation. Nowadays surgeons have the task not only to suppress infection and preserve the eye as an organ, but also to preserve maximal possible visual functions. The review deals with the questions of antibiotics choice with sufficient antibacterial spectrum and minimal toxicity. Questions of modern antibiotics pharmacokinetics and influencing factors such as molecular mass of the antibiotic, the extent of vitreous liquefaction, solubility coefficient of the antibiotic, the extent of eyeball inflammation, status of iris-lens diaphragm and vitreous cavity (phakic, aphakic, pseudophakic, avitreal eye, silicone tamponade, density of antibiotic solution are being discussed. Features and advantages of vitreal surgery are considered. Choice of vitreous body substitutes which

  14. DIFFERENTIAL DIAGNOSTICS OF PROSTATE TUBERCULOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Brizhatyuk

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate tuberculosis is difficult to be diagnosed, especially if lesions are limited only by this organ. The article analyses the experience of differential diagnostics of prostate tuberculosis based on the data of examination of 84 patients. 45 of them were diagnosed with prostate tuberculosis, and 39 patients were diagnosed with chronic bacterial prostatitis. Pathognomonic diagnostics criteria of prostate tuberculosis were the following: detection of tuberculous mycobacteria in the prostatic fluid or ejaculate, signs of granulomatous prostatitis with areas of cavernous necrosis in prostate biopsy samples, and prostate cavities visualized by X-ray or ultrasound examinations. Should the above criteria be absent, the disease can be diagnosed based on the combination of indirect signs: symptoms of prostate inflammation with active tuberculosis of the other localization; large prostate calcification, extensive hyperechoic area of the prostate, spermatocystic lesions, leucospermia and hemospermia, failure of the adequate non-specific anti-bacterial therapy.

  15. Acute bacterial endocarditis. Optimizing surgical results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larbalestier, R I; Kinchla, N M; Aranki, S F; Couper, G S; Collins, J J; Cohn, L H

    1992-11-01

    Acute bacterial endocarditis continues to be a condition with high morbidity. Although the majority of patients are treated by high-dose antibiotics, a high-risk patient group requires surgical intervention, which is the subject of this article. From 1972 to 1991, 3,820 patients underwent heart valve replacement at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston. Of this group, 158 patients underwent surgery for acute bacterial endocarditis: 109 had native valve endocarditis (NVE), and 49 had prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE). There were 108 men and 50 women with a mean age of 49 years (range, 16-79 years); 64% were New York Heart Association functional class IV before surgery, and 12% of the group had a history of intravenous drug abuse. In both NVE and PVE groups, Streptococcus was the predominant infecting agent. Uncontrolled sepsis, progressive congestive failure, peripheral emboli, and echocardiographically demonstrated vegetations were the most common indications for surgery. Eighty-five percent of patients had a single-valve procedure, 15% had a multivalve procedure, and 34 patients had other associated major cardiac procedures. The operative mortality was 6% in NVE and 22% in PVE. Long-term survival at 10 years was 66% for NVE and 29% for PVE. Freedom from recurrent endocarditis at 10 years was 85% for NVE and 82% for PVE. The main factors associated with decreased survival overall were PVE and nonstreptococcal infection. The morbidity and mortality after surgical treatment of acute endocarditis depend on the site, the severity, and the subject infected. Early aggressive surgical intervention is indicated to optimize surgical results, especially in patients with nonstreptococcal infection or PVE.

  16. Hypofractionated Accelerated Radiotherapy Using Concomitant Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Boost Technique for Localized High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Acute Toxicity Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Tee S.; Cheung, Patrick; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Morton, Gerard; Sixel, Katharina E.; Pang, Geordi; Basran, Parminder; Zhang Liying; Tirona, Romeo; Szumacher, Ewa; Danjoux, Cyril; Choo, Richard; Thomas, Gillian

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the acute toxicities of hypofractionated accelerated radiotherapy (RT) using a concomitant intensity-modulated RT boost in conjunction with elective pelvic nodal irradiation for high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This report focused on 66 patients entered into this prospective Phase I study. The eligible patients had clinically localized prostate cancer with at least one of the following high-risk features (Stage T3, Gleason score ≥8, or prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL). Patients were treated with 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the pelvic lymph nodes using a conventional four-field technique. A concomitant intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost of 22.5 Gy in 25 fractions was delivered to the prostate. Thus, the prostate received 67.5 Gy in 25 fractions within 5 weeks. Next, the patients underwent 3 years of adjuvant androgen ablative therapy. Acute toxicities were assessed using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, weekly during treatment and at 3 months after RT. Results: The median patient age was 71 years. The median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level and Gleason score was 18.7 ng/L and 8, respectively. Grade 1-2 genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were common during RT but most had settled at 3 months after treatment. Only 5 patients had acute Grade 3 genitourinary toxicity, in the form of urinary incontinence (n = 1), urinary frequency/urgency (n = 3), and urinary retention (n = 1). None of the patients developed Grade 3 or greater gastrointestinal or Grade 4 or greater genitourinary toxicity. Conclusion: The results of the present study have indicated that hypofractionated accelerated RT with a concomitant intensity-modulated RT boost and pelvic nodal irradiation is feasible with acceptable acute toxicity

  17. Prostatitis - acute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tender scrotum The provider may perform a digital rectal exam to examine your prostate. During this exam, ... Copyright 1997-2018, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing ...

  18. Severe renal failure in acute bacterial pyelonephritis: Do not forget corticosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sqalli Tarik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute renal failure (ARF is a rare complication of acute pyelonephritis in adult immunocompetent patients. Recovery of renal function usually occurs if antibiotics are promptly initiated. However, long-term consequences of renal scarring due to acute pyelonephritis are probably underestimated, and some patients present with prolonged renal failure despite adequate antibiotic therapy. We report two cases of severe ARF complicating bacterial pyelonephritis successfully treated with corticosteroids in association with conventional antibiotics.

  19. Mounting resistance of uropathogens to antimicrobial agents: A retrospective study in patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatiou, Konstantinos; Pierris, Nikolaos

    2017-07-01

    Despite recent progress in the management of chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP), many cases relapse. Increased drug resistance patterns of responsible bacteria have been proposed as the most probable causative factor. Driven by the limited number of previous studies addressing this topic, we aimed to study whether antibiotic resistance increases in patients with CBP when relapse occurs. A secondary aim of this study was to determine the resistance patterns of responsible bacteria from patients with CBP. The study material consisted of bacterial isolates from urine and/or prostatic secretions obtained from patients with CBP. Bacterial identification was performed by using the Vitek 2 Compact system and susceptibility testing was performed by disc diffusion and/or the Vitek 2 system. Interpretation of susceptibility results was based on Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. A total of 253 samples from patients diagnosed with CBP for the first time (group A) and 137 samples from relapsing patients with a history of CBP and previous antibiotic treatment (group B) were analyzed. A significant reduction in bacterial resistance to the less used antibiotics (TMP-SMX, tetracyclines, aminoglycosides, penicillins, and macrolides) was noted. An increase in resistance to quinolones of many bacteria that cause CBP was also noted with the increase in resistance of enterococcus strains being alarming. Comparison of the resistance profile of CBP-responsible bacteria between samples from first-time-diagnosed patients and samples from relapsing patients revealed notable differences that could be attributed to previous antibiotic treatment.

  20. Comparing the bacterial diversity of acute and chronic dental root canal infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana L Santos

    Full Text Available This study performed barcoded multiplex pyrosequencing with a 454 FLX instrument to compare the microbiota of dental root canal infections associated with acute (symptomatic or chronic (asymptomatic apical periodontitis. Analysis of samples from 9 acute abscesses and 8 chronic infections yielded partial 16S rRNA gene sequences that were taxonomically classified into 916 bacterial species-level operational taxonomic units (OTUs (at 3% divergence belonging to 67 genera and 13 phyla. The most abundant phyla in acute infections were Firmicutes (52%, Fusobacteria (17% and Bacteroidetes (13%, while in chronic infections the dominant were Firmicutes (59%, Bacteroidetes (14% and Actinobacteria (10%. Members of Fusobacteria were much more prevalent in acute (89% than in chronic cases (50%. The most abundant/prevalent genera in acute infections were Fusobacterium and Parvimonas. Twenty genera were exclusively detected in acute infections and 18 in chronic infections. Only 18% (n = 165 of the OTUs at 3% divergence were shared by acute and chronic infections. Diversity and richness estimators revealed that acute infections were significantly more diverse than chronic infections. Although a high interindividual variation in bacterial communities was observed, many samples tended to group together according to the type of infection (acute or chronic. This study is one of the most comprehensive in-deep comparisons of the microbiota associated with acute and chronic dental root canal infections and highlights the role of diverse polymicrobial communities as the unit of pathogenicity in acute infections. The overall diversity of endodontic infections as revealed by the pyrosequencing technique was much higher than previously reported for endodontic infections.

  1. Acute Toxicity in Definitive Versus Postprostatectomy Image-Guided Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng, Jonathan C.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Nguyen, Khanh H.; Wong, Jeffrey Y.C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the incidence of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) injury and the dose-volume response in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with image-guided radiotherapy using helical tomotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between November 2004 and March 2007, 146 consecutive patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with helical tomotherapy at the City of Hope Medical Center. Of the 146 patients, 70 had undergone prostatectomy. Acute GI and GU toxicities were evaluated using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Cancer of Medical scoring system. Events were scored for patients developing Grade 2 or greater morbidity within 90 days after the end of radiotherapy (RT). The dosimetric parameters included the minimal dose received by the highest 10%, 20%, 50%, 80%, and 90% of the target volume, the mean rectal dose, minimal rectal dose, maximal rectal dose, and the volume receiving ≥45, ≥65, and ≥70 Gy. These variables, plus the status of radical prostatectomy, hormonal therapy, RT techniques, and medical conditions, were included in a multivariate logistic regression analysis. A goodness-of-fit evaluation was done using the Hosmer-Lemeshow statistic. Results: A dose-response function for acute GI toxicity was elicited. The acute GI Grade 2 or greater toxicity was lower in the definitive RT group than in the postoperative RT group (25% vs. 41%, p <0.05). Acute GU Grade 2 or greater toxicity was comparable between the two groups. No grade 3 or greater complications were observed. No dosimetric variable was significant for GU toxicity. For acute GI toxicity, the significant dosimetric parameters were the minimal dose received by 10%, 20%, and 50% of the target volume and the mean rectal dose; the most predictive parameter was the minimal dose received by 10% of the target volume. The dose-modifying factor was 1.2 for radical prostatectomy. Conclusion: The results of our

  2. The Clinical Potential of Semisynthetic Penicillins in Acute Bacterial Otitis Media and Acute Bacterial Tonsillitis in Children in the Practice of ENT Doctor: Focus on Ospamox and Amoxsiclav®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I. Popovych

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The wide prevalence of bacterial infections of upper respiratory tract, especially in childhood, the presence of complications that threaten the health and lives of patients necessitate the prescription of a rational systemic antibiotic therapy. Given the fact that in most cases the characteristics of the bacterial spectrum as an etiologic agent of these diseases is known, penicillin antibiotics are the first line in this pathology. On the example of two clinical cases, we have considered the use of suspension Ospamox (amoxicillin and Amoxiclav® (amoxicillin clavulanate in children with acute tonsillitis and acute otitis media, which demonstrated high efficacy and safety of treatment.

  3. Dynamics of germs responsible for acute bacterial meningitis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to analyze ten (10) years of epidemiological surveillance data of meningitis in Burkina Faso for high risk germs patterns identification in order to contribute to the strengthening of prevention strategies. A retrospective study of the past decade (2005- 2014) of cases of acute bacterial meningitis ...

  4. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy of prostate cancer. Analysis of interfractional errors and acute toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudat, Volker; Nour, A.; Hammoud, M.; Alaradi, A.; Mohammed, A. [Saad Specialist Hospital, Department of Radiation Oncology, Al Khobar (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-02-15

    The aim of the study was to estimate interfractional deviations in patient and prostate position, the impact of the frequency of online verification on the treatment margins, and to assess acute radiation reactions of high-dose external beam image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) of localized prostate cancer. IG-IMRT was performed by daily online verification of implanted fiducial prostate markers using a megavoltage electronic portal imaging device (EPID). A total of 1011 image-guided treatment fractions from 23 consecutive unselected prostate cancer patients were analyzed. The median total dose was 79.2 Gy (range 77.4-81.0 Gy). Acute radiation reactions were assessed weekly during radiotherapy using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v.4.03. A relevant combined patient set-up and prostate motion population random error of 4-5 mm was observed. Compared to daily IGRT, image guidance every other day required an expansion of the CTV-PTV (clinical target volume-planning target volume) margin of 8.1, 6.6, and 4.1 mm in the longitudinal, vertical, and lateral directions, thereby, increasing the PTV by approximately 30-40 %. No grade 3 or 4 acute radiation reactions were observed with daily IG-IMRT. A high dose with surprisingly low acute toxicity can be applied with daily IG-IMRT using implanted fiducial prostate markers. Daily image guidance is clearly superior to image guidance every other fraction concerning adequate target coverage with minimal margins. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Studie war es, die interfraktionelle Variabilitaet der Patientenlagerung und Prostataposition, den Einfluss der Bildgebungsfrequenz und die akuten Strahlenreaktionen bei einer hochdosierten bildgesteuerten intensitaetsmodulierten Strahlentherapie (IG-IMRT) des Prostatakarzinoms zu untersuchen. IG-IMRT wurde durch taegliche Verifikation von implantierten roentgendichten Prostatamarkern mittels Megavolt-Bildgebung (''electronic portal imaging

  5. Clinical significance of the infection-free interval in the management of acute bacterial exacerbations of chronic bronchitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodosh, Sanford

    2005-06-01

    Rational and appropriate antibiotic use for patients with acute exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (AECB) is a major concern, as approximately half of these patients do not have a bacterial infection. Typically, the result of antimicrobial therapy for patients with acute bacterial exacerbation of chronic bronchitis (ABECB) is not eradication of the pathogen but resolution of the acute symptoms. However, the length of time before the next bacterial exacerbation can be another important variable, as the frequency of exacerbations will affect the overall health of the patient and the rate of lung deterioration over time. Clinical trials comparing antimicrobial therapies commonly measure resolution of symptoms in AECB patients as the primary end point, regardless of whether the exacerbation is documented as bacterial in nature. Ideally, the scientific approach to assessing the efficacy of antibiotic therapy for ABECB should include a measurement of acute bacterial eradication rates in patients with documented bronchial bacterial infection followed by measurement of the infection-free interval (IFI), ie, the time to the next ABECB. The use of these variables can provide a standard for comparing various antimicrobial therapies. As we learn more about how antibiotics can affect the IFI, treatment decisions should be adapted to ensure optimal management of ABECB for the long-term.

  6. Mounting resistance of uropathogens to antimicrobial agents: A retrospective study in patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis relapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Stamatiou

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Despite recent progress in the management of chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP, many cases relapse. Increased drug resistance patterns of responsible bacteria have been proposed as the most probable causative factor. Driven by the limited number of previous studies addressing this topic, we aimed to study whether antibiotic resistance increases in patients with CBP when relapse occurs. A secondary aim of this study was to determine the resistance patterns of responsible bacteria from patients with CBP. Materials and Methods: The study material consisted of bacterial isolates from urine and/or prostatic secretions obtained from patients with CBP. Bacterial identification was performed by using the Vitek 2 Compact system and susceptibility testing was performed by disc diffusion and/or the Vitek 2 system. Interpretation of susceptibility results was based on Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Results: A total of 253 samples from patients diagnosed with CBP for the first time (group A and 137 samples from relapsing patients with a history of CBP and previous antibiotic treatment (group B were analyzed. A significant reduction in bacterial resistance to the less used antibiotics (TMP-SMX, tetracyclines, aminoglycosides, penicillins, and macrolides was noted. An increase in resistance to quinolones of many bacteria that cause CBP was also noted with the increase in resistance of enterococcus strains being alarming. Conclusions: Comparison of the resistance profile of CBP-responsible bacteria between samples from first-time-diagnosed patients and samples from relapsing patients revealed notable differences that could be attributed to previous antibiotic treatment.

  7. Evaluation of the protective effect of pentoxifylline on carrageenan-induced chronic non-bacterial prostatitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajighorbani, Mahboobeh; Ahmadi-Hamedani, Mahmood; Shahab, Elaheh; Hayati, Farzad; Kafshdoozan, Khatereh; Keramati, Keivan; Amini, Amin Hossein

    2017-06-01

    Chronic non-bacterial prostatitis (CNP) is the most common type of prostatitis and oxidative stress (OS) was shown to be highly elevated in prostatitis patients. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of pentoxifylline (PTX) on CNP induced by carrageenan in rats. Male adult Wistar rats (n = 30) were divided into control, CNP and three treatment groups (n = 6) including CNP + cernilton and CNP + PTX groups. CNP was induced by single intraprostatic injection of 1% carrageenan (100 µl). Rats in treatment groups received orally cernilton 100 mg/kg and PTX at 50 and 100 mg/kg 1 week after CNP induction for 21 days. Prostatic index (PI), prostatic specific antigen (PSA), tumor-necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), serum lipid peroxidation (MDA), blood urea nitrogen, creatinine and histopathological changes were compared between groups. There were significant increase of PI, serum levels of PSA, TNF-α and MDA in CNP group at 29 day. In treatment groups, significant reduction in PI, serum levels of PSA, TNF-α, MDA and creatinine was observed especially in rats treated with dose of 50 mg/kg of PTX. In CNP group, histopathological changes of the prostate such as leucocyte infiltration, large involutions and projection into the lumen and reducing the volume of the lumen were observed as well. Whereas PTX, especially at dose of 50 mg/kg, could improve the above-mentioned changes remarkably in CNP treated rats. For the first time, our findings indicated that PTX improved CNP induced by carrageenan in rats.

  8. CSF lactate level: a useful diagnostic tool to differentiate acute bacterial and viral meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abro, Ali Hassan; Abdou, Ahmed Saheh; Ustadi, Abdulla M; Saleh, Ahmed Alhaj; Younis, Nadeem Javeed; Doleh, Wafa F

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the potential role of CSF lactate level in the diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis and in the differentiation between viral and bacterial meningitis. This was a hospital based observational study, conducted at Infectious Diseases Unit, Rashid Hospital Dubai, United Arab Emirates, from July 2004 to June 2007. The patients with clinical diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis and who had CSF Gram stain/culture positive, CSF analysis suggestive of bacterial meningitis with negative Gram stain and culture but blood culture positive for bacteria and patients with clinical diagnosis suggestive of viral meningitis supported by CSF chemical analysis with negative Gram stain and culture as well as negative blood culture for bacteria were included in the study. CT scan brain was done for all patients before lumber puncture and CSF and blood samples were collected immediately after admission. CSF chemical analysis including lactate level was done on first spinal tap. The CSF lactate level was tested by Enzymatic Colorimetric method. A total 95 adult patients of acute meningitis (53 bacterial and 42 viral) fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Among 53 bacterial meningitis patients, Neisseria meningitides were isolated in 29 (54.7%), Strept. Pneumoniae in 18 (33.96%), Staph. Aureus in 2 (3.77%), Klebsiell Pneumoniae in 2 (3.77%), Strept. Agalactiae in 1 (1.8%) and E. Coli in 1 (1.8%). All the patients with bacterial meningitis had CSF lactate > 3.8 mmol/l except one, whereas none of the patients with viral meningitis had lactate level > 3.8 mmol/l. The mean CSF lactate level in bacterial meningitis cases amounted to 16.51 +/- 6.14 mmol/l, whereas it was significantly lower in viral group 2.36 +/- 0.6 mmol/l, p < .0001. CSF lactate level was significantly high in bacterial than viral meningitis and it can provide pertinent, rapid and reliable diagnostic information. Furthermore, CSF lactate level can also differentiate bacterial meningitis from viral one in a quick

  9. Osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Emma Cb; Ajdukiewicz, Katherine Mb; Bergman, Hanna; Heyderman, Robert S; Garner, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Background Every day children and adults die from acute community-acquired bacterial meningitis, particularly in low-income countries, and survivors risk deafness, epilepsy and neurological disabilities. Osmotic therapies may attract extra-vascular fluid and reduce cerebral oedema, and thus reduce death and improve neurological outcomes. This is an update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2013. Objectives To evaluate the effects of osmotic therapies added to antibiotics for acute bacterial meningitis in children and adults on mortality, deafness and neurological disability. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (2017, Issue 1), MEDLINE (1950 to 17 February 2017), Embase (1974 to 17 February 2017), CINAHL (1981 to 17 February 2017), LILACS (1982 to 17 February 2017) and registers of ongoing clinical trials (ClinicalTrials.com, WHO ICTRP) (21 February 2017). We also searched conference abstracts and contacted researchers in the field (up to 12 December 2015). Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials testing any osmotic therapy in adults or children with acute bacterial meningitis. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently screened the search results and selected trials for inclusion. Results are presented using risk ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) and grouped according to whether the participants received steroids or not. We used the GRADE approach to assess the certainty of the evidence. Main results We included five trials with 1451 participants. Four trials evaluated glycerol against placebo, and one evaluated glycerol against 50% dextrose; in addition three trials evaluated dexamethasone and one trial evaluated acetaminophen (paracetamol) in a factorial design. Stratified analysis shows no effect modification with steroids; we present aggregate effect estimates. Compared to placebo, glycerol probably has little or no effect on death in people with bacterial meningitis (RR 1.08, 95% CI 0.90 to 1.30; 5 studies, 1272

  10. Circulating levels of vasoactive peptides in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Strauss, Gitte Irene; Tofteng, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The underlying mechanisms for cerebral blood flow (CBF) abnormalities in acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) are largely unknown. Putative mediators include vasoactive peptides, e.g. calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and endothelin-1 (ET-1), all...

  11. Effect of short-term hyperventilation on cerebral blood flow autoregulation in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation is impaired in patients with acute bacterial meningitis: this may be caused by cerebral arteriolar dilatation. We tested the hypothesis that CBF autoregulation is recovered by acute mechanical hyperventilation in 9 adult patients...... with acute bacterial meningitis. METHODS: Norepinephrine was infused to increase mean arterial pressure (MAP) 30 mm Hg from baseline. Relative changes in CBF were concomitantly recorded by transcranial Doppler ultrasonography of the middle cerebral artery, measuring mean flow velocity (V...... completely during hyperventilation. The slope of the autoregulation curve decreased during hyperventilation compared with normoventilation (Pmeningitis, indicating...

  12. An inducible model of abacterial prostatitis induces antigen specific inflammatory and proliferative changes in the murine prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkamp, Jessica M.; Charbonneau, Bridget; Meyerholz, David K.; Cohen, Michael B.; Snyder, Paul W.; Svensson, Robert U.; Henry, Michael D.; Wang, Hsing- Hui

    2011-01-01

    Background Prostatitis is a poorly understood disease and increasing evidence suggests inflammation is involved in other prostatic diseases, including prostate cancer. Methods The ability of pre-activated CD8 T cells to induce prostatitis was examined by adoptive transfer into POET-3 mice or POET-3/Luc/Pten−/+ mice. Characterization of the inflammatory response was determined by examining leukocyte infiltration by histological analysis, flow cytometry and by evaluating cytokine and chemokine levels in prostate tissue. The impact of inflammation on the prostate was evaluated by monitoring epithelial cell proliferation over time. Results Initiation of inflammation by ovalbumin specific CD8+ T cells (OT-I cells) resulted in development of acute prostatitis in the anterior, dorsolateral and anterior prostate of POET-3 and POET-3/Luc/Pten−/+ mice. Acute prostatitis was characterized by recruitment of adoptively transferred OT-I cells and importantly, autologous CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and regulatory T cells (Treg). In concert with leukocyte infiltration elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were observed. Inflammation also resulted in marked epithelial cell proliferation that was sustained up to 80 days post adoptive-transfer of OT-I cells. Conclusions The POET-3 model represents a novel mouse model to study both acute and chronic prostate inflammation in an antigen-specific system. Further, the POET-3 mouse model can be crossed with other genetic models of disease such as the C57/Luc/Pten−/− model of prostate cancer, allowing the impact of prostatitis on other prostatic diseases to be evaluated. PMID:21656824

  13. 10 original article dynamics of germs responsible for acute bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    boaz

    The aim of this study was to analyze ten (10) years of epidemiological surveillance data of meningitis in Burkina Faso for high risk germs patterns identification in order to contribute to the strengthening of prevention strategies. A retrospective study of the past decade (2005- 2014) of cases of acute bacterial meningitis ...

  14. Chronic bacterial prostatitis: efficacy of short-lasting antibiotic therapy with prulifloxacin (Unidrox®) in association with saw palmetto extract, lactobacillus sporogens and arbutin (Lactorepens®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busetto, Gian Maria; Giovannone, Riccardo; Ferro, Matteo; Tricarico, Stefano; Del Giudice, Francesco; Matei, Deliu Victor; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Gentile, Vincenzo; De Berardinis, Ettore

    2014-07-19

    Bacterial prostatitis (BP) is a common condition accounting responsible for about 5-10% of all prostatitis cases; chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) classified as type II, are less common but is a condition that significantly hampers the quality of life, (QoL) because not only is it a physical condition but also a psychological distress. Commonly patients are treated with antibiotics alone, and in particular fluoroquinolones are suggested by the European Urology guidelines. This approach, although recommended, may not be enough. Thus, a multimodal approach to the prolonged antibiotic therapy may be helpful. 210 patients affected by chronic bacterial prostatitis were enrolled in the study. All patients were positive to Meares-Stamey test and symptoms duration was > 3 months. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy of a long lasting therapy with a fluoroquinolone in association with a nutraceutical supplement (prulifloxacin 600 mg for 21 days and an association of Serenoa repens 320 mg, Lactobacillus Sporogens 200 mg, Arbutin 100 mg for 30 days). Patients were randomized in two groups (A and B) receiving respectively antibiotic alone and an association of antibiotic plus supplement. Biological recurrence at 2 months in Group A was observed in 21 patients (27.6%) and in Group B in 6 patients (7.8%). Uropathogens found at the first follow-up were for the majority Gram - (E. coli and Enterobacter spp.). A statistically significant difference was found at the time of the follow-up between Group A and B in the NIH-CPSI questionnaire score, symptoms evidence and serum PSA. Broad band, short-lasting antibiotic therapy in association with a nutritional supplement (serenoa repens, lactobacillus sporogens and arbutin) show better control and recurrence rate on patients affected by chronic bacterial prostatitits in comparison with antibiotic treatment alone. NCT02130713. Date of trial Registration: 30/04/2014.

  15. Acute febrile illness in cirrhosis - thinking beyond spontaneous bacterial peritonitis!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ajay K; Sircar, Shohini; Jain, Mayank; Adkar, Sagar; Waghmare, Chandrashekhar; Chahwala, Fatema

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to look at the aetiological factors presenting as acute febrile illness in cirrhotic patients. The study group included all cirrhotic patients admitted as inpatients between January and December 2011 with a history of fever of less than seven days duration. Detailed history, clinical examination and investigations, as required, were noted. The data collected were analysed. A total of 42 patients formed the study group. The male-to-female ratio was 9.5:1. The mean age at presentation was 45.09 years (24-77 years). The aetiological factors for fever were: spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (20), lower respiratory tract infection (8), urinary tract infection (6), lower limb cellulitis (4), acute cholecystitis (2) and malaria (2). The mean MELD (model for end-stage liver disease) score at presentation was 20.4. Three patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) and a mean MELD score of 31 died during the hospital admission. Febrile illness in cirrhosis is attributable to multiple causes. Outcome is dependent on the severity of underlying liver disease.

  16. Chronic bacterial prostatitis and irritable bowel syndrome: effectiveness of treatment with rifaximin followed by the probiotic VSL#3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicari, Enzo; La Vignera, Sandro; Castiglione, Roberto; Condorelli, Rosita A; Vicari, Lucia O; Calogero, Aldo E

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of treatment with rifaximin followed by the probiotic VSL#3 versus no treatment on the progression of chronic prostatitis toward chronic microbial prostate-vesiculitis (PV) or prostate-vesiculo-epididymitis (PVE). A total of 106 selected infertile male patients with bacteriologically cured chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were randomly prescribed rifaximin (200 mg, 2 tablets bid, for 7 days monthly for 12 months) and probiotic containing multiple strains VSL#3 (450 × 10(9) FU per day) or no treatment. Ninety-five of them (89.6%) complied with the therapeutic plan and were included in this study. Group A = "6Tx/6-": treatment for the initial 6 and no treatment for the following 6 months (n = 26); Group B = "12Tx": 12 months of treatment (n = 22); Group C = "6-/6Tx": no treatment for the initial 6 months and treatment in the last 6 months (n = 23); Group D = "12-": no treatment (n = 24). The patients of Groups A = "6Tx/6-" and B = "12Tx" had the highest frequency of chronic prostatitis (88.5% and 86.4%, respectively). In contrast, group "12-": patients had the lowest frequency of prostatitis (33.4%). The progression of prostatitis into PV in groups "6Tx/6-" (15.5%) and "6-/6Tx" (13.6%) was lower than that found in the patients of group "12-" (45.8%). Finally, no patient of groups "6Tx/6-" and "6-/6Tx" had PVE, whereas it was diagnosed in 20.8% of group "12-" patients. Long-term treatment with rifaximin and the probiotic VSL#3 is effective in lowering the progression of prostatitis into more complicated forms of male accessory gland infections in infertile patients with bacteriologically cured CBP plus IBS.

  17. Chronic bacterial prostatitis and irritable bowel syndrome: effectiveness of treatment with rifaximin followed by the probiotic VSL#3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo Vicari

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of treatment with rifaximin followed by the probiotic VSL#3 versus no treatment on the progression of chronic prostatitis toward chronic microbial prostate-vesiculitis (PV or prostate-vesiculo-epididymitis (PVE. A total of 106 selected infertile male patients with bacteriologically cured chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS were randomly prescribed rifaximin (200 mg, 2 tablets bid, for 7 days monthly for 12 months and probiotic containing multiple strains VSL#3 (450 × 10 [9] CFU per day or no treatment. Ninety-five of them (89.6% complied with the therapeutic plan and were included in this study. Group A = "6Tx/6-": treatment for the initial 6 and no treatment for the following 6 months (n = 26; Group B = "12Tx": 12 months of treatment (n = 22; Group C = "6-/6Tx": no treatment for the initial 6 months and treatment in the last 6 months (n = 23; Group D = "12-": no treatment (n = 24. The patients of Groups A = "6Tx/6-" and B = "12Tx" had the highest frequency of chronic prostatitis (88.5% and 86.4%, respectively. In contrast, group "12-": patients had the lowest frequency of prostatitis (33.4%. The progression of prostatitis into PV in groups "6Tx/6-" (15.5% and "6-/6Tx" (13.6% was lower than that found in the patients of group "12-" (45.8%. Finally, no patient of groups "6Tx/6-" and "6-/6Tx" had PVE, whereas it was diagnosed in 20.8% of group "12-" patients. Long-term treatment with rifaximin and the probiotic VSL#3 is effective in lowering the progression of prostatitis into more complicated forms of male accessory gland infections in infertile patients with bacteriologically cured CBP plus IBS.

  18. [PSA interest and prostatitis: literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruyère, F; Amine Lakmichi, M

    2013-12-01

    Prostatitis is easily diagnosed but sometimes associated with PSA measurement. An increased PSA in an asymptomatic patient may be associated with antibiotic use to eliminate the inflammatory part and to confirm prostate biopsy. It seems interesting to confirm or infirm these attitudes with a systematic review of the literature We performed a literature review using the words [prostatitis], [acute prostatitis], [prostate specific antigen], [PSA], in the MEDLINE, Pubmed and AMBASE database searching for articles in French or English published in the past 20 years. PSA is not always increased during an acute prostatitis episode. An increased PSA in an asymptomatic man does not seem to be systematically correlated to prostate inflammation. Analyzing the studies, it seems inaccurate to measure PSA value during a febrile urinary infection episode in men. Systematic use of antibiotic to decrease PSA and not performing prostate biopsy is not relevant and may induce resistance to antibiotic and doesn't induce a reduction risk of having prostate biopsy. PSA is unnecessary in case of febrile urinary tract infection in men. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. The GETUG 70 Gy vs. 80 Gy randomized trial for localized prostate cancer: Feasibility and acute toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckendorf, Veronique; Guerif, Stephane; Le Prise, Elisabeth; Cosset, Jean Marc; Lefloch, Olivier; Chauvet, Bruno; Salem, Naji; Chapet, Olivier; Bourdin, Sylvain; Bachaud, Jean Marc; Maingon, Philippe; Lagrange, Jean-L.eon; Malissard, Luc; Simon, Jean-Marc; Pommier, Pascal M.D.; Hay, Men H.; Dubray, Bernard; Luporsi, Elisabeth; Bey, Pierre

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To describe treatments and acute tolerance in a randomized trial comparing 70 Gy and 80 Gy to the prostate in patients with localized prostate cancer. Methods and materials: Between September 1999 and February 2002, 306 patients were randomized to receive 70 Gy (153 patients) or 80 Gy (153 patients) in 17 institutions. Patients exhibited intermediate-prognosis tumors. If the risk of node involvement was greater than 10%, surgical staging was required. Previous prostatectomy was excluded, and androgen deprivation was not admitted. The treatment was delivered in two steps. PTV1-including seminal vesicles, prostate, and a 1-0.5-cm margin-received 46 Gy given with a 4-field conformal technique. PTV2, reduced to prostate with the same margins, irradiated with at least 5 fields. Dose was prescribed according to ICRU recommendations in the 70 Gy group, but adapted at the 80 Gy level. Results: All patients but one in the 80 Gy arm completed the treatment. In the 70 Gy arm, the mean dose to the PTV2 was 69.5 Gy. In the 80 Gy arm, the mean dose in the PTV2 was 78.5 Gy. Acute toxicity according to Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale during treatment was reported in 306 patients. There was no statistically significant difference between the two arms: 12% had no toxicity, 80% complained of bladder toxicity, and 70% complained of rectal symptoms. Two months after the end of treatment, 43% of the 70 Gy level and 48% of the 80 Gy level complained of side effects, including 24% and 20% of sexual disorders. There was 6% and 2% of Grade 3 urinary and rectal toxicity. Five patients required a 10-29-day suspension of the treatment. Acute Grade 2 and 3 side effects were related to PTV and CTV1 size, which was the only independent predictive factor in multivariate analysis. Toxicity was not related to the center, age, arm of treatment, or selected data from dose-volume histogram of organ at risk. Conclusion: Treatments were completed in respect to constraints. Acute toxicity

  20. Acute and late complications after radiotherapy for prostate cancer: Results of a multicenter randomized trial comparing 68 Gy to 78 Gy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeters, Stephanie T.H.; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Putten, Wim L.J. van; Slot, Annerie; Tabak, Hans; Mens, Jan Willem; Lebesque, Joos V.; Koper, Peter C.M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To compare acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) side effects in prostate cancer patients randomized to receive 68 Gy or 78 Gy. Methods and materials: Between June 1997 and February 2003, 669 prostate cancer patients were randomized between radiotherapy with a dose of 68 Gy and 78 Gy, in 2 Gy per fraction and using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy. All T stages with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) 120 days) was scored according to the slightly adapted RTOG/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) criteria. Results: The median follow-up time was 31 months. For acute toxicity no significant differences were seen between the two randomization arms. GI toxicity Grade 2 and 3 was reported as the maximum acute toxicity in 44% and 5% of the patients, respectively. For acute GU toxicity, these figures were 41% and 13%. No significant differences between both randomization arms were seen for late GI and GU toxicity, except for rectal bleeding requiring laser treatment or transfusion (p = 0.007) and nocturia (p = 0.05). The 3-year cumulative risk of late RTOG/EORTC GI toxicity grade ≥2 was 23.2% for 68 Gy, and 26.5% for 78 Gy (p = 0.3). The 3-year risks of late RTOG/EORTC GU toxicity grade ≥2 were 28.5% and 30.2% for 68 Gy and 78 Gy, respectively (p = 0.3). Factors related to acute GI toxicity were HT (p < 0.001), a higher dose-volume group (p = 0.01), and pretreatment GI symptoms (p = 0.04). For acute GU toxicity, prognostic factors were: pretreatment GU symptoms (p < 0.001), HT (p = 0.003), and prior transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) (p = 0.02). A history of abdominal surgery (p < 0.001) and pretreatment GI symptoms (p = 0.001) were associated with a higher incidence of late GI grade ≥2 toxicity, whereas HT (p < 0.001), pretreatment GU symptoms (p < 0.001), and prior TURP (p = 0.006) were prognostic factors for late GU grade ≥2. Conclusions: Raising the dose to the prostate from 68 Gy to

  1. [Transrectal magnetotherapy of the prostate from Intramag device in prophylaxis of postoperative complications of transurethral resection of prostatic adenoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neĭmark, A I; Snegirev, I V; Neĭmark, B A

    2006-01-01

    The authors analyse preoperative preparation of 91 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Two groups of patients received conventional preparation (group 1) and magnetotherapy (group 2) before TUR of the prostate. The examination covered immune system, bacteriological indices of urine and prostatic tissue. Infection of the urinary tract is a main risk factor of complications after TUR. Conventional preoperative preparation fails to correct immunity, to change bacterial urine flora, to improve hemodynamics in the prostate. Transrectal magnetotherapy with running magnetic field eliminates deficiency of T- and B-cell immunity, raises functional activity of B-lymphocytes and phagocytic ability of neutrophils, reduces endogenic intoxication, tissue edema, bacterial contamination, number of thrombohemorrhagic complications. This leads to a decrease in the number of postoperative complications.

  2. Conformal radiation therapy of localized prostate cancer: acute tolerance and early evaluation of effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zierhut, D.; Flentje, M.; Sroka-Perez, G.; Rudat, V.; Engenhart-Cabillic, R.; Wannenmacher, M.

    1997-01-01

    Aim: In a prospective trial early effectiveness and acute toxicity of conformal 3D-planned radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer was quantified using dose-volume-histogramms and evaluated with respect of treatment technique. Results: Eleven patients (of 32) had none, 15 mild (RTOG grade 1) and 6 moderate symptoms (RTOG grade 2, mainly diarrhoea, dysuria and polyuria). Acute complications leading to treatment interruption did not occur. In 16 patients symptoms disappeared within 6 weeks after radiotherapy. Only 2 men had symptoms which lasted longer than 3 months and were endoscopically examined. Up to now no late complications were detected. Incidence and severity of toxicity was significantly (p [de

  3. Volume and hormonal effects for acute side effects of rectum and bladder during conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peeters, Stephanie T.H.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Heemsbergen, Wilma D.; Slot, Annerie; Tabak, Hans; Koper, Peter C.M.; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To identify dosimetric variables predictive of acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity and to determine whether hormonal therapy (HT) is independently associated with acute GI and GU toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated with conformal radiotherapy (RT). Methods and Materials: This analysis was performed on 336 patients participating in a multicenter (four hospitals) randomized trial comparing 68 Gy and 78 Gy. The clinical target volume consisted of the prostate with or without the seminal vesicles, depending on the risk of seminal vesicle involvement. The margin from the clinical target volume to the planning target volume was 1 cm. For these patients, the treatment plan for a total dose of 68 Gy was used, because nearly all toxicity appeared before the onset of the 10-Gy boost. Acute toxicity ( 3 months before RT). Results: Acute GI toxicity Grade 2 or worse was seen in 46% of the patients. Patients with long-term neoadjuvant HT experienced less Grade 2 or worse toxicity (27%) compared with those receiving short-term neoadjuvant HT (50%) and no HT (50%). The volumes of the prostate and seminal vesicles were significantly smaller in both groups receiving neoadjuvant HT compared with those receiving no HT. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, including the two statistically significant clinical variables neoadjuvant HT and hospital, a volume effect was found for the relative, as well as absolute, rectal wall volumes exposed to intermediate and high doses. Of all the length parameters, the relative rectal length irradiated to doses of ≥5 Gy and ≥30 Gy and absolute lengths receiving ≥5-15 and 30 Gy were significant. Acute GU toxicity Grade 2 or worse was reported in 56% of cases. For patients with pretreatment GU symptoms, the rate was 93%. The use of short-term and long-term neoadjuvant HT resulted in more GU toxicity (73% and 71%) compared with no HT (50%). In multivariate analysis, containing the variables

  4. Acute Bacterial Meningitis in Qatar: A Hospital-Based Study from 2009 to 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Fahmi Yousef; Abu-Khattab, Mohammed; Almaslamani, Eman Abdulrahman; Hassan, Abubaker Ahmed; Mohamed, Shehab Fareed; Elbuzdi, Abdurrahman Ali; Elmaki, Nada Yagoub; Anand, Deshmukh; Sanjay, Doiphode

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is a common medical condition in Qatar. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of bacterial meningitis, the frequency of each pathogen, and its sensitivity to antibiotics and risk factors for death. This retrospective study was conducted at Hamad General Hospital between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2013. We identified 117 episodes of acute bacterial meningitis in 110 patients. Their mean age was 26.4 ± 22.3 years (range: 2-74) and 81 (69.2%) of them were male patients. Fifty-nine episodes (50.4%) were community-acquired infection and fever was the most frequent symptom (94%), whereas neurosurgery is the most common underlying condition. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most common causative agent, of which 95% were oxacillin-resistant, while 63.3% of Acinetobacter spp. showed resistance to meropenem. The in-hospital mortality was 14 (12%). Only the presence of underlying diseases, hypotension, and inappropriate treatment were found to be independent predictors of mortality. Acute bacterial meningitis predominantly affected adults and coagulase-negative staphylococci species were the common causative agent in Qatar with majority of infections occurring nosocomially. More than 90% of all implicated coagulase-negative staphylococci strains were oxacillin-resistant.

  5. Acute Bacterial Meningitis in Qatar: A Hospital-Based Study from 2009 to 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahmi Yousef Khan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Bacterial meningitis is a common medical condition in Qatar. The aim of this study was to describe the clinical characteristics of bacterial meningitis, the frequency of each pathogen, and its sensitivity to antibiotics and risk factors for death. Patients and Methods. This retrospective study was conducted at Hamad General Hospital between January 1, 2009, and December 31, 2013. Results. We identified 117 episodes of acute bacterial meningitis in 110 patients. Their mean age was 26.4±22.3 years (range: 2–74 and 81 (69.2% of them were male patients. Fifty-nine episodes (50.4% were community-acquired infection and fever was the most frequent symptom (94%, whereas neurosurgery is the most common underlying condition. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most common causative agent, of which 95% were oxacillin-resistant, while 63.3% of Acinetobacter spp. showed resistance to meropenem. The in-hospital mortality was 14 (12%. Only the presence of underlying diseases, hypotension, and inappropriate treatment were found to be independent predictors of mortality. Conclusion. Acute bacterial meningitis predominantly affected adults and coagulase-negative staphylococci species were the common causative agent in Qatar with majority of infections occurring nosocomially. More than 90% of all implicated coagulase-negative staphylococci strains were oxacillin-resistant.

  6. Chronic bacterial prostatitis and irritable bowel syndrome: effectiveness of treatment with rifaximin followed by the probiotic VSL#3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicari, Enzo; Vignera, La Sandro; Castiglione, Roberto; Condorelli, Rosita A; Vicari, Lucia O; Calogero, Aldo E

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the influence of treatment with rifaximin followed by the probiotic VSL#3 versus no treatment on the progression of chronic prostatitis toward chronic microbial prostate-vesiculitis (PV) or prostate-vesiculo-epididymitis (PVE). A total of 106 selected infertile male patients with bacteriologically cured chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) were randomly prescribed rifaximin (200 mg, 2 tablets bid, for 7 days monthly for 12 months) and probiotic containing multiple strains VSL#3 (450 × 109 CFU per day) or no treatment. Ninety-five of them (89.6%) complied with the therapeutic plan and were included in this study. Group A = “6Tx/6-”: treatment for the initial 6 and no treatment for the following 6 months (n = 26); Group B = “12Tx”: 12 months of treatment (n = 22); Group C = “6-/6Tx”: no treatment for the initial 6 months and treatment in the last 6 months (n = 23); Group D = “12-”: no treatment (n = 24). The patients of Groups A = “6Tx/6-” and B = “12Tx” had the highest frequency of chronic prostatitis (88.5% and 86.4%, respectively). In contrast, group “12-”: patients had the lowest frequency of prostatitis (33.4%). The progression of prostatitis into PV in groups “6Tx/6-” (15.5%) and “6-/6Tx” (13.6%) was lower than that found in the patients of group “12-” (45.8%). Finally, no patient of groups “6Tx/6-” and “6-/6Tx” had PVE, whereas it was diagnosed in 20.8% of group “12-” patients. Long-term treatment with rifaximin and the probiotic VSL#3 is effective in lowering the progression of prostatitis into more complicated forms of male accessory gland infections in infertile patients with bacteriologically cured CBP plus IBS. PMID:24969056

  7. Acute toxicity in prostate cancer patients treated with and without image-guided radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Scott

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT increases the accuracy of treatment delivery through daily target localisation. We report on toxicity symptoms experienced during radiotherapy treatment, with and without IGRT in prostate cancer patients treated radically. Methods Between 2006 and 2009, acute toxicity data for ten symptoms were collected prospectively onto standardized assessment forms. Toxicity was scored during radiotherapy, according to the Common Terminology Criteria Adverse Events V3.0, for 275 prostate cancer patients before and after the implementation of a fiducial marker IGRT program and dose escalation from 74Gy in 37 fractions, to 78Gy in 39 fractions. Margins and planning constraints were maintained the same during the study period. The symptoms scored were urinary frequency, cystitis, bladder spasm, urinary incontinence, urinary retention, diarrhoea, haemorrhoids, proctitis, anal skin discomfort and fatigue. Analysis was conducted for the maximum grade of toxicity and the median number of days from the onset of that toxicity to the end of treatment. Results In the IGRT group, 14228 toxicity scores were analysed from 249 patients. In the non-IGRT group, 1893 toxicity scores were analysed from 26 patients. Urinary frequency ≥G3 affected 23% and 7% in the non-IGRT and IGRT group respectively (p = 0.0188. Diarrhoea ≥G2 affected 15% and 3% of patients in the non-IGRT and IGRT groups (p = 0.0174. Fatigue ≥G2 affected 23% and 8% of patients in the non-IGRT and IGRT groups (p = 0.0271. The median number of days with a toxicity was higher for ≥G2 (p = 0.0179 and ≥G3 frequency (p = 0.0027, ≥G2 diarrhoea (p = 0.0033 and ≥G2 fatigue (p = 0.0088 in the non-IGRT group compared to the IGRT group. Other toxicities were not of significant statistical difference. Conclusions In this study, prostate cancer patients treated radically with IGRT had less severe urinary frequency, diarrhoea and fatigue during treatment

  8. The acute effects of exercise on cortical excitation and psychosocial outcomes in men treated for prostate cancer: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eSanta Mina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Regular exercise improves psychological wellbeing in men treated for prostate cancer. For this population and among cancer survivors in general, the effect of a single bout of exercise on self-report or objective measures of psychological wellbeing has not been examined. We examined the acute effect of a single bout of exercise on the cortical silent period (CSP and on self-reported mood in men that have received treatment for prostate cancer. Methods: Thirty-six prostate cancer survivors were randomly assigned to 60 minutes of low to moderate intensity exercise or to a control condition. Outcomes were assessed immediately before and after either the exercise or the control condition. Results: No significant differences in baseline CSP or mood were observed following the exercise session or control conditions. Participants with higher scores of trait anxiety had significantly shorter CSP at baseline, as well as those receiving androgen deprivation therapy. Age and baseline CSP had a low-moderate, but significant negative correlation. Changes in CSP following the exercise condition were strongly negatively correlated with changes in self-reported vigor. Conclusions: While we did not observe any acute effect of exercise on the CSP in this population, the associations between CSP and trait anxiety, age, and vigor are novel findings requiring further examination.Implications for Cancer Survivors: Exercise did not acutely affect our participants in measures of psychological wellbeing. Additional mechanisms to explain the chronic psychosocial benefits of exercise previously observed in men with prostate cancer require further exploration.Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT01715064 (http://clinicaltrials.gov/show/NCT01715064

  9. The level of neuron-specific enolase and S-100 protein in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Sokhan

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic role of neuron-specific enolase (NSE and S-100 protein levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of patients with acute bacterial meningitis in the course of the disease. Materials and Methods. 54 cases of acute bacterial meningitis were analyzed, among them – 26 with pneumococcal and 28 with meningococcal etiology. Patients were divided into groups depending on the severity and etiology of disease. In addition to routine laboratory methods, we analyzed the CSF levels of S-100 protein and NSE at admission and after 10 – 12 days of treatment. 12 patients with acute respiratory infections and meningism were examined as a comparison group. Results. In all patients with acute bacterial meningitis CSF NSE and protein S-100 levels were significantly higher than in the control group (P <0,05. CSF neuro specific proteins level was in direct dependence on severity of the disease, and in patients with severe disease was significantly higher than in patients with moderate severity and in the control group (P <0,01. After 10 – 12 days of treatment, the level of the NSE and S-100 protein decreased, but in severe cases was still higher than in the control group (P <0,05. Conclusions. Increased cerebrospinal fluid NSE and S – 100 protein levels shows the presence and value of neurons and glial cells damage in patients with acute bacterial meningitis. CSF S-100 protein and neuron-specific enolase levels help to determine the severity of neurons destruction and glial cells in patients with acute bacterial meningitis. Level of neurospecific protein is in direct proportion to the severity of the disease and is the highest in patients with severe cases (P<0,05. It confirms the diagnostic and prognostic value of CSF neurospecific protein determination in patients with bacterial meningitis.

  10. Correlates of Bacterial Ulcers and Acute HSV-2 Infection among Men with Genital Ulcer Disease in South Africa: Age, Recent Sexual Behaviors, and HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leichliter, Jami S; Lewis, David A; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Data from baseline surveys and STI/HIV laboratory tests (n=615 men) were used to examine correlates of bacterial ulcers ( Treponema pallidum , Haemophilus ducreyi , or Chlamydia trachomatis L1-L3 detected in ulcer) and acute HSV-2 ulcers (HSV-2 positive ulcer specimen, HSV-2 sero-negative, and negative for bacterial pathogens) vs. recurrent HSV-2 ulcers (sero-positive), separately. Compared to men with recurrent HSV-2 ulcers, men with bacterial ulcers had larger ulcers but were less likely to be HIV-positive whereas men with acute HSV-2 ulcers were younger with fewer partners. Acute HIV was higher among men with bacterial and acute HSV-2 ulcers; the difference was not statistically significant.

  11. APPLICATION OF TRANSURETHRAL MICROWAVE THERMOTHERAPY FOR PATIENTS WITH ACUTE URINARY RETENTION AND SEVERE COMBINED COMORBIDITY FROM BENIGN PROSTATIC HYPERPLASIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mysak

    2014-12-01

    Conclusions. Taking into consideration the minimally invasive nature, favourable tolerability and absence of adverse effects, TUMT can be considered a method of choice in patients with BPH-triggered AUR and contraindications to major surgical treatments and general anaesthesia. Remote outcomes of TUMT may be evaluated as satisfactory, with good effects in 71.62% patients. However in prostatic volumes exceeding 85 cm3 and pronounced intravesical pattern of BPH growth the efficcacy of TUMT is arguable. KEY WORDS: benign prostatic hyperplasia, acute urinary retention, transurethral microwave hermotherapy.

  12. Acute Sleep Deprivation Enhances Post-Infection Sleep and Promotes Survival during Bacterial Infection in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tzu-Hsing; Williams, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Sleep is known to increase as an acute response to infection. However, the function of this behavioral response in host defense is not well understood. To address this problem, we evaluated the effect of acute sleep deprivation on post-infection sleep and immune function in Drosophila. Setting: Laboratory. Participants: Drosophila melanogaster. Methods and Results: Flies were subjected to sleep deprivation before (early DEP) or after (late DEP) bacterial infection. Relative to a non-deprived control, flies subjected to early DEP had enhanced sleep after infection as well as increased bacterial clearance and survival outcome. Flies subjected to late DEP experienced enhanced sleep following the deprivation period, and showed a modest improvement in survival outcome. Continuous DEP (early and late DEP) throughout infection also enhanced sleep later during infection and improved survival. However, improved survival in flies subjected to late or continuous DEP did not occur until after flies had experienced sleep. During infection, both early and late DEP enhanced NFκB transcriptional activity as measured by a luciferase reporter (κB-luc) in living flies. Early DEP also increased NFκB activity prior to infection. Flies that were deficient in expression of either the Relish or Dif NFκB transcription factors showed normal responses to early DEP. However, the effect of early DEP on post-infection sleep and survival was abolished in double mutants, which indicates that Relish and Dif have redundant roles in this process. Conclusions: Acute sleep deprivation elevated NFκB-dependent activity, increased post-infection sleep, and improved survival during bacterial infection. Citation: Kuo TH, Williams JA. Acute sleep deprivation enhances post-infection sleep and promotes survival during bacterial infection in Drosophila. SLEEP 2014;37(5):859-869. PMID:24790264

  13. 3-D conformal radiotherapy of localized prostate cancer: A subgroup analysis of rectoscopic findings prior to radiotherapy and acute/late rectal side effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldner, Gregor; Zimmermann, Frank; Feldmann, Horst; Glocker, Stefan; Wachter-Gerstner, Natascha; Geinitz, Hans; Becker, Gerd; Poetzi, Regina; Wambersie, Andre; Bamberg, Michael; Molls, Michael; Wachter, Stefan; Poetter, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Background and purpose: To identify endoscopic pathological findings prior to radiotherapy and a possible correlation with acute or chronic rectal side effects after three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) for prostate cancer. Patients and methods: Between 03/99 and 07/02, a total of 298 patients, who consented in a voluntary rectoscopy prior to radiotherapy were included into the analysis. Patients were treated with a total dose of either 70 or 74 Gy. Pathological rectoscopic findings like hemorrhoids, polyps or diverticula were documented. Acute and late rectal side effects were scored using the EORTC/RTOG score. Results: The most frequent pathological endosopic findings were hemorrhoids (35%), polyps (24%) and diverticula (13%). Rectal toxicity was mostly low to moderate. Grade 0/1 cumulative acute and late rectal side effects were 82 and 84%, grade 2 were 18 and 17%, respectively. We could not identify any correlation between preexisting pathological findings and rectal side effects by statistical analysis. Conclusions: There is no evidence that prostate cancer patients presenting with endoscopic verified pathological findings in the rectal mucosa at diagnosis are at an increased risk to develop rectal side effects when treated with 3D-CRT of the prostatic region

  14. Comparison of patient-reported acute urinary and sexual toxicity scores in a 6- versus 2-fraction course of high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy monotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragab, Omar; Park, Sang-June; Zhang, Mingle; Wang, Jason; Velez, Maria; Demanes, David J.; Banerjee, Robyn; Patel, Shyamal; Kamrave, Mitchell

    2018-01-01

    To identify differences in acute urinary and sexual toxicity between a 6-fraction and 2-fraction high-dose-rate brachytherapy monotherapy regimen and correlate dosimetric constraints to short-term toxicity. A single institution retrospective study of 116 men with prostate cancer treated with HDR monotherapy from 2010 to 2015 was conducted. Eighty-one men had 7.25 Gy × 6-fractions and 35 men had 13.5 Gy × 2-fractions. Patients had two CT-planned implants spaced 1–2 weeks apart. Patient baseline characteristics, International Prostate Symptom Scores (IPSS) and Sexual Health Inventory for Men (SHIM) scores were collected pre-treatment and 3, 6 and 12 months post-implantation. Mixed effect modelling was undertaken to compare baseline, 1–6 month and 7–12 month scores between groups. Poisson regression analysis was performed to correlate dosimetric constraints with acute toxicity. There was no difference between baseline and post-implantation IPSS scores between 6-fraction and 2-fraction groups. SHIM scores for men treated with 6-fractions had a steeper decline at 1–6 months, but resolved at 7–12 months. Pre-treatment alpha-blocker use correlated with worse short-term acute urinary toxicity. Worsened SHIM score correlated with increasing age, diabetes mellitus and androgen-deprivation therapy. In a dosimetric analysis of outcomes, prostate V150 dose and bladder wall (D01.cc, D1cc, D2cc) dose correlated with increased IPSS score. No increased acute genitourinary or sexual dysfunction has been observed in men when transitioning from 6-fraction to 2-fraction HDR monotherapy. A dosimetric correlation was found between the V150 and bladder wall doses for acute urinary toxicity. Future research should continue to standardize and validate dose constraints for prostate HDR monotherapy patients.

  15. Factors influencing incidence of acute grade 2 morbidity in conformal and standard radiation treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanks, Gerald E.; Schultheiss, Timothy E.; Hunt, Margie A.; Epstein, Barry

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: The fundament hypothesis of conformal radiation therapy is that tumor control can be increased by using conformal treatment techniques that allow a higher tumor dose while maintaining an acceptable level of complications. To test this hypothesis, it is necessary first to estimate the incidence of morbidity for both standard and conformal fields. In this study, we examine factors that influence the incidence of acute grade 2 morbidity in patients treated with conformal and standard radiation treatment for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Two hundred and forty-seven consecutive patients treated with conformal technique are combined with and compared to 162 consecutive patients treated with standard techniques. The conformal technique includes special immobilization by a cast, careful identification of the target volume in three dimensions, localization of the inferior border of the prostate using the retrograde urethrogram, and individually shaped portals that conform to the Planning Target Volume (PTV). Univariate analysis compares differences in the incidence of RTOG-EORTC grade two acute morbidity by technique, T stage, age, irradiated volume, and dose. Multivariate logistic regression includes these same variables. Results: In nearly all categories, the conformal treatment group experienced significantly fewer acute grade 2 complications than the standard treatment group. Only volume (prostate ± whole pelvis) and technique (conformal vs. standard) were significantly related to incidence of morbidity on multivariate analysis. When dose is treated as a continuous variable (rather than being dichotomized into two levels), a trend is observed on multivariate analysis, but it does not reach significant levels. The incidence of acute grade 2 morbidity in patients 65 years or older is significantly reduced by use of the conformal technique. Conclusion: The conformal technique is associated with fewer grade 2 acute toxicities for all patients. This

  16. Evaluation of acute bacterial rhino sinusitis in asthma patients based on clinical parameters and imaging studies, together with ear, nose and throat examination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faure, Alecsandra Calil Moises; Santoro, Ilka Lopes; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Fernandes, Ana Luisa Godoy [Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). School of Medicine from Sao Paulo. Dept. of Internal Medicine]. E-mail: analgf@terra.com.br; analuisa@pneumo.epm.br; Weckx, Luc Louis Maurice [Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). School of Medicine from Sao Paulo. Otorhinolaryngology; Fernandes, Artur da Rocha Correa [Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP/EPM), SP (Brazil). School of Medicine from Sao Paulo. Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging

    2008-06-15

    Objective: To evaluate paranasal sinuses in patients with stable or acute asthma in order to determine the prevalence of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Methods: A cross-sectional study including 30 patients with acute asthma (73% females) treated in the emergency room and 30 patients with stable asthma (80% females) regularly monitored as outpatients. All patients completed a questionnaire on respiratory signs and symptoms and were submitted to ear, nose and throat (ENT) examination, as well as to X-ray and computed tomography (CT) imaging of the sinuses. Results: Based on the clinical diagnosis, the prevalence of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis was 40% in the patients with acute asthma and 3% in those with stable asthma. The ENT examination findings and the imaging findings in isolation were not useful to confirm the diagnosis. Conclusions: In themselves, ENT examination findings, X-ray findings and CT findings were not useful for the diagnosis of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Our results provide further evidence that a clinical diagnosis of bacterial rhinosinusitis should be made with caution. (author)

  17. Evaluation of acute bacterial rhino sinusitis in asthma patients based on clinical parameters and imaging studies, together with ear, nose and throat examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, Alecsandra Calil Moises; Santoro, Ilka Lopes; Lederman, Henrique Manoel; Fernandes, Ana Luisa Godoy; Weckx, Luc Louis Maurice; Fernandes, Artur da Rocha Correa

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate paranasal sinuses in patients with stable or acute asthma in order to determine the prevalence of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Methods: A cross-sectional study including 30 patients with acute asthma (73% females) treated in the emergency room and 30 patients with stable asthma (80% females) regularly monitored as outpatients. All patients completed a questionnaire on respiratory signs and symptoms and were submitted to ear, nose and throat (ENT) examination, as well as to X-ray and computed tomography (CT) imaging of the sinuses. Results: Based on the clinical diagnosis, the prevalence of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis was 40% in the patients with acute asthma and 3% in those with stable asthma. The ENT examination findings and the imaging findings in isolation were not useful to confirm the diagnosis. Conclusions: In themselves, ENT examination findings, X-ray findings and CT findings were not useful for the diagnosis of acute bacterial rhinosinusitis. Our results provide further evidence that a clinical diagnosis of bacterial rhinosinusitis should be made with caution. (author)

  18. Diagnosing viral and bacterial respiratory infections in acute COPD exacerbations by an electronic nose : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Geffen, Wouter H; Bruins, Marcel; Kerstjens, Huib A M

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory infections, viral or bacterial, are a common cause of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). A rapid, point-of-care, and easy-to-use tool distinguishing viral and bacterial from other causes would be valuable in routine clinical care. An electronic nose

  19. Procalcitonin Identifies Cell Injury, Not Bacterial Infection, in Acute Liver Failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jody A Rule

    Full Text Available Because acute liver failure (ALF patients share many clinical features with severe sepsis and septic shock, identifying bacterial infection clinically in ALF patients is challenging. Procalcitonin (PCT has proven to be a useful marker in detecting bacterial infection. We sought to determine whether PCT discriminated between presence and absence of infection in patients with ALF.Retrospective analysis of data and samples of 115 ALF patients from the United States Acute Liver Failure Study Group randomly selected from 1863 patients were classified for disease severity and ALF etiology. Twenty uninfected chronic liver disease (CLD subjects served as controls.Procalcitonin concentrations in most samples were elevated, with median values for all ALF groups near or above a 2.0 ng/mL cut-off that generally indicates severe sepsis. While PCT concentrations increased somewhat with apparent liver injury severity, there were no differences in PCT levels between the pre-defined severity groups-non-SIRS and SIRS groups with no documented infections and Severe Sepsis and Septic Shock groups with documented infections, (p = 0.169. PCT values from CLD patients differed from all ALF groups (median CLD PCT value 0.104 ng/mL, (p ≤0.001. Subjects with acetaminophen (APAP toxicity, many without evidence of infection, demonstrated median PCT >2.0 ng/mL, regardless of SIRS features, while some culture positive subjects had PCT values <2.0 ng/mL.While PCT appears to be a robust assay for detecting bacterial infection in the general population, there was poor discrimination between ALF patients with or without bacterial infection presumably because of the massive inflammation observed. Severe hepatocyte necrosis with inflammation results in elevated PCT levels, rendering this biomarker unreliable in the ALF setting.

  20. The clinical presentation of acute bacterial meningitis varies with age, sex and duration of illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson Kostenniemi, Urban; Norman, David; Borgström, Malin; Silfverdal, Sven Arne

    2015-11-01

    This Swedish study reviewed differences in clinical presentation and laboratory findings of acute bacterial meningitis in children aged one month to 17 years in Västerbotten County, Sweden. A register-based study was performed for the period 1986 to 2013 using the Västerbotten County Council's patient registration and laboratory records at the Department of Laboratory Medicine at Umeå University Hospital. The medical records were reviewed to extract data and confirm the diagnosis. We found 103 cases of acute bacterial meningitis, and Haemophilus influenzae was the most common pathogen, causing 40.8% of all cases, followed by Streptococcus pneumoniae at 30.1% and Neisseria meningitidis at 9.7%. Significant differences in clinical presentation and laboratory findings were found. Younger children were more unwell than older ones and had more diffuse symptoms on admission. In addition, important sex-related differences were found that might explain the higher case fatality rates for boys than girls. For example, boys tended to have a higher disturbance in the blood-brain barrier, which is known to be a negative prognostic factor. This study showed that clinical presentation for acute bacterial meningitis varied with age and sex and, to a lesser extent, on the duration of the illness. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Prostate hypofractionated radiation therapy with injection of hyaluronic acid: acute toxicities in a phase 2 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapet, Olivier; Decullier, Evelyne; Bin, Sylvie; Faix, Antoine; Ruffion, Alain; Jalade, Patrice; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Udrescu, Corina; Enachescu, Ciprian; Azria, David

    2015-03-15

    Hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) in prostate cancer can be developed only if the risk of rectal toxicity is controlled. In a multicenter phase 2 trial, hypofractionated irradiation was combined with an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) to preserve the rectal wall. Tolerance of the injection and acute toxicity rates are reported. The study was designed to assess late grade 2 toxicity rates. The results described here correspond to the secondary objectives. Acute toxicity was defined as occurring during RT or within 3 months after RT and graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. HA tolerance was evaluated with a visual analog scale during the injection and 30 minutes after injection and then by use of the Common Terminology Criteria at each visit. From 2010 to 2012, 36 patients with low-risk to intermediate-risk prostate cancer were included. The HA injection induced a mean pain score of 4.6/10 ± 2.3. Thirty minutes after the injection, 2 patients still reported pain (2/10 and 3/10), which persisted after the intervention. Thirty-three patients experienced at least 1 acute genitourinary toxicity and 20 patients at least 1 acute gastrointestinal toxicity. Grade 2 toxicities were reported for 19 patients with urinary obstruction, frequency, or both and for 1 patient with proctitis. No grade 3 or 4 toxicities were reported. At the 3-month visit, 4 patients described grade 2 obstruction or frequency, and no patients had any grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities. The injection of HA makes it possible to deliver hypofractionated irradiation over 4 weeks with a dose per fraction of > 3 Gy, with limited acute rectal toxicity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Prostate Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Injection of Hyaluronic Acid: Acute Toxicities in a Phase 2 Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapet, Olivier; Decullier, Evelyne; Bin, Sylvie; Faix, Antoine; Ruffion, Alain; Jalade, Patrice; Fenoglietto, Pascal; Udrescu, Corina; Enachescu, Ciprian; Azria, David

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) in prostate cancer can be developed only if the risk of rectal toxicity is controlled. In a multicenter phase 2 trial, hypofractionated irradiation was combined with an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) to preserve the rectal wall. Tolerance of the injection and acute toxicity rates are reported. Methods and Materials: The study was designed to assess late grade 2 toxicity rates. The results described here correspond to the secondary objectives. Acute toxicity was defined as occurring during RT or within 3 months after RT and graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. HA tolerance was evaluated with a visual analog scale during the injection and 30 minutes after injection and then by use of the Common Terminology Criteria at each visit. Results: From 2010 to 2012, 36 patients with low-risk to intermediate-risk prostate cancer were included. The HA injection induced a mean pain score of 4.6/10 ± 2.3. Thirty minutes after the injection, 2 patients still reported pain (2/10 and 3/10), which persisted after the intervention. Thirty-three patients experienced at least 1 acute genitourinary toxicity and 20 patients at least 1 acute gastrointestinal toxicity. Grade 2 toxicities were reported for 19 patients with urinary obstruction, frequency, or both and for 1 patient with proctitis. No grade 3 or 4 toxicities were reported. At the 3-month visit, 4 patients described grade 2 obstruction or frequency, and no patients had any grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities. Conclusions: The injection of HA makes it possible to deliver hypofractionated irradiation over 4 weeks with a dose per fraction of > 3 Gy, with limited acute rectal toxicity

  3. Prostate Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Injection of Hyaluronic Acid: Acute Toxicities in a Phase 2 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapet, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.chapet@chu-lyon.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); EMR3738, Université Lyon 1, Lyon (France); Decullier, Evelyne; Bin, Sylvie [Pole Information Médicale Evaluation Recherche, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Lyon (France); EA SIS, Université de Lyon, Lyon (France); Faix, Antoine [Department of Urology, Clinique Beausoleil, Montpellier (France); Ruffion, Alain [Université Lyon 1, Lyon (France); Department of Urology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Jalade, Patrice [Department of Medical Physics, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Fenoglietto, Pascal [Department of Radiation Oncology and Physics, Institut du Cancer de Montpellier, Montpellier (France); Udrescu, Corina; Enachescu, Ciprian [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospices Civils de Lyon, Centre Hospitalier Lyon Sud, Pierre Benite (France); Azria, David [Department of Radiation Oncology and Physics, Institut du Cancer de Montpellier, Montpellier (France)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Hypofractionated radiation therapy (RT) in prostate cancer can be developed only if the risk of rectal toxicity is controlled. In a multicenter phase 2 trial, hypofractionated irradiation was combined with an injection of hyaluronic acid (HA) to preserve the rectal wall. Tolerance of the injection and acute toxicity rates are reported. Methods and Materials: The study was designed to assess late grade 2 toxicity rates. The results described here correspond to the secondary objectives. Acute toxicity was defined as occurring during RT or within 3 months after RT and graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0. HA tolerance was evaluated with a visual analog scale during the injection and 30 minutes after injection and then by use of the Common Terminology Criteria at each visit. Results: From 2010 to 2012, 36 patients with low-risk to intermediate-risk prostate cancer were included. The HA injection induced a mean pain score of 4.6/10 ± 2.3. Thirty minutes after the injection, 2 patients still reported pain (2/10 and 3/10), which persisted after the intervention. Thirty-three patients experienced at least 1 acute genitourinary toxicity and 20 patients at least 1 acute gastrointestinal toxicity. Grade 2 toxicities were reported for 19 patients with urinary obstruction, frequency, or both and for 1 patient with proctitis. No grade 3 or 4 toxicities were reported. At the 3-month visit, 4 patients described grade 2 obstruction or frequency, and no patients had any grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicities. Conclusions: The injection of HA makes it possible to deliver hypofractionated irradiation over 4 weeks with a dose per fraction of > 3 Gy, with limited acute rectal toxicity.

  4. Diagnosis and treatment of chronic bacterial prostatitis and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: a consensus guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Jon; Abrahams, Mark; Doble, Andrew; Cooper, Alison

    2015-10-01

    To improve awareness and recognition of chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) and chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS) among non-specialists and patients. To provide guidance to healthcare professionals treating patients with CBP and CP/CPPS, in both non-specialist and specialist settings. To promote efficient referral of care between non-specialists and specialists and the involvement of the multidisciplinary team (MDT). The guideline population were men with CBP or CP/CPPS (persistent or recurrent symptoms and no other urogenital pathology for ≥3 of the previous 6 months). Consensus recommendations for the guidelines were based on a search to identify literature on the diagnosis and management of CBP and CP/CPPS (published between 1999 and February 2014). A Delphi panel process was used where high-quality, published evidence was lacking. CBP and CP/CPPS can present with a wide range of clinical manifestations. The four main symptom domains are urogenital pain, lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS - voiding or storage symptoms), psychological issues and sexual dysfunction. Patients should be managed according to their individual symptom pattern. Options for first-line treatment include antibiotics, α-adrenergic antagonists (if voiding LUTS are present) and simple analgesics. Repeated use of antibiotics, such as quinolones, should be avoided if there is no obvious symptomatic benefit from infection control or cultures do not support an infectious cause. Early use of treatments targeting neuropathic pain and/or referral to specialist services should be considered for patients who do not respond to initial measures. An MDT approach (urologists, pain specialists, nurse specialists, specialist physiotherapists, general practitioners, cognitive behavioural therapists/psychologists, and sexual health specialists) is recommended. Patients should be fully informed about the possible underlying causes and treatment options, including an explanation of

  5. [Acute bacterial meningitis as an occupational disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seixas, Diana; Lebre, Ana; Crespo, Pedro; Ferreira, Eugénia; Serra, José Eduardo; Saraiva da Cunha, José Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus suis is a zoonotic pathogen with worldwide distribution, responsible for more than 700 human cases globally reported. This infection affects mostly men, exposed to pig or pork, which leads to its usual classification as an occupational disease. We report a case of acute bacterial meningitis in a 44 years old male. According to his past medical history, the patient had chronic alcoholism and worked in a restaurant as a piglet roaster. Microbiological examination of blood and CSF revealed S. suis. After 14 days of ceftriaxone the patient fully recovered. The authors review the clinical reports previously described in Portugal. In all of them was possible to identify risk exposition to pork. We alert to this microorganism's importance in Portugal where it is probably underdiagnosed.

  6. Induced Chronic Prostatitis in Rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Similarly, compared with reference group (176.1 ± 12.1 pg/ml), IL-1β level of prostate tissues of high-dose PCS ..... Fig 1: Effect of PCS extract on the histomorphology of prostate tissues in rats. ... involved with cellular recruitment, fever, acute.

  7. [Bacterial biofilms and infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasa, I; Del Pozo, J L; Penadés, J R; Leiva, J

    2005-01-01

    In developed countries we tend to think of heart disease and the numerous forms of cancer as the main causes of mortality, but on a global scale infectious diseases come close, or may even be ahead: 14.9 million deaths in 2002 compared to cardiovascular diseases (16.9 million deaths) and cancer (7.1 million deaths) (WHO report 2004). The infectious agents responsible for human mortality have evolved as medical techniques and hygienic measures have changed. Modern-day acute infectious diseases caused by specialized bacterial pathogens such as diphtheria, tetanus, cholera, plague, which represented the main causes of death at the beginning of XX century, have been effectively controlled with antibiotics and vaccines. In their place, more than half of the infectious diseases that affect mildly immunocompromised patients involve bacterial species that are commensal with the human body; these can produce chronic infections, are resistant to antimicrobial agents and there is no effective vaccine against them. Examples of these infections are the otitis media, native valve endocarditis, chronic urinary infections, bacterial prostatitis, osteomyelitis and all the infections related to medical devices. Direct analysis of the surface of medical devices or of tissues that have been foci of chronic infections shows the presence of large numbers of bacteria surrounded by an exopolysaccharide matrix, which has been named the "biofilm". Inside the biofilm, bacteria grow protected from the action of the antibodies, phagocytic cells and antimicrobial treatments. In this article, we describe the role of bacterial biofilms in human persistent infections.

  8. Diagnosing viral and bacterial respiratory infections in acute COPD exacerbations by an electronic nose: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Geffen, Wouter H; Bruins, Marcel; Kerstjens, Huib A M

    2016-06-16

    Respiratory infections, viral or bacterial, are a common cause of acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). A rapid, point-of-care, and easy-to-use tool distinguishing viral and bacterial from other causes would be valuable in routine clinical care. An electronic nose (e-nose) could fit this profile but has never been tested in this setting before. In a single-center registered trial (NTR 4601) patients admitted with AECOPD were tested with the Aeonose(®) electronic nose, and a diagnosis of viral or bacterial infection was obtained by bacterial culture on sputa and viral PCR on nose swabs. A neural network with leave-10%-out cross-validation was used to assess the e-nose data. Forty three patients were included. In the bacterial infection model, 22 positive cases were tested versus the negatives; and similarly 18 positive cases were tested in the viral infection model. The Aeonose was able to distinguish between COPD-subjects suffering from a viral infection and COPD patients without infection, showing an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.74. Similarly, for bacterial infections, an AUC of 0.72 was obtained. The Aeonose e-nose yields promising results in 'smelling' the presence or absence of a viral or bacterial respiratory infection during an acute exacerbation of COPD. Validation of these results using a new and large cohort is required before introduction into clinical practice.

  9. Acute binge drinking increases serum endotoxin and bacterial DNA levels in healthy individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Bala

    Full Text Available Binge drinking, the most common form of alcohol consumption, is associated with increased mortality and morbidity; yet, its biological consequences are poorly defined. Previous studies demonstrated that chronic alcohol use results in increased gut permeability and increased serum endotoxin levels that contribute to many of the biological effects of chronic alcohol, including alcoholic liver disease. In this study, we evaluated the effects of acute binge drinking in healthy adults on serum endotoxin levels. We found that acute alcohol binge resulted in a rapid increase in serum endotoxin and 16S rDNA, a marker of bacterial translocation from the gut. Compared to men, women had higher blood alcohol and circulating endotoxin levels. In addition, alcohol binge caused a prolonged increase in acute phase protein levels in the systemic circulation. The biological significance of the in vivo endotoxin elevation was underscored by increased levels of inflammatory cytokines, TNFα and IL-6, and chemokine, MCP-1, measured in total blood after in vitro lipopolysaccharide stimulation. Our findings indicate that even a single alcohol binge results in increased serum endotoxin levels likely due to translocation of gut bacterial products and disturbs innate immune responses that can contribute to the deleterious effects of binge drinking.

  10. utility of prostate specific antigen (psa) in the indigenous african man

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    diagnosed with Acute Prostatitis, Benign Prostate Hyperplasia (BPH) and Prostate. Cancer in ... Conclusions: The indigenous black African man has high levels of PSA even in benign ... to have other non-prostatic causes of bladder outlet.

  11. A novel host-proteome signature for distinguishing between acute bacterial and viral infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kfir Oved

    Full Text Available Bacterial and viral infections are often clinically indistinguishable, leading to inappropriate patient management and antibiotic misuse. Bacterial-induced host proteins such as procalcitonin, C-reactive protein (CRP, and Interleukin-6, are routinely used to support diagnosis of infection. However, their performance is negatively affected by inter-patient variability, including time from symptom onset, clinical syndrome, and pathogens. Our aim was to identify novel viral-induced host proteins that can complement bacterial-induced proteins to increase diagnostic accuracy. Initially, we conducted a bioinformatic screen to identify putative circulating host immune response proteins. The resulting 600 candidates were then quantitatively screened for diagnostic potential using blood samples from 1002 prospectively recruited patients with suspected acute infectious disease and controls with no apparent infection. For each patient, three independent physicians assigned a diagnosis based on comprehensive clinical and laboratory investigation including PCR for 21 pathogens yielding 319 bacterial, 334 viral, 112 control and 98 indeterminate diagnoses; 139 patients were excluded based on predetermined criteria. The best performing host-protein was TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL (area under the curve [AUC] of 0.89; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.86 to 0.91, which was consistently up-regulated in viral infected patients. We further developed a multi-protein signature using logistic-regression on half of the patients and validated it on the remaining half. The signature with the highest precision included both viral- and bacterial-induced proteins: TRAIL, Interferon gamma-induced protein-10, and CRP (AUC of 0.94; 95% CI, 0.92 to 0.96. The signature was superior to any of the individual proteins (P<0.001, as well as routinely used clinical parameters and their combinations (P<0.001. It remained robust across different physiological systems

  12. Differential Modulation of Transcription Factors and Cytoskeletal Proteins in Prostate Carcinoma Cells by a Bacterial Lactone

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    Senthil R. Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study tested the effect of a bacterial lactone N-(3-oxododecanoyl-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL on the cytoskeletal and transcriptional genes and proteins in prostate adenocarcinoma (PA cells (DU145 and LNCaP and prostate small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (SCNC PC3 cells including their cellular viability and apoptosis. Our data indicate that cell migration and colony formation were affected in the presence of C12-HSL. C12-HSL induced apoptosis and altered viability of both PA and SCNC cells in a concentration dependent manner as measured by fluorescence and chemiluminescence assays. Compared to PCa cells, noncancerous prostate epithelial cells (RWPE1 were resistant to modification by C12-HSL. Further, the viability of PC3 cells in 3D matrix was suppressed by C12-HSL treatment as detected using calcein AM fluorescence in situ. C12-HSL treatment induced cytoskeletal associated protein expression of vinculin and RhoC, which may have implications in cancer cell motility, adhesion, and metastasis. IQGAP protein expression was reduced in DU145 and RWPE1 cells in the presence of C12-HSL. C12-HSL decreased STAT3 phosphorylation in DU145 cells but increased STAT1 protein phosphorylation in PC3 and LNCaP cells. Overall, these studies indicate that C12-HSL can trigger changes in transcription factors and cytoskeletal proteins and thereby modulate growth and migration properties of PCa cells.

  13. Dependency of cerebral blood flow upon mean arterial pressure in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten; Larsen, Fin Stolze; Qvist, Jesper

    2000-01-01

    Diseases, Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark. PATIENTS: Sixteen adult patients with acute bacterial meningitis. INTERVENTION: Infusion of norepinephrine to increase MAP. MEASUREMENTS: During a rise in MAP induced by norepinephrine infusion, we measured relative changes in CBF by transcranial Doppler......OBJECTIVE: Patients with acute bacterial meningitis are often treated with sympathomimetics to maintain an adequate mean arterial pressure (MAP). We studied the influence of such therapy on cerebral blood flow (CBF). DESIGN: Prospective physiologic trial. SETTING: The Department of Infectious....... Autoregulation was classified as impaired if Vmean increased by >10% per 30 mm Hg increase in MAP and if no lower limit of autoregulation was identified by the computer program; otherwise, autoregulation was classified as preserved. MAIN RESULTS: Initially, Vmean increased from a median value of 46 cm/sec (range...

  14. Intravenous piperacillin/tazobactam plus fluoroquinolone prophylaxis prior to prostate ultrasound biopsy reduces serious infectious complications and is cost effective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remynse LC

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Louis C Remynse III, Patrick J Sweeney, Kevin A Brewton, Jay M LonswayUrology Associates of Battle Creek, PC, Battle Creek, MI, USAAbstract: Infectious complications related to prostate ultrasound and biopsy have increased in the past decade with the emergence of increasing fluoroquinolone bacterial resistance. We investigated the addition of intravenous (iv piperacillin/tazobactam immediately prior to prostate ultrasound and biopsy with standard fluoroquinolone prophylaxis to determine if it would decrease the incidence of serious infectious complications after prostate ultrasound and biopsy. Group 1 patients were a historic control of 197 patients who underwent prostate ultrasound and biopsy with standard fluoroquinolone prophylaxis. Group 2 patients, 104 patients, received standard fluoroquinolone prophylaxis and the addition of a single dose of iv piperacillin/tazobactam 30 minutes prior to prostate ultrasound and biopsy. There were ten serious bacterial infectious complications in group 1 patients. No patients in group 2 developed serious bacterial infections after prostate ultrasound and biopsy. There was approximately a 5% incidence of serious bacterial infection in group 1 patients. Subgroup analysis revealed an almost 2.5 times increased risk of infection in diabetes patients undergoing prostate ultrasound and biopsy. There was a 10% risk of serious bacterial infection in diabetics compared with a 3.8% risk group 1 nondiabetes patients. The addition of a single dose of iv piperacillin/tazobactam along with standard fluoroquinolone prophylaxis substantially reduces the risk of serious bacterial infection after prostate ultrasound and biopsy (P < 0.02.Keywords: piperacillin/tazobactam, fluoroquinolone, prostate biopsy, infectious complications

  15. Multiparametric MR imaging in diagnosis of chronic prostatitis and its differentiation from prostate cancer

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    Vivek Kumar Sah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic prostatitis is a heterogeneous condition with high prevalence rate. Chronic prostatitis has overlap in clinical presentation with other prostate disorders and is one of the causes of high serum prostate specific antigen (PSA level. Chronic prostatitis, unlike acute prostatitis, is difficult to diagnose reliably and accurately on the clinical grounds alone. Not only this, it is also challenging to differentiate chronic prostatitis from prostate cancer with imaging modalities like TRUS and conventional MR Imaging, as the findings can mimic those of prostate cancer. Even biopsy doesn't play promising role in the diagnosis of chronic prostatitis as it has limited sensitivity and specificity. As a result of this, chronic prostatitis may be misdiagnosed as a malignant condition and end up in aggressive surgical management resulting in increased morbidity. This warrants the need of reliable diagnostic tool which has ability not only to diagnose it reliably but also to differentiate it from the prostate cancer. Recently, it is suggested that multiparametric MR Imaging of the prostate could improve the diagnostic accuracy of the prostate cancer. This review is based on the critically published literature and aims to provide an overview of multiparamateric MRI techniques in the diagnosis of chronic prostatitis and its differentiation from prostate cancer.

  16. Prostate-Specific G-Protein Coupled Receptor, an Emerging Biomarker Regulating Inflammation and Prostate Cancer Invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, M; Siwko, S; Liu, M

    2016-01-01

    Prostate cancer is highly prevalent among men in developed countries, but a significant proportion of detected cancers remain indolent, never progressing into aggressive carcinomas. This highlights the need to develop refined biomarkers that can distinguish between indolent and potentially dangerous cases. The prostate-specific G-protein coupled receptor (PSGR, or OR51E2) is an olfactory receptor family member with highly specific expression in human prostate epithelium that is highly overexpressed in PIN and prostate cancer. PSGR has been functionally implicated in prostate cancer cell invasiveness, suggesting a potential role in the transition to metastatic PCa. Recently, transgenic mice overexpressing PSGR in the prostate were reported to develop an acute inflammatory response followed by emergence of low grade PIN, whereas mice with compound PSGR overexpression and loss of PTEN exhibited accelerated formation of invasive prostate adenocarcinoma. This article will review recent PSGR findings with a focus on its role as a potential prostate cancer biomarker and regulator of prostate cancer invasion and inflammation.

  17. Acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity of image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer using a daily water-filled endorectal balloon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deville, Curtiland; Both, Stefan; Bui, Viet; Hwang, Wei-Ting; Tan, Kay-See; Schaer, Mattia; Tochner, Zelig; Vapiwala, Neha

    2012-01-01

    Our purpose was to report acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity rates for prostate cancer patients undergoing image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT) with a daily endorectal water-filled balloon (ERB H2O ), and assess associations with planning parameters and pretreatment clinical characteristics. The first 100 patients undergoing prostate and proximal seminal vesicle IG-IMRT with indexed-lumen 100 cc ERB H2O to 79.2 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions at our institution from 12/2008- 12/2010 were assessed. Pretreatment characteristics, organ-at-risk dose volume histograms, and maximum GU and GI toxicities (CTCAE 3.0) were evaluated. Logistic regression models evaluated univariate association between toxicities and dosimetric parameters, and uni- and multivariate association between toxicities and pretreatment characteristics. Mean age was 68 (range 51–88). Thirty-two, 49, and 19 patients were low, intermediate, and high-risk, respectively; 40 received concurrent androgen deprivation. No grade 3 or greater toxicities were recorded. Maximum GI toxicity was grade 0, 1, and 2 in 69%, 23%, and 8%, respectively. Infield (defined as 1 cm above/below the CTV) rectal mean/median doses, D75, V30, and V40 and hemorrhoid history were associated with grade 2 GI toxicity (Ps < 0.05). Maximum acute GU toxicity was grade 0, 1, and 2 for 17%, 41%, and 42% of patients, respectively. Infield bladder V20 (P = 0.03) and pretreatment International Prostate Symptom Scale (IPSS) (P = 0.003) were associated with grade 2 GU toxicity. Prostate IG-IMRT using a daily ERB H2O shows low rates of acute GI toxicity compared to previous reports of air-filled ERB IMRT when using stringent infield rectum constraints and comparable GU toxicities

  18. Current Indications for Transurethral Resection of the Prostate and Associated Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Chu Liu

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP is the most common surgical procedure for relieving symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Here, we report our experience of current indications for TURP and their associated outcomes at Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital (KMUH. A total of 111 patients who underwent TURP at KMUH between May 2000 and December 2001 were included in this retrospective review. For each patient, the surgical indication was categorized into acute urinary retention, chronic complications (including renal impairment, recurrent urinary infection, bladder stone/diverticulum, post-void residue, and recurrent hematuria, and symptomatic prostatism. Thirty-five patients (31% had acute urinary retention, 28 (27% had chronic complications, and 48 (42% had symptomatic prostatism. Most patients chose TURP only when medical treatment had failed to relieve symptoms, no matter what category they belonged to. Patients with acute urinary retention and chronic complications had larger prostates (p = 0.002 and more tissue resected (p = 0.05 than those with symptomatic prostatism. Patients with acute urinary retention seemed to be at greater risk of postoperative complications such as recurrent urinary retention and urinary tract infection. We suggest that urodynamic study may be necessary to rule out concomitant bladder dysfunction before surgery and that adequate prophylactic antibiotic treatment be used to decrease the risk of urinary tract infection during or after TURP, especially when pyuria is noted preoperatively in patients with acute urinary retention.

  19. The Role of Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction in Detecting Etiological Causes of Bacterial Prostatitis Associated Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

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    Bramastha Rosadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH has been correlated with chronic prostatitis according recent study. Chronic pelvic pain is the chief complain of BPH followed by prostatitis. The gold standard of the etiological diagnosis is urine culture, but the negativity rate is still high. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR as a diagnostic tool in search of etiological causes could identify microorganism on DNA level. This research aims to find out the role of multiplex polymerase chain reaction as diagnostic tools on prostatitis patients. Material and Method: A total of 12 samples collected during the TURP procedure in Sanglah General Hospital Denpasar – Bali from February until May 2015. All of the samples has been diagnosed prostatitis clinically and perform urine culture test. The prostate specimen taken was sent to the Pathological anatomy for histopathology diagnostic and underwent multiplex PCR for etiologic diagnostic. Result: 12 samples have been declared as prostatitis based on histopathology examination, and then were analyzed using multiplex PCR. 10 samples were positive (6 were E. coli, 2 were C. trachomatis, the rest were N. gonorrhea and P. aeruginosa. The urine culture revealed 9 positive, within the result 6 were E. coli, and the others were P. aeruginosa, M. morganii and A. haemolyticus. Conclusion: In prostatitis patient, the etiological diagnostic was important. Multiplex PCR as diagnostic tools could detect the microorganism on a negative urine culture. The combination of the urine culture test and multiplex PCR revealed a better result on etiologic diagnosis which leads to a better management of the disease. 

  20. Graminex Pollen: Phenolic Pattern, Colorimetric Analysis and Protective Effects in Immortalized Prostate Cells (PC3) and Rat Prostate Challenged with LPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locatelli, Marcello; Macchione, Nicola; Ferrante, Claudio; Chiavaroli, Annalisa; Recinella, Lucia; Carradori, Simone; Zengin, Gokhan; Cesa, Stefania; Leporini, Lidia; Leone, Sheila; Brunetti, Luigi; Menghini, Luigi; Orlando, Giustino

    2018-05-11

    Prostatitis, a general term describing prostate inflammation, is a common disease that could be sustained by bacterial or non-bacterial infectious agents. The efficacy of herbal extracts with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects for blunting the burden of inflammation and oxidative stress, with possible improvements in clinical symptoms, is under investigation. Pollen extracts have been previously reported as promising agents in managing clinical symptoms related to prostatitis. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the protective effects of Graminex pollen (Graminex TM , Deshler, OH, USA), a commercially available product based on standardized pollen extracts, in rat prostate specimens, ex vivo. In this context, we studied the putative mechanism of action of pollen on multiple inflammatory pathways, including the reduction of prostaglandin E₂ (PGE₂), nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB), and malondialdehyde (MDA), whose activities were significantly increased by inflammatory stimuli. We characterized by means of chromatographic and colorimetric studies the composition of Graminex pollen to better correlate the activity of pollen on immortalized prostate cells (PC3), and in rat prostate specimens challenged with Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that Graminex pollen was able to reduce radical oxygen species (ROS) production by PC3 cells and MDA, NFκB mRNA, and PGE₂ levels, in rat prostate specimens. According to our experimental evidence, Graminex pollen appears to be a promising natural product for the management of the inflammatory components in the prostate.

  1. The effect of aerobic exercise on treatment-related acute toxicity in men receiving radical external beam radiotherapy for localised prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapur, G; Windsor, P M; McCowan, C

    2010-09-01

    We retrospectively analysed acute radiation toxicity data for patients who had participated in a randomised controlled study in our centre in order to assess the impact of aerobic exercise on acute rectal and bladder morbidity during treatment. Data from 65 of 66 patients were analysed: 33 allocated into a control group (standard advice) and 33 into an exercise group (aerobic walking for 30 min at least three times per week) during 4 weeks of external beam radiotherapy; one patient in the exercise group withdrew after randomisation before starting radiotherapy. There was a trend towards less severe acute rectal toxicity in the exercise group with a statistically significant difference in mean toxicity scores over the 4 weeks of radiotherapy (P=0.004), with no significant difference in bladder toxicity scores between the two groups (P=0.123). The lack of an association for severity of bladder toxicity could be attributed to the confounding effect of lower urinary tract symptoms from their prostate cancer. Keeping active and being asked to adhere to a well-defined exercise schedule appears to reduce the severity of rectal toxicity during radiotherapy to the prostate.

  2. Rapid and widely disseminated acute phase protein response after experimental bacterial infection of pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgaard, Kerstin; Mortensen, Shila; Boye, Mette

    2009-01-01

    The acute phase protein response is a well-described generalized early host response to tissue injury, inflammation and infection, observed as pronounced changes in the concentrations of a number of circulating serum proteins. The biological function of this response and its interplay with other...... parts of innate host defence reactions remain somewhat elusive. In order to gain new insight into this early host defence response in the context of bacterial infection we studied gene expression changes in peripheral lymphoid tissues as compared to hepatic expression changes, 14-18 h after lung...... with measurements of interleukin-6 and selected acute phase proteins in serum. C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A were clearly induced 14-18 h after infection. Extrahepatic expression of acute phase proteins was found to be dramatically altered as a result of the lung infection with an extrahepatic acute phase...

  3. Uit de Cochrane Library: Marginaal grotere genezingskans door antibioticabehandeling bij acute bacteriële conjunctivitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamerlynck, J. V. T. H.; Rietveld, R. P.; Hooft, L.

    2007-01-01

    Acute bacterial conjunctivitis is one of the most frequently encountered ocular disorders in primary care. It is frequently self-limiting, and the widespread use of broad-spectrum antibiotics has led to concerns regarding antibiotic resistance. Therefore, a Cochrane systematic review of 5 randomised

  4. Acute bacterial infections of the lower respiratory tract in children from low-income countries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fleer, A; Wolf, B.H.M.

    Acute bacterial infection of the lower respiratory tract is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children and is responsible for 4 million childhood deaths each year. Most of these deaths are caused by pneumonia and occur in the youngest children in the poorest parts of the world. Severe

  5. Advanced Prostate Cancer Presenting as Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Ramos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS is characterized by endothelial dysfunction, consumption thrombocytopenia, microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, and acute renal failure. HUS generally has a dismal prognosis, except when associated with gastroenteritis caused by verotoxin-producing bacteria. Cancer associated HUS is uncommon, and there are only scarce reports on prostate cancer presenting with HUS. Case Presentation. A 72-year-old man presented to the emergency department with oliguria, hematuria, and hematemesis. Clinical evaluation revealed acute renal failure, hemolysis, normal blood-clotting studies, and prostate-specific antigen value of 1000 ng/mL. The patient was started on hemodialysis, ultrafiltration with plasma exchange, and androgen blockade with bicalutamide and completely recovered from HUS. The authors review the 14 published cases on this association. Conclusion. The association of HUS and prostate cancer occurs more frequently in patients with high-grade, clinically advanced prostate cancer. When readily recognized and appropriately treated, HUS does not seem to worsen prognosis in prostate cancer patients.

  6. Acute sleep deprivation enhances post-infection sleep and promotes survival during bacterial infection in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tzu-Hsing; Williams, Julie A

    2014-05-01

    Sleep is known to increase as an acute response to infection. However, the function of this behavioral response in host defense is not well understood. To address this problem, we evaluated the effect of acute sleep deprivation on post-infection sleep and immune function in Drosophila. Laboratory. Drosophila melanogaster. Flies were subjected to sleep deprivation before (early DEP) or after (late DEP) bacterial infection. Relative to a non-deprived control, flies subjected to early DEP had enhanced sleep after infection as well as increased bacterial clearance and survival outcome. Flies subjected to late DEP experienced enhanced sleep following the deprivation period, and showed a modest improvement in survival outcome. Continuous DEP (early and late DEP) throughout infection also enhanced sleep later during infection and improved survival. However, improved survival in flies subjected to late or continuous DEP did not occur until after flies had experienced sleep. During infection, both early and late DEP enhanced NFκB transcriptional activity as measured by a luciferase reporter (κB-luc) in living flies. Early DEP also increased NFκB activity prior to infection. Flies that were deficient in expression of either the Relish or Dif NFκB transcription factors showed normal responses to early DEP. However, the effect of early DEP on post-infection sleep and survival was abolished in double mutants, which indicates that Relish and Dif have redundant roles in this process. Acute sleep deprivation elevated NFκB-dependent activity, increased post-infection sleep, and improved survival during bacterial infection.

  7. Clinical and diagnostic importance of changes of colon at chronic prostatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Popkov

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of researches was studying clinical, microbiological and morphological characteristic of colon at patients at chronic prostatitis, definition of method of pathogenetic therapy on the basis of the received results. Material and methods of investigation. 50 patients at chronic bacterial prostatitis, 50 patients at asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis and 30 practically healthy males were inspected. Microflora of prostata's secret and colon, morphology and structure of components of diffuse neuroendocrine system of colon were studied. Clinical, microbiological, иммуногистохимические methods and morphometrical analysis were applied. Results. It is defined, that at 74% patients with asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis irritable bowel syndrome and at 26% - chronic nonulcerative colitis were diagnosed. At all patients at chronic bacterial prostatitis chronic nonulcerative colitis were detected. These variants were correlleted with different types of intestinal dysbiosis and degree of microbe producing of prostate. Use probiotic Bactistatin® at patients with a chronic prostatitis raises clinical efficiency of antibacterial therapy, promotes reduction of inflammatory changes, restoration of its microbic landscape and neuroendocrine homeostasis of colon. inclusion. At chronic prostatitis structural and functional pathology of colon are often registered, they are connected with clinical variant of prostatitis and can mask of prostata's pathology. Using Bactistatin® at patients with a chronic prostatitis is proved and effective

  8. Prostate specific antigen enhances the innate defence of prostatic epithelium against Escherichia coli infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townes, Claire L; Ali, Ased; Gross, Naomi; Pal, Deepali; Williamson, Stuart; Heer, Rakesh; Robson, Craig N; Pickard, Robert S; Hall, Judith

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated whether the increase in serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) typically seen during male urinary tract infection (UTI) is incidental or reflects an innate defence mechanism of the prostate. The protective roles of the whey-acid-motif-4-disulphide core (WFDC) proteins, secretory leukoproteinase inhibitor (SLPI) and WFDC2, in the prostate were also examined. UTI recurrence was assessed retrospectively in men following initial UTI by patient interview. PSA, SLPI, and WFDC2 gene expression were assessed using biopsy samples. LNCaP and DU145 in vitro prostate cell models were utilized to assess the effects of an Escherichia coli challenge on PSA and WFDC gene expression, and bacterial invasion of the prostate epithelium. The effects of PSA on WFDC antimicrobial properties were studied using recombinant peptides and time-kill assays. Men presenting with PSA >4 ng/ml at initial UTI were less likely to have recurrent (r) UTI than those with PSA prostatic epithelium, and the PSA and SLPI proteins co-localized in vivo. Challenging LNCaP (PSA-positive) cells with E. coli increased PSA, SLPI, and WFDC2 gene expression (P prostate innate defences. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Canadian guidelines for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Alan

    2014-01-01

    Objective To provide a clinical summary of the Canadian clinical practice guidelines for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) that includes relevant considerations for family physicians. Quality of evidence Guideline authors performed a systematic literature search and drafted recommendations. Recommendations received both strength of evidence and strength of recommendation ratings. Input from external content experts was sought, as was endorsement from Canadian medical societies (Association of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Disease Canada, Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Canadian Society of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians, and the Family Physicians Airways Group of Canada). Main message Diagnosis of ABRS is based on the presence of specific symptoms and their duration; imaging or culture are not needed in uncomplicated cases. Treatment is dependent on symptom severity, with intranasal corticosteroids (INCSs) recommended as monotherapy for mild and moderate cases, although the benefit might be modest. Use of INCSs plus antibiotics is reserved for patients who fail to respond to INCSs after 72 hours, and for initial treatment of patients with severe symptoms. Antibiotic selection must account for the suspected pathogen, the risk of resistance, comorbid conditions, and local antimicrobial resistance trends. Adjunct therapies such as nasal saline irrigation are recommended. Failure to respond to treatment, recurrent episodes, and signs of complications should prompt referral to an otolaryngologist. The guidelines address situations unique to the Canadian health care environment, including actions to take during prolonged wait periods for specialist referral or imaging. Conclusion The Canadian guidelines provide up-to-date recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of ABRS that reflect an evolving understanding of the disease. In addition, the guidelines offer useful tools to help

  10. The effect of oral sucralfate on the acute proctitis associated with prostate radiotherapy: a double-blind, randomized trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneebone, Andrew; Mameghan, Hedy; Bolin, Terry; Berry, Martin; Turner, Sandra; Kearsley, John; Graham, Peter; Fisher, Richard; Delaney, Geoff

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: Acute rectal complications occur in the majority of patients receiving external-beam radiotherapy for carcinoma of the prostate. Sucralfate has been proposed to reduce radiation-induced mucosal injury by forming a protective barrier on ulcer bases, binding local growth factors, and stimulating angiogenesis. However, there is conflicting clinical evidence as to whether sucralfate, taken prophylactically during radiotherapy, can ameliorate the symptoms of acute radiation proctitis. Methods and Materials: A double-blind randomized trial was conducted at four Radiation Oncology Departments in Sydney, Australia, between February 1995 and June 1997. A total of 338 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer receiving small volume radiotherapy, of whom 335 were evaluable, were randomized to receive either 3 g of oral sucralfate suspension or placebo twice a day during radiotherapy. Patients kept a daily record of their bowel symptoms and were graded according to the RTOG/EORTC acute toxicity criteria. Results: One hundred sixty-four patients received sucralfate and 171 received placebo. Both groups were well balanced with regard to patient, tumor, treatment factors, and baseline symptoms, except that the placebo group had a significantly more liquid baseline stool consistency score (p=0.004). Patients kept a daily diary of symptoms during radiotherapy. After adjusting for baseline values, there was no significant difference between the two groups with regard to stool frequency (p=0.41), consistency (p=0.20), flatus (p=0.25), mucus (p=0.54), and pain (p=0.73). However, there was more bleeding in the sucralfate group, with 64% of patients noticing rectal bleeding, compared with 47% in the placebo group (p=0.001). There was no significant difference between the two groups with respect to RTOG/EORTC acute toxicity (p=0.88; sucralfate 13%, 44%, 43% and placebo 15%, 44%, 40% for grade 0, 1, and 2, respectively). Conclusion: This study suggests that oral

  11. [Acute bacterial parotitis in infants under 3 months of age: a retrospective study in a pediatric tertiary care center].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhoul, J; Lorrot, M; Teissier, N; Delacroix, G; Doit, C; Bingen, E; Faye, A

    2011-12-01

    Acute bacterial parotitis is a rare infectious disease in infants under 3 months of age. To describe the clinical characteristics and the course of acute bacterial parotitis in infants less than 3 months old. Infants under 3 months of age, hospitalized at Robert Debré university hospital, Paris, France, between January 2005 and December 2009 for acute bacterial parotitis, were included in a retrospective study. Five infants less than 3 months of age were included in this study, for a frequency of 2.5/1000 hospitalizations in this age group. All were born at term, 4 of 5 were male. Three of the 5 patients had specific clinical signs of parotitis on admission. One patient had septic shock on admission. The ultrasound confirmed the parotitis in all cases. No parotid abscess was demonstrated on imaging. All patients had at least one abnormal inflammatory biological test (WBC, CRP, PCT). Bacteria were identified in 4 of 5 cases: Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in the pus culture of the Stenon duct in 2 patients and a group B Streptococcus was isolated from blood culture of 2 other patients. The duration of intravenous antibiotic therapy varied from 4 to 13 days, and the total duration of antibiotic therapy was between 10 and 16 days. No surgical procedures were needed. Acute bacterial parotitis in infants under 3 months of age might be associated with localized infections due to S. aureus, but also with a more severe clinical presentation due to group B streptococcus infection. Early diagnosis and appropriate antibiotic therapy might prevent the progression to serious complications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. Toxicity after intensity-modulated, image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flentje, Michael; Guckenberger, Matthias; Ok, Sami; Polat, Buelent; Sweeney, Reinhart A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate toxicity after dose-escalated radiotherapy for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated treatment planning (IMRT) and image-guided treatment (IGRT) delivery. Patients and Methods: 100 patients were treated with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) IMRT for prostate cancer: doses of 76.23 Gy and 60 Gy in 33 fractions were prescribed to the prostate and the seminal vesicles, respectively, for intermediate- and high-risk patients (n = 74). The total dose was 73.91 Gy in 32 fractions for low-risk patients and after transurethral resection of the prostate (n = 26). The pelvic lymphatics were treated with 46 Gy in 25 fractions in patients with high risk of lymph node metastases using an SIB to the prostate (n = 25). IGRT was practiced with cone-beam computed tomography. Acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was evaluated prospectively (CTCAE v3.0). Results: Treatment was completed as planned by all patients. Acute GI and GU toxicity grade ≥ 2 was observed in 12% and 42% of the patients, respectively, with 4% suffering from GU toxicity grade 3. 6 weeks after treatment, the incidence of acute toxicity grade ≥ 2 had decreased to 12%. With a median follow-up of 26 months, late GI and GU toxicity grade ≥ 2 was seen in 1.5% and 7.7% of the patients at 24 months. Four patients developed late toxicity grade 3 (GI n = 1; GU n = 3). Presence of acute GI and GU toxicity was significantly associated with late GI (p = 0.0007) and GU toxicity (p = 0.006). Conclusion: High-dose radiotherapy for prostate cancer using IMRT and IGRT resulted in low rates of acute toxicity and preliminary results of late toxicity are promising. (orig.)

  13. Toxicity after intensity-modulated, image-guided radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flentje, Michael [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Univ. Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany); Guckenberger, Matthias; Ok, Sami; Polat, Buelent; Sweeney, Reinhart A.

    2010-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate toxicity after dose-escalated radiotherapy for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated treatment planning (IMRT) and image-guided treatment (IGRT) delivery. Patients and Methods: 100 patients were treated with simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) IMRT for prostate cancer: doses of 76.23 Gy and 60 Gy in 33 fractions were prescribed to the prostate and the seminal vesicles, respectively, for intermediate- and high-risk patients (n = 74). The total dose was 73.91 Gy in 32 fractions for low-risk patients and after transurethral resection of the prostate (n = 26). The pelvic lymphatics were treated with 46 Gy in 25 fractions in patients with high risk of lymph node metastases using an SIB to the prostate (n = 25). IGRT was practiced with cone-beam computed tomography. Acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity was evaluated prospectively (CTCAE v3.0). Results: Treatment was completed as planned by all patients. Acute GI and GU toxicity grade {>=} 2 was observed in 12% and 42% of the patients, respectively, with 4% suffering from GU toxicity grade 3. 6 weeks after treatment, the incidence of acute toxicity grade {>=} 2 had decreased to 12%. With a median follow-up of 26 months, late GI and GU toxicity grade {>=} 2 was seen in 1.5% and 7.7% of the patients at 24 months. Four patients developed late toxicity grade 3 (GI n = 1; GU n = 3). Presence of acute GI and GU toxicity was significantly associated with late GI (p = 0.0007) and GU toxicity (p = 0.006). Conclusion: High-dose radiotherapy for prostate cancer using IMRT and IGRT resulted in low rates of acute toxicity and preliminary results of late toxicity are promising. (orig.)

  14. Ultrasonographic and cytopathologic aspects of prostate disease in 52 dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Cunha Lacreta Junior

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated 52 dogs, which were male, intact, varied in age, of pure or mixed breed, with clinical signs suggestive of prostatic disease. Each individual underwent an ultrasound examination and fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the prostate gland for cytological evaluation. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH was the most frequent prostatic disease, followed by cystic benign prostatic hyperplasia, bacterial prostatitis, abscesses, cysts, adenocarcinoma, nonbacterial prostatitis and paraprostatic cysts. The highest frequencies of prostate disorder were found in mixed breeds, followed by poodles and German shepherds. Ultrasound examination allowed the determination of prostate size, as well as the visualization of the diseases affecting the gland, and was effective in guiding aspiration biopsy. The cytological evaluation of the gland, especially when associated with changes in ultrasound images, revealed the presumptive diagnosis of the condition.

  15. Platelet transfusion therapy in sub-Saharan Africa: bacterial contamination, recipient characteristics and acute transfusion reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hume, Heather A.; Ddungu, Henry; Angom, Racheal; Baluku, Hannington; Kajumbula, Henry; Kyeyune-Byabazaire, Dorothy; Orem, Jackson; Ramirez-Arcos, Sandra; Tobian, Aaron A.R.

    2017-01-01

    Background Little data are available on bacterial contamination (BC) of platelet units or acute transfusion reactions to platelet transfusions (PT) in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Methods This prospective observational study evaluated the rate of BC of whole blood derived platelet units (WB-PU), the utility of performing Gram stains (GS) to prevent septic reactions, characteristics of patients receiving PT and the rate of acute reactions associated with PT at the Uganda Cancer Institute in Kampala, Uganda. An aliquot of each WB-PU studied was taken to perform GS and culture using the Bactec™ 9120 instrument. Study participants were monitored for reactions. Results 337 WB-PU were evaluated for BC, of which 323 units were transfused in 151 transfusion episodes to 50 patients. The frequency of BC ranged from 0.3%–2.1% (according to criteria used to define BC). The GS had high specificity (99.1%), but low sensitivity to detect units with BC. The median platelet count prior to PT was 10,900 (IQR 6,000–18,900) cells/μL. 78% of PT were given to patients with no bleeding. Acute reactions occurred in 11 transfusion episodes, involving 13 WB-PU, for a rate of 7.3% (95%CI=3.7–12.7%) per transfusion episode. All recipients of units with positive bacterial cultures were receiving antibiotics at the time of transfusion; none experienced a reaction. Conclusions The rate of BC observed in this study is lower than previously reported in SSA, but still remains a safety issue. As GS appears to be an ineffective screening tool, alternate methods should be explored to prevent transfusing bacterially-contaminated platelets in SSA. PMID:27079627

  16. Acute genitourinary toxicity after high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external-beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer: Correlation between the urethral dose in HDR brachytherapy and the severity of acute genitourinary toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo; Ito, Kazuto; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Noda, Shin-ei; Harashima, Koichi; Sakurai, Hideyuki; Nakayama, Yuko; Yamamoto, Takumi; Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Nakano, Takashi; Niibe, Hideo

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Several investigations have revealed that the α/β ratio for prostate cancer is atypically low, and that hypofractionation or high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy regimens using appropriate radiation doses may be expected to yield tumor control and late sequelae rates that are better or at least as favorable as those achieved with conventional radiation therapy. In this setting, we attempted treating localized prostate cancer patients with HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using this approach, with special emphasis on the relationship between the severity of acute genitourinary (GU) toxicity and the urethral dose calculated from the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of HDR brachytherapy. Methods and Materials: Between September 2000 and December 2003, 70 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated by iridium-192 HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT at the Gunma University Hospital. Hypofractionated EBRT was administered in fraction doses of 3 Gy, three times per week; a total dose of 51 Gy was delivered to the prostate gland and the seminal vesicles using the four-field technique. No elective pelvic irradiation was performed. After the completion of EBRT, all the patients additionally received transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS)-guided HDR brachytherapy. The fraction size and the number of fractions in HDR brachytherapy were prospectively changed, whereas the total radiation dose for EBRT was fixed at 51 Gy. The fractionation in HDR brachytherapy was as follows: 5 Gy x 5, 7 Gy x 3, 9 Gy x 2, administered twice per day, although the biologic effective dose (BED) for HDR brachytherapy combined with EBRT, assuming that the α/β ratio is 3, was almost equal to 138 in each fractionation group. The planning target volume was defined as the prostate gland with 5-mm margin all around, and the planning was conducted based on

  17. Childhood acute bacterial meningitis: clinical spectrum, bacteriological profile and outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bari, A.; Zeeshan, S.; Rathore, A. W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To determine the disease pattern, etiological agents and outcome of childhood acute bacterial meningitis. Study Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Paediatric Medicine, The Children's Hospital, Lahore, from January to December 2012. Methodology: A total of 199 children between the ages of 1 month and 5 years, admitted with the diagnosis of meningitis on the basis of clinical findings and positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), were included. In all patients, complete blood count (CBC), CSF culture sensitivity, and blood culture sensitivity were performed. Data was analysed using SPSS version 20. Results: Out of 199 children, 127 (63.8%) were males with M:F ratio of 1.7:1. Mean age was 11.33 ± 12 months. Maximum numbers of children were < 1 year of age, 136 (68.3%). Only 90 (45.2%) children were fully vaccinated according to Expanded Program of Immunisation (EPI) schedule. Presentations with refusal to take feed (p=0.008) and with impaired conscious state were independent predictors of death (p=0.002). Complications were noted in 34 (17%) and were significantly associated with severe malnutrition (p=0.006) and altered conscious level at presentation (p < 0.001). The common pathogens identified on CSF culture were coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) in 11 (5.5%) and streptococcus pneumoniae in 5 (2.5%). Overall mortality was 10.1%. The commonest pathogen isolated from children who died was streptococcus pneumoniae (p=0.039). Conclusion: Acute bacterial meningitis mostly affected children under the age of 1 year. CSF culture revealed both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The most common pathogen in children who died was streptococcus pneumoniae. (author)

  18. Clinical results from first use of prostate stent as fiducial for radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl, Jesper; Nielsen, Jane (Dept. of Medical Physics, Dept. of Oncology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aalborg (Denmark)), e-mail: jhc@rn.dk; Holmberg, Mats (Dept. of Oncology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aalborg (Denmark)); Larsen, Erik Hoejkjaer; Fabrin, Knud (Dept. of Urology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aalborg (Denmark)); Fisker, Rune V. (Dept. of Radiology, Aalborg Hospital, Aarhus Univ. Hospital, Aalborg (Denmark))

    2011-05-15

    Purpose. A clinical feasibility study using a removable prostate stent as fiducial for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of localized prostate cancer (PC). Material and methods. The study included patients with local or locally advanced PC. The clinical target volume (CTV) was outlined on magnetic resonance (MR) images co-registered to planning computer tomography (CT) images. Daily online IGRT was delivered using the stent as fiducial. Risk of migration was estimated using multiple MR. Acute urinary toxicity was scored using the international prostate symptom score (IPSS). Late gastro-intestinal (GI) and genito-urinary (GU) toxicity was scored using the Radio Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score, biochemical failure (BF) was defined as an elevation of prostate specific antigen (PSA) above nadir plus 2 ng/ml after radiotherapy. Results. One hundred men were enrolled in the study. Ninety completed radiotherapy with the stent as fiducial. No migration of the stent was seen, but three cases of dislocation of the stent to the bladder were observed. Acute urinary toxicity based on IPSS was comparable to toxicity in patients who had gold markers (GM) as fiducials. Removal of the stent was associated with a high frequency of urinary retention. Late GI and GU toxicity and BF were comparable to those of other studies, but longer observation time is needed. Conclusions. This study reports the first clinical results of using a prostate stent as fiducial. No migration of the stent observed. Dislocation of the stent to the urinary bladder was observed in three cases, requiring removal of the stent and insertion of a new fiducial. Acute toxicity during radiotherapy evaluated from IPSS was comparable to toxicity in patients with GM. Removal of the stent was associated with a high frequency of post procedural urinary retention. Late toxicity and BF were comparable to those of other studies, though longer observation time is needed

  19. Clinical results from first use of prostate stent as fiducial for radiotherapy of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carl, Jesper; Nielsen, Jane; Holmberg, Mats; Larsen, Erik Hoejkjaer; Fabrin, Knud; Fisker, Rune V.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. A clinical feasibility study using a removable prostate stent as fiducial for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of localized prostate cancer (PC). Material and methods. The study included patients with local or locally advanced PC. The clinical target volume (CTV) was outlined on magnetic resonance (MR) images co-registered to planning computer tomography (CT) images. Daily online IGRT was delivered using the stent as fiducial. Risk of migration was estimated using multiple MR. Acute urinary toxicity was scored using the international prostate symptom score (IPSS). Late gastro-intestinal (GI) and genito-urinary (GU) toxicity was scored using the Radio Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score, biochemical failure (BF) was defined as an elevation of prostate specific antigen (PSA) above nadir plus 2 ng/ml after radiotherapy. Results. One hundred men were enrolled in the study. Ninety completed radiotherapy with the stent as fiducial. No migration of the stent was seen, but three cases of dislocation of the stent to the bladder were observed. Acute urinary toxicity based on IPSS was comparable to toxicity in patients who had gold markers (GM) as fiducials. Removal of the stent was associated with a high frequency of urinary retention. Late GI and GU toxicity and BF were comparable to those of other studies, but longer observation time is needed. Conclusions. This study reports the first clinical results of using a prostate stent as fiducial. No migration of the stent observed. Dislocation of the stent to the urinary bladder was observed in three cases, requiring removal of the stent and insertion of a new fiducial. Acute toxicity during radiotherapy evaluated from IPSS was comparable to toxicity in patients with GM. Removal of the stent was associated with a high frequency of post procedural urinary retention. Late toxicity and BF were comparable to those of other studies, though longer observation time is needed

  20. Clinical results from first use of prostate stent as fiducial for radiotherapy of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carl, Jesper; Nielsen, Jane; Holmberg, Mats; Larsen, Erik Hoejkjaer; Fabrin, Knud; Fisker, Rune V

    2011-05-01

    A clinical feasibility study using a removable prostate stent as fiducial for image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) of localized prostate cancer (PC). The study included patients with local or locally advanced PC. The clinical target volume (CTV) was outlined on magnetic resonance (MR) images co-registered to planning computer tomography (CT) images. Daily online IGRT was delivered using the stent as fiducial. Risk of migration was estimated using multiple MR. Acute urinary toxicity was scored using the international prostate symptom score (IPSS). Late gastro-intestinal (GI) and genito-urinary (GU) toxicity was scored using the Radio Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) score, biochemical failure (BF) was defined as an elevation of prostate specific antigen (PSA) above nadir plus 2 ng/ml after radiotherapy. One hundred men were enrolled in the study. Ninety completed radiotherapy with the stent as fiducial. No migration of the stent was seen, but three cases of dislocation of the stent to the bladder were observed. Acute urinary toxicity based on IPSS was comparable to toxicity in patients who had gold markers (GM) as fiducials. Removal of the stent was associated with a high frequency of urinary retention. Late GI and GU toxicity and BF were comparable to those of other studies, but longer observation time is needed. This study reports the first clinical results of using a prostate stent as fiducial. No migration of the stent observed. Dislocation of the stent to the urinary bladder was observed in three cases, requiring removal of the stent and insertion of a new fiducial. Acute toxicity during radiotherapy evaluated from IPSS was comparable to toxicity in patients with GM. Removal of the stent was associated with a high frequency of post procedural urinary retention. Late toxicity and BF were comparable to those of other studies, though longer observation time is needed.

  1. A randomized trial comparing hypofractionated and conventionally fractionated three-dimensional external-beam radiotherapy for localized prostate adenocarcinoma. A report on acute toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norkus, Darius; Miller, Albert; Kurtinaitis, Juozas; Valuckas, Konstantinas Povilas [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Inst. of Oncology, Vilnius Univ. (Lithuania); Haverkamp, Uwe [Dept. of Radiology, Clemenshospital, Muenster (Germany); Popov, Sergey [Dept. of Radiotherapy, Riga Eastern Hospital, Latvian Oncology Center, Riga (Latvia); Prott, Franz-Josef [Inst. of Radiology and Radiotherapy (RNS), St. Josefs Hospital, Wiesbaden (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: to compare acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity between patient groups with localized prostate adenocarcinoma, treated with conventionally fractionated (CFRT) and hypofractionated (HFRT) three-dimensional conformal external-beam radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Patients and methods: 91 patients were enrolled into a randomized study with a minimum follow-up of 3 months. 44 men in the CFRT arm were irradiated with 74 Gy in 37 fractions at 2 Gy per fraction for 7.5 weeks. 47 men in the HFRT arm were treated with 57 Gy in 17 fractions for 3.5 weeks, given as 13 fractions of 3 Gy plus four fractions of 4.5 Gy. The clinical target volume (CTV) included the prostate and the base of seminal vesicles. The CTV-to-PTV (planning target volume) margin was 8-10 mm. Study patients had portal imaging and/or simulation performed on the first fractions and repeated at least weekly. Results: no acute grade 3 or 4 toxicities were observed. The grade 2 GU acute toxicity proportion was significantly lower in the HFRT arm: 19.1% versus 47.7% ({chi}{sup 2}-test, p = 0.003). The grade 2 GU acute toxicity-free survival was significantly better in the HFRT arm (log-rank test, p = 0.008). The median duration of overall GI acute toxicity was shorter with HFRT: 3 compared to 6 weeks with CFRT (median test, p = 0.017). Conclusion: in this first evaluation, the HFRT schedule is feasible and induces acceptable or even lower acute toxicity compared with the toxicities in the CFRT schedule. Extended follow-up is needed to justify this fractionation schedule's safety in the long term. (orig.)

  2. Serenoa repens extract additionally to quinolones in the treatment of chronic bacterial prostatitis. The preliminary results of a long term observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Stamatiou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic prostatitis displays a variety of symptoms (mainly local pain exhibiting variability in origin and intensity. The purpose of this article is to briefly present the preliminary results of our study examining the role of phytotherapeutic agents in the treatment of chronic prostatitis patients. Materials and methods: The study included in total fifty-six consecutive patients who visited the outpatient department. Subjects were randomized into two groups. Subjects in the first group (28 patients received prulifloxacin 600 mg for 15 days, while subjects in the second group (28 patients received prulifloxacin 600 mg for 15 days and Serenoa repens extract for 8 weeks. The response was tested using laboratory and clinical criteria. Results: We found statistically significant differences between the two groups regarding pain regression and no statistically significant regarding bacterial eradication. Moreover however while sexual dysfunction improvement was equally achieved in both groups, improvement of urinary symptoms was more evident in the 2nd group especially after the completion of the antibiotic treatment. Conclusions: Serenoa repens extract for 8 weeks seems to improve prostatitis related pain. Further randomized, placebo-controlled studies are needed to substantiate safer conclusions.

  3. 75 FR 52755 - Draft Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-27

    ... antimicrobial drugs for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI), impetigo... of antimicrobial drugs for the treatment of ABSSSI, impetigo, and minor cutaneous abscesses. This... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2010-D-0433...

  4. High frequency of chronic bacterial and non-inflammatory prostatitis in infertile patients with prostatitis syndrome plus irritable bowel syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Enzo Vicari; Sandro La Vignera; Domenico Arcoria; Rosita Condorelli; Lucia O Vicari; Roberto Castiglione; Andrea Mangiameli; Aldo E Calogero

    2011-01-01

    Background Although prostatitis syndrome (PS) and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) are common disorders, information on the prevalence of IBS in infertile patients with PS is relatively scanty. Therefore, this study was undertaken to estimate the frequency of PS and IBS and to evaluate the prevalence of the various diagnostic categories of prostatitis. Methodology/Principal Findings This study enrolled 152 patients with PS, diagnosed by the NIH-Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) in an...

  5. [Chronic bacterial prostatitis. Clinical and microbiological study of 332 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heras-Cañas, Víctor; Gutiérrez-Soto, Blanca; Serrano-García, María Luisa; Vázquez-Alonso, Fernando; Navarro-Marí, José María; Gutiérrez-Fernández, José

    2016-08-19

    Chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) is characterized by long-lasting symptoms, frequently associated with psychosomatic disorders. The objective of the study was to study PCB in our environment clinically and microbiologically. Between January 2013 and December 2014 761 patients with suspected CBP were studied. Of these patients 332 (43.6%) underwent a complete microbiological study and the major clinical signs and symptoms were collected. Eighteen point four percent of patients were diagnosed microbiologically with CBP, Enterococcus faecalis being the main aetiologic agent (37.7%), followed by Escherichia coli (22.2%). Ninety-six point seven percent of the CBP had positive semen cultures, while only 22.9% had positive urine post-semen cultures. Data of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of semen were 96.7%, 95.9%, 84.3% and 99.3%, respectively and urine post-semen 22.9%, 99.3%, 87.5% and 85.1%, respectively. Testicular perineum pain (44.3%), ejaculatory discomfort (27.9%) and haemospermia (26.2%) were highlighted as the patients' main clinical manifestations. Fractionated culture for the microbiological diagnosis of CBP could be simplified by the culture of urine pre-semen and semen, without the need for the culture of urine post-semen. The main aetiologic agent of CBP in our media was Enterococcus faecalis, followed by Escherichia coli. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. The role of chronic prostatic inflammation in the pathogenesis and progression of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandaglia, Giorgio; Briganti, Alberto; Gontero, Paolo; Mondaini, Nicola; Novara, Giacomo; Salonia, Andrea; Sciarra, Alessandro; Montorsi, Francesco

    2013-08-01

    Several different stimuli may induce chronic prostatic inflammation, which in turn would lead to tissue damage and continuous wound healing, thus contributing to prostatic enlargement. Patients with chronic inflammation and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) have been shown to have larger prostate volumes, more severe lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and a higher probability of acute urinary retention than their counterparts without inflammation. Chronic inflammation could be a predictor of poor response to BPH medical treatment. Thus, the ability to identify patients with chronic inflammation would be crucial to prevent BPH progression and develop target therapies. Although the histological examination of prostatic tissue remains the only available method to diagnose chronic inflammation, different parameters, such as prostatic calcifications, prostate volume, LUTS severity, storage and prostatitis-like symptoms, poor response to medical therapies and urinary biomarkers, have been shown to be correlated with chronic inflammation. The identification of patients with BPH and chronic inflammation might be crucial in order to develop target therapies to prevent BPH progression. In this context, clinical, imaging and laboratory parameters might be used alone or in combination to identify patients that harbour chronic prostatic inflammation. © 2013 BJU International.

  7. Toxicity Profile With a Large Prostate Volume After External Beam Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinkawa, Michael; Fischedick, Karin; Asadpour, Branka; Gagel, Bernd; Piroth, Marc D.; Nussen, Sandra; Eble, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of prostate volume on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) before and at different intervals after radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A group of 204 patients was surveyed prospectively before (Time A), at the last day (Time B), 2 months after (Time C), and 16 months (median) after (Time D) radiotherapy, with a validated questionnaire (Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite). The group was divided into subgroups with a small (11-43 cm 3 ) and a large (44-151 cm 3 ) prostate volume. Results: Patients with large prostates presented with lower urinary bother scores (median 79 vs. 89; p = 0.01) before treatment. Urinary function/bother scores for patients with large prostates decreased significantly compared to patients with small prostates due to irritative/obstructive symptoms only at Time B (pain with urination more than once daily in 48% vs. 18%; p 3 vs. 47 cm 3 ; p < 0.01). Conclusions: Patients with a large prostate volume have a great risk of irritative/obstructive symptoms (particularly dysuria) in the acute radiotherapy phase. These symptoms recover rapidly and do not influence long-term HRQOL

  8. Symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia: the role of 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors in the prevention of acute urinary retention and surgical therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Marigliano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH is a disease that affects over 50% of males aged 50 years or older. In men aged >80 years, the incidence is 90%. BPH occurs in 9-25% of males aged 40 to 79 years. Fifty percent of patients with BPH are symptomatic. The symptoms include reduced urinary flow, nocturia, defective bladder emptying, urinary hesitancy, and dysuria. Disease progression can be associated with acute urinary retention (AUR. Prostatic obstruction includes mechanical and dynamic components, the latter mediated by alpha-muscarinic receptors. Treatment with alpha-1-blockers (alfuzosin, doxazosin, tamsulosin, and terazosin leads to rapid amelioration of symptoms and urinary flow, usually within one or two weeks. The 5-alpha reductase inhibitors (5-ARIs are “disease-modifying drugs.” They control the growth of the prostate by blocking the conversion of testosterone into dihydrotestosterone (DHT. Finasteride is a 5–ARI that is selective for type 2 receptors. Dutasteride is a powerful inhibitor of both 5- alpha reductase isoforms (type 1 and 2 and produces more complete suppression of DHT synthesis than finasteride. Dutasteride also has a much longer half-life than finasteride (five weeks versus five to six hours. The authors review the results of clinical trials involving finasteride and dutasteride, with and without alpha-1-blockers, highlighting the important role of dutasteride in improving acute urinary retention and eliminating the need for surgical therapy.

  9. Acute morbidity reduction using 3DCRT for prostate carcinoma; a randomised phase III study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koper, P.; Putten, W. van; Stroom, J.; Korevaar, G.; Heijmen, B.; Wijnmaalen, A.; Jansen, P.; Hanssens, P.; Griep, C.; Krol, A.; Samson, M.; Levendag, P.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: A randomised phase III toxicity study (conventional vs conformal radiotherapy) was performed for prostatic carcinoma to study the effects on the (acute) morbidity of intestinal/rectosigmoid and bladder. The observed toxicity was compared with Dose Volume Histograms to reveal possible volume (reduction) effects. Methods: In the phase III study 266 T1-4 N0M0 prostate cancer patients were entered. Patients were randomised for conventional and conformal radiotherapy (total dose 66 Gy, minimum PTV dose 95% ICRU and a CTV-PTV margin of 10 mm in both study arms). The GTV was limited to the prostate only in T1 tumors. In all other patients the GTV was defined to be prostate and seminal vesicles for the complete treatment course. The CTV-PTV margin (10mm) was created by a automated program to ensure the minimum prescribed margin. The rectosigmoid was defined to be the rectum including the sigmoid within the Treatment Volume (ICRU). Acute toxicity was evaluated using the EORTC/RTOG morbidity score and weekly quality of life questionnaires. The radiation technique comparison was done by Dose volume Histogram analysis using the Area Under The Curve (AUC) for different dose levels. In this preliminary DVH analysis we present the data for the first 100 patients. Results: Patient and tumor characteristics were evenly distributed between both study groups. The maximum toxicity is reached at 75% of the tumordose (TD) (rectal grade I 59% grade II 26%, bladder grade I 48%, grade II 16% and grade III 1% [catheter for urinary retention]). Comparing both study arms there seems to be a reduction in intestinal morbidity (grade II and higher resp. 32% vs 19% p=0.02). Further analysis revealed a marked reduction in medication for anal symptoms; this accounts for a large part of the significant difference in intestinal toxicity (grade II conventional vs conformal rectosigmoid 18% vs 14% and anal 16% vs 8%). For bladder morbidity no difference for mobidity higher than grade I is

  10. Risk of disseminated intravascular coagulation in patients undergoing US-guided transperineal prostatic biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stella, M.S.; Comparato, D.; Camici, M.; Evangelisti, L.; Gaudio, V.; De Negri, F.; Talarico, L.; Giusti, C.; Morelli, G.

    1991-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a severe life-threatening acute bleeding disorder. Traumatized tissues, tumors, necrotic tissues, or bacterial endotoxines release similar material in the blood to the tissutal factors activating the coagulation cascade. This preliminary study was aimed at verifying the risk of DIV in patients undergoing US-guided transperineal prostatic biopsy with Chiba and Tru-Cut needles. To evaluate the activation degree of coagulation factors in the circulation, the authors measured the concentrations of urinary fibrin degradation products in 10 patients undergoing US-guided transperineal prostatic biopsy, both before and after biopsy, every second hour, for 24 hours. Every tube of urine sample contained soya bean trypsin inhibitor and bovine thrombin to prevent any further fibrin degradation during incubation period for the possible presence of blood in urine samples. The results showed that 7/10 patients had marked increase in urinary fibrin degradation product levels (up to 800 XXXX%), with a 3-phase trend: early peak after 2-6 hours, middle peak after 6-14 hours, and late peak after 18-24 hours, which proved the activation of the coagulation cascade

  11. Prostate histotripsy for BPH: initial canine results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, William W.; Hall, Timothy L.; Hempel, Christopher R.; Cain, Charles A.

    2009-02-01

    Histotripsy is an extracorporeal ablative technology that utilizes microsecond pulses of intense ultrasound (< 1% duty cycle) to produce nonthermal, mechanical fractionation of targeted tissue. We have previously demonstrated the feasibility of histotripsy prostate ablation. In this study we sought to assess the chronic tissue response, tolerability and safety of histotripsy in a chronic in vivo canine model. Five acute and thirteen chronic canine subjects were anesthetized and treated with histotripsy targeting the prostate. Pulses consisted of 3 cycle bursts of 750 kHz ultrasound at a repetition rate of 300 Hz delivered transabdominally from a highly focused 15 cm aperture array. Transrectal ultrasound imaging provided accurate targeting and real-time monitoring of histotripsy treatment. Prostates were harvested at 0, 7, 28, or 56 days after treatment. Consistent mechanical tissue fractionation and debulking of prostate tissue was seen acutely and at delayed time points without collateral injury. Urothelialization of the treatment cavity was apparent 28 days after treatment. Canine subjects tolerated histotripsy with minimal hematuria or discomfort. Only mild transient lab abnormalities were noted. Histotripsy is a promising non-invasive therapy for prostate tissue fractionation and debulking that appears safe and well tolerated without systemic side effects in the canine model.

  12. A systematic literature review of the economic implications of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Degener, F.; Ivanescu, C.; Casamayor, M.; Postma, M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: During the years, acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) have seen an increase in incidence in many parts of the western world. Additionally, the treatment of ABSSSIs, generally consisting of surgical debridement or drainage and empiric antibiotics in the hospital,

  13. Acute and Late Toxicity in a Randomized Trial of Conventional Versus Hypofractionated Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcangeli, Giorgio; Fowler, Jack; Gomellini, Sara; Arcangeli, Stefano; Saracino, Biancamaria; Petrongari, Maria Grazia; Benassi, Marcello; Strigari, Lidia

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the toxicity between hypofractionation vs. conventional fractionation schedules in patients with high-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Between January 2003 and December 2007, 168 patients were randomized to receive either hypofractionated (62 Gy in 20 fractions within 5 weeks, 4 fractions/wk) or conventionally fractionated (80 Gy in 40 fractions within 8 weeks) three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy to the prostate and seminal vesicles. All patients had undergone a 9-month course of total androgen deprivation, with radiotherapy starting 2 months after initiation of the total androgen deprivation. Results: The median follow-up was 32 and 35 months in the hypofractionation and conventional fractionation arms, respectively. For the patients developing acute toxicity, no difference between the two fractionation groups was found in either severity or duration of gastrointestinal or genitourinary toxicity. Also, no difference was found in the incidence and severity of late gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity between the two treatment schedules, with a 3-year rate of Grade 2 or greater toxicity of 17% and 16% for the hypofractionation arm and 14% and 11% for the conventional fractionation arm, respectively. A statistically significant correlation between acute and late gastrointestinal toxicity was found only in the conventional fractionation group. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that the hypofractionation regimen used in our study is safe, with only a slight, nonsignificant increase in tolerable and temporary acute toxicity compared with the conventional fractionation schedule. The severity and frequency of late complications was equivalent between the two treatment groups.

  14. [Pathogens in expressed prostatic secretion and their correlation with serum prostate specific antigen: analysis of 320 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Xia; Zhang, Jia-Ming; Wu, Kai; Chen, Juan; Shi, Jian-Feng

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the pathogenic infection and its drug resistance in expressed prostatic secretion (EPS) and its correlation with serum PSA, and provide some evidence for the systematic and normalized diagnosis and treatment of prostatitis. Three EPS swabs were collected from each of the 320 prostatis patients following measurement of the serum PSA level, 1 for bacterial culture and identification, 1 for detection of Mycoplasma and drug sensitivity, and the other for examination of Chlamydia trachomatis antigen by colloidal gold immunoblot. Totally 244 strains were isolated from the 320 EPS samples, including 188 bacterial strains (dominated by Staphylococcus and sensitive to vancomycin or linezolid) and 44 Mycoplasma and Chlamydia strains (mainly Ureaplasma urealyticum and susceptible to josamycin or doxycycline). The serum PSA level was significantly higher in the pathogen-positive than in the pathogen-negative group ([6.98 +/- 0.56] microg/L vs [2.32 +/- 0.12] microg/L, P Prostatitis may lead to the elevation of the serum PSA level and the pathogens involved vary in their resistance to different antibacterial spectrums. Therefore, appropriate and individualized antibiotic therapy should be selected according to etiological diagnosis and the results of drug sensitivity test.

  15. Dose-escalated simultaneous integrated-boost treatment of prostate cancer patients via helical tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geier, M.; Astner, S.T.; Duma, M.N.; Putzhammer, J.; Winkler, C.; Molls, M.; Geinitz, H. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologische Onkologie; Jacob, V. [Universitaetsklinikum Freiburg (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde; Nieder, C. [Nordland Hospital, Bodoe (Norway). Dept. of Oncology and Palliative Care; Tromsoe Univ. (Norway). Inst. of Clinical Medicine

    2012-05-15

    The goal of this work was to assess the feasibility of moderately hypofractionated simultaneous integrated-boost intensity-modulated radiotherapy (SIB-IMRT) with helical tomotherapy in patients with localized prostate cancer regarding acute side effects and dose-volume histogram data (DVH data). Acute side effects and DVH data were evaluated of the first 40 intermediate risk prostate cancer patients treated with a definitive daily image-guided SIB-IMRT protocol via helical tomotherapy in our department. The planning target volume including the prostate and the base of the seminal vesicles with safety margins was treated with 70 Gy in 35 fractions. The boost volume containing the prostate and 3 mm safety margins (5 mm craniocaudal) was treated as SIB to a total dose of 76 Gy (2.17 Gy per fraction). Planning constraints for the anterior rectal wall were set in order not to exceed the dose of 76 Gy prescribed to the boost volume. Acute toxicity was evaluated prospectively using a modified CTCAE (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events) score. SIB-IMRT allowed good rectal sparing, although the full boost dose was permitted to the anterior rectal wall. Median rectum dose was 38 Gy in all patients and the median volumes receiving at least 65 Gy (V65), 70 Gy (V70), and 75 Gy (V75) were 13.5%, 9%, and 3%, respectively. No grade 4 toxicity was observed. Acute grade 3 toxicity was observed in 20% of patients involving nocturia only. Grade 2 acute intestinal and urological side effects occurred in 25% and 57.5%, respectively. No correlation was found between acute toxicity and the DVH data. This institutional SIB-IMRT protocol using daily image guidance as a precondition for smaller safety margins allows dose escalation to the prostate without increasing acute toxicity. (orig.)

  16. High-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer using daily fiducial marker-based position verification: acute and late toxicity in 331 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lips, Irene M; Dehnad, Homan; Gils, Carla H van; Boeken Kruger, Arto E; Heide, Uulke A van der; Vulpen, Marco van

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the acute and late toxicity after high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) with fiducial marker-based position verification for prostate cancer. Between 2001 and 2004, 331 patients with prostate cancer received 76 Gy in 35 fractions using IMRT combined with fiducial marker-based position verification. The symptoms before treatment (pre-treatment) and weekly during treatment (acute toxicity) were scored using the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC). The goal was to score late toxicity according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC) scale with a follow-up time of at least three years. Twenty-two percent of the patients experienced pre-treatment grade ≥ 2 genitourinary (GU) complaints and 2% experienced grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI) complaints. Acute grade 2 GU and GI toxicity occurred in 47% and 30%, respectively. Only 3% of the patients developed acute grade 3 GU and no grade ≥ 3 GI toxicity occurred. After a mean follow-up time of 47 months with a minimum of 31 months for all patients, the incidence of late grade 2 GU and GI toxicity was 21% and 9%, respectively. Grade ≥ 3 GU and GI toxicity rates were 4% and 1%, respectively, including one patient with a rectal fistula and one patient with a severe hemorrhagic cystitis (both grade 4). In conclusion, high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy with fiducial marker-based position verification is well tolerated. The low grade ≥ 3 toxicity allows further dose escalation if the same dose constraints for the organs at risk will be used

  17. High-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy for prostate cancer using daily fiducial marker-based position verification: acute and late toxicity in 331 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boeken Kruger Arto E

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We evaluated the acute and late toxicity after high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT with fiducial marker-based position verification for prostate cancer. Between 2001 and 2004, 331 patients with prostate cancer received 76 Gy in 35 fractions using IMRT combined with fiducial marker-based position verification. The symptoms before treatment (pre-treatment and weekly during treatment (acute toxicity were scored using the Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC. The goal was to score late toxicity according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (RTOG/EORTC scale with a follow-up time of at least three years. Twenty-two percent of the patients experienced pre-treatment grade ≥ 2 genitourinary (GU complaints and 2% experienced grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI complaints. Acute grade 2 GU and GI toxicity occurred in 47% and 30%, respectively. Only 3% of the patients developed acute grade 3 GU and no grade ≥ 3 GI toxicity occurred. After a mean follow-up time of 47 months with a minimum of 31 months for all patients, the incidence of late grade 2 GU and GI toxicity was 21% and 9%, respectively. Grade ≥ 3 GU and GI toxicity rates were 4% and 1%, respectively, including one patient with a rectal fistula and one patient with a severe hemorrhagic cystitis (both grade 4. In conclusion, high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy with fiducial marker-based position verification is well tolerated. The low grade ≥ 3 toxicity allows further dose escalation if the same dose constraints for the organs at risk will be used.

  18. 78 FR 63220 - Guidance for Industry on Acute Bacterial Skin and Skin Structure Infections: Developing Drugs for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... assist sponsors in the development of new antibacterial drugs to treat acute bacterial skin and skin..., rm. 2201, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002. Send one self-addressed adhesive label to assist that office... Fishers Lane, rm. 1061, Rockville, MD 20852. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Joseph G. Toerner, Center...

  19. Hypofractionated stereotactic body radiotherapy in low- and intermediate-risk prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hun Jung; Phak, Jeong Hoon; Kim, Woo Chul [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Inha University Hospital, Inha University School of Medicine, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) takes advantage of low α/β ratio of prostate cancer to deliver a large dose in few fractions. We examined clinical outcomes of SBRT using CyberKnife for the treatment of low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer. This study was based on a retrospective analysis of the 33 patients treated with SBRT using CyberKnife for localized prostate cancer (27.3% in low-risk and 72.7% in intermediate-risk). Total dose of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions of 7.25 Gy were administered. The acute and late toxicities were recorded using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group scale. Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response was monitored. Thirty-three patients with a median 51 months (range, 6 to 71 months) follow-up were analyzed. There was no biochemical failure. Median PSA nadir was 0.27 ng/mL at median 33 months and PSA bounce occurred in 30.3% (n = 10) of patients at median at median 10.5 months after SBRT. No grade 3 acute toxicity was noted. The 18.2% of the patients had acute grade 2 genitourinary (GU) toxicities and 21.2% had acute grade 2 gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities. After follow-up of 2 months, most complications had returned to baseline. There was no grade 3 late GU and GI toxicity. Our experience with SBRT using CyberKnife in low- and intermediate-risk prostate cancer demonstrates favorable efficacy and toxicity. Further studies with more patients and longer follow-up duration are required.

  20. Chronic prostatic infection and inflammation by Propionibacterium acnes in a rat prostate infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsson, Jan; Drott, Johanna Bergh; Laurantzon, Lovisa; Laurantzon, Oscar; Bergh, Anders; Elgh, Fredrik

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammation in the prostate, seen as infiltration of inflammatory cells into the prostate gland in histological samples, affects approximately half the male population without indication of prostate disease, and is almost ubiquitous in patients diagnosed with benign prostate hyperplasia and cancer. Several studies have demonstrated the gram-positive bacterium Propionibacterium acnes to be frequently present in prostate tissue from men suffering from prostate disease. P. acnes has been shown to be associated with histological inflammation in human prostatectomy specimens, and also to induce strong inflammatory response in prostate-derived tissue culture models. The present paper describes a rat model for assessment of the pathogenic potential of P. acnes in prostate. Prostate glands of Sprague Dawley rats (n = 98) were exposed via an abdominal incision and live P. acnes or, in control rats, saline were injected into the ventral and dorso-lateral lobes. Rats were sacrificed 5 days, 3 weeks, 3 months and 6 months post infection, and prostate tissue was analyzed for bacterial content and histological inflammation. Rat sera were assessed for levels of CRP and anti-P. acnes IgG. Live P. acnes could be recovered from the dorso-lateral lobes up to 3 months post infection, while the ventral lobes were cleared from bacteria at that time. In samples up to 3 months post infection, the dorso-lateral lobes exhibited intense focal inflammation. CRP and IgG levels were elevated throughout the span of the experiment, and reached maximum levels 3 weeks and 3 months post infection, respectively. We show that P. acnes have the potential to cause chronic infection in previously healthy prostate, and that the infection has potential to cause chronic histological inflammation in the infected tissue. The high prevalence of P. acnes in human prostate tissue calls for resolution of pathogenic details. The present rat model suggests that complications such as chronic

  1. Uspecifik granulomatøs prostatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Marcussen, N

    1989-01-01

    Non-specific granulomatous prostatitis (NGP) is histologically defined and reported with an incidence below 3.4% in unselected series of patients. A survey of the literature concerning NGP is given on the basis of a retrospective investigation of 14 case-histories. Microscopically, NGP is charact......Non-specific granulomatous prostatitis (NGP) is histologically defined and reported with an incidence below 3.4% in unselected series of patients. A survey of the literature concerning NGP is given on the basis of a retrospective investigation of 14 case-histories. Microscopically, NGP...... is characterized by focal or diffuse occurrence of granulomas in the prostate. The etiological significance has been attributed to acute non-specific prostatitis and local hypersensitivity and/or simple foreign-body reactions are considered to be pathogenetic factors. The mean age of patients suffering from NGP...... suspected. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy may be of some guidance. However, the diagnosis is settled postoperatively by histologic investigation, where prostatic cancer, iatrogenic granulomas and specific granulomatous inflammations must be considered as differential diagnoses. Irrespective the choice...

  2. Diagnostic value of latex agglutination test in diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syeda Fasiha Mohammadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To know the incidence of bacterial meningitis in children below five years of age. To compare conventional culture and antigen detection methods ( Latex agglutination test. Materials and Methods: 100 CSF samples of clinically suspected meningitis cases in children below 5 years of age were included. The samples were subjected to cell count, Gram stain, culture and LAT. The organisms isolated in the study were characterized according to standard procedures. Results: Of the 100 cases studied, 31 cases were diagnosed as ABM by Gram stain, culture and latex agglutination test as per WHO criteria. The hospital frequency of ABM was 1.7%. 15 (48.38 cases were culture positive. Gram stain was positive in 22(70.96 cases and LAT in 17(54.83 cases. Haemophilus influenzae was the most common causative agent of acute bacterial meningitis followed by S.pneumoniae. Case fatality rate was 45.16%.The sensitivity and specificity of LAT was 66.66% and 87.91% respectively. Conclusion : Bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency and early diagnosis and treatment is life saving and reduces chronic morbidity. LAT was more sensitive compared to conventional Gram stain and Culture technique in identifying the fastidious organisms like H.influenzae, S.pneumoniae and Group B Streptococcus. However, the combination of Gram stain, Culture and LAT proved to be more productive than any of the single tests alone.

  3. Anatomy-based inverse planning dose optimization in HDR prostate implant: A toxicity study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoudieh, Alireza; Tremblay, Christine; Beaulieu, Luc; Lachance, Bernard; Harel, Francois; Lessard, Etienne; Pouliot, Jean; Vigneault, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate the acute and late complications in patients who have received HDR implant boost using inverse planning, and to determine dose volume correlations. Patients and methods: Between September 1999 and October 2002, 44 patients with locally advanced prostate cancer (PSA ≥10 ng/ml, and/or Gleason score ≥7, and/or Stage T2c or higher) were treated with 40-45 Gy external pelvic field followed by 2-3 fraction of inverse-planned HDR implant boost (6-9.5 Gy /fraction). Median follow-up time was 1.7 years with 81.8% of patients who had at least 12 months of follow up (range 8.6-42.5. Acute and late morbidity data were collected and graded according to RTOG criteria. Questionnaires were used to collect prostate related measures of quality of life, and international prostate symptom score (IPSS) before and after treatment. Dose-volume histograms for prostate, urethra, bladder, penis bulb and rectum were analyzed. Results: The median patient age was 64 years. Of these, 32% were in the high risk group, and 61% in the intermediate risk group. 3 patients (7%) had no adverse prognostic factors. A single grade 3 GU acute toxicity was reported but no grade 3-4 acute GI toxicity. No grade 3-4 late GU or GI toxicity was reported. Acute (late) grade 2 urinary and rectal symptoms were reported in 31.8 (11.4%) and 4.6% (4.6%) of patients, respectively. A trend for predicting acute GU toxicity is seen for total HDR dose of more than 18 Gy (OR=3.6, 95%CI=[0.96-13.5], P=0.058). The evolution of toxicity is presented for acute and late GU/GI toxicity. Erectile dysfunction occurs in approximately 27% of patients who were not on hormonal deprivation, but may be taking sildenafil. The IPSS peaked on averaged 6 weeks post-implant and returned to the baseline at a median of 6 months. Conclusions: Inverse-planned HDR brachytherapy is a viable option to deliver higher dose to the prostate as a boost without increasing GU or rectal

  4. Acute gastrointestinal and genitourinary toxicity of image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer using a daily water-filled endorectal balloon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deville Curtiland

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our purpose was to report acute gastrointestinal (GI and genitourinary (GU toxicity rates for prostate cancer patients undergoing image-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IG-IMRT with a daily endorectal water-filled balloon (ERBH2O, and assess associations with planning parameters and pretreatment clinical characteristics. Methods The first 100 patients undergoing prostate and proximal seminal vesicle IG-IMRT with indexed-lumen 100 cc ERBH2O to 79.2 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions at our institution from 12/2008- 12/2010 were assessed. Pretreatment characteristics, organ-at-risk dose volume histograms, and maximum GU and GI toxicities (CTCAE 3.0 were evaluated. Logistic regression models evaluated univariate association between toxicities and dosimetric parameters, and uni- and multivariate association between toxicities and pretreatment characteristics. Results Mean age was 68 (range 51–88. Thirty-two, 49, and 19 patients were low, intermediate, and high-risk, respectively; 40 received concurrent androgen deprivation. No grade 3 or greater toxicities were recorded. Maximum GI toxicity was grade 0, 1, and 2 in 69%, 23%, and 8%, respectively. Infield (defined as 1 cm above/below the CTV rectal mean/median doses, D75, V30, and V40 and hemorrhoid history were associated with grade 2 GI toxicity (Ps  Conclusion Prostate IG-IMRT using a daily ERBH2O shows low rates of acute GI toxicity compared to previous reports of air-filled ERB IMRT when using stringent infield rectum constraints and comparable GU toxicities.

  5. Acute genitourinary toxicity after high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external-beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer: Second analysis to determine the correlation between the urethral dose in HDR brachytherapy and the severity of acute genitourinary toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akimoto, Tetsuo; Katoh, Hiroyuki; Noda, Shin-ei; Ito, Kazuto; Yamamoto, Takumi; Kashiwagi, Bunzo; Nakano, Takashi

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We have been treating localized prostate cancer with high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) at our institution. We recently reported the existence of a correlation between the severity of acute genitourinary (GU) toxicity and the urethral radiation dose in HDR brachytherapy by using different fractionation schema. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of the urethral dose in the development of acute GU toxicity more closely than in previous studies. For this purpose, we conducted an analysis of patients who had undergone HDR brachytherapy with a fixed fractionation schema combined with hypofractionated EBRT. Methods and Materials: Among the patients with localized prostate cancer who were treated by 192-iridium HDR brachytherapy combined with hypofractionated EBRT at Gunma University Hospital between August 2000 and November 2004, we analyzed 67 patients who were treated by HDR brachytherapy with the fractionation schema of 9 Gy x two times combined with hypofractionated EBRT. Hypofractionated EBRT was administered at a fraction dose of 3 Gy three times weekly, and a total dose of 51 Gy was delivered to the prostate gland and seminal vesicles using the four-field technique. No elective pelvic irradiation was performed. After the completion of EBRT, all the patients additionally received transrectal ultrasonography-guided HDR brachytherapy. The planning target volume was defined as the prostate gland with a 5-mm margin all around, and the planning was conducted based on computed tomography images. The tumor stage was T1c in 13 patients, T2 in 31 patients, and T3 in 23 patients. The Gleason score was 2-6 in 12 patients, 7 in 34 patients, and 8-10 in 21 patients. Androgen ablation was performed in all the patients. The median follow-up duration was 11 months (range 3-24 months). The toxicities were graded based on the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and the European Organization

  6. Dose-Volume Relationships for Acute Bowel Toxicity in Patients Treated With Pelvic Nodal Irradiation for Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiorino, Claudio; Alongi, Filippo; Perna, Lucia; Broggi, Sara; Cattaneo, Giovanni Mauro; Cozzarini, Cesare; Di Muzio, Nadia; Fazio, Ferruccio; Calandrino, Riccardo

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To find correlation between dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of the intestinal cavity (IC) and moderate-severe acute bowel toxicity in men with prostate cancer treated with pelvic nodal irradiation. Methods and Materials: The study group consisted of 191 patients with localized prostate cancer who underwent whole-pelvis radiotherapy with radical or adjuvant/salvage intent during January 2004 to November 2007. Complete planning/clinical data were available in 175 of these men, 91 of whom were treated with a conventional four-field technique (50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fraction) and 84 of whom were treated with IMRT using conventional Linac (n = 26, 50.4 Gy, 1.8 Gy/fraction) or Helical TomoTherapy (n = 58, 50-54 Gy, 1.8-2 Gy/fraction). The IC outside the planning target volume (PTV) was contoured and the DVH for the first 6 weeks of treatment was recovered in all patients. The correlation between a number of clinical and DVH (V10-V55) variables and toxicity was investigated in univariate and multivariate analyses. The correlation between DVHs for the IC outside the PTV and DVHs for the whole IC was also assessed. Results: Twenty-two patients experienced toxicity (3/22 in the IMRT/tomotherapy group). Univariate analyses showed a significant correlation between V20-V50 and toxicity (p = 0.0002-0.001), with a higher predictive value observed for V40-V50. Previous prostatectomy (p = 0.066) and abdominal/pelvic surgery (p = 0.12) also correlated with toxicity. Multivariate analysis that included V45, abdominal/pelvic surgery, and prostatectomy showed that the most predictive parameters were V45 (p = 0.002) and abdominal/pelvic surgery (p = 0.05, HR = 2.4) Conclusions: Our avoidance IMRT approach drastically reduces the incidence of acute bowel toxicity. V40-V50 of IC and, secondarily, previous abdominal/pelvic surgery were the main predictors of acute bowel toxicity.

  7. Epidemiological and microbiological aspects of acute bacterial diarrhea in children from Salvador, Bahia, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Diniz-Santos, Daniel R.; Santana, José S.; Barretto, Junaura R.; Andrade, Maria Goreth M.; Silva, Luciana R.

    2005-01-01

    In the few cases of acute childhood diarrhea that require antimicrobial therapy, the correct choice of the drug depends on detailed previous knowledge of local strains. In order to establish such parameters in our city, we reviewed the results of all 260 positive stool cultures of children between 0 and 15 years of age during two years at a pediatric tertiary care facility in Salvador, Brazil. Bacterial strains had been presumptively identified by culturing in selective media and by biochemic...

  8. Development of a Set of Nomograms to Predict Acute Lower Gastrointestinal Toxicity for Prostate Cancer 3D-CRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdagni, Riccardo; Rancati, Tiziana; Fiorino, Claudio; Fellin, Gianni; Magli, Alessandro; Baccolini, Michela; Bianchi, Carla; Cagna, Emanuela; Greco, Carlo; Mauro, Flora A.; Monti, Angelo F.; Munoz, Fernando; Stasi, Michele; Franzone, Paola; Vavassori, Vittorio

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To predict acute Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and Subjective Objective Signs Management and Analysis/Late Effect of Normal Tissue (SOMA/LENT) toxicities of the lower gastrointestinal (LGI) syndrome in patients with prostate cancer undergoing three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy using a tool (nomogram) that takes into account clinical and dosimetric variables that proved to be significant in the Italian Association for Radiation Oncology (AIRO) Group on Prostate Cancer (AIROPROS) 0102 trial. Methods and Materials: Acute rectal toxicity was scored in 1,132 patients by using both the RTOG/EORTC scoring system and a 10-item self-assessed questionnaire. Correlation between clinical variables/dose-volume histogram constraints and rectal toxicity was investigated by means of multivariate logistic analyses. Multivariate logistic analyses results were used to create nomograms predicting the symptoms of acute LGI syndrome. Results: Mean rectal dose was a strong predictor of Grade 2-3 RTOG/EORTC acute LGI toxicity (p 0.0004; odds ratio (OR) = 1.035), together with hemorrhoids (p = 0.02; OR 1.51), use of anticoagulants/antiaggregants (p = 0.02; OR = 0.63), and androgen deprivation (AD) (p = 0.04; OR = 0.65). Diabetes (p = 0.34; OR 1.28) and pelvic node irradiation (p = 0.11; OR = 1.56) were significant variables to adjust toxicity prediction. Bleeding was related to hemorrhoids (p = 0.02; OR = 173), AD (p = 0.17; OR = 0.67), and mean rectal dose (p 0.009; OR = 1.024). Stool frequency was related to seminal vesicle irradiation (p = 0.07; OR = 6.46), AD administered for more than 3 months (p = 0.002; OR = 0.32), and the percent volume of rectum receiving more than 60 Gy (V60Gy) V60 (p = 0.02; OR = 1.02). Severe fecal incontinence depended on seminal vesicle irradiation (p = 0.14; OR = 4.5) and V70 (p = 0.033; OR 1.029). Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this work presents the

  9. Meningitis registry of hospitalized cases in children: epidemiological patterns of acute bacterial meningitis throughout a 32-year period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syriopoulou Vassiliki P

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacterial meningitis remains a source of substantial morbidity and mortality in childhood. During the last decades gradual changes have been observed in the epidemiology of bacterial meningitis, related to the introduction of new polysaccharide and conjugate vaccines. The study presents an overview of the epidemiological patterns of acute bacterial meningitis in a tertiary children 's hospital during a 32-year period, using information from a disease registry. Moreover, it discusses the contribution of communicable disease registries in the study of acute infectious diseases. Methods In the early 1970s a Meningitis Registry (MR was created for patients admitted with meningitis in Aghia Sofia Children's Hospital in Athens. The MR includes demographic, clinical and laboratory data as well as treatment, complications and outcome of the patients. In 2000 a database was created and the collected data were entered, analyzed and presented in three chronological periods: A (1974–1984, B (1985–1994 and C (1995–2005. Results Of the 2,477 cases of bacterial meningitis registered in total, 1,146 cases (46.3% were classified as "probable" and 1,331 (53.7% as "confirmed" bacterial meningitis. The estimated mean annual Incidence Rate (IR was 16.9/100,000 for bacterial meningitis, 8.9/100,000 for Neisseria meningitidis, 1.3/100,000 for Streptococcus pneumoniae, 2.5/100,000 for Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib before vaccination and 0.4/100,000 for Hib after vaccination. Neisseria meningitis constituted the leading cause of childhood bacterial meningitis for all periods and in all age groups. Hib was the second most common cause of bacterial meningitis before the introduction of Hib conjugate vaccine, in periods A and B. The incidence of bacterial meningitis due to Streptococcus pneumoniae was stable. The long-term epidemiological pattern of Neisseria meningitidis appears in cycles of approximately 10 years, confirmed by a significant

  10. Strain-specific induction of experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Christopher M; Flies, Dallas B; Mosse, Claudio A; Parwani, Anil; Hipkiss, Edward L; Drake, Charles G

    2013-05-01

    Prostatitis, a clinical syndrome characterized by pelvic pain and inflammation, is common in adult males. Although several induced and spontaneous murine models of prostatitis have been explored, the role of genetic background on induction has not been well-defined. Using a standard methodology for the induction of experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP), we investigated both acute and chronic inflammation on several murine genetic backgrounds. In our colony, nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice evinced spontaneous prostatitis that was not augmented by immunization with rat prostate extract (RPE). In contrast, the standard laboratory strain Balb/c developed chronic inflammation in response to RPE immunization. Development of EAP in other strains was variable. These data suggest that Balb/c mice injected with RPE may provide a useful model for chronic prostatic inflammation. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Bone dissemination of prostate cancer after holmium laser enucleation of the prostate: a case report and a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koguchi, Dai; Nishi, Morihiro; Satoh, Takefumi; Shitara, Toshiya; Matsumoto, Kazumasa; Fujita, Tetsuo; Yoshida, Kazunari; Iwamura, Masatsugu

    2014-02-01

    We report a case of dissemination of prostate cancer after holmium laser enucleation of the prostate in an 80-year-old patient. The patient presented at hospital because of nocturia. Transrectal ultrasound-guided biopsy was carried out because of high serum prostate-specific antigen (3.55 ng/mL), but it showed no malignancies. Benign prostate hyperplasia was diagnosed, and he was started on an α1-blocker. Although the urinary symptom improved with silodosin, acute urinary retention occurred 3 years after therapy began. Holmium laser enucleation of the prostate for relief of bladder outlet obstruction enabled discharge of urine. Pathological examination of the resected tissue found adenocarcinoma with a high Gleason score, 4 + 5. Serum alkaline phosphatase increased rapidly after holmium laser enucleation, and bone scintigraphy confirmed multiple bone metastases. Prostate cancer, T1bN0M1b, was diagnosed. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  12. Cooperation between Monocyte-Derived Cells and Lymphoid Cells in the Acute Response to a Bacterial Lung Pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S Brown

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease, a potentially fatal lung infection. Alveolar macrophages support intracellular replication of L. pneumophila, however the contributions of other immune cell types to bacterial killing during infection are unclear. Here, we used recently described methods to characterise the major inflammatory cells in lung after acute respiratory infection of mice with L. pneumophila. We observed that the numbers of alveolar macrophages rapidly decreased after infection coincident with a rapid infiltration of the lung by monocyte-derived cells (MC, which, together with neutrophils, became the dominant inflammatory cells associated with the bacteria. Using mice in which the ability of MC to infiltrate tissues is impaired it was found that MC were required for bacterial clearance and were the major source of IL12. IL12 was needed to induce IFNγ production by lymphoid cells including NK cells, memory T cells, NKT cells and γδ T cells. Memory T cells that produced IFNγ appeared to be circulating effector/memory T cells that infiltrated the lung after infection. IFNγ production by memory T cells was stimulated in an antigen-independent fashion and could effectively clear bacteria from the lung indicating that memory T cells are an important contributor to innate bacterial defence. We also determined that a major function of IFNγ was to stimulate bactericidal activity of MC. On the other hand, neutrophils did not require IFNγ to kill bacteria and alveolar macrophages remained poorly bactericidal even in the presence of IFNγ. This work has revealed a cooperative innate immune circuit between lymphoid cells and MC that combats acute L. pneumophila infection and defines a specific role for IFNγ in anti-bacterial immunity.

  13. Postoperative high-dose pelvic radiotherapy for N+ prostate cancer: Toxicity and matched case comparison with postoperative prostate bed-only radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Praet, Charles; Ost, Piet; Lumen, Nicolaas; De Meerleer, Gert; Vandecasteele, Katrien; Villeirs, Geert; Decaestecker, Karel; Fonteyne, Valérie

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report on toxicity of postoperative high-dose whole-pelvis radiotherapy (WPRT) with androgen deprivation therapy for lymph node metastasized (N1) prostate cancer (PC). To perform a matched-case analysis to compare this toxicity profile to postoperative prostate bed-only radiotherapy (PBRT). Materials and methods: Forty-eight N1-PC patients were referred for WPRT and 239 node-negative patients for PBRT. Patients were matched 1:1 according to pre-treatment demographics, symptoms, treatment and tumor characteristics. Mean dose to the prostate bed was 75 Gy (WPRT–PBRT) and 54 Gy to the elective nodes (WPRT) in 36 or 37 fractions. End points are genito-urinary (GU) and gastro-intestinal (GI) toxicity. Results: After WPRT, 35% developed grade 2 (G2) and 4% G3 acute GU toxicity. Acute GI toxicity developed in 42% (G2). Late GU toxicity developed in 36% (G2) and 7% (G3). One patient had G4 incontinence. Recuperation occurred in 59%. Late GI toxicity developed in 25% (G2) with 100% recuperation. Incidence of acute and late GI toxicity was higher following WPRT compared to PBRT (p ⩽ 0.041). GU toxicity was similar. With WPRT mean dose to bladder and rectosigmoid were higher. Conclusions: Postoperative high-dose WPRT comes at the cost of a temporary increase in G2. GI toxicity compared to PBRT because larger volumes of rectosigmoid are irradiated

  14. Prostate health index and prostate cancer gene 3 score but not percent-free Prostate Specific Antigen have a predictive role in differentiating histological prostatitis from PCa and other nonneoplastic lesions (BPH and HG-PIN) at repeat biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Stefano; Passera, Roberto; Fiori, Cristian; Bollito, Enrico; Cappia, Susanna; Mario Scarpa, Roberto; Sottile, Antonino; Franco Randone, Donato; Porpiglia, Francesco

    2015-10-01

    To determine if prostate health index (PHI), prostate cancer antigen gene 3 (PCA3) score, and percentage of free prostate-specific antigen (%fPSA) may be used to differentiate asymptomatic acute and chronic prostatitis from prostate cancer (PCa), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (HG-PIN) in patients with elevated PSA levels and negative findings on digital rectal examination at repeat biopsy (re-Bx). In this prospective study, 252 patients were enrolled, undergoing PHI, PCA3 score, and %fPSA assessments before re-Bx. We used 3 multivariate logistic regression models to test the PHI, PCA3 score, and %fPSA as risk factors for prostatitis vs. PCa, vs. BPH, and vs. HG-PIN. All the analyses were performed for the whole patient cohort and for the "gray zone" of PSA (4-10ng/ml) cohort (171 individuals). Of the 252 patients, 43 (17.1%) had diagnosis of PCa. The median PHI was significantly different between men with a negative biopsy and those with a positive biopsy (34.9 vs. 48.1, Pprostatitis and PCa was moderate, although it extended to a good range of threshold probabilities (40%-100%), whereas that from using %fPSA was negligible: this pattern was reported for the whole population as for the "gray zone" PSA cohort. In front of a good diagnostic performance of all the 3 biomarkers in distinguishing negative biopsy vs. positive biopsy, the clinical benefit of using the PCA3 score and PHI to estimate prostatitis vs. PCa was comparable. PHI was the only determinant for prostatitis vs. BPH, whereas no biomarkers could differentiate prostate inflammation from HG-PIN. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A randomized hypofractionation dose escalation trial for high risk prostate cancer patients: interim analysis of acute toxicity and quality of life in 124 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norkus, Darius; Valuckas, Konstantinas Povilas; Karklelyte, Agata; Engels, Benedikt; Versmessen, Harijati; Griskevicius, Romas; De Ridder, Mark; Storme, Guy; Aleknavicius, Eduardas; Janulionis, Ernestas

    2013-01-01

    The α/β ratio for prostate cancer is postulated being in the range of 0.8 to 2.2 Gy, giving rise to the hypothesis that there may be a therapeutic advantage to hypofractionation. To do so, we carried out a randomized trial comparing hypofractionated and conventionally fractionated image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) in high-risk prostate cancer. Here, we report on acute toxicity and quality of life (QOL) for the first 124 randomized patients. The trial compares 76 Gy in 38 fractions (5 fractions/week) (Arm 1) to 63 Gy in 20 fractions (4 fractions/week) (Arm 2) (IG-IMRT). Prophylactic pelvic lymph node irradiation with 46 Gy in 23 fractions sequentially (Arm 1) and 44 Gy in 20 fractions simultaneously (Arm 2) was applied. All patients had long term androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) started before RT. Both physician-rated acute toxicity and patient-reported QOL using EPIC questionnaire are described. There were no differences in overall maximum acute gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity. Compared to conventional fractionation (Arm 1), GI and GU toxicity both developed significantly earlier but also disappeared earlier in the Arm 2, reaching significant differences from Arm 1 at week 8 and 9. In multivariate analyses, only parameter shown to be related to increased acute Grade ≥1 GU toxicity was the study Arm 2 (p = 0.049). There were no statistically significant differences of mean EPIC scores in any domain and sub-scales. The clinically relevant decrease (CRD) in EPIC urinary domain was significantly higher in Arm 2 at month 1 with a faster recovery at month 3 as compared to Arm 1. Hypofractionation at 3.15 Gy per fraction to 63 Gy within 5 weeks was well tolerated. The GI and GU physician-rated acute toxicity both developed earlier but recovered faster using hypofractionation. There was a correlation between acute toxicity and bowel and urinary QOL outcomes. Longer follow-up is needed to determine the significance of these

  16. Correlates of Bacterial Ulcers and Acute HSV-2 Infection among Men with Genital Ulcer Disease in South Africa: Age, Recent Sexual Behaviors, and HIV

    OpenAIRE

    Leichliter, Jami S.; Lewis, David A.; Paz-Bailey, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Data from baseline surveys and STI/HIV laboratory tests (n=615 men) were used to examine correlates of bacterial ulcers (Treponema pallidum, Haemophilus ducreyi, or Chlamydia trachomatis L1–L3 detected in ulcer) and acute HSV-2 ulcers (HSV-2 positive ulcer specimen, HSV-2 sero-negative, and negative for bacterial pathogens) vs. recurrent HSV-2 ulcers (sero-positive), separately. Compared to men with recurrent HSV-2 ulcers, men with bacterial ulcers had larger ulcers but were less likely to be...

  17. A phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study of misoprostol rectal suppositories to prevent acute radiation proctitis in patients with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hille, Andrea; Schmidberger, Heinz; Hermann, Robert M.; Christiansen, Hans; Saile, Bernhard; Pradier, Olivier; Hess, Clemens F.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Acute radiation proctitis is the most relevant complication of pelvic radiation and is still mainly treated supportively. Considering the negative impact of acute proctitis symptoms on patients' daily activities and the potential relationship between the severity of acute radiation injury and late damage, misoprostol was tested in the prevention of acute radiation-induced proctitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 100 patients who underwent radiotherapy for prostate cancer were entered into this phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study with misoprostol or placebo suppositories. Radiation-induced toxicity was evaluated weekly during radiotherapy using the Common Toxicity Criteria. Results: Between the placebo and the misoprostol groups, no significant differences in proctitis symptoms occurred: 76% of patients in each group had Grade 1 toxicity, and 26% in the placebo group and 36% in the misoprostol group had Grade 2 toxicity. No differences were found in onset or symptom duration. Comparing the peak incidence of patients' toxicity symptoms, significantly more patients experienced rectal bleeding in the misoprostol group (p = 0.03). Conclusion: Misoprostol given as a once-daily suppository did not decrease the incidence and severity of radiation-induced acute proctitis and may increase the incidence of acute bleeding

  18. Predictors of Acute Bacterial Meningitis in Children from a Malaria-Endemic Area of Papua New Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laman, Moses; Manning, Laurens; Greenhill, Andrew R.; Mare, Trevor; Michael, Audrey; Shem, Silas; Vince, John; Lagani, William; Hwaiwhanje, Ilomo; Siba, Peter M.; Mueller, Ivo; Davis, Timothy M. E.

    2012-01-01

    Predictors of acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) were assessed in 554 children in Papua New Guinea 0.2–10 years of age who were hospitalized with culture-proven meningitis, probable meningitis, or non-meningitic illness investigated by lumbar puncture. Forty-seven (8.5%) had proven meningitis and 36 (6.5%) had probable meningitis. Neck stiffness, Kernig’s and Brudzinski’s signs and, in children Papua New Guinea but malaria microscopy augments diagnostic precision. PMID:22302856

  19. Bacterial meningitis in immunocompromised patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veen, K.E.B.

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial meningitis is an acute infection of the meninges, in The Netherlands most commonly caused by Streptococcus pneumoniae and Neisseria meningitides. Risk factors for acquiring bacterial meningitis include a decreased function of the immune system. The aim of this thesis was to study

  20. Use of nasopharyngeal culture to determine appropriateness of antibiotic therapy in acute bacterial rhinosinusitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stella; Woodbury, Kristin; Ferguson, Berrylin J

    2013-04-01

    Rhinosinusitis is one of the top 5 diagnoses for which an antibiotic is prescribed, often without a clear bacterial etiology. This study evaluated whether nasopharyngeal culture and gram stain could serve as a surrogate for endoscopically obtained middle meatal cultures in directing appropriate therapy for acute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS). This study also investigated the utility of a rapid sinus test screen in differentiating bacterial from nonbacterial rhinosinusitis. Thirty-one adult patients met inclusion criteria for ABRS. Samples were obtained from both the middle meatus and nasopharynx for Gram stain and culture. Nasal mucous samples were tested with a rapid sinus test strip measuring pH, levels of protein, nitrites, and leukocyte esterase. Sixty-one percent (61%) of nasopharyngeal and 48% of middle meatal samples grew pathogenic bacteria. The concordance rate was 84% between the 2 sites (p = 0.0006). The following pathogenic organisms were detected: Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus. For nasopharyngeal samples, reliance on Gram stain alone exhibited a sensitivity of 31% and specificity of 100% and, similarly, for middle meatus samples, 47% and 93%, respectively. The rapid sinus test revealed a sensitivity of 83% and specificity of 7%. Nasopharyngeal and middle meatal cultures exhibited high concordance for pathogenic bacteria. Gram stain exhibited moderate sensitivity and excellent specificity. Nasopharyngeal cultures could provide a viable method, especially in a primary care setting, for determining the appropriateness of antibiotic therapy. The rapid sinus test's lack of specificity precluded its utility in the differentiation between bacterial and nonbacterial rhinosinusitis. © 2013 ARS-AAOA, LLC.

  1. THE COMBINED ROLE OF HERBAL THERAPY IN THE PREVENTION OF URINARY TRACT INFECTIONS DURING PROSTATE BIOPSY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Il'yash

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Prostate biopsy is a routine method for diagnosing prostate cancer. However, there are a number of serious complications associated with this procedure, and especially development of infection.Objective. Evaluation of the effectiveness of complex herbal therapy in the prevention of infectious complications in patients exposed to prostate biopsy.Materials and methods. The study included 40 patients aged 48 to 69 years who underwent prostate biopsy. Patients with chronic prostatitis (category 4 NIH were divided into two groups. Patients in the comparison group limited to standard antibiotic therapy, and the patients of the main group additionally received Canephron N. The efficacy of the therapy was evaluated at 1, 2 and 6 months after the start of treatment by the dynamics of leukocyte count in prostate secretion and bacterial contamination, prostate- specific atigen (PSA level, questionnaire data, ultrasound and urodynamic survey methods.Results. The level of PSA compared to baseline data, decreased by 56.9% in the comparison group and by 67.6% in the main group (p<0.05. A clinically significant bacterial titer and an increase in the number of leukocytes more than10 in sight, were registered in the comparison group in two times more often, than in patients of the main group.Conclusion. The results of the study make it possible to recommend for patients with chronic prostatitis of category 4 NIH the prescription of Canephron N.

  2. Metastasis of a Prostatic Carcinoma along an Omental Graft in a Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry M. Jacobs

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An 11-year-old male American Bulldog was presented for hematuria and tenesmus. It had been treated for chronic bacterial prostatitis with abscessation two years earlier and underwent castration and a prostatic omentalization procedure. There was no histologic evidence of prostatic neoplasia at that time. On physical examination, an enlarged prostate was found by rectal palpation, and it was characterized with ultrasonography and computed tomography. Surgical biopsies were obtained, and histopathology identified prostatic adenocarcinoma. It received carprofen and mitoxantrone chemotherapy in addition to palliative radiation therapy; it was euthanized six weeks later due to a progression of clinical signs. Necropsy findings included marked localized expansion of the prostatic tumor and dissemination of prostatic carcinoma cells throughout the peritoneal cavity along the omental graft with infiltration onto the serosal surfaces of most abdominal viscera and fat. This case represents a previously unreported potential complication of the omentalization procedure wherein carcinoma cells from a prostatic tumor that independently arose after omentalization may have metastasized along the surgically created omental graft.

  3. Prostate Artery Embolization for Complete Urinary Outflow Obstruction Due to Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Simon Chun Ho, E-mail: simonyu@cuhk.edu.hk; Cho, Carmen Chi Min; Hung, Esther Hiu Yee [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Imaging and Interventional Radiology (Hong Kong); Chiu, Peter Ka Fung; Yee, Chi Hang; Ng, Chi Fai [The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Department of Surgery, Prince of Wales Hospital (Hong Kong)

    2017-01-15

    BackgroundWe aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of PAE in weaning of catheter and relieving obstructive urinary symptoms in patients with acute urinary retention (AUR) due to benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) and failed trial without catheter (TWOC).Materials and MethodsIn this prospective study approved by the institutional review board, a signed informed consent was obtained. Eighteen consecutive patients with AUR due to BPH and failed TWOC were recruited. Nineteen consecutive patients with BPH but without AUR were recruited as a control. Patients with CTA evidence of arterial occlusion or significant stenosis along the prostate artery access path were excluded. PAE was performed using microspheres (100–300 μm diameter). Outcome assessment included successful weaning of catheter in 2 weeks, procedure-related complications, change of symptomatology and urodynamic findings at 1 month as compared to baseline, percent non-perfused prostate volume, and prostate volume reduction on MRI at 2 weeks.ResultsTwo patients in the study group and four in the control group were excluded due to arterial pathology. Embolization of bilateral prostate arteries was achieved in all patients in both the groups (100%). There was no complication. The catheter was successfully weaned in 87.5% (14/16) of patients within 14 days in the treatment group. There was no significant difference in patient demographics, prostate characteristics, and all outcome assessment parameters between both the groups.ConclusionsPAE was probably safe and effective in weaning of catheter and relieving obstructive urinary symptoms in patients due to BPH, with treatment outcomes comparable to those without AUR.

  4. Prostate Artery Embolization for Complete Urinary Outflow Obstruction Due to Benign Prostatic Hypertrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Simon Chun Ho; Cho, Carmen Chi Min; Hung, Esther Hiu Yee; Chiu, Peter Ka Fung; Yee, Chi Hang; Ng, Chi Fai

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundWe aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of PAE in weaning of catheter and relieving obstructive urinary symptoms in patients with acute urinary retention (AUR) due to benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) and failed trial without catheter (TWOC).Materials and MethodsIn this prospective study approved by the institutional review board, a signed informed consent was obtained. Eighteen consecutive patients with AUR due to BPH and failed TWOC were recruited. Nineteen consecutive patients with BPH but without AUR were recruited as a control. Patients with CTA evidence of arterial occlusion or significant stenosis along the prostate artery access path were excluded. PAE was performed using microspheres (100–300 μm diameter). Outcome assessment included successful weaning of catheter in 2 weeks, procedure-related complications, change of symptomatology and urodynamic findings at 1 month as compared to baseline, percent non-perfused prostate volume, and prostate volume reduction on MRI at 2 weeks.ResultsTwo patients in the study group and four in the control group were excluded due to arterial pathology. Embolization of bilateral prostate arteries was achieved in all patients in both the groups (100%). There was no complication. The catheter was successfully weaned in 87.5% (14/16) of patients within 14 days in the treatment group. There was no significant difference in patient demographics, prostate characteristics, and all outcome assessment parameters between both the groups.ConclusionsPAE was probably safe and effective in weaning of catheter and relieving obstructive urinary symptoms in patients due to BPH, with treatment outcomes comparable to those without AUR.

  5. Bacterial Species and Antibiotic Sensitivity in Korean Patients Diagnosed with Acute Otitis Media and Otitis Media with Effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Jeon, Eun Ju; Hong, Seok Min; Bae, Chang Hoon; Lee, Ho Yun; Park, Moo Kyun; Byun, Jae Yong; Kim, Myung Gu; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2017-04-01

    Changes over time in pathogens and their antibiotic sensitivity resulting from the recent overuse and misuse of antibiotics in otitis media (OM) have complicated treatment. This study evaluated changes over 5 years in principal pathogens and their antibiotic sensitivity in patients in Korea diagnosed with acute OM (AOM) and OM with effusion (OME). The study population consisted of 683 patients who visited the outpatient department of otorhinolaryngology in 7 tertiary hospitals in Korea between January 2010 and May 2015 and were diagnosed with acute AOM or OME. Aural discharge or middle ear fluid were collected from patients in the operating room or outpatient department and subjected to tests of bacterial identification and antibiotic sensitivity. The overall bacteria detection rate of AOM was 62.3% and OME was 40.9%. The most frequently isolated Gram-positive bacterial species was coagulase negative Staphylococcus aureus (CNS) followed by methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA), methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), and Streptococcus pneumonia (SP), whereas the most frequently isolated Gram-negative bacterium was Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA). Regardless of OM subtype, ≥ 80% of CNS and MRSA strains were resistant to penicillin (PC) and tetracycline (TC); isolated MRSA strains showed low sensitivity to other antibiotics, with 100% resistant to PC, TC, cefoxitin (CFT), and erythromycin (EM); and isolated PA showed low sensitivity to quinolone antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin (CIP) and levofloxacin (LFX), and to aminoglycosides. Bacterial species and antibiotic sensitivity did not change significantly over 5 years. The rate of detection of MRSA was higher in OME than in previous studies. As bacterial predominance and antibiotic sensitivity could change over time, continuous and periodic surveillance is necessary in guiding appropriate antibacterial therapy. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  6. Comparison of acute and subacute genitourinary and gastrointestinal adverse events of radiotherapy for prostate cancer using intensity-modulated radiation therapy, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, permanent implant brachytherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morimoto, Masahiro; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Konishi, Koji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Takahashi, Yutaka; Ogata, Toshiyuki; Koizumi, Masahiko; Teshima, Teruki; Bijl, Henk P; van der Schaaf, Arjen; Langendijk, Johannes A; Ogawa, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    AIMS AND BACKGROUND: To examine acute and subacute urinary and rectal toxicity in patients with localized prostate cancer monotherapeutically treated with the following four radiotherapeutic techniques: intensity-modulated radiation therapy, three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy,

  7. Isolation of Capsulate Bacteria from Acute Dentoalveolar Abscesses

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, M. A. O.; Milligan, S. G.; MacFarlane, T. W.; Carmichael, F. A.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of a capsule was determined for 198 bacterial strains (57 facultative anaerobes, 141 strict anaerobes) isobdted from pus samples aspirated from 40 acute dentoalveolar abscesses. A total of 133 (67 per cent) of the isolates (42 facultative anaerobes, 91 strict anaerobes) were found to have a capsule. Possession ofa capsule may in part explain the apparent pathogenicity of the bacterial species encountered in acute dentoalveolar abscess.Keywords - Bacterial capsule; Acute dentoalve...

  8. Iodine-125 thin seeds decrease prostate swelling during transperineal interstitial permanent prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beydoun, Nadine; Bucci, Joseph A.; Chin, Yaw S.; Malouf, David

    2014-01-01

    Prostate swelling following seed implantation is a well-recognised phenomenon. The purpose of this intervention was to assess whether using thinner seeds reduces post-implant swelling with permanent prostate brachytherapy. Eighteen consecutive patients eligible for prostate seed brachytherapy underwent seed implantation using iodine-125 (I-125) thin seeds. Operative time, dosimetry, prostate swelling and toxicity were assessed and compared with standard I-125 stranded seed controls, sourced from the department's brachytherapy database. A learning curve was noted with the thin seeds in terms of greater bending and deviation of needles from their intended path. This translated into significantly longer total operative time (88 vs 103 minutes; P=0.009, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.1-24.3) and time per needle insertion (2.6 vs 3.7 minutes; P<0.001, 95% CI 0.5-1.3) for the thin seeds. Day 30 prostate volumes were significantly smaller in the thin seed group compared with standard seeds (40.9cc vs 46.8cc; P=0.001, 95% CI 1.5-5.6). The ratio of preoperative transrectal ultrasound to day 30 post-implant CT volume was also smaller in the thin seed group (1.2±0.1 for standard seeds vs 1.1±0.1 for thin seeds). Post-implant dosimetric parameters were comparable for both groups. No significant differences were seen in acute urinary morbidity or quality of life between the two groups. I-125 thin seeds are associated with an initial learning curve, with longer operative time, even for experienced brachytherapists. The significant reduction in day 30 prostate volumes with the thin seeds has useful implications in terms of optimising dose coverage to the prostate in the early period post-implantation, as well as improving the accuracy of post-implant dosimetric assessments.

  9. Acute exposure to crystalline silica reduces macrophage activation in response to bacterial lipoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillian Lee Beamer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous studies have examined the relationship between alveolar macrophages (AM and crystalline silica (SiO2 using in vitro and in vivo immunotoxicity models; however, exactly how exposure to SiO2 alters the functionality of AM and the potential consequences for immunity to respiratory pathogens remains largely unknown. Because recognition and clearance of inhaled particulates and microbes is largely mediated by pattern recognition receptors (PRR on the surface of AM, we hypothesized that exposure to SiO2 limits the ability of AM to respond to bacterial challenge by altering PRR expression. Alveolar and bone marrow-derived macrophages downregulate TLR2 expression following acute SiO2 exposure (e.g. 4 hours. Interestingly, these responses were dependent upon interactions between SiO2 and the class A scavenger receptor CD204, but not MARCO. Furthermore, SiO2 exposure decreased uptake of fluorescently labeled Pam2CSK4 and Pam3CSK4, resulting in reduced secretion of IL-1β, but not IL-6. Collectively, our data suggest that SiO2 exposure alters AM phenotype, which in turn affects their ability to uptake and respond to bacterial lipoproteins.

  10. Cytotoxicity and Acute Gastrointestinal Toxicity of Bacterial Cellulose-Poly (acrylamide-sodium acrylate Hydrogel: A Carrier for Oral Drug Delivery

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    Manisha Pandey 1,2 * , Hira Choudhury 1, Mohd Cairul Iqbal Mohd Amin 2

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Preliminary safety evaluation of polymer intended to use as drug delivery carrier is essential. Methods: In this study polyacrylamide grafted bacterial cellulose (BC/AM hydrogel was prepared by microwave irradiation initiated free radical polymerization. The synthesized hydrogel was subjected to in vitro cytotoxicity and acute gastrointestinal toxicity studies to evaluate its biological safety as potential oral drug delivery carrier. Results: The results indicate that hydrogel was non cytotoxic and did not show any histopathological changes in GI tract after a high dose of oral administration. Conclusion: The results revealed that hydrogel composed of bacterial cellulose and polyacrylamide is safe as oral drug delivery carrier.

  11. Clinical significance of determination of changes of EPS IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10 and LDH5/LDH1 levels in patients with chronic prostatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yongchang

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of the changes of expressed prostatic secretion IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10 and LDH5/LDH1 levels in patients with chronic prostatitis. Methods: Expressed prostatic secretion IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10 (with Radioimmunoassay) and LDH5/LDH1 (with cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis) levels were determined in 32 patients with chronic prostatitis and 35 controls. These 32 patients were of 3 groups: 1)chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP, n=10) 2) chronic pelvic pain syndrome IIIA (CPPS IIIA n=9) 3) CPPSIIIB n=13. Results: Expressed prostatic secretion levels of IL-1β, IL-2 and LDH5/LDH1 were significantly higher in patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP) groups than those in controls (all P 0.05). But the expressed prostatic secretion levels of IL-10 were still significantly lower in patients with chronic nonbacterial prostatitis, chronic pelvic pain syndrome(CPPSIIIB) groups than those in controls (all P<0.05). Conclusion: There were changes of expressed prostatic secretion IL-1β, IL-2, IL-10 and LDH5/LDH1 levels in patients with chronic prostatitis. Combined determination of the expressed prostatic secretion 4 markers levels is valuable for the diagnosis of chronic prostatitis and CPPSIII and for differentiation of CPPSIII types. (authors)

  12. Co-trimoxazole alone for prevention of bacterial infection in patients with acute leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, I D; Donnelly, P; Catovsky, D; Darrell, J; Johnson, S A; Goldman, J M; Galton, D A

    1982-01-02

    43 patients undergoing treatment for acute leukaemia were randomised to receive either co-trimoxazole alone or co-trimoxazole with framycetin and colistin as antibacterial prophylaxis during periods of neutropenia. There were no significant differences between the two treatment groups in the time before the onset of the first fever, the number of episodes of fever or of septicaemia per patient, the number of neutropenic days during which patients remained afebrile or did not require systemic antibiotics, or the number of resistant organisms acquired. Co-trimoxazole alone is cheaper and easier to take than co-trimoxazole with framycetin and colistin, and it is therefore preferable to the three-drug combination for the prophylaxis of bacterial infection.

  13. Emerging treatment options for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections: focus on intravenous delafloxacin

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    Righi E

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Elda Righi, Alessia Carnelutti, Antonio Vena, Matteo Bassetti Infectious Diseases Division, Santa Maria della Misericordia University Hospital, Udine, Italy Abstract: The increase in hospitalization due to acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI caused by resistant pathogens supports the need for new treatment options. Antimicrobial options for ABSSSI that provide broad-spectrum coverage, including gram-negative pathogens and multidrug-resistant gram-positive bacteria, such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, are limited. Delafloxacin is a novel fluoroquinolone available as intravenous and oral formulations and is characterized by an increased efficacy in acidic environments and activity on bacterial biofilm. Delafloxacin displays enhanced in vitro activity against MRSA, and enterococci, while maintaining efficacy against gram-negative pathogens and anaerobes. Delafloxacin has been studied for the treatment of ABSSSI and respiratory infections. Phase III studies have demonstrated noninferiority of delafloxacin compared to vancomycin, linezolid, tigecycline, and the combination of vancomycin plus aztreonam in the treatment of ABSSSI. Due to its favorable pharmacokinetic characteristics, the wide spectrum of action, and the potential for sequential therapy, delafloxacin represents a promising option in the empirical and targeted treatment of ABSSSI, both in hospital- and in community-based care. Keywords: bacterial skin and skin structure infections, multidrug-resistant bacteria, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, delafloxacin

  14. Prostate calcifications: A case series supporting the microbial biofilm theory

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    Tommaso Cai

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Prostate calcifications are a common finding during transrectal prostate ultrasound in both healthy subjects and patients, but their etiopathogenesis and clinical significance are not fully understood. We aimed to establish a new methodology for evaluating the role of microbial biofilms in the genesis of prostate calcifications. Materials and Methods: Ten consecutive patients who had undergone radical prostatectomy were enrolled in this study. All of the patients presented with prostate calcifications during transrectal ultrasound evaluation before surgery and underwent Meares-Stamey tests and clinical evaluation with the National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index and the International Prostate Symptom Score. At the time of radical prostatectomy, the prostate specimen, after removal, was analyzed with ultrasonography under sterile conditions in the operating room. Core biopsy specimens were taken from the site of prostate calcification and subjected to ultrastructural and microbiological analysis. Results: The results of the Meares-Stamey test showed only 1 of 10 patients (10% with positive cultures for Escherichia coli. Two of five patients (40% had positive cultures from prostate biopsy specimens. Enterococcus faecalis, Enterococcus raffinosus, and Citrobacter freundii were isolated. Ultrastructural analysis of the prostate biopsy specimens showed prostate calcifications in 6 of 10 patients (60%, and a structured microbial biofilm in 1 patient who had positive cultures for E. faecalis and E. raffinosus. Conclusions: Although the findings are supported by a low number of patients, this study highlights the validity of the proposed methodology for investigating the role of bacterial biofilms in the genesis of prostate calcification.

  15. Clinical feasibility study for the use of implanted gold seeds in the prostate as reliable positioning markers during megavoltage irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehnad, Homan; Nederveen, Aart J.; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Moorselaar, R. Jeroen A. van; Hofman, Pieter; Lagendijk, Jan J.W.

    2003-01-01

    Background and purpose: The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of using gold seed implants in the prostate for position verification, using an a-Si flat panel imager as a detector during megavoltage irradiation of prostate carcinoma. This is a study to guarantee positioning accuracy in intensity-modulated radiotherapy. Methods and materials: Ten patients with localized prostate carcinoma (T2-3) received between one and three fiducial gold markers in the prostate. All patients were treated with 3-D conformal radiotherapy with an anterior-posterior (AP) and two lateral wedge fields. The acute gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicities were scored using common toxicity criteria scales (CTC). Using three consecutive CT scans and portal images obtained during the treatment we have studied the occurrence of any change in prostate shape (deformation), seed migration and the magnitude of translations and rotations of the prostate. Results: We observed no acute major complications for prostate irradiation regarding the seed implantation. The maximum acute GU toxicity grade 2 (dysuria and frequency) was observed in seven patients during the treatment. The maximum grade 2 (diarrhoea) was scored in two patients regarding the acute GI toxicities. No significant prostate deformation could be detected in the consecutive CT scans. It appeared that the distances between the markers only slightly changed during treatment (S.D. 0.5 mm). Random prostate translations were (1 S.D.) 2.1, 3.2 and 2.2 mm in the lateral (LR), AP and cranial-caudal (CC) directions, respectively, whereas systematic translations were 3.3, 4.8 and 3.5 mm in the LR, AP and CC directions, respectively. Random prostate rotations were (1 S.D.) 3.6, 1.7 and 1.9 deg. around the LR, AP and CC axis, respectively, whereas systematic rotations were 4.7, 2.0 and 2.7 deg. around the LR, AP and CC axis, respectively. Conclusions: We found that the fiducial gold seeds are a safe and appropriate

  16. In-bore transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies: Are there risk factors for complications?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meier-Schroers, Michael, E-mail: michael.meier@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Homsi, Rami, E-mail: rami.homsi@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Kukuk, Guido, E-mail: guido.kukuk@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Wolter, Karsten, E-mail: karsten.wolter@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Decker, Georges, E-mail: georges.decker@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Fischer, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.fischer@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Marx, Christian, E-mail: christian.marx@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Schmeel, Frederic Carsten, E-mail: carsten.schmeel@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Block, Wolfgang, E-mail: wolfgang.block@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Sprinkart, Alois Martin, E-mail: sprinkart@uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Traeber, Frank, E-mail: frank.traeber@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Schild, Hans Heinz, E-mail: hans.schild@ukb.uni-bonn.de [Department of Radiology, University of Bonn, Sigmund-Freud-Str 25, 53127 Bonn (Germany); Willinek, Winfried, E-mail: w.willinek@bk-trier.de [Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, Sonography and Nuclear Medicine, Hospital of the Barmherzige Brüder Trier, Nordallee 1, 54292 Trier (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Purpose: To systematically analyze risk factors for complications of in-bore transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies (MRGB). Materials and methods: 90 patients, who were scheduled for MRGB were included for this study. Exclusion criteria were coagulation disorders, therapy with anticoagulant drugs, and acute infections of the urinary and the lower gastrointestinal tract. Directly after, one week and one year after the biopsy, we assessed biopsy related complications (e.g. hemorrhages or signs of prostatitis). Differences between patients with and without complications were analyzed regarding possible risk factors: age, prostate volume, number of taken samples, biopsy duration, biopsy of more than one lesion, diabetes, arterial hypertension, hemorrhoids, benign prostate hyperplasia, carcinoma or prostatitis (according to histopathological analysis), and lesion localization. Complications were classified according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Results: We observed 15 grade I complications in 90 biopsies (16.7%) with slight hematuria in 9 cases (10%), minor vasovagal reactions in 4 cases (4.4%), and urinary retention and positioning-related facial dysesthesia in 1 case each (1.1%). One patient showed acute prostatitis requiring antibiotics as the only grade II complication (1.1%). There were no adverse events that occurred later than one week. Complications grade III or higher such as pelvic abscesses, urosepsis or severe hemorrhages were not seen. There were no significant associations between the assessed risk factors and biopsy-related complications. Conclusion: In-bore transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies can be considered safe procedures in the diagnosis of prostate cancer with very low complication rates. There seem to be no risk factors for complications.

  17. In-bore transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies: Are there risk factors for complications?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meier-Schroers, Michael; Homsi, Rami; Kukuk, Guido; Wolter, Karsten; Decker, Georges; Fischer, Stefan; Marx, Christian; Schmeel, Frederic Carsten; Block, Wolfgang; Sprinkart, Alois Martin; Traeber, Frank; Schild, Hans Heinz; Willinek, Winfried

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To systematically analyze risk factors for complications of in-bore transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies (MRGB). Materials and methods: 90 patients, who were scheduled for MRGB were included for this study. Exclusion criteria were coagulation disorders, therapy with anticoagulant drugs, and acute infections of the urinary and the lower gastrointestinal tract. Directly after, one week and one year after the biopsy, we assessed biopsy related complications (e.g. hemorrhages or signs of prostatitis). Differences between patients with and without complications were analyzed regarding possible risk factors: age, prostate volume, number of taken samples, biopsy duration, biopsy of more than one lesion, diabetes, arterial hypertension, hemorrhoids, benign prostate hyperplasia, carcinoma or prostatitis (according to histopathological analysis), and lesion localization. Complications were classified according to the Clavien-Dindo classification. Results: We observed 15 grade I complications in 90 biopsies (16.7%) with slight hematuria in 9 cases (10%), minor vasovagal reactions in 4 cases (4.4%), and urinary retention and positioning-related facial dysesthesia in 1 case each (1.1%). One patient showed acute prostatitis requiring antibiotics as the only grade II complication (1.1%). There were no adverse events that occurred later than one week. Complications grade III or higher such as pelvic abscesses, urosepsis or severe hemorrhages were not seen. There were no significant associations between the assessed risk factors and biopsy-related complications. Conclusion: In-bore transrectal MRI-guided prostate biopsies can be considered safe procedures in the diagnosis of prostate cancer with very low complication rates. There seem to be no risk factors for complications.

  18. Zinc in human prostate gland. Normal, hyperplastic and cancerous

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaichick, V.Ye.; Sviridova, T.V.; Zaichick, S.V.

    1997-01-01

    Zinc concentration in a prostate gland is much higher than that in other human tissues. Data about zinc changes for different prostate diseases are limited and greatly contradictory. Zinc content was determined for biopsy and resected materials of transrectal puncture tissues from benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. There were 109 patients (50 BPH and 59 cancer) available for the present study. Control group consisted of 37 intact glands of men died an unexpected death (accident, murder, acute cardiac insufficiency, etc.). All materials studied were divided into two parts. One of them was morphologically examined, while another one was subjected to zinc analysis by INAA. Zinc contents (M ± SE) of normal, benign hyperplastic and cancerous prostate glands were found to be 1018 ± 124, 1142 ± 77, and 146 ± 10 μg/g dry tissue, respectively. It was shown that zinc assessments in the materials of transrectal puncture biopsy of indurated prostate sites can be used as an additional test for differential diagnostics of BPH and cancer. Accuracy, sensitivity and specificity of the test are 98 ± 2%. (author)

  19. 3-D conformal HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, T.; Baltas, D.; Kurek, R.; Roeddiger, S.; Kontova, M.; Anagnostopoulos, G.; Skazikis, G.; Zamboglou, N.; Dannenberg, T.; Buhleier, T.; Tunn, U.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: pilot study to evaluate feasibility, acute toxicity and conformal quality of three-dimensional (3-D) conformal high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as monotherapy for localized prostate cancer using intraoperative real-time planning. Patients and methods: between 05/2002 and 05/2003, 52 patients with prostate cancer, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) ≤ 10 ng/ml, Gleason score ≤ 7 and clinical stage ≤ T2a were treated. Median PSA was 6.4 ng/ml and median Gleason score 5. 24/52 patients had stage T1c and 28/52 stage T2a. For transrectal ultrasound-(TRUS-)guided transperineal implantation of flexible plastic needles into the prostate, the real-time HDR planning system SWIFT trademark was used. After implantation, CT-based 3-D postplanning was performed. All patients received one implant for four fractions of HDR brachytherapy in 48 h using a reference dose (D ref ) of 9.5 Gy to a total dose of 38.0 Gy. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) were analyzed to evaluate the conformal quality of each implant using D 90 , D 10 urethra, and D 10 rectum. Acute toxicity was evaluated using the CTC (common toxicity criteria) scales. Results: median D 90 was 106% of D ref (range: 93-115%), median D 10 urethra 159% of D ref (range: 127-192%), and median D 10 rectum 55% of D ref (range: 35-68%). Median follow-up is currently 8 months. In 2/52 patients acute grade 3 genitourinary toxicity was observed. No gastrointestinal toxicity > grade 1 occurred. Conclusion: 3-D conformal HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy using intraoperative real-time planning is a feasible and highly conformal treatment for localized prostate cancer associated with minimal acute toxicity. Longer follow-up is needed to evaluate late toxicity and biochemical control. (orig.)

  20. Targeting Prostate Cancer with Bifunctional Modulators of the Androgen Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Wittmann, B.; Dwyer, M.; Cui, H.; Dye, D.; McDonnell, D.; Norris , J. Inhibition of prostate cancer cell growth by second-site androgen receptor antagonists...Wittmann, B.; Dwyer, M.; Cui, H.; Dye, D.; McDonnell, D.; Norris , J. Inhibition of prostate cancer cell growth by second-site androgen receptor...important clin- ical problem in diseases such as asthma (51, 52), ne- phrotic syndrome (53), and malignancies such as acute lymphoblastic leukemia (54

  1. Importance of viruses in acute otitis media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nokso-Koivisto, Johanna; Marom, Tal; Chonmaitree, Tasnee

    2015-02-01

    Acute otitis media occurs as a complication of viral upper respiratory tract infection. Bacterial otopathogens and respiratory viruses interact and play important roles in acute otitis media development. A better understanding of viral and bacterial interactions may lead to innovative ways to lessen the burden of this common childhood disease. There has been increasing evidence that acute otitis media occurs during upper respiratory infection, even in the absence of nasopharyngeal bacterial colonization. Among the types of viruses associated with acute otitis media, respiratory syncytial virus continues to be the most commonly detected. It is still unclear whether viral load plays an important role in acute otitis media development, but symptomatic upper respiratory tract infection (as opposed to asymptomatic viral infection) is crucial. Widespread use of bacterial and viral vaccines in young children, including pneumococcal conjugate and influenza vaccines, has led to the reduction in otitis media-related healthcare use between 2001 and 2011. There has been no new vaccine against respiratory viruses other than influenza. Progress has been made toward the reduction of the burden of acute otitis media in the last decade. Success in reducing acute otitis media incidence will rely mainly on prevention of nasopharyngeal otopathogen colonization, as well as reduction in the incidence of viral upper respiratory tract infection.

  2. Dosimetry and preliminary acute toxicity in the first 100 men treated for prostate cancer on a randomized hypofractionation dose escalation trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollack, Alan; Hanlon, Alexandra L.; Horwitz, Eric M.; Feigenberg, Steven J.; Konski, Andre A.; Movsas, Benjamin; Greenberg, Richard E.; Uzzo, Robert G.; Ma, C.-M. Charlie; McNeeley, Shawn W.; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Price, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The α/β ratio for prostate cancer is postulated to be between 1 and 3, giving rise to the hypothesis that there may be a therapeutic advantage to hypofractionation. The dosimetry and acute toxicity are described in the first 100 men enrolled in a randomized trial. Patients and Methods: The trial compares 76 Gy in 38 fractions (Arm I) to 70.2 Gy in 26 fractions (Arm II) using intensity modulated radiotherapy. The planning target volume (PTV) margins in Arms I and II were 5 mm and 3 mm posteriorly and 8 mm and 7 mm in all other dimensions. The PTV D95% was at least the prescription dose. Results: The mean PTV doses for Arms I and II were 81.1 and 73.8 Gy. There were no differences in overall maximum acute gastrointestinal (GI) or genitourinary (GU) toxicity acutely. However, there was a slight but significant increase in Arm II GI toxicity during Weeks 2, 3, and 4. In multivariate analyses, only the combined rectal DVH parameter of V65 Gy/V50 Gy was significant for GI toxicity and the bladder volume for GU toxicity. Conclusion: Hypofractionation at 2.7 Gy per fraction to 70.2 Gy was well tolerated acutely using the planning conditions described

  3. Comparison of tamsulosin and silodosin in the management of acute urinary retention secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia in patients planned for trial without catheter. A prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Siddangouda B; Ranka, Kshitiz; Kundargi, Vinay S; Guru, Nilesh

    2017-01-01

    We present a prospective randomized study to compare the efficacy of tamsulosin and silodosin in patients suffering from acute urinary retention caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia, planned for trial without catheter. Patients with acute urinary retention secondary to benign prostatic hyperplasia (total 160) were catheterized and randomized into two groups: Group A: tamsulosin 0.4 mg (80 patients) and Group B: silodosin 8 mg (80 patients). After three days, the catheter was removed, and patients were put on trial without catheter. Patients with a successful trial without catheter were followed up after two weeks and one month, taking into account the international prostate symptom score (IPSS), post void residual volume (PVR), and peak flow rate (PFR). Statistical analysis of the data was performed. Both group A (tamsulosin) and group B (silodosin) had similar results of trial without catheter (group A: 67.50%, group: B 60%). In follow up, three patients in group A and four patients in group B had retention of urine, requiring recatheterization. These patients were withdrawn from the study. No significant differences were present between group A and group B patients in regard with IPSS, PVR and PFR measured at the time of successful trial without catheter and during follow up at two weeks and one month. Efficacy for trial without catheter of tamsulosin was slightly higher than silodosin, but comparable. No statistical difference between tamsulosin & silodosin treated groups were found in regard with IPSS, PVR and PFR.

  4. Etiology and Risk Factors of Acute Gastroenteritis in a Taipei Emergency Department: Clinical Features for Bacterial Gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Chao-Chih; Ji, Dar-Der; Wu, Fang-Tzy; Mu, Jung-Jung; Yang, Ji-Rong; Jiang, Donald Dah-Shyong; Lin, Wen-Yun; Chen, Wei-Ting; Yen, Muh-Yong; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Chen, Tony Hsiu-Hsi

    2016-01-01

    Background The causative pathogen is rarely identified in the emergency department (ED), since the results of cultures are usually unavailable. As a result, antimicrobial treatment may be overused. The aim of our study was to investigate the pathogens, risk factors of acute gastroenteritis, and predictors of acute bacterial gastroenteritis in the ED. Methods We conducted a matched case-control study of 627 stool samples and 612 matched pairs. Results Viruses (41.3%) were the leading cause of gastroenteritis, with noroviruses (32.2%) being the most prevalent, followed by bacteria (26.8%) and Giardia lamblia (12.4%). Taking antacids (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 4.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.57–6.53), household members/classmates with gastroenteritis (aOR 4.69; 95% CI, 2.76–7.96), attending a banquet (aOR 2.29; 95% CI, 1.64–3.20), dining out (aOR 1.70; 95% CI, 1.13–2.54), and eating raw oysters (aOR 3.10; 95% CI, 1.61–5.94) were highly associated with gastroenteritis. Elders (aOR 1.04; 05% CI, 1.02–1.05), those with CRP >10 mg/L (aOR 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15–3.62), or those who were positive for fecal leukocytes (aOR 2.04; 95% CI, 1.15–3.62) or fecal occult blood (aOR 1.97; 95% CI, 1.03–3.77) were more likely to be hospitalized in ED. In addition, presence of fecal leukocytes (time ratio [TR] 1.22; 95% CI, 1.06–1.41), abdominal pain (TR 1.20; 95% CI, 1.07–1.41), and frequency of vomiting (TR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.64–0.98) were significantly associated with the duration of acute gastroenteritis. Presence of fecal leukocytes (aOR 2.08; 95% CI, 1.42–3.05), winter season (aOR 0.45; 95% CI, 0.28–0.74), frequency of diarrhea (aOR 1.69; 95% CI, 1.01–2.83), and eating shrimp or crab (aOR 1.53; 95% CI, 1.05–2.23) were highly associated with bacterial gastroenteritis. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the final model was 0.68 (95% CI, 0.55–0.63). Conclusions Acute bacterial gastroenteritis was highly associated with season

  5. Six-dimensional correction of intra-fractional prostate motion with CyberKnife stereotactic body radiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sean eCollins

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractLarge fraction radiation therapy offers a shorter course of treatment and radiobiological advantages for prostate cancer treatment. The CyberKnife is an attractive technology for delivering large fraction doses based on the ability to deliver highly conformal radiation therapy to moving targets. In addition to intra-fractional translational motion (left-right, superior-inferior and anterior-posterior, prostate rotation (pitch, roll and yaw can increase geographical miss risk. We describe our experience with six-dimensional (6D intrafraction prostate motion correction using CyberKnife stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT. Eighty-eight patients were treated by SBRT alone or with supplemental external radiation therapy. Trans-perineal placement of four gold fiducials within the prostate accommodated X-ray guided prostate localization and beam adjustment. Fiducial separation and non-overlapping positioning permitted the orthogonal imaging required for 6D tracking. Fiducial placement accuracy was assessed using the CyberKnife fiducial extraction algorithm. Acute toxicities were assessed using Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC v3. There were no Grade 3, or higher, complications and acute morbidity was minimal. Ninety-eight percent of patients completed treatment employing 6D prostate motion tracking with intrafractional beam correction. Suboptimal fiducial placement limited treatment to 3D tracking in 2 patients. Our experience may guide others in performing 6D correction of prostate motion with CyberKnife SBRT.

  6. A case report of acute pediatric bacterial meningitis due to the rare isolate, Pseudomonas putida

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Grishma V. Kulkarni

    2016-01-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is the medical emergency which warrants an early diagnosis and an aggressive therapy. Despite the availability of the potent newer antibiotics, the mortality caused by ABM and its complications remain high in India, ranging from 16% to 32%. The aim of this case report is to present the rare isolation ofPseudomonas putida from cerebrospinal lfuid sample. Besides this, the author also emphasizes the importance of correctly identifying the organism and thus the selection of the most accurate antibiotic from the susceptibility proifle to allow for early recovery and to improve the patient outcome and survival.

  7. Once-weekly versus every-other-day stereotactic body radiotherapy in patients with prostate cancer (PATRIOT): A phase 2 randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quon, Harvey C; Ong, Aldrich; Cheung, Patrick; Chu, William; Chung, Hans T; Vesprini, Danny; Chowdhury, Amit; Panjwani, Dilip; Pang, Geordi; Korol, Renee; Davidson, Melanie; Ravi, Ananth; McCurdy, Boyd; Zhang, Liying; Mamedov, Alexandre; Deabreu, Andrea; Loblaw, Andrew

    2018-05-01

    Prostate stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) regimens differ in time, dose, and fractionation. We completed a multicentre, randomized phase II study to investigate the impact of overall treatment time on quality of life (QOL). Men with low and intermediate-risk prostate cancer were randomly assigned to 40 Gy in 5 fractions delivered once per week (QW) vs. every other day (EOD). QOL was assessed using the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite. The primary endpoint was the proportion with a minimum clinically important change (MCIC) in bowel QOL during the acute (≤12 week) period, and analysis was by intention-to-treat. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01423474. 152 men from 3 centres were randomized with median follow-up of 47 months. Patients treated QW had superior acute bowel QOL with 47/69 (68%) reporting a MCIC compared to 63/70 (90%) treated EOD (p = 0.002). Fewer patients treated QW reported moderate-severe problems with bowel QOL during the acute period compared with EOD (14/70 [20%] vs. 40/70 [57%], p < 0.001). Acute urinary QOL was also better in the QW arm, with 52/67 (78%) vs 65/69 (94%) experiencing a MCIC (p = 0.006). There were no significant differences in late urinary or bowel QOL at 2 years or last follow-up. Prostate SBRT delivered QW improved acute bowel and urinary QOL compared to EOD. Patients should be counselled regarding the potential for reduced short-term toxicity and improved QOL with QW prostate SBRT. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Acute bacterial sternoclavicular osteomyelitis in a long-term renal transplant recipient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dounousi, Evangelia; Duni, Anila; Xiromeriti, Sofia; Pappas, Charalambos; Siamopoulos, Kostas C

    2016-06-24

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice for a significant number of patients with end-stage renal disease. Although immunosuppression therapy improves graft and patient's survival, it is a major risk factor for infection following kidney transplantation altering clinical manifestations of the infectious diseases and complicating both the diagnosis and management of renal transplant recipients (RTRs). Existing literature is very limited regarding osteomyelitis in RTRs. Sternoclavicular osteomyelitis is rare and has been mainly reported after contiguous spread of infection or direct traumatic seeding of the bacteria. We present an interesting case of acute, bacterial sternoclavicular osteomyelitis in a long-term RTR. Blood cultures were positive for Streptococcus mitis, while the portal entry site was not identified. Magnetic resonance imaging of the sternoclavicluar region and a three-phase bone scan were positive for sternoclavicular osteomyelitis. Eventually, the patient was successfully treated with Daptomycin as monotherapy. In the presence of immunosuppression, the transplant physician should always remain alert for opportunistic pathogens or unusual location of osteomyelitis.

  9. Cerebral blood flow, oxidative metabolism and cerebrovascular carbon dioxide reactivity in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Kirsten; Strauss, Gitte Irene; Thomsen, Gerda

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimal arterial carbon dioxide tension (P(a)CO(2)) in patients with acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) is unknown and controversial. The objective of this study was to measure global cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebrovascular CO(2) reactivity (CO(2)R), and cerebral metabolic rates...... and hyperventilation with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) (14 patients) and/or the Kety-Schmidt technique (KS) (11 patients and all controls). In KS studies, CMR was measured by multiplying the arterial to jugular venous concentration difference (a-v D) by CBF. RESULTS: CBF did not differ...

  10. [Microbiología, sensibilidad antibiótica y factores asociados a bacteriemia en la prostatitis aguda].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré, C; Llopis, F; Jacob, J

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the characteristics of patients with acute prostatitis presenting to the Emergency Department, the microbiological findings, antibiotic susceptibility, and bacteraemia associated factors. Observational and cohort study with prospective follow-up including patients with acute prostatitis presenting to the Emergency Department from January-December 2012. Data were collected for demographic variables, comorbidities, microbiological findings, antibiotic treatment and outcome. Two hundred and forty one episodes of acute prostatitis were included. Mean age was 62.9 ± 16 years, a history of prostate adenoma was reported in 54 cases (22.5%) and prior manipulation of the lower urinary tract in 40 (17%). Mean symptoms duration was 3.38 ± 4.04 days, voiding symptoms were present in 176 cases (73%) and fever in 154 (64%). Seventy patients (29%) were admitted to the hospital and 3 died. From 216 urine cultures, 128 were positive (59%) and 24 (17.6%) out of 136 blood cultures. Escherichia coli was the main pathogen (58.6% of urine cultures and 64% of blood cultures) with resistant strains to fluoroquinolones, cotrimoxazole and amoxicillin/clavulanic in 27.7%, 22.9% and 27.7% of cases respectively. In the univariate analysis, only chills were associated to bacteraemia (p=0.013). At 30-day follow-up, patients with bacteraemia returned more frequently to the Emergency Department (p=0.037) and were more often admitted to the hospital (p=0.003). Patients with acute prostatitis discharged from the Emergency Department need clinical follow-up and monitoring of microbiological findings in order to assure an adequate antibiotic treatment. Return to Emergency Department and admission to the hospital were significantly more frequent among patients with bacteraemia.

  11. Fractionation and protraction for radiotherapy of prostate carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenner, David J.; Hall, Eric J.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether current fractionation and brachytherapy protraction schemes for the treatment of prostatic cancer with radiation are optimal, or could be improved. Methods and Materials: We analyzed two mature data sets on radiotherapeutic tumor control for prostate cancer, one using EBRT and the other permanent seed implants, to extract the sensitivity to changes in fractionation of prostatic tumors. The standard linear-quadratic model was used for the analysis. Results: Prostatic cancers appear significantly more sensitive to changes in fractionation than most other cancers. The estimated α/β value is 1.5 Gy [0.8, 2.2]. This result is not too surprising as there is a documented relationship between cellular proliferative status and sensitivity to changes in fractionation, and prostatic tumors contain exceptionally low proportions of proliferating cells. Conclusions: High dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy would be a highly appropriate modality for treating prostate cancer. Appropriately designed HDR brachytherapy regimens would be expected to be as efficacious as low dose rate, but with added advantages of logistic convenience and more reliable dose distributions. Similarly, external beam treatments for prostate cancer can be designed using larger doses per fraction; appropriately designed hypofractionation schemes would be expected to maintain current levels of tumor control and late sequelae, but with reduced acute morbidity, together with the logistic and financial advantages of fewer numbers of fractions

  12. Correlation of p63 immunohistochemistry with histology and contrast enhanced MRI in characteristic lesions induced by minimally invasive thermal treatments in a dog prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascal, A.; Butts-Pauly, K.; Plata, J.; Sommer, G.; Daniel, B.; Bouley, D. M.

    2017-03-01

    Thermal ablation techniques are important tools to treat low grade tumors in the prostate gland. The use of Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) has been an excellent tool to visualize and assess the thermally ablated areas in real time. In this study slides from dog prostates previously treated with cryoablation or High Intensity Focal Ultrasound (HIFU) were immunohistochemically stained with the biomarker p63, in order to determine if this marker would be helpful for differentiatiating between viable, sub lethally damaged and normal glands. Digitized slides were analyzed using Sedeen Viewer software, and compared with corresponding representative H&E slides and MR images. p63 staining in the cryoablated acute duration prostates was negative in the coagulation necrosis zone (region of interest subjected to the coldest temperatures). In acute duration HIFU treated prostates, the central heat-fixed zone (region of interest subjected to the hottest temperatures) still displayed + p63 staining. Cryoablated or HIFU subacute duration treated prostates were very hemorrhagic, but presented the same stain pattern in the treated areas as the acute duration prostates, and in chronic duration prostates, whether treated with cryo or HIFU, glands displayed robust p63 staining most prevalent in the outer edges of the lesion where there was extensive glandular regeneration. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the value of p63 IHC and its usefulness in detecting viable prostate basal cells in normal dog prostates following either cryoablation of HIFU. Our results suggest that the portions of the lesion with complete loss of p63 staining correspond well to the non-enhancing region in cryoablated prostates, as viewed with MRI. However, p63 staining in the heat-fixed zone in acute harvested HIFU treated prostates remains positive, suggesting either inadequate heat to destroy basal cells, or heat-fixation of the p63 antigen and false positive staining. Therefore p63 staining does not

  13. Urethral dose and increment of international prostate symptom score (IPSS) in transperineal permanent interstitial implant (TPI) of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, N.; Itami, J.; Okuma, K.; Marino, H.; Ban, T.; Nakazato, M.; Kanai, K.; Naoi, K.; Fuse, M.; Nakagawa, K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: to find the factors which influence the acute increment of international prostate symptom score (IPSS) after transperineal permanent interstitial implant (TPI) using 125 I seeds. Patients and methods: from April 2004 through September 2006, 104 patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer underwent TPI without external-beam irradiation. Median patient age was 70 years with a median follow-up of 13.0 months. 73 patients (70%) received neoadjuvant hormone therapy. The increment of IPSS was defined as the difference between pre- and postimplant maximal IPSS. Clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters evaluated included age, initial prostate-specific antigen, Gleason Score, neoadjuvant hormone therapy, initial IPSS, post-TPI prostatic volume, number of implanted seeds, prostate V 100 , V 150 , D 90 , urethral D max , and urethral D 90 . In order to further evaluate detailed urethral doses, the base and apical urethra were defined and the dosimetric parameters were calculated. Results: the IPSS peaked 3 months after TPI and returned to baseline at 12-15 months. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a statistically significant correlation of post-TPI prostatic volume, number of implanted seeds, and the dosimetric parameters of the base urethra with IPSS increment. Conclusion: the base urethra appears to be susceptible to radiation and the increased dose to this region deteriorates IPSS. It remains unclear whether the base urethral dose relates to the incidence of late urinary morbidities. (orig.)

  14. Update on the use of dutasteride in the management of benign prostatic hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Miller

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Joe Miller, Thomas H TarterDivision of Urology, Southern Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, IL, USAAbstract: Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH is a frequent cause of lower urinary symptoms, with a prevalence of 50% by the sixth decade of life. Hyperplasia of stromal and epithelial prostatic elements that surround the urethra cause lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS, urinary tract infection, and acute urinary retention. Medical treatments of symptomatic BPH include; 1 the 5α-reductase inhibitors, 2 the α1-adrenergic antagonists, and 3 the combination of a 5α-reductase inhibitor and a α1-adrenergic antagonist. Selective α1-adrenergic antagonists relax the smooth muscle of the prostate and bladder neck without affecting the detrussor muscle of the bladder wall, thus decreasing the resistance to urine flow without compromising bladder contractility. Clinical trials have shown that α1-adrenergic antagonists decrease LUTS and increase urinary flow rates in men with symptomatic BPH, but do not reduce the long-term risk of urinary retention or need for surgical intervention. Inhibitors of 5α-reductase decrease production of dihydrotestosterone within the prostate resulting in decreased prostate volumes, increased peak urinary flow rates, improvement of symptoms, and decreased risk of acute urinary retention and need for surgical intervention. The combination of a 5α-reductase inhibitor and a α1-adrenergic antagonist reduces the clinical progression of BPH over either class of drug alone.Keywords: prostatic hyperplasia, 5α-reductase, dutasteride

  15. Acupuncture for chronic prostatitis: A systematic review and meta-analysis protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Tianzhong; Cheng, Ying; Jin, Yuhao; Xu, Na; Guo, Taipin

    2018-04-01

    Chronic prostatitis (CP) is a prevalent genitourinary condition. Considering its safety profile, acupuncture can be an option treating CP symptoms. The aim of this review is to undertake a systematic review to estimate the effectiveness and safety of acupuncture on CP. We will search all randomized controlled trials for CP in August 2018 in the databases of MEDLINE, Cochrane Library, Web of Science, EMBASE, Springer, WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Wan fang, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM), PsycInfo, Chinese Scientific Journal Database (VIP), and other available resources. Languages are limited as English and Chinese. Search terms used are will "acupuncture," and "chronic prostatitis," "non-bacterial prostatitis," "abacterial prostatitis." And duplicates will be screened. The primary outcomes consisted of improvement rate and pain relief evaluated by The National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) index. Secondary outcomes include the recurrence rate and side effects, such as pneumothorax, discomforts, and infection. This study will demonstrate an evidence-based review of acupuncture for chronic prostatitis. The study will provide clear evidence to assess the effectiveness and side effects of acupuncture for chronic prostatitis. There is no requirement of ethical approval and it will be in print or disseminated by electronic copies. CRD42018088834.

  16. Diethylstilbestrol 1 mg in the Treatment of Acute Urinary Retention due to Prostatic Obstruction in the Elderly: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Oliveira Reis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients who failed a catheter-free trial after acute urinary retention and one week of full dose alpha-blocker and 5-alpha-reductase inhibitor were offered Diethylstilbestrol 1 mg plus Aspirin 100 mg over 4 weeks. Prostate volume, age, serum creatinine, and initial retention drained urine volume were recorded. After excluding cardiovascular morbidity (n=7, upper urinary tract dilation (n=3, compromised renal function (n=2, urinary tract infection (n=2, neurological diagnosis (n=2, or preferred immediate channel transurethral resection of prostate (n=5, 48 of 69 consecutive patients ≥70 years were included. Mean age was 76.6 years (70–84, mean prostate volume 90 cm3 (42–128, and mean follow-up 204 days; 58% (28/48 were passing urine and 42% (20/48 were catheter dependent after 4 weeks Diethylstilbestrol trial. Mean age and drained urine volume of catheter dependent patients were 82.4 years and 850 mL compared with 74.6 years and 530 mL in catheter-free men, respectively. Age and drained urine volume were independent predictors of catheter-free trial (both P<0.01. Seventy-five percent (6/8 of patients 80 years and older were catheter dependent. Transient nipple/breast tenderness and gynecomastia were the only adverse effects reported by 21% (10/48 and 4% (2/48, respectively. No patient presented severe complications.

  17. Image-Guided Hypofractionated Radiotherapy in Low-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurizio Valeriani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate efficacy and toxicity of image-guided hypofractionated radiotherapy (HFRT in the treatment of low-risk prostate cancer. Outcomes and toxicities of this series of patients were compared to another group of 32 low-risk patients treated with conventional fractionation (CFRT. Methods. Fifty-nine patients with low-risk prostate cancer were analysed. Total dose for the prostate and proximal seminal vesicles was 60 Gy delivered in 20 fractions. Results. The median follow-up was 30 months. The actuarial 4-year overall survival, biochemical free survival, and disease specific survival were 100%, 97.4%, and 97.4%, respectively. Acute grade 1-2 gastrointestinal (GI and genitourinary (GU toxicity rates were 11.9% and 40.7%, respectively. Grade 1 GI and GU late toxicity rates were 8.5% and 13.6%, respectively. No grade ≥2 late toxicities were recorded. Acute grade 2-3 GU toxicity resulted significantly lower (P=0.04 in HFRT group compared to the CFRT group. The cumulative 4-year incidence of grade 1-2 GU toxicity was significantly higher (P<0.001 for HFRT patients. Conclusions. Our study demonstrated that hypofractionated regimen provided excellent biochemical control in favorable risk prostate cancer patients. The incidence of GI and GU toxicity was low. However, HFRT presented higher cumulative incidence of low-grade late GU toxicity than CFRT.

  18. Presence of PSA auto-antibodies in men with prostate abnormalities (prostate cancer/benign prostatic hyperplasia/prostatitis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokant, M T; Naz, R K

    2015-04-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), produced by the prostate, liquefies post-ejaculate semen. PSA is detected in semen and blood. Increased circulating PSA levels indicate prostate abnormality [prostate cancer (PC), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostatitis (PTIS)], with variance among individuals. As the prostate has been proposed as an immune organ, we hypothesise that variation in PSA levels among men may be due to presence of auto-antibodies against PSA. Sera from healthy men (n = 28) and men having prostatitis (n = 25), BPH (n = 30) or PC (n = 29) were tested for PSA antibody presence using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) values converted to standard deviation (SD) units, and Western blotting. Taking ≥2 SD units as cut-off for positive immunoreactivity, 0% of normal men, 0% with prostatitis, 33% with BPH and 3.45% with PC demonstrated PSA antibodies. One-way analysis of variance (anova) performed on the mean absorbance values and SD units of each group showed BPH as significantly different (P prostatitis. All others were nonsignificant (P prostate abnormalities, especially differentiating BPH from prostate cancer and prostatitis. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  19. The curative management of synchronous rectal and prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavanagh, Dara O; Martin, Joseph; Small, Cormac; Joyce, Myles R; Faul, Clare M; Kelly, Paul J; O'Riordain, Michael; Gillham, Charles M; Armstrong, John G; Salib, Osama; McNamara, Deborah A; McVey, Gerard; O'Neill, Brian D P

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Neoadjuvant “long-course” chemoradiation is considered a standard of care in locally advanced rectal cancer. In addition to prostatectomy, external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy with or without androgen suppression (AS) are well established in prostate cancer management. A retrospective review of ten cases was completed to explore the feasibility and safety of applying these standards in patients with dual pathology. To our knowledge, this is the largest case series of synchronous rectal and prostate cancers treated with curative intent. Methods: Eligible patients had synchronous histologically proven locally advanced rectal cancer (defined as cT3-4Nx; cTxN1-2) and non-metastatic prostate cancer (pelvic nodal disease permissible). Curative treatment was delivered to both sites simultaneously. Follow-up was as per institutional guidelines. Acute and late toxicities were reviewed, and a literature search performed. Results: Pelvic external beam radiotherapy (RT) 45–50.4 Gy was delivered concurrent with 5-fluorouracil (5FU). Prostate total dose ranged from 70.0 to 79.2 Gy. No acute toxicities occurred, excluding AS-induced erectile dysfunction. Nine patients proceeded to surgery, and one was managed expectantly. Three relapsed with metastatic colorectal cancer, two with metastatic prostate cancer. Five patients have no evidence of recurrence, and four remain alive with metastatic disease. With a median follow-up of 2.2 years (range 1.2–6.3 years), two significant late toxicities occurred; G3 proctitis in a patient receiving palliative bevacizumab and a G3 anastomotic stricture precluding stoma reversal. Conclusion: Patients proceeding to synchronous radical treatment of both primary sites should receive 45–50.4 Gy pelvic RT with infusional 5FU. Prostate dose escalation should be given with due consideration to the potential impact of prostate cancer on patient survival, as increasing dose may result in significant late morbidity

  20. Dosimetric predictors of diarrhea during radiotherapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Endres, Eugene J.; Parker, Brent C.; Sormani, Maria Pia

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: to investigate dosimetric predictors of diarrhea during radiotherapy (RT) for prostate cancer. Patients and methods: all patients who underwent external-beam radiotherapy as part of treatment for localized prostate cancer at the University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX, USA, from May 2002 to November 2006 were extracted from the own database. From the cumulative dose-volume histogram (DVH), the absolute volumes (V-value) of intestinal cavity (IC) receiving 15, 30, and 45 Gy were extracted for each patient. Acute gastrointestinal toxicity was prospectively scored at each weekly treatment visit according to CTC (common toxicity criteria) v2.0. The endpoint was the development of peak grade ≥ 2 diarrhea during RT. Various patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics were evaluated using logistic regression. Results: 149 patients were included in the analysis, 112 (75.2%) treated with whole-pelvis intensity-modulated radiotherapy (WP-IMRT) and 37 (24.8%) with prostate-only RT, including or not including, the seminal vesicles (PORT ± SV). 45 patients (30.2%) developed peak grade ≥ 2 diarrhea during treatment. At univariate analysis, IC-V 15 and IC-V 30 , but not IC-V 45 , were correlated to the endpoint; at multivariate analysis, only IC-V 15 (p = 0.047) along with peak acute proctitis (p = 0.041) was independently correlated with the endpoint. Conclusion: these data provide a novel and prostate treatment-specific ''upper limit'' DVH for IC. (orig.)

  1. Dose-Escalated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Patients With Intermediate- and High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Initial Dosimetry Analysis and Patient Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotecha, Rupesh; Djemil, Toufik; Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Thousand, Richard A.; Vassil, Andrew; Stovsky, Mark; Berglund, Ryan K.; Klein, Eric A.; Stephans, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To report the short-term clinical outcomes and acute and late treatment-related genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities in patients with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2011 and 2014, 24 patients with prostate cancer were treated with SBRT to the prostate gland and proximal seminal vesicles. A high-dose avoidance zone (HDAZ) was created by a 3-mm expansion around the rectum, urethra, and bladder. Patients were treated to a minimum dose of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions, with a simultaneous dose escalation to a dose of 50 Gy to the target volume away from the HDAZ. Acute and late GU and GI toxicity outcomes were measured according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events toxicity scale, version 4. Results: The median follow-up was 25 months (range, 18-45 months). Nine patients (38%) experienced an acute grade 2 GU toxicity, which was medically managed, and no patients experienced an acute grade 2 GI toxicity. Two patients (8%) experienced late grade 2 GU toxicity, and 2 patients (8%) experienced late grade 2 GI toxicity. No acute or late grade ≥3 GU or GI toxicities were observed. The 24-month prostate-specific antigen relapse-free survival outcome for all patients was 95.8% (95% confidence interval 75.6%-99.4%), and both biochemical failures occurred in patients with high-risk disease. All patients are currently alive at the time of this analysis and continue to be followed. Conclusions: A heterogeneous prostate SBRT planning technique with differential treatment volumes (low dose: 36.25 Gy; and high dose: 50 Gy) with an HDAZ provides a safe method of dose escalation. Favorable rates of biochemical control and acceptably low rates of acute and long-term GU and GI toxicity can be achieved in patients with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer treated with SBRT.

  2. Dose-Escalated Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Patients With Intermediate- and High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Initial Dosimetry Analysis and Patient Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotecha, Rupesh; Djemil, Toufik; Tendulkar, Rahul D.; Reddy, Chandana A.; Thousand, Richard A.; Vassil, Andrew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Stovsky, Mark; Berglund, Ryan K.; Klein, Eric A. [Department of Urology, Glickman Urological and Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Stephans, Kevin L., E-mail: stephak@ccf.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Purpose: To report the short-term clinical outcomes and acute and late treatment-related genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities in patients with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Methods and Materials: Between 2011 and 2014, 24 patients with prostate cancer were treated with SBRT to the prostate gland and proximal seminal vesicles. A high-dose avoidance zone (HDAZ) was created by a 3-mm expansion around the rectum, urethra, and bladder. Patients were treated to a minimum dose of 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions, with a simultaneous dose escalation to a dose of 50 Gy to the target volume away from the HDAZ. Acute and late GU and GI toxicity outcomes were measured according to the National Cancer Institute Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events toxicity scale, version 4. Results: The median follow-up was 25 months (range, 18-45 months). Nine patients (38%) experienced an acute grade 2 GU toxicity, which was medically managed, and no patients experienced an acute grade 2 GI toxicity. Two patients (8%) experienced late grade 2 GU toxicity, and 2 patients (8%) experienced late grade 2 GI toxicity. No acute or late grade ≥3 GU or GI toxicities were observed. The 24-month prostate-specific antigen relapse-free survival outcome for all patients was 95.8% (95% confidence interval 75.6%-99.4%), and both biochemical failures occurred in patients with high-risk disease. All patients are currently alive at the time of this analysis and continue to be followed. Conclusions: A heterogeneous prostate SBRT planning technique with differential treatment volumes (low dose: 36.25 Gy; and high dose: 50 Gy) with an HDAZ provides a safe method of dose escalation. Favorable rates of biochemical control and acceptably low rates of acute and long-term GU and GI toxicity can be achieved in patients with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer treated with SBRT.

  3. Impact of Hypoxia on the Metastatic Potential of Human Prostate Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai Yao; Bae, Kyungmi; Siemann, Dietmar W.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Intratumoral hypoxia is known to be associated with radioresistance and metastasis. The present study examined the effect of acute and chronic hypoxia on the metastatic potential of prostate cancer PC-3, DU145, and LNCaP cells. Methods and Materials: Cell proliferation and clonogenicity were tested by MTT assay and colony formation assay, respectively. 'Wound-healing' and Matrigel-based chamber assays were used to monitor cell motility and invasion. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) expression was tested by Western blot, and HIF-1-target gene expression was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Secretion of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) was determined by gelatin zymography. Results: When PC-3 cells were exposed to 1% oxygen (hypoxia) for various periods of time, chronic hypoxia (≥24 h) decreased cell proliferation and induced cell death. In contrast, prostate cancer cells exposed to acute hypoxia (≤6 h) displayed increased motility, clonogenic survival, and invasive capacity. At the molecular level, both hypoxia and anoxia transiently stabilized HIF-1α. Exposure to hypoxia also induced the early expression of MMP-2, an invasiveness-related gene. Treatment with the HIF-1 inhibitor YC-1 attenuated the acute hypoxia-induced migration, invasion, and MMP-2 activity. Conclusions: The length of oxygen deprivation strongly affected the functional behavior of all three prostate cancer cell lines. Acute hypoxia in particular was found to promote a more aggressive metastatic phenotype.

  4. [Ultrasound physiotherapy treatment of prostatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talberg, P I; Andryukhin, M I; Mazina, S E; Nikolaev, A L

    2016-12-01

    Develop a method of treatment of prostatitis based on the use of a standard antibiotic, immunomodulatory therapy, and transrectal ultrasound physiotherapy. The dynamics of the accumulation of the antibiotic was investigated in male rats. Sonication was performed immediately before the administration of the antibiotic and its accumulation in the process at 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100 min after dosing. The clinical study included 138 patients with chronic prostatitis. Patients of the experimental group, in addition to standard therapy, 10 sessions of transrectal ultrasound physical therapy was performed. The efficacy of treatment was assessed after 14 and 28 days after initiation. and its discussion. Experiments on laboratory animals have shown that the highest concentration and the residence time of antibiotic in the prostate tissue is noted ultrasonic treatment in the period of maximum blood concentration of the test drug. The data obtained allow to determine that the ultrasonic treatment must be performed considering the pharmacokinetics of the antibiotic. In conducting clinical trials on day 14 of treatment and clinical manifestations of prostatitis bacterial microflora in prostatic secretions were no patients in both groups. In 15% of patients of the experimental group the number of leukocytes decreased to the normal range. After 28 days the amount of leukocytes was normal in 51% of patients in the control and 85% in the experimental group. In animal experiments defined the optimal time interval separating the moment of injection of the antibiotic from the beginning of sonication. Clinical studies have shown that the transrectal ultrasound exposure during the period of maximum concentration of the antibiotic in the blood, improves patient outcomes by 33.8%.

  5. 3D conformal radiation therapy and hormonal therapy for localized prostate cancer: Is age a limiting factor?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faure, A.; Negrea, T.; Lechevallier, E.; Coulange, C.; Murraciole, X.; Jouvea, E.; Sambuca, R.; Cowen, D.

    2011-01-01

    No study on side effects had showed that conformal radiation therapy for prostate cancer is more harmful in patients older than 70 years to patients younger. The aim of this study was to evaluate acute and late toxicities of conformal radiotherapy, with high dose for localized prostate cancer in patients older than 70 years and compared to patients younger than 70 years. Between 1996 and 2009, 104 patients were treated with radiation therapy and hormonal therapy for localized cancer prostate. Median follow-up was 105 months (9 300). Acute (occurred at ≤ three months) and late side effects of 55 patients older than 70 years (median age: 75 [71 92]) were graded according to the CTCAE 3.0 criteria and compared to the younger population. Median dose to the prostate was 75.6 Gy (67 80) in both groups. There were no significant differences in acute and late side effects between age groups. For patients above 70 years, the incidence of grade II or higher acute and late side effects were respectively 27 and 22% for urologic symptoms and 13 and 16% for rectal symptoms. The frequency of grade III late symptoms was low and ranged between 0 and 6% for the evaluated symptoms, irrespective of age group. Older patients had a better biochemical recurrence-free survival than younger patients (86 versus 77% at four years, P ≡ ns). High dose 3D conformal radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer was well tolerated in patients older than 70 years. Age is not a limiting factor for conformal radiation therapy and hormonotherapy for older patients. (authors)

  6. Estrogen receptors in the human male prostatic urethra and prostate in prostatic cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, A; Bruun, J; Balslev, E

    1999-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERs) in the prostate and prostatic urethra were examined in 33 men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and in 11 with prostate cancer (PC). The Abbot monoclonal ER-ICA assay was used for immunohistochemical investigation. In the BPH group, ERs were revealed in the prostatic...... demonstrated in the prostatic stroma and/or prostatic urethra in 6 out of 11 cases. In both BPH and PC patients, immunoreactivity was weak and confined to few cells, indicating low ER content in the prostate as well as in the prostatic urethra. Dextran-coated charcoal (DCC) analysis was used for detection...... and quanticization of cytosolic and nuclear ERs. In the BPH group, ERs were detected once in the prostate and prostatic urethra in the nuclear and cytosol, and additionally in the prostatic urethra in the cytosol fraction in three cases. In all cases, ER content was low, ranging from 10-15 fmol/mg protein. In the PC...

  7. Prostatic sarcoma after treatment of rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Andrew G

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The relationship between radiation exposure for treatment of cancer and occurrence of a second primary cancer at the irradiated site is well known. This phenomenon is however rare in prostate. Case presentation A 75-year-old farmer was treated for rectal cancer with preoperative 45 Gy of radiotherapy and abdominoperineal resection. Four years later he developed symptoms of bladder outlet obstruction and acute urinary retention. He underwent a transurethral resection of the prostate. Histological examination of the removed prostate tissue and immunohistochemistry revealed it to be a poorly differentiated sarcoma. Conclusion We believe this to be the first reported case of radiation-induced sarcoma following radiotherapy treatment for rectal cancer. Since radiotherapy plays a pivotal role in the contemporary treatment of rectal adenocarcinoma, it is relevant to be aware of the potential long-term carcinogenic complications of radiotherapy of the pelvis.

  8. Prostate-specific antigen density: correlation with histological diagnosis of prostate cancer, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Iersel, M. P.; Witjes, W. P.; de la Rosette, J. J.; Oosterhof, G. O.

    1995-01-01

    To assess the additional value of prostate-specific antigen density in the diagnosis of prostate cancer in patients who undergo prostate biopsies. The study comprised 376 patients with symptoms of prostatism who were undergoing prostate biopsy. Digital rectal examination (DRE) and transrectal

  9. Daily-diary evaluated side-effects of conformal versus conventional prostatic cancer radiotherapy technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widmark, A.; Fransson, P.; Franzen, L.; Littbrand, B.; Henriksson, R.

    1997-01-01

    Conventional 4-field box radiotherapy technique induces high morbidity for patients with localized prostatic cancer. Using a patient daily diary, the present study compared side-effects after conventional radiotherapy with conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer. Fifty-eight patients treated with the conventional technique (with or without sucralfate) were compared with 72 patients treated with conformal technique. The patient groups were compared with an age-matched control population. Patients treated with conformal technique were also evaluated regarding acute and late urinary problems. Results showed that patients treated with conformal technique reported significantly fewer side-effects as compared with conventional technique. Patients treated with sucralfate also showed slightly decreased intestinal morbidity in comparison to non-sucralfate group. Acute and late morbidity evaluated by the patients was decreased after conformal radiotherapy as compared with the conventional technique. Sucralfate may be of value if conformal radiotherapy is used for dose escalation in prostatic cancer patients. (orig.)

  10. Life-threatening meningitis resulting from transrectal prostate biopsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou-Jun Shen; Shan-Wen Chen; Hua Wang; Xie-Lai Zhou; Ju-Ping Zhao

    2005-01-01

    After antibiotic prophylaxis with metronidazole and levofloxacin, a transrectal sextant biopsy was performed under the guide of transrectal ultrasonography (TRUS) for a 75-year-old suspicious patient with prostate adenocarcinoma.Although antibiotics were also given after this procedure, the patient still developed fever, anxious, agrypnia and headache. Blood cultures remained negative. Lumbar puncture was performed and was consistent with Escherichia coli bacterial meningitis.

  11. Desulfovibrio bacterial species are increased in ulcerative colitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rowan, Fiachra

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: Debate persists regarding the role of Desulfovibrio subspecies in ulcerative colitis. Combined microscopic and molecular techniques enable this issue to be investigated by allowing precise enumeration of specific bacterial species within the colonic mucous gel. The aim of this study was to combine laser capture microdissection and quantitative polymerase chain reaction to determine Desulfovibrio copy number in crypt-associated mucous gel in health and in acute and chronic ulcerative colitis. METHODS: Colonic mucosal biopsies were harvested from healthy controls (n = 19) and patients with acute (n = 10) or chronic (n = 10) ulcerative colitis. Crypt-associated mucous gel was obtained by laser capture microdissection throughout the colon. Pan-bacterial 16S rRNA and Desulfovibrio copy number\\/mm were obtained by polymerase chain reaction at each locus. Bacterial copy numbers were interrogated for correlation with location and disease activity. Data were evaluated using a combination of ordinary linear methods and linear mixed-effects models to cater for multiple interactions. RESULTS: Desulfovibrio positivity was significantly increased in acute and chronic ulcerative colitis at multiple levels within the colon, and after normalization with total bacterial signal, the relative Desulfovibrio load was increased in acute colitis compared with controls. Desulfovibrio counts did not significantly correlate with age, disease duration, or disease activity but interlevel correlations were found in adjacent colonic segments in the healthy control and chronic ulcerative colitis groups. CONCLUSION: The presence of Desulfovibrio subspecies is increased in ulcerative colitis and the data presented suggest that these bacteria represent an increased percentage of the colonic microbiome in acute ulcerative colitis.

  12. Estrogen receptors in the human male prostatic urethra and prostate in prostatic cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, A; Bruun, J; Balslev, E

    1999-01-01

    Estrogen receptors (ERs) in the prostate and prostatic urethra were examined in 33 men with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and in 11 with prostate cancer (PC). The Abbot monoclonal ER-ICA assay was used for immunohistochemical investigation. In the BPH group, ERs were revealed in the prostatic...... stroma in eight cases and in the glandular epithelium in one. In four cases ERs were seen in the prostatic stroma and in the glandular epithelium. In the prostatic urethra, ERs were found in 19 cases located in the urothelium, lamina propria and/or periurethral glands. In the PC group, ERs were...... demonstrated in the prostatic stroma and/or prostatic urethra in 6 out of 11 cases. In both BPH and PC patients, immunoreactivity was weak and confined to few cells, indicating low ER content in the prostate as well as in the prostatic urethra. Dextran-coated charcoal (DCC) analysis was used for detection...

  13. Prolonged use of indwelling urinary catheter following acute urinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J.O. Bello

    prolonged use of urinary catheters following acute urinary retention secondary to benign prostate enlarge- ment (BPE) and urethral ... indwelling urinary catheter for >3 months following acute urinary retention due to BPE or USD. The study .... the major health-care financing strategy in Nigeria and accounts for more than ...

  14. Xanthogranulomatous Prostatitis, a Rare Prostatic Entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Noyola

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available There are several benign prostatic pathologies that can clinically mimic a prostate adenocarcinoma. Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis is a benign inflammatory condition of the prostate and a rare entity. A 47-year old male, with 3 years of lower urinary tract symptoms, with a palpable hypogastric tumor, digital rectal examination: solid prostate, of approximately 60 g. Initial PSA was 0.90 ng/mL. He underwent surgical excision of the lower abdominal nodule and prostatectomy. Histopathology showed xanthogranulomatous prostatitis, without malignancy. Xanthogranulomatous prostatitis is an extremely rare entity that can simulate prostate adenocarcinoma, therefore having a correct histopathological diagnosis is essential.

  15. Predictive factors for acute and late urinary toxicity after permanent interstitial brachytherapy in Japanese patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, Ryuta; Bekku, Kensuke; Katayama, Norihisa

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the frequency of and to determine predictive factors associated with Radiation Therapy Oncology Group urinary toxicity in prostate brachytherapy patients. From January 2004 to April 2011, 466 consecutive Japanese patients underwent permanent iodine-125-seed brachytherapy (median follow up 48 months). International Prostate Symptom Score and Radiation Therapy Oncology Group toxicity data were prospectively collected. Prostate volume, International Prostate Symptom Score before and after brachytherapy, and postimplant analysis were examined for an association with urinary toxicity, defined as Radiation Therapy Oncology Group urinary toxicity of Grade 1 or higher. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine the factors associated with urinary toxicity. The rate of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group urinary toxicity grade 1 or higher at 1, 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 months was 67%, 40%, 21%, 31%, 27% and 28%, respectively. Grade 2 or higher urinary toxicity was less than 1% at each time-point. International Prostate Symptom Score was highest at 3 months and returned to normal 12 months after brachytherapy. On multivariate analysis, patients with a larger prostate size, greater baseline International Prostate Symptom Score, higher prostate V100, higher prostate V150, higher prostate D90 and a greater number of seeds had more acute urinary toxicities at 1 month and 12 months after brachytherapy. On multivariate analysis, significant predictors for urinary toxicity at 1 month and 12 months were a greater baseline International Prostate Symptom Score and prostate V100. Most urinary symptoms are tolerated and resolved within 12 months after prostate brachytherapy. Acute and late urinary toxicity after brachytherapy is strongly related to the baseline International Prostate Symptom Score and prostate V100. (author)

  16. Transvesical prostatectomy in the management of benign prostatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-06-02

    Jun 2, 2014 ... only occurred in 76 patients (25.7%); acute urinary retention was seen in 106 patients (35.7%). Chronic ... prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common problem in the ... of the drugs, open prostatectomy or transurethral resection .... Storage LUTS. 37 ... there was paucity of data about prostatectomy specimen.

  17. Synergistic interaction of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatitis on prostate cancer risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, S-C; Lai, S-W; Tsai, P-Y; Chen, P-C; Wu, H-C; Lin, W-H; Sung, F-C

    2013-01-01

    Background: The incidence of prostate cancer is much lower in Asian men than in Western men. This study investigated whether prostate cancer is associated with prostatitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and other medical conditions in the low-incidence population. Methods: From the claims data obtained from the universal National Health Insurance of Taiwan, we identified 1184 patients with prostate cancer diagnosed from 1997 to 2008. Controls comprised 4736 men randomly selected from a cancer-free population. Both groups were 50 years of age or above. Medical histories between the two groups were compared. Results: Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that prostatitis and BPH had stronger association with prostate cancer than the other medical conditions tested. Compared with men without prostatitis and BPH, a higher odds ratio (OR) for prostate cancer was associated with BPH (26.2, 95% confidence interval (CI) 20.8–33.0) than with prostatitis (10.5, 95% CI=3.36–32.7). Men with both conditions had an OR of 49.2 (95% CI=34.7–69.9). Conclusion: Men with prostate cancer have strong association with prostatitis and/or BPH. Prostatitis interacts with BPH, resulting in higher estimated relative risk of prostate cancer in men suffering from both conditions. PMID:23612451

  18. Factors Affecting the Improvement of the Initial Peak Urinary Flow Rate after Transurethral Resection of the Prostate or Photoselective Vaporization of the Prostate for Treating Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hwa Sub Choi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose We evaluated the factors that affect the improvement of the initial peak flow rate after transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP or photoselective vaporization of the prostate (PVP for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH patients by using noninvasive tools. Methods One hundred and twenty seven BPH patients who had undergone TURP or PVP between January 2005 and May 2009 were evaluated. They were divided into 2 groups: the postoperative initial peak urinary flow rate (Qmax was less than 10 mL/sec (Group 1; n=37, TURP=11, PVP=26 and more than 10 mL/sec (Group 2; n=90, TURP=41, PVP=49. We confirmed the patients' preoperative check lists. The check list were the international prostate symptom score (IPSS, the quality of life score, a past history of acute urinary retention (AUR, body mass index and/or pyuria, the serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA level and the prostate volume, the prostate transitional zone volume and prostatic calcification. The initial Qmax was measured at the outpatient clinic one week after discharge. Results The improvement rate was not significant difference between the TURP group (78.8% and the PVP group (65.3%. The efficacy parameters were the IPSS-storage symptom score, the prostate volume, the PSA level and a past history of AUR. The IPSS-storage symptom scores of Group 1 (12.3±3.3 was higher than those of Group 2 (10.5±1.7. The prostate volume of Group 2 (42.3±16.6 g was bigger than that of Group 1 (36.6±7.8 g. The PSA level of Group 2 (3.8±2.6 ng/mL was higher than that of Group 1 (2.6±2.6 ng/mL. A past history of AUR in Group 1 (35.1% was more prevalent than that of Group 2 (15.6%. Conclusions The non-invasive factors affecting the initial Qmax after TURP or PVP were the IPSS-storage symptom score, the prostate volume and a past history of AUR. Accordingly, in patients who have a higher IPSS-storage symptom score, a smaller prostate volume and a history of AUR, there might be a detrimental effect on

  19. Antibiotics usefulness and choice in BPCO acute exacerbation

    OpenAIRE

    Bruno Tartaglino

    2005-01-01

    Although the debate on the role of bacterial infections and antibiotic treatment in AE-COPD remains open, there is evidence that the persistence of bacteria after acute exacerbation (residual bacterial colony) influences the frequency and severity of subsequent acute exacerbation and that antibiotic treatment that induces faster and more complete eradication produces better clinical outcomes. New aspects must now be considered, given that COPD is a chronic illness subject to acute exacerbatio...

  20. Endoscopic assessment and prediction of prostate urethral disintegration after histotripsy treatment in a canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, George R; Styn, Nicholas R; Hall, Timothy L; Roberts, William W

    2012-02-01

    Histotripsy is a nonthermal focused ultrasound technology that uses acoustic cavitation to homogenize tissue. Previous research has demonstrated that the prostatic urethra is more resistant to histotripsy effects than prostate parenchyma, a finding that may complicate the creation of transurethral resection of the prostate-like treatment cavities. The purpose of this study was to characterize the endoscopic appearance of the prostatic urethra during and after histotripsy treatment and to identify features that are predictive of urethral disintegration. Thirty-five histotripsy treatments were delivered in a transverse plane traversing the prostatic urethra in 17 canine subjects (1-3/prostate ≥1 cm apart). Real-time endoscopy was performed in the first four subjects to characterize development of acute urethral treatment effect (UTE). Serial postprocedure endoscopy was performed in all subjects to assess subsequent evolution of UTE. Endoscopy during histotripsy was feasible with observation of intraurethral cavitation, allowing characterization of the real-time progression of UTE from normal to frank urethral disintegration. While acute urethral fragmentation occurred in 3/35 (8.6%) treatments, frank urethral disintegration developed in 24/35 (68.5%) within 14 days of treatment. Treating until the appearance of hemostatic pale gray shaggy urothelium was the best predictor of achieving urethral fragmentation within 14 days of treatment with positive and negative predictive values of 0.91 and 0.89, respectively. Endoscopic assessment of the urethra may be a useful adjunct to prostatic histotripsy to help guide therapy to ensure urethral disintegration, allowing drainage of the homogenized adenoma and effective tissue debulking.

  1. Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon, C.; Galli, M.; Meoli, P.; Mariani, L.; Novelli, L.; Gonzalez, G.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Objective: To analyze the feasibility of high dose assessing acute and late toxicities both rectal and genitourinary in patients with clinically localized prostate cancer. Material and methods: Between April 2006 and April 2008 90 patients diagnosed with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with MRT technique in the Department of Radiotherapy. The analysis included 80 patients, 10 of them in treatment. The total dose received was 80 Gy. One patient received 70.2 Gy (because of previous pelvic radiotherapy). Age average: 65 (r 43-85 years). Stage: T1c: 43 p (53.75%), T2: 35 p (43.75%), T3: 1 p (1.25%). Score of Gleason 10 ng/ml and [es

  2. PREVALENCE OF BENIGN PROSTATIC HYPERPLASIA AND PROSTATE CANCER IN AFRICANS AND AFRICANS IN THE DIASPORA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboah, E D

    2016-01-01

    There have been several publications on population or community prevalence of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer from various countries and races but few reports are from Africa on Africans. A review on the prevalence of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer in Africans and other races. The current literature on prevalence of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), prostate cancer (PC), and benign prostatic hyperplasia co-existing with prostate cancer in Africans and other races is reviewed. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) prevalence in Ghana is responsible for 60% acute retention of urine and 28.6% of haematuria. Worldwide prevalence of BPH varies from 20 - 62% in men over 50 years and this includes USA, UK, Japan and Ghana. Reports from South Africa indicate prevalence of over 50% in adult males of 60 years. BPH co-existing with PC - Reports from USA, UK and Japan and Ghana reveal moderate association of BPH and PC. The co-existence of PC in patients being treated for BPH is 3 - 20% Prostate Cancer prevalence - There is high prevalence in USA, Scandinavian Countries, African Americans (AA) and Caribbean blacks. Ghana, Trinidad & Tobago have reported high prevalence of 6 -10% in men aged 50 years and above but others reported low prevalence in Africans from Africa. The low reporting from Africa of 10 - 40:100,000 is attributable to under reporting, absence of PSA screening/testing, lack of reliable cancer registries and poor medical facilities. Economic Costs of BPH and PC: BPH in the USA national direct costs are estimated at U$4Billion and individual costs of US$1536 annually. In Ghana, individual costs for BPH medications range from US$300 - 550 per year and cost for simple prostatectomy/TURP is estimated at US$1100. For prostate cancer, individual direct costs from Europe range from 6,575 - 12,000 euros, £2818.00 UK and over U$12,000 - 20,000 in USA per annum. In Ghana, individual direct costs ranges, for radical prostatectomy and

  3. Prostatic Artery Embolization as an Alternative to Indwelling Bladder Catheterization to Manage Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in Poor Surgical Candidates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rampoldi, Antonio; Barbosa, Fabiane, E-mail: fabiane001@hotmail.com [Ospedale Niguarda Ca’ Granda, Department of Interventional Radiology (Italy); Secco, Silvia [Ospedale Niguarda Ca’ Granda, Department of Urology (Italy); Migliorisi, Carmelo [Ospedale Niguarda Ca’ Granda, Department of Interventional Radiology (Italy); Galfano, Antonio; Prestini, Giovanni [Ospedale Niguarda Ca’ Granda, Department of Urology (Italy); Harward, Sardis Honoria [Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice (United States); Trapani, Dario Di [Ospedale Niguarda Ca’ Granda, Department of Urology (Italy); Brambillasca, Pietro Maria; Ruggero, Vercelli; Solcia, Marco [Ospedale Niguarda Ca’ Granda, Department of Interventional Radiology (Italy); Carnevale, Francisco Cesar [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Department of Interventional Radiology (Brazil); Bocciardi, Aldo Massimo [Ospedale Niguarda Ca’ Granda, Department of Urology (Italy)

    2017-04-15

    PurposeTo prospectively assess discontinuation of indwelling bladder catheterization (IBC) and relief of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) following prostate artery embolization (PAE) in poor surgical candidates.MethodsPatients ineligible for surgical intervention were offered PAE after at least 1 month of IBC for management of urinary retention secondary to BPH; exclusion criteria for PAE included eligibility for surgery, active bladder cancer or known prostate cancer. Embolization technical and clinical success were defined as bilateral prostate embolization and removal of IBC, respectively. Patients were followed for at least 6 months and evaluated for International Prostate Symptom Score, quality of life, prostate size and uroflowmetric parameters.ResultsA total of 43 patients were enrolled; bilateral embolization was performed in 33 (76.7%), unilateral embolization was performed in 8 (18.6%), and two patients could not be embolized due to tortuous and atherosclerotic pelvic vasculature (4.7%). Among the patients who were embolized, mean prostate size decreased from 75.6 ± 33.2 to 63.0 ± 23.2 g (sign rank p = 0.0001, mean reduction of 19.6 ± 17.3%), and IBC removal was achieved in 33 patients (80.5%). Clavien II complications were reported in nine patients (21.9%) and included urinary tract infection (three patients, 7.3%) and recurrent acute urinary retention (six patients, 14.6%). Nine patients (22.0%) experienced post-embolization syndrome.ConclusionsPAE is a safe and feasible for the relief of LUTS and IBC in highly comorbid patients without surgical treatment options.

  4. Prostatic Artery Embolization as an Alternative to Indwelling Bladder Catheterization to Manage Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia in Poor Surgical Candidates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rampoldi, Antonio; Barbosa, Fabiane; Secco, Silvia; Migliorisi, Carmelo; Galfano, Antonio; Prestini, Giovanni; Harward, Sardis Honoria; Trapani, Dario Di; Brambillasca, Pietro Maria; Ruggero, Vercelli; Solcia, Marco; Carnevale, Francisco Cesar; Bocciardi, Aldo Massimo

    2017-01-01

    PurposeTo prospectively assess discontinuation of indwelling bladder catheterization (IBC) and relief of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) due to benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) following prostate artery embolization (PAE) in poor surgical candidates.MethodsPatients ineligible for surgical intervention were offered PAE after at least 1 month of IBC for management of urinary retention secondary to BPH; exclusion criteria for PAE included eligibility for surgery, active bladder cancer or known prostate cancer. Embolization technical and clinical success were defined as bilateral prostate embolization and removal of IBC, respectively. Patients were followed for at least 6 months and evaluated for International Prostate Symptom Score, quality of life, prostate size and uroflowmetric parameters.ResultsA total of 43 patients were enrolled; bilateral embolization was performed in 33 (76.7%), unilateral embolization was performed in 8 (18.6%), and two patients could not be embolized due to tortuous and atherosclerotic pelvic vasculature (4.7%). Among the patients who were embolized, mean prostate size decreased from 75.6 ± 33.2 to 63.0 ± 23.2 g (sign rank p = 0.0001, mean reduction of 19.6 ± 17.3%), and IBC removal was achieved in 33 patients (80.5%). Clavien II complications were reported in nine patients (21.9%) and included urinary tract infection (three patients, 7.3%) and recurrent acute urinary retention (six patients, 14.6%). Nine patients (22.0%) experienced post-embolization syndrome.ConclusionsPAE is a safe and feasible for the relief of LUTS and IBC in highly comorbid patients without surgical treatment options.

  5. Combination therapy with dutasteride and tamsulosin for the treatment of symptomatic enlarged prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J; Tarter, TH

    2009-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a frequent cause of lower urinary symptoms, with a prevalence of 50% by the sixth decade of life. Hyperplasia of stromal and epithelial prostatic elements that surround the urethra cause lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS), urinary tract infection and acute urinary retention. Medical treatments of symptomatic BPH include; 1) the 5α-reductase inhibitors, 2) the α1-adrenergic antagonists, and 3) the combination of a 5α-reductase inhibitor and a α1-adrenergic antagonist. Selective α1-adrenergic antagonists relax the smooth muscle of the prostate and bladder neck without affecting the detrussor muscle of the bladder wall, thus decreasing the resistance to urine flow without compromising bladder contractility. Clinical trials have shown that α1-adrenergic antagonists decrease LUTS and increase urinary flow rates in men with symptomatic BPH, but do not reduce the long-term risk of urinary retention or need for surgical intervention. Inhibitors of 5α-reductase decrease production of dihydrotestosterone within the prostate resulting in decreased prostate volumes, increased peak urinary flow rates, improvement of symptoms, and decreased risk of acute urinary retention and need for surgical intervention. Interim results of the ongoing Combination of Avodart and Tamsulosin (CombAt) study have shown combination therapy with the 5α-reductase inhibitor dutasteride and the α1-adrenergic antagonist tamsulosin offer significant improvements from baseline compared with either drug alone. PMID:19554096

  6. Acute radiation proctitis. A clinical, histopathological and histochemical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovdenak, Nils

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the study is: 1) A sequential description of the clinical course of acute radiation proctitis during pelvic RT. 2) A sequential description of the rectal mucosal histopathology during pelvic RT as a possible substrate for clinical toxicity. 3) To assess the mucosal protease activity during RT as a possible explanation of the observed tissue changes. 4) To assess the efficacy of prophylactic sucralfate in acute radiation proctitis a randomised study was initiated and carried out together with a meta-analysis of previously available data. 5) Most studies on clinical acute toxicity in pelvic RT use either the RTOG/EORTC score system or focus on diarrhoea/stool frequency. A more differentiated and sensitive recording was developed and tested to pick up symptoms escaping the commonly used scores. 6) Study the relation between histopathological findings and the clinical picture. 4 papers presenting various studies are included. The titles are: 1) Acute radiation proctitis: a sequential clinicopathologic study during pelvic radiotherapy. 2) Clinical significance of increased gelatinolytic activity in the rectal mucosa during external beam radiation therapy of prostate cancer. 3) Profiles and time course of acute radiation toxicity symptoms during conformal radiotherapy for cancer of the prostate. 4) Sucralfate does not ameliorate acute radiation proctitis. Some future prospects are discussed

  7. Acute radiation proctitis. A clinical, histopathological and histochemical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hovdenak, Nils

    2004-07-01

    The aim of the study is: 1) A sequential description of the clinical course of acute radiation proctitis during pelvic RT. 2) A sequential description of the rectal mucosal histopathology during pelvic RT as a possible substrate for clinical toxicity. 3) To assess the mucosal protease activity during RT as a possible explanation of the observed tissue changes. 4) To assess the efficacy of prophylactic sucralfate in acute radiation proctitis a randomised study was initiated and carried out together with a meta-analysis of previously available data. 5) Most studies on clinical acute toxicity in pelvic RT use either the RTOG/EORTC score system or focus on diarrhoea/stool frequency. A more differentiated and sensitive recording was developed and tested to pick up symptoms escaping the commonly used scores. 6) Study the relation between histopathological findings and the clinical picture. 4 papers presenting various studies are included. The titles are: 1) Acute radiation proctitis: a sequential clinicopathologic study during pelvic radiotherapy. 2) Clinical significance of increased gelatinolytic activity in the rectal mucosa during external beam radiation therapy of prostate cancer. 3) Profiles and time course of acute radiation toxicity symptoms during conformal radiotherapy for cancer of the prostate. 4) Sucralfate does not ameliorate acute radiation proctitis. Some future prospects are discussed.

  8. Sucralfate versus mesalazine versus hydrocortisone in the prevention of acute radiation proctitis during conformal radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma. A randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanguineti, Giuseppe; Franzone, Paola; Marcenaro, Michela; Foppiano, Franca; Vitale, Vito

    2003-07-01

    To assess whether the topical use of steroids or 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) is superior to sucralfate in preventing acute rectal toxicity during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) to 76 Gy. Patients undergoing 3DCRT for prostate carcinoma at our institution were offered to be randomized to sucralfate 3 g in 15 ml suspension enema (Antepsin, mesalazine 4 g gel enema (Enterasyn, or hydrocortisone 100 mg foam enema (Colifoam. Randomization was blind to the treating physician but not to the patient. Sucralfate was chosen as control arm. Topical treatment had to be performed once daily, starting on day 1 of 3DCRT. Acute rectal toxicity was scored weekly according to RTOG criteria. Time to occurrence of grade 2+ acute rectal toxicity was taken as endpoint. The trial was opened in August 1999, and after the first 24 patients had been treated, arm 2 was discontinued because of eight patients receiving mesalazine, seven actually developed acute rectal toxicity (five patients grade 3 and two patients grade 2). Until May 2001, 134 consecutive patients were randomly assigned to sucralfate (63 patients), mesalazine (eight patients) or hydrocortisone (63 patients). The cumulative incidence of acute rectal toxicity at the end of treatment by arm is 61.9 +/- 6.1%, 87.5 +/- 11.7%, and 52.4 +/- 6.2% for arms 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The difference between the mesalazine group and the sucralfate group is highly significant (hazard ratio [HR] 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-5.7; p = 0.03). At both uni- and multivariate analysis taking into account several patients and treatment covariates, the difference between hydrocortisone and sucralfate is not significant (HR 0.7, 95% CI 0.5-1.2; p = 0.2). Topical mesalazine is contraindicated during radiotherapy. Hydrocortisone enema is not superior to sucralfate in preventing acute rectal toxicity.

  9. Predictors for Rectal and Intestinal Acute Toxicities During Prostate Cancer High-Dose 3D-CRT: Results of a Prospective Multicenter Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vavassori, Vittorio; Fiorino, Claudio; Rancati, Tiziana; Magli, Alessandro; Fellin, Gianni; Baccolini, Michela; Bianchi, Carla; Cagna, Emanuela; Mauro, Flora A.; Monti, Angelo F.; Munoz, Fernando; Stasi, Michele; Franzone, Paola; Valdagni, Riccardo

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To find predictors for rectal and intestinal acute toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with ≥70 Gy conformal radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between July 2002 and March 2004, 1,132 patients were entered into a cooperative study (AIROPROS01-02). Toxicity was scored using the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scale and by considering the changes (before and after treatment) of the scores of a self-administered questionnaire on rectal/intestinal toxicity. The correlation with a number of parameters was assessed by univariate and multivariate analyses. Concerning the questionnaire, only moderate/severe complications were considered. Results: Of 1,132 patients, 1,123 were evaluable. Of these patients, 375, 265, and 28 had Grade 1, 2, and 3 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer toxicity, respectively. The mean rectal dose was the most predictive parameter (p = 0.0004; odds ratio, 1.035) for Grade 2 or worse toxicity, and the use of anticoagulants/antiaggregants (p 0.02; odds ratio, 0.63) and hormonal therapy (p = 0.04, odds ratio, 0.65) were protective. The questionnaire-based scoring revealed that a greater mean rectal dose was associated with a greater risk of bleeding; larger irradiated volumes were associated with frequency, tenesmus, incontinence, and bleeding; hormonal therapy was protective against frequency and tenesmus; hemorrhoids were associated with a greater risk of tenesmus and bleeding; and diabetes associated highly with diarrhea. Conclusion: The mean rectal dose correlated with acute rectal/intestinal toxicity in three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for prostate cancer, and hormonal therapy and the use of anticoagulants/antiaggregants were protective. According to the moderate/severe injury scores on the self-assessed questionnaire, several clinical and dose-volume parameters were independently predictive for

  10. Acute colonic obstruction due to benign prostatic hypertrophy.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mac Giobuin, S

    2012-02-01

    A seventy two year old man presented to the Emergency Department with clinical features of colonic obstruction. Subsequent radiological investigations confirmed this impression and revealed the aetiology to be compression of the sigmoid colon against the sacrum by a massively distended urinary bladder. Chronic urinary retention due to benign prostatic hypertrophy is an extremely unusual cause of large bowel obstruction. Little in this patient\\'s clinical findings suggested this aetiology. We reviewed the literature in this area and highlight the benefits of CT scanning over contrast studies.

  11. Preferential radiosensitization of human prostatic carcinoma cells by mild hyperthermia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Samuel; Brown, Stephen L.; Kim, Sang-Hie; Khil, Mark S.; Kim, Jae Ho

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Recent cell culture studies by us and others suggest that some human carcinoma cells are more sensitive to heat than are rodent cells following mild hyperthermia. In studying the cellular mechanism of enhanced thermosensitivity of human tumor cells to hyperthermia, prostatic carcinoma cells of human origin were found to be more sensitive to mild hyperthermia than other human cancer cells. The present study was designed to determine the magnitude of radiosensitization of human prostatic carcinoma cells by mild hyperthermia and to examine whether the thermal radiosensitization is related to the intrinsic thermosensitivity of cancer cells. Methods and Materials: Two human prostatic carcinoma cell lines (DU-145 and PC-3) and other carcinoma cells of human origin, in particular, colon (HT-29), breast (MCF-7), lung (A-549), and brain (U-251) were exposed to temperatures of 40-41 deg. C. Single acute dose rate radiation and fractionated radiation were combined with mild hyperthermia to determine thermal radiosensitization. The end point of the study was the colony-forming ability of single-plated cells. Results: DU-145 and PC-3 cells were found to be exceedingly thermosensitive to 41 deg. C for 24 h, relative to other cancer cell lines. Ninety percent of the prostatic cancer cells were killed by a 24 h heat exposure. Prostatic carcinoma cells exposed to a short duration of heating at 41 deg. C for 2 h resulted in a substantial enhancement of radiation-induced cytotoxicity. The thermal enhancement ratios (TERs) of single acute dose radiation following heat treatment 41 deg. C for 2 h were 2.0 in DU-145 cells and 1.4 in PC-3 cells. The TERs of fractionated irradiation combined with continuous heating at 40 deg. C were similarly in the range of 2.1 to 1.4 in prostate carcinoma cells. No significant radiosensitization was observed in MCF-7 and HT-29 cells under the same conditions. Conclusion: The present data suggest that a significant radiosensitization of

  12. Determination of the Normal Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) Value in Iraqi Society and its Relation to Bacterial Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamel, F.H.

    2012-01-01

    The study was carried out by radioimmunoassay and immuno radiographic analysis in the Iraqi Ministry of Health, within the research plan of Kurdistan institution for strategic study and scientific research. A total of 793 serum samples were collected in which 50 patient samples have biopsy with positive bacterial UTI. The other 743 samples were obtained from normal healthy volunteers all were over 45 years old. The samples were gathered randomly from three regions in Iraq namely, from north (Sulaymaniyah, Erbil and Dohuk), from the middle (Baghdad and Diyala) and from south (Basra, Missan and Najaf). The total PSA was measured and the results were subjected to statistical analysis based on statistical package social science (SPSS) method. The obtained data showed that the normal PSA values are function of the age of the donors. The results were grouped and clarified that PSA was less than 3.8 ng/ml for the age 45-55 years, while it was less than 4.8 ng/ml for the volunteers from 56-65 years old and the values lower than 5.9 ng/ml for group aged 66-75 years old. On the other hand, the obtained data illustrated that there were non-significant variations in PSA values as a function of the geographic regions. The PSA values for the 50 male positive bacterial UTI samples were within the same grouping previously stated for the normal healthy volunteers. Seven cases of the 743 samples showed abnormal high PSA values (i.e. greater than 9 ng/ml) which represent 0.93% of the healthy collected samples. It could be concluded that the PSA has non-significance relation to the bacterial UTI. In addition, the radioimmunoassay has a sensitivity of about 99.04% for the normal cases and specificity of 0.96% for prostate cancer.

  13. Antibody Responses to Prostate-Associated Antigens in Patients with Prostatitis and Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricque, Brett B.; Eickhoff, Jens C.; McNeel, Douglas G.

    2010-01-01

    Background An important focus of tumor immunotherapy has been the identification of appropriate antigenic targets. Serum-based screening approaches have led to the discovery of hundreds of tumor-associated antigens recognized by IgG. Our efforts to identify immunologically recognized proteins in prostate cancer have yielded a multitude of antigens, however prioritizing these antigens as targets for evaluation in immunotherapies has been challenging. In this report, we set out to determine whether the evaluation of multiple antigenic targets would allow the identification of a subset of antigens that are common immunologic targets in patients with prostate cancer. Methods Using a phage immunoblot approach, we evaluated IgG responses in patients with prostate cancer (n=126), patients with chronic prostatitis (n=45), and men without prostate disease (n=53). Results We found that patients with prostate cancer or prostatitis have IgG specific for multiple common antigens. A subset of 23 proteins was identified to which IgG were detected in 38% of patients with prostate cancer and 33% patients with prostatitis versus 6% of controls (pprostate and prostate cancer, and suggest that IgG responses to a panel of commonly recognized prostate antigens could be potentially used in the identification of patients at risk for prostate cancer or as a tool to identify immune responses elicited to prostate tissue. PMID:20632317

  14. Maximum Urine Flow Rate of Less than 15ml/Sec Increasing Risk of Urine Retention and Prostate Surgery among Patients with Alpha-1 Blockers: A 10-Year Follow Up Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Ho Liu

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the subsequent risk of acute urine retention and prostate surgery in patients receiving alpha-1 blockers treatment and having a maximum urinary flow rate of less than 15ml/sec.We identified patients who were diagnosed with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH and had a maximum uroflow rate of less than 15ml/sec between 1 January, 2002 to 31 December, 2011 from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database into study group (n = 303. The control cohort included four BPH/LUTS patients without 5ARI used for each study group, randomly selected from the same dataset (n = 1,212. Each patient was monitored to identify those who subsequently developed prostate surgery and acute urine retention.Prostate surgery and acute urine retention are detected in 5.9% of control group and 8.3% of study group during 10-year follow up. Compared with the control group, there was increase in the risk of prostate surgery and acute urine retention in the study group (HR = 1.83, 95% CI: 1.16 to 2.91 after adjusting for age, comorbidities, geographic region and socioeconomic status.Maximum urine flow rate of less than 15ml/sec is a risk factor of urinary retention and subsequent prostate surgery in BPH patients receiving alpha-1 blocker therapy. This result can provide a reference for clinicians.

  15. Acute pancreatitis with saw palmetto use: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Bruminhent, Jackrapong; Carrera, Perliveh; Li, Zhongzhen; Amankona, Raymond; Roberts, Ingram M

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Saw palmetto is a phytotherapeutic agent commercially marketed for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Evidence suggests that saw palmetto is a safe product, and mild gastrointestinal adverse effects have been reported with its use. We report a case of acute pancreatitis, possibly secondary to the use of saw palmetto. Case presentation A 61-year-old Caucasian man with a history of benign prostatic hyperplasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease developed epiga...

  16. Epidemiology and outcomes of bacterial meningitis in Mexican children: 10-year experience (1993-2003).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Paredes, Carlos; Lammoglia, Lorena; Hernández, Isabel; Santos-Preciado, José Ignacio

    2008-07-01

    Acute bacterial meningitis remains an important cause of morbidity, neurologic sequelae, and mortality in children in Latin America. We retrospectively reviewed the hospital-based medical records of children diagnosed with acute bacterial meningitis, aged 1 month to 18 years, at a large inner city referral Hospital in Mexico City, for a 10-year period (1993-2003). To characterize the epidemiology, clinical features, and outcomes of acute bacterial meningitis, we subdivided our study into two time periods: the period prior to the routine use of Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine (1993-1998) and the period after the vaccine became available (1999-2003). A total of 218 cases of acute bacterial meningitis were identified during the study period. The most frequently affected age group was that of children aged between 1 and 6 months. Hib was the most commonly isolated pathogen, found in 50% of cases. However, its incidence declined significantly after the introduction of the combined diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis, hepatitis B, and conjugated Hib (DTP-HB/Hib) pentavalent vaccine into the universal vaccination schedule for children in 1998. Streptococcus pneumoniae followed as the second most commonly isolated bacterial pathogen. Neisseria meningitidis was isolated in only a few cases, confirming the historically low incidence of this pathogen in Mexico. Identified risk factors for death were found to include the presence of septic shock and intracranial hypertension, but were not attributable to any particular bacterial pathogen. In our hospital, acute bacterial meningitis remains a severe disease with important sequelae and mortality. The incidence of Hib meningitis cases has declined since the introduction of the Hib vaccine. However, S. pneumoniae persists as an important cause of bacterial meningitis, highlighting the need for the implementation of vaccination policies against this pathogen.

  17. Dose Volume Histogram analysis for rectum and urethral reaction of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagi, Takeshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Kamada, Tadashi; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinically relevant parameters for rectum and urethral reaction using DVH (dose volume histogram) in carbon ion radiotherapy of prostate cancer. In this year, we studied the urinary reaction mainly. 35 patients with prostate cancer were treated with carbon ion beams between June 1995 and December 1997. The applied dose was escalated from 54.0 GyE to 72.0 GyE in fixed 20 fractions. Clinical urinary reaction and rectum reaction were reviewed using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scoring system for acute reactions, RTOG/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) scoring system for late reactions. Taking the ROI (region of interest) for DVH of urethra, we used surrogate one that was derived from the observation of MR images. 35 patients were analyzed for acute urinary reaction and 34 for late urinary reaction in the study of this year. DVH analysis suggested difference among the grades for acute and late reactions. These analysis appears to be a useful tool for predicting the urinary reactions. (author)

  18. Prostatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prostatitis Overview Prostatitis is swelling and inflammation of the prostate gland, a walnut-sized gland situated directly below the bladder in ... produces fluid (semen) that nourishes and transports sperm. Prostatitis often causes painful or difficult urination. Other symptoms ...

  19. Impact of practice and of technical modifications on acute morbidity after prostate curie-therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Fur, E.; Malhaire, J.P.; Pradier, O.; Valeri, A.

    2011-01-01

    Based on a cohort of 150 patients treated by curie-therapy for a prostate cancer, the authors report the analysis of the influence of some technical modifications (use of an automatic stepper at the beginning of a second period, and of a high frequency echographic probe during a third period) on the urinary toxicity. This toxicity has been assessed by using the urinary retention rate, and the difference between the maximum and initial International Prostate Symptom Score (IPPS). Rectal morbidity has been scaled according to a modified Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) scale. It appears that the occurrence of urinary retention after prostate radiotherapy decreases with practice and use of the automatic stepper. It seems that there is no impact on urinary morbidity (urinary retention excluded) nor on rectal morbidity. Short communication

  20. Chlamydia trachomatis versus common uropathogens as a cause of chronic bacterial prostatitis: Is there any difference? Results of a prospective parallel-cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Cai

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The role of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT infection in chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP is well known. What is unclear is whether there are any differences in the course or clinical outcome of the disease when the cause is CT or other uropathogens. Materials and Methods: A series of 311 patients affected by CBP due to CT (cohort A was compared with a group of 524 patients affected by CBP caused by common uropathogen bacteria (cohort B. All participants completed the following questionnaires: National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index, International Prostate Symptom Score, International Index of Erectile Function-15 erectile function domain (IIEF-15-EFD, Premature Ejaculation Diagnostic Tool (PEDT, and the Short Form 36 (SF-36 Health Survey. All patients were followed with clinical and microbiological evaluations. Results: After a mean follow-up time of 42.3 months, the number of symptomatic episodes was significantly higher in patients in cohort A than in cohort B (4.1±1.1 vs. 2.8±0.8, p<0.001, and the mean time to first symptomatic recurrence was shorter in cohort A than in cohort B (3.3±2.3 months vs. 5.7±1.9 months, p<0.001. Moreover, scores on the SF-36 tool were significantly lower in cohort A (96.5±1.0 vs. 99.7±1.9, p<0.001 at the first symptomatic recurrence. Cohort A also showed significantly lower scores on the IIEF-15-EFD and PEDT questionnaires at the end of the follow-up period (26.8±2.9 vs. 27.3±3.3, p=0.02 and 11.5±2.3 vs. 4.5±2.8, p<0.001, respectively. Conclusions: Patients affected by CBP due to CT infection have a higher number of symptomatic recurrences with a more severe impact on quality of life.

  1. A Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Randomized Clinical Trial With Magnesium Oxide to Reduce Intrafraction Prostate Motion for Prostate Cancer Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lips, Irene M., E-mail: i.m.lips@umcutrecht.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Gils, Carla H. van [Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Kotte, Alexis N.T.J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Leerdam, Monique E. van [Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Erasmus University Medical Center, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Franken, Stefan P.G.; Heide, Uulke A. van der; Vulpen, Marco van [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether magnesium oxide during external-beam radiotherapy for prostate cancer reduces intrafraction prostate motion in a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial. Methods and Materials: At the Department of Radiotherapy, prostate cancer patients scheduled for intensity-modulated radiotherapy (77 Gy in 35 fractions) using fiducial marker-based position verification were randomly assigned to receive magnesium oxide (500 mg twice a day) or placebo during radiotherapy. The primary outcome was the proportion of patients with clinically relevant intrafraction prostate motion, defined as the proportion of patients who demonstrated in {>=}50% of the fractions an intrafraction motion outside a range of 2 mm. Secondary outcome measures included quality of life and acute toxicity. Results: In total, 46 patients per treatment arm were enrolled. The primary endpoint did not show a statistically significant difference between the treatment arms with a percentage of patients with clinically relevant intrafraction motion of 83% in the magnesium oxide arm as compared with 80% in the placebo arm (p = 1.00). Concerning the secondary endpoints, exploratory analyses demonstrated a trend towards worsened quality of life and slightly more toxicity in the magnesium oxide arm than in the placebo arm; however, these differences were not statistically significant. Conclusions: Magnesium oxide is not effective in reducing the intrafraction prostate motion during external-beam radiotherapy, and therefore there is no indication to use it in clinical practice for this purpose.

  2. Prostate Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... know the exact cause of your prostate problem. Prostatitis The cause of prostatitis depends on whether you ... prostate problem in men older than age 50. Prostatitis If you have a UTI, you may be ...

  3. Genetic and metabolic signals during acute enteric bacterial infection alter the microbiota and drive progression to chronic inflammatory disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamdar, Karishma; Khakpour, Samira; Chen, Jingyu; Leone, Vanessa; Brulc, Jennifer; Mangatu, Thomas; Antonopoulos, Dionysios A.; Chang, Eugene B; Kahn, Stacy A.; Kirschner, Barbara S; Young, Glenn; DePaolo, R. William

    2016-01-13

    Chronic inflammatory disorders are thought to arise due to an interplay between predisposing host genetics and environmental factors. For example, the onset of inflammatory bowel disease is associated with enteric proteobacterial infection, yet the mechanistic basis for this association is unclear. We have shown previously that genetic defiency in TLR1 promotes acute enteric infection by the proteobacteria Yersinia enterocolitica. Examining that model further, we uncovered an altered cellular immune response that promotes the recruitment of neutrophils which in turn increases metabolism of the respiratory electron acceptor tetrathionate by Yersinia. These events drive permanent alterations in anti-commensal immunity, microbiota composition, and chronic inflammation, which persist long after Yersinia clearence. Deletion of the bacterial genes involved in tetrathionate respiration or treatment using targeted probiotics could prevent microbiota alterations and inflammation. Thus, acute infection can drive long term immune and microbiota alterations leading to chronic inflammatory disease in genetically predisposed individuals.

  4. Significance of prostatic weight in prostatism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K M; Bruskewitz, R C; Iversen, P

    1983-01-01

    In addition to routine evaluation, 68 patients with prostatism underwent blinded urodynamic testing prior to transurethral prostatectomy and were reexamined symptomatologically and urodynamically at 3 and 12 months after surgery to determine if prostatic weight could predict postoperative outcome....... Resected prostatic weight correlated with estimated weight at cystoscopy and with obstructive symptoms, but not with urodynamic variables of infravesical obstruction. Patients with small prostates improved symptomatologically to the same degree as patients with larger glands, although they did not improve...... to the same degree urodynamically. Prostatic weight, therefore, could not be used to predict the outcome of transurethral surgery....

  5. PROCTITIS ONE WEEK AFTER STEREOTACTIC BODY RADIATION THERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER: IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL TRIAL DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ima Paydar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proctitis following prostate cancer radiation therapy is a primary determinant of quality of life (QOL. While previous studies have assessed acute rectal morbidity at 1 month after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT, little data exist on the prevalence and severity of rectal morbidity within the first week following treatment. This study reports the acute bowel morbidity one week following prostate SBRT. Materials and methods: Between May 2013 and August 2014, 103 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with 35 to 36.25 Gy in five fractions using robotic SBRT delivered on a prospective clinical trial. Bowel toxicity was graded using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAEv.4. Bowel QOL was assessed using EPIC-26 questionnaire bowel domain at baseline, one week, one month, and three months. Time-dependent changes in bowel symptoms were statistically compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Clinically significant change was assessed by the minimally important difference (MID in EPIC score. This was defined as a change of one-half standard deviation (SD from the baseline score. Results: One hundred and three patients with a minimum of three months of follow-up were analyzed. The cumulative incidence of acute grade 2 GI toxicity was 23%. There were no acute ≥ grade 3 bowel toxicities. EPIC bowel summary scores maximally declined at 1 week after SBRT (-13.9, p<0.0001 before returning to baseline at three months after SBRT (+0.03, p=0.94. Prior to treatment, 4.9% of men reported that their bowel bother was a moderate to big problem. This increased to 28.4% (p<0.0001 one week after SBRT and returned to baseline at three months after SBRT (0.0%, p=0.66. Only the bowel summary and bowel bother score declines at 1 week met the MID threshold for clinically significant change. Conclusion: The rate and severity of acute proctitis following prostate SBRT peaked at one week after

  6. Biomarkers of Prostatic Cancer: An Attempt to Categorize Patients into Prostatic Carcinoma, Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia, or Prostatitis Based on Serum Prostate Specific Antigen, Prostatic Acid Phosphatase, Calcium, and Phosphorus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahana Sarwar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostatitis, BPH, and P.Ca are the most frequent pathologies of the prostate gland that are responsible for morbidity in men. Raised levels of PSA are seen in different pathological conditions involving the prostate. PAP levels are altered in inflammatory or infectious or abnormal growth of the prostate tissue. Serum calcium and phosphorus levels were also found to be altered in prostate cancer and BPH. The present study was carried out to study the levels of PSA, PAP, calcium, and phosphorus in serum of patients with Prostatitis, BPH, or P.Ca and also to evaluate the relationship between them. Males in the age group of 50–85 years with LUTS disease symptoms and with PSA levels more than 4 ng/mL were included. A total of 114 patients were analyzed including 30 controls. Prostatitis in 35.7% of cases, BPH in 35.7% of the cases, and P.Ca in 28.57% of the cases were observed. Thus, the nonmalignant cases constitute a majority. PSA, a marker specific for prostatic conditions, was significantly high in all the diseases compared to controls. A rise in serum PSA and PAP indicates prostatitis or, in combination with these two tests, decreased serum calcium shows advanced disease.

  7. A randomized trial comparing bladder volume consistency during fractionated prostate radiation therapy

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Mullaney, L.

    2014-01-10

    Organ motion is a contributory factor to the variation in location of the prostate and organs at risk during a course of fractionated prostate radiation therapy (RT). A prospective randomized controlled trial was designed with the primary endpoint to provide evidence-based bladder-filling instructions to achieve a consistent bladder volume (BV) and thus reduce the bladder-related organ motion. The secondary endpoints were to assess the incidence of acute and late genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity for patients and patients’ satisfaction with the bladder-filling instructions.

  8. Treatment outcome of high-dose image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy using intra-prostate fiducial markers for localized prostate cancer at a single institute in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Ken; Shimizu, Eiji; Abe, Keiko; Shirata, Yuko; Ishikawa, Yohjiro

    2012-01-01

    Several studies have confirmed the advantages of delivering high doses of external beam radiotherapy to achieve optimal tumor-control outcomes in patients with localized prostate cancer. We evaluated the medium-term treatment outcome after high-dose, image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using intra-prostate fiducial markers for clinically localized prostate cancer. In total, 141 patients with localized prostate cancer treated with image-guided IMRT (76 Gy in 13 patients and 80 Gy in 128 patients) between 2003 and 2008 were enrolled in this study. The patients were classified according to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network-defined risk groups. Thirty-six intermediate-risk patients and 105 high-risk patients were included. Androgen-deprivation therapy was performed in 124 patients (88%) for a median of 11 months (range: 2–88 months). Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) relapse was defined according to the Phoenix-definition (i.e., an absolute nadir plus 2 ng/ml dated at the call). The 5-year actuarial PSA relapse-free survival, the 5-year distant metastasis-free survival, the 5-year cause-specific survival (CSS), the 5-year overall survival (OS) outcomes and the acute and late toxicities were analyzed. The toxicity data were scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. The median follow-up was 60 months. The 5-year PSA relapse-free survival rates were 100% for the intermediate-risk patients and 82.2% for the high-risk patients; the 5-year actuarial distant metastasis-free survival rates were 100% and 95% for the intermediate- and high-risk patients, respectively; the 5-year CSS rates were 100% for both patient subsets; and the 5-year OS rates were 100% and 91.7% for the intermediate- and high-risk patients, respectively. The Gleason score (<8 vs. ≥8) was significant for the 5-year PSA relapse-free survival on multivariate analysis (p = 0.044). There was no grade 3 or 4 acute toxicity. The incidence of

  9. The Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Prostate Cancer This booklet is about prostate cancer. Learning about medical care for your cancer ... ePub This booklet covers: The anatomy of the prostate and basics about prostate cancer Treatments for prostate ...

  10. Prostate cancer-associated gene expression alterations determined from needle biopsies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, David Z; Huang, Chung-Ying; O'Brien, Catherine A; Coleman, Ilsa M; Garzotto, Mark; True, Lawrence D; Higano, Celestia S; Vessella, Robert; Lange, Paul H; Nelson, Peter S; Beer, Tomasz M

    2009-05-01

    To accurately identify gene expression alterations that differentiate neoplastic from normal prostate epithelium using an approach that avoids contamination by unwanted cellular components and is not compromised by acute gene expression changes associated with tumor devascularization and resulting ischemia. Approximately 3,000 neoplastic and benign prostate epithelial cells were isolated using laser capture microdissection from snap-frozen prostate biopsy specimens provided by 31 patients who subsequently participated in a clinical trial of preoperative chemotherapy. cDNA synthesized from amplified total RNA was hybridized to custom-made microarrays composed of 6,200 clones derived from the Prostate Expression Database. Expression differences for selected genes were verified using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Comparative analyses identified 954 transcript alterations associated with cancer (q transport. Genes down-regulated in prostate cancers were enriched in categories related to immune response, cellular responses to pathogens, and apoptosis. A heterogeneous pattern of androgen receptor expression changes was noted. In exploratory analyses, androgen receptor down-regulation was associated with a lower probability of cancer relapse after neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical prostatectomy. Assessments of tumor phenotypes based on gene expression for treatment stratification and drug targeting of oncogenic alterations may best be ascertained using biopsy-based analyses where the effects of ischemia do not complicate interpretation.

  11. Prostatic paracoccidioidomycosis: differential diagnosis of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Lima Lopes

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic prostatic paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM is a very rare condition; however, it may express as a typical benign prostatic hyperplasia or a simulating prostatic adenocarcinoma. This case report presents PCM mimicking prostatic adenocarcinoma. The purpose of this paper is to call the general physician's attention to this important differential diagnosis.

  12. Sucralfate versus mesalazine versus hydrocortisone in the prevention of acute radiation proctitis during conformal radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma. A randomized study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanguineti, G.; Franzone, P.; Marcenaro, M.; Vitale, V.; Foppiano, F.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: To assess whether the topical use of steroids or 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) is superior to sucralfate in preventing acute rectal toxicity during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) to 76 Gy. Patients and Methods: Patients undergoing 3DCRT for prostate carcinoma at our institution were offered to be randomized to sucralfate 3 g in 15 ml suspension enema (Antepsin trademark ), mesalazine 4 g gel enema (Enterasyn trademark), or hydrocortisone 100 mg foam enema (Colifoam trademark ). Randomization was blind to the treating physician but not to the patient. Sucralfate was chosen as control arm. Topical treatment had to be performed once daily, starting on day 1 of 3DCRT. Acute rectal toxicity was scored weekly according to RTOG criteria. Time to occurrence of grade 2+ acute rectal toxicity was taken as endpoint. Results: The trial was opened in August 1999, and after the first 24 patients had been treated, arm 2 was discontinued because of eight patients receiving mesalazine, seven actually developed acute rectal toxicity (five patients grade 3 and two patients grade 2). Until May 2001, 134 consecutive patients were randomly assigned to sucralfate (63 patients), mesalazine (eight patients) or hydrocortisone (63 patients). The cumulative incidence of acute rectal toxicity at the end of treatment by arm is 61.9 ± 6.1%, 87.5 ± 11.7%, and 52.4 ± 6.2% for arms 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The difference between the mesalazine group and the sucralfate group is highly significant (hazard ratio [HR] 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-5.7; p = 0.03). At both uni- and multivariate analysis taking into account several patients and treatment covariates, the difference between hydrocortisone and sucralfate is not significant (HR 0.7, 95% CI 0.5-1.2; p = 0.2). Conclusion: Topical mesalazine is contraindicated during radiotherapy. Hydrocortisone enema is not superior to sucralfate in preventing acute rectal toxicity. (orig.)

  13. Sucralfate versus mesalazine versus hydrocortisone in the prevention of acute radiation proctitis during conformal radiotherapy for prostate carcinoma. A randomized study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanguineti, G.; Franzone, P.; Marcenaro, M.; Vitale, V. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, National Inst. for Cancer Research, Genova (Italy); Foppiano, F. [Dept. of Physics, National Inst. for Cancer Research, Genova (Italy)

    2003-07-01

    Purpose: To assess whether the topical use of steroids or 5-aminosalicylic acid (5-ASA) is superior to sucralfate in preventing acute rectal toxicity during three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) to 76 Gy. Patients and Methods: Patients undergoing 3DCRT for prostate carcinoma at our institution were offered to be randomized to sucralfate 3 g in 15 ml suspension enema (Antepsin {sup trademark}), mesalazine 4 g gel enema (Enterasyn trademark), or hydrocortisone 100 mg foam enema (Colifoam {sup trademark}). Randomization was blind to the treating physician but not to the patient. Sucralfate was chosen as control arm. Topical treatment had to be performed once daily, starting on day 1 of 3DCRT. Acute rectal toxicity was scored weekly according to RTOG criteria. Time to occurrence of grade 2+ acute rectal toxicity was taken as endpoint. Results: The trial was opened in August 1999, and after the first 24 patients had been treated, arm 2 was discontinued because of eight patients receiving mesalazine, seven actually developed acute rectal toxicity (five patients grade 3 and two patients grade 2). Until May 2001, 134 consecutive patients were randomly assigned to sucralfate (63 patients), mesalazine (eight patients) or hydrocortisone (63 patients). The cumulative incidence of acute rectal toxicity at the end of treatment by arm is 61.9 {+-} 6.1%, 87.5 {+-} 11.7%, and 52.4 {+-} 6.2% for arms 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The difference between the mesalazine group and the sucralfate group is highly significant (hazard ratio [HR] 2.5, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-5.7; p = 0.03). At both uni- and multivariate analysis taking into account several patients and treatment covariates, the difference between hydrocortisone and sucralfate is not significant (HR 0.7, 95% CI 0.5-1.2; p = 0.2). Conclusion: Topical mesalazine is contraindicated during radiotherapy. Hydrocortisone enema is not superior to sucralfate in preventing acute rectal toxicity. (orig.)

  14. Antibiotics usefulness and choice in BPCO acute exacerbation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Tartaglino

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Although the debate on the role of bacterial infections and antibiotic treatment in AE-COPD remains open, there is evidence that the persistence of bacteria after acute exacerbation (residual bacterial colony influences the frequency and severity of subsequent acute exacerbation and that antibiotic treatment that induces faster and more complete eradication produces better clinical outcomes. New aspects must now be considered, given that COPD is a chronic illness subject to acute exacerbations of varying frequencies and that acute exacerbations correspond to functional respiratory deterioration. One of the parameters that is currently acquiring clinical relevance is the interval free of infection (IFI, the period that elapses between one acute exacerbation and the next, caused by bacterial infection. Another guiding concept in the choice of antibiotic treatment is that not all patients benefit in the same way; those requiring more aggressive treatment are most likely to be those with FEV1 < 50%, frequent exacerbations (> 3/year treated with antibiotics, relevant co-morbidity, under chronic steroid treatment, etc., for these patients it is recommended to administer antibiotics active on the three most common pathogens (in particular H. influenzae, considering the resistance acquired in recent years, and on Pseudomomias aeruginosa.

  15. Rational management of acute keratoconus

    OpenAIRE

    Yu. B. Slonimskiy; A. Yu. Slonimskiy; E. A. Korchuganova

    2015-01-01

    Acute keratoconus is a common and severe complication of advanced progressive keratoconus that occurs in more than 30 % of cases. Acute corneal edema in advanced progressive keratectasia is reffered to as acute corneal hydrops (hydrops corneae). It has been also reported in other ectatic disorders such as pellucid marginal degeneration. The most common misdiagnosis in hydrops is HSV disciform keratitis or acute bacterial keratitis. 126 corneal hydrops patients (79 men, 47 women) aged 16‑63 (1...

  16. Surgical treatment of neurologic complications of bacterial meningitis in children in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namani, Sadie A; Koci, Remzie A; Kuchar, Ernest; Dedushi, Kreshnike H

    2012-04-01

    Neurologic complications of bacterial meningitis can occur any time during the course of the disease and some of them need neurosurgical aproach. to determine the incidence of neurologic complications of bacterial meningitis in children requring neurosurgical treatment. a total of 277 children were followed and treated for bacterial meningitis at the Clinic of Infectious Diseases in Prishtina. The authors have analyzed cases who developed acute neurologic complications and treatment procedures. of the 277 children treated for bacterial meningitis, due to the suspicion for neurologic complications, 109 children underwent a head computerized tomography scan. About 47 cases (43%) had evident structural abnormalities while only 15/277 cases (5%) required neurosurgical treatment; 9/38 cases with subdural collections, 5 cases with hydrocephalus and 1 case of spinal abscess. Neurosurgical intervention were not common in pediatric bacterial meningitis cases (5%) but were highly significant in cases complicated with acute neurologic complications (32%).

  17. Modulation of AKR1C2 by curcumin decreases testosterone production in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ide, Hisamitsu; Lu, Yan; Noguchi, Takahiro; Muto, Satoru; Okada, Hiroshi; Kawato, Suguru; Horie, Shigeo

    2018-04-01

    Intratumoral androgen biosynthesis has been recognized as an essential factor of castration-resistant prostate cancer. The present study investigated the effects of curcumin on the inhibition of intracrine androgen synthesis in prostate cancer. Human prostate cancer cell lines, LNCaP and 22Rv1 cells were incubated with or without curcumin after which cell proliferation was measured at 0, 24, 48 and 72 hours, respectively. Prostate tissues from the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model were obtained after 1-month oral administration of 200 mg/kg/d curcumin. Testosterone and dihydrotestosterone concentrations in LNCaP prostate cancer cells were determined through LC-MS/MS assay. Curcumin inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis of prostate cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Curcumin decreased the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory proteins, CYP11A1 and HSD3B2 in prostate cancer cell lines, supporting the decrease of testosterone production. After 1-month oral administration of curcumin, Aldo-Keto reductase 1C2 (AKR1C2) expression was elevated. Simultaneously, decreased testosterone levels in the prostate tissues were observed in the TRAMP mice. Meanwhile, curcumin treatments considerably increased the expression of AKR1C2 in prostate cancer cell lines, supporting the decrease of dihydrotestosterone. Taken together, these results suggest that curcumin's natural bioactive compounds could have potent anticancer properties due to suppression of androgen production, and this could have therapeutic effects on prostate cancer. © 2018 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  18. Preventive effects of oligomerized polyphenol on estradiol-induced prostatitis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Suk; Lee, Eun Jin; Cho, Kang Su; Yoon, So Jung; Lee, Young Hoon; Hong, Sung Joon

    2009-06-30

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS, NIH category III) accounts for 90-95% of prostatitis cases. However, standard treatment has not yet been established. It is known that polyphenols have an inhibitory effect on inflammation by their antioxidative capacity, and oligonol, a polyphenol derivative, has much higher bioavailability and bioactivity than common polyphenols. We investigated the anti-inflammatory effects and mechanisms of oligonol in estradiol-induced prostatitis rat models. Prostatitis was induced by 17 beta-estradiol (E2) and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) in Wistar male rats (n = 20). Ten rats were placed in the oligonol-treated group and 10 in the E2 + DHT-treated group. The other 10 rats were also included as normal control group. Oligonol (60 mg/kg/day) was administered via gavage tube for 4 weeks. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) were quantified, and phosphorylation of IkappaBa and histological changes were also evaluated in prostatic tissue. The SOD and GPx activity showed tendencies to increase in the oligonol-treated group compared to the normal control group. TNF-alpha expression was slightly reduced in the oligonol-treated group. Western blotting demonstrated that phosphorylation of IkappaBa in the oligonol-treated group was significantly lower than in the normal control group. The E2 + DHT-treated group revealed severe atrophy of acinar epithelial cells and infiltration of leukocytes and lymphocytes in the prostate, however, the oligonol-treated group showed overall reduction in inflammatory features. This study demonstrates that oligonol improves estradiol-induced non-bacterial prostatitis by regulating phosphorylation of IkappaBa. These findings suggest that oligonol has a beneficial effect on prevention and treatment of CP/CPPS.

  19. About the Prostate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us About the Prostate Prostate Cancer Basics Risk Factors Prostate Cancer Prevention ... that connects to the anus. Ultrasound of the prostate Prostate Zones The prostate is divided into several ...

  20. Toxicity and outcome of pelvic IMRT for node-positive prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, A.C.; Luetjens, J.; Eckert, F.; Bamberg, M.; Alber, M.; Schilling, D.; Belka, C.; Gaswindt, U.

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study reports on the treatment techniques, toxicity, and outcome of pelvic intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for lymph node-positive prostate cancer (LNPPC, T1-4, c/pN1 cM0). Patients and methods: Pelvic IMRT to 45-50.4 Gy was applied in 39 cases either after previous surgery of involved lymph nodes (n = 18) or with a radiation boost to suspicious nodes (n = 21) with doses of 60-70 Gy, usually combined with androgen deprivation (n = 37). The prostate and seminal vesicles received 70-74 Gy. In cases of previous prostatectomy, prostatic fossa and remnants of seminal vesicles were given 66-70 Gy. Treatment-related acute and late toxicity was graded according to the RTOG criteria. Results: Acute radiation-related toxicity higher than grade 2 occurred in 2 patients (with the need for urinary catheter/subileus related to adhesions after surgery). Late toxicity was mild (grade 1-2) after a median follow-up of 70 months. Over 50% of the patients reported no late morbidity (grade 0). PSA control and cancer-specific survival reached 67% and 97% at over 5 years. Conclusion: Pelvic IMRT after the removal of affected nodes or with a radiation boost to clinically positive nodes led to an acceptable late toxicity (no grade 3/4 events), thus justifying further evaluation of this approach in a larger cohort. (orig.)

  1. Urethra-Sparing, Intraoperative, Real-Time Planned, Permanent-Seed Prostate Brachytherapy: Toxicity Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilli, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal-Hopital Notre-Dame, Montreal, QC (Canada); Taussky, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.taussky.chum@ssss.gouv.qc.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal-Hopital Notre-Dame, Montreal, QC (Canada); Donath, David; Le, Hoa Phong; Larouche, Renee-Xaviere; Beliveau-Nadeau, Dominique; Hervieux, Yannick; Delouya, Guila [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal-Hopital Notre-Dame, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To report the toxicity outcome in patients with localized prostate cancer undergoing {sup 125}I permanent-seed brachytherapy (BT) according to a urethra-sparing, intraoperative (IO), real-time planned conformal technique. Methods and Materials: Data were analyzed on 250 patients treated consecutively for low- or intermediate-risk prostate cancer between 2005 and 2009. The planned goal was urethral V{sub 150} = 0. Acute and late genitourinary (GU), gastrointestinal (GI), and erectile toxicities were scored with the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) questionnaire and Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (version 3.0). Median follow-up time for patients with at least 2 years of follow-up (n = 130) was 34.4 months (range, 24-56.9 months). Results: Mean IO urethra V{sub 150} was 0.018% {+-} 0.08%. Mean prostate D{sub 90} and V{sub 100} on day-30 computed tomography scan were 158.0 {+-} 27.0 Gy and 92.1% {+-} 7.2%, respectively. Mean IPSS peak was 9.5 {+-} 6.3 1 month after BT (mean difference from baseline IPSS, 5.3). No acute GI toxicity was observed in 86.8% of patients. The 3-year probability of Grade {>=}2 late GU toxicity-free survival was 77.4% {+-} 4.0%, with Grade 3 late GU toxicity encountered in only 3 patients. Three-year Grade 1 late GI toxicity-free survival was 86.1% {+-} 3.2%. No patient presented Grade {>=}2 late GI toxicity. Of patients with normal sexual status at baseline, 20.7% manifested Grade {>=}2 erectile dysfunction after BT. On multivariate analysis, elevated baseline IPSS (p = 0.016) and high-activity sources (median 0.61 mCi) (p = 0.033) predicted increased Grade {>=}2 late GU toxicity. Conclusions: Urethra-sparing IO BT results in low acute and late GU toxicity compared with the literature. High seed activity and elevated IPSS at baseline increased long-term GU toxicity.

  2. Prostate-specific antigen velocity is not better than total prostate-specific antigen in predicting prostate biopsy diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorday, William; Sadrzadeh, Hossein; de Koning, Lawrence; Naugler, Christopher T

    2015-12-01

    1.) Identify whether prostate-specific antigen velocity improves the ability to predict prostate biopsy diagnosis. 2.) Test whether there is an increase in the predictive capability of models when Gleason 7 prostate cancers are separated into a 3+4 and a 4+3 group. Calgary Laboratory Services' Clinical Laboratory Information System was searched for prostate biopsies reported between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2013. Total prostate-specific antigen tests were recorded for each patient from January 1, 2007 to the most recent test before their recorded prostate biopsy. The data set was divided into the following three groups for comparison; benign, all prostate cancer and Gleason 7-10. The Gleason grade 7-10 group was further divided into 4+3 and 3+4 Gleason 7 prostate cancers. Prostate-specific antigen velocity was calculated using four different methods found in the literature. Receiver operator curves were used to assess operational characteristics of the tests. 4622 men between the ages of 40-89 with a prostate biopsy were included for analysis. Combining prostate-specific antigen velocity with total prostate-specific antigen (AUC=0.570-0.712) resulted in small non-statistically significant changes to the area under the curve compared to the area under the curve of total prostate-specific antigen alone (AUC=0.572-0.699). There were marked increases in the area under curves when 3+4 and 4+3 Gleason 7 cancers were separated. Prostate-specific antigen velocity does not add predictive value for prostate biopsy diagnosis. The clinical significance of the prostate specific antigen test can be improved by separating Gleason 7 prostate cancers into a 3+4 and 4+3 group. Copyright © 2015 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Bacterial pathogen spectrum of acute diarrheal outpatients in an urbanized rural district in Southwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongming Zhou

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To conduct a one-year pathogen surveillance of acute diarrheal disease based on outpatient clinics in township hospitals in rural Hongta District of Yunnan Province, China. Methods: Fecal specimens of acute diarrhea cases and relevant epidemiological information were collected. Salmonella, Shigella, Vibrio, Aeromonas, Plesiomonas shigelloides and diarrheogenic Escherichia coli (DEC were examined. Results: Among the 797 stool specimens sampled, 198 samples (24.8% were positive in pathogen isolation, and 223 strains were isolated. The order of isolation rates from high to low were DEC, Aeromonas, P. shigelloides, Salmonella, Shigella and Vibrio. The overall positive rate in middle school students and preschool children was relatively high; while the overall positive rate of less than 1-year-old infants and above 55 years olds was relatively low. The isolates were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE. Some cases had the same or very close onset time, and the isolates had similar PFGE patterns, suggesting a possible outbreak once occurred but was not detected by the current infectious disease reporting system. Conclusions: Pathogen infection and transmission in rapidly urbanized rural areas is a serious issue. There is a great need for a more sensitive and accurate mode of monitoring, reporting and outbreak identification of diarrheal disease. Keywords: Diarrheal disease, Diarrheogenic pathogen, Molecular typing, Surveillance, Bacterial pathogen

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound or with a rectal examination, an ultrasound-guided biopsy can be performed. This procedure involves advancing ... of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is enlarged, also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) , with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment ... caption Related Articles and Media Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (Enlargement of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and ...

  6. Review article: Prostate cancer screening using prostate specific ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Prostate cancer is the commonest cancer among men in Nigeria and early detection is key to cure and survival but its screening through prostate specific antigen (PSA) has remain controversial in literature. Screening with prostate specific antigen (PSA) has led to more men diagnosed with prostate cancer than ...

  7. Bacterial colonization of colonic crypt mucous gel and disease activity in ulcerative colitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rowan, Fiachra

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVE: To optimize total bacterial 16S rRNA quantification in microdissected colonic crypts in healthy controls and patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and to characterize the findings with disease activity. BACKGROUND: Microscopic and molecular techniques have recently converged to allow bacterial enumeration in remote anatomic locations [eg, crypt-associated mucous gel (CAMG)]. The aims of this study were to combine laser capture microdissection (LCM) and 16S rRNA-based quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to determine total bacterial copy number in CAMG both in health and in UC and to characterize the findings with disease activity. METHODS: LCM was used to microdissect CAMG from colonic mucosal biopsies from controls (n = 20) and patients with acute (n = 10) or subacute (n = 10) UC. Pan-bacterial 16S rRNA copy number per millimeter square in samples from 6 locations across the large bowel was obtained by qPCR using Desulfovibrio desulfuricans as a reference strain. Copy numbers were correlated with the UC disease activity index (UCDAI) and the simple clinical colitis activity index (SCCAI). RESULTS: Bacterial colonization of CAMG was detectable in all groups. Copy numbers were significantly reduced in acute UC. In subacute colitis, there was a positive correlation between copy number and UCDAI and SCCAI in the ascending, transverse and sigmoid colon. CONCLUSIONS: This study describes a sensitive method of quantitatively assessing bacterial colonization of the colonic CAMG. A positive correlation was found between CAMG bacterial load and subacute disease activity in UC, whereas detectable bacterial load was reduced in acute UC.

  8. Individualized planning target volumes for intrafraction motion during hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy boost for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Patrick; Sixel, Katharina; Morton, Gerard; Loblaw, D. Andrew; Tirona, Romeo; Pang, Geordi; Choo, Richard; Szumacher, Ewa; DeBoer, Gerrit; Pignol, Jean-Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of the study was to access toxicities of delivering a hypofractionated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) boost with individualized intrafraction planning target volume (PTV) margins and daily online correction for prostate position. Methods and materials: Phase I involved delivering 42 Gy in 21 fractions using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, followed by a Phase II IMRT boost of 30 Gy in 10 fractions. Digital fluoroscopy was used to measure respiratory-induced motion of implanted fiducial markers within the prostate. Electronic portal images were taken of fiducial marker positions before and after each fraction of radiotherapy during the first 9 days of treatment to calculate intrafraction motion. A uniform 10-mm PTV margin was used for the first phase of treatment. PTV margins for Phase II were patient-specific and were calculated from the respiratory and intrafraction motion data obtained from Phase I. The IMRT boost was delivered with daily online correction of fiducial marker position. Acute toxicity was measured using National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria, version 2.0. Results: In 33 patients who had completed treatment, the average PTV margin used during the hypofractionated IMRT boost was 3 mm in the lateral direction, 3 mm in the superior-inferior direction, and 4 mm in the anteroposterior direction. No patients developed acute Grade 3 rectal toxicity. Three patients developed acute Grade 3 urinary frequency and urgency. Conclusions: PTV margins can be reduced significantly with daily online correction of prostate position. Delivering a hypofractionated boost with this high-precision IMRT technique resulted in acceptable acute toxicity

  9. CD64 on monocytes and granulocytes in severe acute bronchiolitis: Pilot study on its usefulness as a bacterial infection biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Salido, Alberto; Serrano-González, Ana; Casado-Flores, Juan; Sierra-Colomina, Montserrat; de Azagra-Garde, Amelia Martínez; García-Teresa, María Ángeles; Melen, Gustavo J; Ramírez-Orellana, Manuel

    2018-02-27

    The CD64 receptor has been described as a biomarker of bacterial infection. We speculated that CD64 surface expression on monocytes and granulocytes of children with severe acute bronchiolitis (SAB) could be altered in cases of probable bacterial infection (PBI) determined using classical biomarkers (procalcitonin and C-reactive protein, leukocyte count, and radiographic findings). A prospective observational pilot study was conducted from October 2015 to February 2016 in children admitted for pediatric critical care. A blood sample was taken in the first 24 hours of admission, and CD64 was measured by flow cytometry. The values obtained were analyzed and correlated with traditional biomarkers of PBI. Thirty-two children were included; a correlation was found between CD64 expression and the PBI criteria. CD64 surface expression was higher in children with PBI (area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.73; P = 0.042) and the percentage of CD64 + granulocytes was higher in children with PBI. This is the first study to describe CD64 surface expression on monocytes and granulocytes in SAB, finding CD64 values to be higher in children with PBI. Larger clinical studies are needed to elucidate the real accuracy of CD64 as a biomarker of bacterial infection. ©2018 Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  10. Ultrasonography and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in differential diagnosis of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mechev, D.S.; Shcherbyina, O.V.; Yatsik, V.Yi.; Gladka, L.Yu.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the work is analysis of diagnostic possibilities of transrectal ultrasonography and PSA in differential diagnosis of prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia. 142 patients have been investigated by transrectal ultrasonography. he transrectal ultrasonography and PSA are sensible tests in diagnosis of prostate cancer and in differential diagnosis of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer

  11. Prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R., Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results.

  12. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, G.P.; Kuss, R.; Khoury, S.; Chatelain, C.; Denis, L.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 70 selections. Some of the titles are: Place of the Computed Tomography in the Staging of Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in Staging of the Prostatic Cancer; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Prostate; Long-Term Results in Radiotherapy of Prostatic Cancer; Interstitial Irradiation Using I-125 Seeds; and Treatment of Cancer of the Prostate by Use of Physiotherapy: Long-Term Results

  13. Granulomatous prostatitis after intravesical immunotherapy mimicking prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Białek

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Intravesical immunotherapy with attenuated strains of Mycobacterium bovis is a widely used therapeutic option in patients with non-muscle-invasive transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. A rare complication of intravesical therapy with the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine is granulomatous prostatitis, which due to increasing levels of prostate-specific antigen and abnormalities found in transrectal examination of the prostate may suggest concomitant prostate cancer. A case of extensive granulomatous prostatitis in a 61-year-old patient which occurred after the first course of a well-tolerated Bacillus Calmette-Guérin therapy is presented. Due to abnormalities found in rectal examination and an abnormal transrectal ultrasound image of the prostate with extensive infiltration mimicking neoplastic hyperplasia a core biopsy of the prostate was performed. Histopathological examination revealed inflammatory infiltration sites of tuberculosis origin.

  14. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as a Monotherapy for Favorable-Risk Prostate Cancer: A Phase II Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkati, Maroie; Williams, Scott G.; Foroudi, Farshad; Tai, Keen Hun; Chander, Sarat; Dyk, Sylvia van; See, Andrew; Duchesne, Gillian M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: There are multiple treatment options for favorable-risk prostate cancer. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a monotherapy is appealing, but its use is still investigational. A Phase II trial was undertaken to explore the value of such treatment in low-to-intermediate risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a single-institution, prospective study. Eligible patients had low-risk prostate cancer features but also Gleason scores of 7 (51% of patients) and stage T2b to T2c cancer. Treatment with HDR brachytherapy with a single implant was administered over 2 days. One of four fractionation schedules was used in a dose escalation study design: 3 fractions of 10, 10.5, 11, or 11.5 Gy. Patients were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 2.0 for urinary toxicity, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scoring schema for rectal toxicity, and the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaire to measure patient-reported health-related quality of life. Biochemical failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir plus 2 ng/ml. Results: Between 2003 and 2008, 79 patients were enrolled. With a median follow-up of 39.5 months, biochemical relapse occurred in 7 patients. Three- and 5-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 88.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 78.0-96.2%) and 85.1% (95% CI, 72.5-94.5%), respectively. Acute grade 3 urinary toxicity was seen in only 1 patient. There was no instance of acute grade 3 rectal toxicity. Rates of late grade 3 rectal toxicity, dysuria, hematuria, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence were 0%, 10.3%, 1.3%, 9.0%, and 0%, respectively. No grade 4 or greater toxicity was recorded. Among the four (urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal) domains assessed with the EPIC questionnaire, only the sexual domain did not recover with time. Conclusions: HDR brachytherapy as a monotherapy for favorable

  15. High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy as a Monotherapy for Favorable-Risk Prostate Cancer: A Phase II Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barkati, Maroie [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Williams, Scott G., E-mail: scott.williams@petermac.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Foroudi, Farshad; Tai, Keen Hun; Chander, Sarat [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Dyk, Sylvia van [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); See, Andrew [Ballarat Austin Radiation Oncology Centre, Ballarat (Australia); Duchesne, Gillian M. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Department of Pathology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia)

    2012-04-01

    Purpose: There are multiple treatment options for favorable-risk prostate cancer. High-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy as a monotherapy is appealing, but its use is still investigational. A Phase II trial was undertaken to explore the value of such treatment in low-to-intermediate risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: This was a single-institution, prospective study. Eligible patients had low-risk prostate cancer features but also Gleason scores of 7 (51% of patients) and stage T2b to T2c cancer. Treatment with HDR brachytherapy with a single implant was administered over 2 days. One of four fractionation schedules was used in a dose escalation study design: 3 fractions of 10, 10.5, 11, or 11.5 Gy. Patients were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 2.0 for urinary toxicity, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer scoring schema for rectal toxicity, and the Expanded Prostate Cancer Index Composite (EPIC) questionnaire to measure patient-reported health-related quality of life. Biochemical failure was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) nadir plus 2 ng/ml. Results: Between 2003 and 2008, 79 patients were enrolled. With a median follow-up of 39.5 months, biochemical relapse occurred in 7 patients. Three- and 5-year actuarial biochemical control rates were 88.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 78.0-96.2%) and 85.1% (95% CI, 72.5-94.5%), respectively. Acute grade 3 urinary toxicity was seen in only 1 patient. There was no instance of acute grade 3 rectal toxicity. Rates of late grade 3 rectal toxicity, dysuria, hematuria, urinary retention, and urinary incontinence were 0%, 10.3%, 1.3%, 9.0%, and 0%, respectively. No grade 4 or greater toxicity was recorded. Among the four (urinary, bowel, sexual, and hormonal) domains assessed with the EPIC questionnaire, only the sexual domain did not recover with time. Conclusions: HDR brachytherapy as a monotherapy for favorable

  16. Genetic and immunologic aspects of acute pancreatitis : An odyssey

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijmeijer, R.M.

    2014-01-01

    Acute pancreatitis is the leading cause of acute hospitalization for gastrointestinal diseases. The course of acute pancreatitis is often mild and self-limiting, but in 15-25% of patients, pancreatitis is severe with an increased mortality risk. Infectious complications, and especially bacterial

  17. Nonspecific Presentation of a Multiloculated Prostatic Abscess After Transurethral Prostatic Biopsy for Elevated Prostate-specific Antigen Level

    OpenAIRE

    Gandhi, Nilay M.; Lin, Joseph; Schaeffer, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Prostate postbiopsy infectious complications typically present in the form of prostatitis and uncommonly urosepsis. Prostatic abscesses are generally found after multiple bouts of prostatitis and are associated with a clinically septic picture requiring intensive care unit admission and resuscitation. We report the case of a 65-year-old man who presented with prostatic abscess in the setting of nonspecific urinary symptoms after transrectal ultrasonography–guided prostate biopsy. At 4-month f...

  18. OK-432 reduces mortality and bacterial translocation in irradiated and granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF)-treated mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nose, Masako; Uzawa, Akiko; Ogyu, Toshiaki [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Suzuki, Gen

    2001-06-01

    Acute radiation induces bacterial translocation from the gut, followed by systemic infection and sepsis. In order to reduce the mortality after acute whole body irradiation, it is essential to control bacterial translocation. In this study, we established a bacterial translocation assay as a sensitive method to detect minor mucosal injury by radiation. By utilizing this assay, we evaluated the adverse effects, if any, of hematopoietic reagents on the mucosal integrity in the respiratory and gastro-intestinal tracts. Bacterial translocation to the liver and spleen occurred after whole-body irradiation if the dose exceeded 6 Gy. The administration of G-CSF unexpectedly increased the bacterial translocation in 8 Gy-irradiated mice. The pharmaceutical preparation of low-virulent Streptococcus pyogenes, OK-432, significantly reduced the endotoxin levels in peripheral blood without any reduction of bacterial translocation. A combined treatment with G-CSF and OK-432 decreased bacterial translocation and prevented death. This result indicates that the early administration of G-CSF has an adverse effect on bacterial translocation, and that a combined treatment of G-CSF and OK-432 attenuates the adverse effect of G-CSF and improves the survival rate after acute irradiation. (author)

  19. Racial differences in the relationship between clinical prostatitis, presence of inflammation in benign prostate and subsequent risk of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rybicki, B A; Kryvenko, O N; Wang, Y; Jankowski, M; Trudeau, S; Chitale, D A; Gupta, N S; Rundle, A; Tang, D

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiologic studies, primarily done in white men, suggest that a history of clinically-diagnosed prostatitis increases prostate cancer risk, but that histological prostate inflammation decreases risk. The relationship between a clinical history of prostatitis and histologic inflammation in terms of how these two manifestations of prostatic inflammation jointly contribute to prostate cancer risk and whether racial differences exist in this relationship is uncertain. Using a nested design within a cohort of men with benign prostate tissue specimens, we analyzed the data on both clinically-diagnosed prostatitis (NIH categories I-III) and histological inflammation in 574 prostate cancer case-control pairs (345 white, 229 African American). Clinical prostatitis was not associated with increased prostate cancer risk in the full sample, but showed a suggestive inverse association with prostate cancer in African Americans (odds ratio (OR)=0.47; 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.27-0.81). In whites, clinical prostatitis increased risk by 40%, but was only associated with a significant increased prostate cancer risk in the absence of evidence of histological inflammation (OR=3.56; 95% CI=1.15-10.99). Moreover, PSA velocity (P=0.008) and frequency of PSA testing (P=0.003) were significant modifiers of risk. Clinical prostatitis increased risk of prostate cancer almost three-fold (OR=2.97; 95% CI=1.40-6.30) in white men with low PSA velocity and about twofold in white men with more frequent PSA testing (OR=1.91; 95% CI=1.09-3.35). In our cohort of men with benign prostate specimens, race, and histological inflammation were important cofactors in the relationship between clinical prostatitis and prostate cancer. Clinical prostatitis was associated with a slightly decreased risk for prostate cancer in African American men. In white men, the relationship between clinical prostatitis and prostate cancer risk was modified by histological prostatic inflammation, PSA velocity, and

  20. High-dose rate brachytherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer: acute toxicity and biochemical behavior analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esteves, Sergio Carlos Barros; Oliveira, Antonio Carlos Zuliani de; Cardoso, Herbeni; Tagawa, Eduardo Komai; Castelo, Roberto; D'Imperio, Marcio

    2006-01-01

    Objective: this study focuses on the biochemical response of the following variables: prostate volume, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) value, Gleason scores, staging, the risk of the disease, and hormone therapy. Objective: in the period between February of 1998 and July of 2001, 46 patients with prostate cancer were treated with radiotherapy, in a combination of teletherapy and high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. The age ranged from 51 to 79 years (averaging 66.4 years). T1c stage was the most frequent one: 30 (65%). The Gleason score was below 7 in 78% of the patients. PSA ranged from 3.4 to 33.3, being below 10 in 39% of the cases. The average prostatic volume was 32.3 cc. Twenty-eight percent of the patients received hormone therapy. Teletherapy dose ranged from 45 to 50.4 Gy, associated to four fractions of 4 Gy of HDR brachytherapy. Results: the follow-up period varied from 6 to 43 months. Four patients missed the follow-up and four died (one due to the disease). Out of the 39 patients that were analyzed, 76% presented a less than 1.5 PSA. None of the analyzed variables were found to be of statistical significance (p > 0.05) regarding biochemical control. Conclusion: the use of HDR brachytherapy was found to be effective in the treatment of prostate cancer and, in this study, the variables considered as prognostic factors did not interfere in the biochemical control. (author)

  1. Radiotherapy and local hyperthermia plus androgen suppression in locally advanced prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maluta, S.; Marciai, N.; Gabbani, M.; Palazzi, M.; Dall'Oglio, S.; Grandinetti, A.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In advanced prostatic cancer, hyperthermia may be useful in order to enhance irradiation efficacy so to avoid delivering of too high dose of radiotherapy which increases acute and late sequelae. A multi-centric phase II study is warranted to give hyperthermia a level 3 evidence in prostate cancer treatment. A randomized phase III study to demonstrate efficacy of hyperthermia is not available because of the optimal results obtained by using radiotherapy combined with androgen suppression. To evaluate hyperthermia gain, LHT should be combined with radiotherapy alone in patients refusing androgen suppression or affected by hormone refractory prostate carcinoma (HRPC). Patients with HRPC have multiple possibilities of treatment improving performance status and median survival, as chemotherapy regimens, and new agents. All these treatments modalities need to be confirmed by phase III trials. Also hyperthermia may be considered among these promising approaches. (author)

  2. A phase II study of localized prostate cancer treated to 75.6 Gy with 3D conformal radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichol, Alan; Chung, Peter; Lockwood, Gina; Rosewall, Tara; Divanbiegi, Lorella; Sweet, Joan; Toi, Ants; Bayley, Andrew; Bristow, Rob; Crook, Juanita; Gospodarowicz, Mary; McLean, Michael; Milosevic, Michael; Warde, Padraig; Catton, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Background and purpose: To prospectively evaluate toxicity, biochemical failure-free survival (bFFS) and biopsy-proven local control for prostate cancer patients treated with 75.6 Gy in 42 fractions using 6-field conformal radiotherapy to prostate alone. Patients and methods: From 1997 to 1999, 140 patients with T1-2NxM0, Gleason score ≤8, and PSA ≤20 ng/ml prostate cancer were assessed using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute and late toxicity scores. bFFS was determined for 120 patients treated without hormones. Post-treatment prostate biopsies were performed at a median of 3 years and a late toxicity questionnaire was administered at a median of 5 years. Results: Clinically important acute toxicities were gastrointestinal (GI) grade 2: 22% and 3: 0%, and genitourinary (GU) grade 2: 24% and 3: 2%. Late physician-assessed toxicities were GI ≥grade 2: 2%, and GU ≥grade 2: 1%. The 3-year bFFS of patients failure-free before biopsy was 93% (95% CI: 83-100) from a negative biopsy and 22% (95% CI: 0-56) from a positive biopsy (P=0.001). Patients reported significantly more late toxicity than physicians (GI: P=0.003, GU: P<0.001). At 5.0 years median follow-up, cause-specific survival was 98% (95% CI: 96-100), overall survival was 91% (95% CI: 86-97), and bFFS was 55% (95% CI: 45-64). Conclusions: 75.6 Gy caused modest levels of acute and late toxicity. Three-year biopsies predicted subsequent biochemical outcome

  3. Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome: a review of evaluation and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polackwich, A S; Shoskes, D A

    2016-06-01

    Chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome (CP/CPPS), also known as NIH Category III Prostatitis is a highly prevalent syndrome with significant impact on quality of life. As a heterogeneous syndrome, there exists no 'one size fits all' therapy with level 1 evidence to guide therapy. This often leads to a nihilistic approach to patients and clinical outcomes are poor. In this review, we examine the evidence for CP/CPPS therapies and discuss our technique of clinical phenotyping combined with multimodal therapy. Review of Medline articles with terms 'non-bacterial prostatitis', 'abacterial prostatitis' and 'chronic pelvic pain syndrome'. Many individual therapies have been evaluated in the treatment of CP/CPPS; antibiotics, anti-inflammatory medications (including bioflavonoids), neuromodulators, alpha blockers, pelvic floor physical therapy and cognitive behavior therapy. Each of these has been found to have varying success in alleviating symptoms. UPOINT is a system of clinical phenotyping for CP/CPPS patients that has 6 defined domains, which guide multimodal therapy. It has been validated to correlate with symptom burden and therapy guided by UPOINT leads to significant symptom improvement in 75-84% of patients based on three independent studies. CP/CPPS is a heterogeneous condition and, much like with prostate cancer, optimal therapy can only be achieved by classifying patients into clinically meaningful phenotypic groups (much like TNM) and letting the phenotype drive therapy.

  4. Diagnostic accuracy of urinary prostate protein glycosylation profiling in prostatitis diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermassen, Tijl; Van Praet, Charles; Poelaert, Filip; Lumen, Nicolaas; Decaestecker, Karel; Hoebeke, Piet; Van Belle, Simon; Rottey, Sylvie; Delanghe, Joris

    2015-01-01

    Although prostatitis is a common male urinary tract infection, clinical diagnosis of prostatitis is difficult. The developmental mechanism of prostatitis is not yet unraveled which led to the elaboration of various biomarkers. As changes in asparagine-linked-(N-)-glycosylation were observed between healthy volunteers (HV), patients with benign prostate hyperplasia and prostate cancer patients, a difference could exist in biochemical parameters and urinary N-glycosylation between HV and prostatitis patients. We therefore investigated if prostatic protein glycosylation could improve the diagnosis of prostatitis. Differences in serum and urine biochemical markers and in total urine N-glycosylation profile of prostatic proteins were determined between HV (N=66) and prostatitis patients (N=36). Additionally, diagnostic accuracy of significant biochemical markers and changes in N-glycosylation was assessed. Urinary white blood cell (WBC) count enabled discrimination of HV from prostatitis patients (Pprostatitis patients from HV (Pprostatitis patients compared to HV (Pprostatitis. Further research is required to unravel the developmental course of prostatic inflammation.

  5. Acute urinary retention as a late complication of subcutaneous liquid silicone injection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Luongo de Matos

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Acute urinary retention is characterized by a sudden interruption of urinary output; urine is retained in the bladder due to either functional or obstructive anatomic factors, and cannot be voided. The main causes of acute urinary obstruction are benign prostatic hyperplasia, constipation, prostate adenocarcinoma, urethral stenosis, clot retention, neurological disorders, following surgery, calculi, drugs, or urinary tract infections. A transvestite patient, aged 55 years, described having had liquid silicone subcutaneously injected in various parts of the body, the last one four years ago. He complained of absent urinary output during the last 14 hours. The physical examination revealed skin deformation due to migration of implants; a hard nodule (characterized as a foreign body was present in the preputium and a diagnosis of acute urinary retention was made; an unsuccessful attempt to exteriorize the glans for urinary catheterization, was followed by therapeutic cystostomy. Acute urinary retention has not been mentioned in the medical literature as a complication of liquid silicone subcutaneous injection.

  6. The link between benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsted, David Dynnes; Bojesen, Stig E

    2013-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer are among the most common diseases of the prostate gland and represent significant burdens for patients and health-care systems in many countries. The two diseases share traits such as hormone-dependent growth and response to antiandrogen...... therapy. Furthermore, risk factors such as prostate inflammation and metabolic disruption have key roles in the development of both diseases. Despite these commonalities, BPH and prostate cancer exhibit important differences in terms of histology and localization. Although large-scale epidemiological...... studies have shown that men with BPH have an increased risk of prostate cancer and prostate-cancer-related mortality, it remains unclear whether this association reflects a causal link, shared risk factors or pathophysiological mechanisms, or detection bias upon statistical analysis. Establishing BPH...

  7. Association between asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis NIH category IV and prostatic calcification in patients with obstructive benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Paul F; Seklehner, Stephan; Brustmann, Herman; Riedl, Claus R; Lusuardi, Lukas

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of prostatic calcification and prostatitis NIH category IV in patients with obstructive BPH. Ninety-six patients with obstructive BPH who had undergone transurethral electroresection of the prostate gland were evaluated. In accordance with a preoperative transrectal ultrasound examination, patients were divided into one group with prostatic calcification (N.=31) and one without (N.=65). Prostatitis NIH category IV was classified according to the grading system by Irani. Correlations between the incidence of prostatic calcification, histological prostatitis, PSA, uric acid, cholesterol, triglycerides, CRP, IPSS, IIEF-25, and NIC-CPSI were analyzed. A stone analysis of prostatic calcification was performed using X-ray powder diffraction. Sixty-nine (71.9%) patients had NIH category IV prostatitis, accounting for 83.9% of those with prostatic calcification versus 66.1% of those without (Pprostatic calcification and the severity of inflammation (Pprostatic calcifications were elevated levels of uric acid. Such patients were 1.4times more likely of having calcifications in the prostate gland (OR=1.4, Pprostatic calcification. These were significantly more common in patients with NIH category IV prostatitis.

  8. The standards of an ultrasound examination of the prostate gland. Part 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz F. Tyloch

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the rules of the proper performing of the ultrasound examination of the prostate gland. It has been divided into two parts: the general part and the detailed part. The first part presents the necessary requirements related to the ultrasound equipment needed for performing transabdominal and transrectal examinations of the prostate gland. The second part presents the application of the ultrasound examination in benign prostatic hyperplasia, in cases of prostate inflammation and in prostate cancer. Ultrasound examinations applied in the diagnostics of benign prostatic hyperplasia accelerated the diagnosis, facilitated the qualification to surgery and the selection of the treatment method. The assessment of the size of the prostate gland performed using the endorectal ultrasound examination is helpful in making the choice between transurethral electroresection and adenomectomy. In prostate inflammation this examination should be performed with particular gentleness due to pain ailments. The indication for performing the examination in acute inflammation is the suspicion of prostate abscess. In chronic, exacerbating prostatitis it is possible to perform an intraprostatic antibiotic injection. In the recent years increased morbidity and detectability of prostate gland cancer is observed among men. In Poland it ranks second (13% among diseases occurring in men. The indication for an endorectal examination is the necessity to assess the size of the prostate gland, its configuration, the echostructure in classical ultrasonography, the vascularization in an ultrasound examination performed with power doppler and, if possible, the differences in the gland tissue firmness (consistency in elastography. The ultrasound examination is used for performing the mapping biopsy of the prostate gland – from routine, strictly defined locations, the targeted biopsy – from locations suspected of neoplastic proliferation and the staging biopsy

  9. urethral plasmakinetic resection of prostate on prostate- specific ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    reduce blood flow in BPH, thereby preventing bleeding [6,7]. Thus ... urethra, prostate and surrounding tissue ... The peripheral blood and prostatic fluid of the patients ... Coronary heart ..... Length Density of Prostate Vessels, Intraoperative,.

  10. Prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bey, P.; Beckendorf, V.; Stines, J.

    2001-01-01

    Radiation therapy of prostate carcinoma with a curative intent implies to treat the whole prostate at high dose (at least 66 Gy). According to clinical stage, PSA level, Gleason's score, the clinical target volume may include seminal vesicles and less often pelvic lymph nodes. Microscopic extra-capsular extension is found in 15 to 60% of T1-T2 operated on, specially in apex tumors. On contrary, cancers developing from the transitional zone may stay limited to the prostate even with a big volume and with a high PSA level. Zonal anatomy of the prostate identifies internal prostate, including the transitional zone (5% of the prostate in young people). External prostate includes central and peripheral zones. The inferior limit of the prostate is not lower than the inferior border of the pubic symphysis. Clinical and radiological examination: ultrasonography, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), CT-scan identify prognostic factors as tumor volume, capsule effraction, seminal vesicles invasion and lymph node extension. The identification of the clinical target volume is now done mainly by CT-Scan which identifies prostate and seminal vesicles. NMR could be helpful to identify more precisely prostate apex. The definition of margins around the clinical target volume has to take in account daily reproducibility and organ motion and of course the maximum tolerable dose for organs at risk. (authors)

  11. PROSTATE-SPECIFIC ANTIGEN A Clue for the Prostatic Origin of Metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    MANABE, Toshiaki; TSUKAYAMA, Chotatsu; YAMAGUCHI, Masae; YAMASHITA, Koshi

    1983-01-01

    The prostate-specific antigen is a recently purified glycoprotein which is present only in the prostatic gland. In order to confirm the usefulness of this protein in isolating prostatic carcinomas from socalled metastatic carcinomas of unknown primary site, we immunohistochemically studied 19 non-neoplastic prostatic tissue, 18 primary carcinomas of the prostate, and 32 non-prostatic adenocarcinomas. From our study, we concluded that PSA is highly specific for the prostatic carcinomas. The ab...

  12. [Correlation of IL-8 and IL-6 in prostatic fluid with serum prostate-specific antigen level in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia complicated by prostatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xingfei; Wu, Chunlei; Yu, Qinnan; Zhu, Feng; Liu, Pei; Zhang, Huiqing

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the correlation of the levels of interleukin-8 (IL-8) and IL-6 in the prostatic fluid with serum levels of serum prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) complicated by prostatitis. A series of 211 patients undergoing surgery of BPH were divided into BPH group (n=75) and BPH with prostatitis group (n=136) according to the white blood cell count in the prostatic fluid. The clinical and laboratory findings were compared between the two groups, and stepwise regression analysis was used to assess the association of IL-8 and IL-6 with serum PSA level. No significant differences were found in age, BMI, blood pressure, blood glucose, blood lipids, IPSS score, PSA-Ratio, or prostate volume between the two groups (Pprostatitis had significantly increased serum PSA and prostate fluid IL-8 and IL-6 levels compared with those without prostatitis (Pprostatic fluid were all positively correlated with serum PSA level. Prostatitis is an important risk factor for elevated serum PSA level in patients with BPH, and both IL-8 and IL-6 levels in the prostatic fluid are correlated with serum PSA level.

  13. Comparison of prostate cancer gene 3 score, prostate health index and percentage free prostate-specific antigen for differentiating histological inflammation from prostate cancer and other non-neoplastic alterations of the prostate at initial biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Stefano; Passera, Roberto; Bollito, Enrico; Manfredi, Matteo; Scarpa, Roberto Mario; Sottile, Antonino; Randone, Donato Franco; Porpiglia, Francesco

    2014-12-01

    To determine if prostate cancer gene 3 (PCA3) score, Prostate Health Index (PHI), and percent free prostate-specific antigen (%fPSA) may be used to differentiate prostatitis from prostate cancer (PCa), benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia (HG-PIN) in patients with elevated PSA and negative digital rectal examination (DRE). in the present prospective study, 274 patients, undergoing PCA3 score, PHI and %fPSA assessments before initial biopsy, were enrolled. Three multivariate logistic regression models were used to test PCA3 score, PHI and %fPSA as risk factors for prostatitis vs. PCa, vs. BPH, and vs. HG-PIN. All the analyses were performed for the whole patient cohort and for the 'gray zone' of PSA (4-10 ng/ml) cohort (188 individuals). The determinants for prostatitis vs. PCa were PCA3 score, PHI and %fPSA (Odds Ratio [OR]=0.97, 0.96 and 0.94, respectively). Unit increase of PHI was the only risk factor for prostatitis vs. BPH (OR=1.06), and unit increase of PCA3 score for HG-PIN vs. prostatitis (OR=0.98). In the 'gray zone' PSA cohort, the determinants for prostatitis vs. PCa were PCA3 score, PHI and %fPSA (OR=0.96, 0.94 and 0.92, respectively), PCA3 score and PHI for prostatitis vs. BPH (OR=0.96 and 1.08, respectively), and PCA3 score for prostatitis vs. HG-PIN (OR=0.97). The clinical benefit of using PCA3 score and PHI to estimate prostatitis vs. PCa was comparable; even %fPSA had good diagnostic performance, being a faster and cheaper marker. PHI was the only determinant for prostatitis vs. BPH, while PCA3 score for prostatitis vs. HG-PIN. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  14. Comparison of telomerase activity in prostate cancer, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia and benign prostatic hyperplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soleiman Mahjoub

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Telomerase is a reverse transcriptase enzyme that synthesizes telomeric DNA on chromosome ends. The enzyme is important for the immortalization of cancer cells because it maintains the telomeres. METHODS: Telomerase activity (TA was measured by fluorescence-based telomeric repeat amplification protocol (FTRAP assay in prostate carcinoma and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH. RESULTS: TA was present in 91.4% of 70 prostate cancers, 68.8% of 16 prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN, 43.3% of 30 BPH*, 21.4% of 14 atrophy and 20% of 15 normal samples adjacent to tumor. There was not any significant correlation between TA, histopathological tumor stage or gleason score. In contrast to high TA in the BPH* tissue from the cancer-bearing gland, only 6.3% of 32 BPH specimens from patients only diagnosed with BPH were telomerase activity-positive. CONCLUSIONS: These results indicate that TA is present in most prostate cancers. The high rate of TA in tissue adjacent to tumor may be attributed either to early molecular alteration of cancer that was histologically unapparent, or to the presence of occult cancer cells. Our findings suggest that the re-expression of telomerase activity could be one step in the transformation of BPH to PIN. KEY WORDS: Telomerase activity, prostate cancer, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, benign prostatic hyperplasia.

  15. Peripheral lymphocyte subset variation predicts prostate cancer carbon ion radiotherapy outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ze-Liang; Li, Bing-Xin; Wu, Xian-Wei; Li, Ping; Zhang, Qing; Wei, Xun-Bin; Fu, Shen

    2016-01-01

    The immune system plays a complementary role in the cytotoxic activity of radiotherapy. Here, we examined changes in immune cell subsets after heavy ion therapy for prostate cancer. The lymphocyte counts were compared with acute radiotherapy-related toxicity, defined according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, and short-term local efficacy, defined based on prostate-specific antigen concentrations. Confirmed prostate cancer patients who had not received previous radiotherapy were administered carbon ion radiotherapy (CIR) in daily fractions of 2.74 GyE with a total dose of 63-66 GyE. Lymphocyte subset counts were investigated before, during and after radiotherapy, and at a 1 month follow-up. Most notable among our findings, the CD4/CD8 ratio and CD19+ cell counts were consistently higher in patients with a complete response (CR) or partial response (PR) to CIR than in those classified in the stable disease (SD) group (P<0.05 for both). But CD3+ and CD8+ cell counts were lower in the CR and PR groups than in the SD group. These results indicate that variations in peripheral lymphocyte subpopulations are predictive of outcome after CIR for prostate cancer. PMID:27029063

  16. Hypofractionated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Carcinoma of the Prostate: Analysis of Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coote, Joanna H.; Wylie, James P.; Cowan, Richard A.; Logue, John P.; Swindell, Ric; Livsey, Jacqueline E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Dose escalation for prostate cancer improves biological control but with a significant increase in late toxicity. Recent estimates of low α/β ratio for prostate cancer suggest that hypofractionation may result in biological advantage. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) should enable dose escalation to the prostate while reducing toxicity to local organs. We report late toxicity data of a hypofractionated IMRT regime. Methods and Materials: Eligible men had T2-3N0M0 adenocarcinoma prostate, and either Gleason score ≥ 7 or prostate-specific antigen 20-50 ng/L. Patients received 57-60 Gy to prostate in 19-20 fractions using five-field IMRT. All received hormonal therapy for 3 months before radiotherapy to a maximum of 6 months. Toxicity was assessed 2 years postradiotherapy using the RTOG criteria, LENT/SOMA, and UCLA prostate index assessment tools. Results: Acute toxicity was favorable with no RTOG Grade 3 or 4 toxicity. At 2 years, there was 4% Grade 2 bowel and 4.25% Grade 2 bladder toxicity. There was no Grade 3 or 4 bowel toxicity; one patient developed Grade 3 bladder toxicity. UCLA data showed a slight improvement in urinary function at 2 years compared with pretreatment. LENT/SOMA assessments demonstrated general worsening of bowel function at 2 years. Patients receiving 60 Gy were more likely to develop problems with bowel function than those receiving 57 Gy. Conclusions: These data demonstrate that hypofractionated radiotherapy using IMRT for prostate cancer is well tolerated with minimal late toxicity at 2 years posttreatment. Ongoing studies are looking at the efficacy of hypofractionated regimes with respect to biological control.

  17. Effect of vaccines on bacterial meningitis worldwide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McIntyre, Peter B.; O'Brien, Katherine L.; Greenwood, Brian; van de Beek, Diederik

    2012-01-01

    Three bacteria-Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Neisseria meningitidis-account for most acute bacterial meningitis. Measurement of the effect of protein-polysaccharide conjugate vaccines is most reliable for H influenzae meningitis because one serotype and one age group account

  18. Stereotactic hypofractionated accurate radiotherapy of the prostate (SHARP), 33.5 Gy in five fractions for localized disease: First clinical trial results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madsen, Berit L.; Hsi, R. Alex; Pham, Huong T.; Fowler, Jack F.; Esagui, Laura C.; Corman, John

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and toxicity of stereotactic hypofractionated accurate radiotherapy (SHARP) for localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A Phase I/II trial of SHARP performed for localized prostate cancer using 33.5 Gy in 5 fractions, calculated to be biologically equivalent to 78 Gy in 2 Gy fractions (α/β ratio of 1.5 Gy). Noncoplanar conformal fields and daily stereotactic localization of implanted fiducials were used for treatment. Genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity were evaluated by American Urologic Association (AUA) score and Common Toxicity Criteria (CTC). Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) values and self-reported sexual function were recorded at specified follow-up intervals. Results: The study includes 40 patients. The median follow-up is 41 months (range, 21-60 months). Acute toxicity Grade 1-2 was 48.5% (GU) and 39% (GI); 1 acute Grade 3 GU toxicity. Late Grade 1-2 toxicity was 45% (GU) and 37% (GI). No late Grade 3 or higher toxicity was reported. Twenty-six patients reported potency before therapy; 6 (23%) have developed impotence. Median time to PSA nadir was 18 months with the majority of nadirs less than 1.0 ng/mL. The actuarial 48-month biochemical freedom from relapse is 70% for the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology definition and 90% by the alternative nadir + 2 ng/mL failure definition. Conclusions: SHARP for localized prostate cancer is feasible with minimal acute or late toxicity. Dose escalation should be possible

  19. Comparison of sonographic features in benign prostate hyperplasia and prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Won Young; Hong, Hyun Sook; Kang, Eun Young; Seol, Hae Young; Suh, Won Hyuck

    1988-01-01

    Transrectal sonography of prostate was sensitive to textural changes produced by both benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancers. During recent 4 years, twenty cases of BPH and twenty cases of prostate cancers proven histologically were analyzed in their sonographic features, retrospectively, by using transrectal prostate sonography and suprapubic prostate sonography. The results were as follows: 1. Mean weights of BPH and prostate cancers was 40.4g and 47.6g, respectively. 2. Sonographic features of BPH revealed isoechogenecity in 11 cases, homogeneity in 18 cases, well defined capsular margins in 19 cases, and calcification in 16 cases. 3. Sonographic features of prostate cancers revealed mixed echogenecity in 14 cases, inhomogeneity in 15 cases, poorly defined capsular margin in 14 cases, and calcifications in 13 cases. 4. Authors concluded that prostate sonography were valuable diagnostic modality in the differentiation of BPH and prostate cancers.

  20. Role of bacterial infection in the exacerbation of acute or prolonged asthma attack in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Nagayama

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitatively cultured bacteria in sputum sampled from asthmatic children aged 0–14 years was examined to determine whether there is a relationship between asthmatic states and bacterial species present in the respiratory tract. We used cytological examination to improve the specificity of pathogens cultured in sputum. Asthmatic children were divided into three groups: (i group 1, acute asthma attack (n=191; (ii group 2, prolonged asthma attack (n=68; and (iii group 3, pneumonia without asthma attack (n=39. The number of specimens was 212, 75 and 44 for groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. The number of specimens with pathogenic bacteria present in group 1 decreased with age, from 36.8% in infants under 1 year of age to 8.7% in children over the age of 9 years. The species of bacteria in group 1 were Haemophilus influenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Moraxella catarrhalis and these were distributed evenly in the samples. In group 2, pathogenic bacteria were present in 34.7% of patients (26/75, peaking at over 40% among children between 4 and 8 years of age. The presence of H. influenzae was dominant in group 2. The percentage of pathogenic bacteria present in group 3 specimens was 40.9%. The data suggest that there is a significant relationship between the presence of bacteria in sputum and clinical symptoms, such as fever and pneumonic episodes, during acute asthma attacks.

  1. Quality of Life and Toxicity after SBRT for Organ-Confined Prostate Cancer, a Seven Year Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Jay Katz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT yields excellent disease control for lowandintermediate-risk prostate cancer by delivering high doses of radiation in a small number offractions. Our report presents a 7-year update on treatment toxicity and quality of life (QOLfrom 515 patients treated with prostate SBRT.Methods: From 2006 to 2009, 515 patients with clinically localized, low-, intermediate- andhigh-risk prostate cancer were treated with SBRT using Cyberknife technology. Treatmentconsisted of 35 to 36.25 Gy in 5 fractions. Seventy-two patients received hormone therapy.Toxicity was assessed at each follow up visit using the Expanded Prostate Cancer IndexComposite (EPIC questionnaire and the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG urinaryand rectal toxicity scale.Results: Median follow up was 72 months. The actuarial 7-year freedom from biochemicalfailure was 95.8%, 89.3% and 68.5% for low-, intermediate- and high-risk groups, respectively(p < 0.001. No patients experienced acute Grade III or IV acute complications. Fewer than 5%of patients had any acute Grade II urinary or rectal toxicity. Late toxicity was low, with Grade IIrectal and urinary toxicity of 4% and 9.1%, respectively, and Grade III urinary toxicity of 1.7%.Mean EPIC urinary and bowel QOL declined at 1 month post-treatment, returned to baseline by2 years and remained stable thereafter. EPIC sexual QOL declined by 23% at 6-12 months andremained stable afterwards. Of patients potent at baseline evaluation, 67% remained potent atlast follow-up.Conclusions: This study suggests that SBRT, when administered to doses of 35 to 36.25 Gy, isefficacious and safe. With long-term follow up in our large patient cohort, we continue to findlow rates of late toxicity and excellent rates of biochemical control.

  2. Does Core Length Taken per cc of Prostate Volume in Prostate Biopsy Affect the Diagnosis of Prostate Cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deliktas, Hasan; Sahin, Hayrettin; Cetinkaya, Mehmet; Dere, Yelda; Erdogan, Omer; Baldemir, Ercan

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the minimal core length to be taken per cc of prostate volume for an effective prostate biopsy. A retrospective analysis was performed on the records of 379 patients who underwent a first prostate biopsy with 12 to 16 cores under transrectal ultrasound guidance between September 2012 and April 2015. For each patient, the core length per cc of the prostate and the percentage of sampled prostate volume were calculated, and these values were compared between the patients with and without prostate cancer. A total of 348 patients were included in the study. Cancer was determined in 26.4% of patients. The mean core length taken per cc of prostate and the percentage of sampled prostate volume were determined to be 3.40 ± 0.15 mm/cc (0.26%; range, 0.08-0.63 cc) in patients with cancer and 2.75 ± 0.08 mm/cc (0.20%; range, 0.04-0.66 cc) in patients without cancer (P = .000 and P = .000), respectively. Core length taken per cc of prostate of > 3.31 mm/cc was found to be related to an increase in the rates of prostate cancer diagnosis (odds ratio, 2.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.68-4.78). The rate of cancer determination for core length taken per cc of prostate of  3.31 mm/cc, 41.1%. Core length taken per cc of prostate and the percentage of sampled prostate volume are important morphometric parameters in the determination of prostate cancer. The results of study suggest a core length per cc of the prostate of > 3.31 mm/cc as a cutoff value for quality assurance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Granulomatous prostatitis: a pitfall in MR imaging of prostatic carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevenois, P.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Cliniques Univ. de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme (Belgium); Stallenberg, B. [Dept. of Radiology, Cliniques Univ. de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme (Belgium); Sintzoff, S.A. [Dept. of Radiology, Cliniques Univ. de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme (Belgium); Salmon, I. [Dept. of Pathology, Cliniques Univ. de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme (Belgium); Regemorter, G. van [Dept. of Urology, Cliniques Univ. de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme (Belgium); Struyven, J. [Dept. of Radiology, Cliniques Univ. de Bruxelles, Hopital Erasme (Belgium)

    1992-08-01

    Granulomatous prostatitis is an uncommon disease that can mimic prostatic carcinoma on both digital rectal examination and transrectal ultrasound. Four patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate had a histological diagnosis of granulomatous prostatitis; three of them had recent urinary tract infections. The other patient had an associated midline prostatic cyst and a focus of malignancy. T1- and T2-weighted spin-echo images were obtained in all cases. Peripheral zone lesions of decreased signal intensity, suggestive of carcinoma, were found in all four patients on T2-weighted images. Granulomatous prostatitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of low signal intensity areas with prostatic magnetic resonance imaging. (orig.)

  4. Urinary prostate-specific antigen: predictor of benign prostatic hyperplasia progression?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejcic, Tomislav P; Tulic, Cane Dz; Lalic, Natasa V; Glisic, Biljana D; Ignjatovic, Svetlana D; Markovic, Biljana B; Hadzi-Djokic, Jovan B

    2013-04-01

    Urinary prostate-specific antigen (uPSA) can be used as additional parameter of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) progression. From January 2001 to December 2011, uPSA was determined in 265 patients with benign prostate. Based on total prostate volume (TPV), the patients with benign prostate were divided in two groups: TPV specificity of 0.83 and sensitivity of 0.67. The level of uPSA reflects prostatic hormonal activity and correlates with TPV, PSA and age. UPSA level ≥ 150 ng/mL can be used as additional predictive parameter of BPH progression.

  5. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for primary prostate cancer: a systematic review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Tze-Jian; Foroudi, Farsgad; Gill, Suki; Siva, Shankar

    2014-01-01

    Stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for prostate cancer allows overall treatment times to be reduced to as little as 1 week while maintaining a non-invasive approach. This study provides a comprehensive summary of the literature relating to SBRT in prostate cancer. A systematic review of the relevant literature was performed using structured search terms. Fourteen phase I–II trials and retrospective studies using SBRT for the treatment of prostate cancer were used. Three studies were identified which addressed cost. Dose fractionation, radiotherapy procedures, biochemical progression-free survival, toxicity, cost and quality of life were critically appraised. A total of 1472 patients were examined across studies. Median follow-up ranged from 11 to 60 months. The most common dose fractionation was 35–36.25Gy in five fractions, used in nine out of 14 studies. Ten of 14 studies used CyberKnife. The overall biochemical progression-free survival ranged 81–100%. Acute grade 2 urinary and rectal toxicities were reported in 5–42% and 0–27% of patients, respectively. Acute grade 3 or more urinary and rectal toxicity were 0.5% and 0%, respectively. Late grade 2 urinary toxicity was reported in 0–29% of patients, while 1.3% had a late grade 3 urinary toxicity. There were no late grade 4 urinary toxicities seen. Late grade 2 rectal toxicity was reported in 0–11%, while 0.5% had a late grade 3 rectal toxicity. Late grade 4 rectal toxicity was reported in 0.2% of patients.

  6. Intraepithelial lymphocytes in relation to NIH category IV prostatitis in autopsy prostate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikov, Dorian; Bachurska, Svitlana; Staikov, Dimitri; Sarafian, Victoria

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative analysis of the number, normal and pathologic ratios between lymphocytes and epithelial cells (ECs), and the significance of intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs) in normal prostatic epithelium, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and high grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN) in relation to NIH category IV prostatitis (histologic prostatitis: HP) was studied in autopsy prostate. IELs were analysed in 59 autopsy prostates, which was routinely embedded in paraffin and immunohistochemically stained for CD3. An average of 300-500 ECs were counted per case. The number of IELs was calculated as the mean/100 ECs. Category IV prostatitis was evaluated using NIH consensus grading system in terms of anatomical localization and grade. In healthy individuals the mean number of IELs/100 ECs was 0.61 ± 0.34% or ≤1 lymphocyte/100 ECs, which is considered as the normal basal level of prostate IELs. In category IV prostatitis, the mean number of IELs/100 ECs was 8.53 ± 3.25% or 5-11 lymphocytes/100 ECs. The number of IELs in both around and inside inflammation areas correlated to the grade and location of HP (P prostatic inflammation (P prostatic IELs in normal prostate and in relation to category IV prostatitis. The detected normal upper limit of CD3+ IELs is 1 lymphocyte/100 ECs in the normal prostate epithelium. This is considered as an organ specific characteristic of the prostate-associated lymphoid tissue (PALT). Values >5 IELs/100 ECs indicate the presence of category IV prostatitis. The severity of inflammation correlates to the number of IELs. There is an intimate link between the quantity of the IELs, the degree of the severity and the localization of category IV prostatitis. HP is a chronic and dynamic inflammatory process affecting the whole prostate gland. The increased number of IELs suggests the immune or autoimmune character of category IV prostatitis, BPH and inflammatory preneoplastic (PIN) lesions in the prostatic tumor

  7. Acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections in internal medicine wards: old and new drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcone, Marco; Concia, Ercole; Giusti, Massimo; Mazzone, Antonino; Santini, Claudio; Stefani, Stefania; Violi, Francesco

    2016-08-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are a common cause of hospital admission among elderly patients, and traditionally have been divided into complicated and uncomplicated SSTIs. In 2010, the FDA provided a new classification of these infections, and a new category of disease, named acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs), has been proposed as an independent clinical entity. ABSSSIs include three entities: cellulitis and erysipelas, wound infections, and major cutaneous abscesses This paper revises the epidemiology of SSTIs and ABSSSIs with regard to etiologies, diagnostic techniques, and clinical presentation in the hospital settings. Particular attention is owed to frail patients with multiple comorbidities and underlying significant disease states, hospitalized on internal medicine wards or residing in nursing homes, who appear to be at increased risk of infection due to multi-drug resistant pathogens and treatment failures. Management of ABSSSIs and SSTIs, including evaluation of the hemodynamic state, surgical intervention and treatment with appropriate antibiotic therapy are extensively discussed.

  8. Prostate brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Implant therapy - prostate cancer; Radioactive seed placement; Internal radiation therapy - prostate; High dose radiation (HDR) ... place the seeds that deliver radiation into your prostate. The seeds are placed with needles or special ...

  9. Hypofractionated intensity modulated irradiation for localized prostate cancer, results from a phase I/II feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junius, Sara; Haustermans, Karin; Bussels, Barbara; Oyen, Raymond; Vanstraelen, Bianca; Depuydt, Tom; Verstraete, Jan; Joniau, Steven; Van Poppel, Hendrik

    2007-01-01

    To assess acute (primary endpoint) and late toxicity, quality of life (QOL), biochemical or clinical failure (secondary endpoints) of a hypofractionated IMRT schedule for prostate cancer (PC). 38 men with localized PC received 66 Gy (2.64 Gy) to prostate,2 Gy to seminal vesicles (50 Gy total) using IMRT. Acute toxicity was evaluated weekly during radiotherapy (RT), at 1–3 months afterwards using RTOG acute scoring system. Late side effects were scored at 6, 9, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 36 months after RT using RTOG/EORTC criteria. Quality of life was assessed by EORTC-C30 questionnaire and PR25 prostate module. Biochemical failure was defined using ASTRO consensus and nadir+2 definition, clinical failure as local, regional or distant relapse. None experienced grade III-IV toxicity. 10% had no acute genito-urinary (GU) toxicity, 63% grade I; 26% grade II. Maximum acute gastrointestinal (GI) scores 0, I, II were 37%, 47% and 16%. Maximal acute toxicity was reached weeks 4–5 and resolved within 4 weeks after RT in 82%. Grade II rectal bleeding needing coagulation had a peak incidence of 18% at 16 months after RT but is 0% at 24–36 months. One developed a urethral stricture at 2 years (grade II late GU toxicity) successfully dilated until now. QOL urinary symptom scores reached a peak incidence 1 month after RT but normalized 6 months later. Bowel symptom scores before, at 1–6 months showed similar values but rose slowly 2–3 years after RT. Nadir of sexual symptom scores was reached 1–6 months after RT but improved 2–3 years later as well as physical, cognitive and role functional scales. Emotional, social functional scales were lowest before RT when diagnosis was given but improved later. Two years after RT global health status normalized. This hypofractionated IMRT schedule for PC using 25 fractions of 2.64 Gy did not result in severe acute side effects. Until now late urethral, rectal toxicities seemed acceptable as well as failure rates. Detailed analysis of

  10. Multi-parametric MRI findings of granulomatous prostatitis developing after intravesical bacillus calmette-guérin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Josh; Princenthal, Robert; Cohen, Martin I

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate the multi-parametric MRI (mpMRI) findings in patients with biopsy-proven granulomatous prostatitis and prior Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) exposure. MRI was performed in six patients with pathologically proven granulomatous prostatitis and a prior history of bladder cancer treated with intravesical BCG therapy. Multi-parametric prostate MRI images were recorded on a GE 750W or Philips Achieva 3.0 Tesla MRI scanner with high-resolution, small-field-of-view imaging consisting of axial T2, axial T1, coronal T2, sagittal T2, axial multiple b-value diffusion (multiple values up to 1200 or 1400), and dynamic contrast-enhanced 3D axial T1 with fat suppression sequence. Two different patterns of MR findings were observed. Five of the six patients had a low mean ADC value prostatitis. The other pattern seen in one of the six patients was decreased signal on the ADC map images with increased signal on the high-b-value sequence, revealing true restricted diffusion indistinguishable from aggressive prostate cancer. This patient had biopsy-confirmed acute BCG prostatitis. Our study suggests that patients with known BCG exposure and PI-RADS v2 scores ≤3, showing similar mpMRI findings as demonstrated, may not require prostate biopsy.

  11. Prostate-Specific Natural Health Products (Dietary Supplements) Radiosensitize Normal Prostate Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasan, Yasmin; Schoenherr, Diane; Martinez, Alvaro A.; Wilson, George D.; Marples, Brian

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Prostate-specific health products (dietary supplements) are taken by cancer patients to alleviate the symptoms linked with poor prostate health. However, the effect of these agents on evidence-based radiotherapy practice is poorly understood. The present study aimed to determine whether dietary supplements radiosensitized normal prostate or prostate cancer cell lines. Methods and Materials: Three well-known prostate-specific dietary supplements were purchased from commercial sources available to patients (Trinovin, Provelex, and Prostate Rx). The cells used in the study included normal prostate lines (RWPE-1 and PWR-1E), prostate tumor lines (PC3, DU145, and LNCaP), and a normal nonprostate line (HaCaT). Supplement toxicity was assessed using cell proliferation assays [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] and cellular radiosensitivity using conventional clonogenic assays (0.5-4Gy). Cell cycle kinetics were assessed using the bromodeoxyuridine/propidium iodide pulse-labeling technique, apoptosis by scoring caspase-3 activation, and DNA repair by assessing γH2AX. Results: The cell growth and radiosensitivity of the malignant PC3, DU145, and LNcaP cells were not affected by any of the dietary prostate supplements (Provelex [2μg/mL], Trinovin [10μg/mL], and Prostate Rx [50 μg/mL]). However, both Trinovin (10μg/mL) and Prostate Rx (6μg/mL) inhibited the growth rate of the normal prostate cell lines. Prostate Rx increased cellular radiosensitivity of RWPE-1 cells through the inhibition of DNA repair. Conclusion: The use of prostate-specific dietary supplements should be discouraged during radiotherapy owing to the preferential radiosensitization of normal prostate cells.

  12. The impact of bladder preparation protocols on post treatment toxicity in radiotherapy for localised prostate cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yat Man Tsang

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: The empty bladder preparation approach has non-inferior acute and intermediate post RT GI and GU toxicities in patients treated for localised prostate cancer with advanced radiotherapy techniques compared to the full bladder preparation.

  13. Prostate-Specific Antigen Mass and Free Prostate-Specific Antigen Mass for Predicting the Prostate Volume of Korean Men With Biopsy-Proven Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Tae Yong; Chae, Ji Yun; Kim, Jong Wook; Kim, Jin Wook; Oh, Mi Mi; Yoon, Cheol Yong; Moon, Du Geon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose It has been reported that prostate-specific antigen (PSA) correlates with prostate volume. Recently, some studies have reported that PSA mass (PSA adjusted for plasma volume) is more accurate than PSA at predicting prostate volume. In this study, we analyzed the accuracy of PSA and the related parameters of PSA mass, free PSA (fPSA), and fPSA mass in predicting prostate volume. Materials and Methods We retrospectively investigated 658 patients who underwent prostate biopsy from 2006 t...

  14. Prostate specific antigen in a community-based sample of men without prostate cancer: Correlations with prostate volume, age, body mass index, and symptoms of prostatism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.L.H.R. Bosch (Ruud); W.C.J. Hop (Wim); C.H. Bangma (Chris); W.J. Kirkels (Wim); F.H. Schröder (Fritz)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractThe correlation between both prostate specific antigen levels (PSA) and prostate specific antigen density (PSAD) and age, prostate volume parameters, body mass index, and the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS) were studied in a community‐based population. A sample of 502 men

  15. Plant-derived SAC domain of PAR-4 (Prostate Apoptosis Response 4 exhibits growth inhibitory effects in prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shayan eSarkar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The gene Par-4 (Prostate Apoptosis Response 4 was originally identified in prostate cancer cells undergoing apoptosis and its product Par-4 showed cancer specific pro-apoptotic activity. Particularly, the SAC domain of Par-4 (SAC-Par-4 selectively kills cancer cells leaving normal cells unaffected. The therapeutic significance of bioactive SAC-Par-4 is enormous in cancer biology; however, its large scale production is still a matter of concern. Here we report the production of SAC-Par-4-GFP fusion protein coupled to translational enhancer sequence (5′ AMV and apoplast signal peptide (aTP in transgenic Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun NN plants under the control of a unique recombinant promoter M24. Transgene integration was confirmed by genomic DNA PCR, Southern and Northern blotting, Real-time PCR and Nuclear run-on assays. Results of Western blot analysis and ELISA confirmed expression of recombinant SAC-Par-4-GFP protein and it was as high as 0.15% of total soluble protein. In addition, we found that targeting of plant recombinant SAC-Par-4-GFP to the apoplast and endoplasmic reticulum (ER was essential for the stability of plant recombinant protein in comparison to the bacterial derived SAC-Par-4. Deglycosylation analysis demonstrated that ER-targeted SAC-Par-4-GFP-SEKDEL undergoes O-linked glycosylation unlike apoplast-targeted SAC-Par-4-GFP. Furthermore, various in vitro studies like mammalian cells proliferation assay (MTT, apoptosis induction assays, and NF-κB suppression suggested the cytotoxic and apoptotic properties of plant-derived SAC-Par-4-GFP against multiple prostate cancer cell lines. Additionally, pre-treatment of MAT-LyLu prostate cancer cells with purified SAC-Par-4-GFP significantly delayed the onset of tumor in a syngeneic rat prostate cancer model. Taken altogether, we proclaim that plant made SAC-Par-4 may become a useful alternate therapy for effectively alleviating cancer in the new era.

  16. Antibiotic treatment delay and outcome in acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køster-Rasmussen, Rasmus; Korshin, André; Meyer, Christian N

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To identify to what degree in-hospital delay of antibiotic therapy correlated to outcome in community acquired bacterial meningitis. METHODS: All cases of culture-positive cerebrospinal fluids in east Denmark from 2002 to 2004 were included. Medical records were collected retrospectiv......OBJECTIVES: To identify to what degree in-hospital delay of antibiotic therapy correlated to outcome in community acquired bacterial meningitis. METHODS: All cases of culture-positive cerebrospinal fluids in east Denmark from 2002 to 2004 were included. Medical records were collected......=1.30/h, CI: 1.08-1.57). The median delay to the first dose of adequate antibiotics was 1h and 39min (1h and 14min in children vs. 2h in adults, pmeningitis. CONCLUSION: The delay in antibiotic therapy correlated...

  17. Age related clinical manifestation of acute bacterial meningitis in children presenting to emergency department of a tertiary care hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fayyaz, J.; Khursheed, M.; Feroze, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the signs and symptoms of acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) in different age groups of a paediatric population. Methods: The retrospective study comprised patients who had been admitted through the Emergency Department of Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi with the relevant diagnosis from September 2009 to September 2011. Case record forms were used to collect data from patient files. Data was collected using variables such as age, gender, presenting complaints, clinical signs and symptoms, computed tomography scan findings and final outcome of patients. There was a minimal risk of breach in patient confidentiality. SPSS 19 was used for data analysis. Results: A total of 192 patients were enrolled. The presenting complaint in 165 (86%) patients was fever; vomiting in 93 (48.43%); and 49 (52.68%) of them were more than 5 years old. Irritability was present in 54 (28.12%) children, of whom 27 (50%) were less than one year. Fits were present in 47 (24.47%) cases out of which 21 (44.68%) were less than one year. Neck stiffness and signs of meningeal irritation, Kerning's sign and Brudzincski's sign, were present in 53 (27.60%) patients; 26 (13.54%); and 18 (9.3%) respectively. These signs were more common in children over 5 years of age, reflected by 29 (54.7%), 16 (61.5%) and 11 (61.11%) patients respectively. On presentation, headache was found in 77 (40.10%) children among whom 56 (72.72%) were over 5 years. Besides, 151 (78.6%) patients required admission to the ward, while 40 (20.8%) were admitted in High Dependancy Unit/critical care units. Adverse outcome was observed in 6 (3.12%) patients. Conclusion: Younger children with acute bacterial meningitis presented with non-specific signs and symptoms. Headache and signs of meningeal irritation were common findings in children over 5 years. (author)

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to ... Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces pictures ...

  19. IL-1RI (Interleukin-1 Receptor Type I Signalling is Essential for Host Defence and Hemichannel Activity During Acute Central Nervous System Bacterial Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Xiong

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Staphylococcus aureus is a common aetiological agent of bacterial brain abscesses. We have previously established that a considerable IL-1 (interleukin-1 response is elicited immediately following S. aureus infection, where the cytokine can exert pleiotropic effects on glial activation and blood–brain barrier permeability. To assess the combined actions of IL-1α and IL-1β during CNS (central nervous system infection, host defence responses were evaluated in IL-1RI (IL-1 receptor type I KO (knockout animals. IL-1RI KO mice were exquisitely sensitive to intracerebral S. aureus infection, as demonstrated by enhanced mortality rates and bacterial burdens within the first 24 h following pathogen exposure compared with WT (wild-type animals. Loss of IL-1RI signalling also dampened the expression of select cytokines and chemokines, concomitant with significant reductions in neutrophil and macrophage infiltrates into the brain. In addition, the opening of astrocyte hemichannels during acute infection was shown to be dependent on IL-1RI activity. Collectively, these results demonstrate that IL-1RI signalling plays a pivotal role in the genesis of immune responses during the acute stage of brain abscess development through S. aureus containment, inflammatory mediator production, peripheral immune cell recruitment, and regulation of astrocyte hemichannel activity. Taken in the context of previous studies with MyD88 (myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 and TLR2 (Toll-like receptor 2 KO animals, the current report advances our understanding of MyD88-dependent cascades and implicates IL-1RI signalling as a major antimicrobial effector pathway during acute brain-abscess formation.

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  1. Prostate Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home › Aging & Health A to Z › Prostate Diseases Font size A A A Print Share Glossary Basic ... body. Approximately 3 million American men have some type of prostate disease. The most common prostate diseases ...

  2. The Early Result of Whole Pelvic Radiotherapy and Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy Boost for High Risk Localized Prostate Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei eLin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available PurposeThe rationale for hypofractionated radiotherapy in the treatment of prostate cancer is based on the modern understanding of radiobiology and advances in stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT techniques. Whole-pelvis irradiation combined with SBRT boost for high-risk prostate cancer might escalate biologically effective dose without increasing toxicity. Here, we report our 4-year results of SBRT boost for high-risk localized prostate cancer.Methods and MaterialsFrom October 2009 to August 2012, 41 patients of newly diagnosed, high-risk or very high-risk (NCCN definition localized prostate cancer patients were treated with whole-pelvis irradiation and SBRT boost. The whole pelvis dose was 45Gy (25 fractions of 1.8Gy. The SBRT boost dose was 21 Gy (three fractions of 7 Gy. Ninety percent of these patients received hormone therapy. The toxicities of gastrointestinal (GI and genitourinary (GU tracts were scored by Common Toxicity Criteria Adverse Effect (CTCAE v3.0. Biochemical failure was defined by Phoenix definition.ResultsMedian follow-up was 42 months. Mean PSA before treatment was 44.18 ng/ml. Mean PSA level at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months was 0.94, 0.44, 0.13, 0.12, and 0.05 ng/ml, respectively. The estimated 4-year biochemical failure-free survival was 91.9%. Three biochemical failures were observed. GI and GU tract toxicities were minimal. No grade 3 acute GU or GI toxicity was noted. During radiation therapy, 27% of the patient had grade 2 acute GU toxicity and 12% had grade 2 acute GI toxicity. At 3 months, most toxicity scores had returned to baseline. At the last follow up, there was no grade 3 late GU or GI toxicity.ConclusionsWhole-pelvis irradiation combined with SBRT boost for high-risk localized prostate cancer is feasible with minimal toxicity and encouraging biochemical failure-free survival. Continued accrual and follow-up would be necessary to confirm the biochemical control rate and the toxicity profiles.

  3. Dutasteride reduces prostate size and prostate specific antigen in older hypogonadal men with benign prostatic hyperplasia undergoing testosterone replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Stephanie T; Hirano, Lianne; Gilchriest, Janet; Dighe, Manjiri; Amory, John K; Marck, Brett T; Matsumoto, Alvin M

    2011-07-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia and hypogonadism are common disorders in aging men. There is concern that androgen replacement in older men may increase prostate size and symptoms of benign prostatic hyperplasia. We examined whether combining dutasteride, which inhibits testosterone to dihydrotestosterone conversion, with testosterone treatment in older hypogonadal men with benign prostatic hyperplasia reduces androgenic stimulation of the prostate compared to testosterone alone. We conducted a double-blind, placebo controlled trial of 53 men 51 to 82 years old with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia, prostate volume 30 cc or greater and serum total testosterone less than 280 ng/dl (less than 9.7 nmol/l). Subjects were randomized to daily transdermal 1% T gel plus oral placebo or dutasteride for 6 months. Testosterone dosing was adjusted to a serum testosterone of 500 to 1,000 ng/dl. The primary outcomes were prostate volume measured by magnetic resonance imaging, serum prostate specific antigen and androgen levels. A total of 46 subjects completed all procedures. Serum testosterone increased similarly into the mid-normal range in both groups. Serum dihydrotestosterone increased in the testosterone only but decreased in the testosterone plus dutasteride group. In the testosterone plus dutasteride group prostate volume and prostate specific antigen (mean ± SEM) decreased 12% ± 2.5% and 35% ± 5%, respectively, compared to the testosterone only group in which prostate volume and prostate specific antigen increased 7.5% ± 3.3% and 19% ± 7% (p = 0.03 and p = 0.008), respectively, after 6 months of treatment. Prostate symptom scores improved in both groups. Combined treatment with testosterone plus dutasteride reduces prostate volume and prostate specific antigen compared to testosterone only. Coadministration of a 5α-reductase inhibitor with testosterone appears to spare the prostate from androgenic stimulation during testosterone replacement in older

  4. Stages of Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetics of Prostate Cancer Prostate Cancer Screening Research Prostate Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Prostate Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Prostate ...

  5. Does Small Prostate Predict High Grade Prostate Cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caliskan, S.; Kaba, S.; Koca, O.; Ozturk, M. I.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The current study is aimed to assess the patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer and investigate the association between prostate size and adverse outcomes at final pathology. Study Design: Comparative, descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Haydarpasa Numune Training and Research Hospital, Turkey, from January 2008 to January 2016. Methodology: The patients treated with open radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer were reviewed. Patient characteristics including prostate specific antigen (PSA), free PSA levels, age, biopsy, and radical prostatectomy results were recorded. The patients whose data were complete or prostate weight was equal to or less than 80 gm, were included in the study. Patients with < 40 gm prostate weight was in group 1 and the patients in group 2 had a prostate weight from 40 to 80 gm. High grade prostate cancer was defined to have a Gleason score between 7 or higher at biopsy and final pathology. Pathology and biopsy results were compared within groups. MedCalc Statistical Software demo version was used for statistical analyses. Results: There were 162 patients in this study. Of these, 71 (43.82 percent) patients were in group 1 and 91 (56.17 percent) patients were in group 2. The age ranged from 49 to 76 years. Mean value of 62.70 +-6.82 and 65.82 +- 5.66 years in group 1 and 2, respectively. Fifty (70.42 percent) and 68 patients (74.74 percent) had a Gleason score of 6 in group 1 and 2, respectively. Organconfined disease was reported in 53 patients (74.64 percent) in group 1 and in 78 patients (85.71 percent) in group 2. Gleason score concordance between biopsy and prostatectomy was reported in 61 patients (67.03 percent) and downgrading was detected in 4 patients (4.4 percent) in group 2. The median tumor volume of the patients was 4.47 cm/sup 3/ in group 1 and 6 cm/sup 3/ in group 2 (p=0.502). High grade prostate cancer was reported in 52.11 percent and 45.05 percent of the patients in

  6. Acute renal failure caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae pyelonephritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Creyghton, W. M.; Lobatto, S.; Weening, J. J.

    2001-01-01

    We report a 34-year-old male patient without prior medical history who presented with acute renal failure due to acute bacterial pyelonephritis. Both blood and urine cultures grew Klebsiella pneumoniae. Although a kidney biopsy revealed extensive necrosis and no viable glomeruli, renal function

  7. Efficiency of antibiotic treatment of premature ejaculation in patients with type III prostatic inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teoman Cem Kadioglu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The most common male sexual disorder is premature ejaculation as it affects 30-40% of sexually active men. Various studies showed that the correlation of prostatic inflammation and chronic bacterial prostatitis with premature ejaculation is present in more than half of the sufferers. These studies also show that more than 85% of prostatic inflammation cases was shown to be caused by chronic prostatitis in the premature ejaculation patient group. Even though this relation is evident, the effect of antibiotic treatment of premature ejaculation in patients with chronic prostatitis has only recently being investigated extensively. In this study, 36 men suffering from secondary premature ejaculation who were included the study. These patients had no erectile dysfunction problems and were included in the study after they timed intravaginal ejaculatory latency in their last 3 intercourses to see that time was less than 2 minutes in each trial. To evaluate the prostatic inflammation, diagnosis was made by identifying 10 or more white blood cells per high power field in expressed prostatic secretions. 22 of 36 premature ejaculation patients in our study had more than 10 white blood cells in thier expressed prostatic secretions and were diagnosed to have prostatic inflammation. The other 14 patients were included in the study as the control group. Following one month antibiotic treatment 78% patients in the study group returned with the information that all 3 of their last intercourses ended with more than 2 minutes of intravaginal ejaculatory latency time while none of the control group reported similarly. No side effects were reported by any of the patients due to antibiotic usage. Our study shows that patients with PE that may benefit from month-long quinolone antibiotic therapy can be screened for by checking their expressed prostatic secretions under a microscope in the office. A more accurate definition of premature ejaculation, a scale for

  8. Prostatic specific antigen for prostate cancer detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Nogueira

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Prostate-specific antigen (PSA has been used for prostate cancer detection since 1994. PSA testing has revolutionized our ability to diagnose, treat, and follow-up patients. In the last two decades, PSA screening has led to a substantial increase in the incidence of prostate cancer (PC. This increased detection caused the incidence of advanced-stage disease to decrease at a dramatic rate, and most newly diagnosed PC today are localized tumors with a high probability of cure. PSA screening is associated with a 75% reduction in the proportion of men who now present with metastatic disease and a 32.5% reduction in the age-adjusted prostate cancer mortality rate through 2003. Although PSA is not a perfect marker, PSA testing has limited specificity for prostate cancer detection, and its appropriate clinical application remains a topic of debate. Due to its widespread use and increased over-detection, the result has been the occurrence of over-treatment of indolent cancers. Accordingly, several variations as regards PSA measurement have emerged as useful adjuncts for prostate cancer screening. These procedures take into consideration additional factors, such as the proportion of different PSA isoforms (free PSA, complexed PSA, pro-PSA and B PSA, the prostate volume (PSA density, and the rate of change in PSA levels over time (PSA velocity or PSA doubling time. The history and evidence underlying each of these parameters are reviewed in the following article.

  9. Prostatic specific antigen for prostate cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogueira, Lucas; Corradi, Renato; Eastham, James A

    2009-01-01

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) has been used for prostate cancer detection since 1994. PSA testing has revolutionized our ability to diagnose, treat, and follow-up patients. In the last two decades, PSA screening has led to a substantial increase in the incidence of prostate cancer (PC). This increased detection caused the incidence of advanced-stage disease to decrease at a dramatic rate, and most newly diagnosed PC today are localized tumors with a high probability of cure. PSA screening is associated with a 75% reduction in the proportion of men who now present with metastatic disease and a 32.5% reduction in the age-adjusted prostate cancer mortality rate through 2003. Although PSA is not a perfect marker, PSA testing has limited specificity for prostate cancer detection, and its appropriate clinical application remains a topic of debate. Due to its widespread use and increased over-detection, the result has been the occurrence of over-treatment of indolent cancers. Accordingly, several variations as regards PSA measurement have emerged as useful adjuncts for prostate cancer screening. These procedures take into consideration additional factors, such as the proportion of different PSA isoforms (free PSA, complexed PSA, pro-PSA and B PSA), the prostate volume (PSA density), and the rate of change in PSA levels over time (PSA velocity or PSA doubling time). The history and evidence underlying each of these parameters are reviewed in the following article.

  10. Defining the implant treatment volume for patients with low risk prostate cancer: does the anterior base need to be treated?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Amico, Anthony V.; Davis, Ann; Vargas, Sara O.; Renshaw, Andrew A.; Jiroutek, Michael; Richie, Jerome P.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: An increased incidence of acute urinary retention has been reported after interstitial prostate radiation therapy when the anterior base of the prostate gland receives 100% of the prescription dose. The frequency of prostate cancer in this location as a function of the pre-treatment prostate specific antigen (PSA), biopsy Gleason score, and 1992 American Joint Commission on Cancer Staging (AJCC) was determined. Methods and Materials: One hundred four men treated at the Brigham and Women's Hospital with radical prostatectomy for clinically localized prostate cancer between 1995-1996 comprised the study population. Prostatectomy specimens were whole mounted and the location of each tumor foci enumerated. Results: Of 269 foci of prostate cancer found in 39 low-risk prostate cancer patients (PSA 1c,2a ), a single focus (0.37%) was noted in the anterior base. Conversely, 20/355 (5.6%) and 18/251 (7.2%) tumor foci were noted in the anterior base in 43 patients with intermediate risk and 24 patients with high-risk disease, respectively. Conclusions: A new definition of the treatment volume excluding the anterior base for low-risk prostate cancer patients may be justified

  11. Prostate-specific antigen lowering effect of metabolic syndrome is influenced by prostate volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Woo Suk; Heo, Nam Ju; Paick, Jae-Seung; Son, Hwancheol

    2016-04-01

    To investigate the influence of metabolic syndrome on prostate-specific antigen levels by considering prostate volume and plasma volume. We retrospectively analyzed 4111 men who underwent routine check-ups including prostate-specific antigen and transrectal ultrasonography. The definition of metabolic syndrome was based on the modified Adult Treatment Panel III criteria. Prostate-specific antigen mass density (prostate-specific antigen × plasma volume / prostate volume) was calculated for adjusting plasma volume and prostate volume. We compared prostate-specific antigen and prostate-specific antigen mass density levels of participants with metabolic syndrome (metabolic syndrome group, n = 1242) and without metabolic syndrome (non-prostate-specific antigen metabolic syndrome group, n = 2869). To evaluate the impact of metabolic syndrome on prostate-specific antigen, linear regression analysis for the natural logarithm of prostate-specific antigen was used. Patients in the metabolic syndrome group had significantly older age (P prostate volume (P prostate-specific antigen (non-metabolic syndrome group vs metabolic syndrome group; 1.22 ± 0.91 vs 1.15 ± 0.76 ng/mL, P = 0.006). Prostate-specific antigen mass density in the metabolic syndrome group was still significantly lower than that in the metabolic syndrome group (0.124 ± 0.084 vs 0.115 ± 0.071 μg/mL, P = 0.001). After adjusting for age, prostate volume and plasma volume using linear regression model, the presence of metabolic syndrome was a significant independent factor for lower prostate-specific antigen (prostate-specific antigen decrease by 4.1%, P = 0.046). Prostate-specific antigen levels in patients with metabolic syndrome seem to be lower, and this finding might be affected by the prostate volume. © 2016 The Japanese Urological Association.

  12. An evaluation of intrafraction motion of the prostate in the prone and supine positions using electromagnetic tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, Amish P.; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Willoughby, Twyla R.; Langen, Katja M.; Meeks, Sanford L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate differences in target motion during prostate irradiation in the prone versus supine position using electromagnetic tracking to measure prostate mobility. Materials/methods: Twenty patients received prostate radiotherapy in the supine position utilizing the Calypso Localization System (registered) for prostate positioning and monitoring. For each patient, 10 treatment fractions were followed by a session in which the patient was repositioned prone, and prostate mobility was tracked. The fraction of time that the prostate was displaced by >3, 5, 7, and 10 mm was calculated for each patient, for both positions (400 tracking sessions). Results: Clear patterns of respiratory motion were seen in the prone tracks due to the influence of increased abdominal motion. Averaged over all patients, the prostate was displaced >3 and 5 mm for 37.8% and 10.1% of the total tracking time in the prone position, respectively. In the supine position, the prostate was displaced >3 and 5 mm for 12.6% and 2.9%, respectively. With both patient setups, inferior and posterior drifts of the prostate position were observed. Averaged over all prone tracking sessions, the prostate was displaced >3 mm in the posterior and inferior directions for 11.7% and 9.5% of the total time, respectively. Conclusions: With real-time tracking of the prostate, it is possible to study the effects of different setup positions on the prostate mobility. The percentage of time the prostate moved >3 and 5 mm was increased by a factor of three in the prone versus supine position. For larger displacements (>7 mm) no difference in prostate mobility was observed between prone and supine positions. To reduce rectal toxicity, radiotherapy in the prone position may be a suitable alternative provided respiratory motion is accounted for during treatment. Acute and late toxicity results remain to be evaluated for both patient positions.

  13. Prostate Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine away from ... and out of the body. A young man's prostate is about the size of a walnut. It ...

  14. Acute gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and dermatological toxicity during dose-escalated 3D-conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) using an intrarectal balloon for prostate gland localization and immobilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woel, Rosemonde; Beard, Clair; Chen, Ming-Hui; Hurwitz, Mark; Loffredo, Marian; McMahon, Elizabeth; Ching, Jane; Lopes, Lynn; D'Amico, Anthony V.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: We determined the acute gastrointestinal (GI), genitourinary (GU), and dermatologic (D) toxicity during dose-escalated three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT). A modified intrarectal balloon (Medrad) was used for prostate gland localization and immobilization. Methods: Forty-six men with clinical category T1c to T3a, and at least one high-risk feature (PSA >10, Gleason ≥7, or MRI evidence of extracapsular extension or seminal vesical invasion) comprised the study cohort. Treatment consisted of hormonal therapy and 4-field 3DCRT using an intrarectal balloon for the initial 15 of 40 treatments. Planning treatment volume dose was 72 Gy (95% normalization). A Mantel-Haenzel Chi-square test compared the distribution of GU, GI, and D symptoms at baseline and at end of treatment (EOT). Results: There was no significant difference between the 2 time points in the proportion of patients with bowel symptoms (p = 0.73), tenesmus (p = 0.27), nocturia (p = 1.00), or GU urgency (p = 0.40). However, there was a significant decrease in GU frequency (70% vs. 50%, p = 0.46) as a result of medical interventions and a significant increase in hemorrhoidal irritation (4% vs. 20%, p = 0.02) and anal cutaneous skin reaction (0% vs. 70%, p < 0.001). By 3 months after EOT compared to baseline, there was no significant difference in the proportion of patients experiencing hemorrhoidal bleeding (4% vs. 8%, p = 0.52), requiring intervention for hemorrhoidal symptoms (7% vs. 5%, p = 0.8), or experiencing persistent anal cutaneous skin reaction (0% vs. 3%, p = 0.31). Conclusion: Dose-escalated 3DCRT using an intrarectal balloon for prostate localization and immobilization was well tolerated. Acute GU, GI, and D symptoms resolved with standard dietary or medical interventions by the EOT or shortly thereafter

  15. Acute-phase proteins: As diagnostic tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Jain

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The varied reactions of the host to infection, inflammation, or trauma are collectively known as the acute-phase response and encompass a wide range of pathophysiological responses such as pyrexia, leukocytosis, hormone alterations, and muscle protein depletion combining to minimize tissue damage while enhancing the repair process. The mechanism for stimulation of hepatic production of acute-phase proteins is by proinflammatory cytokines. The functions of positive acute-phase proteins (APP are regarded as important in optimization and trapping of microorganism and their products, in activating the complement system, in binding cellular remnants like nuclear fractions, in neutralizing enzymes, scavenging free hemoglobin and radicals, and in modulating the host′s immune response. APP can be used as diagnostic tool in many diseases like bovine respiratory syncytial virus, prostate cancer, bronchopneumonia, multiple myeloma, mastitis, Streptococcus suis infection, starvation, or lymphatic neoplasia. Thus, acute-phase proteins may provide an alternative means of monitoring animal health.

  16. External beam radiotherapy for carcinoma of the prostate: a retrospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mithal, N.P.; Hoskin, P.J.

    1993-01-01

    Two hundred and thirty-seven consecutive patients receiving radiotherapy for primary prostatic carcinoma have been reviewed. The presenting symptoms included acute retention, chronic outflow obstruction and haematuria. The diagnosis was confirmed at trans-urethral resection of the prostate (TURP) in 95%; all but seven patients had adenocarcinoma. The clinical stage at presentation was T 0 (3%), T 1 (9%), T 2 (49%), T 3 (21%) and T 4 (17%). Two hundred and six patients received primary radiotherapy, 38 had concurrent endocrine therapy. Local relapse alone occurred in 38 patients (16%), distant relapse alone occurred in 30 (13%), and both local and distant relapse occurred in 30 (13%). Median time to local relapse alone was 25 months, distant relapse alone 14 months, and local and distant relapse 22 months. Overall survival was related to stage and grade at presentation. No influence of endocrine therapy, dose or planning technique was seen, but a significant advantage for those patients treated using a planned volume compared with parallel opposed fields was observed. Acute radiation toxicity affecting the bladder occurred in 42% and the bowel in 45%. Late toxicity affecting the bladder occurred in 7% and the bowel in 2%. (author)

  17. Dose to the Bladder Neck Is the Most Important Predictor for Acute and Late Toxicity After Low-Dose-Rate Prostate Brachytherapy: Implications for Establishing New Dose Constraints for Treatment Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathout, Lara; Folkert, Michael R.; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Yamada, Yoshiya [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Cohen, Gil' ad N. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Zelefsky, Michael J., E-mail: zelefskm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: To identify an anatomic structure predictive for acute (AUT) and late (LUT) urinary toxicity in patients with prostate cancer treated with low-dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR) with or without external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: From July 2002 to January 2013, 927 patients with prostate cancer (median age, 66 years) underwent LDR brachytherapy with Iodine 125 (n=753) or Palladium 103 (n=174) as definitive treatment (n=478) and as a boost (n=449) followed by supplemental EBRT (median dose, 50.4 Gy). Structures contoured on the computed tomographic (CT) scan on day 0 after implantation included prostate, urethra, bladder, and the bladder neck, defined as 5 mm around the urethra between the catheter balloon and the prostatic urethra. AUT and LUT were assessed with the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version4. Clinical and dosimetric factors associated with AUT and LUT were analyzed with Cox regression and receiver operating characteristic analysis to calculate area under the receiver operator curve (ROC) (AUC). Results: Grade ≥2 AUT and grade ≥2 LUT occurred in 520 patients (56%) and 154 patients (20%), respectively. No grade 4 toxicities were observed. Bladder neck D2cc retained a significant association with AUT (hazard ratio [HR], 1.03; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.04; P<.0001) and LUT (HR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.00-1.03; P=.014) on multivariable analysis. In a comparison of bladder neck with the standard dosimetric variables by use of ROC analysis (prostate V100 >90%, D90 >100%, V150 >60%, urethra D20 >130%), bladder neck D2cc >50% was shown to have the strongest prognostic power for AUT (AUC, 0.697; P<.0001) and LUT (AUC, 0.620; P<.001). Conclusions: Bladder neck D2cc >50% was the strongest predictor for grade ≥2 AUT and LUT in patients treated with LDR brachytherapy. These data support inclusion of bladder neck constraints into brachytherapy planning to decrease urinary toxicity.

  18. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for low-risk prostate cancer: five-year outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Christopher R

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose Hypofractionated, stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT is an emerging treatment approach for prostate cancer. We present the outcomes for low-risk prostate cancer patients with a median follow-up of 5 years after SBRT. Method and Materials Between Dec. 2003 and Dec. 2005, a pooled cohort of 41 consecutive patients from Stanford, CA and Naples, FL received SBRT with CyberKnife for clinically localized, low-risk prostate cancer. Prescribed dose was 35-36.25 Gy in five fractions. No patient received hormone therapy. Kaplan-Meier biochemical progression-free survival (defined using the Phoenix method and RTOG toxicity outcomes were assessed. Results At a median follow-up of 5 years, the biochemical progression-free survival was 93% (95% CI = 84.7% to 100%. Acute side effects resolved within 1-3 months of treatment completion. There were no grade 4 toxicities. No late grade 3 rectal toxicity occurred, and only one late grade 3 genitourinary toxicity occurred following repeated urologic instrumentation. Conclusion Five-year results of SBRT for localized prostate cancer demonstrate the efficacy and safety of shorter courses of high dose per fraction radiation delivered with SBRT technique. Ongoing clinical trials are underway to further explore this treatment approach.

  19. Intensity modulated radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer: rigid compliance to dose-volume constraints as a warranty of acceptable toxicity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Michael J; Nadalin, Wladmir; Weltman, Eduardo; Hanriot, Rodrigo M; Luz, Fábio P; Cecílio, Paulo J; Cruz, José C da; Moreira, Frederico R; Santos, Adriana S; Martins, Lidiane C

    2007-01-01

    To report the toxicity after intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for patients with localized prostate cancer, as a sole treatment or after radical prostatectomy. Between August 2001 and December 2003, 132 patients with prostate cancer were treated with IMRT and 125 were evaluable to acute and late toxicity analysis, after a minimum follow-up time of one year. Clinical and treatment data, including normal tissue dose-volume histogram (DVH) constraints, were reviewed. Gastro-intestinal (GI) and genito-urinary (GU) signs and symptoms were evaluated according to the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) toxicity scales. Median prescribed dose was 76 Gy. Median follow-up time was of 26.1 months. From the 125 patients, 73 (58.4%) presented acute Grade 1 or Grade 2 GI and 97 (77.2%) presented acute Grade 1 or Grade 2 GU toxicity. Grade 3 GI acute toxicity occurred in only 2 patients (1.6%) and Grade 3 GU acute toxicity in only 3 patients (2.4%). Regarding Grade 1 and 2 late toxicity, 26 patients (20.8%) and 21 patients (16.8%) presented GI and GU toxicity, respectively. Grade 2 GI late toxicity occurred in 6 patients (4.8%) and Grade 2 GU late toxicity in 4 patients (3.2%). None patient presented any Grade 3 or higher late toxicity. Non-conformity to DVH constraints occurred in only 11.2% of treatment plans. On univariate analysis, no significant risk factor was identified for Grade 2 GI late toxicity, but mean dose delivered to the PTV was associated to higher Grade 2 GU late toxicity (p = 0.042). IMRT is a well tolerable technique for routine treatment of localized prostate cancer, with short and medium-term acceptable toxicity profiles. According to the data presented here, rigid compliance to DHV constraints might prevent higher incidences of normal tissue complication

  20. Characterization of adenoviral transduction profile in prostate cancer cells and normal prostate tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Jianzhong; Tai, Phillip W L; Lu, Yi; Li, Jia; Ma, Hong; Su, Qin; Wei, Qiang; Li, Hong; Gao, Guangping

    2017-09-01

    Prostate diseases are common in males worldwide with high morbidity. Gene therapy is an attractive therapeutic strategy for prostate diseases, however, it is currently underdeveloped. As well known, adeno virus (Ad) is the most widely used gene therapy vector. The aims of this study are to explore transduction efficiency of Ad in prostate cancer cells and normal prostate tissue, thus further providing guidance for future prostate pathophysiological studies and therapeutic development of prostate diseases. We produced Ad expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), and characterized the transduction efficiency of Ad in both human and mouse prostate cancer cell lines in vitro, as well as prostate tumor xenograft, and wild-type mouse prostate tissue in vivo. Ad transduction efficiency was determined by EGFP fluorescence using microscopy and flow cytometry. Cell type-specific transduction was examined by immunofluorescence staining of cell markers. Our data showed that Ad efficiently transduced human and mouse prostate cancer cells in vitro in a dose dependent manner. Following intratumoral and intraprostate injection, Ad could efficiently transduce prostate tumor xenograft and the major prostatic cell types in vivo, respectively. Our findings suggest that Ad can efficiently transduce prostate tumor cells in vitro as well as xenograft and normal prostate tissue in vivo, and further indicate that Ad could be a potentially powerful toolbox for future gene therapy of prostate diseases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Acute pancreatitis with saw palmetto use: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amankona Raymond

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Saw palmetto is a phytotherapeutic agent commercially marketed for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Evidence suggests that saw palmetto is a safe product, and mild gastrointestinal adverse effects have been reported with its use. We report a case of acute pancreatitis, possibly secondary to the use of saw palmetto. Case presentation A 61-year-old Caucasian man with a history of benign prostatic hyperplasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease developed epigastric pain associated with nausea 36 hours prior to presentation. He denied drinking alcohol prior to the development of his symptoms. His home medications included saw palmetto, lansoprazole and multivitamins. Laboratory results revealed elevated lipase and amylase levels. An abdominal ultrasound demonstrated a nondilated common bile duct, without choledocholithiasis. Computed tomography of his abdomen showed the pancreatic tail with peripancreatic inflammatory changes, consistent with acute pancreatitis. Our patient's condition improved with intravenous fluids and pain management. On the fourth day of hospitalization his pancreatic enzymes were within normal limits: he was discharged home and advised to avoid taking saw palmetto. Conclusion It is our opinion that a relationship between saw palmetto and the onset of acute pancreatitis is plausible, and prescribers and users of saw palmetto should be alert to the possibility of such adverse reactions.

  2. Acute pancreatitis with saw palmetto use: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruminhent, Jackrapong; Carrera, Perliveh; Li, Zhongzhen; Amankona, Raymond; Roberts, Ingram M

    2011-08-25

    Saw palmetto is a phytotherapeutic agent commercially marketed for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia. Evidence suggests that saw palmetto is a safe product, and mild gastrointestinal adverse effects have been reported with its use. We report a case of acute pancreatitis, possibly secondary to the use of saw palmetto. A 61-year-old Caucasian man with a history of benign prostatic hyperplasia and gastroesophageal reflux disease developed epigastric pain associated with nausea 36 hours prior to presentation. He denied drinking alcohol prior to the development of his symptoms. His home medications included saw palmetto, lansoprazole and multivitamins. Laboratory results revealed elevated lipase and amylase levels. An abdominal ultrasound demonstrated a nondilated common bile duct, without choledocholithiasis. Computed tomography of his abdomen showed the pancreatic tail with peripancreatic inflammatory changes, consistent with acute pancreatitis. Our patient's condition improved with intravenous fluids and pain management. On the fourth day of hospitalization his pancreatic enzymes were within normal limits: he was discharged home and advised to avoid taking saw palmetto. It is our opinion that a relationship between saw palmetto and the onset of acute pancreatitis is plausible, and prescribers and users of saw palmetto should be alert to the possibility of such adverse reactions.

  3. Radiation proctopathy in the treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, Amit K.; Mai Weiyan; McGary, John E.; Grant, Walter H.; Butler, E. Brian; Teh, B.S.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To compile and review data on radiation proctopathy in the treatment of prostate cancer with respect to epidemiology, clinical manifestations, pathogenesis, risk factors, and treatment. Methods: Medical literature databases including PubMed and Medline were screened for pertinent reports, and critically analyzed for relevance in the scope of our purpose. Results: Rectal toxicity as a complication of radiotherapy has received attention over the past decade, especially with the advent of dose-escalation in prostate cancer treatment. A number of clinical criteria help to define acute and chronic radiation proctopathy, but lack of a unified grading scale makes comparing studies difficult. A variety of risk factors, related to either radiation delivery or patient, are the subject of intense study. Also, a variety of treatment options, including medical therapy, endoscopic treatments, and surgery have shown varied results, but a lack of large randomized trials evaluating their efficacy prevents forming concrete recommendations. Conclusion: Radiation proctopathy should be an important consideration for the clinician in the treatment of prostate cancer especially with dose escalation. With further study of possible risk factors, the advent of a standardized grading scale, and more randomized trials to evaluate treatments, patients and physicians will be better armed to make appropriate management decisions

  4. Tuberculosis of the prostate and urethra: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitin Gupta

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Genitourinary tuberculosis contributes to 10-14% of extrapulmonary tuberculosis and is a major health problem in India. Prostate tuberculosis is uncommon and is usually found incidentally following transurethral resection. The most common mode of involvement is hematogenous, though descending infection and direct intracanalicular extension is known. Predisposing factors include prior tubercular infection, immuno-compromised status, previous BCG therapy. The presentation is diffuse caseating epitheloid cell granulomas, which can be confirmed by prostate biopsy. Urine PCR has good sensitivity (95.5% and specificity ( 98.12% in diagnosis. Imaging techniques like TRUS and CT/MRI also allow good visualization of the lesion and its extension. Urethral tuberculosis is very rare and is usually secondary to upper tract or genital tuberculosis. The presentation may be acute urethritis or chronic stricture or fistulae. The treatment of choice is chemotherapy with 3-4 anti tubercular drugs for initial 6-12 weeks and later 2 drugs for additional 3-6 months. Surgery is usually reserved for cases where chemotherapy fails and is done after 4-6 weeks of ATT. With a high index of suspicion it may be possible to diagnose a larger number of cases of prostatic and urethral tuberculosis especially in this country where tuberculosis is almost endemic.

  5. The Utility of Acute-Phase Proteins in the Assessment of Treatment Response in Dogs With Bacterial Pneumonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viitanen, S. J.; Lappalainen, A. K.; Christensen, M. B.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Acute-phase proteins (APPs) are sensitive markers of inflammation, and serum C-reactive protein (CRP) recently has been shown to be a useful diagnostic marker in dogs with bacterial pneumonia (BP). In humans with community-acquired pneumonia, APPs also have great utility as follow......-up markers aiding in the assessment of treatment response. Objectives: The aim of our study was to investigate the applicability of APPs as markers of treatment response in dogs with BP. Animals: Nineteen dogs diagnosed with BP and 64 healthy dogs. Methods: The study was conducted as a prospective...... longitudinal observational study. Serum CRP, serum amyloid A (SAA), and haptoglobin concentrations were followed during a natural course of BP. Normalization of serum CRP was used to guide the duration of antibiotic treatment (treatment was stopped 5–7 days after CRP normalized) in 8 of 17 dogs surviving...

  6. Bacterial Aggregates Establish at the Edges of Acute Epidermal Wounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Lene; Kragh, Kasper N.; Eickhardt, Steffen R.

    2018-01-01

    for culturing from the wounds and adjacent skin, and the wounds including adjacent skin were excised. Tissue sections were stained with peptide nucleic acid (PNA) fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) probes, counterstained by 4′,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole, and evaluated by confocal laser scanning...... microscopy (CLSM). Results: No bacterial aggregates were detected at day 0. At day 4, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) were the sole bacteria identified by CLSM/PNA-FISH and culturing. CoNS was isolated from 78% of the wound swabs and 48% of the skin swabs. Bacterial aggregates (5–150 μm) were...

  7. Prostate Health Index improves multivariable risk prediction of aggressive prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Stacy; Shin, Sanghyuk S; Broyles, Dennis L; Wei, John T; Sanda, Martin; Klee, George; Partin, Alan W; Sokoll, Lori; Chan, Daniel W; Bangma, Chris H; van Schaik, Ron H N; Slawin, Kevin M; Marks, Leonard S; Catalona, William J

    2017-07-01

    To examine the use of the Prostate Health Index (PHI) as a continuous variable in multivariable risk assessment for aggressive prostate cancer in a large multicentre US study. The study population included 728 men, with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels of 2-10 ng/mL and a negative digital rectal examination, enrolled in a prospective, multi-site early detection trial. The primary endpoint was aggressive prostate cancer, defined as biopsy Gleason score ≥7. First, we evaluated whether the addition of PHI improves the performance of currently available risk calculators (the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial [PCPT] and European Randomised Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer [ERSPC] risk calculators). We also designed and internally validated a new PHI-based multivariable predictive model, and created a nomogram. Of 728 men undergoing biopsy, 118 (16.2%) had aggressive prostate cancer. The PHI predicted the risk of aggressive prostate cancer across the spectrum of values. Adding PHI significantly improved the predictive accuracy of the PCPT and ERSPC risk calculators for aggressive disease. A new model was created using age, previous biopsy, prostate volume, PSA and PHI, with an area under the curve of 0.746. The bootstrap-corrected model showed good calibration with observed risk for aggressive prostate cancer and had net benefit on decision-curve analysis. Using PHI as part of multivariable risk assessment leads to a significant improvement in the detection of aggressive prostate cancer, potentially reducing harms from unnecessary prostate biopsy and overdiagnosis. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the prostate. help diagnose the cause of a man's infertility. A transrectal ultrasound of the prostate gland is typically used to help diagnose symptoms such as: a nodule felt by a physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated ...

  9. Tissue concentrations of prostate-specific antigen in prostatic carcinoma and benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pretlow, T G; Pretlow, T P; Yang, B; Kaetzel, C S; Delmoro, C M; Kamis, S M; Bodner, D R; Kursh, E; Resnick, M I; Bradley, E L

    1991-11-11

    Prostate-specific antigen (PSA), as measured in peripheral blood, is currently the most widely used marker for the assessment of tumor burden in the longitudinal study of patients with carcinoma of the prostate (PCA). Studies from other laboratories have led to the conclusion that a given volume of PCA causes a much higher level of PSA in the peripheral circulation of patients than a similar volume of prostate without carcinoma. We have evaluated PSA in the resected tissues immunohistochemically and in extracts of PCA and of prostates resected because of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Immunohistochemical results were less quantitative than but consistent with the results of the ELISA of tissue extracts. Immunohistochemically, there was considerable heterogeneity in the expression of PSA by both PCA and BPH both within and among prostatic tissues from different patients. While the levels of expression of PSA in these tissues overlap broadly, PSA is expressed at a lower level in PCA than in BPH when PSA is expressed as a function of wet weight of tissue (p = 0.0095), wet weight of tissue/% epithelium (p less than 0.0001), protein extracted from the tissue (p = 0.0039), or protein extracted/% epithelium (p less than 0.0001).

  10. Dose escalation by hypo fractionation in localized prostate cancer - a large single institution experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahadevan, A.; Klein, E.; Kupelian, P.

    2003-01-01

    To report the outcomes of high dose radiation therapy using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) with hypo fractionation in localized prostate cancer at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation. A total of 278 patients with localized prostate cancer were treated with IMRT between 1998 and 2001. All cases had available pretreatment PSA (iPSA) and biopsy Gleason scores (bGS), no nodal metastasis, a minimum 2 year follow-up, and >5 follow-up PSA levels. The frequency by T-stage was: T1-T2A in 86%, T2B-T2C in 9%, and T3 in 5%. The median iPSA was 8.35. The frequency by bGS was: =7 in 45%. The age range for the patients was from 48 to 85 years (median 68 years). The median follow-up was 33 months (range: 24-49 months). The median doses delivered were 83Gy (delivered at 2.5Gy per fraction to 70 Gy; this being equivalent to 83 Gy at standard fractionation of 1.8 Gy using an alpha/beta of 2). The ASTRO definition for biochemical failure was used. Toxicity was assessed using Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) criteria. The 3-year biochemical relapse free survival (bRFS) for the entire cohort at three years was 91%. Any (grade 1 or higher) acute genito-urinary (GU) side effects were seen in 79% of patients. Grade 2 or higher acute GU toxicity was seen in 18% of patients. Any (grade 1 or higher) acute gastro-intestinal (GI) side effects were seen in 65% of patients. Grade 2 or higher acute GI toxicity was seen in 11% of patients. Any (grade 1 or higher) late GU side effects were seen in 3% of patients. Grade 2 or higher late GU toxicity was seen in 1.5% of patients. Any (grade 1 or higher) late GI side effects were seen in 13% of patients. Grade 2 or higher late GI toxicity was seen in 5% of patients. Higher doses of radiation delivered by IMRT resulted in excellent bRFS outcomes in patients with localized prostate cancer receiving external beam radiation therapy. IMRT can be effectively used to safely increase dose delivery without compromising on quality of life

  11. Differentiation of prostatitis and prostate cancer using the Prostate Imaging-Reporting and Data System (PI-RADS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier-Schroers, Michael; Kukuk, Guido; Wolter, Karsten; Decker, Georges; Fischer, Stefan; Marx, Christian; Traeber, Frank; Sprinkart, Alois Martin; Block, Wolfgang; Schild, Hans Heinz; Willinek, Winfried

    2016-07-01

    To determine if prostate cancer (PCa) and prostatitis can be differentiated by using PI-RADS. 3T MR images of 68 patients with 85 cancer suspicious lesions were analyzed. The findings were correlated with histopathology. T2w imaging (T2WI), diffusion weighted imaging (DWI), dynamic contrast enhancement (DCE), and MR-Spectroscopy (MRS) were acquired. Every lesion was given a single PI-RADS score for each parameter, as well as a sum score and a PI-RADS v2 score. Furthermore, T2-morphology, ADC-value, perfusion type, citrate/choline-level, and localization were evaluated. 44 of 85 lesions showed PCa (51.8%), 21 chronic prostatitis (24.7%), and 20 other benign tissue such as hyperplasia or fibromuscular tissue (23.5%). The single PI-RADS score for T2WI, DWI, DCE, as well as the aggregated score including and not including MRS, and the PI-RADS v2-score were all significantly higher for PCa than for prostatitis or other tissue (pprostatitis than for other tissue (p=0.029 and p=0.020), whereas the other parameters were not different. Prostatitis usually presented borderline pathological PI-RADS scores, showed restricted diffusion with ADC≥900mm(2)/s in 100% of cases, was more often indistinctly hypointense on T2WI (66.7%), and localized in the transitional zone (57.1%). An ADC≥900mm(2)/s achieved the highest predictive value for prostatitis (AUC=0.859). Prostatitis can be differentiated from PCa using PI-RADS, since all available parameters are more distinct in cases of cancer. However, there is significant overlap between prostatitis and other benign findings, thus PI-RADS is only suitable to a limited extent for the primary assessment of prostatitis. Restricted diffusion with ADC≥900mm(2)/s is believed to be a good indicator for prostatitis. MRS can help to distinguish between prostatitis and other tissue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Prostate-specific antigen superior serum marker for prostatic carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaney, J A; Allen, M A; Keane, T; Duffy, J J

    1987-05-01

    A new immunoradiometric assay based on dual monoclonal antibody reaction system (Hybritech-TANDEM/sup R/) was used to measure serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) in 39 patients with prostatic carcinoma (CaP), in 57 with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and in 14 without prostatic disease. Serum PSA was elevated in 82% of patients with CaP while PAP was elevated in only 54%. In this and other studies, PSA is superior to conventional serum markers in sensitivity, prediction of CaP stage and in longitudinal monitoring of disease. A 16% false positive rate precludes PSA as a screening test. The assay used was found to be simple and reliable.

  13. Prostate-specific antigen superior serum marker for prostatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heaney, J.A.; Allen, M.A.; Keane, T.; Duffy, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    A new immunoradiometric assay based on dual monoclonal antibody reaction system (Hybritech-TANDEM R ) was used to measure serum levels of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP) in 39 patients with prostatic carcinoma (CaP), in 57 with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and in 14 without prostatic disease. Serum PSA was elevated in 82% of patients with CaP while PAP was elevated in only 54%. In this and other studies, PSA is superior to conventional serum markers in sensitivity, prediction of CaP stage and in longitudinal monitoring of disease. A 16% false positive rate precludes PSA as a screening test. The assay used was found to be simple and reliable. (author)

  14. Prostate radiation in non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer provides an interesting insight into biology of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascoe Abigail C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The natural history of non-metastatic castrate refractory prostate cancer is unknown and treatment options are limited. We present a retrospective review of 13 patients with locally advanced or high risk prostate cancer, initially treated with hormone monotherapy and then treated with prostate radiation after becoming castration refractory. Findings Median PSA response following prostate radiation was 67.4%. Median time to biochemical progression following radiotherapy was 15 months and to detection of metastatic disease was 18.5 months. Median survival from castration resistance (to date of death or November 2011 was 60 months, with median survival from RT 42 months. Conclusion Prostate radiation appears to be beneficial even in patients with potential micrometastatic disease, which supports the hypothesis that the primary tumour is important in the progression of prostate cancer. These results are an interesting addition to the literature on the biology of prostate cancer especially as this data is unlikely to be available in the future due to combined prostate radiation and androgen deprivation therapy now being the standard of care.

  15. SU-D-204-03: Comparison of Patient Positioning Methods Through Modeling of Acute Rectal Toxicity in Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer. Does Quality of Data Matter More Than the Quantity?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X; Fatyga, M; Vora, S; Wong, W; Schild, S; Schild, M [Mayo Clinic Arizona, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Herman, M [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Li, J; Wu, T [Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine if differences in patient positioning methods have an impact on the incidence and modeling of grade >=2 acute rectal toxicity in prostate cancer patients who were treated with Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT). Methods: We compared two databases of patients treated with radiation therapy for prostate cancer: a database of 79 patients who were treated with 7 field IMRT and daily image guided positioning based on implanted gold markers (IGRTdb), and a database of 302 patients who were treated with 5 field IMRT and daily positioning using a trans-abdominal ultrasound system (USdb). Complete planning dosimetry was available for IGRTdb patients while limited planning dosimetry, recorded at the time of planning, was available for USdb patients. We fit Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model to IGRTdb only, and Univariate Logistic Regression (ULR) NTCP model to both databases. We perform Receiver Operating Characteristics analysis to determine the predictive power of NTCP models. Results: The incidence of grade >= 2 acute rectal toxicity in IGRTdb was 20%, while the incidence in USdb was 54%. Fits of both LKB and ULR models yielded predictive NTCP models for IGRTdb patients with Area Under the Curve (AUC) in the 0.63 – 0.67 range. Extrapolation of the ULR model from IGRTdb to planning dosimetry in USdb predicts that the incidence of acute rectal toxicity in USdb should not exceed 40%. Fits of the ULR model to the USdb do not yield predictive NTCP models and their AUC is consistent with AUC = 0.5. Conclusion: Accuracy of a patient positioning system affects clinically observed toxicity rates and the quality of NTCP models that can be derived from toxicity data. Poor correlation between planned and clinically delivered dosimetry may lead to erroneous or poorly performing NTCP models, even if the number of patients in a database is large.

  16. Antibiofilm Activity, Compound Characterization, and Acute Toxicity of Extract from a Novel Bacterial Species of Paenibacillus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saad Musbah Alasil

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of many antimicrobial agents is currently decreasing; therefore, it is important to search for alternative therapeutics. Our study was carried out to assess the in vitro antibiofilm activity using microtiter plate assay, to characterize the bioactive compounds using Ultra Performance Liquid Chromatography-Diode Array Detection and Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and to test the oral acute toxicity on Sprague Dawley rats of extract derived from a novel bacterial species of Paenibacillus strain 139SI. Our results indicate that the crude extract and its three identified compounds exhibit strong antibiofilm activity against a broad range of clinically important pathogens. Three potential compounds were identified including an amino acid antibiotic C8H20N3O4P (MW 253.237, phospholipase A2 inhibitor C21H36O5 (MW 368.512, and an antibacterial agent C14H11N3O2 (MW 253.260. The acute toxicity test indicates that the mortality rate among all rats was low and that the biochemical parameters, hematological profile, and histopathology examination of liver and kidneys showed no significant differences between experimental groups P>0.05. Overall, our findings suggest that the extract and its purified compounds derived from novel Paenibacillus sp. are nontoxic exhibiting strong antibiofilm activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens that can be useful towards new therapeutic management of biofilm-associated infections.

  17. Benefits and medium-term outcome of the Sorin Pericarbon Freedom stentless aortic prosthesis in cases of acute bacterial endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanelli, Guglielmo; Pirro, Fabrizio; Meli, Marco; Trevisan, Davide; Telesca, Mariassunta; Campisano, Barbara; Mussini, Cristina; Barbieri, Andrea

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the ease of use and the advantages of Sorin Pericarbon Freedom (SPF) stentless valve in cases of acute bacterial endocarditis and to check the intermediate-term results after the implant of SPF with respect to resistance to infection, valve deterioration and durability. Between June 2003 and February 2015, 26 patients with active aortic valve bacterial endocarditis underwent aortic valve replacement with SPF pericardial stentless aortic prosthesis. The mean age was 57 ± 18 years; 73% of the patients were in preoperative NYHA class III and VI. Mean Logistic EuroSCORE was 14.2 ± 12.7. Endocarditis occurred in 18 patients with native valves, and in 9 patients with prosthetic valves (4 mechanical aortic valve prostheses; 5 aortic bioprostheses). Aortic root abscesses were observed in 16 cases (61.5%). Surgery was emergent in 3 cases (11.5%). Redo surgery was performed in 9 cases (35%). Cumulative follow-up was 126.8 patient-years (mean 4.9 ± 3.3 years). Operative hospital mortality was 0% for all patients. Residual mean prosthetic gradient at discharge was 9.4 ± 3.6 mmHg. Neither residual aortic incompetence nor residual abscess cavity was observed at discharge. Mean ejection fraction at discharge was 54 ± 8% (Min; Max: 35%; 65%). A total of 4 patients died at follow-up, all for non-cardiac causes. One patient was lost to follow-up. Two patients (8%) underwent non-valve-related reoperation with 0% mortality. Residual mean gradient at follow-up was 7.2 ± 2.1 mmHg. Three patients (17%) presented with mild/moderate aortic incompetence and 89% of patients were in NYHA Class I-II at follow-up. At 9 years, actuarial freedom from valve-related reoperation and from structural valve deterioration was 100%. The SPF aortic prosthesis is a true pericardial stentless prosthesis suitable for the treatment of acute bacterial endocarditis. Intermediate-time results in terms of freedom from reoperation, structural valve deterioration and

  18. From Prostate to Bone: Key Players in Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thobe, Megan N.; Clark, Robert J.; Bainer, Russell O.; Prasad, Sandip M.; Rinker-Schaeffer, Carrie W.

    2011-01-01

    Bone is the most common site for metastasis in human prostate cancer patients. Skeletal metastases are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality and overall greatly affect the quality of life of prostate cancer patients. Despite advances in our understanding of the biology of primary prostate tumors, our knowledge of how and why secondary tumors derived from prostate cancer cells preferentially localize bone remains limited. The physiochemical properties of bone, and signaling molecules including specific chemokines and their receptors, are distinct in nature and function, yet play intricate and significant roles in prostate cancer bone metastasis. Examining the impact of these facets of bone metastasis in vivo remains a significant challenge, as animal models that mimic the natural history and malignant progression clinical prostate cancer are rare. The goals of this article are to discuss (1) characteristics of bone that most likely render it a favorable environment for prostate tumor cell growth, (2) chemokine signaling that is critical in the recruitment and migration of prostate cancer cells to the bone, and (3) current animal models utilized in studying prostate cancer bone metastasis. Further research is necessary to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the extravasation of disseminated prostate cancer cells into the bone and to provide a better understanding of the basis of cancer cell survival within the bone microenvironment. The development of animal models that recapitulate more closely the human clinical scenario of prostate cancer will greatly benefit the generation of better therapies

  19. From Prostate to Bone: Key Players in Prostate Cancer Bone Metastasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thobe, Megan N. [Section of Urology, Department of Surgery, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Clark, Robert J. [Department of Molecular Pathogenesis and Molecular Medicine, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Bainer, Russell O. [Department of Human Genetics, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Prasad, Sandip M.; Rinker-Schaeffer, Carrie W., E-mail: crinkers@uchicago.edu [Section of Urology, Department of Surgery, The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2011-01-27

    Bone is the most common site for metastasis in human prostate cancer patients. Skeletal metastases are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality and overall greatly affect the quality of life of prostate cancer patients. Despite advances in our understanding of the biology of primary prostate tumors, our knowledge of how and why secondary tumors derived from prostate cancer cells preferentially localize bone remains limited. The physiochemical properties of bone, and signaling molecules including specific chemokines and their receptors, are distinct in nature and function, yet play intricate and significant roles in prostate cancer bone metastasis. Examining the impact of these facets of bone metastasis in vivo remains a significant challenge, as animal models that mimic the natural history and malignant progression clinical prostate cancer are rare. The goals of this article are to discuss (1) characteristics of bone that most likely render it a favorable environment for prostate tumor cell growth, (2) chemokine signaling that is critical in the recruitment and migration of prostate cancer cells to the bone, and (3) current animal models utilized in studying prostate cancer bone metastasis. Further research is necessary to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the extravasation of disseminated prostate cancer cells into the bone and to provide a better understanding of the basis of cancer cell survival within the bone microenvironment. The development of animal models that recapitulate more closely the human clinical scenario of prostate cancer will greatly benefit the generation of better therapies.

  20. Granulomatous prostatitis - an infrequent diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RPS Punia

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Granulomatous prostatitis is a rare disorder of pros-tate. We encountered 10 cases of′grmudomatous prosta-titis consisting of 5 cases of non-specific granulomatous prostatitis, 2 cases of xanthogranulomatous prostatitis, I case of tuberculous prostatitis, I case of malakoplakia prostate and I case of granulomatous prostatitis associ-ated with adenocarcinoma prostate. The diagnosis was made by histopathologic examination of trucut biopsy, TURP chips or retropubic prostatectomy specimen. In all the cases, granulomatous prostatitis was an incidental find-ing.

  1. Conformal treatment of prostate cancer with improved targeting: superior prostate-specific antigen response compared to standard treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corn, Benjamin W; Hanks, Gerald E; Schultheiss, Timothy E; Hunt, Margie A; Lee, W Robert; Coia, Lawrence R

    1995-05-15

    , respectively, and in 56% vs. 38% of patients when normalization was defined as {<=} 1.5 ng/ml (p < 0.05). In a multivariate analysis, pretreatment PSA level ({<=} 15 vs. > 15), and the use of conformal irradiation were statistically significant prognostic discriminants of PSA normalization at 1 year while total irradiation dose, clinical stage, and the addition of pelvic fields were not significant. Conclusions: As measured by PSA normalization, conformal techniques with improved targeting produced responses that were significantly better than conventional techniques among patients treated with definitive irradiation. These results, coupled with our previously documented reduction of acute and chronic sequelae, support the continued use of CRT as a more effective method of treatment for prostate cancer.

  2. Stromal androgen receptor roles in the development of normal prostate, benign prostate hyperplasia, and prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Simeng; Chang, Hong-Chiang; Tian, Jing; Shang, Zhiqun; Niu, Yuanjie; Chang, Chawnshang

    2015-02-01

    The prostate is an androgen-sensitive organ that needs proper androgen/androgen receptor (AR) signals for normal development. The progression of prostate diseases, including benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer (PCa), also needs proper androgen/AR signals. Tissue recombination studies report that stromal, but not epithelial, AR plays more critical roles via the mesenchymal-epithelial interactions to influence the early process of prostate development. However, in BPH and PCa, much more attention has been focused on epithelial AR roles. However, accumulating evidence indicates that stromal AR is also irreplaceable and plays critical roles in prostate disease progression. Herein, we summarize the roles of stromal AR in the development of normal prostate, BPH, and PCa, with evidence from the recent results of in vitro cell line studies, tissue recombination experiments, and AR knockout animal models. Current evidence suggests that stromal AR may play positive roles to promote BPH and PCa progression, and targeting stromal AR selectively with AR degradation enhancer, ASC-J9, may allow development of better therapies with fewer adverse effects to battle BPH and PCa. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Management outcome of acute urinary retention: model of prediction.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Daly, Padraig

    2012-01-31

    OBJECTIVES: To assess for predictors of outcome in patients presenting with acute urinary retention (AUR). METHODS: A study was performed in our unit to evaluate trial without catheter (TWOC) and successive management. We assessed for predictors of surgical or medical management, which included: age, volume drained at time of catheterisation, cause of retention, serum creatinine, success of trial of voiding, co-morbidities, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and prostate size on digital rectal examination (DRE). RESULTS: 72 men were entered into the study over an 18-month period: 27 had a successful first TWOC, 20 patients had a second TWOC, and 6 were successful. In total, 31 of the 33 patients with a successful TWOC remained on alpha-blockers without a further episode of AUR within a minimum of 6 months\\' follow-up. Patients failing TWOC were managed by transurethral resection of the prostate (n = 22), long-term catheterisation (n = 15) or prostatic stents (n = 3), and 1 patient died prior to intervention. Three predictors were significant on multivariate analysis: PSA (>2.9 ng\\/ml), prostate size on DRE (large) and volume drained at time of catheterisation (>or=1,000 ml). CONCLUSION: Patients with elevated PSA (>2.9 ng\\/ml), a large prostate size on DRE and a volume drained at time of catheterisation >1,000 ml are best managed by surgical intervention, while those with volumes drained at time of catheterisation of <1,000 ml, a PSA prostate on DRE may be managed medically.

  4. Treatment of prostatic cancer using daily intermittent multiportal therapy (DIMT) technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Keishiro; Irie, Goro (Hokkaido Univ., Sapporo (Japan). School of Medicine); Shirato, Hiroki; Takayama, Naohisa; Sutoh, Susumu

    1992-06-01

    In the treatment of prostatic cancer using a newly proposed intermittent multiportal therapy (DIMT), acute reactions, change in tumor marker levels, and complications more than 6 months after treatment were evaluated. From June 1989 to September 1990, 26 patients with prostatic cancer (stage A2, 3 patients; B, 9; C, 2; D, 10; recurrence, 2) were treated. Fifteen patients were followed up for more than one year, with a mean period of 11.6 months. The treatment schedule is 52.5 Gy in 16 fractions in 4 weeks for radical treatment, and 30.0 Gy in 8 fractions in 2 weeks for palliative treatment. The 360 degree rotation about the patient was divided into 16 fractions, and 2 opposing fractions were used in one day as parallel opposed portals to treat the target volume. The fractions were serially treated one per day, so that 8 treatment days produced a total dose of distribution similar to that for conventional conformational therapy. The size of the irradiation field varied from 6 x 6 cm to 9 x 9 cm. No hormonal therapy was performed for stage A2 or B. Acute effect was minimal including skin erythema 2/26 (7%), pollakisuria 1/26 (4%), mild symptoms due to acute proctitis 9/26 (35%). Abnormality high PSA and/or PAP levels returned to the normal range after the treatment in 7 of 10 patients. Local recurrence was detected in 1 patient with stage D, 15 months after completion of therapy, but 21 other patients continued for more than 6 months with no clinical evidence of local recurrence. No residual disease was detected by biopsy undertaken in 10 patients after more than 6 months. No severe complication was detected after more than 6 months except in 1 patient who needed colostomy for the relief of rectal bleeding. DIMT can have the total dose distribution similar to that of conventional conformational therapy without specific devices. Initial results on prostatic cancer treatment were encouraging. (J.P.N.).

  5. Phase II Study of Long-Term Androgen Suppression With Bevacizumab and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vuky, Jacqueline, E-mail: vukyja@ohsu.edu [Section of Community Hematology/Oncology, Knight Cancer Institute, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR (United States); Pham, Huong T. [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Warren, Sarah; Douglass, Erika [Benaroya Research Institute, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Badiozamani, Kasra [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States); Madsen, Berit; Hsi, Alex [Peninsula Cancer Center, Poulsbo, WA (United States); Song Guobin [Section of Hematology/Oncology and Radiation Oncology, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: We report a Phase II trial assessing the acute and late toxicities of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), long-term androgen suppression (LTAS), and bevacizumab in patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We treated 18 patients with LTAS with bicalutamide and goserelin in combination with bevacizumab and IMRT. Bevacizumab (10 mg/kg every 2 weeks) was administered for the first 16 weeks, and 15 mg/kg was then given every 3 weeks for 12 additional weeks, with an IMRT dose of 77.9 Gy to the prostate, 64.6 Gy to the seminal vesicles, and 57 Gy to the pelvic lymph nodes. Patients were eligible if they had clinical stage T2b to T4, a Gleason sum score of 8 to 10, or a prostate- specific antigen level of 20ng/mL or greater. The primary endpoint of the study was evaluation of acute and late toxicities. Results: The median age was 69 years, with a median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level of 12.5 ng/mL and Gleason score of 8. The pretreatment clinical stage was T1c in 4 patients, T2 in 11, and T3 in 3. All patients completed IMRT with median follow-up of 34 months (range, 28-40 months) The most common Grade 2 or higher toxicities were hypertension (61% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), proteinuria (28% with Grade 2 and 6% with Grade 3), and leucopenia (28% with Grade 2). No Grade 4 or higher acute toxicities were reported. Late toxicities included proctitis (6% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), rectal bleeding (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), hematuria (6% with Grade 2), proteinuria (17% with Grade 2), hyponatremia (6% with Grade 3), cystitis (6% with Grade 3), and urinary retention (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3). Grade 4 prostatitis occurred in 1 patient (6%). Conclusions: Bevacizumab does not appear to exacerbate the acute effects of IMRT. Late toxicities may have been worsened with this regimen. Further investigations of bevacizumab with LTAS and IMRT should be

  6. Phase II Study of Long-Term Androgen Suppression With Bevacizumab and Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in High-Risk Prostate Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuky, Jacqueline; Pham, Huong T.; Warren, Sarah; Douglass, Erika; Badiozamani, Kasra; Madsen, Berit; Hsi, Alex; Song Guobin

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We report a Phase II trial assessing the acute and late toxicities of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), long-term androgen suppression (LTAS), and bevacizumab in patients with high-risk localized prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: We treated 18 patients with LTAS with bicalutamide and goserelin in combination with bevacizumab and IMRT. Bevacizumab (10 mg/kg every 2 weeks) was administered for the first 16 weeks, and 15 mg/kg was then given every 3 weeks for 12 additional weeks, with an IMRT dose of 77.9 Gy to the prostate, 64.6 Gy to the seminal vesicles, and 57 Gy to the pelvic lymph nodes. Patients were eligible if they had clinical stage T2b to T4, a Gleason sum score of 8 to 10, or a prostate- specific antigen level of 20ng/mL or greater. The primary endpoint of the study was evaluation of acute and late toxicities. Results: The median age was 69 years, with a median pretreatment prostate-specific antigen level of 12.5 ng/mL and Gleason score of 8. The pretreatment clinical stage was T1c in 4 patients, T2 in 11, and T3 in 3. All patients completed IMRT with median follow-up of 34 months (range, 28–40 months) The most common Grade 2 or higher toxicities were hypertension (61% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), proteinuria (28% with Grade 2 and 6% with Grade 3), and leucopenia (28% with Grade 2). No Grade 4 or higher acute toxicities were reported. Late toxicities included proctitis (6% of patients with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), rectal bleeding (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3), hematuria (6% with Grade 2), proteinuria (17% with Grade 2), hyponatremia (6% with Grade 3), cystitis (6% with Grade 3), and urinary retention (6% with Grade 2 and 11% with Grade 3). Grade 4 prostatitis occurred in 1 patient (6%). Conclusions: Bevacizumab does not appear to exacerbate the acute effects of IMRT. Late toxicities may have been worsened with this regimen. Further investigations of bevacizumab with LTAS and IMRT should be

  7. Bacterial Contribution in Chronicity of Wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Kashif; Saleha, Shamim; Zhu, Xudong; Huo, Liang; Basit, Abdul; Franco, Octavio Luiz

    2017-04-01

    A wound is damage of a tissue usually caused by laceration of a membrane, generally the skin. Wound healing is accomplished in three stages in healthy individuals, including inflammatory, proliferative, and remodeling stages. Healing of wounds normally starts from the inflammatory phase and ends up in the remodeling phase, but chronic wounds remain in an inflammatory stage and do not show progression due to some specific reasons. Chronic wounds are classified in different categories, such as diabetic foot ulcer (DFU), venous leg ulcers (VLU) and pressure ulcer (PU), surgical site infection (SSI), abscess, or trauma ulcers. Globally, the incidence rate of DFU is 1-4 % and prevalence rate is 5.3-10.5 %. However, colonization of pathogenic bacteria at the wound site is associated with wound chronicity. Most chronic wounds contain more than one bacterial species and produce a synergetic effect that results in previously non-virulent bacterial species becoming virulent and causing damage to the host. While investigating bacterial diversity in chronic wounds, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Peptoniphilus, Enterobacter, Stenotrophomonas, Finegoldia, and Serratia were found most frequently in chronic wounds. Recently, it has been observed that bacteria in chronic wounds develop biofilms that contribute to a delay in healing. In a mature biofilm, bacteria grow slowly due to deficiency of nutrients that results in the resistance of bacteria to antibiotics. The present review reflects the reasons why acute wounds become chronic. Interesting findings include the bacterial load, which forms biofilms and shows high-level resistance toward antibiotics, which is a threat to human health in general and particularly to some patients who have acute wounds.

  8. Study of bacterial meningitis in children below 5 years with comparative evaluation of gram staining, culture and bacterial antigen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadhav Ml, Kala

    2014-04-01

    Bacterial meningitis is one of the most serious infections seen in infants and children, which is associated with acute complications and chronic morbidity. Infections of Central Nervous System (CNS) still dominate the scene of childhood neurological disorders in most of the developing tropical countries. To isolate, identify and determine the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of pathogens associated with bacterial meningitis. We also aimed to comparatively evaluate of Gram staining, culture and bacterial antigen detection in cerebrospinal fluid samples. Present comparative study included 100 CSF samples of children below the age of 5 years, who were clinically suspected meningitis cases. The samples were subjected to Gram staining, culture and Latex agglutination test (LAT). The organisms isolated in the study were characterized and antibiotic susceptibility test was done according to standard guidelines. It was done by using Gaussian test. Of the 100 cases, 24 were diagnosed as Acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) cases by. Gram staining, culture and latex agglutination test. 21 (87.5%) cases were culture positive, with 2 cases being positive for polymicrobial isolates. Gram staining was positive in 17 (70.53%) cases and LAT was positive in 18 (33.33%) cases. Streptococcus pneumoniae was the predominant organism which was isolated and it was sensitive to antibiotics. In the present study, male to female ratio was 1.27:1, which showed a male preponderance. With the combination of Gram staining, culture, and LAT, 100% sensitivity and specificity can be achieved (p Gram staining and LAT can detect 85% of cases of ABM. Bacterial meningitis is a medical emergency and making an early diagnosis and providing treatment early are life saving and they reduce chronic morbidity.

  9. Radiation-Induced Leiomyosarcoma of the Prostate after Brachytherapy for Prostatic Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroto Horiguchi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy (RTx has been employed as a curative therapy for prostatic adenocarcinoma. RTx-induced sarcomas (RISs are rare, late adverse events, representing less than 0.2% of all irradiated patients. RISs are more aggressive tumors than prostatic adenocarcinomas. Herein, we present a case with RTx-induced prostatic leiomyosarcoma after permanent brachytherapy for prostatic adenocarcinoma. A 69-year-old male presented with dysuria and gross hematuria. Six years previously, he had been diagnosed with localized prostate cancer and was treated by permanent brachytherapy. Urethroscopy showed stenosis by a tumor at the prostate. Transurethral prostatectomy was performed for a diagnosis. Based on pathological findings, the diagnosis was leiomyosarcoma of the prostate. He was treated with three cycles of neoadjuvant chemotherapy (CTx that consisted of doxorubicin and ifosfamide (AI, followed by a prostatocystectomy with intrapelvic lymphadenectomy. The tumor extended from the prostate and infiltrated the bladder wall and serosa with lymphatic and venous invasion. The surgical margin was negative, and no residual prostatic adenocarcinoma was observed. The proportion of necrotic tumor cells by neoadjuvant CTx was around 50%. Subsequently, adjuvant CTx was offered, but the patient chose a follow-up without CTx. Local recurrence and lung metastasis were detected by computed tomography 3 months after the surgery. He was treated again with AI. However, CTx was not effective and he died 6 months after the operation. In conclusion, an effective treatment strategy for prostatic sarcoma should be developed in the near future, although the clinical feature of prostatic sarcoma remains unclear due to its rare incidence.

  10. Osteoblast-Prostate Cancer Cell Interaction in Prostate Cancer Bone Metastases

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Navone, Nora

    2001-01-01

    .... This suggests that prostate cancer cells interact with cells from the osteoblastic lineage. To understand the molecular bases of prostatic bone metastases, we established two prostate cancer cell lines, MDA PCa 2a and MDA PCa 2b (1...

  11. Prostatitis and male infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshahrani, Saad; McGill, John; Agarwal, Ashok

    2013-11-01

    The prostate gland plays an important role in male reproduction. Inflammation of the prostate gland (prostatitis) is a common health problem affecting many young and middle aged men. Prostatitis is considered a correctable cause of male infertility, but the pathophysiology and appropriate treatment options of prostatitis in male infertility remain unclear. This literature review will focus on current data regarding prostatitis and its impact on male infertility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Baldness, benign prostate hyperplasia, prostate cancer and androgen levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faydaci, Gökhan; Bilal, Eryildirim; Necmettin, Penpegül; Fatih, Tarhan; Asuman, Orçun; Uğur, Kuyumcuoğlu

    2008-12-01

    We evaluated the pattern of baldness and serum androgen levels in patients with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer. BPH, prostate cancer and androgenic alopecia (AA) were somehow androgen dependent and affect large population of elderly men. A total of 152 patients, 108 patients with BPH and 44 patients with prostate cancer were included in the study. We measured serum total, free and bioavailable testosterone, FSH, LH, prolactin, estradiol, albumin and SHBG levels. Baldness classification was based on Norwood's classification and we categorised baldness as vertex and frontal baldness. The frequency of AA in BPH and prostate cancer groups were not different. We looked for some correlation between the two groups with respect to AA and hormone levels. We did not find any correlation between AA and total testosterone, free testosterone, bioavailable testosterone or SHBG levels in both groups. This prospective study with selected small group of patients showed that there is no difference of male pattern baldness in BPH and prostate cancer patients and also there is no correlation between pattern of baldness and serum androgen levels.

  13. External radiation therapy of prostatic carcinoma and its relationship to hormonal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takada, Chitose; Ito, Koushiro; Nishi, Junko; Yamamoto, Toshihiro; Hatanaka, Yoshimi; Baba, Yuji; Takahashi, Mutsumasa.

    1995-01-01

    From 1980 to 1990, a total of 54 patients with prostatic carcinoma were treated with external radiation therapy at the Kumamoto National Hospital. Ten patients were classified as Stage B, 22 as Stage C, and another 22 as Stage D according to the American Urological Association Clinical Staging System. The 5-year survival for all 54 patients was 30%. The 5-year disease-specific survival was 67% for Stage B, 47% for Stage C, and 26% for Stage D. The 5-year survival was 43% for patients in whom radiation therapy was initiated immediately after the first diagnosis or with less than one year of hormonal therapy, while it was 0% for patients in whom radiation therapy was initiated after more than one year of hormonal therapy (p=0.01). The cause of intercurrent death was acute myocardial infarction in four patients and acute cardiac failure in one. Four of these patients received hormonal therapy for more than one year. The incidence of radiation-induced proctitis was not severe. This study suggests that long-term hormonal therapy prior to radiation therapy worsens the prognosis of patients with prostatic carcinoma. (author)

  14. Seminal epithelium in prostate biopsy can mimic malignant and premalignant prostatic lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arista-Nasr, J; Trolle-Silva, A; Aguilar-Ayala, E; Martínez-Benítez, B

    2016-01-01

    In most prostate biopsies, the seminal epithelium is easily recognised because it meets characteristic histological criteria. However, some biopsies can mimic malignant or premalignant prostatic lesions. The aims of this study were to analyse the histological appearance of the biopsies that mimic adenocarcinomas or preneoplastic prostatic lesions, discuss the differential diagnosis and determine the frequency of seminal epithelia in prostate biopsies. We consecutively reviewed 500 prostate puncture biopsies obtained using the sextant method and selected those cases in which we observed seminal vesicle or ejaculatory duct epithelium. In the biopsies in which the seminal epithelium resembled malignant or premalignant lesions, immunohistochemical studies were conducted that included prostate-specific antigen and MUC6. The most important clinical data were recorded. Thirty-six (7.2%) biopsies showed seminal epithelium, and 7 of them (1.4%) resembled various prostate lesions, including high-grade prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, atypical acinar proliferations, adenocarcinomas with papillary patterns and poorly differentiated carcinoma. The seminal epithelium resembled prostate lesions when the lipofuscin deposit, the perinuclear vacuoles or the nuclear pseudoinclusions were inconspicuous or missing. Five of the 7 biopsies showed mild to moderate cellular atypia with small and hyperchromatic nuclei, and only 2 showed cellular pleomorphism. The patients were alive and asymptomatic after an average of 6 years of progression. The seminal epithelium resembles prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, atypical acinar proliferations and various types of prostatic adenocarcinomas in approximately 1.4% of prostate biopsies. Copyright © 2015 AEU. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. A completely calcified prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinod Priyadarshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostatic calcification and prostatic calculus formation is commonly seen in adult population with chronic prostatitis, however, gross prostatic calcification which involves more than 3 cm2 of the gland is quite rare. We are presenting here one such case in which almost whole glandular prostate was converted into stone which is never reported so far.

  16. High-dose intensity modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer: early toxicity and biochemical outcome in 772 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Fuks, Zvi; Hunt, Margie; Yamada, Yoshiya; Marion, Christine; Ling, C. Clifton; Amols, Howard; Venkatraman, E.S.; Leibel, Steven A.

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To report the acute and late toxicity and preliminary biochemical outcomes in 772 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with high-dose intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Between April 1996 and January 2001, 772 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with IMRT. Treatment was planned using an inverse-planning approach, and the desired beam intensity profiles were delivered by dynamic multileaf collimation. A total of 698 patients (90%) were treated to 81.0 Gy, and 74 patients (10%) were treated to 86.4 Gy. Acute and late toxicities were scored by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group morbidity grading scales. PSA relapse was defined according to The American Society of Therapeutic Radiation Oncology Consensus Statement. The median follow-up time was 24 months (range: 6-60 months). Results: Thirty-five patients (4.5%) developed acute Grade 2 rectal toxicity, and no patient experienced acute Grade 3 or higher rectal symptoms. Two hundred seventeen patients (28%) developed acute Grade 2 urinary symptoms, and one experienced urinary retention (Grade 3). Eleven patients (1.5%) developed late Grade 2 rectal bleeding. Four patients (0.1%) experienced Grade 3 rectal toxicity requiring either one or more transfusions or a laser cauterization procedure. No Grade 4 rectal complications have been observed. The 3-year actuarial likelihood of ≥ late Grade 2 rectal toxicity was 4%. Seventy-two patients (9%) experienced late Grade 2 urinary toxicity, and five (0.5%) developed Grade 3 urinary toxicity (urethral stricture). The 3-year actuarial likelihood of ≥ late Grade 2 urinary toxicity was 15%. The 3-year actuarial PSA relapse-free survival rates for favorable, intermediate, and unfavorable risk group patients were 92%, 86%, and 81%, respectively. Conclusions: These data demonstrate the feasibility of high-dose IMRT in a large number of patients. Acute and late rectal toxicities seem to be

  17. Role of transurethral resection of the prostate in the management of prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szollosi Attila

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Prostate cancer is the second most diagnosed cancer in men, after lung cancer. The gold standard procedure in prostate cancer (PCa diagnosis is the ultrasound guided prostate biopsy. Transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP used in solving the bladder outlet obstruction, can have a role in detection of PCa. The aim of this retrospective study is to examine the role of transurethral resection of the prostate in the diagnosis and therapy of prostate cancer.

  18. NITRIC OXIDE ACTIVITY OF NEUTROPHIL IN BLOOD AND CEREBROSPINAL FLUID OF THE CHILDREN WITH BACTERIAL AND VIRAL MENINGITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. P. Molochniy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of study of nitric oxide activity of neutrophil leucocytic and freeradical processes in blood and cerebrospinal fluid of the children with bacterial and viral meningitison the acute period diseases. The peculiarities or activity of freeradical processes and nitric oxide of cerebrospinal fluid with bacterial meningitis in acute period diseases and activities of studies of ferments with the health children. 

  19. Perceived causes of prostate cancer among prostate cancer survivors in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kok, D.E.G.; Cremers, R.G.H.M.; Aben, K.K.H.; Oort, van I.M.; Kampman, E.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate self-reported causes of prostate cancer among prostate cancer survivors in the Netherlands to obtain insight into the common beliefs and perceptions of risk factors for prostate cancer. Materials and methods A total of 956 prostate cancer survivors,

  20. Inflammatory Responses in a Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia Epithelial Cell Line (BPH-1) Infected with Trichomonas vaginalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang-Su; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Han, Ik-Hwan; Ahn, Myoung-Hee; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2016-04-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis causes the most prevalent sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Trichomonads have been detected in prostatic tissues from prostatitis, benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and prostate cancer. Chronic prostatic inflammation is known as a risk factor for prostate enlargement, benign prostatic hyperplasia symptoms, and acute urinary retention. Our aim was to investigate whether T. vaginalis could induce inflammatory responses in cells of a benign prostatic hyperplasia epithelial cell line (BPH-1). When BPH-1 cells were infected with T. vaginalis, the protein and mRNA of inflammatory cytokines, such as CXCL8, CCL2, IL-1β, and IL-6, were increased. The activities of TLR4, ROS, MAPK, JAK2/STAT3, and NF-κB were also increased, whereas inhibitors of ROS, MAPK, PI3K, NF-κB, and anti-TLR4 antibody decreased the production of the 4 cytokines although the extent of inhibition differed. However, a JAK2 inhibitor inhibited only IL-6 production. Culture supernatants of the BPH-1 cells that had been incubated with live T. vaginalis (trichomonad-conditioned medium, TCM) contained the 4 cytokines and induced the migration of human monocytes (THP-1 cells) and mast cells (HMC-1 cells). TCM conditioned by BPH-1 cells pretreated with NF-κB inhibitor showed decreased levels of cytokines and induced less migration. Therefore, it is suggested that these cytokines are involved in migration of inflammatory cells. These results suggest that T. vaginalis infection of BPH patients may cause inflammation, which may induce lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS).

  1. Prognostic Importance of Small Prostate Size in Men Receiving Definitive Prostate Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Adamovich, Edward; Wallner, Kent E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess whether small prostate size is an adverse prognostic factor in men undergoing brachytherapy in the same manner in which it seems to be for men undergoing radical prostatectomy. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to June 2008, 2024 patients underwent brachytherapy by a single brachytherapist. Median follow-up was 7.4 years. The role of small prostate size (≤20 cm 3 ) as a prognostic factor for biochemical progression-free survival, cause-specific survival, and all-cause mortality was investigated. The differences in survival between men with small and larger prostates were compared using Kaplan-Meier curves and log-rank tests. Results: Median prostate size for the entire cohort was 32.7 cm 3 . For the 167 men with small prostates, median prostate size was 17.4 cm 3 . There was no difference in biochemical progression-free survival (95.2% vs 96.2%, P=.603), cause-specific survival (97.7% vs 98.3%, P=.546), or all-cause mortality (78.0% vs 77.2%, P=.838) at 10 years for men with small prostates compared with men with larger prostates. On univariate and multivariate analysis, small prostate size was not associated with any of the primary outcome measures. Conclusion: Men with small prostates treated with brachytherapy have excellent outcomes and are at no higher risk of treatment failure than men with larger glands. High-quality implants with adequate margins seem sufficient to address the increased adverse risk factors associated with small prostate size.

  2. Nano-sized titanium dioxide toxicity in rat prostate and testis: Possible ameliorative effect of morin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahin, Nancy N; Mohamed, Maha M

    2017-11-01

    This study investigated the effect of short-term oral exposure to nano-sized titanium dioxide (nTiO 2 ) on Wistar rat prostate and testis, and the associating reproductive-related alterations. The study also evaluated the potential ameliorative effect of the natural flavonoid, morin, on nTiO 2 -induced aberrations. Intragastric administration of nTiO 2 (50mg/kg/day for 1, 2 and 3weeks) increased testicular gamma-glutamyltransferase (γ-GT) activity and decreased testicular steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and c-kit gene expression, serum testosterone level and sperm count. nTiO 2 -treated rats also exhibited prostatic and testicular altered glutathione levels, elevated TNF-α levels, up-regulated Fas, Bax and caspase-3 gene expression, down-regulated Bcl-2 gene expression and enhanced prostatic lipid peroxidation. Sperm malformation and elevated testicular acid phosphatase (ACP) activity and malondialdehyde level, serum prostatic acid phosphatase activity, prostate specific antigen (PSA), gonadotrophin and estradiol levels occurred after the 2 and 3week regimens. Morin (30mg/kg/day administered intragastrically for 5weeks) mitigated nTiO 2 -induced prostatic and testicular injury as evidenced by lowering serum PSA level, testicular γ-GT and ACP activities and TNF-α level, along with hampering both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways. Moreover, morin alleviated prostatic lipid peroxidation, raised prostatic glutathione level, and relieved testicular reductive stress. Additionally, morin increased testicular StAR and c-kit mRNA expression, raised the sperm count, reduced sperm deformities and modified the altered hormone profile. Histopathological evaluation supported the biochemical findings. In conclusion, morin could ameliorate nTiO 2 -induced prostatic and testicular injury and the corresponding reproductive-related aberrations via redox regulatory, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic mechanisms, promoting steroidogenesis and

  3. Serenoa repens associated with selenium and lycopene extract and bromelain and methylsulfonylmethane extract are able to improve the efficacy of levofloxacin in chronic bacterial prostatitis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Cai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To date, the management of patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis (CBP is not satisfactory, especially in terms of symptoms relief. Here, we evaluated the efficacy and the safety of a combination of serenoa repens, selenium and lycopene extract + bromelain and methylsulfonylmethane extract associated with levofloxacin in patients with CBP. Materials and methods: All patients with clinical and instrumental diagnosis of CBP, admitted to a single Urological Institution from March to June 2015 were enrolled in this phase III study. All enrolled patients were randomized into two groups: Group A received levofloxacin 500 mg o.d. for 14 days associated with lycopene and methylsulfonylmethane; Group B received levofloxacin (500 mg o.d. for 14 days only. Clinical and microbiological analyses were carried out at the time of admission (T0 and during the followups at 1 month (T1 and 6 months (T2 from the end of the treatment. NIH Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (CPSI, International Prostatic Symptom Score (IPSS and Quality of Well-Being (QoL questionnaires were used. The main outcome measures were the rate of microbiological cure and the improvement in questionnaire results from baseline at the end of the follow-ups period. Results: Forty patients were enrolled in Group A and 39 in Group B. During the follow-up (T1, we recorded a significant changes in terms of NIH-CPSI and IPSS in Group A (mean difference: 17.6 ± 2.65; 12.2 ± 2.33; p < 0.01; p < 0.05, respectively and versus Group B at the intergroup analysis (mean difference: -9 ± 1.82; -8.33 ± 1.71; p < 0.05; p < 0.05, respectively. No differences were reported in terms of microbiological findings between the two groups. At the second follow-up visit (T2, questionnaire results demonstrated statistically significant differences between groups (p < 0.001. One patient in Group A (2.5% and 7 patients (17.9% in Group B showed a symptomatic and microbiological recurrence (p = 0

  4. Prostate Cancer FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundraise for PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us Prostate Cancer FAQs Top 10 Things You Should Know About ... prostate cancer detected? What are the symptoms of prostate cancer? If the cancer is caught at its earliest ...

  5. Prostate Cancer Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fundraise for PCF: Many vs Cancer Contact Us Prostate Cancer Symptoms and Signs Prostate Cancer Basics Risk Factors ... earlier. So what are the warning signs of prostate cancer? Unfortunately, there usually aren’t any early warning ...

  6. Prostate cancer - treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000403.htm Prostate cancer - treatment To use the sharing features on this page, ... drugs is recommended. References National Cancer Institute. Prostate cancer treatment (PDQ): Stages of prostate cancer. Updated July 31, ...

  7. MR spectroscopy of normal prostate, prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia: correlative study of metabolic characteristics with histopathological findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Liangping; Wang Xiaoying; Ding Jianping; Li Feiyu; Shan Gangzhi; Xiao Jiangxi; Jiang Xuexiang

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To quantify and compare the metabolic characteristics of normal prostate, prostate cancer (PCa), and benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) by using MR spectroscopy (MRS). Methods: Twenty-one cases of Pca, 23 cases of BPH proved by operation or systemic biopsy, and 17 cases of normal prostate were examined by MRS. The prostate was divided into 6 regions (left/ right bottom, middle, and tip), and the (Choline + Creatine)/Citrate (CC/C) value of each region was measured. After biopsy, all the puncture locations were marked and enrolled in one of the regions mentioned above. The average CC/C ratios of the normal prostate peripheral zone, the area of Pca, and the central zone of BPH were calculated. Results: The average ratio of CC/C for prostate cancer (2.13 ± 0.82) was statistically higher than that of normal prostate tissue (0.42 ± 0.19) and the regions of BPH (0.62 ± 0.19) (t 0.725, P=0.000; t=0.684, P=0.000). Conclusion: The difference of metabolic levels measured by MRS between PCa and BPH is statistically significant. MRS may be useful in the differential diagnosis of PCa and BPH. (authors)

  8. Procalcitonin to initiate or discontinue antibiotics in acute respiratory tract infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuetz, Philipp; Wirz, Yannick; Sager, Ramon; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Stolz, Daiana; Tamm, Michael; Bouadma, Lila; Luyt, Charles E; Wolff, Michel; Chastre, Jean; Tubach, Florence; Kristoffersen, Kristina B; Burkhardt, Olaf; Welte, Tobias; Schroeder, Stefan; Nobre, Vandack; Wei, Long; Bucher, Heiner C; Bhatnagar, Neera; Annane, Djillali; Reinhart, Konrad; Branche, Angela; Damas, Pierre; Nijsten, Maarten W N; de Lange, Dylan W; Deliberato, Rodrigo O; Lima, Stella Ss; Maravić-Stojković, Vera; Verduri, Alessia; Cao, Bin; Shehabi, Yahya; Beishuizen, Albertus; Jensen, Jens-Ulrik S; Corti, Caspar; van Oers, Jos A; Falsey, Ann R; de Jong, Evelien; Oliveira, Carolina F; Beghe, Bianca; Briel, Matthias; Mueller, Beat

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) comprise of a large and heterogeneous group of infections including bacterial, viral, and other aetiologies. In recent years, procalcitonin (PCT), a blood marker for bacterial infections, has emerged as a promising tool to improve decisions about

  9. Early symptomatic and late seizures in Kosovar children with bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namani, Sadie A; Kuchar, Ernest; Koci, Remzie; Mehmeti, Murat; Dedushi, Kreshnike

    2011-11-01

    Despite the dramatic decrease of mortality rate among children with bacterial meningitis in recent decades, some patients are left with neurologic sequelae. The purpose of this study was to analyze the occurrence of seizures as predictors for meningitis-related deaths or neurological sequelae including late seizures. This study uses a retrospective chart review of 277 children (aged 0-16 years, median 2 years, 162 boys) treated for bacterial meningitis in University Clinical Centre in Prishtina (Kosovo). Of the 277 children treated for bacterial meningitis, 60 children (22%) manifested seizures prior to admission, 57 children (21%) had seizures after admission, and late seizures were diagnosed in 24 children (9%). The risk for adverse outcome was significantly higher in patients who had seizures prior to admission (52/60) and in patients who manifested seizures later than 24 h (41/41; RR 8.17 and 6.78 respectively, p < 0.0001). All children who manifested late seizures were diagnosed with meningitis-related acute neurologic complications: subdural effusion (18), hydrocephalus (6), intracranial bleeding (1), and subdural empyema (2). Of the 60 children who presented seizures prior to admission, only 11 manifested late seizures. Seizures prior to admission were predictors of high risk of adverse outcome in bacterial meningitis in children. The risk of secondary epilepsy (9%) occurred only in children with evident structural neurologic complications during the acute phase of bacterial meningitis.

  10. Nomogram to predict rectal toxicity following prostate cancer radiotherapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Bernard Delobel

    Full Text Available To identify predictors of acute and late rectal toxicity following prostate cancer radiotherapy (RT, while integrating the potential impact of RT technique, dose escalation, and moderate hypofractionation, thus enabling us to generate a nomogram for individual prediction.In total, 972 patients underwent RT for localized prostate cancer, to a total dose of 70 Gy or 80 Gy, using two different fractionations (2 Gy or 2.5 Gy/day, by means of several RT techniques (3D conformal RT [3DCRT], intensity-modulated RT [IMRT], or image-guided RT [IGRT]. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify predictors of acute and late rectal toxicity. A nomogram was generated based on the logistic regression model used to predict the 3-year rectal toxicity risk, with its accuracy assessed by dividing the cohort into training and validation subgroups.Mean follow-up for the entire cohort was 62 months, ranging from 6 to 235. The rate of acute Grade ≥2 rectal toxicity was 22.2%, decreasing when combining IMRT and IGRT, compared to 3DCRT (RR = 0.4, 95%CI: 0.3-0.6, p<0.01. The 5-year Grade ≥2 risks for rectal bleeding, urgency/tenesmus, diarrhea, and fecal incontinence were 9.9%, 4.5%, 2.8%, and 0.4%, respectively. The 3-year Grade ≥2 risk for overall rectal toxicity increased with total dose (p<0.01, RR = 1.1, 95%CI: 1.0-1.1 and dose per fraction (2Gy vs. 2.5Gy (p = 0.03, RR = 3.3, 95%CI: 1.1-10.0, and decreased when combining IMRT and IGRT (RR = 0.50, 95% CI: 0.3-0.8, p<0.01. Based on these three parameters, a nomogram was generated.Dose escalation and moderate hypofractionation increase late rectal toxicity. IMRT combined with IGRT markedly decreases acute and late rectal toxicity. Performing combined IMRT and IGRT can thus be envisaged for dose escalation and moderate hypofractionation. Our nomogram predicts the 3-year rectal toxicity risk by integrating total dose, fraction dose, and RT technique.

  11. Oral Phage Therapy of Acute Bacterial Diarrhea With Two Coliphage Preparations: A Randomized Trial in Children From Bangladesh

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarker, Shafiqul Alam; Sultana, Shamima; Reuteler, Gloria; Moine, Deborah; Descombes, Patrick; Charton, Florence; Bourdin, Gilles; McCallin, Shawna; Ngom-Bru, Catherine; Neville, Tara; Akter, Mahmuda; Huq, Sayeeda; Qadri, Firdausi; Talukdar, Kaisar; Kassam, Mohamed; Delley, Michèle; Loiseau, Chloe; Deng, Ying; El Aidy, Sahar; Berger, Bernard; Brüssow, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is rising in important bacterial pathogens. Phage therapy (PT), the use of bacterial viruses infecting the pathogen in a species-specific way, is a potential alternative. Method T4-like coliphages or a commercial Russian coliphage product or placebo was orally given over 4 days to Bangladeshi children hospitalized with acute bacterial diarrhea. Safety of oral phage was assessed clinically and by functional tests; coliphage and Escherichia coli titers and enteropathogens were determined in stool and quantitative diarrhea parameters (stool output, stool frequency) were measured. Stool microbiota was studied by 16S rRNA gene sequencing; the genomes of four fecal Streptococcus isolates were sequenced. Findings No adverse events attributable to oral phage application were observed (primary safety outcome). Fecal coliphage was increased in treated over control children, but the titers did not show substantial intestinal phage replication (secondary microbiology outcome). 60% of the children suffered from a microbiologically proven E. coli diarrhea; the most frequent diagnosis was ETEC infections. Bacterial co-pathogens were also detected. Half of the patients contained phage-susceptible E. coli colonies in the stool. E. coli represented less than 5% of fecal bacteria. Stool ETEC titers showed only a short-lived peak and were otherwise close to the replication threshold determined for T4 phage in vitro. An interim analysis after the enrollment of 120 patients showed no amelioration in quantitative diarrhea parameter by PT over standard care (tertiary clinical outcome). Stool microbiota was characterized by an overgrowth with Streptococcus belonging to the Streptococcus gallolyticus and Streptococcus salivarius species groups, their abundance correlated with quantitative diarrhea outcome, but genome sequencing did not identify virulence genes. Interpretation Oral coliphages showed a safe gut transit in children, but failed to achieve

  12. Temporal resolution of urinary morbidity following prostate brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrick, Gregory S.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Dorsey, Anthony T.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To report the short-term urinary morbidity for prostate brachytherapy patients without a preimplant history of a transurethral resection of the prostate gland and who received prophylactic and prolonged α-blockers. α-blockers may decrease radiation-induced urethritis and increase urinary flow. Multiple clinical and treatment parameters were evaluated to identify factors associated with increased acute urinary morbidity. Materials and Methods: One hundred seventy consecutive patients without a prior history of a transurethral resection of the prostate gland underwent transperineal ultrasound guided prostate brachytherapy for clinical T1c-T3a carcinoma of the prostate gland. For all patients, an α-blocker was initiated prior to implantation and continued at least until the international prostate symptom score (IPSS) returned to baseline levels. Clinical parameters evaluated for short-term urinary morbidity included patient age, clinical T stage, preimplant IPSS (obtained within 3 weeks of implantation), and prostate ultrasound volume. Treatment parameters included the utilization of neoadjuvant hormonal manipulation, the utilization of moderate dose external beam radiation therapy before implantation, the choice of isotope, the urethral dose, the total implant activity in millicuries, and a variety of dosimetric quality indicators (D 90 and V 100 /V 150 /V 200 ). Catheter dependency and the duration of α-blocker dependency was also evaluated. On average, 11.2 IPSS surveys were obtained for each patient. Results: One hundred fifty of the 170 patients (88.2%) had the urinary catheter permanently removed on day 0. Only one patient required an urinary catheter for > 5 days. Two patients (1.2%) required a subsequent transurethral resection of the prostate gland because of prolonged obstructive/irritative symptoms. To date, no patient has developed an urinary stricture or urinary incontinence. The IPS score on average peaked at 2 weeks following implantation

  13. Appearance and methods of prostatic arteriography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Gang; Yang Zhigang; Meng Fanzhe; Zhang Yingguang; Chen Zhiqiang; Yang Ming

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the methods of prostatic arteriography and evaluate the arteriographic appearance of prostatic blood supply. Methods: Selective and super-selective prostatic arteriographies were performed in 62 patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostatic cancer. Results: The prostatic blood supply originated mainly from inferior vesical artery or internal pudendal artery or prostatic artery (80%). Prostatic arteriography could be performed successfully with skillful catheterization and high resolution DSA. Conclusions: Prostatic arteriography is helpful for evaluating the origin and quantity of prostate vasculature and important to differentiate benign prostatic hyperplasia from prostatic cancer

  14. Focus on JNJ-Q2, a novel fluoroquinolone, for the management of community-acquired bacterial pneumonia and acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones TM

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Travis M Jones,1,2 Steven W Johnson,1,3 V Paul DiMondi,1,4 Dustin T Wilson,1,2 1Department of Pharmacy Practice, College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Campbell University, Buies Creek, 2Department of Pharmacy, Duke University Hospital, Durham, 3Department of Pharmacy, Forsyth Medical Center, Novant Health, Winston-Salem, 4Department of Pharmacy, Durham VA Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA Abstract: JNJ-Q2 is a novel, fifth-generation fluoroquinolone that has excellent in vitro and in vivo activity against a variety of Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms. In vitro studies indicate that JNJ-Q2 has potent activity against pathogens responsible for acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae. JNJ-Q2 also has been shown to have a higher barrier to resistance compared to other agents in the class and it remains highly active against drug-resistant organisms, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus, ciprofloxacin-resistant methicillin-resistant S. aureus, and drug-resistant S. pneumoniae. In two Phase II studies, the efficacy of JNJ-Q2 was comparable to linezolid for ABSSSI and moxifloxacin for CABP. Furthermore, JNJ-Q2 was well tolerated, with adverse event rates similar to or less than other fluoroquinolones. With an expanded spectrum of activity and low potential for resistance, JNJ-Q2 shows promise as an effective treatment option for ABSSSI and CABP. Considering its early stage of development, the definitive role of JNJ-Q2 against these infections and its safety profile will be determined in future Phase III studies. Keywords: JNJ-Q2, fluoroquinolone, ABSSSI, CABP, MRSA

  15. [Bacterial etiology of acute otitis media in Spain in the post-pneumococcal conjugate vaccine era].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumarola, Felix; Salamanca de la Cueva, Ignacio; Sistiaga-Hernando, Alessandra; García-Corbeira, Pilar; Moraga-Llop, Fernando A; Cardelús, Sara; McCoig, Cynthia; Gómez Martínez, Justo Ramón; Rosell Ferrer, Rosa; Iniesta Turpin, Jesús; Devadiga, Raghavendra

    2016-11-01

    Acute otitis media (AOM) is common in children aged <3 years. A pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) (PCV7; Prevenar, Pfizer/Wyeth, USA) has been available in Spain since 2001, which has a coverage rate of 50-60% in children aged <5 years. Children aged ≥3 to 36 months with AOM confirmed by an ear-nose-throat specialist were enrolled at seven centers in Spain (February 2009-May 2012) (GSK study identifier: 111425). Middle-ear-fluid samples were collected by tympanocentesis or spontaneous otorrhea and cultured for bacterial identification. Culture-negative samples were further analyzed using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Of 125 confirmed AOM episodes in 124 children, 117 were analyzed (median age: 17 months (range: 3-35); eight AOM episodes were excluded from analyses. Overall, 69% (81/117) episodes were combined culture- and PCR-positive for ≥1 bacterial pathogen; 44% (52/117) and 39% (46/117) were positive for Haemophilus influenzae (Hi) and Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spn), respectively. 77 of 117 episodes were cultured for ≥1 bacteria, of which 63 were culture-positive; most commonly Spn (24/77; 31%) and Hi (32/77; 42%). PCR on culture-negative episodes identified 48% Hi- and 55% Spn-positive episodes. The most common Spn serotype was 19F (4/24; 17%) followed by 19A (3/24; 13%); all Hi-positive episodes were non-typeable (NTHi). 81/117 AOM episodes (69%) occurred in children who had received ≥1 pneumococcal vaccine dose. NTHi and Spn were the main etiological agents for AOM in Spain. Impact of pneumococcal vaccination on AOM requires further evaluation in Spain, after higher vaccination coverage rate is reached. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Prevalence of benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer and its relative factors in Lanzhou

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhong Ganping; Wang Jiaji; Yue Zhongjin; Chen Xuehong

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer in Lanzhou, an investigation of the incidence of BPH and prostate cancer in 1356 male inhabitants over 50 years of age has been carried out including I-PSS, life quality (L), volume of prostate (V) and digital rectal examination. Plasma testosterone (T) and prostate specific antigen (PSA) were assayed in 145 cases. The incidence of BPH was 35.03%, being 41.04% in urban and 30.05% in rural inhabitants. The increase of BPH has been higher in urban inhabitants (P<0.05). The incidence of prostate cancer was 2.05%, being 3.09% in urban and 2.02% in rural inhabitants, the increase of prostate cancer has been higher in urban inhabitants (P< 0.05). A significant increase of prostate specific antigen was noted in prostate cancer patients (P<0.05). Conclusions: The increase of BPH and prostate cancer has been higher in urban inhabitants. The age, diet and residential areas might associate with a higher incidence of BPH and prostate cancer

  17. Intraoperative real-time planned conformal prostate brachytherapy: Post-implantation dosimetric outcome and clinical implications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zelefsky, Michael J.; Yamada, Yoshiya; Cohen, Gil'ad N.; Sharma, Neha; Shippy, Alison M.; Fridman, David; Zaider, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To report the dosimetric outcome of patients with clinically localized prostate cancer treated with I-125 permanent implantation using an intraoperative real-time conformal planning technique. Methods and materials: Five hundred and sixty-two patients with prostate cancer were treated with I-125 permanent interstitial implantation using a transrectal ultrasound-guided approach. Real-time intraoperative treatment planning software that incorporates inverse planning optimization was used. Dose-volume constraints for this inverse-planning system included: prostate V100 ≥95%, maximal urethral dose ≤120%, and average rectal dose 3 of the rectum was exposed to the prescription dose, the incidence of late grade 2 toxicity rectal toxicity was 9% compared to 4% for smaller volumes of the rectum exposed to similar doses (p = 0.003). No dosimetric parameter in these patients with tight dose confines for the urethra influenced acute or late urinary toxicity. Conclusion: Real-time intraoperative planning was associated with a 90% consistency of achieving the planned intraoperative dose constraints for target coverage and maintaining planned urethral and rectal constraints in a high percentage of implants. Rectal volumes of ≥2.5 cm 3 exposed to the prescription doses were associated with an increased incidence of grade 2 rectal bleeding. Further enhancements in imaging guidance for optimal seed deposition are needed to guarantee optimal dose distribution for all patients. Whether such improvements lead to further reduction in acute and late morbidities associated with therapy requires further study

  18. Prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia-like ductal prostatic adenocarcinoma: A case suitable for active surveillance?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroush Rais-Bahrami

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to typical prostatic ductal adenocarcinoma, prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PIN-like ductal adenocarcinoma is a rare variant of prostate cancer with low-grade clinical behavior. We report a case of a 66-year-old African-American male with an elevated serum prostate-specific antigen who underwent multiparametric prostate magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and MRI/ultrasound fusion-guided biopsies. Pathology demonstrated low-volume Gleason score 3 + 3 = 6 (Grade Group 1, acinar adenocarcinoma involving one core and PIN-like ductal adenocarcinoma on a separate core. Herein, we discuss the potential role of active surveillance for patients with this rare variant of prostate cancer found in the era of advanced imaging with multiparametric MRI for prostate cancer.

  19. Enlarged Prostate (BPH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The prostate is a gland in men. It helps make semen, the fluid that contains sperm. The prostate surrounds the tube that carries urine out of the body. As men age, their prostate grows bigger. If it gets too large, it ...

  20. Prostate Cancer Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prostate. The prostate is a gland in the male reproductive system located just below the bladder (the organ that ... up part of semen . Enlarge Anatomy of the male reproductive and urinary systems, showing the prostate, testicles, bladder, and other organs. ...

  1. Proteinase-Activated Receptor-1 and Immunomodulatory Effects of a PAR1-Activating Peptide in a Mouse Model of Prostatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton, M. Mark; Nelson, Lisa K.; Benediktsson, Hallgrimur; Hollenberg, Morley D.; Buret, Andre G.; Ceri, Howard

    2013-01-01

    Background. Nonbacterial prostatitis has no established etiology. We hypothesized that proteinase-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) can play a role in prostatitis. We therefore investigated the effects of PAR1 stimulation in the context of a new model of murine nonbacterial prostatitis. Methods. Using a hapten (ethanol-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid- (DNBS-)) induced prostatitis model with both wild-type and PAR1-null mice, we examined (1) the location of PAR1 in the mouse prostate and (2) the impact of a PAR1-activating peptide (TFLLR-NH2: PAR1-TF) on ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation. Results. Ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation was maximal at 2 days. In the tissue, PAR1 was expressed predominantly along the apical acini of prostatic epithelium. Although PAR1-TF on its own did not cause inflammation, its coadministration with ethanol-DNBS reduced all indices of acute prostatitis. Further, PAR1-TF administration doubled the prostatic production of interleukin-10 (IL-10) compared with ethanol-DNBS treatment alone. This enhanced IL-10 was not observed in PAR1-null mice and was not caused by the reverse-sequence receptor-inactive peptide, RLLFT-NH2. Surprisingly, PAR1-TF, also diminished ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation in PAR1-null mice. Conclusions. PAR1 is expressed in the mouse prostate and its activation by PAR1-TF elicits immunomodulatory effects during ethanol-DNBS-induced prostatitis. However, PAR1-TF also diminishes ethanol-DNBS-induced inflammation via a non-PAR1 mechanism by activating an as-yet unknown receptor. PMID:24459330

  2. Radiological Findings of Prostatic Arterial Anatomy for Prostatic Arterial Embolization: Preliminary Study in 55 Chinese Patients with Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guodong Zhang

    Full Text Available To describe the prostatic arterial supply using Cone-beam computed tomography (CT and digital subtraction angiography (DSA before prostatic arterial embolization (PAE for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH.In a retrospective study from January 2012 to January 2014, 55 male patients (110 hemipelves with BPH who underwent PAE were evaluated by Cone-beam CT in addition to pelvic DSA during embolization planning. Each hemipelvis was evaluated regarding the number of prostatic arteries (PA and their origins, diameters, territorial perfusion, and anastomoses with adjacent arteries.A total of 114 PAs were identified in 110 hemipelves. There was one PA in 96.4% of the hemipelves (n=106, and two independent PAs in the other 3.6% (n=4. The PA was found to originate from the anterior trunk of the internal iliac artery in 39.5% of cases (n=45 , from the superior vesical artery in 32.6% (n=37, and from the internal pudendal artery in 27.9% of cases (n=32. Extra-prostatic anastomoses between PA and adjacent arteries were found in 39.1% of hemipelves (n=43. Intra-prostatic anastomoses between PAs and contra-lateral prostatic branches were found in 61.8% of hemipelves (n=68. In 67.3% of our study population (n=37, the prostate was dominantly supplied via a unilateral PA.The prostatic vascularization is complex with frequent anatomic variations. Knowledge of the vascular anatomy of the prostate may provide indications for planning PAE and avoiding nontarget embolization.

  3. Relationship of age, prostate-specific antigen, and prostate volume in Indonesian men with benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putra, Ida Bagus O W; Hamid, Agus R A H; Mochtar, Chaidir A; Umbas, Rainy

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the relationship between age, prostate specific antigen (PSA), and prostate volume (PV) in Indonesian men with histologically proven benign prostatic hyperplasia. Data were generated from our BPH database from June 1994 until December 2013. Subjects were men with a minimum age of 40 years with chief complaint of LUTS or urinary retention, diagnosed with BPH. All patients underwent TRUS-guided prostate biopsy. Patients with PSA level >10 ng/mL were excluded from the study to exclude the possibility of occult prostate cancer. PV was measured with TRUS. Appropriate statistical tests were employed for data analysis. In all, 1638 patients were enrolled in our study. There was a statistically significant difference in PSA (P = 0.03) and PV (P Prostate volume was significantly correlated with PSA. Even though the results were weaker, these results are consistent with results in other sets of population. The results vary between different countries and thus, ethnicities. Indonesia is a populous a sociocultural and ethnically diverse country. Therefore, aside from PSA, age, and PV, when investigating men with BPH, ethnicity may also need to be taken into account.

  4. Virtual HDR CyberKnife SBRT for Localized Prostatic Carcinoma: 5-year Disease-free Survival and Toxicity Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Blake Fuller

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSEProstate stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT may substantially recapitulate the dose distribution of high-dose-rate (HDR brachytherapy, representing an externally delivered Virtual HDR treatment method. Herein we present 5-year outcomes from a cohort of consecutively treated Virtual HDR SBRT prostate cancer patients.METHODSSeventy-nine patients were treated from 2006 - 2009, 40 low-risk and 39 intermediate-risk, under IRB-approved clinical trial, to 38 Gy in 4 fractions. The planning target volume (PTV included prostate plus a 2-mm volume expansion in all directions, with selective use of a 5-mm prostate-to-PTV expansion and proximal seminal vesicle coverage in intermediate-risk patients, to better cover potential extraprostatic disease; rectal PTV margin reduced to zero in all cases. The prescription dose covered > 95% of the PTV (V100 >= 95%, with a minimum 150% PTV dose escalation to create HDR-like PTV dose distribution.RESULTSMedian pre-SBRT PSA level of 5.6 ng/mL decreased to 0.05 ng/mL 5 years out and 0.02 ng/mL 6 years out. At least one PSA bounce was seen in 55 patients (70% but only 3 of them subsequently relapsed, Biochemical-relapse-free survival was 100% and 92% for low-risk and intermediate-risk patients, respectively, by ASTRO definition (98% and 92% by Phoenix definition. Local relapse did not occur, distant metastasis-free survival was 100% and 95% by risk-group, and disease-specific survival was 100%. Acute and late grade 2 GU toxicity incidence was 10% and 9%, respectively; with 6% late grade 3 GU toxicity. Acute urinary retention did not occur. Acute and late grade 2 GI toxicity was 0% and 1%, respectively, with no grade 3 or higher toxicity. Of patients potent pre-SBRT, 65% remained so at 5 years.CONCLUSIONSVirtual HDR prostate SBRT creates a very low PSA nadir, a high rate of 5-year disease-free survival and an acceptable toxicity incidence, with results closely resembling those reported post-HDR brachytherapy.

  5. Acute bacterial meningitis in children admitted to the Queen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to design appropriate interventioos, we collected clinical and demographic data prospectively on all children aged one day to 14 years admitted with a diagnosis of bacterial meningitis (BM) from April 1st 1996 to March 31st 1997 to the Queen Elizabeth Central Hospital (QECH), Blantyre Malawi. During the study ...

  6. Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Targeted Bio-orthogonal Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0595 TITLE: Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Targeted Bio -orthogonal Therapy for Metastatic Prostate Cancer...Sep 2016 - 14 Sep 2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Prostate-Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) Targeted Bio -orthogonal Therapy for Metastatic Prostate

  7. Hematuria following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for clinically localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurka, Marie K; Chen, Leonard N; Bhagat, Aditi; Moures, Rudy; Kim, Joy S; Yung, Thomas; Lei, Siyuan; Collins, Brian T; Krishnan, Pranay; Suy, Simeng; Dritschilo, Anatoly; Lynch, John H; Collins, Sean P

    2015-01-01

    Hematuria following prostate radiotherapy is a known toxicity that may adversely affect a patient’s quality of life. Given the higher dose of radiation per fraction using stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) there is concern that post-SBRT hematuria would be more common than with alternative radiation therapy approaches. Herein, we describe the incidence and severity of hematuria following stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for prostate cancer at our institution. Two hundred and eight consecutive patients with prostate cancer treated with SBRT monotherapy with at least three years of follow-up were included in this retrospective analysis. Treatment was delivered using the CyberKnife® (Accuray) to doses of 35–36.25 Gy in 5 fractions. Toxicities were scored using the CTCAE v.4. Hematuria was counted at the highest grade it occurred in the acute and late setting for each patient. Cystoscopy findings were retrospectively reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed. Hematuria-associated bother was assessed via the Expanded Prostate Index Composite (EPIC)-26. The median age was 69 years with a median prostate volume of 39 cc. With a median follow-up of 48 months, 38 patients (18.3%) experienced at least one episode of hematuria. Median time to hematuria was 13.5 months. In the late period, there were three grade 3 events and five grade 2 events. There were no grade 4 or 5 events. The 3-year actuarial incidence of late hematuria ≥ grade 2 was 2.4%. On univariate analysis, prostate volume (p = 0.022) and history of prior procedure(s) for benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) (p = 0.002) were significantly associated with hematuria. On multivariate analysis, history of prior procedure(s) for BPH (p < 0.0001) and α 1A antagonist use (p = 0.008) were significantly associated with the development of hematuria. SBRT for prostate cancer was well tolerated with hematuria rates comparable to other radiation modalities. Patients factors

  8. Prostate Cancer Ambassadors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vines, Anissa I.; Hunter, Jaimie C.; Carlisle, Veronica A.; Richmond, Alan N.

    2016-01-01

    African American men bear a higher burden of prostate cancer than Caucasian men, but knowledge about how to make an informed decision about prostate cancer screening is limited. A lay health advisor model was used to train “Prostate Cancer Ambassadors” on prostate cancer risk and symptoms, how to make an informed decision for prostate-specific antigen screening, and how to deliver the information to members of their community. Training consisted of two, 6-hour interactive sessions and was implemented in three predominantly African American communities over an 8-month period between 2013 and 2014. Following training, Ambassadors committed to contacting at least 10 people within 3 months using a toolkit composed of wallet-sized informational cards for distribution, a slide presentation, and a flip chart. Thirty-two Ambassadors were trained, with more than half being females (59%) and half reporting a family history of prostate cancer. Prostate cancer knowledge improved significantly among Ambassadors (p ≤ .0001). Self-efficacy improved significantly for performing outreach tasks (p < .0001), and among women in helping a loved one with making an informed decision (p = .005). There was also an improvement in collective efficacy in team members (p = .0003). Twenty-nine of the Ambassadors fulfilled their commitment to reach at least 10 people (average number of contacts per Ambassador was 11). In total, 355 individuals were reached with the prostate cancer information. The Ambassador training program proved successful in training Ambassadors to reach communities about prostate cancer and how to make an informed decision about screening. PMID:27099348

  9. Prostatic Artery Embolization for Enlarged Prostates Due to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. How I Do It

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnevale, Francisco C.; Antunes, Alberto A.

    2013-01-01

    Prostatic artery embolization (PAE) has emerged as an alternative to surgical treatments for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Patient selection and refined technique are essential for good results. Urodynamic evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging are very important and technical limitations are related to elderly patients with tortuous and atherosclerotic vessels, anatomical variations, difficulty visualizing and catheterizing small diameter arteries feeding the prostate, and the potential risk of bladder and rectum ischemia. The use of small-diameter hydrophilic microcatheters is mandatory. Patients can be treated safely by PAE with low rates of side effects, reducing prostate volume with clinical symptoms and quality of life improvement without urinary incontinence, ejaculatory disorders, or erectile dysfunction. A multidisciplinary approach with urologists and interventional radiologists is essential to achieve better results

  10. Prostatic Artery Embolization for Enlarged Prostates Due to Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia. How I Do It

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnevale, Francisco C., E-mail: fcarnevale@uol.com.br [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Interventional Radiology Unit (Brazil); Antunes, Alberto A., E-mail: antunesuro@uol.com.br [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Division of Urology (Brazil)

    2013-12-15

    Prostatic artery embolization (PAE) has emerged as an alternative to surgical treatments for benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Patient selection and refined technique are essential for good results. Urodynamic evaluation and magnetic resonance imaging are very important and technical limitations are related to elderly patients with tortuous and atherosclerotic vessels, anatomical variations, difficulty visualizing and catheterizing small diameter arteries feeding the prostate, and the potential risk of bladder and rectum ischemia. The use of small-diameter hydrophilic microcatheters is mandatory. Patients can be treated safely by PAE with low rates of side effects, reducing prostate volume with clinical symptoms and quality of life improvement without urinary incontinence, ejaculatory disorders, or erectile dysfunction. A multidisciplinary approach with urologists and interventional radiologists is essential to achieve better results.

  11. Manipulation of nitric oxide in an animal model of acute liver injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We evaluated the impact of altering nitric oxide release on acute liver injury, the associated gut injury and bacterial translocation, at different time intervals. Methods: An acute rat liver injury model induced by D-galactosamine was used. Sprague Dawley rats were divided into four main groups: normal control, acute liver ...

  12. Flaxseed suppressed prostatic epithelial proliferation in a rat model of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Mahmoud M; Hassan, Nahla S; Schlicht, Michael J; Bosland, Maarten C

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a disease occurring frequently among elderly males, is a slow progressive enlargement of the fibromuscular and epithelial structures of the prostate gland. Dietary factors may influence the prostate and exert an influence on prostatic growth and disease. The current study was undertaken to investigate the protective effect of dietary flaxseed supplementation against testosterone-induced prostatic hyperplasia in male rats. Forty male Wistar rats were divided into 5 groups: (1) untreated control; (2) treatment with testosterone propionate (TP) to induce prostate enlargement; (3) TP-treated group fed a diet containing 5% milled flaxseed; (4) TP-treated group fed a diet containing 10% milled flaxseed; and (5) TP-treated group fed a diet containing 20 ppm finasteride. Treatment with TP significantly increased the absolute and relative weights of different prostatic lobes, serum testosterone (T), and testosterone/estradiol ratio, as well as prostatic vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, RNA synthesis per cell, and epithelial cell proliferation, detected as Ki67 labeling. Histopathological examination did not reveal marked differences in acinar morphology in ventral prostate, whereas morphometric analysis showed significantly increased epithelial cell height. Co-administration of flaxseed or finasteride with TP significantly reduced prostatic VEFG, epithelial cell proliferation, and RNA/DNA ratio, along with a significant increase in serum T and testosterone/estradiol ratio compared with TP-only-treated rats. Our results indicate that flaxseed, similar to the 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride, blocked TP-induced prostate enlargement in a rat model of BPH, likely through suppression of prostatic VEFG and cellular proliferation.

  13. A Rare Prostatic Diagnosis of an Old Man: A Pure Prostatic Leiomyoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. M. van Ulden-Bleumink

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A pure leiomyoma of the prostate is a rare benign tumor. An 82-year-old man was referred to our urology department with gross hematuria and complete urinary retention. Examination revealed a benign prostatic hyperplasia. Transrectal ultrasound showed a prostate of 125 mL. Serum PSA was 1.9 µg/L. A simple retropubic prostatectomy was performed. Histopathological examination showed a pure leiomyoma of the prostate, without the presence of glandular prostate tissue. The diagnosis, characteristics, and treatment of this tumor are described.

  14. Prostate atypia: does repeat biopsy detect clinically significant prostate cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorin, Ryan P; Wiener, Scott; Harris, Cory D; Wagner, Joseph R

    2015-05-01

    While the treatment pathway in response to benign or malignant prostate biopsies is well established, there is uncertainty regarding the risk of subsequently diagnosing prostate cancer when an initial diagnosis of prostate atypia is made. As such, we investigated the likelihood of a repeat biopsy diagnosing prostate cancer (PCa) in patients in which an initial biopsy diagnosed prostate atypia. We reviewed our prospectively maintained prostate biopsy database to identify patients who underwent a repeat prostate biopsy within one year of atypia (atypical small acinar proliferation; ASAP) diagnosis between November 1987 and March 2011. Patients with a history of PCa were excluded. Chart review identified patients who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP), radiotherapy (RT), or active surveillance (AS). For some analyses, patients were divided into two subgroups based on their date of service. Ten thousand seven hundred and twenty patients underwent 13,595 biopsies during November 1987-March 2011. Five hundred and sixty seven patients (5.3%) had ASAP on initial biopsy, and 287 (50.1%) of these patients underwent a repeat biopsy within one year. Of these, 122 (42.5%) were negative, 44 (15.3%) had atypia, 19 (6.6%) had prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, and 102 (35.6%) contained PCa. Using modified Epstein's criteria, 27/53 (51%) patients with PCa on repeat biopsy were determined to have clinically significant tumors. 37 (36.3%) proceeded to RP, 25 (24.5%) underwent RT, and 40 (39.2%) received no immediate treatment. In patients who underwent surgery, Gleason grade on final pathology was upgraded in 11 (35.5%), and downgraded 1 (3.2%) patient. ASAP on initial biopsy was associated with a significant risk of PCa on repeat biopsy in patients who subsequently underwent definitive local therapy. Patients with ASAP should be counseled on the probability of harboring both clinically significant and insignificant prostate cancer. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Prostate-specific antigen-based prostate cancer screening: Past and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberts, Arnout R; Schoots, Ivo G; Roobol, Monique J

    2015-06-01

    Prostate-specific antigen-based prostate cancer screening remains a controversial topic. Up to now, there is worldwide consensus on the statement that the harms of population-based screening, mainly as a result of overdiagnosis (the detection of clinically insignificant tumors that would have never caused any symptoms), outweigh the benefits. However, worldwide opportunistic screening takes place on a wide scale. The European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer showed a reduction in prostate cancer mortality through prostate-specific antigen based-screening. These population-based data need to be individualized in order to avoid screening in those who cannot benefit and start screening in those who will. For now, lacking a more optimal screening approach, screening should only be started after the process of shared decision-making. The focus of future research is the reduction of unnecessary testing and overdiagnosis by further research to better biomarkers and the value of the multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging, potentially combined in already existing prostate-specific antigen-based multivariate risk prediction models. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  16. Nonbacterial prostatitis: a comprehensive review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de la Rosette, J. J.; Debruyne, F. M.

    1991-01-01

    The term 'prostatitis' denotes a condition of inflammation of the prostate. Prostatitis is usually employed to describe any unexplained symptom or condition that might possibly emanate from a disorder of the prostate gland. The diagnosis of nonbacterial prostatitis is reserved for those patients

  17. Outcomes Associated With 3 Treatment Schedules of High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy Monotherapy for Favorable-Risk Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jawad, Maha Saada; Dilworth, Joshua T.; Gustafson, Gary S.; Ye, Hong; Wallace, Michelle [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Martinez, Alvaro [Michigan HealthCare Professionals/21" s" t Century Oncology, Farmington Hills, Michigan (United States); Chen, Peter Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States); Krauss, Daniel J., E-mail: DKrauss@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Royal Oak, Michigan (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: We report the outcomes associated with 3 high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy regimens used as monotherapy for favorable-risk prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Four hundred ninety-four patients with stage ≤T2b prostate cancer, Gleason score ≤7, and prostate-specific antigen levels ≤15 ng/mL underwent HDR brachytherapy as monotherapy. Of those, 319 received 38 Gy in 4 fractions, 79 received 24 Gy in 2 fractions, and 96 received 27 Gy in 2 fractions. Acute and chronic genitourinary (GU) and gastrointestinal (GI) toxicities were defined as side effects occurring ≤6 and >6 months, respectively, after radiation therapy (RT) and were graded according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0. The time to toxicity was calculated from the date of RT completion. Variables were analyzed with χ{sup 2} test. P values <.05 were considered significant. Results: The median overall follow-up time was 4 years (range, 5.5, 3.5, and 2.5 years for 38 Gy, 24 Gy, and 27 Gy, respectively, P<.001). Acute and chronic grade ≥2 GU and GI toxicity profiles were similar among groups. Acceptable rates of grade 2 GU toxicities were seen with overall acute/chronic frequency/urgency, dysuria, retention, incontinence, and hematuria rates of 14%/20%, 6%/7%, 7%/4%, 1.5%/2%, and 1.5%/7%, respectively. Minimal grade 3 and no grade 4 or 5 toxicities were seen. Grade 1, 2, and 3 chronic urethral stricture rates were 0.3%, 2%, and 1%, respectively. All GI toxicities were similar between groups, with overall rates of acute/chronic grade 2 diarrhea, rectal pain/tenesmus, rectal bleeding, and proctitis of 1%/1%, <1%/0.5%, 0%/2%, and <1%/1%, respectively. No grade 3, 4, or 5 toxicities were seen. All comparisons were similar for hormone-naïve patients. The median time to maximal GU/GI toxicity was similar between groups, ranging from 1 to 1.6 to 0.9 to 1.2 years, respectively. There were no differences in clinical outcomes between the 3 groups at 5

  18. Immunohistochemical expression of interleukin-2 receptor and interleukin-6 in patients with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia: association with asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis NIH category IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Paul Friedrich; Seklehner, Stephan; Brustmann, Hermann; Lusuardi, Lukas; Riedl, Claus R

    2015-04-01

    This study prospectively investigated the immunohistochemical expression of interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in patients with prostate cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and a possible association of these conditions with asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis National Institutes of Health (NIH) category IV. The study included 139 consecutive patients who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate and transvesical enucleation of the prostate (n = 82) or radical prostatectomy (n = 57). To characterize inflammatory changes the criteria proposed by Irani et al. [J Urol 1997;157:1301-3] were used. IL-2R and IL-6 expression was studied by a standard immunohistochemical method. Results were correlated with tumour, node, metastasis stage, Gleason scores, total prostate-specific antigen, International Prostate Symptom Score and body mass index. IL-2R and IL-6 expression was significantly higher in neoplastic prostate cancer tissue than in normal tissue of prostate cancer patients (p Prostate cancer patients with prostatitis showed significantly higher IL-2R expression than those without inflammation (p prostatitis than in those without (p prostate cancer tissue than in normal tissue. Patients with asymptomatic inflammatory prostatitis NIH category IV showed significantly greater activity.

  19. Ornithine Decarboxylase Activity Is Required for Prostatic Budding in the Developing Mouse Prostate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Gamat

    Full Text Available The prostate is a male accessory sex gland that produces secretions in seminal fluid to facilitate fertilization. Prostate secretory function is dependent on androgens, although the mechanism by which androgens exert their effects is still unclear. Polyamines are small cationic molecules that play pivotal roles in DNA transcription, translation and gene regulation. The rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine biosynthesis is ornithine decarboxylase, which is encoded by the gene Odc1. Ornithine decarboxylase mRNA decreases in the prostate upon castration and increases upon administration of androgens. Furthermore, testosterone administered to castrated male mice restores prostate secretory activity, whereas administering testosterone and the ornithine decarboxylase inhibitor D,L-α-difluromethylornithine (DFMO to castrated males does not restore prostate secretory activity, suggesting that polyamines are required for androgens to exert their effects. To date, no one has examined polyamines in prostate development, which is also androgen dependent. In this study, we showed that ornithine decarboxylase protein was expressed in the epithelium of the ventral, dorsolateral and anterior lobes of the adult mouse prostate. Ornithine decarboxylase protein was also expressed in the urogenital sinus (UGS epithelium of the male and female embryo prior to prostate development, and expression continued in prostatic epithelial buds as they emerged from the UGS. Inhibiting ornithine decarboxylase using DFMO in UGS organ culture blocked the induction of prostatic buds by androgens, and significantly decreased expression of key prostate transcription factor, Nkx3.1, by androgens. DFMO also significantly decreased the expression of developmental regulatory gene Notch1. Other genes implicated in prostatic development including Sox9, Wif1 and Srd5a2 were unaffected by DFMO. Together these results indicate that Odc1 and polyamines are required for androgens to exert their

  20. The value of prostate specific antigen and prostate specific antigen density in the diagnosis ad treatment of prostate cancer

    International Nu