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Sample records for acute acromioclavicular joint

  1. Management of acute unstable acromioclavicular joint injuries.

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    Cisneros, Luis Natera; Reiriz, Juan Sarasquete

    2016-12-01

    Surgical management of acute unstable acromioclavicular joint injuries should be focused on realigning the torn ends of the ligaments to allow for healing potential. The most widely utilized treatment methods incorporate the use of metal hardware, which can alter the biomechanics of the acromioclavicular joint. This leads to a second surgical procedure for hardware removal once the ligaments have healed. Patients with unstable acromioclavicular joint injuries managed with arthroscopy-assisted procedures have shown good and excellent clinical outcomes, without the need for a second operation. These procedures incorporate a coracoclavicular suspension device aimed to function as an internal brace, narrowing the coracoclavicular space thus allowing for healing of the torn coracoclavicular ligaments. The lesser morbidity of a minimally invasive approach and the possibility to diagnose and treat concomitant intraarticular injuries; no obligatory implant removal, and the possibility of having a straight visualization of the inferior aspect of the base of the coracoid (convenient when placing coracoclavicular fixation systems) are the main advantages of the arthroscopic approach over classic open procedures. This article consists on a narrative review of the literature in regard to the management of acute acromioclavicular joint instability.

  2. A modified surgical technique for reconstruction of an acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation

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    Marchie, Anthony; Kumar, Arun; Catre, Melanio

    2009-01-01

    We report a modified surgical technique for reconstruction of coracoclavicular and acromioclavicular ligaments after acute dislocation of acromioclavicular joint using suture anchors. We have repaired 3 consecutive type III acromioclavicular dislocations with good results. This technique is simple and safe and allows anatomical reconstruction of the ligaments in acute dislocations. PMID:20671868

  3. A modified surgical technique for reconstruction of an acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation

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    Marchie, Anthony; Kumar, Arun; Catre, Melanio

    2009-01-01

    We report a modified surgical technique for reconstruction of coracoclavicular and acromioclavicular ligaments after acute dislocation of acromioclavicular joint using suture anchors. We have repaired 3 consecutive type III acromioclavicular dislocations with good results. This technique is simple and safe and allows anatomical reconstruction of the ligaments in acute dislocations.

  4. Combined arthroscopically assisted coraco- and acromioclavicular stabilization of acute high-grade acromioclavicular joint separations.

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    Hann, Carmen; Kraus, Natascha; Minkus, Marvin; Maziak, Nina; Scheibel, Markus

    2018-01-01

    Due to high rate of persisting dynamic posterior translation (DPT) following isolated coracoclavicular double-button technique for reconstruction of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint reported in the literature, an additional acromioclavicular cerclage was added to the procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiological results of patients with high-grade AC-joint instability treated with a double TightRope technique with an additional percutaneous acromioclavicular cerclage. Fifty-nine patients (6 f/53 m; median age 38.3 (range 21.5-63.4 years) who sustained an acute high-grade AC-joint dislocation (Rockwood type V) were treated using the above-mentioned technique. At the final follow-up, the constant score (CS), the subjective shoulder value (SSV), the Taft score (TF) and the acromioclavicular joint instability score (ACJI) as well as bilateral anteroposterior stress views with 10 kg of axial load and bilateral modified Alexander views were obtained. At a median follow-up of 26.4 (range 20.3-61.0) months, 34 patients scored a median of 90 (33-100) points in the CS, 90 (25-100) % in the SSV, 11 (4-12) points in the TF and 87 (43-100) points in the ACJI. The coracoclavicular (CC) distance was 12.1 (6.5-19.8) mm and the CC difference 2.0 (0.0-11.0) mm. Two patients (5.8%) showed a complete DPT of the AC joint, and fourteen patients (41.1%) displayed a partial DPT. The overall revision rate was 11.7%. Two patients presented implant irritation, one patient a recurrent instability, and one patient suffered from a local infection. The arthroscopically assisted and image-intensifier-controlled double TightRope technique with an additional percutaneous acromioclavicular cerclage leads to good and excellent clinical results after a follow-up of 2 years. The incidence of persisting dynamic horizontal translation is lower compared to isolated coracoclavicular stabilization. Thus, we recommend using the double TightRope implant with an additional

  5. Endobutton technique for the treatment of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocations

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    Raif Özden

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Acromioclavicular (AC joint dislocation is a common injury frequently affecting young athletes. The aim of this study is to evaluate postoperative functional results in cases diagnosed with acute AC joint dislocation stabilized with endobutton system. Methods: This fixation procedure has been applied on 10 patients. Indications of the technique included: a grade V AC joint dislocation (7 patients, and grade III AC joint dislocation (3 patient according to Rockwood classification. The coracoclavicular (CC interval and AC joint were reduced using two endobuttons. One endobutton was fitted on the clavicle and the second was placed at the undersurface of the coracoid. Outcomes were assessed with the Constant shoulder score and visual analog pain scale. Results: All the patients had powerful intraoperative fixation. Immediately after surgery, and 6 weeks, and 1 year postoperative radiographs showed adequate reduction of the CC distance and the AC joint. The mean Constant shoulder score was 89 (88–92 in the injured shoulder and 90 (88–93 in the uninjured shoulder. There was no statically significant difference between the injured and normal shoulder in terms of Constant shoulder score and there was no complication during the process. Conclusion: This technique is a safe and effective method for providing fixation for the AC joint.

  6. Clinical Effect of Acute Complete Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation Treated with Micro-Movable and Anatomical Acromioclavicular Plate

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    Liu, Qingjun; Miao, Jianyun; Lin, Bin; Guo, Zhimin

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: We evaluated the long-term clinical results of acute complete acromioclavicular dislocations treated with micro-movable and anatomical acromioclavicular plate. Methods: Open reduction and internal fixation was performed using the MAAP in 16 patients (10 males, 6 females; mean age 36 years; range16 to 63 years) with acute complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Radiographic evaluations were routinely conducted every 3 weeks until 3 months postoperatively. The MAAP were removed under local anesthesia after 3 months postoperatively. We evaluated the functional results by using the constant scoring system and radiological results in the last follow-up time. The mean follow up was 26 months (range 16 to 38 months). Results: The mean Constant score was 94 (range, 78 to 100). The results were excellent in 12 patients (75.0%), good in 3 patients (18.8%) and satisfactory in 1patient (6.2%). Three patients with scores of 80 to 90 had mild pain during activity, but have not affected the shoulder range of motion. One patient has both some pain and limited range of motion of shoulder joint. All patients but one have returned to their preoperative work without any limitations. Compared to the contralateral side, radiography showed anatomical reposition in the vertical plane in 14 cases, slight loss of reduction in 2 older patients. Conclusion: We recommend the MAAP fixation for surgical treatment of acute complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation as it could provide satisfactory shoulder functions and clinical results, with lower complication rate. However, it is necessary to continue to observe the clinical effects of this fixation technique. PMID:23091410

  7. Concomitant glenohumeral pathologies associated with acute and chronic grade III and grade V acromioclavicular joint injuries.

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    Jensen, Gunnar; Millett, Peter J; Tahal, Dimitri S; Al Ibadi, Mireille; Lill, Helmut; Katthagen, Jan Christoph

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the risk of concomitant glenohumeral pathologies with acromioclavicular joint injuries grade III and V. Patients who underwent arthroscopically-assisted stabilization of acromioclavicular joint injuries grade III or grade V between 01/2007 and 12/2015 were identified in the patient databases of two surgical centres. Gender, age at index surgery, grade of acromioclavicular joint injury (Rockwood III or Rockwood V), and duration between injury and index surgery (classified as acute or chronic) were of interest. Concomitant glenohumeral pathologies were noted and their treatment was classified as debridement or reconstructive procedure. A total of 376 patients (336 male, 40 female) were included. Mean age at time of arthroscopic acromioclavicular joint reconstruction surgery was 42.1 ± 14.0 years. Overall, 201 patients (53%) had one or more concomitant glenohumeral pathologies. Lesions of the biceps tendon complex and rotator cuff were the most common. Forty-five patients (12.0%) had concomitant glenohumeral pathologies that required an additional repair. The remaining 156 patients (41.5%) received a debridement of their concomitant pathologies. Rockwood grade V compared to Rockwood grade III (p = 0.013; odds ratio 1.7), and chronic compared to acute injury were significantly associated with having a concomitant glenohumeral pathology (p = 0.019; odds ratio 1.7). The probability of having a concomitant glenohumeral pathology was also significantly associated with increasing age (p acromioclavicular joint injury of either grade III or V. Twenty-two percent of these patients with concomitant glenohumeral pathologies received an additional dedicated repair procedure. Although a significant difference in occurrence of concomitant glenohumeral pathologies was seen between Rockwood grades III and V, and between acute and chronic lesions, increasing age was identified as the most dominant predictor. Level IV, case series.

  8. Double-button Fixation System for Management of Acute Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation

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    Ali Torkaman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Surgical treatments for acromioclavicular (AC joint dislocation present with some complications. The present study was designed to evaluate the double-button fixation system in the management of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Methods: This cross sectional study, done between February 2011 to June 2014, consisted of 28 patients who underwent surgical management by the double-button fixation system for acute AC joint dislocation. Age, sex, injury mechanism, dominant hand, side with injury, length of follow up, time before surgery, shoulder and hand (DASH, constant and visual analogue scale (VAS scores, and all complications of the cases during the follow up were recorded. Results: The mean age of patients was 33.23±6.7 years. Twenty four patients (85.71% were male and four (14.28% were female. The significant differences were observed between pre-operation VAS, constant shoulder scores and post-operation measurements (P=0.001, P=0.0001, P=0.0001, respectively. There were not any significant differences between right and left coracoclavicular (P=0.238, but two cases of heterotrophic ossifications were recorded. The mean follow-up time was 16.17±4.38 months. Conclusion: According to the results, the double-button fixation system for management of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation has suitable results and minimal damage to the soft tissues surrounding the coracoclavicular ligaments.

  9. Double-button Fixation System for Management of Acute Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation

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    Torkaman, Ali; Bagherifard, Abolfazl; Mokhatri, Tahmineh; Haghighi, Mohammad Hossein Shabanpour; Monshizadeh, Siamak; Taraz, Hamid; Hasanvand, Amin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Surgical treatments for acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation present with some complications. The present study was designed to evaluate the double-button fixation system in the management of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Methods: This cross sectional study, done between February 2011 to June 2014, consisted of 28 patients who underwent surgical management by the double-button fixation system for acute AC joint dislocation. Age, sex, injury mechanism, dominant hand, side with injury, length of follow up, time before surgery, shoulder and hand (DASH), constant and visual analogue scale (VAS) scores, and all complications of the cases during the follow up were recorded. Results: The mean age of patients was 33.23±6.7 years. Twenty four patients (85.71%) were male and four (14.28%) were female. The significant differences were observed between pre-operation VAS, constant shoulder scores and post-operation measurements. There were not any significant differences between right and left coracoclavicular, but two cases of heterotrophic ossifications were recorded. The mean follow-up time was 16.17±4.38 months. Conclusion: According to the results, the double-button fixation system for management of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation has suitable results and minimal damage to the soft tissues surrounding the coracoclavicular ligaments. PMID:26894217

  10. Injury patterns of the acromioclavicular ligament complex in acute acromioclavicular joint dislocations: a cross-sectional, fundamental study.

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    Maier, Dirk; Jaeger, Martin; Reising, Kilian; Feucht, Matthias J; Südkamp, Norbert P; Izadpanah, Kaywan

    2016-09-06

    Horizontal instability impairs clinical outcome following acute acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) reconstruction and may be caused by insufficient healing of the superior acromioclavicular ligament complex (ACLC). However, characteristics of acute ACLC injuries are poorly understood so far. Purposes of this study were to identify different ACLC tear types, assess type-specific prevalence and determine influencing cofactors. This prospective, cross-sectional study comprised 65 patients with acute-traumatic Rockwood-5 (n = 57) and Rockwood-4 (n = 8) injuries treated operatively by means of mini-open ACJ reduction and hook plate stabilization. Mean age at surgery was 38.2 years (range, 19-57 years). Standardized pre- and intraoperative evaluation included assessment of ACLC tear patterns and cofactors related to the articular disc, the deltoid-trapezoidal (DT) fascia and bony ACJ morphology. Articular disc size was quantified as 0 = absent, 1 = remnant, 2 = meniscoid and 3 = complete. All patients showed complete ruptures of the superior ACLC, which could be assigned to four different tear patterns. Clavicular-sided (AC-1) tears were observed in 46/65 (70.8 %), oblique (AC-2) tears in 12/65 (18.5 %), midportion (AC-3) tears in 3/65 (4.6 %) and acromial-sided (AC-4) tears in 4/65 (6.1 %) of cases. Articular disc size manifestation was significantly (P < .001) more pronounced in patients with AC-1 tears (1.89 ± 0.57) compared to patients with AC-2 tears (0.67 ± 0.89). Other cofactors did not influence ACLC tear patterns. ACLC dislocation with incarceration caused mechanical impediment to anatomical ACJ reduction in 14/65 (21.5 %) of cases including all Rockwood-4 dislocations. Avulsion "in continuity" was a consistent mode of failure of the DT fascia. Type-specific operative strategies enabled anatomical ACLC repair of all observed tear types. Acute ACLC injuries follow distinct tear patterns. There exist clavicular-sided (AC-1

  11. Acromioclavicular joint separation

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    Devan Pandya, BS

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 30-year-old male was brought in by ambulance to the emergency department as a trauma activation after a motorcycle accident. The patient was the helmeted rider of a motorcycle traveling at an unknown speed when he lost control and was thrown off his vehicle. He denied loss of consciousness, nausea, or vomiting. The patient’s vital signs were stable and his only complaint was pain around his left shoulder. On exam, the patient had a prominent left clavicle without skin compromise. He had adequate range of motion in the left shoulder with moderate pain, and his left upper extremity was neurovascularly intact. Significant findings: Plain films of the left shoulder showed elevation of the left clavicle above the acromion. There was an increase in the acromioclavicular (AC and coracoclavicular (CC distances (increased joint distances marked with red and blue arrows, respectively. A normal AC joint measures 1-3 mm whereas a normal CC distance measures 11-13 mm.1 The injury was classified as a Rockwood type III AC joint separation. Discussion: The AC joint is a synovial joint between an oval facet on the acromion and a similar facet on the distal end of the clavicle. Horizontal stability is provided by the AC joint while axial stability is provided by the CC joint.2,3 AC joint injuries account for about 9%-12% of shoulder girdle injuries, and the most common mechanism is direct trauma.4,5 Initial evaluation with imaging includes plain films with three views: the anterior-posterior (AP view with the shoulder in internal and external rotation as well as an axillary, or scapula-Y view (sensitivity 40%, specificity 90% for all films.6,7 AC joint injuries are classified by the Rockwood system.8 Type I involves a sprain or incomplete tear of the AC ligaments with an intact CC ligament. The AC joint appears normal on X-ray, but can become widened with stress, achieved by having the patient hold a 10-15 pound weight from each

  12. Management of acromioclavicular joint injuries.

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    Li, Xinning; Ma, Richard; Bedi, Asheesh; Dines, David M; Altchek, David W; Dines, Joshua S

    2014-01-01

    Acromioclavicular joint injuries are among the most common shoulder girdle injuries in athletes and most commonly result from a direct force to the acromion with the arm in an adducted position. Acromioclavicular joint injuries often present with associated injuries to the glenohumeral joint, including an increased incidence of superior labrum anterior posterior (SLAP) tears that may warrant further evaluation and treatment. Anteroposterior stability of the acromioclavicular joint is conferred by the capsule and acromioclavicular ligaments, of which the posterior and superior ligaments are the strongest. Superior-inferior stability is maintained by the coracoclavicular (conoid and trapezoid) ligaments. Type-I or type-II acromioclavicular joint injuries have been treated with sling immobilization, early shoulder motion, and physical therapy, with favorable outcomes. Return to activity can occur when normal shoulder motion and strength are obtained and the shoulder is asymptomatic as compared with the contralateral normal extremity. The management of type-III injuries remains controversial and is individualized. While a return to the previous level of functional activity with nonsurgical treatment has been documented in a number of case series, surgical reduction and coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction has been associated with a favorable outcome and can be considered in patients who place high functional demands on their shoulders or in athletes who participate in overhead sports. Surgical management is indicated for high-grade (≥type IV) acromioclavicular joint injuries to achieve anatomic reduction of the acromioclavicular joint, reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments, and repair of the deltotrapezial fascia. Outcomes after surgical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments have been satisfactory with regard to achieving pain relief and return to functional activities, but further improvements in the biomechanical strength of these

  13. A stress MRI of the shoulder for evaluation of ligamentous stabilizers in acute and chronic acromioclavicular joint instabilities.

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    Izadpanah, Kaywan; Winterer, Jan; Vicari, Marco; Jaeger, Martin; Maier, Dirk; Eisebraun, Leonie; Ute Will, Jutta; Kotter, Elmar; Langer, Mathias; Südkamp, Norbert P; Hennig, Jürgen; Weigel, Mathias

    2013-06-01

    To show the feasibility of a stress magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as a new method for simultaneous evaluation of the morphology and the functional integrity of the acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) ligamentous stabilizers. MRI of four volunteers, 10 patients with acute, and six with chronic ACJ injuries was performed using a 0.25 T open MRI scanner. A 2D-proton-density and a 3D-gradient-echo sequence at rest and under 6.5 kg shoulder traction were performed. Comparative measurements of the coracoclavicular and the acromioclavicular distance were performed. Additionally, the conoid and trapezoid ligament lengths were measured with multiplanar reconstructions. MRI at rest correctly identified tears of the coracoclavicular and the acromioclavicular ligaments in eight patients suffering acute ACJ injuries. Stress application helped to distinguish between partial and complete coracoclavicular ligament tears in two cases. Insufficiency of the ACJ ligaments was present in all acute and chronic ACJ injuries. Stress application in chronic ACJ ligaments revealed isolated insufficiency of the conoid ligament in three cases and of the trapezoid ligament in one case. Combined insufficiency was present in two cases. Stress MRI facilitates simultaneous acquisition of morphologic and functional information of the ACJ stabilizers. In acute ACJ injuries it helps to distinguish between partial and complete ligament tears. In chronic ACJ injuries it provides functional information of the ligament regrinds. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Complications after arthroscopic coracoclavicular reconstruction using a single adjustable-loop-length suspensory fixation device in acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation.

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    Shin, Sang-Jin; Kim, Nam-Ki

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical and radiological outcomes after arthroscopically assisted coracoclavicular (CC) fixation using a single adjustable-loop-length suspensory fixation device for acute acromioclavicular dislocation and to report intraoperative and postoperative complications. Eighteen consecutive patients with acute acromioclavicular dislocation underwent arthroscopically assisted CC fixation using a single TightRope (Arthrex, Naples, FL). Using the Rockwood classification, 3 patients had grade III dislocations, one patient had a grade IV dislocation, and 14 patients had grade V dislocations. The preoperative CC distance of the injured shoulder was 16.1 ± 2.7 mm (range, 11.2 to 21.0 mm), and it increased by 99% ± 36% (range, 17% to 153%) on average compared with the contralateral shoulder. The average CC distance was 10.5 ± 2.5 mm (range, 7.7 to 15.5 mm), and it increased by 30% ± 30% (range, -9.4% to 90%) at the final follow-up. Compared with immediate postoperative radiographs, the CC distance was maintained in 12 patients, increased between 50% and 100% in 4 patients, and increased more than 100% in 2 patients at final follow-up. However, there was no statistical difference in Constant scores between 6 patients with reduction loss (95.6 ± 4.5) and 12 patients with reduction maintenance (98.4 ± 2.5; P = .17). Perioperative complications occurred in 8 patients, including one case of acromioclavicular arthritis, one case of delayed distal clavicular fracture at the clavicular hole of the device, 3 cases of clavicular or coracoid button failures, and 3 cases of clavicular bony erosion. Satisfactory clinical outcomes were obtained after CC fixation using the single adjustable-loop-length suspensory fixation device for acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation. However, CC fixation failure of greater than 50% of the unaffected side in radiological examinations occurred in 33% of the patients within 3 months after the operation

  15. Coronal plane radiographic evaluation of the single TightRope technique in the treatment of acute acromioclavicular joint injury.

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    Yi, Young; Kim, Jeong Woo

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to demonstrate the technical aspects of the single TightRope (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA) procedure for acute acromioclavicular-coracoclavicular joint dislocation, identify the predictive factors influencing its outcome, and assess and validate the significance of specific radiologic parameters. We reviewed true anteroposterior shoulder radiographs of 62 consecutive patients who had undergone surgical reconstruction using TightRope for an acute acromioclavicular-coracoclavicular injury. All patients were followed up for at least 12 months between October 2009 and March 2012 and were divided into dissociated or nondissociated groups according to their surgical outcome. We measured the clavicle tunnel anteroposterior angle, distal clavicular tunnel placement, and tunnel-to-medial coracoid ratio, and compared the parameters in each group after a satisfactory intraclass correlation coefficient reliability test result. The angles of patients in the dissociated group were more acute compared with the angles of those in the nondissociated group, which were perpendicular, as verified statistically using the paired t test. The difference in the distal clavicular tunnel placement and tunnel-to-medial coracoid ratio between the groups was not significant. Therefore, tunnel placement is not influenced by coracoclavicular dissociation. The clavicle tunnel anteroposterior angle can be used as a predictor of surgical outcome in coracoclavicular augmentation surgery. The surgeon should strive to place a perpendicular hole from the clavicle to the coracoid process for the TightRope fixation to enable a successful reconstruction of the acute acromioclavicular-coracoclavicular injury. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Management of chronic unstable acromioclavicular joint injuries.

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    Cisneros, Luis Natera; Reiriz, Juan Sarasquete

    2017-12-01

    The acromioclavicular joint represents the link between the clavicle and the scapula, which is responsible for the synchronized dynamic of the shoulder girdle. Chronic acromioclavicular joint instability involves changes in the orientation of the scapula, which provokes cinematic alterations that might result in chronic pain. Several surgical strategies for the management of patients with chronic and symptomatic acromioclavicular joint instability have been described. The range of possibilities includes anatomical and non-anatomical techniques, open and arthroscopy-assisted procedures, and biological and synthetic grafts. Surgical management of chronic acromioclavicular joint instability should involve the reconstruction of the torn ligaments because it is accepted that from three weeks after the injury, these structures may lack healing potential. Here, we provide a review of the literature regarding the management of chronic acromioclavicular joint instability. Expert opinion, Level V.

  17. Surgical treatment of acute type V acromioclavicular joint dislocations in professional athletes: an anatomic ligament reconstruction with synthetic implant augmentation.

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    Triantafyllopoulos, Ioannis K; Lampropoulou-Adamidou, Kalliopi; Schizas, Nikitas P; Karadimas, Eleftherios V

    2017-12-01

    Most acromioclavicular (AC) joint injuries occur in men in their third decade of life during high-speed or high-impact body contact sports. The management of acute complete AC joint dislocation is surgical. Current surgical techniques include anatomic reconstruction of the main restraints of the AC joint and aim to improve functional outcomes and to reduce the complication rate. We present 10 cases of acute type V AC joint dislocation in professional athletes treated surgically with anatomic reconstruction of the coracoclavicular and AC ligaments and augmentation with the use of a synthetic polyester tape. The minimum follow-up of the patients was 2 years (mean, 48 months; range, 24-86 months). The postoperative functional outcome was assessed at 1 year and 2 years using the Constant-Murley, American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons, and modified University of California-Los Angeles scoring systems. In all cases, the postoperative scores were significantly improved (P < .005 in all comparisons with the preoperative scores), and all patients returned to their preinjury high level of activity 6 months postoperatively. Radiographs at 1 month and 6 months revealed the maintenance of reduction. There were no complications. According to the results of our series of patients, demanding cases of acute AC joint dislocation Rockwood type V, in professional athletes, require anatomic fixation of both coracoclavicular and AC ligaments for return to sports as soon as possible and at the preinjury level of performance. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Arthroscopically Assisted Reconstruction of Acute Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocations: Anatomic AC Ligament Reconstruction With Protective Internal Bracing—The “AC-RecoBridge” Technique

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    Izadpanah, Kaywan; Jaeger, Martin; Ogon, Peter; Südkamp, Norbert P.; Maier, Dirk

    2015-01-01

    An arthroscopically assisted technique for the treatment of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocations is presented. This pathology-based procedure aims to achieve anatomic healing of both the acromioclavicular ligament complex (ACLC) and the coracoclavicular ligaments. First, the acromioclavicular joint is reduced anatomically under macroscopic and radiologic control and temporarily transfixed with a K-wire. A single-channel technique using 2 suture tapes provides secure coracoclavicular stabilization. The key step of the procedure consists of the anatomic repair of the ACLC (“AC-Reco”). Basically, we have observed 4 patterns of injury: clavicular-sided, acromial-sided, oblique, and midportion tears. Direct and/or transosseous ACLC repair is performed accordingly. Then, an X-configured acromioclavicular suture tape cerclage (“AC-Bridge”) is applied under arthroscopic assistance to limit horizontal clavicular translation to a physiological extent. The AC-Bridge follows the principle of internal bracing and protects healing of the ACLC repair. The AC-Bridge is tightened on top of the repair, creating an additional suture-bridge effect and promoting anatomic ACLC healing. We refer to this combined technique of anatomic ACLC repair and protective internal bracing as the “AC-RecoBridge.” A detailed stepwise description of the surgical technique, including indications, technical pearls and pitfalls, and potential complications, is given. PMID:26052493

  19. Can symptomatic acromioclavicular joints be differentiated from asymptomatic acromioclavicular joints on 3-T MR imaging?

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    Choo, Hye Jung; Lee, Sun Joo; Kim, Jung Han; Cha, Seong Sook; Park, Young Mi; Park, Ji Sung; Lee, Jun Woo; Oh, Minkyung

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate retrospectively whether symptomatic acromioclavicular joints can be differentiated from asymptomatic acromioclavicular joints on 3-T MR imaging. This study included 146 patients who underwent physical examination of acromioclavicular joints and 3-T MR imaging of the shoulder. Among them, 67 patients showing positive results on physical examination were assigned to the symptomatic group, whereas 79 showing negative results were assigned to the asymptomatic group. The following MR findings were compared between the symptomatic and asymptomatic groups: presence of osteophytes, articular surface irregularity, subchondral cysts, acromioclavicular joint fluid, subacromial fluid, subacromial bony spurs, joint capsular distension, bone edema, intraarticular enhancement, periarticular enhancement, superior and inferior joint capsular distension degree, and joint capsular thickness. The patients were subsequently divided into groups based on age (younger, older) and the method of MR arthrography (direct MR arthrography, indirect MR arthrography), and all the MR findings in each subgroup were reanalyzed. The meaningful cutoff value of each significant continuous variable was calculated using receiver operating characteristic analysis. The degree of superior capsular distension was the only significant MR finding of symptomatic acromioclavicular joints and its meaningful cutoff value was 2.1mm. After subgroup analyses, this variable was significant in the older age group and indirect MR arthrography group. On 3-T MR imaging, the degree of superior joint capsular distension might be a predictable MR finding in the diagnosis of symptomatic acromioclavicular joints. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Arthroscopic fixation of acute acromioclavicular joint disruption with TightRope™: Outcome and complications after minimum 2 (2-5) years follow-up.

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    Zhang, Li-Feng; Yin, Bo; Hou, Su; Han, Bing; Huang, De-Fa

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the midterm results of arthroscopic reconstruction of acute acromioclavicular (AC) joint disruption using TightRope™ system. We retrospectively assess the results of 24 patients of acute AC joint dislocation who were operated using TightRope system. Constant and University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) scores and coracoclavicular distance were calculated pre- and postoperatively. Data was entered into MS excel and analyzed using the SPSS version 17. The mean follow-up was 39.45 months. Constant and UCLA scores were significantly increased postoperatively. Six patients had partial loss of reduction within 3-6 months and two patients had a failure of construct. Constant score was significantly lower in these patients. TightRope reconstruction of the AC joint is a reproducible and safe alternative to many other techniques of AC joint reconstruction. Early subluxation remains a concern and may reflect the need for technique modification.

  1. Acromioclavicular joint: Normal variation and the diagnosis of dislocation

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    Keats, T.E.; Pope, T.L. Jr.

    1988-04-01

    Acromioclavicular separation is a common traumatic injury. Diagnosis rests on clinical and radiographic findings. However, normal variation in the alignment of the acromioclavicular joint may make the roentgen diagnosis more difficult. We stress the variations of normal alignment at the acromioclavicular joint and offer suggestions for avoiding pitfalls in this clinical situation.

  2. The acromioclavicular joint: Normal variation and the diagnosis of dislocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keats, T.E.; Pope, T.L. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Acromioclavicular separation is a common traumatic injury. Diagnosis rests on clinical and radiographic findings. However, normal variation in the alignment of the acromioclavicular joint may make the roentgen diagnosis more difficult. We stress the variations of normal alignment at the acromioclavicular joint and offer suggestions for avoiding pitfalls in this clinical situation. (orig.)

  3. A retrospective comparative study of arthroscopic fixation in acute Rockwood type IV acromioclavicular joint dislocation: single versus double paired Endobutton technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Liu, Haifeng; Lu, Wei; Li, Dingfu; Zhu, Weimin; Ouyang, Kan; Wu, Bing; Peng, Liangquan; Wang, Daping

    2018-05-24

    Rockwood type IV acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) dislocation is a trauma usually needs surgical treatment. Paired EndoButton technique (PET) is used in treating such condition. However, the effect of using different types of PET (single versus double PET) for fixation remains controversial. This study aims to evaluate and compare the efficacy of single and double PET and to provide a suitable option for the surgeons. We retrospectively reviewed the charts of patients with acute Rockwood type IV ACJ dislocation who had undergone arthroscopic fixation using single or double PET fixation between March 2009 and March 2015. Seventy-eight consecutive patients identified from chart review were picked and were divided into the single and double PET group with 39 cases in each group. The indexes of visual analog scale score (VAS) for pain, the radiographs of the affected shoulder at different time points of the follow-up, the time of return to activities and sports, the constant functional score, and the Karlsson acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) score, were assessed in a minimum of 2 years postoperation. The average coracoclavicular (CC) and acromioclavicular (AC) distances of the affected joints in the double PET group were significantly smaller than those of the single PET group 2 years postoperation (P  0.05). The mean VAS pain score was not significantly different, while significant difference was found for the number and times of cases return to activities and sports, constant functional score, and Karlsson ACJ score (P < 0.05) between the two groups. Therefore, the double PET group has better outcome than the single PET group. Complications including redislocation, button slippage, erosion, or AC joint instability occurred in the single PET group, while the complication in the double PET group was rare. Compared with the single PET, the double PET group achieved better outcome with less complications in arthroscopically treating acute Rockwood type IV ACJ

  4. Arthroscopically assisted reduction of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation using a single double-button device: Medium-term clinical and radiological outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issa, S-P; Payan, C; Le Hanneur, M; Loriaut, P; Boyer, P

    2018-02-01

    Double-button devices for endoscopic management of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation (ACJD) provide satisfactory short-term functional and radiological results. However, little exists in the literature regarding the long- and medium-term results of these implants, especially regarding the evolution of the acromioclavicular joint (ACJ). Satisfactory and steady long- and medium-term outcomes can be achieved in patients with acute ACJD undergoing endoscopically assisted ACJ repair using a single double-button device. A retrospective single-center study was conducted in patients with acute Rockwood III and IV ACJD treated endoscopically with a single double-button device from October 2008 to October 2010, allowing a minimum 5-year follow-up. Functional evaluation used Constant and Quick-DASH scores. Clinical evidence of dislocation recurrence was combined with bilateral Zanca views to assess coracoclavicular distance. Acromioclavicular osteoarthritis was evaluated on the Paxinos test and Zanca views. Nineteen of the 25 operated patients were seen at a mean 76.9±8.5 months' follow-up. Mean age was 34.4±8.3 years. Mean Constant and Quick-DASH scores were 96.2±5.1 and 0.9±1.6 points, respectively. Four patients had a recurrence of their initial dislocation, 3 of whom had positive Paxinos test, whereas the 15 patients without recurrence had a negative test (p=0.004). Five patients had radiological evidence of ACJ osteoarthritis: all 4 patients with recurrence and 1 without (p=0.001). Long- and medium-term radioclinical outcome of endoscopically assisted management of acute ACJD using a single double-button device seems to be satisfactory and steady over time. Recurrence of the initial dislocation appears to be related to onset of degenerative ACJ arthropathy. Therapeutic type IV-Retrospective case series. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Tratamento artroscópico da luxação acromioclavicular aguda com âncoras Arthroscopic treatment of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation using suture anchors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Muntada Cavinatto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apresentar os resultados clínicos e radiográficos de uma série de casos com diagnóstico de Luxação Acromioclavicular (LAC Aguda, tratados através da fixação coracoclavicular com âncoras por via artroscópica. MÉTODO: Vinte pacientes apresentando LAC com menos de 30 dias de evolução foram operados pela técnica da estabilização coracoclavicular com âncoras por via artroscópica. Duas âncoras metálicas com dois fios cada, foram inseridas no coracóide. Os fios foram amarrados sobre a clavícula passando por túneis transósseos claviculares. Para a avaliação radiográfica, foi utilizada a medida comparativa da distância coracoclavicular com o lado contralateral e a avaliação funcional através dos escores de Constant e UCLA o seguimento foi de seis meses. RESULTADO: Dos vinte casos inicialmente selecionados, seis necessitaram de novo procedimento cirúrgico e foram excluídos do estudo. Dos quatorze pacientes restantes, apenas dois mantiveram redução da articulação acromioclavicular, enquanto os demais apresentaram algum grau de desvio no decorrer da evolução. Desconsiderando os pacientes excluídos, os escores de Constant e UCLA tiveram média 94,79 (82-100 e, 32,64 (26-35, respectivamente. CONCLUSÃO: A técnica apresentou um alto índice de perda da redução ao longo da evolução de seis meses. A avaliação funcional apresentou resultado satisfatório com escore médio elevado de Evidência: Nível de Evidência: Nível III, estudo retrospectivo.OBJECTIVE: To present the clinical and radiographic results of a case series of patients with acute acromioclavicular dislocation (AAD treated by arthroscopic coracoclavicular fixation with suture anchors. METHOD: Twenty patients with AAD with less than 30 days since the injury were submitted to a coracoclavicular stabilization procedure using 2 suture anchors placed at the base of the coracoid process. Each suture anchor was connected to 2 strands of No.2

  6. Radiographic changes in the operative treatment of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation – tight rope technique vs. K-wire fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horst, Klemens; Dienstknecht, Thomas; Andruszkow, Hagen; Gradl, Gertraud; Kobbe, Philipp; Pape, Hans-Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Operative treatment of higher degree acromioclavicular joint luxation is common. A new option is made available by the tight rope technique. It claims to provide adequate outcome with the use of a minimally invasive technique. First clinical studies justified its medical use, but the equivalence to established surgical methods remains unclear. We therefore analyzed radiographic data from patients that were treated with the tight rope system (TR) and compared them to those treated with K-wires (KW) fixation. Retrospective study with inclusion criteria: surgery for acromioclavicular joint luxation between 2004 and 2011, classified as Rockwood type III, no concomitant injury, first event injury. We compared pre- and post-operative X-rays with those taken at the end of treatment. Clinical data from follow-ups and radiographic data were evaluated. The main outcome variable was the remaining distance between the acromion and clavicle (ACD), as well as the coracoid process and clavicle (CCD). 27 patients (TR: n=16; KW: n=11) with comparable demographics and injury severity were included. Surgery reduced ACD (TR: p=0.002; KW: p<0.001) and CCD (TR: p=0.001; KW: p=0.003). Heterotopic ossification or postoperative osteolysis was not significantly associated with either one of the procedures. Three patients (18.75%) in the TR group showed impaired wound healing, migrating K-wires were recorded in 2 patients (18.2%) and impingement syndrome occurred in 1 patient (9.1%) with K-wires. Posttraumatic arthritis was not seen. There was a loss of reduction in 2 cases within the TR-group (12.51%) and 1 in the KW-group (9.1%). At last follow up, ACD and CCD were wider in both groups compared to the healthy side. This study shows that the Tight rope system is an effective alternative in the treatment of higher degree acromioclavicular luxation and comparable to the established methods

  7. Transarticular fixation by hook plate versus coracoclavicular stabilization by single multistrand titanium cable for acute Rockwood grade-V acromioclavicular joint dislocation: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, You-Shui; Zhang, Yue-Lei; Ai, Zi-Sheng; Sun, Yu-Qiang; Zhang, Chang-Qing; Zhang, Wei

    2015-11-19

    Hook plate (HP) is popularly used for acute and severely displaced acromioclavicular (AC) dislocations. However, subacromial impingement and acromion osteolysis induced by transarticular fixation are notorious. The current case-control study was to compare transarticular fixation by HP to coracoclavicular (CC) stabilization by single multistrand titanium cable (MSTC). Between January 2006 and August 2009, 24 patients with acute AC dislocations were surgically treated by open reduction and transarticular fixation with HP. These patients were matched to a series of 24 patients, who were managed by CC stabilization with MSTC in the same period. All AC dislocations were graded as Rockwood type V. Implant was removed 8-12 months after the primary operation in all patients, and 12 months at least were needed to assess the maintenance of AC joint. Functional results were evaluated before implant removal as well as in the last follow-up based on Constant-Murley criteria. There were no differences of demographic data including age, dominant gender and side, injury-to-surgery interval, operation time and follow-up period. In terms of functionality, Constant score was 95.8 ± 4.1 in MSTC group, while 76.7 ± 8.0 in HP group before implant removal (P acromioclavicular joint presented in 16 patients (66.7%) in patients treated by HP, while it was found in only 3 patients (12.5%) treated by MSTC (P acromioclavicular dislocation both before and after removal of the implant. Hardware removal is of great benefits for functional improvement in patients treated by HP.

  8. Truly anatomic coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction with 2 Endobutton devices for acute Rockwood type V acromioclavicular joint dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Cheng; Song, Li-Jun; Zhang, Hao; Tang, Guo-Long; Li, Xiang; Fang, Jia-Hu

    2018-06-01

    Truly anatomic coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction (TACCR) according to the original insertions is a creative new method for the treatment of severe acromioclavicular separation. This research analyzed the clinical and radiologic results of TACCR in 25 patients with at least 2-year follow-up. The study enrolled 25 patients with Rockwood type V acromioclavicular joint dislocations who underwent TACCR using 2 Endobutton (Smith & Nephew Inc., Andover, MA, USA) devices from May 2013 to October 2015. Patients were assessed with clinical and radiologic follow-up at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months postoperatively. The clinical assessments consisted of the visual analog scale and the Constant score. The radiographic evaluations were performed by measurements of the coracoclavicular distance. The mean follow-up was 34 ± 6.8 months (range, 24-48 months). The visual analog scale and Constant scores revealed significant advancements from 5 ± 0.9 (range, 4-7) and 45 ± 5.6 (range, 30-54) scores preoperatively to 0 ± 0.5 (range, 0-2) and 95 ± 2.9 (range, 91-98) scores at 24 months postoperatively, respectively. The coracoclavicular distance significantly decreased from 23 ± 5.4 mm (range, 16-34 mm) preoperatively to 8 ± 0.9 mm (range, 7-10 mm) at the final follow-up. TACCR represents a safe, reliable and creative surgical technique that yields good to excellent clinical and radiologic outcomes in the treatment of severe acromioclavicular separation. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A Simple Method for Identifying the Acromioclavicular Joint During Arthroscopic Procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Javed, Saqib; Heasley, Richard; Ravenscroft, Matt

    2013-01-01

    Arthroscopic acromioclavicular joint excision is performed via an anterior portal and is technically demanding. We present a simple method for identifying the acromioclavicular joint during arthroscopic procedures.

  10. Radiological evaluation of the acromioclavicular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaeaetaeinen, U.; Maekelae, A.; Pirinen, A.

    1991-01-01

    X-ray measurement of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint may cause difficulties because of different projections and the lack of a reproducible measurement. In order to find the ideal measurement to estimate the state of the AC joint, 28 healthy adult volunteers were X-rayed. The least vulnerable measurement for errors in projection was the distance between the coracoid process and the upper part of the clavicle. The effect of stress was evaluated; the range of normal AC joint laxity was determined as 3 mm. (orig.)

  11. Radiological evaluation of the acromioclavicular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaeaetaeinen, U.; Maekelae, A. (Kuopio Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Surgery); Pirinen, A. (Kuopio Univ. Central Hospital (Finland). Dept. of Radiology)

    1991-02-01

    X-ray measurement of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint may cause difficulties because of different projections and the lack of a reproducible measurement. In order to find the ideal measurement to estimate the state of the AC joint, 28 healthy adult volunteers were X-rayed. The least vulnerable measurement for errors in projection was the distance between the coracoid process and the upper part of the clavicle. The effect of stress was evaluated; the range of normal AC joint laxity was determined as 3 mm. (orig.).

  12. PREFERED SURGICAL TECHNIQUE USED BY ORTHOPEDISTS IN ACUTE ACROMIOCLAVICULAR DISLOCATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    NISHIMI, ALEXANDRE YUKIO; ARBEX, DEMETRIO SIMÃO; MARTINS, DIOGO LUCAS CAMPOS; GUSMÃO, CARLOS VINICIUS BUARQUE DE; BONGIOVANNI, ROBERTO RANGEL; PASCARELLI, LUCIANO

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine whether training on shoulder and elbow surgery influences the orthopedist surgeons' preferred technique to address acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation (ACD). Methods: A survey was conducted with shoulder and elbow specialists and general orthopedists on their preferred technique to address acute ACD. Results: Thirty specialists and forty-five general orthopedists joined the study. Most specialists preferred the endobutton technique, while most general orthopedists preferred the modified Phemister procedure for coracoclavicular ligament repair using anchors. We found no difference between specialists and general orthopedists in the number of tunnels used to repair the coracoclavicular ligament; preferred method for wire insertion through the clavicular tunnels; buried versus unburied Kirschner wire insertion for acromioclavicular temporary fixation; and time for its removal; and regarding the suture thread used for deltotrapezoidal fascia closure. Conclusion: Training on shoulder and elbow surgery influences the surgeons' preferred technique to address acute ACD. Level of Evidence V, Expert Opinion. PMID:28149190

  13. Operative treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation: a new technique with suture anchors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Jingwei

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: To evaluate clinical outcome of suture anchors in strengthening both acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments in the surgical treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with acute traumatic Rockwood III, IV and V dislocations of the acromioclavicular joint surgically treated at our institute between October 2010 and January 2012 were recruited. All patients underwent open reduction combined with suture anchors. Function was evaluated using the ConstantMurley shoulder score. Clinical and radiographic shoulder ratings were evaluated using Taft criteria at 3, 6 and 12 months. Results:Two cases with fixation loosening were not included in final statistical analysis. Other patients obtained full joint reposition on immediate postoperative radiographs. Follow-up was performed with an average of 15.6 months (range, 12-19. After early range of motion exercises, 96.2% of the patients (25/26 could abduct and elevate their shoulders more than 90 degrees within postoperative 3 months. There was no infection. Average Constant-Murley score was 96.3 points (range, 94-100 and mean Taft shoulder rating was 10.7 points (range, 8-12 at 12 months. Conclusion: The suture anchor is a relatively simple technique and can avoid screw removal which is helpful in reconstructing both acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments in acute traumatic acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Key words: Acromioclavicular joint; Dislocations; Surgery; Suture anchors

  14. Arthroscopically assisted stabilization of acute high-grade acromioclavicular joint separations in a coracoclavicular Double-TightRope technique: V-shaped versus parallel drill hole orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Natascha; Haas, Norbert P; Scheibel, Markus; Gerhardt, Christian

    2013-10-01

    The arthroscopically assisted Double-TightRope technique has recently been reported to yield good to excellent clinical results in the treatment of acute, high-grade acromioclavicular dislocation. However, the orientation of the transclavicular-transcoracoidal drill holes remains a matter of debate. A V-shaped drill hole orientation leads to better clinical and radiologic results and provides a higher vertical and horizontal stability compared to parallel drill hole placement. This was a cohort study; level of evidence, 2b. Two groups of patients with acute high-grade acromioclavicular joint instability (Rockwood type V) were included in this prospective, non-randomized cohort study. 15 patients (1 female/14 male) with a mean age of 37.7 (18-66) years were treated with a Double-TightRope technique using a V-shaped orientation of the drill holes (group 1). 13 patients (1 female/12 male) with a mean age of 40.9 (21-59) years were treated with a Double-TightRope technique with a parallel drill hole placement (group 2). After 2 years, the final evaluation consisted of a complete physical examination of both shoulders, evaluation of the Subjective Shoulder Value (SSV), Constant Score (CS), Taft Score (TF) and Acromioclavicular Joint Instability Score (ACJI) as well as a radiologic examination including bilateral anteroposterior stress views and bilateral Alexander views. After a mean follow-up of 2 years, all patients were free of shoulder pain at rest and during daily activities. Range of motion did not differ significantly between both groups (p > 0.05). Patients in group 1 reached on average 92.4 points in the CS, 96.2 % in the SSV, 10.5 points in the TF and 75.9 points in the ACJI. Patients in group 2 scored 90.5 points in the CS, 93.9 % in the SSV, 10.5 points in the TF and 84.5 points in the ACJI (p > 0.05). Radiographically, the coracoclavicular distance was found to be 13.9 mm (group 1) and 13.4 mm (group 2) on the affected side and 9.3 mm (group 1

  15. Restoration of horizontal stability in complete acromioclavicular joint separations: surgical technique and preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haoqing; Wang, Chuanshun; Wang, Jiandong; Wu, Kai; Hang, Donghua

    2013-11-13

    Our purpose was to investigate the clinical efficacy of arthroscope-assisted acromioclavicular ligament reconstruction in combination with double endobutton coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction for the treatment of complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation. During the period from February 2010 to October 2012, ten patients with Rockwood types IV and V acromioclavicular joint dislocation were hospitalized and nine were treated with acromioclavicular ligament reconstruction combined with double endobutton of coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction. The improvement in shoulder functions was assessed using a Constant score and visual analog scale (VAS) system. The mean follow-up period was 33.6 ± 5.4 months. The mean Constant scores improved from 25.2 ± 6.6 preoperatively to 92.4 ± 6.5 postoperatively, while the mean VAS score decreased from 5.9 ± 1.4 to 1.2 ± 0.9; significant differences were observed. The final follow-up revealed that excellent outcomes were achieved in eight patients and good outcome in two patients. Arthroscope-assisted acromioclavicular ligament reconstruction in combination with double endobutton of coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction is an effective approach for treatment of acute complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation.

  16. Acute acromioclavicular dislocation: a cheaper, easier and all-arthroscopic system. Is it effective in nowadays economical crisis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre, Sergi; Dada, Michelle; Santos, Simon; Lozano, Lluis; Alemany, Xavier; Peidro, Lluis

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this manuscript is to show an effective, easier and cheaper way to reduce acute acromioclavicular (AC) dislocation type III and V (Rockwood classification). Numerous procedures have been described for surgical management of acromioclavicular joint disruption. Newest devices involve an arthroscopic technique that allows nonrigid anatomic fixation of the acromioclavicular joint. Arthroscopically assisted treatment of acute AC joint dislocation is advantageous because it provides good clinical results and few complications. It also allows reviewing glenohumeral associated lesions. This surgical technique requires no specific implants to achieve a correct AC reduction. Actually, economical advantages are very important factors to decide the use of determinate surgical techniques.

  17. Synovial chondromatosis of the acromioclavicular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudawara, Ikuo; Aono, Masanari; Ohzono, Kenji; Mano, Masayuki

    2004-01-01

    A 53-year-old woman presented with swelling of 3 years' duration on the right anterior chest wall. A radiograph showed coarse calcifications around the subclavicular region and erosion of the ipsilateral acromioclavicular joint. Computed tomography also showed calcifications in soft tissue. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a tumor around the clavicle extending to the anterior aspect of chest wall, which had low signal intensity on T1-weighted imaging and high signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging. The histologic findings were of a hyaline cartilage-like mass consisting of mature chondrocytes and an extracellular matrix. The histologic diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis was made. The present case is unusual in respect of the location and size of the tumor. (orig.)

  18. Synovial chondromatosis of the acromioclavicular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudawara, Ikuo; Aono, Masanari; Ohzono, Kenji [Osaka National Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Osaka (Japan); Mano, Masayuki [Osaka National Hospital, Department of Pathology, Osaka (Japan)

    2004-10-01

    A 53-year-old woman presented with swelling of 3 years' duration on the right anterior chest wall. A radiograph showed coarse calcifications around the subclavicular region and erosion of the ipsilateral acromioclavicular joint. Computed tomography also showed calcifications in soft tissue. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a tumor around the clavicle extending to the anterior aspect of chest wall, which had low signal intensity on T1-weighted imaging and high signal intensity on T2-weighted imaging. The histologic findings were of a hyaline cartilage-like mass consisting of mature chondrocytes and an extracellular matrix. The histologic diagnosis of synovial chondromatosis was made. The present case is unusual in respect of the location and size of the tumor. (orig.)

  19. Ultrasound of the coracoclavicular ligaments in the acute phase of an acromioclavicular disjonction: Comparison of radiographic, ultrasound and MRI findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faruch Bilfeld, Marie; Lapègue, Franck; Chiavassa Gandois, Hélène; Bayol, Marie Aurélie; Bonnevialle, Nicolas; Sans, Nicolas

    2017-02-01

    Acromioclavicular joint injuries are typically diagnosed by clinical and radiographic assessment with the Rockwood classification, which is crucial for treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to describe how the ultrasound findings of acromioclavicular joint injury compare with radiography and MRI findings. Forty-seven patients with suspected unilateral acromioclavicular joint injury after acute trauma were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients underwent digital radiography, ultrasound and 3T MRI. A modified Rockwood classification was used to evaluate the coracoclavicular ligaments. The classifications of acromioclavicular joint injuries diagnosed with radiography, ultrasound and MRI were compared. MRI was used as the gold standard. The agreement between the ultrasound and MRI findings was very good, with a correlation coefficient of 0.83 (95 % CI: 0.72-0.90; p acromioclavicular injury. • Ultrasound is appropriate for acute acromioclavicular trauma due to its accessibility. • Ultrasound contributes to the diagnostic work-up of acute lesions of the coracoclavicular ligaments. • Ultrasound is appropriate in patients likely to benefit from surgical treatment. • Ultrasound could be a supplement to standard radiography in acute acromioclavicular trauma.

  20. Epidemiology of Isolated Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Chillemi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Acromioclavicular (AC joint dislocation is a common shoulder problem. However, information about the basic epidemiological features of this condition is scarce. The aim of this study is to analyze the epidemiology of isolated AC dislocation in an urban population. Materials and Methods. A retrospective database search was performed to identify all patients with an AC dislocation over a 5-year period. Gender, age, affected side and traumatic mechanism were taken into account. X-rays were reviewed by two of the authors and dislocations were classified according to the Rockwood’s criteria. Results. A total of 108 patients, with a mean age of 37.5 years were diagnosed with AC dislocation. 105 (97.2% had an isolated AC dislocation, and 3 (2.8% were associated with a clavicle fracture. The estimated incidence was 1.8 per 10000 inhabitants per year and the male-female ratio was 8.5 : 1. 50.5% of all dislocations occurred in individuals between the ages of 20 and 39 years. The most common traumatic mechanism was sport injury and the most common type of dislocation was Rockwood type III. Conclusions. Age between 20 and 39 years and male sex represent significant demographic risk factors for AC dislocation.

  1. The surgical treatment of acromioclavicular joint injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boffano, Michele; Mortera, Stefano; Wafa, Hazem; Piana, Raimondo

    2017-01-01

    Acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) injuries are common, but their incidence is probably underestimated. As the treatment of some sub-types is still debated, we reviewed the available literature to obtain an overview of current management. We analysed the literature using the PubMed search engine. There is consensus on the treatment of Rockwood type I and type II lesions and for high-grade injuries of types IV, V and VI. The treatment of type III injuries remains controversial, as none of the studies has proven a significant benefit of one procedure when compared with another. Several approaches can be considered in reaching a valid solution for treating ACJ lesions. The final outcome is affected by both vertical and horizontal post-operative ACJ stability. Synthetic devices, positioned using early open or arthroscopic procedures, are the main choice for young people. Type III injuries should be managed surgically only in cases with high-demand sporting or working activities. Cite this article: EFORT Open Rev 2017;2:432–437. DOI: 10.1302/2058-5241.2.160085. PMID:29209519

  2. Quantification of dynamic posterior translation in modified bilateral Alexander views and correlation with clinical and radiological parameters in patients with acute acromioclavicular joint instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkus, Marvin; Hann, Carmen; Scheibel, Markus; Kraus, Natascha

    2017-06-01

    Classification of AC-joint instability is based on radiologic evaluation of anteroposterior (a.p.) stress views of both shoulders, neglecting the horizontal component of instability. Recent studies have proposed an association of dynamic posterior translation (DPT) and inferior clinical results. The purpose of this study was to quantify DPT in modified Alexander views and correlate it with other radiological and clinical data. Thirty-two patients (4 f, 28 m, mean age 34.1) with acute AC-joint dislocation (16 = RW III, 16 = RW V) underwent radiological examination including bilateral a.p. stress views with measurement of the coracoclavicular distance (CCD) and bilateral modified Alexander views with different approaches to quantify DPT (overlapping area OA AC , overlapping length OL AC ). In addition, the Constant Score, Subjective Shoulder Value, Taft Score (TF), and the Acromioclavicular Joint Instability Score (ACJI) were obtained. In Rockwood (RW) type III injuries, a mean CCD of 15.8 (9.8-22.8) mm, OA AC of 50.9 (0-216.6) mm 2 , and OL AC of 6.5 (-4.7-17.9) mm were found. RW V patients showed a CCD of 23.1 (13.7-32.0) mm; OA AC 7.0 (0-92.3) mm 2 ; and OL AC -4.8 (-19.6-9.8) mm. Particularly in RW III the CCD, OA AC and OL AC revealed significant correlation with the ACJI (r = -0.64/r = 0.72/r = 0.68, p  0.05 and OL AC with TF: r = -0.45, p > 0.05). Measuring the OL AC is a convenient way for quantifying DPT in modified Alexander views. It showed significant correlation with clinical scores, indicating the relevance of DPT in patients with AC-joint injury.

  3. Combined acromioclavicular joint dislocation and coracoid avulsion in an adult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Monappa; Tripathy, Sujit Kumar; Goyal, Saumitra; Rao, Sarath K

    2015-05-20

    Avulsion fracture of coracoid process with acromioclavicular joint dislocation is extremely rare. We report a case of coracoid avulsion with acromioclavicular disruption in a 24-year-old man who sustained injuries in a road traffic accident. Although acromioclavicular (AC) dislocation was obvious from an initial radiograph, coracoid avulsion was picked up in a CT scan. Open reduction and internal fixations of the coracoid with a 4 mm cannulated screw, an AC joint with two K-wires and an anchor suture, resulted in rapid recovery. The patient had complete range of shoulder movements at the end of 3 months and he resumed his professional activities. After 1 year, he had normal shoulder movement without any functional limitations. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  4. Surgical Treatment Results of Acute Acromioclavicular Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Jabalameli

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Different methods of surgical treatment for acromioclavicular(ACjoint injury were considered in the literature. The purpose of the study was to compare intra- articular AC repair technique with the extra-articular coracoclavicular repair technique for the patients with Rockwood type III and VAC joint injury when indicated.Methods: Nineteen consecutive patients with Rockwood type III and VAC joint injury  were treated with intra-articular (Group I - 12 cases and extra-articular (Group II - 7cases repair technique between 1380 - 1386, and the results reviewed. When the diagnosis was established, the mean age of the patients was 32.5 years (Range, 18 - 60; group I and II 31.8 years (Range, 18 - 60 and 34 years (Range, 22 - 58 respectively. The mean duration of postoperative follow - up was 24 months. The Constant shoulder scoring system was applied to obtain clinical results.   Results: Only in group I, the post-surgical complication was associated with fiber allergy, wound infection and pin site infection in two patients respectively. No pain was detected in fourteen cases. Four patients in group I had occasional mild pain during sport activity, while one case in this group reported severe pain during resting which prevented the patient from activity. Also, there was an ossification in thirteen patients particularly in group I. Clinical results showed the mean constant shoulder score was 93.4 in group I and 97.1 in group II.Conclusion: At the time of the follow - up, there was a clear difference between both groups regarding to postoperative pain and discomfort.Therefore, it seemed that potential cause of pain was due to postoperative complications. An interesting postoperative complication without interfere in the functional outcome was coracoclavicular space ossification in most cases. This was probably because of soft tissue injury during the operation.It seemed that surgical treatment of Rockwood type III and VAC joint injuries

  5. Reconstruction of chronic acromioclavicular joint disruption with artificial ligament prosthesis

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    Chouhan Devendra Kumar

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available 【Abstract】Objective: Management of Rockwood type 3 acromioclavicular disruptions is a matter of debate. Should we adopt conservative or operative measures at first presentation? It is not clear but most of the evidences are in favour of conservative management. We present our expe-rience in managing these patients surgically. Methods: We present a prospective series of eight cases of chronic Rockwood type 3 acromioclavicular joint disruptions treated surgically. Anatomical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligament was done by artificial braided polyester ligament prosthesis. Results: All the patients were able to perform daily activities from an average of the 14th postoperative day. All patients felt an improvement in pain, with decrease in ave-rage visual analogue scale from preoperative 6.5 points (range 3-9 points to 2.0 points (range 0-5 points, Constant score from 59% to 91% and American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons shoulder score from 65 to 93 points postoperatively. These results improved or at least remained stationary on midterm follow-up, and no deterioration was recorded at an average follow-up of 46 months. Conclusion: This midterm outcome analysis of the artificial ligament prosthesis is the first such follow-up study with prosthesis. Our results are encouraging and justify the further use and evaluation of this relatively new and easily reproducible technique. Key words: Acromioclavicular joint; Prostheses and implants; Reconstructive surgical procedures; Ligaments

  6. Controversies relating to the management of acromioclavicular joint dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, C S; Beazley, J; Zywiel, M G; Lawrence, T M; Veillette, C J H

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this review is to address controversies in the management of dislocations of the acromioclavicular joint. Current evidence suggests that operative rather than non-operative treatment of Rockwood grade III dislocations results in better cosmetic and radiological results, similar functional outcomes and longer time off work. Early surgery results in better functional and radiological outcomes with a reduced risk of infection and loss of reduction compared with delayed surgery. Surgical options include acromioclavicular fixation, coracoclavicular fixation and coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction. Although non-controlled studies report promising results for arthroscopic coracoclavicular fixation, there are no comparative studies with open techniques to draw conclusions about the best surgical approach. Non-rigid coracoclavicular fixation with tendon graft or synthetic materials, or rigid acromioclavicular fixation with a hook plate, is preferable to fixation with coracoclavicular screws owing to significant risks of loosening and breakage. The evidence, although limited, also suggests that anatomical ligament reconstruction with autograft or certain synthetic grafts may have better outcomes than non-anatomical transfer of the coracoacromial ligament. It has been suggested that this is due to better restoration horizontal and vertical stability of the joint. Despite the large number of recently published studies, there remains a lack of high-quality evidence, making it difficult to draw firm conclusions regarding these controversial issues.

  7. Ultrasound of the coracoclavicular ligaments in the acute phase of an acromioclavicular disjunction: Comparison of radiographic, ultrasound and MRI findings

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    Faruch Bilfeld, Marie; Lapegue, Franck; Chiavassa Gandois, Helene; Bayol, Marie Aurelie; Sans, Nicolas [CHU Toulouse-Purpan, Service de Radiologie, Toulouse Cedex 9 (France); Bonnevialle, Nicolas [CHU Toulouse-Purpan, Service d' Orthopedie, Toulouse Cedex 9 (France)

    2017-02-15

    Acromioclavicular joint injuries are typically diagnosed by clinical and radiographic assessment with the Rockwood classification, which is crucial for treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to describe how the ultrasound findings of acromioclavicular joint injury compare with radiography and MRI findings. Forty-seven patients with suspected unilateral acromioclavicular joint injury after acute trauma were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients underwent digital radiography, ultrasound and 3T MRI. A modified Rockwood classification was used to evaluate the coracoclavicular ligaments. The classifications of acromioclavicular joint injuries diagnosed with radiography, ultrasound and MRI were compared. MRI was used as the gold standard. The agreement between the ultrasound and MRI findings was very good, with a correlation coefficient of 0.83 (95 % CI: 0.72-0.90; p < 0.0001). Ultrasound detected coracoclavicular ligament injuries with a sensitivity of 88.9 %, specificity of 90.0 %, positive predictive value of 92.3 % and negative predictive value of 85.7 %. The agreement between the ultrasound and radiography findings was poor, with a correlation coefficient of 0.69 (95 % CI: 0.51-0.82; p < 0.0001). Ultrasound is an effective examination for the diagnostic work-up of lesions of the coracoclavicular ligaments in the acute phase of an acromioclavicular injury. (orig.)

  8. Ultrasound of the coracoclavicular ligaments in the acute phase of an acromioclavicular disjunction: Comparison of radiographic, ultrasound and MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faruch Bilfeld, Marie; Lapegue, Franck; Chiavassa Gandois, Helene; Bayol, Marie Aurelie; Sans, Nicolas; Bonnevialle, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Acromioclavicular joint injuries are typically diagnosed by clinical and radiographic assessment with the Rockwood classification, which is crucial for treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to describe how the ultrasound findings of acromioclavicular joint injury compare with radiography and MRI findings. Forty-seven patients with suspected unilateral acromioclavicular joint injury after acute trauma were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients underwent digital radiography, ultrasound and 3T MRI. A modified Rockwood classification was used to evaluate the coracoclavicular ligaments. The classifications of acromioclavicular joint injuries diagnosed with radiography, ultrasound and MRI were compared. MRI was used as the gold standard. The agreement between the ultrasound and MRI findings was very good, with a correlation coefficient of 0.83 (95 % CI: 0.72-0.90; p < 0.0001). Ultrasound detected coracoclavicular ligament injuries with a sensitivity of 88.9 %, specificity of 90.0 %, positive predictive value of 92.3 % and negative predictive value of 85.7 %. The agreement between the ultrasound and radiography findings was poor, with a correlation coefficient of 0.69 (95 % CI: 0.51-0.82; p < 0.0001). Ultrasound is an effective examination for the diagnostic work-up of lesions of the coracoclavicular ligaments in the acute phase of an acromioclavicular injury. (orig.)

  9. Acute high-grade acromioclavicular joint injuries: quality of life comparison between patients managed operatively with a hook plate versus patients managed non-operatively.

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    Natera Cisneros, Luis Gerardo; Sarasquete Reiriz, Juan

    2017-04-01

    Surgical indication for acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) injuries still represents a reason for shoulder and trauma debate. In high-grade injuries, surgery is advocated because some of the non-operatively managed patients may have persistent shoulder pain that could make them unable to return to their previous activity. It has been shown that many of the patients with high-grade ACJ injuries that are managed non-operatively involve the development of scapular dyskinesis, situation that may result in loss of strength and weakness. On the other side, it has been widely reported that the period while the hook plate is present involves functional limitations and pain. The purpose of this study was to compare the quality of life (QoL) of patients with acute high-grade ACJ injuries (Rockwood grade III-V), managed operatively with a hook plate versus the QoL of patients managed non-operatively, 24 months or more after shoulder injury. Patients with acute high-grade ACJ injuries managed operatively (hook plate) or non-operatively, between 2008 and 2012 were included. The QoL was evaluated by means of the Health Survey questionnaire (SF36), the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for pain, the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaire, the Constant score and the Global Satisfaction (scale from 0 to 10) assessed at the last follow-up visit. The presence of scapular dyskinesis was assessed. Comparison between groups was made. Thirty-two patients were included: 11 hook plate-group (PLATE group) (5 Rockwood III and 6 V) and 21 conservative-group (CONS group) (4 Rockwood III and 17 V). The mean age was 41 [19-55] years old for the PLATE group and 38 [19-55] for the CONS group (p = 0.513). The mean follow-up was 32.50 ± 11.64 months for the PLATE group and 34.77 ± 21.98 months for the CONS group (p = 0.762). The mean results of the questionnaires assessed at the last follow-up visit were: (1) physical SF36 score (PLATE group 53.70 ± 4.33 and CONS group

  10. Complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation treated with reconstructed ligament by trapezius muscle fascia and observation of fascial metaplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chaoliang; Huang, Sufang; Wang, Yingzhen; Sun, Xuesheng; Zhu, Tao; Li, Qiang; Lin, Chu

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated the long-term clinical results of acute complete acromioclavicular dislocations treated by reconstruction of the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligament using trapezius muscle fascia. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed using the clavicular hook plate in 12 patients with acute complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation, and the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments were reconstructed using trapezius muscle fascia. Radiographic evaluations were conducted postoperatively. We evaluated the functional results with constant scoring system and radiological results at the final follow-up visit. The mean Constant score at the final follow-up visit was 91.67 (range, 81 to 100). The results were excellent in eight patients (66.7%) and good in four patients (33.3%). Three patients with scores from 80 to 90 had mild pain during activity, but this did not affect the range of motion of the shoulder. All patients have returned to their preoperative work without any limitations. Compared with the contralateral side, radiography showed anatomical reposition in the vertical plane in all cases. The hook-plate fixation with ligament reconstruction was successful in treating AC dislocations. The acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligament were reconstructed by trapezius muscle fascia that keep the distal clavicle stable both vertically and horizontally after type III injuries.

  11. Complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation treated with reconstructed ligament by trapezius muscle fascia and observation of fascial metaplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Chaoliang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the long-term clinical results of acute complete acromioclavicular dislocations treated by reconstruction of the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligament using trapezius muscle fascia. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed using the clavicular hook plate in 12 patients with acute complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation, and the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments were reconstructed using trapezius muscle fascia. Radiographic evaluations were conducted postoperatively. We evaluated the functional results with constant scoring system and radiological results at the final follow-up visit. The mean Constant score at the final follow-up visit was 91.67 (range, 81 to 100. The results were excellent in eight patients (66.7% and good in four patients (33.3%. Three patients with scores from 80 to 90 had mild pain during activity, but this did not affect the range of motion of the shoulder. All patients have returned to their preoperative work without any limitations. Compared with the contralateral side, radiography showed anatomical reposition in the vertical plane in all cases. The hook-plate fixation with ligament reconstruction was successful in treating AC dislocations. The acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligament were reconstructed by trapezius muscle fascia that keep the distal clavicle stable both vertically and horizontally after type III injuries.

  12. Simultaneous of Mid Third Clavicle Fracture and Type 3 Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation; A Case Report

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    Saeed Solooki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Simultaneous mid third clavicle fracture and acromioclavicular joint dislocation is a rare combination injury, as a result of high-energy trauma. We report a patient with a middle third clavicle fracture and ipsilateral grade three-acromioclavicular joint dislocation, which is a rare combination. The patient wanted to get back to work as soon as possible, so the fracture was fixed with reconstruction plate after open reduction and plate contouring; and acromioclavicular joint dislocation was reduced and fixed with two full threaded cancellous screws. One screw was inserted through the plate to the coracoid process. Clinical and radiographic finding revealed complete union of clavicle fracture and anatomical reduction of acromioclavicular joint with pain free full joint range of motion one year after operation.

  13. A Case Report of an Acromioclavicular Joint Ganglion Associated with a Rotator Cuff Tear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Suguru; Gotoh, Masafumi; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Shirachi, Isao; Okawa, Takahiro; Higuchi, Fujio; Shiba, Naoto

    2017-04-13

    We report a case of subcutaneous ganglion adjacent to the acromioclavicular joint with massive rotator cuff tear [1-7]. An 81-year-old woman presented with a ganglion adjacent to the acromioclavicular joint that had first been identified 9 months earlier. The ganglion had recurred after having been aspirated by her local physician, so she was referred to our hospital. The puncture fluid was yellowish, clear and viscous. Magnetic resonance imaging identified a massive rotator cuff tear with multi- lobular cystic lesions continuous to the acromioclavicular joint, presenting the "geyser sign". During arthroscopy, distal clavicular resection and excision of the ganglion were performed together with joint debridement. At present, the ganglion has not recurred and the patient has returned to normal daily activity. In this case, the ganglion may have developed subsequent to the concomitant massive cuff tear, due to subcutaneous fluid flow through the damaged acromioclavicular joint.

  14. Simultaneous of Mid Third Clavicle Fracture and Type 3 Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation; A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Solooki

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available   Simultaneous mid third clavicle fracture and acromioclavicular joint dislocation is a rare combination injury, as a result of high-energy trauma. We report a patient with a middle third clavicle fracture and ipsilateral grade three-acromioclavicular joint dislocation, which is a rare combination. The patient wanted to get back to work as soon as possible, so the fracture was fixed with reconstruction plate after open reduction and plate contouring; and acromioclavicular joint dislocation was reduced and fixed with two full threaded cancellous screws. One screw was inserted through the plate to the coracoid process. Clinical and radiographic finding revealed complete union of clavicle fracture and anatomical reduction of acromioclavicular joint with pain free full joint range of motion one year after operation.

  15. Simultaneous Middle Third Clavicle Fracture and Type 3 Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation; A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solooki, Saeed; Azad, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Simultaneous middle third clavicle fracture and acromioclavicular joint dislocation is a rare combination injury, as a result of high-energy trauma. We report a patient with a middle third clavicle fracture and ipsilateral grade three-acromioclavicular joint dislocation, which is a rare combination. The patient wanted to get back to work as soon as possible, so the fracture was fixed with reconstruction plate after open reduction and plate contouring; and acromioclavicular joint dislocation was reduced and fixed with two full threaded cancellous screws. One screw was inserted through the plate to the coracoid process. Clinical and radiographic finding revealed complete union of clavicle fracture and anatomical reduction of acromioclavicular joint with pain free full joint range of motion one year after operation. PMID:25207318

  16. Relationship between MRI and clinical findings in the acromioclavicular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, L.K.; Griffiths, H.L.; Kenter, K.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To determine the relationship between the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint and the physical findings. Design: A total of 116 consecutive patients underwent routine MR imaging (MRI) of the shoulder over an 18-month period. All MR studies were interpreted by a blinded, experienced musculoskeletal radiologist. Eleven variables were studied: the presence of osteophytes; fluid in the joint; fluid outside the joint; high signal in the clavicle or in the acromion; fluid in the subacromial bursa; irregularity of the joint margins; bulging of the capsule; widening of the joint; the age of the patient; and the presence of a rotator cuff tear. The clinical information was supplied by an experienced shoulder surgeon blinded to the MRI findings. A control group of 23 normal volunteers was also studied. Results: The only statistically significant correlation (P=0.0249) was between high signal in the distal clavicle and degenerative changes found clinically. A weaker relationship existed between fluid in the joint and the clinical examination and between increasing degenerative changes and advancing age. Otherwise, no material relationship was found between any of the other MR abnormalities and the clinical picture. Conclusion: There appears to be no real correlation between the MR appearances and the clinical findings in the AC joint. (orig.)

  17. Relationship between MRI and clinical findings in the acromioclavicular joint

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    Jordan, L.K.; Griffiths, H.L. [Department of Radiology, University of Missouri Health Care (United States); Kenter, K. [Department of Orthopedics, University of Missouri Health Care (United States)

    2002-09-01

    Objective: To determine the relationship between the magnetic resonance (MR) appearance of the acromioclavicular (AC) joint and the physical findings. Design: A total of 116 consecutive patients underwent routine MR imaging (MRI) of the shoulder over an 18-month period. All MR studies were interpreted by a blinded, experienced musculoskeletal radiologist. Eleven variables were studied: the presence of osteophytes; fluid in the joint; fluid outside the joint; high signal in the clavicle or in the acromion; fluid in the subacromial bursa; irregularity of the joint margins; bulging of the capsule; widening of the joint; the age of the patient; and the presence of a rotator cuff tear. The clinical information was supplied by an experienced shoulder surgeon blinded to the MRI findings. A control group of 23 normal volunteers was also studied. Results: The only statistically significant correlation (P=0.0249) was between high signal in the distal clavicle and degenerative changes found clinically. A weaker relationship existed between fluid in the joint and the clinical examination and between increasing degenerative changes and advancing age. Otherwise, no material relationship was found between any of the other MR abnormalities and the clinical picture. Conclusion: There appears to be no real correlation between the MR appearances and the clinical findings in the AC joint. (orig.)

  18. Acromioclavicular joint dislocations: radiological correlation between Rockwood classification system and injury patterns in human cadaver species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschler, Anica; Rösler, Klaus; Rotter, Robert; Gradl, Georg; Mittlmeier, Thomas; Gierer, Philip

    2014-09-01

    The classification system of Rockwood and Young is a commonly used classification for acromioclavicular joint separations subdividing types I-VI. This classification hypothesizes specific lesions to anatomical structures (acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments, capsule, attached muscles) leading to the injury. In recent literature, our understanding for anatomical correlates leading to the radiological-based Rockwood classification is questioned. The goal of this experimental-based investigation was to approve the correlation between the anatomical injury pattern and the Rockwood classification. In four human cadavers (seven shoulders), the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments were transected stepwise. Radiological correlates were recorded (Zanca view) with 15-kg longitudinal tension applied at the wrist. The resulting acromio- and coracoclavicular distances were measured. Radiographs after acromioclavicular ligament transection showed joint space enlargement (8.6 ± 0.3 vs. 3.1 ± 0.5 mm, p acromioclavicular joint space width increased to 16.7 ± 2.7 vs. 8.6 ± 0.3 mm, p acromioclavicular joint lesions higher than Rockwood type I and II. The clinical consequence for reconstruction of low-grade injuries might be a solely surgical approach for the acromioclavicular ligaments or conservative treatment. High-grade injuries were always based on additional structural damage to the coracoclavicular ligaments. Rockwood type V lesions occurred while muscle attachments were intact.

  19. Clinical outcomes of the Cadenat procedure in the treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriyama, Hiroaki; Gotoh, Masafumi; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Yoshikawa, Eiichirou; Uryu, Takuya; Okawa, Takahiro; Higuchi, Fujio; Shirahama, Masahiro; Shiba, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    We report our clinical experience using the modified Cadenat method to treat acromioclavicular joint dislocation, and discuss the usefulness of this method. This study examined 6 shoulders in 6 patients (5 males, 1 female) who were diagnosed with acromioclavicular joint dislocation and treated with the modified Cadenat method at our hospital. Average age at onset was 49.3 years (26-78 years), average time interval from injury until surgery was 263.8 days (10 to 1100 days), and the average follow-up period was 21.7 months (12 to 42 months). Post-operative assessment was performed using plain radiographs to determine shoulder joint dislocation rate and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score. The average post-operative JOA score was 94.1 points (91 to 100 points). The acromioclavicular joint dislocation rate improved from 148.7% (72 to 236%) before surgery to 28.6% (0 to 60%) after surgery. Conservative treatment has been reported to achieve good outcomes in acromioclavicular joint dislocations. However, many patients also experience chronic pain or a sensation of fatigue upon putting the extremity in an elevated posture, and therefore ensuring the stability of the acromioclavicular joint is crucial for highly active patients. In this study, we treated acromioclavicular joint dislocations by the modified Cadenat method, and were able to achieve favorable outcomes.

  20. Secondary infection of haematoma following closed acromioclavicular joint dislocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupley, Leanne; Berg, Andrew James; Mohil, Randeep

    2016-01-01

    An unusual case of a patient presenting with a large infected haematoma following a traumatic grade II acromioclavicular joint dislocation is reported. Diagnosis of this rare complication, of an otherwise common self-limiting injury, was delayed until 19 days postinjury despite several presentations during this time with worsening swelling and pain. The patient was found to have significant tissue destruction by the time washout was performed and required multiple procedures to treat the infection. This case highlights the need for a high index of suspicion for complications, even following common self-limiting injuries, when patients represent with symptoms that do not fit the usual natural history of the condition, particularly if they have risk factors for bleeding and infection. PMID:26786526

  1. Arthroscopic procedures and therapeutic results of anatomical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments for acromioclavicular Joint dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, K; Yamamoto, K

    2016-09-01

    Surgical treatment is recommended for type 5 acromioclavicular joint dislocation on Rockwood's classification. We believe that anatomic repair of the coracoclavicular ligaments best restores the function of the acromioclavicular joint. We attempted to correctly reconstruct the anatomy of the coracoclavicular ligaments under arthroscopy, and describe the minimally invasive arthroscopic procedure. There were 22 patients; mean age at surgery, 38.1 years. Mean time to surgery was 13.2 days. Mean follow-up was 3 years 2 months. The palmaris longus tendon was excised from the ipsilateral side to replace the conoid ligament, while artificial ligament was used for reconstructing the trapezoid ligament. Both ligament reconstructions were performed arthroscopically. No temporary fixation of the acromioclavicular joint was performed. On postoperative radiographic evaluation, 4 patients showed subluxation and 2 showed dislocation of the acromioclavicular joint; the other 16 patients had maintained reduction at the final consultation. MR images 1year after surgery clearly revealed the reconstructed ligaments in 19 patients. Only 1 patient showed osteoarthritis of the acromioclavicular joint. Although it requires resection of the ipsilateral palmaris longus for grafting, we believe that anatomic reconstruction of both coracoclavicular ligaments best restores the function of the acromioclavicular joint. 4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. A combined technique for acromioclavicular reconstruction after acute dislocation - technical description and functional outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo Lino Moura

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: This study aims to describe the surgical approach to such injuries and to present the clinical and functional outcomes obtained in a cohort of patients. Methods: This is an observational retrospective study that included 153 patients with acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation, operated between 1999 and 2015. Clinical evaluation included the following outcomes: Constant functional scale, development of complications, time to return to previous work/sport activities, and satisfaction index. The contra-lateral (uninjured shoulder was used as control in subjective outcomes. Radiological evaluation was performed in order to monitor signs of loss of reduction, degenerative joint changes, and coracoclavicular calcifications. Results: The mean age was 29.20 ± 9.53 (16-71, with a large male predominance (91.5%. Follow-up lasted 55.41 ± 24.87 (12-108 months. The mean Constant score attained was 96.45 ± 4.00 (84-100 on operated shoulders and 98.28 ± 1.81 (93-100 on contralateral ones. Almost all patients (98.69% were satisfied with the surgical results. Worse outcomes were observed in acromioclavicular joint dislocations of increasing grade (from type III to V, but worse for type IV, both concerning the Constant score and return to work or sport. The overall incidence of complications was considered low, with the most prevalent being Kirschner wire failure and isolated coracoclavicular ligament calcifications. Conclusion: The surgical technique described is an excellent option in the treatment of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocations of Rockwood grades III to V. This is corroborated by the excellent clinical and functional outcomes and the low rate of complications.

  3. A combined technique for acromioclavicular reconstruction after acute dislocation - technical description and functional outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Diogo Lino; Reis E Reis, Augusto; Ferreira, João; Capelão, Manuel; Braz Cardoso, José

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to describe the surgical approach to such injuries and to present the clinical and functional outcomes obtained in a cohort of patients. This is an observational retrospective study that included 153 patients with acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation, operated between 1999 and 2015. Clinical evaluation included the following outcomes: Constant functional scale, development of complications, time to return to previous work/sport activities, and satisfaction index. The contra-lateral (uninjured) shoulder was used as control in subjective outcomes. Radiological evaluation was performed in order to monitor signs of loss of reduction, degenerative joint changes, and coracoclavicular calcifications. The mean age was 29.20 ± 9.53 (16-71), with a large male predominance (91.5%). Follow-up lasted 55.41 ± 24.87 (12-108) months. The mean Constant score attained was 96.45 ± 4.00 (84-100) on operated shoulders and 98.28 ± 1.81 (93-100) on contralateral ones. Almost all patients (98.69%) were satisfied with the surgical results. Worse outcomes were observed in acromioclavicular joint dislocations of increasing grade (from type III to V, but worse for type IV), both concerning the Constant score and return to work or sport. The overall incidence of complications was considered low, with the most prevalent being Kirschner wire failure and isolated coracoclavicular ligament calcifications. The surgical technique described is an excellent option in the treatment of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocations of Rockwood grades III to V. This is corroborated by the excellent clinical and functional outcomes and the low rate of complications.

  4. Radiosynoviorthesis of acromioclavicular joint using 169Er-citrate: prospective evaluation of efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereb, Marika; Liepe, Knut; Fischer, Manfred; Kaliska, Lucia; Noskovicova, Lucia; Balogova, Sona

    2018-01-01

    There is a clinical need for therapeutic alternative in patients with persisting painful arthritis of AC-joint and failure of previous treatments. However, no radiopharmaceutical is currently explicitly approved for radiosynoviorthesis of acromioclavicular joint. The aim of our study was to prospectively assess the efficacy and safety of radiosynoviorthesis of acromioclavicular joint using erbium-169 citrate. Radiosynoviorthesis of acromioclavicular joint was performed in 51 consecutive patients (18 males, 33 females) mean age 64.3 (range 43.8-82.6, median 63.6) years with clinically confirmed arthritis of 85 acromioclavicular joints. The efficacy of RSO was reported by patients according to 10-step visual analogue scale of pain (VAS) (0 = no pain, 10 = most severe pain) at 6 months after radiosynoviorthesis and by ranking the global therapeutic effect of RSO in 4 categories (1 = the best effect, 4 = no change). To assess the variation of blood perfusion in treated joints, the efficacy of RSO was also evaluated by variation of target (acromioclavicular joint)/non-target (soft tissue) uptake ratio (T/NTR) of metylendiphosphonate (99mTc) measured as number of counts over region of interest on blood pool phase of two-phase bone scintigraphy performed before and 6 months after RSO. Radiosynoviorthesis was followed by significant decrease in VAS, mean - 3.1 (-47%). Excellent, good, moderate and bad response was observed in 57 (67%), 25 (29%), 1 (1%) and in 2 (2%) of acromioclavicular joints respectively. A significant correlation between decrease of T/NTR and variation of VAS in % (ρ = 0.532, p acromioclavicular joint in whom previous line(s) of treatment did not lead to satisfactory pain relief.

  5. Wide field of view CT and acromioclavicular joint instability: A technical innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyer, David R; Troupis, John M; Kamali Moaveni, Afshin

    2015-06-01

    A 21-year-old female with a traumatic shoulder injury is investigated and managed for symptoms relating to this injury. Pathology at the acromioclavicular joint is detected clinically; however, clinical examination and multiple imaging modalities do not reach a unified diagnosis on the grading of this acromioclavicular joint injury. When management appropriate to that suggested injury grading fail to help the patient's symptoms, further investigation methods were utilised. Wide field of view, dynamic CT (4D CT) is conducted on the patient's affected shoulder using a 320 × 0.5 mm detector multislice CT. Scans were conducted with a static table as the patient completed three movements of the affected shoulder. Capturing multiple data sets per second over a z-axis of 16 cm, measurements of the acromioclavicular joint were made, to show dynamic changes at the joint. Acromioclavicular (AC) joint translations were witnessed in three planes (a previously unrecognised pathology in the grading of acromioclavicular joint injuries). Translation in multiple planes was also not evident on careful clinical examination of this patient. AC joint width, anterior-posterior translation, superior-inferior translation and coracoclavicular width were measured with planar reconstructions while volume-rendered images and dynamic sequences aiding visual understanding of the pathology. Wide field of view dynamic CT (4D CT) is an accurate and quick modality to diagnose complex acromioclavicular joint injury. It provides dynamic information that no other modality can; 4D CT shows future benefits for clinical approach to diagnosis and management of acromioclavicular joint injury, and other musculoskeletal pathologies. © 2015 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  6. Ipsilateral Closed Clavicle and Scapular spine Fracture with Acromioclavicular Joint Disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kembhavi, Raghavendra S; James, Boblee

    2015-01-01

    Injuries around shoulder and clavicle are quite common. Injuries involving lateral end of clavicle involving acromioclavicular joints are commoner injuries. In this rare injury, we report about a case involving clavicle and scapular spine fracture with acromioclavicular disruption which has never been described in English literature as per our knowledge. A patient with closed clavicle and scapular spine fracture with acromioclavicular joint disruption was treated with open reduction and internal fixation of clavicle and scapular spine as a staged procedures. Six months post operatively, patient had excellent functional recovery with near full range of movements. Though rare complex injury, clavicle fracture with scapular spine fracture with acromioclavicular disruption, when managed properly with good physiotherapy protocol post operatively will result in good clinical and functional outcome.

  7. Operative Versus Non-operative Treatment of Grade III Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocations and the Use of SurgiLig: a Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younis, Fizan; Ajwani, Sanil; Bibi, Asia; Riley, Eleanor; Hughes, Peter J

    2017-12-30

    Acromioclavicular joint dislocations are common shoulder girdle injuries. The treatment of grade III acromioclavicular joint dislocations is controversial. Furthermore, the literature on the use of the Sur-giligTM synthetic ligament for reconstruction of dislocations is sparse. This retrospective review aimed to establish whether operative treatment was superior to non-operative treatment in grade III acromioclavicular joint dislocations treated at our institute over a 5-year period. We also reviewed the effectiveness of reconstruction with SurgiligTM after acute and chronic dislocations across all grades of acromioclavicular joint dislocations. Twenty-five patients completed full follow-up with grade III dislocations. The mean follow-up in the operated group was 3.56 years and in the non-operated group this was 3.29 years. The mean Oxford Shoul-der Score (OSS) in the operated group was 39.8, whereas the mean OSS in the non-operated group was 45.9 (p=0.01). The mean pain score in the operated group was 2.2, and in the non-operated group this was 1.6. The mean satisfaction score in the operated group was 8.2 and that in the non-operated group was 7.8. There was no statistically significant difference in pain or satisfaction scores. In respect to the cohort treated with Surg-iligTM synthetic ligament, 22 patients across all grades of dislocations had this procedure performed. The mean post-operative Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS) was 40. 1. Non-operative treatment is not inferior to operative treatment for grade III acromioclavicular joint dislocations. The data from this study demonstrat-ed that the non-operated group had superior Ox-ford Shoul-der Scores that were statistically significant. 2. Additionally, the use of the SurgiligTM ligament appears to be effective in treating both chronic and acute acromioclavicular joint dislocations.

  8. Effects of hook plate on shoulder function after treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chang-Hong; Dong, Qi-Rong; Zhou, Rong-Kui; Zhen, Hua-Qing; Jiao, Ya-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Internal fixation with hook plate has been used to treat acromioclavicular joint dislocation. This study aims to evaluate the effect of its use on shoulder function, to further analyze the contributing factors, and provide a basis for selection and design of improved internal fixation treatment of the acromioclavicular joint dislocation in the future. A retrospective analysis was performed on patients treated with a hook plate for acromioclavicular joint dislocation in our hospital from January 2010 to February 2013. There were 33 cases in total, including 25 males and 8 females, with mean age of 48.27 ± 8.7 years. There were 29 cases of Rockwood type III acromioclavicular dislocation, 4 cases of type V. The Constant-Murley shoulder function scoring system was used to evaluate the shoulder function recovery status after surgery. Anteroposterior shoulder X-ray was used to assess the position of the hook plate, status of acromioclavicular joint reduction and the occurrence of postoperative complications. According to the Constant-Murley shoulder function scoring system, the average scores were 78 ± 6 points 8 to 12 months after the surgery and before the removal of the hook plate, the average scores were 89 ± 5 minutes two months after the removal of hook plate. Postoperative X-ray imaging showed osteolysis in 10 cases (30.3%), osteoarthritis in six cases (18.1%), osteolysis associated with osteoarthritis in four cases(12.1%), and steel hook broken in one case (3%). The use of hook plate on open reduction and internal fixation of the acromioclavicular joint dislocation had little adverse effect on shoulder function and is an effective method for the treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Osteoarthritis and osteolysis are the two common complications after hook plate use, which are associated with the impairment of shoulder function. Shoulder function will be improved after removal of the hook plate.

  9. What role do plain radiographs have in assessing the skeletally immature acromioclavicular joint?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Yeol; Kwon, Soon-Sun; Chung, Chin Youb; Lee, Kyoung Min; Park, Moon Seok

    2014-01-01

    Because of incomplete ossification of the coracoid process and acromion, acromioclavicular joint configuration in the skeletally immature patient differs from that of adults. Although comparison to radiographic standards for this joint is critical in the evaluation of acromioclavicular joint injuries, these standards are not well defined for children or adolescents. We therefore sought to determine (1) the reliability of numerous radiographic measurements of the skeletally immature acromioclavicular joint, including the vertical and shortest coracoclavicular interval, and the acromioclavicular joint offset; (2) the timing of ossification of the acromion and coracoid in males and females; and (3) the differences in the values of these radiographic measurements based on age and sex. This study was based on a total of 485 subjects, 8 to 18 years old, who underwent conventional AP view radiographs of both shoulders. The 485 subjects were included to assess normal configuration around the acromioclavicular joint and 466 of these subjects were evaluated for comparison between both sides. The vertical and shortest coracoclavicular interval, coracoclavicular clavicle width ratio, acromioclavicular joint offset, and difference of the coracoclavicular interval of both sides were measured. A reliability test was conducted before obtaining the main measurements. The relationship of measurements with sex, age, and stage of ossification was evaluated. The vertical and shortest coracoclavicular interval showed excellent reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient ([ICC], 0.918 and 0.934). The acromioclavicular joint offset showed low reliability (ICC, 0.543). The ossification centers of the acromion and the coracoid processes appeared and fused earlier in females than in males. The vertical coracoclavicular interval, which was not affected by partial ossification of the coracoid process, was less than 11 mm in the 90% quantile of total subjects in males and 10 mm in the 90

  10. Changes in surgical procedures for acromioclavicular joint dislocation over the past 30 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, Katsumi; Yamamoto, Kengo

    2013-10-01

    Generally, surgical treatment is recommended for Rockwood type 5 traumatic acromioclavicular joint dislocations. Since 1980, the authors have performed the modified Dewar procedure, the modified Cadenat procedure, and anatomical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments for this injury. The goal of this study was to determine the ideal surgical procedure for acromioclavicular joint dislocations by comparing these 3 procedures. The modified Dewar procedure was performed on 55 patients (Dewar group), the modified Cadenat procedure was performed on 73 patients (Cadenat group), and anatomical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments was performed on 11 patients (reconstruction group). According to the UCLA scoring system, therapeutic results averaged 27.3 points in the Dewar group, 28.2 in the Cadenat group, and 28.4 in the reconstruction group. The incidence of residual subluxation or dislocation in the acromioclavicular joint was evaluated at final radiographic follow-up. Subluxation occurred in 21 patients in the Dewar group, 18 in the Cadenat group, and 3 in the reconstruction group. Dislocation occurred in 3 patients in the Dewar group. Osteoarthritic changes in the acromioclavicular joint occurred in 20 patients in the Dewar group, 9 in the Cadenat group, and 1 in the reconstruction group. The modified Cadenat procedure can provide satisfactory therapeutic results and avoid postoperative failure or loss of reduction compared with the modified Dewar procedure. However, the modified Cadenat procedure does not anatomically restore the coracoclavicular ligaments. Anatomic restoration of both coracoclavicular ligaments can best restore acromioclavicular joint function. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction using the LockDown synthetic implant: a study with cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taranu, R; Rushton, P R P; Serrano-Pedraza, I; Holder, L; Wallace, W A; Candal-Couto, J J

    2015-12-01

    Dislocation of the acromioclavicular joint is a relatively common injury and a number of surgical interventions have been described for its treatment. Recently, a synthetic ligament device has become available and been successfully used, however, like other non-native solutions, a compromise must be reached when choosing non-anatomical locations for their placement. This cadaveric study aimed to assess the effect of different clavicular anchorage points for the Lockdown device on the reduction of acromioclavicular joint dislocations, and suggest an optimal location. We also assessed whether further stability is provided using a coracoacromial ligament transfer (a modified Neviaser technique). The acromioclavicular joint was exposed on seven fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders. The joint was reconstructed using the Lockdown implant using four different clavicular anchorage points and reduction was measured. The coracoacromial ligament was then transferred to the lateral end of the clavicle, and the joint re-assessed. If the Lockdown ligament was secured at the level of the conoid tubercle, the acromioclavicular joint could be reduced anatomically in all cases. If placed medial or 2 cm lateral, the joint was irreducible. If the Lockdown was placed 1 cm lateral to the conoid tubercle, the joint could be reduced with difficulty in four cases. Correct placement of the Lockdown device is crucial to allow anatomical joint reduction. Even when the Lockdown was placed over the conoid tubercle, anterior clavicle displacement remained but this could be controlled using a coracoacromial ligament transfer. ©2015 The British Editorial Society of Bone & Joint Surgery.

  12. [Complications of treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation and unstable distal clavicular fracture with clavicular hook plate].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yi-Yong; Cui, Heng-Yan; Jiang, Pan-Qiang; Wang, Jian-Liang

    2013-11-01

    To investigate the causes and prevention of the complications about treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation (Tossy III) and unstable distal clavicular fracture (Neer II) with clavicular hook plate. From January 2001 to December 2011, 246 patients with acromioclavicular joint dislocation (Tossy III) and 222 patients with unstable distal clavicular fracture (Neer II) were treated with acromioclvicular hook plate fixation,including 348 males and 120 females with an average age of 45.4 years old ranging from 21 to 80 years old. The mean time from injury to operation was 30.8 hours (ranged from 1 h to 15 d). All patients had normal shoulder function before injury. According to Karlsson evaluation standard, the cases with excellent and good function of the shoulder joint were regarded as the normal group, and the cases with poor function of shoulder joint as the abnormal group. The comparison of the range of forward flexion,backward stretch, adduction, abduction and elevation of shoulder joints between two groups was performed. The data of impingement, subacromial osteolysis, acromioclavicular arthritis, clavicular stress fracture, downward acromioclavicular joint subluxation, hook cut-out and hook break were summarized. All patients were followed up from 8 to 48 months with an average of 12.5 months. The results were excellent in 308 cases,good in 76,and poor in 84 according to Karlsson evaluation. The excellent and good rate was 82.1%. The difference of the range of forward flexion, backward stretch, adduction, abduction and elevation of shoulder joints between two groups had a statistically significant difference (P acromioclavicular arthritis or painful shoulder caused by delayed dirigation,7 (1.50%) with clavicular stress fracture or interal plate upward, 6 (1.28%) with downward acromioclavicular joint subluxation, 5 (1.07%) with hook cut -out and 3 (0.64%) in hook break. The clavicular hook plate is useful for the treatment of acromioclavicular joint

  13. Acromioclavicular joint cyst: nine cases of a pseudotumor of the shoulder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tshering Vogel, Dechen W.; Anderson, Suzanne E. [University Hospital of Bern, Department of Diagnostic, Interventional and Pediatric Radiology, Bern (Switzerland); Steinbach, Lynne S. [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, California (United States); Hertel, Ralph [University Hospital of Bern, Department of Orthopedics, Plastic and Hand Surgery, Bern (Switzerland); Bernhard, Juerg [Burgerspital, Department of Rheumatology, Solothurn (Switzerland); Stauffer, Edouard [University Hospital of Bern, Department of Pathology, Bern (Switzerland)

    2005-05-01

    (1) To analyse the imaging appearances of nine patients with acromioclavicular joint cysts presenting as shoulder masses for tumor staging with operative, histopathological and joint aspiration findings. Retrospective review of imaging and correlation with clinical, operative and surgical notes. Images were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists by consensus. Nine patients who presented clinically with a shoulder mass were evaluated by radiographs (n=9), ultrasound (n=1), conventional arthrography (n=3), MRI (n=6; with direct MR arthrography n=2, indirect MR arthrography n=4). All patients had a focal mass superior to the AC joint, with a size ranging from 1.5 cm to 6 cm and a mean of 3.27 cm. Correlation was available with surgery (n=7), histopathology (n=2) and cyst aspiration (n=2). Two patients were managed conservatively. Geyser sign was positive in all three arthrograms. All MRIs revealed extensive rotator cuff tears with a column of fluid extending from the glenohumeral joint through the rotator cuff tear into the acromioclavicular joint and acromioclavicular cyst. Chondrocalcinosis was seen in the acromioclavicular joint cyst (n=2) and in the glenohumeral joint (n=1). Aspirate in two patients contained calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals. (orig.)

  14. Acromioclavicular joint cyst: nine cases of a pseudotumor of the shoulder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tshering Vogel, Dechen W.; Anderson, Suzanne E.; Steinbach, Lynne S.; Hertel, Ralph; Bernhard, Juerg; Stauffer, Edouard

    2005-01-01

    (1) To analyse the imaging appearances of nine patients with acromioclavicular joint cysts presenting as shoulder masses for tumor staging with operative, histopathological and joint aspiration findings. Retrospective review of imaging and correlation with clinical, operative and surgical notes. Images were reviewed by two musculoskeletal radiologists by consensus. Nine patients who presented clinically with a shoulder mass were evaluated by radiographs (n=9), ultrasound (n=1), conventional arthrography (n=3), MRI (n=6; with direct MR arthrography n=2, indirect MR arthrography n=4). All patients had a focal mass superior to the AC joint, with a size ranging from 1.5 cm to 6 cm and a mean of 3.27 cm. Correlation was available with surgery (n=7), histopathology (n=2) and cyst aspiration (n=2). Two patients were managed conservatively. Geyser sign was positive in all three arthrograms. All MRIs revealed extensive rotator cuff tears with a column of fluid extending from the glenohumeral joint through the rotator cuff tear into the acromioclavicular joint and acromioclavicular cyst. Chondrocalcinosis was seen in the acromioclavicular joint cyst (n=2) and in the glenohumeral joint (n=1). Aspirate in two patients contained calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals. (orig.)

  15. ARTHROSCOPIC TREATMENT OF ACROMIOCLAVICULAR JOINT DISLOCATION BY TIGHT ROPE TECHNIQUE (ARTHREX®)

    Science.gov (United States)

    GÓmez Vieira, Luis Alfredo; Visco, Adalberto; Daneu Fernandes, Luis Filipe; GÓmez Cordero, Nicolas Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Presenting the arthroscopic treatment by Tight Rope - Arthrex® system for acute acromioclavicular dislocation and to evaluate results obtained with this procedure. Methods: Between August 2006 and May 2007, 10 shoulders of 10 patients with acute acromioclavicular dislocation were submitted to arthroscopic repair using the Tight Rope - Arthrex® system. Minimum follow-up was 12 months, with a mean of 15 months. Age ranged from 26 to 42, mean 34 years. All patients were male. Radiology evaluation was made by trauma series x-ray. The patients were assisted in the first month weekly and after three months after the procedure. Clinical evaluation was based on the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) criteria. Results: All patients were satisfied after the arthroscopic procedure and the mean UCLA score was 32,5. Conclusion: The arthroscopic treatment by Tight Rope – Arthrex® system for acute acromioclavicular dislocation showed to be an efficient technique. PMID:26998453

  16. Surgical treatment of a concurrent type 5 acromioclavicular joint dislocation and a failed anterior glenohumeral joint stabilization

    OpenAIRE

    Rashid, Abbas; Lawrence, Christopher; Tytherleigh-Strong, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic glenohumeral joint dislocation and acromioclavicular joint subluxations tend to occur in young active males. Use of the coracoid process either as a transfer in recurrent instability or in suspensory reconstructions of the coracoclavicular ligaments have gained popularity. However this requires careful consideration in the event of concomitant injuries if they both require surgery.

  17. Is coracoclavicular stabilisation alone sufficient for the endoscopic treatment of severe acromioclavicular joint dislocation (Rockwood types III, IV, and V)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, J; Duparc, F; Andrieu, K; Duport, M; Toussaint, B; Bertiaux, S; Clavert, P; Gastaud, O; Brassart, N; Beaudouin, E; De Mourgues, P; Berne, D; Bahurel, J; Najihi, N; Boyer, P; Faivre, B; Meyer, A; Nourissat, G; Poulain, S; Bruchou, F; Ménard, J F

    2015-12-01

    The primary objective was to evaluate correlations linking anatomical to functional outcomes after endoscopically assisted repair of acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation (ACJD). Combined acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular stabilisation improves radiological outcomes compared to coracoclavicular stabilisation alone. A prospective multicentre study was performed. Clinical outcome measures were pain intensity on a visual analogue scale (VAS), subjective functional impairment (QuickDASH score), and Constant's score. Anatomical outcomes were assessed on standard radiographs (anteroposterior view of the acromioclavicular girdle and bilateral axillary views) obtained preoperatively and postoperatively and on postoperative dynamic radiographs taken as described by Tauber et al. Of 116 patients with acute ACJD included in the study, 48% had type III, 30% type IV, and 22% type V ACJD according to the Rockwood classification. Coracoclavicular stabilisation was achieved using a double endobutton in 93% of patients, and concomitant acromioclavicular stabilisation was performed in 50% of patients. The objective functional outcome was good, with an unweighted Constant's score ≥ 85/100 and a subjective QuickDASH functional disability score ≤ 10 in 75% of patients. The radiographic analysis showed significant improvements from the preoperative to the 1-year postoperative values in the vertical plane (decrease in the coracoclavicular ratio from 214 to 128%, p=10(-6)) and in the horizontal plane (decrease in posterior displacement from 4 to 0mm, p=5×10(-5)). The anatomical outcome correlated significantly with the functional outcome (absolute R value=0.19 and p=0.045). We found no statistically significant differences across the various types of constructs used. Intra-operative control of the acromioclavicular joint did not improve the result. Implantation of a biological graft significantly improved both the anatomical outcome in the vertical plane (p=0.04) and

  18. A Case of Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation Associated with Coracoid Process Fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yosuke; Gotoh, Masafumi; Mitsui, Yasuhiro; Shirachi, Isao; Yoshikawa, Eiichiro; Uryu, Takuya; Murakami, Hidetaka; Okawa, Takahiro; Higuchi, Fujio; Shiba, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    Rupture of any two or more parts of the superior shoulder suspensory complex (SSSC) including the distal clavicle, acromion, coracoid process, glenoid cavity of the scapula, acromioclavicular ligament, and coracoclavicular ligament is associated with shoulder girdle instability and is an indication for surgery. Here we report a case of acromioclavicular joint dislocation associated with coracoid process fracture. A 48-year-old man sustained a hard blow to the left shoulder from a fall, and simple radiography detected a coracoid process fracture and acromioclavicular joint dislocation. The injury consisted of a rupture of two parts of the SSSC. For the coracoid process fracture, osteosynthesis was performed using hollow cancellous bone screws. For the acromioclavicular joint dislocation, hook plate fixation and the modified Neviaser's procedure were performed. The bone healed well 5 months after surgery, at which time the screws were removed. At 18 months after initial surgery, the coracoid process fracture had healed with a 10% rate of dislocation on radiography, and the patient currently has no problem performing daily activities, no range of motion limitations, and a Japanese Orthopaedic Association scale score of 93.

  19. A New Technique for Solving Tightrope Cutout during Acromioclavicular Joint Fixation: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng BW

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Acromioclavicular joint (ACJ dissociation is one of the common injuries affecting adults. The stability of ACJ largely depends on the integrity of acromioclavicular ligament, coracoclavicular ligament, capsule, trapezius muscle and deltoid muscle. The injury has been classified by Rockwood into six types and treatment options can be guided by the classification. TightRope fixation is one of the many surgical procedures available to address acromioclavicular joint separation. It consists of tensioning of a no. 5 Fibrewire suture secured at both ends to low- profile metallic buttons. Despite various advantages of using this technique, complications such as suture cut-out, clavicle fracture and suture failure have been documented. The author presents a case of a type III acromioclavicular joint dissociation treated with TightRope which suture cutout was noted intra-operatively. Decision to amend the fixation using a cut one-third tubular plate as an additional anchor for the metallic button on the clavicle was made. Patient’s progress was evaluated using the University of California at Los Angeles Shoulder Score (UCLA Shoulder Score and significant improvement was noted six months post operatively. We propose this technique as a solution to the encountered problem.

  20. MR imaging of the intraarticular disk of the acromioclavicular joint: a comparison with anatomical, histological and in-vivo findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heers, Guido; Goetz, Juergen; Schubert, Thomas; Schachner, Henrik; Neumaier, Ulrich; Grifka, Joachim; Hedtmann, Achim [Orthopaedische Universitaetsklinik Regensburg, Asklepios Klinikum Bad Abbach, Bad Abbach (Germany)

    2007-01-15

    To characterize MRI features of the intraarticular disk of the acromioclavicular joint. We studied the appearance of 11 acromioclavicular joints of six cadavers (subjects aged 57-89 years at the time of death) and six healthy shoulders on T1-weighted, T2 (TSE)-weighted, STIR and PD (fat saturated) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and compared the findings with observations during dissection and histological examination. Macroscopic examinations showed two wedge-shaped disks underneath the superior and above the inferior joint capsule in nine specimens. In two specimens the acromioclavicular joints were degenerated. Histologically, the disk tissue consisted of fibrocartilage whereas the joint cartilage was partly degenerated, containing zones of fibrocartilage amidst degenerated hyaline cartilage, which may explain the similar signal intensity of both structures in all sequences used. MR appearance of the intraarticular structures of the acromioclavicular joint was similar in cadaveric and healthy shoulders. The difficulties related to imaging the acromioclavicular joint may be explained by the anatomy. Similar signal intensity of cartilage and disk may be explained by their similar histological structure (fibrocartilage). MRI findings should be interpreted with respect to the variable anatomy. These results may serve as a basis for further radiological studies of the acromioclavicular joint. (orig.)

  1. MR imaging of the intraarticular disk of the acromioclavicular joint: a comparison with anatomical, histological and in-vivo findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heers, Guido; Goetz, Juergen; Schubert, Thomas; Schachner, Henrik; Neumaier, Ulrich; Grifka, Joachim; Hedtmann, Achim

    2007-01-01

    To characterize MRI features of the intraarticular disk of the acromioclavicular joint. We studied the appearance of 11 acromioclavicular joints of six cadavers (subjects aged 57-89 years at the time of death) and six healthy shoulders on T1-weighted, T2 (TSE)-weighted, STIR and PD (fat saturated) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and compared the findings with observations during dissection and histological examination. Macroscopic examinations showed two wedge-shaped disks underneath the superior and above the inferior joint capsule in nine specimens. In two specimens the acromioclavicular joints were degenerated. Histologically, the disk tissue consisted of fibrocartilage whereas the joint cartilage was partly degenerated, containing zones of fibrocartilage amidst degenerated hyaline cartilage, which may explain the similar signal intensity of both structures in all sequences used. MR appearance of the intraarticular structures of the acromioclavicular joint was similar in cadaveric and healthy shoulders. The difficulties related to imaging the acromioclavicular joint may be explained by the anatomy. Similar signal intensity of cartilage and disk may be explained by their similar histological structure (fibrocartilage). MRI findings should be interpreted with respect to the variable anatomy. These results may serve as a basis for further radiological studies of the acromioclavicular joint. (orig.)

  2. Correlation of macroscopic osteoarthrotic changes and radiographic findings in the acromioclavicular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stenlund, B.; Marions, O.; Engstroem, K.F.; Goldie, I.; Soedersjukhuset, Stockholm; Karolinska Sjukhuset, Stockholm

    1988-01-01

    In a total of 108 acromioclavicular articulations from cadavers the osteoarthrotic changes were studied. The articulations were macroscopically and radiographically ranked according to their grade of osteoarthrosis. The two ranking lines were correlated statistically and showed a rank correlation of 0.741. In 38 articulations tomography was also carried out. These articulations were classified into five grades of osteoarthrosis and the macroscopic, conventional radiographic and tomographic gradings were compared. The correlation coefficient for tomography versus macroscopy was 0.714. Tomography versus standard radiography showed a correlation of 0.767 and standard radiography versus macroscopy a correlation of 0.841. The standard radiographic investigation reveals moderate and severe osteoarthrotic changes in the acromioclavicular joint but cannot depict smaller changes. Tomography does not seem to improve the specificity. There is a need for a better radiologic technique in the examination of the acromioclavicular joint. Radiography during some kind of loading might be a practical way of improving the specificity and make it possible to show early osteoarthrosis in the acromioclavicular articulation. (orig.)

  3. Correlation of macroscopic osteoarthrotic changes and radiographic findings in the acromioclavicular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stenlund, B.; Marions, O.; Engstroem, K.F.; Goldie, I.

    In a total of 108 acromioclavicular articulations from cadavers the osteoarthrotic changes were studied. The articulations were macroscopically and radiographically ranked according to their grade of osteoarthrosis. The two ranking lines were correlated statistically and showed a rank correlation of 0.741. In 38 articulations tomography was also carried out. These articulations were classified into five grades of osteoarthrosis and the macroscopic, conventional radiographic and tomographic gradings were compared. The correlation coefficient for tomography versus macroscopy was 0.714. Tomography versus standard radiography showed a correlation of 0.767 and standard radiography versus macroscopy a correlation of 0.841. The standard radiographic investigation reveals moderate and severe osteoarthrotic changes in the acromioclavicular joint but cannot depict smaller changes. Tomography does not seem to improve the specificity. There is a need for a better radiologic technique in the examination of the acromioclavicular joint. Radiography during some kind of loading might be a practical way of improving the specificity and make it possible to show early osteoarthrosis in the acromioclavicular articulation.

  4. Biomechanical analysis of acromioclavicular joint dislocation repair using coracoclavicular suspension devices in two different configurations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abat, Ferran; Sarasquete, Juan; Natera, Luis Gerardo; Calvo, Ángel; Pérez-España, Manuel; Zurita, Néstor; Ferrer, Jesús; del Real, Juan Carlos; Paz-Jimenez, Eva; Forriol, Francisco

    2015-09-01

    The best treatment option for some acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocations is controversial. For this reason, the aim of this study was to evaluate the vertical biomechanical behavior of two techniques for the anatomic repair of coracoclavicular (CC) ligaments after an AC injury. Eighteen human cadaveric shoulders in which repair using a coracoclavicular suspension device was initiated after injury to the acromioclavicular joint were included in the study. Three groups were formed; group I (n = 6): control; group II (n = 6): repair with a double tunnel in the clavicle and in the coracoid (with two CC suspension devices); group III (n = 6): repair in a "V" configuration with two tunnels in the clavicle and one in the coracoid (with one CC suspension device). The biomechanical study was performed with a universal testing machine (Electro Puls 3000, Instron, Boulder, MA, USA), with the clamping jaws set in a vertical position. The force required for acromioclavicular reconstruction system failure was analyzed for each cadaveric piece. Group I reached a maximum force to failure of 635.59 N (mean 444.0 N). The corresponding force was 939.37 N (mean 495.6 N) for group II and 533.11 N (mean 343.9 N) for group III. A comparison of the three groups did not find any significant difference despite the loss of resistance presented by group III. Anatomic repair of coracoclavicular ligaments with a double system (double tunnel in the clavicle and in the coracoid) permits vertical translation that is more like that of the acromioclavicular joint. Acromioclavicular repair in a "V" configuration does not seem to be biomechanically sufficient.

  5. [Case-control study on measurement of coracoclavicular and acromioclavicular ligament injuries during internal fixation operation for the treatment of fresh acromioclavicular joint dislocation of Tossy type III].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ting-Jin; Sun, Peng; Zheng, Liang-Guo; Qi, Xiang-Yang

    2014-01-01

    To study measurement methods of acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligament injuries,its therapeutic effects and complications during internal fixation operation for the treatment of fresh acromioclavicular joint dislocations of Tossy type III. From July 2003 to May 2012,127 patients with acromioclavicular joint dislocations of Tossy type III were treated with wire fixation from coracoid process to clavicle or hook-plate fixation. The patients were divided into group A (63 cases) and group B (64 cases) according to whether acromioclavicular ligament and coracoclavicular ligament were repaired or not. In group A (ligaments repaired), there were 39 males and 24 females with an average age of (33.25 +/- 8.46) years old (ranged from 17 to 59 years). And in group B (no ligaments repaired), there were 41 males and 23 females with an average age of (34.10 +/- 7.19) years (ranged from 19 to 57 years). The operation times, intraoperative blood loss, postoperative infections, internal fixation failure, recurrence and other complications, together with therapeutic effects were compared between two groups. The outcome was analyzed according to Karlsson standard. In group A, 54 patients got an excellent result and 9 good according to Karlsson standard;the average operative time was (55.90 +/- 26.56) min; the average intraoperative bleeding amount was (99.80 +/- 50.30) ml; 1 patient had wire broken without re-dislocation at 16 weeks after operation, 3 patients got wound fat liquefaction and recovered after treatment, 1 patient had pain after shoulder joint motion and pain disappeared after implants were taken out. In group B, 52 patients got an excellent result and 12 good according to Karlsson standard; the average operative time was (49.50 +/- 23.14) min; the average intraoperative bleeding amount was (87.30 +/- 46.41) ml; 2 patients got wound fat liquefaction, and 2 patients had pain after shoulder joint motion. All the patients were followed up, and the duration ranged

  6. [EFFECTIVENESS OF CLAVICULAR HOOK PLATE COMBINED WITH TRAPEZIUS MUSCLE FASCIA FOR RECONSTRUCTION OF ACROMIOCLAVICULAR AND CORACOCLAVICULAR LIGAMENTS TO TREAT COMPLETE ACROMIOCLAVICULAR JOINT DISLOCATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chaoliang; Wang, Yingzhen; Zhu, Tao; Sun, Xuesheng; Lin, Chu; Gao, Bo; Li, Xinxia

    2015-02-01

    To explore the effectiveness of the clavicular hook plate combined with trapezius muscle fascia for reconstruction of acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments to treat acute complete acromioclavicular dislocations. Between January 2008 and April 2012, 66 patients with acromioclavicular dislocation were treated with the clavicular hook plate combined with trapezius muscle fascia for reconstruction of acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments in 32 cases (experimental group) and with the clavicular hook plate in 34 cases (control group). There was no significant difference in gender, age, injured side, the cause of injury, and the time from injury to operation between 2 groups (P > 0.05). Visual analogue scale (VAS), Constant shoulder scores, and coracoid clavi-cledistance (CC. Dist) were measured at preoperation and at 2 years after operation. Signal/noise quotiem (SNQ) was measured by MRI at 2 years after operation. The operation complications were observed. The patients of 2 groups obtained primary healing of incision. The morbidity of complication in experimental group (12.5%, 4/32) was significantly lower than that in control group (91.2%, 31/34) (Χ2 = 40.96, P = 0.00). All the cases were followed up 2.8 years on average (range, 2 to 4 years). VAS scores and CC.Dist significantly decreased at 2 years after operation when compared with preoperative values in the 2 groups (P acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments is successful in treating acute complete acromioclavicular dislocations, with the advantages of higher ligament healing, less complication, and early improvement of shoulder functions.

  7. Hook plate fixation for acute acromioclavicular dislocations without coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction: a functional outcome study in military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Narinder; Sharma, Vyom

    2015-08-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the shoulder function after clavicular hook plate fixation of acute acromioclavicular dislocations (Rockwood type III) in a population group consisting exclusively of high-demand military personnel. This prospective study was carried out at a tertiary care military orthopaedic centre during 2012-2013 using clavicular hook plate for management of acromioclavicular injuries without coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction in 33 patients. All patients underwent routine implant removal after 16 weeks. The functional outcome was assessed at 3, 6 and 12 months after hook plate removal and 2 years from the initial surgery using the Constant Murley and UCLA Scores. All the patients were male serving soldiers and had sustained acromioclavicular joint dislocation (Rockwood type III). Mean age of the patient group was 34.24 years (21-55 years). The mean follow-up period in this study was 23.5 months (20-26 months) after hook plate fixation and an average of 19.9 months (17-22 months) after hook plate removal. The average Constant Score at 3 months after hook plate removal was 60.3 as compared to 83.7 and 90.3 at 6 months and 1 year, respectively, and an average of 91.8 at the last follow-up that was approximately 2 years after initial surgery which was statistically significant (p value acromioclavicular dislocations producing excellent medium-term functional results in high-demand soldiers.

  8. Anatomical principles for minimally invasive reconstruction of the acromioclavicular joint with anchors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Chuanzhi; Lu, Yaojia; Wang, Qiang; Chen, Gang; Hu, Hansheng; Lu, Zhihua

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the outcome of a minimally invasive surgical technique for the treatment of patients with acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Sixteen patients with complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation were enrolled in this study. All patients were asked to follow the less active rehabilitation protocol post-operatively. Computed tomography with 3-D reconstruction of the injured shoulder was performed on each patient post operatively for the assessment of the accuracy of the suture anchor placement in the coracoid process and the reduction of the acromioclavicular joint. Radiographs of Zanca view and axillary view of both shoulders were taken for evaluating the maintenance of the acromioclavicular joint reduction at each follow-up visit. The Constant shoulder score was used for function assessment at the final follow-up. Twenty seven of the 32 anchors implanted in the coracoid process met the criteria of good position. One patient developed complete loss of reduction and another had partial loss of reduction in the anteroposterior plane. For the other 14 patients, the mean Constant score was 90 (range, 82-95). For the patients with partial and complete loss of reduction, the Constant score were 92 and 76 respectively. All of them got nearly normal range of motion of the shoulders and restored to pre-operative life and works. With this minimally invasive approach and limited exposure of the coracoid, a surgeon can place the suture anchors at the anatomical insertions of the coracoclavicular ligament and allow the dislocated joint reduced and maintained well. Level IV, Case series; therapeutic study.

  9. The treatment of the acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation with LARS artificial ligament:a preliminary report%应用LARS人工韧带治疗急性肩锁关节脱位的初步报告

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈爱民; 鹿楠; 叶添文; 杨鹏; 朱磊; 李菁

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently,the clinical perspectives of surgical treatment for Tossy Ⅲacromioclavicular(AC)joint dislocations are relatively identical.Due to the post-traumatic ruptures of the acromioclavicular ligament and coracoclavicular(CC)ligament which are used to maintain stability of the joint,the clavicle moves backward and upward,and the upper arm and the scapula drops downward for the gravity of the upper arm and the influence of the sternocleidomastoid muscle.Since such complications as reduction difficulties,redislocation after external fixation,pressure ulcers of the skin,and so forth are particularly prone to occur in the conservative therapy,the operative treatment is more inclined to be adopted for the Tossy Ⅲ dislocation of the AC joint.With the single repair and fixation of the CC ligament,redislocation is likely to happen after implant removal because the ruptured ligaments healed as scar tissue.Therefore,this study uses an operative method of reconstructing and augmenting the CC ligament with LARS artificial ligament for the treatment of Tossy Ⅲ AC joint dislocation,and evaluates its clinical effect.Methods From November 2006 to July 2009,8 patients with acute AC joint dislocation of Tossy Ⅲ were admitted into our hospital.Five patients were male and 3 were female,and their ages ranged from 21 to 45.Sides:3 injuries were on the left and 5 were on the right.Seven patients suffered from falling on the ground,and 1 patient was inj ured in a traffic accident.All the patients were treated with LARS artificial ligaments to reconstruct the CC ligament.Constant score and VAS score were adopted in clinical evaluation.Zanca view of the bilateral AC joint and the axillary radiograph of the affected shoulder joint were employed for imaging evaluation.All the patients were simple Tossy Ⅲ dislocation of AC joint with no trauma of other parts and skin breakdown.Regular pre-operative examinations and evaluations were carried out after admission,and LARS

  10. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction with coracoacromial ligament transfer using the docking technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gobezie Reuben

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symptomatic Acromioclavicular (AC dislocations have historically been surgically treated with Coracoclavicular (CC ligament reconstruction with transfer of the Coracoacromial (CA ligament. Tensioning the CA ligament is the key to success. Methods Seventeen patients with chronic, symptomatic Type III AC joint or acute Type IV and V injuries were treated surgically. The distal clavicle was resected and stabilized with CC ligament reconstruction using the CA ligament. The CA ligament was passed into the medullary canal and tensioned, using a modified 'docking' technique. Average follow-up was 29 months (range 12–57. Results Postoperative ASES and pain significantly improved in all patients (p = 0.001. Radiographically, 16 (94% maintained reduction, and only 1 (6% had a recurrent dislocation when he returned to karate 3 months postoperatively. His ultimate clinical outcome was excellent. Conclusion The docking procedure allows for tensioning of the transferred CA ligament and healing of the ligament in an intramedullary bone tunnel. Excellent clinical results were achieved, decreasing the risk of recurrent distal clavicle instability.

  11. Minimally invasive reconstruction of acute type IV and Type V acromioclavicular separations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsenis, Dimitris L; Stamoulis, Dimitris; Begkas, Dimitris; Tsamados, Stamatis

    2015-04-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the midterm radiologic, clinical, and functional results of the early reconstruction of the severe acromioclavicular joint dislocation using the flipptack fixation button technique. Between December 2006 and December 2009, one hundred thirty-five consecutive patients with acromioclavicular joint separations were admitted to the authors' institution. Fifty patients were included in the study. According to Rockwood classification, 29 (58%) dislocations were type IV and 21 (42%) were type V. Surgery was performed at an average of 4.2 days (range, 0-12 days) after dislocation. All dislocations were treated with the flipptack fixation button technique. All patients were evaluated at a final postoperative follow-up of 42 months (range, 36-49 months). The clinical outcome was assessed using the Constant score. The functional limitation was assessed using the bother index of the short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment. Radiographs taken immediately postoperatively and at the final follow-up assessed acromioclavicular joint reduction, coracoclavicular distance, and joint arthrosis. At the final follow-up, mean Constant score was 93.04 (range, 84-100). The average (±SD) short Musculoskeletal Function Assessment bother index was 20.88±8.95 (range, 2.0-49). No statistically significant difference was found between the acromioclavicular joint dislocation type and the clinical result (P=.227; chi-square, 6.910, Kruskal Wallis test). The regression of the coracoclavicular distance at final follow-up was not statistically significant (P=.276; chi-square, 6.319, Kruskal Wallis test). The flipptack fixation button technique is an effective alternative for the treatment of severe acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Because all objectives of the treatment were obtained, the results do not deteriorate over time. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Rotational and translational stability of different methods for direct acromioclavicular ligament repair in anatomic acromioclavicular joint reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitzel, Knut; Obopilwe, Elifho; Apostolakos, John; Cote, Mark P; Russell, Ryan P; Charette, Ryan; Singh, Hardeep; Arciero, Robert A; Imhoff, Andreas B; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2014-09-01

    Many reconstructions of acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocations have focused on the coracoclavicular (CC) ligaments and neglected the functional contribution of the AC ligaments and the deltotrapezial fascia. To compare the modifications of previously published methods for direct AC reconstruction in addition to a CC reconstruction. The hypothesis was that there would be significant differences within the variations of surgical reconstructions. Controlled laboratory study. A total of 24 cadaveric shoulders were tested with a servohydraulic testing system. Two digitizing cameras evaluated the 3-dimensional movement. All reconstructions were based on a CC reconstruction using 2 clavicle tunnels and a tendon graft. The following techniques were used to reconstruct the AC ligaments: a graft was shuttled underneath the AC joint back from anterior and again sutured to the acromial side of the joint (group 1), a graft was fixed intramedullary in the acromion and distal clavicle (group 2), a graft was passed over the acromion and into an acromial tunnel (group 3), and a FiberTape was fixed in a cruciate configuration (group 4). Anterior, posterior, and superior translation, as well as anterior and posterior rotation, were tested. Group 1 showed significantly less posterior translation compared with the 3 other groups (P < .05) but did not show significant differences compared with the native joint. Groups 3 and 4 demonstrated significantly more posterior translation than the native joint. Group 1 showed significantly less anterior translation compared with groups 2 and 3. Group 3 demonstrated significantly more anterior translation than the native joint. Group 1 demonstrated significantly less superior translation compared with the other groups and with the native joint. The AC joint of group 1 was pulled apart less compared with all other reconstructions. Only group 1 reproduced the native joint for the anterior rotation at the posterior marker. Group 4 showed

  13. Ligament Augmentation and Reconstruction System Failures in Repair of Grade V Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin K.-H. Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ligament Augmentation and Reconstruction System® (LARS® represents a popular synthetic anatomical reduction method for acromioclavicular joint dislocation by means of coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction. To our knowledge, no early failure has been documented in the literature. We present two unusual cases of LARS failure, one at four months after implant and the other at three weeks, without obvious causes, requiring re-do reconstruction, and discuss potential contributory factors.

  14. Arthroscopic treatment of acute acromioclavicular dislocations using a double button device: Clinical and MRI results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loriaut, P; Casabianca, L; Alkhaili, J; Dallaudière, B; Desportes, E; Rousseau, R; Massin, P; Boyer, P

    2015-12-01

    Arthroscopic treatment of acute grade 3 and 4 acromioclavicular dislocation is controversial, due to the risk of recurrence and of postoperative reduction defect. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether the healing of the acromioclavicular (AC) and coracoclavicular (CC) ligaments and the accurate 3D positioning parameters of the AC joint using MRI were correlated with satisfactory functional outcome. Thirty-nine patients were enrolled from 2009 to 2011 and managed arthroscopically by CC lacing using a double-button device. Clinical assessment included the Shoulder and Hand (QuickDash) score, Constant-Murley score and visual analog scale (VAS) for residual pain. Time and rate to return to work and return to sport were assessed according to type of sport and work. Postoperative complications were recorded. Radiological examination consisted of anteroposterior clavicle and lateral axillary radiographs. AC ligament healing and 3D joint congruency were assessed on MRI and correlated to the clinical results. Mean patient age was 35.7 years (range, 20-55). Mean follow-up was 42.3±10.6 months (range, 24-60). At final follow-up, mean QuickDash score, Constant score and VAS were respectively 1.7±4 (range, 0-11), 94.7±7.3 (range, 82-100) and 0.5±1.4 (range, 0-2). Thirty-five (90%) patients were able to resume work, including heavy manual labor, and sport. Radiology found accurate 3D joint congruency in 34 patients (87%) and CC and AC ligament healing in 36 (93%). Complications included reduction loss at 6 weeks in 3 patients, requiring surgical stabilization. Satisfactory functional results were associated with accurate AC joint congruency in the coronal and axial planes (P<0.05) and good AC and CC ligament healing (P<0.04). An initial 25% reduction defect in the coronal plane was not associated with poor functional results (P=0.07). Arthroscopic treatment by CC lacing satisfactorily restored ligament and joint anatomy in the present series. These

  15. Biomechanical analysis of acromioclavicular joint dislocation treated with clavicle hook plates in different lengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Cheng-Min; Huang, Kui-Chou; Pan, Chien-Chou; Lee, Cheng-Hung; Su, Kuo-Chih

    2015-11-01

    Clavicle hook plates are frequently used in clinical orthopaedics to treat acromioclavicular joint dislocation. However, patients often exhibit acromion osteolysis and per-implant fracture after undergoing hook plate fixation. With the intent of avoiding future complications or fixation failure after clavicle hook plate fixation, we used finite element analysis (FEA) to investigate the biomechanics of clavicle hook plates of different materials and sizes when used in treating acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Using finite element analysis, this study constructed a model comprising four parts: clavicle, acromion, clavicle hook plate and screws, and used the model to simulate implanting different types of clavicle hook plates in patients with acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Then, the biomechanics of stainless steel and titanium alloy clavicle hook plates containing either six or eight screw holes were investigated. The results indicated that using a longer clavicle hook plate decreased the stress value in the clavicle, and mitigated the force that clavicle hook plates exert on the acromion. Using a clavicle hook plate material characterized by a smaller Young's modulus caused a slight increase in the stress on the clavicle. However, the external force the material imposed on the acromion was less than the force exerted on the clavicle. The findings of this study can serve as a reference to help orthopaedic surgeons select clavicle hook plates.

  16. Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation with Ipsilateral Mid Third Clavicle, Mid Shaft Humerus and Coracoid Process Fracture - A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Naveen; Mandloi, Avinash; Agrawal, Ashish; Singh, Shailendra

    2016-01-01

    The clavicle, humerus and acromioclavicular (AC) joint separately are very commonly involved in traumatic injuries around the shoulder. Acromioclavicular joint dislocation with distal clavicle fracture is a well recognized entity in clinical practice. AC joint dislocation with mid shaft clavicle fracture is uncommon and only few cases have been reported in literature. However, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report to describe an acromioclavicular dislocation with ipsilateral mid shaft clavicle, mid shaft humerus and coracoid process fracture. Fractures of the humerus and clavicle along with the acromioclavicular joint dislocation were fixed at the same setting. A 65-year-old male met with a high velocity road traffic accident. Plain radiographs showed displaced mid third clavicle fracture with acromioclavicular joint dislocation with mid shaft humerus fracture. Surgical fixation was planned for humerus with interlocking nail, clavicle with locking plate and acromioclavicular joint with reconstruction of coracoclavicular ligaments. Intraoperatively, coracoid process was found to have a comminuted fracture. The operative plan had to be changed on table as coracoclavicular fixation was not possible. So acromioclavicular joint fixation was done using tension band wiring and the coracoclavicular ligament was repaired using a 2-0 ethibond. The comminuted coracoid fracture was managed conservatively. K wires were removed at 6 weeks. Early mobilization was started. In acromioclavicular joint injuries, clavicle must be evaluated for any injury. Although it is more commonly associated with distal clavicle fractures, it can be associated with middle third clavicle fractures. As plain radiographs, AP view are most of the times insufficient for viewing integrity of coracoid process, either special views like Stryker notch or CT scan may help in diagnosing such concealed injuries. When associated with fractures of the humerus and clavicle, anatomical

  17. Biplanar fixation of acromio-clavicular joint dislocation associated with coracoid process fracture: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radwan G. Metwaly

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acromioclavicular (AC joint injury associated with coracoid process (CP fracture is a rare injury and only case reports had been published in the literature. Although AC joint injury is not uncommon, there is controversy as regard the best stabilization method whether to use wires, hook plate, arthroscopic reconstruction or the recently described techniques of anatomic restoration of both the coracoclavicular (CC and acromioclavicular (AC ligaments to add stability in both the vertical as well as the horizontal plane for the AC joint. Isolated CP fracture rarely necessitates surgical intervention; but in association with AC joint injury; a controversy as regard best management, surgical approach, technique of stabilization and implant used is present due to paucity of literature. Patient and method: A 36 years old manual worker who sustained a combined injury of AC joint (grade III and CP comminuted base fracture had been treated surgically in our hospital using a biplanar fixation technique; blind 4 mm cannulated screw for the CP fracture and anatomic reconstruction of the AC ligament using FibreTape (Arthrex, Naples, FL; to add stability in both the vertical and horizontal plane. Follow up was done for one year. Results: After completion of rehabilitation program, patient could return to work with no shoulder pain in ten weeks postoperatively. Till the last follow up there was no evidence of loss of reduction or shoulder pain with a Constant score of 86. Conclusion: Our technique in combined AC joint and CP fracture, address both injuries to add biplanar AC joint stability allowing accelerated rehabilitation and avoids metal hardware complications. Keywords: Acromioclavicular, Coracoid process, Anatomic reconstruction, And horizontal stability

  18. A comparison between two double-button endoscopically assisted surgical techniques for the treatment acute acromioclavicular dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vulliet, P; Le Hanneur, M; Cladiere, V; Loriaut, P; Boyer, P

    2018-04-01

    To compare clinical and radiological outcomes between two endoscopically assisted double-button techniques in high-grade acute acromioclavicular separations. A retrospective single-center study was conducted in patients with acute acromioclavicular joint dislocation Rockwood types III and V, from 2009 to 2014. All were treated endoscopically, with a 1-year minimum follow-up. Two consecutive series were conducted; the first (TR group) received the TightRope ® system, whereas last series (DB group) was treated with the Dog Bone ® button technology (Arthrex, Naples, FL, USA). Primary endpoints were last follow-up values of Constant score (CS) and Quick-DASH (QD) score. Moreover, the posttraumatic displacement and its evolution were assessed on bilateral Zanca radiographs. A displacement of 5 mm or greater the day after surgery was considered as a lack of reduction; the same difference on last follow-up X-rays was considered as a loss of reduction. Forty patients were reviewed: 22 in the TR group and 18 in the DB group. After a mean follow-up of 27.7 ± 8.3 months, CS and QD averaged, respectively, 94.3 ± 4.4 and 2.0 ± 2.6 in the TR series, whereas they averaged, respectively, 95 ± 6.1 and 3.4 ± 3.3 in the DB series after a mean follow-up of 24.1 ± 5 months (PCS = 0.16, PQDS = 0.08). Lack of reduction and loss of reduction rates were significantly higher in the DB group, with P = 0.0005 and P acromioclavicular dislocations. IV: Therapeutic study-cases series.

  19. Results of Operative and Nonoperative Treatment of Rockwood Types III and V Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joukainen, Antti; Kröger, Heikki; Niemitukia, Lea; Mäkelä, E. Antero; Väätäinen, Urho

    2014-01-01

    Background: The optimal treatment of acute, complete dislocation of the acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) is still unresolved. Purpose: To determine the difference between operative and nonoperative treatment in acute Rockwood types III and V ACJ dislocation. Study Design: Randomized controlled trial; Level of evidence, 2. Methods: In the operative treatment group, the ACJ was reduced and fixed with 2 transarticular Kirschner wires and ACJ ligament suturing. The Kirschner wires were extracted after 6 weeks. Nonoperatively treated patients received a reduction splint for 4 weeks. At the 18- to 20-year follow-up, the Constant, University of California at Los Angeles Shoulder Rating Scale (UCLA), Larsen, and Simple Shoulder Test (SST) scores were obtained, and clinical and radiographic examinations of both shoulders were performed. Results: Twenty-five of 35 potential patients were examined at the 18- to 20-year follow-up. There were 11 patients with Rockwood type III and 14 with type V dislocations. Delayed surgical treatment for ACJ was used in 2 patients during follow-up: 1 in the operatively treated group and 1 in the nonoperatively treated group. Clinically, ACJs were statistically significantly less prominent or unstable in the operative group than in the nonoperative group (normal/prominent/unstable: 9/4/3 and 0/6/3, respectively; P = .02) and in the operative type III (P = .03) but not type V dislocation groups. In operatively and nonoperatively treated patients, the mean Constant scores were 83 and 85, UCLA scores 25 and 27, Larsen scores 11 and 11, and SST scores 11 and 12 at follow-up, respectively. There were no statistically significant differences in type III and type V dislocations. In the radiographic analysis, the ACJ was wider in the nonoperative than the operative group (8.3 vs 3.4 mm; P = .004), and in the type V dislocations (nonoperative vs operative: 8.5 vs 2.4 mm; P = .007). There was no statistically significant difference between study groups in

  20. Bioabsorbable Suture Anchor Migration to the Acromioclavicular Joint: How Far Can These Implants Go?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Medina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Few complications regarding the use of bioabsorbable suture anchors in the shoulder have been reported. What motivated this case report was the unusual location of the anchor, found in the acromioclavicular joint which, to our knowledge, has never been reported so far. A 53-year old male with previous rotator cuff (RC repair using bioabsorbable suture anchors presented with pain and weakness after 2 years of surgery. A suspicion of retear of the RC led to request of a magnetic resonance image, in which the implant was found located in the acromioclavicular joint. The complications reported with the use of metallic implants around the shoulder led to the development of bioabsorbable anchors. Advantages are their absorption over time, minimizing the risk of migration or interference with revision surgery, less artifacts with magnetic resonance imaging, and tendon-to-bone repair strength similar to metallic anchors. Since the use of bioabsorbable suture anchors is increasing, it is important to know the possible complications associated with these devices.

  1. ISAKOS upper extremity committee consensus statement on the need for diversification of the Rockwood classification for acromioclavicular joint injuries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beitzel, Knut; Mazzocca, Augustus D; Bak, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Optimal treatment for the unstable acromioclavicular (AC) joint remains a highly debated topic in the field of orthopaedic medicine. In particular, no consensus exists regarding treatment of grade III injuries, which are classified according to the Rockwood classification by disruption of both th...

  2. Midshaft clavicle fractures with associated ipsilateral acromioclavicular joint dislocations: Incidence and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottomeyer, Christina; Taylor, Benjamin C; Isaacson, Mark; Martinez, Lara; Ebaugh, Pierce; French, Bruce G

    2017-02-01

    Simultaneous ipsilateral clavicle and acromioclavicular (AC) joint injury have been infrequently reported in the literature at this time. The purpose of this study was to assess incidence as well as assess risk factors for this dual injury pattern. We performed a retrospective review of a prospectively collected database (Level III evidence), evaluating 383 adult patients without previous shoulder girdle injury or trauma with a minimum 1-year follow-up who sustained a displaced diaphyseal clavicle fracture. All patients in the study underwent either nonoperative management or surgical reduction and stabilization of a diaphyseal clavicle fracture with a plate and screw construct. Study subjects were followed with serial radiographs. Clavicle and shoulder radiographs, as well as chest radiographs and contralateral films in questionable cases, were used to assess for acromioclavicular joint injury in both operative and nonoperative groups. Additional data was collected on concurrent injuries, patient demographics, fracture characteristics, fixation techniques, surgical/post-operative data, and operative or nonoperative treatment. We found that 13/183 (7.1%) of patients undergoing fixation of a diaphyseal clavicle fracture had an ipsilateral AC joint injury, while 13/200 (6.5%) of patients undergoing conservative management had an ipsilateral AC joint injury. Critical analysis of the data revealed that presence of ipsilateral scapular body fractures, and a likely incidental association with superior plating fixation, were associated with an increased rate of this injury pattern. Ipsilateral clavicle fracture and AC joint injury is much more common than traditionally believed, with an incidence of 6.8% overall. It is unknown how the presence of an associated AC injury influences outcome, as AC injury was not universally symptomatic. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Biomechanical analysis of clavicle hook plate implantation with different hook angles in the acromioclavicular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Li-Kun; Su, Kuo-Chih; Lu, Wen-Hsien; Lee, Cheng-Hung

    2017-08-01

    A clavicle hook plate is a simple and effective method for treating acromioclavicular dislocation and distal clavicle fractures. However, subacromial osteolysis and peri-implant fractures are complicated for surgeons to manage. This study uses finite element analysis (FEA) to investigate the post-implantation biomechanics of clavicle hook plates with different hook angles. This FEA study constructed a model with a clavicle, acromion, clavicle hook plate, and screws to simulate the implantation of clavicle hook plates at different hook angles (90°, 95°, 100°, 105°, and 110°) for treating acromioclavicular joint dislocations. This study investigated the biomechanics of the acromion, clavicle, hook plate, and screws. A smaller hook angle increases the stress on the middle third of the clavicle. A larger hook angle increases the force exerted by the clavicle hook plate on the acromion. The screw at the most medial position on the plate generated the highest stress. The highest stress on the implanted clavicle hook plate was on the turning corner of the hook. A clavicle hook plate with different hook angles may induce different biomechanical behaviors in the clavicle and acromion. Orthopedic surgeons must select a suitable clavicle hook plate based on the anatomical structure of each patient.

  4. Clinical factors that affect perceived quality of life in arthroscopic reconstruction for acromioclavicular joint dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abat, F; Gich, I; Natera, L; Besalduch, M; Sarasquete, J

    To analyse the results of arthroscopic repair of acromioclavicular dislocation in terms of health-related quality of life. Prospective study of patients with acromioclavicular dislocation Rockwood grade iii-v, treated arthroscopically with a mean follow up of 25.4 months. The demographics of the series were recorded and evaluations were performed preoperatively, at 3 months and 2 years with validated questionnaires as Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36), visual analogue scale (VAS), The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH), Constant-Murley Shoulder Outcome Score (Constant) and Walch-Duplay Score (WD). Twenty patients, 17 men and 3 women with a mean age of 36.1 years, were analysed. According to the classification of Rockwood, 3 patients were grade iii, 3 grade iv and 14 grade v. Functional and clinical improvement was detected in all clinical tests (SF-36, VAS and DASH) at 3 months and 2 years follow up (Pacromioclavicular joint dislocation grades iii-v was not influenced by gender, age, grade, displacement, handedness, evolution of the VAS, scoring of the Constant or by the WD. However, it is correlated with the evolution in the DASH score. Copyright © 2017 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Migration of a Broken Kirschner Wire after Surgical Treatment of Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabri Batın

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Kirschner wire (K-wire is one of the commonly used implants in orthopaedics practice. Migration of the wire is one of the most frequently reported complications after fixation by the K-wire. In particular, it has been reported that a greater range of motion in the shoulder, negative intrathoracic pressure associated with respiration, gravitational force, and muscular activities may cause migration from the upper extremities. In general, thin and long foreign bodies with smooth surfaces that are localized within the tendon sheath and at an upper extremity can migrate more readily and can reach longer distances. Here, we present a patient with long-term migration of a broken K-wire who underwent fixation for acromioclavicular joint dislocation 5 years ago.

  6. [Treatment of complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation with transfer of the medial half of the coracoacromial ligament to reconstruct the coracoclavicular ligament].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wen-Wei; Shi, Zeng-Yuan; Liu, Zheng-Xin; Mao, Hai-Jiao

    2015-04-01

    To explore the operation methods and clinical effects of transfer of the medial half of the coracoacromial ligament to reconstruct the coracoclavicular ligament in treating complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation. From January 2006 to June 2012,26 patients with acute complete acromioclavicular joint dislocation underwent surgery. Transfer of the medial half of the coracoacromial ligament to reconstruct the coracoclavicular ligament, additional clavical hoot plate and Kirschner wires fixation, were performed in all the patients. Among the patients, 18 patients were male and 8 patients were female, with an average age of 36.7 years old (ranged from 25 to 51 years). The duration from injury to operation was from 3 to 12 days with an average of 5 days. According to the Rockwood classification, 4 cases were grade III and 22 cases were grade V . Clinical manifestation included local swelling, tenderness with snapping, limitation of shoulder joint motion. In preoperative bilateral shoulder joint X-rays, the injured coracoclavicular distance was (16.2 ± 5.0) mm which was significantly wider than that of uninjured sides (7.6 ± 1.0) mm. Clinical results were evaluated according to X-rays and Constant-Murley score. All incisions obtained primary healing after operation without complication of infection, internal fixation breakage, redislocation. All the patients were followed up from 12 to 30 months with an average of 18 months. Kirschner wires and internal fixation plate were removed at 1 month and 8-10 months after operation, respectively. At final follow-up, the motion of shoulder joint recovered to normal and a no pain joint was obtained. According to Constant-Murley score, 24 cases got excellent results and 2 cases good. There was no significant difference after operation between the injured coracoclavicular distance and the uninjured contralateral side [(7.7 ± 1.2) mm vs (7.6 ± 1.0) mm), P > 0.05]. Transfer of the medial half of the coracoacromial ligament to

  7. Acromioclavicular Joint Fixation Using an Acroplate Combined With a Coracoclavicular Screw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli Darestani, Reza; Ghaffari, Arash; Hosseinpour, Mehrdad

    2013-01-01

    Background Appropriate treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation is controversial. Acroplate fixation is one of the most common treatment methods of acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) dislocation. Based on the risk of re-dislocation after Acroplate fixation, we assumed that combined fixation with an Acroplate and a coracoclavicular screw helps improve the outcome. Objectives The main purpose of the current study was to compare the outcome of ACJ dislocation treated with an Acroplate alone and in combination with coracoclavicular screw. Patients and Methods This study was carried out on 40 patients with ACJ dislocation types III to VI who were divided randomly into two equal groups: Acroplate group (P) and Acroplate in combination with coracoclavicular screw group (P + S). The screws were extracted 3-6 months postoperatively. The patients were followed for 1 year and Imatani’s score was calculated. Finally, the data were compared between the groups. Results The mean Imatani’s score was significantly higher in P + S group (83.4 ± 14.1) than P group (81.2 ± 10.3) (P < 0.001). The mean duration of surgery was the same in the two groups (59.8 ± 9.4 minutes in group P V.s 64.3 ± 10.9 minutes in group P + S; P = 0.169). There were no cases of re-dislocation, degenerative changes and ossification and all patients returned to their previous jobs or sporting activities. Conclusions Using a coracoclavicular screw combined with an Acroplate can improve the patients’ function after ACJ disruption without any significant increase in surgical duration. Authors recommend this technique in the fixation of ACJ dislocation. PMID:24396788

  8. Comparative study on the treatment of Rockwood type III acute acromioclavicular dislocation: Clinical results from the TightRope® technique vs. K-wire fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, K; Garving, C; Thometzki, T; Lichte, P; Knobe, M; Dienstknecht, T; Hofman, M; Pape, H-C

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to address the inconsistency regarding the operative treatment of Rockwood type III acromioclavicular joint separation. We compared results after single- and double TightRope ® reduction with results after acromioclavicular transfixation via K-wires only and additional ligament augmentation in acute acromioclavicular (AC) joint separations graded Rockwood type III, and hypothesized that the TightRope ® technique leads to better clinical and radiological results. We conducted a retrospective clinical cohort study and included 42 consecutive patients (mean age 43 years [24-66]) diagnosed and operatively treated between 2004 and 2012 (mean follow-up was 54.6 months [15-118]). Specific shoulder scores as well as scores reflecting the patients' overall mental and physical health status were used. Radiological evaluation was also performed. The SF12 test revealed comparability between all subgroups. Specific shoulder tests and a visual analogue scale demonstrated comparable results. Radiographic measurements showed a significant reduction in the AC distance and CC distance after surgery in all subgroups. The early complication rate was 9.5% for all patients, while late complications occurred in 14.3% of all cases. Compared to the established methods, the operative TightRope ® procedures represent a safe alternative in Rockwood III injuries. All investigated techniques predominantly led to good and excellent clinical results in acute Rockwood type III AC joint instabilities. Avoidance of material removal and shorter hospital stays appear to speak in favour for the TightRope ® technique. IV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. A concise evidence-based physical examination for diagnosis of acromioclavicular joint pathology: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krill, Michael K; Rosas, Samuel; Kwon, KiHyun; Dakkak, Andrew; Nwachukwu, Benedict U; McCormick, Frank

    2018-02-01

    The clinical examination of the shoulder joint is an undervalued diagnostic tool for evaluating acromioclavicular (AC) joint pathology. Applying evidence-based clinical tests enables providers to make an accurate diagnosis and minimize costly imaging procedures and potential delays in care. The purpose of this study was to create a decision tree analysis enabling simple and accurate diagnosis of AC joint pathology. A systematic review of the Medline, Ovid and Cochrane Review databases was performed to identify level one and two diagnostic studies evaluating clinical tests for AC joint pathology. Individual test characteristics were combined in series and in parallel to improve sensitivities and specificities. A secondary analysis utilized subjective pre-test probabilities to create a clinical decision tree algorithm with post-test probabilities. The optimal special test combination to screen and confirm AC joint pathology combined Paxinos sign and O'Brien's Test, with a specificity of 95.8% when performed in series; whereas, Paxinos sign and Hawkins-Kennedy Test demonstrated a sensitivity of 93.7% when performed in parallel. Paxinos sign and O'Brien's Test demonstrated the greatest positive likelihood ratio (2.71); whereas, Paxinos sign and Hawkins-Kennedy Test reported the lowest negative likelihood ratio (0.35). No combination of special tests performed in series or in parallel creates more than a small impact on post-test probabilities to screen or confirm AC joint pathology. Paxinos sign and O'Brien's Test is the only special test combination that has a small and sometimes important impact when used both in series and in parallel. Physical examination testing is not beneficial for diagnosis of AC joint pathology when pretest probability is unequivocal. In these instances, it is of benefit to proceed with procedural tests to evaluate AC joint pathology. Ultrasound-guided corticosteroid injections are diagnostic and therapeutic. An ultrasound-guided AC joint

  10. Return-to-activity after anatomical reconstruction of acute high-grade acromioclavicular separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saier, T; Plath, J E; Beitzel, K; Minzlaff, P; Feucht, J M; Reuter, S; Martetschläger, F; Imhoff, Andreas B; Aboalata, M; Braun, S

    2016-04-02

    To evaluate return-to-activity (RtA) after anatomical reconstruction of acute high-grade acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) separation. A total of 42 patients with anatomical reconstruction of acute high-grade ACJ-separation (Rockwood Type V) were surveyed to determine RtA at a mean 31 months follow-up (f-u). Sports disciplines, intensity, level of competition, participation in overhead and/or contact sports, as well as activity scales (DASH-Sport-Module, Tegner Activity Scale) were evaluated. Functional outcome evaluation included Constant score and QuickDASH. All patients (42/42) participated in sporting activities at f-u. Neither participation in overhead/contact sports, nor level of activity declined significantly (n.s.). 62 % (n = 26) of patients reported subjective sports specific ACJ integrity to be at least the same as prior to the trauma. Sporting intensity (hours/week: 7.3 h to 5.4 h, p = .004) and level of competition (p = .02) were reduced. If activity changed, in 50 % other reasons but clinical symptoms/impairment were named for modified behavior. QuickDASH (mean 6, range 0-54, SD 11) and DASH-Sport-Module (mean 6, range 0-56, SD 13) revealed only minor disabilities at f-u. Over time Constant score improved significant to an excellent score (mean 94, range 86-100, SD 4; p < .001). Functional outcome was not correlated with RtA (n.s.). All patients participated in sporting activities after anatomical reconstruction of high-grade (Rockwood Type V) ACJ-separation. With a high functional outcome there was no significant change in activity level (Tegner) and participation in overhead and/or contact sports observed. There was no correlation between functional outcome and RtA. Limiting, there were alterations in time spent for sporting activities and level of competition observed. But in 50 % those were not related to ACJ symptoms/impairment. Unrelated to successful re-established integrity and function of the ACJ it should be considered that

  11. The biomechanical influence of the deltotrapezoid fascia on horizontal and vertical acromioclavicular joint stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, M F; Averbeck, A K; Welke, B; Smith, T; Claassen, L; Wellmann, M

    2016-04-01

    Many studies have investigated the biomechanical influence of the acromioclavicular (AC) and coracoclavicular (CC) ligaments on the stability of the acromioclavicular joint (ACJ). It has been shown that augmentation of the CC ligaments alone can result in residual horizontal instability. Our hypothesis was that the DTF would have a significant stabilizing effect on horizontal ACJ stability. In a biomechanical in vitro study a sequential injury of the ACJ was created on eight shoulders from full body, which were placed in an upright sitting position. The translation and rotation of the clavicle were measured in relation to the acromion using an optical navigation system in various states during thoracic-humeral elevation, abduction, and horizontal adduction. The three states were: an intact shoulder, complete sectioning of the AC ligaments, and a circular lesion of the DTF. Compared to the intact state we found a significant increase in anterior rotation of the clavicle of 1.11° (p = 0.012) and a tendency in lateral translation of 2.71 mm (p = 0.017) in relation to the acromion, with a combined lesion of AC ligaments and DTF. No significant differences were found between the intact state and the isolated dissected AC ligaments as well in adduction as elevation. A combined lesion of the AC ligaments and the DTF resulted in a quantitatively small but significant increase in anterior rotation and a tendency in lateral translation of the clavicle in relation to the acromion. These differences were quantitatively small, so that the clinical relevance of the stabilization effect of combined AC ligaments and DTF injuries is questionable.

  12. Arthroscopic resection of the distal clavicle in osteoarthritis of the acromioclavicular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Soo Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Symptomatic acromioclavicular joint (ACJ lesions are a common cause of shoulder complaints that can be treated successfully with both conservative and surgical methods. There are several operative techniques, including both open and arthroscopic surgery, for excising the distal end of the clavicle. Here, we present a new modified arthroscopic technique for painful osteoarthritis of the ACJ and evaluate its clinical outcomes. Our hypothesis was that 4- to 7-mm resection of the distal clavicle in an en bloc fashion would have several advantages, including no bony remnants, maintenance of stability of the ACJ, and reduced prevalence of heterotopic ossification, in addition to elimination of the pathologic portion of the distal clavicle. Materials and Methods: 20 shoulders of 20 consecutive patients with painful and isolated osteoarthritis of the ACJ who were treated by arthroscopic en bloc resection of the distal clavicle were included in the study. There were 10 males and 10 females with an average age of 56 years (range 42-70 years. The mean duration of followup was 6 years and 2 months (range 4-8 years 10 months. The results were evaluated using the University of California Los Angeles (UCLA shoulder rating score. Results: The overall UCLA score was 13.7 preoperatively, which improved to 33.4 postoperatively. All subscores were improved significantly ( P < 0.001. There were no specific complications at the latest followup. Conclusion: It is critical in this procedure to resect the distal clavicle evenly from superior to inferior in an en bloc fashion without any small bony remnants and to preserve the capsule and acromioclavicular ligament superoposteriorly. This arthroscopic procedure is a reliable and reproducible technique for painful osteoarthritis of the ACJ lesions in active patients engaged in overhead throwing sports and heavy labor.

  13. Modified Weaver-Dunn Procedure Versus The Use of Semitendinosus Autogenous Tendon Graft for Acromioclavicular Joint Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegazy, Galal; Safwat, Hesham; Seddik, Mahmoud; Al-Shal, Ehab A; Al-Sebai, Ibrahim; Negm, Mohame

    2016-01-01

    The optimal operative method for acromioclavicular joint reconstruction remains controversial. The modified Weaver-Dunn method is one of the most popular methods. Anatomic reconstruction of coracoclavicular ligaments with autogenous tendon grafts, widely used in treating chronic acromioclavicular joint instability, reportedly diminishes pain, eliminates sequelae, and improves function as well as strength. To compare clinical and radiologic outcomes between a modified Weaver-Dunn procedure and an anatomic coracoclavicular ligaments reconstruction technique using autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft. Twenty patients (mean age, 39 years) with painful, chronic Rockwood type III acromioclavicular joint dislocations were subjected to surgical reconstruction. In ten patients, a modified Weaver-Dunn procedure was performed, in the other ten patients; autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft was used. The mean time between injury and the index procedure was 18 month (range from 9 - 28). Clinical evaluation was performed using the Oxford Shoulder Score and Nottingham Clavicle Score after a mean follow-up time of 27.8 months. Preoperative and postoperative radiographs were compared. In the Weaver-Dunn group the Oxford Shoulder Score improved from 25±4 to 40±2 points. While the Nottingham Clavicle Score increased from 48±7 to 84±11. In semitendinosus tendon graft group, the Oxford Shoulder Score improved from 25±3 points to 50±2 points and the Nottingham Clavicle Score from 48±8 points to 95±8, respectively. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction using the semitendinosus tendon graft achieved better Oxford Shoulder Score and Nottingham Clavicle Score compared to the modified Weaver-Dunn procedure.

  14. Comparison of the Tight Rope Technique and Clavicular Hook Plate for the Treatment of Rockwood Type III Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Leyi; Wang, Te; Lu, Di; Hu, Wei; Hong, Jianjun; Chen, Hua

    2018-06-01

    Acromioclavicular joint dislocation is one of the most common shoulder problems and may lead to instability or degenerative changes. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of the Tight Rope system and clavicular hook plate for Rockwood type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation in adults. This was a prospective, randomized study in a hospital setting. From January 2012 to December 2014, 69 patients with type III injury were reviewed. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: Group A was treated using the TightRope system and Group B with the clavicular hook plate. All participants were followed up for 12 months. Clinical outcomes, radiological results and postoperative complications were recorded. The length of incision was significantly shorter in Goup A than that in Group B. The blood loss of surgery was significantly less in the Group A. Significant difference could be found between the two groups regarding the Visual Analogue Scale scores one day after surgery, at the 3 and 12 months follow-up. There were no differences according to the improvement of the Constant-Murley score and the coracoclavicular distance between the groups. The two groups have similar clinical and radiological outcomes. Both treatments could relieve the pain of dislocation, improve the function of Acromioclavicular joint and rectify the coracoclavicular distance measured in plain films. However, the TightRope system exhibited some advantages in terms of length of incision, blood loss of surgery, the pain postoperatively and no need for a second surgery.

  15. Experimental and clinical evaluation of acromioclavicular joint structures with new scan orientations in MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Fritz K.; Schaefer, Philipp J.; Brossmann, Joachim; Hilgert, Ralf Erik; Heller, Martin; Jahnke, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the study was to evaluate MRI for visualization of acromioclavicular (ac) joint structures in cadaveric shoulders, asymptomatic volunteers and symptomatic patients with trauma of the ac-joint. Three cadaveric shoulders were examined to find adequate planes and sequences for MRI. Afterwards, MR images were correlated to corresponding anatomical sections. Six asymptomatic volunteers and 13 patients were scanned in a 1.5 T Magnetom Vision with three sequences in the following planes: (1) parallel to the clavicle; (2) orthogonal to the ac joint, each time a fat-suppressed proton density-weighted + T2-sequence (TR/TE 4,000/15 ms) was performed; (3) parallel to the clavicle, T1-SE (TR/TE 817/20 ms). The parameters were: slice thickness 3 mm, field-of-view 180 mm, matrix 210 x 256 pixels. Standard of reference in the patients was clinical examination and conventional X-rays. Classification was by Rockwood grades I-VI. MRI allowed excellent visualization and diagnoses of ac-joint structures in volunteers and patients (n=6 normal, n=1 Rockwood I, n=5 Rockwood II, n=3 Rockwood III, n=4 Rockwood V). On MRI, in one lesion type II and III each, a lower lesion type was suspected clinically and by X-ray. In one patient additional information by MRI led to surgery. MRI allows excellent anatomical display of ac-joint structures and can give clinically relevant information on type and extension of ac-joint trauma, which may influence therapy. (orig.)

  16. Experimental and clinical evaluation of acromioclavicular joint structures with new scan orientations in MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Fritz K.; Schaefer, Philipp J.; Brossmann, Joachim; Hilgert, Ralf Erik; Heller, Martin; Jahnke, Thomas [University Hospital of Schleswig-Holstein Campus Kiel, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Kiel (Germany)

    2006-07-15

    The objective of the study was to evaluate MRI for visualization of acromioclavicular (ac) joint structures in cadaveric shoulders, asymptomatic volunteers and symptomatic patients with trauma of the ac-joint. Three cadaveric shoulders were examined to find adequate planes and sequences for MRI. Afterwards, MR images were correlated to corresponding anatomical sections. Six asymptomatic volunteers and 13 patients were scanned in a 1.5 T Magnetom Vision with three sequences in the following planes: (1) parallel to the clavicle; (2) orthogonal to the ac joint, each time a fat-suppressed proton density-weighted + T2-sequence (TR/TE 4,000/15 ms) was performed; (3) parallel to the clavicle, T1-SE (TR/TE 817/20 ms). The parameters were: slice thickness 3 mm, field-of-view 180 mm, matrix 210 x 256 pixels. Standard of reference in the patients was clinical examination and conventional X-rays. Classification was by Rockwood grades I-VI. MRI allowed excellent visualization and diagnoses of ac-joint structures in volunteers and patients (n=6 normal, n=1 Rockwood I, n=5 Rockwood II, n=3 Rockwood III, n=4 Rockwood V). On MRI, in one lesion type II and III each, a lower lesion type was suspected clinically and by X-ray. In one patient additional information by MRI led to surgery. MRI allows excellent anatomical display of ac-joint structures and can give clinically relevant information on type and extension of ac-joint trauma, which may influence therapy. (orig.)

  17. Treatment of Rockwood type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation using autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft and endobutton technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye G

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gang Ye, Chao-An Peng, Hua-Bin Sun, Jing Xiao, Kang Zhu Department of Orthopedics, the People’s Hospital of Huangpi District, Wuhan City, People’s Republic of China Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic effect of autogenous semitendinosus graft and endobutton technique, and compare with hook plate in treatment of Rockwood type III acromioclavicular (AC joint dislocation.Methods: From April 2012 to April 2013, we treated 46 patients with Rockwood type III AC joint dislocation. Patients were randomly divided into two groups: Group A was treated using a hook plate and Group B with autogenous semitendinosus graft and endobutton technique. All participants were followed up for 12 months. Radiographic examinations were performed every 2 months postoperatively, and clinical evaluation was performed using the Constant–Murley score at the last follow-up.Results: Results indicated that patients in Group B showed higher mean scores (90.3±5.4 than Group A (80.4±11.5 in terms of Constant–Murley score (P=0.001. Group B patients scored higher in terms of pain (P=0.002, activities (P=0.02, range of motion (P<0.001, and strength (P=0.004. In Group A, moderate pain was reported by 2 (8.7% and mild pain by 8 (34.8% patients. Mild pain was reported by 1 (4.3% patient in Group B. All patients in Group B maintained complete reduction, while 2 (8.7% patients in Group A experienced partial reduction loss. Two patients (8.7% encountered acromial osteolysis on latest radiographs, with moderate shoulder pain and limited range of motion.Conclusion: Autogenous semitendinosus graft and endobutton technique showed better results compared with the hook plate method and exhibited advantages of fewer complications such as permanent pain and acromial osteolysis. Keywords: Rockwood type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation, autogenous semitendinosus graft, endobutton, hook plate

  18. Interobserver and intraobserver reliability of radiographic classification of acromioclavicular joint dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringenberg, Jonathan D; Foughty, Zachary; Hall, Adam D; Aldridge, J Mack; Wilson, Joseph B; Kuremsky, Marshall A

    2018-03-01

    The classification and treatment of acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocations remain controversial. The purpose of this study was to determine the interobserver and intraobserver reliability of the Rockwood classification system. We hypothesized poor interobserver and intraobserver reliability, limiting the role of the Rockwood classification system in determining severity of AC joint dislocations and accurately guiding treatment decisions. We identified 200 patients with AC joint injuries using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision code 831.04. Fifty patients met inclusion criteria. Deidentified radiographs were compiled and presented to 6 fellowship-trained upper extremity orthopedic surgeons. The surgeons classified each patient into 1 of the 6 classification types described by Rockwood. A second review was performed several months later by 2 surgeons. A κ value was calculated to determine the interobserver and intraobserver reliability. The interobserver and intraobserver κ values were fair (κ = 0.278) and moderate (κ = 0.468), respectively. Interobserver results showed that 4 of the 50 radiographic images had a unanimous classification. Intraobserver results for the 2 surgeons showed that 18 of the 50 images were rated the same on second review by the first surgeon and 38 of the 50 images were rated the same on second review by the second surgeon. We found that the Rockwood classification system has limited interobserver and intraobserver reliability. We believe that unreliable classification may account for some of the inconsistent treatment outcomes among patients with similarly classified injuries. We suggest that a better classification system is needed to use radiographic imaging for diagnosis and treatment of AC joint dislocations. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Loss of reduction and complications of coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction with autogenous tendon graft in acute acromioclavicular dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Nam Hong; Lim, Seok Min; Lee, Sang Young; Lim, Tae Kang

    2017-04-01

    This study was conducted to report loss of reduction and complications after single-tunnel coracoclavicular (CC) ligament reconstruction with autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft for acute acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocations. This retrospective study included patients with acute, unstable AC dislocations (surgery within 6 weeks after trauma). We excluded patients with chronic injury and distal clavicle fractures with CC ligaments disruption. We measured the CC distance on anteroposterior radiographs of both clavicles, preoperatively, immediately postoperatively, and at the final follow-up visit. We evaluated clinical outcomes using the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder Assessment and the University of California, Los Angeles Shoulder Rating Scale scores and perioperative complications. There were 30 patients (27 men and 3 women) with mean age of 41 years (range, 19-70 years). The mean follow-up period was 31 months (range, 12-186 months). Mean CC distance was 15.5 ± 3.7 mm (84% ± 14% of the contralateral shoulder) preoperatively, 8.9 ± 2.6 mm (9% ± 40%) immediately postoperatively (P 25% increase of CC distance) developed in 14 patients (47%), and complications occurred in 6 patients (20%), including 3 distal clavicle fractures through the tunnel. Final clinical scores were significantly lower in patients with complications (27 vs. 33 of the University of California, Los Angeles assessment [P < .001] and 81 vs. 95 of the American Shoulder and Elbow Surgeons Shoulder assessment [P < .001]). In acute AC joint dislocation, single-tunnel CC ligament reconstruction using autogenous tendon graft resulted in loss of reduction rate of 47% and a complication rate of 20%. The development of complications adversely affected clinical outcomes. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Acute high-grade acromioclavicular dislocations treated with triple button device (MINAR): Preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano-Martínez, José Antonio; Nicolás-Serrano, Gregorio; Bento-Gerard, Julio; Picazo-Marín, Francisco; Andrés-Grau, Josefina

    2016-11-01

    Describe the clinical and radiological results of triple button device in the treatment of high-grade AC dislocations (Rockwood, type V) and assess whether improves vertical and horizontal stability compared to the techniques previously described. This retrospective study included 39 patients with type V acromioclavicular dislocations treated with Twin Tail TightRope™ system (triple button device). Of the 39 patients, 33 (26 men and 7 women) were able to participate in clinical and radiographic follow up. At the time of surgery, the mean age was 25years±7(range, 17-49). All patients underwent bilateral-weighted Zanca (CC distance) and Alexander view (AC distance) as well as the Constant Score (CS) and Acromioclavicular Joint Instability Scoring System (ACJI). Radiological and clinical outcome was assessed during routine follow-up examinations preoperatively, postoperatively, 1, 3, 6 months and every year after the surgery. The presence of calcification, degenerative changes, mobilization of implants and bone resorption were also assessed. After a mean follow up of 25±4months (range 14-38), the results of the Constant (CS) were 94.1±5,5 (range 76-100) and test ACJI 87.3±9,8 (range 65-100), showing no significant differences with the uninjured shoulder (CS 95.8±2.5, range 83-100; ACJI 94.1±3.7, range 80-100). At final review, we observed that preoperative coracoclavicular distance (Zanca View) improved from 21,75±1.97mm to 8,73mm±0.75 and the acromioclavicular distance (Alexander View) from 12,65mm±1.99 to 0,35±0.3mm. Compared with healthy shoulder, these differences were not significant. There was no loss of reduction with this system in the vertical plane. 4 patients (12.12%) revealed signs of posterior instability with worse clinical test results. The presence of degenerative joint changes (6,06%), calcifications (27,2%) or mobilization of the implant (18,18%) was not associated with worse clinical outcomes. Twin Tail device using minimally invasive

  1. [COMPARISON OF EFFECTIVENESS BETWEEN TWO OPERATIVE TECHNIQUES OF CORACOCLAVICULAR LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION FOR TREATMENT OF Tossy TYPE III ACROMIOCLAVICULAR JOINT DISLOCATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hongwei; Gao, Sheng; Yin, Yong; Li, Yunfei; Han, Qingtian; Li, Huizhang

    2015-11-01

    To evaluate and compare the effectiveness of double Endobutton technique and suture anchor combined Endobutton plate in the treatment of Tossy type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Between May 2010 and March 2014, a retrospective study was preformed on 56 patients with Tossy type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation. The coracoclavicular ligament was reconstructed with double Endobutton technique in 31 cases (Endobutton group), and with suture anchor combined Endobutton plate in 25 cases (Anchor group). There was no significant difference in age, gender, injury causes, injury side, associated injury, medical comorbidities, and disease duration between 2 groups (P>0.05). The operation time, medical device expenses, postoperative complications, preoperative and postoperative Constant-Murley scores, and postoperative Karlsson grading of the injured shoulder were compared between 2 groups. The average operation time in Endobutton group was significantly greater than that in Anchor group (t = 4.285, P = 0.000); there was no significant difference in the medical device expenses between 2 groups (t = 1.555, P = 0.126). Primary healing of incision was obtained in all patients of 2 groups; no early complications of infection and skin necrosis occurred. All patients were followed up 15.6 months on average (range, 11-35 months). During follow-up, some loss of reduction and ectopic ossification in the coracoclavicular gap were observed in 1 case and 6 cases of Endobutton group, respectively. No recurrence of acromioclavicular joint dislocation, implant fixation loosening and broken, and secondary fractures occurred in the other patients. There was significant difference in the incidence of postoperative complications between 2 groups (P = 0.013). Constant-Murley scores of the injured shoulder significantly increased at 9 months after operation when compared with preoperative values in 2 groups (P 0.05). At last follow-up, there was no significant difference in

  2. Acromioclavicular joint dislocation: a Dog Bone button fixation alone versus Dog Bone button fixation augmented with acromioclavicular repair-a finite element analysis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumanont, Sermsak; Nopamassiri, Supachoke; Boonrod, Artit; Apiwatanakul, Punyawat; Boonrod, Arunnit; Phornphutkul, Chanakarn

    2018-03-20

    Suspension suture button fixation was frequently used to treat acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) dislocation. However, there were many studies reporting about complications and residual horizontal instability after fixation. Our study compared the stability of ACJ after fixation between coracoclavicular (CC) fixation alone and CC fixation combined with ACJ repair by using finite element analysis (FEA). A finite element model was created by using CT images from the normal shoulder. The model 1 was CC fixation with suture button alone, and the model 2 was CC fixation with suture button combined with ACJ repair. Three different forces (50, 100, 200 N) applied to the model in three planes; inferior, anterior and posterior direction load to the acromion. The von Mises stress of the implants and deformation at ACJs was recorded. The ACJ repair in the model 2 could reduce the peak stress on the implant after applying the loading forces to the acromion which the ACJ repair could reduce the peak stress of the FiberWire at suture button about 90% when compared to model 1. And, the ACJ repair could reduce the deformation of the ACJ after applying the loading forces to the acromion in both vertical and horizontal planes. This FEA supports that the high-grade injuries of the ACJ should be treated with CC fixation combined with ACJ repair because this technique provides excellent stability in both vertical and horizontal planes and reduces stress to the suture button.

  3. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction by coracoid process transfer augmented with hook plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yeming; Zhang, Jianguo

    2014-06-01

    Various techniques have been reported for the treatment of chronic acromioclavicular (AC) joint separation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the results of surgical construction of coracoclavicular ligament using coracoid process transfer augmented with a hook plate fixation. Twenty-one patients treated with coracoid process transfer augmented with a hook plate fixation for chronic type III and V AC injuries were retrospectively analysed in 2003-2009. The age of the patients ranged from 23 to 58 years with an average age of 41.6 years. The patients were followed up clinically and radiographically, with an average of 33.0 months. Functional status and the ability to return to work were recorded during follow-up. Constant score and visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain were measured. The mean Constant score has increased from 70.9 points preoperatively to 90.7 points at follow-up. The mean VAS score has decreased from 4.7 preoperatively to 1.2 at follow-up. The average abduction was 172°, forward flexion was 170° and external rotation was 56°. There were 10 excellent results, 10 good results and one fair result. All patients had resumed their job or returned to original sport activity at mean 3.7 months postoperatively. No reduction loss was observed after plate removal and the final follow-up. Despite retrospective nature of the study, the outcomes of surgical construction with process transfer augmented with hook plate fixation are promising for chronic type III and V AC injuries. Therapeutic level IV. Retrospective case series, treatment study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparison of 3-Dimensional Shoulder Complex Kinematics in Individuals With and Without Shoulder Pain, Part 1: Sternoclavicular, Acromioclavicular, and Scapulothoracic Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    LAWRENCE, REBEKAH L.; BRAMAN, JONATHAN P.; LAPRADE, ROBERT F.; LUDEWIG, PAULA M.

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN Cross-sectional. OBJECTIVES To compare sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, and scapulothoracic joint motion between symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals during shoulder motion performed in 3 planes of humerothoracic elevation. BACKGROUND Differences in scapulothoracic kinematics are associated with shoulder pain. Several studies have measured these differences using surface sensors, but the results of this technique may be affected by skin-motion artifact. Furthermore, previous studies have not included the simultaneous measurement of sternoclavicular and acromioclavicular joint motion. METHODS Transcortical bone pins were inserted into the clavicle, scapula, and humerus of 12 asymptomatic and 10 symptomatic individuals for direct, bone-fixed tracking using electromagnetic sensors. Angular positions for the sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, and scapulothoracic joints were measured during shoulder flexion, abduction, and scapular plane abduction. RESULTS Differences between groups were found for sternoclavicular and scapulothoracic joint positions. Symptomatic individuals consistently demonstrated less sternoclavicular posterior rotation, regardless of angle, phase, or plane of shoulder motion. Symptomatic individuals also demonstrated less scapulothoracic upward rotation at 30° and 60° of humerothoracic elevation during shoulder abduction and scapular plane abduction. CONCLUSION The results of this study show that differences in shoulder complex kinematics exist between symptomatic and asymptomatic individuals. However, the magnitude of these differences was small, and the resulting clinical implications are not yet fully understood. The biomechanical coupling of the sternoclavicular and acromioclavicular joints requires further research to better understand scapulothoracic movement deviations and to improve manual therapy and exercise-based physical therapy interventions. PMID:25103135

  5. Prevalence of remaining horizontal instability in high-grade acromioclavicular joint injuries surgically managed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisneros, Luis Natera; Reiriz, Juan Sarasquete

    2017-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of remaining horizontal instability in high-grade acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) injuries surgically managed by means of four different surgical strategies and to assess its relation to the clinical outcomes and the quality of life. In this multicentric non-randomized retrospective study, 53 patients with high-grade ACJ injuries surgically managed (by means of open or arthroscopic surgery) were clinically and radiographically assessed at 24 months or more after shoulder surgery. The presence of post-surgical remaining horizontal instability was evaluated by means of Alexander or axillary X-ray views. The study population was divided into two groups: patients with evidence of post-surgical remaining horizontal instability and patients without evidence of post-surgical remaining horizontal instability at the last follow-up visit. The relationship between remaining horizontal instability and the quality-of-life questionnaires was analyzed. 18.87% (10/53) of the Alexander or axillary X-rays views showed post-surgical remaining horizontal instability at the last follow-up visit (INSTAB-group). Results of the questionnaires were: (1) physical SF36 score (INSTAB-group 57.02 ± 3.17  and NO-INSTAB-group 57.66 ± 3.30, p = 0.583); (2) mental SF36 score (INSTAB-group 53.95 ± 3.98  and NO-INSTAB-group 55.71 ± 3.30, p = 0.150); (3) NRS for pain (INSTAB-group 1.30 ± 1.49 and NO-INSTAB-group 0.83  ± 1.08, p = 0.260); (4) DASH questionnaire (INSTAB-group 5.27 ± 5.42 and NO-INSTAB-group 3.06 ± 2.30, p = 0.049); (5) Constant score (INSTAB-group 93.4 ± 3.5 and NO-INSTAB-group 94.83  ± 4.3, p = 0.333); and Global satisfaction (INSTAB-group 8.7  ± 0.95 and NO-INSTAB-group 8.64 ± 1.03, p = 0.874). Independently of the type of procedure, post-surgical remaining horizontal instability was present in almost one-fifth of the patients, and this group of patients showed a significantly worse DASH score. The

  6. Morphological analysis of acromion and hook plate for the fixation of acromioclavicular joint dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jong Pil; Lee, Yeon Soo; Song, Geun Soo; Oh, Joo Han

    2017-03-01

    Acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation is a common sports injury. Hook plate fixation is currently widely used to treat this injury, as it can promote the natural healing of the ligament with good clinical outcomes. However, subacromial erosion and impingement are frequently observed post-operatively. It was hypothesized that the morphology and the contact characteristics between the hook portion and the acromion are the main causes of complications after hook plate fixation with the currently available commercial designs. Three-dimensional reconstructed models of the AC joint obtained from the computed tomographic scans of 23 male and 23 female patients (mean age, 61.1 ± 6.3 years) were evaluated, and multiple anatomical parameters were measured. For the subacromial positioning of the hook plate, an actual hook plate (Synthes Inc., West Chester, PA, USA) was scanned, and the contact between the hook plate and the acromion was estimated. The thicknesses of the acromion and distal clavicle were 9.7 ± 1.5 mm (10.7 mm in men; 8.6 mm in women) and 11.3 ± 1.6 mm (11.6 mm in men; 10.0 mm in women), respectively. The width of the acromion was 28.5 ± 3.6 mm. The mean inclination angle between the hook plate and the acromion was 29.3° ± 9.7° (27.9° in men; 30.6° in women). The hook plate made a point contact with the acromion at 9.2 ± 3.3 mm (31.5 %) from the lateral end of the acromion. The results revealed that the hook made a pinpoint contact with the undersurface of the acromion, and this might explain why complications commonly occur after hook plate fixation. The force concentration phenomenon associated with the hook plate of existing designs results from cases of morphological mismatch, such as excessive inclination and improper occupation of the subacromial space.

  7. [Design and clinical application of the drilling guide in the treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation with closed reduction and Kirschner fixation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Song; Hao, Yong-qiang; Shi, Xiao-lin; Zhao, Huan-li; Gao, Kai-tuo; Sun, Jin-xu

    2011-03-01

    To investigate a drilling guide in the treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation with closed reduction and Kirschner fixation and explore the therapeutic effect. From June 2008 to December 2009, 36 patients with acromioclavicular joint dislocation (Tossy III) were treated with closed reduction and Kirschner fixation using a self-designed drilling guide as well as percutaneous repair of acromioclavicular joint. Among the patients, 24 patients were male and 12 patients were female,ranging in age from 20 to 61 years, averaged 38.6 years. The duration from injury to operation ranged from 3.5 to 72 h,with a mean of 15.2 h. No clavicle fracture was found in all cases. The operative time, intra-operative bleeding and therapeutic effects were observed. There were no complications including neurovascular problems. The mean operating time were 20 min,mean blood loss were about 10 ml. According to the observation of postoperative X-ray examination, all Kirschners in acromioclavicular joint were in place. All Kirschners were removed in 6 postoperative weeks. All the patients were followed up ranging from 2 to 26 months (averaged 14.3 months). According to the Karlsson standard,22 patients got an excellent result, 13 good and 1 poor. This method has following advantages: easy operation and fixation; minimum injuries to articular surface; and which would be widely used in clinical practice.

  8. Anatomic ligament consolidation of the superior acromioclavicular ligament and the coracoclavicular ligament complex after acute arthroscopically assisted double coracoclavicular bundle stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobmann, S; Buckup, J; Colcuc, C; Roessler, P P; Zimmermann, E; Schüttler, K F; Hoffmann, R; Welsch, F; Stein, T

    2017-09-18

    The consolidation of the acromioclavicular (AC) and coracoclavicular (CC) ligament complex after arthroscopically assisted stabilization of acute acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) separation is still under consideration. Fifty-five consecutive patients after arthroscopically assisted double-CC-bundle stabilization within 14 days after acute high-grade ACJ separation were studied prospectively. All patients were clinically analysed preoperatively (FU0) and post-operatively (FU1 = 6 months; FU2 = 12 months). The structural MRI assessments were performed at FU0 (injured ACJ) and at FU2 bilateral (radiologic control group) and assessed separately the ligament thickness and length at defined regions for the conoid, trapezoid and the superior AC ligament. Thirty-seven patients were assessed after 6.5 months and after 16.0 months. The 16-month MRI analysis revealed for all patients continuous ligament healing for the CC-complex and the superior AC ligament with in the average hypertrophic consolidation compared to the control side. Separate conoid and trapezoid strands (double-strand configuration) were detected in 27 of 37 (73%) patients, and a single-strand configuration was detected in 10 of 37 (27%) patients; both configurations showed similar CCD data. The ligament healing was not influenced by the point of surgery, age at surgery and heterotopic ossification. The clinical outcome was increased (FU0-FU2): Rowe, 47.7-97.0 pts.; TAFT, 3.9-10.6 pts.; NAS pain , 8.9-1.4 pts. (all P < 0.05). The arthroscopically assisted double-CC-bundle stabilization within 14 days after acute high-grade ACJ separation showed 16 months after surgery sufficient consolidations of the AC and double-CC ligament complex in 73%. III, Case series.

  9. Reconstruction of displaced acromio-clavicular joint dislocations using a triple suture-cerclage: description of a safe and efficient surgical technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandmann Gunther H

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Purpose In this retrospective study we investigated the clinical and radiological outcome after operative treatment of acute Rockwood III-V injuries of the AC-joint using two acromioclavicular (AC cerclages and one coracoclavicular (CC cerclage with resorbable sutures. Methods Between 2007 and 2009 a total of 39 patients fit the inclusion criteria after operative treatment of acute AC joint dislocation. All patients underwent open reduction and anatomic reconstruction of the AC and CC-ligaments using PDS® sutures (Polydioxane, Ethicon, Norderstedt, Germany. Thirty-three patients could be investigated at a mean follow up of 32±9 months (range 24–56 months. Results The mean Constant score was 94.3±7.1 (range 73–100 with an age and gender correlated score of 104.2%±6.9 (88-123%. The DASH score (mean 3.46±6.6 points, the ASES score (94.6±9.7points and the Visual Analogue Scale (mean 0.5±0,6 revealed a good to excellent clinical outcome. The difference in the coracoclavicular distance compared to the contralateral side was Conclusion Open AC joint reconstruction using AC and CC PDS cerclages provides good to excellent clinical results in the majority of cases. However, radiographically, the CC distance increased significantly at final follow up, but neither the amount of re-dislocation nor calcifications of the CC ligaments or osteoarthritis of the AC joint had significant influence on the outcome. Level of evidence Case series, Level IV

  10. Coracoid Process Avulsion Fracture at the Coracoclavicular Ligament Attachment Site in an Osteoporotic Patient with Acromioclavicular Joint Dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiro Onada

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Coracoid fractures are uncommon, mostly occur at the base or neck of the coracoid process (CP, and typically present with ipsilateral acromioclavicular joint (ACJ dislocation. However, CP avulsion fractures at the coracoclavicular ligament (CCL attachment with ACJ dislocation have not been previously reported. A 59-year-old woman receiving glucocorticoid treatment fell from bed and complained of pain in her shoulder. Radiographs revealed an ACJ dislocation with a distal clavicle fracture. Three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT reconstruction showed a small bone fragment at the medial apex of the CP. She was treated conservatively and achieved a satisfactory outcome. CP avulsion fractures at the CCL attachment can occur in osteoporotic patients with ACJ dislocations. Three-dimensional computed tomography is useful for identifying this fracture type. CP avulsion fractures should be suspected in patients with ACJ dislocations and risk factors for osteoporosis or osteopenia.

  11. Anatomical Evaluation of the Proximity of Neurovascular Structures During Arthroscopically Assisted Acromioclavicular Joint Reconstruction: A Cadaveric Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaszek, Daniel; Pickell, Michael; Wilson, Evan; Ducsharm, Melissa; Hesse, Daniel; Easteal, Ron; Bardana, Davide D

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the safety of an arthroscopic technique for acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) reconstruction by investigating its proximity to important neurovascular structures. Six shoulders from 4 cadaveric specimens were used for ACJ reconstruction in this study. The procedure consists of performing an arthroscopic acromioclavicular (AC) reduction with a double button construct, followed by coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction without drilling clavicular tunnels. Shoulders were subsequently dissected in order to identify and measure distances to adjacent neurovascular structures. The suprascapular artery and nerve were the closest neurovascular structures to implanted materials. The mean distances were 8.2 (standard deviation [SD] = 3.6) mm to the suprascapular nerve and 5.6 (SD = 4.2) mm to the suprascapular artery. The mean distance of the suprascapular nerve from implants was found to be greater than 5 mm (P = .040), while the distance to the suprascapular artery was not (P > .5). Neither difference was statistically significant (P = .80 for artery; P = .08 for nerve). Mini-open, arthroscopically assisted ACJ reconstruction safely avoids the surrounding nerves, with no observed damage to any neurovascular structures including the suprascapular nerve and artery, and may be a viable alternative to open techniques. However, surgeons must remain cognizant of possible close proximity to the suprascapular artery. This study represents an evaluation of the safety and feasibility of a minimally invasive ACJ reconstruction as it relates to the proximity of neurovascular structures. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. In vivo analysis of acromioclavicular joint motion after hook plate fixation using three-dimensional computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Sang; Yoo, Yon-Sik; Jang, Seong Wook; Nair, Ayyappan Vijayachandran; Jin, Hyonki; Song, Hyun-Seok

    2015-07-01

    The clavicle hook plate can be used to treat acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligament injury or distal clavicular fracture with comminution. However, the hook plate can induce subacromial impingement, resulting in discomfort from the hardware. Our inclusion criteria were (1) men and women aged older than 20 years and (2) the presence of comminuted distal clavicular fractures (Neer type IIB) fixed with a hook plate (Synthes, Oberdorf, Switzerland). Three-dimensional computed tomography was obtained before removal of the hook plate. Seven patients were enrolled prospectively. The mean age was 42 years (range, 24-60 years). Zero degree images and abduction images were obtained. The sagittal cut surface was obtained 5 mm medial from the distal clavicle. The equator of the cut surface of the clavicle was compared with the full abduction model to analyze rotation. The center of the cut surface of the clavicle was compared with the full abduction model to analyze translation. The average difference in rotation of the distal clavicle between both shoulders was 16° (range, 3°-22°; P = .001). The mean difference in anterior translation of the distal clavicle was 2.2 mm (range, -0.7 to 5.6 mm; P = .030). Hook plate fixation at the acromioclavicular joint causes decreased internal rotation and increased anterior translation of the distal clavicle with respect to the medial acromion, indicating that the scapula relative to the thorax has decreased posterior tilting and increased external rotation in shoulders fixed using a hook plate. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Case-control study on shoulder pain caused by hook palte for the treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying-guo; Cai, Xiao-bing; Wang, Xiao-min; Zhu, Yong-gan; Pan, He-yong

    2015-06-01

    To explore causes of shoulder pain and propose prevention measures in treating acromioclavicular joint dislocation. From January 2005 to January 2013, 86 patients with acromioclavicular joint dislocation (Tossy III) were treated with hook plate fixation, and were divided into two groups. Bsaed on recovery of shoulder function mostly, the patients who suffered from rest pain, motion pain were named as shoulder pain group, while the patients without pain were named as painless group. In shoulder pain group, there were 21 cases including 15 males and and 6 females ranging the age from 22 to 62 years old with an average of (40.6±11.2) years old. There were 8 cases were on the left side and 13 cases were on the right side. In painless group, there were 65 cases including 36 males and and 29 females ranging the age from 19 to 65 years old with an average of (40.0±11.3) years old. There were 33 cases were on the left side and 32 cases were on the right side. The time from injury to operation ranged from 3 h to 8 d with an average of 34.6 h. Shoulder function of all patients were normal before injuried. Postoperative pain, activity of daily living (ADL), range of motion, deltoid muscle strength were compared. Anteflexion,rear protraction, abduction and upthrow of shoulder joint were also compared. Postoperative complications between two groups were observed and compared. All patients were followed up from 12 to 48 months with an average of 18.5 months. Constant-Murley score were used to evaluate clinical efficacy at the least following up, and 13 cases got an excellent results, 5 moderate, 2 good and 1 poor in shoulder pain group ; while 61 cases were obtained excellent results, 3 moderate and 1 good in painless group. There were significantly differences between two groups in Constant-Murley score and activity of shoulder joint (Pacromioclavicular arthritis. Chosing individual clavicular hook plate, fulfilling anatomic reset, paying attention to the repair of articular

  14. [EFFECTIVENESS COMPARISON OF CORACOCLAVICULAR LIGAMENT RECONSTRUCTION BETWEEN BY AUTOLOGOUS AND ALLOGENEIC TENDON GRAFTS COMBINED WITH HOOK PLATE FIXATION FOR TREATING ACROMIOCLAVICULAR JOINT DISLOCATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Fei; Sun, Zhenzhong; Wei, Xuming; Liu, Xueguang; Zhou, Ming; Zhuang, Yin; Song, Sheng

    2016-05-08

    To compare the effectiveness of coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction between by using autologous plantaris tendon graft combined with hook plate fixation and allogeneic tendon graft combined with hook plate fixation for treating acromiocavicular joint dislocation. Thirty-three patients with acromioclavicular joint dislocation who accorded with the inclusion criteria between January 2013 and June 2014 were assigned into 2 groups. The patients were treated with autologous plantaris tendon graft combined with hook plate fixation in group A ( n =17), and with allogeneic tendon graft combined with hook plate fixation in group B ( n =16). Thirteen-one patients was followed up more than 12 months (15 in group A and 16 in group B). There was no significant difference in gender, age, cause of injury, sides, time between injury and surgery, and type of dislocation ( P >0.05). The assessments included operation time, hospitalization time, hospitalization expenses, shoulder range of motion, gap of acromioclavicular, Constant-Murley scores, and visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain. The operation time of group A was significantly longer than that of group B, and the hospitalization expense was significantly lower than that of group B ( P 0.05). No redislocation of acromioclavicular joint and rejection reaction occurred during follow-up. At last follow-up, there was no significant difference in shoulder range of motion, Constant-Murley score, and VAS score between 2 groups ( P >0.05). Coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction by autologous plantaris tendon or allogeneic tendon graft combined with hook plate fixation for the treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation can achieve good effectiveness. The appropriate treatment should be chosen according to the patient's economic situation.

  15. BiPOD Arthroscopic Acromioclavicular Repair Restores Bidirectional Stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Beer, Joe; Schaer, Michael; Latendresse, Kim; Raniga, Sumit; Moor, Beat K; Zumstein, Matthias A

    2017-01-01

    Stabilizing the acromioclavicular joint in the vertical and horizontal planes is challenging, and most current techniques do not reliably achieve this goal. The BiPOD repair is an arthroscopically assisted procedure performed with image intensifier guidance that reconstructs the coracoclavicular ligaments as well as the acromioclavicular ligaments to achieve bidirectional stability. Repair is achieved with a combination of 2-mm FiberTape (Arthrex, Naples, Florida) and 20-mm Poly-Tape (Neoligaments, Leeds, England) to achieve rigid repair, prevent bone abrasion, and promote tissue ingrowth. This study is a prospective review of the first 6 patients treated for high-grade acute acromioclavicular injury with the BiPOD technique. The study included 6 men who were 21 to 36 years old (mean, 27 years). At 6-month follow-up, complications were recorded and radiographic analysis was used to determine the coracoclavicular distance for vertical reduction and the amount of acromioclavicular translation on the Alexander axillary view was used to determine horizontal reduction. One patient had a superficial infection over the tape knot. The difference in coracoclavicular distance between the operated side and the uninvolved side was 9±2 mm preoperatively and 0.3±2 mm at 6-month follow-up. On Alexander axillary view, all 6 patients showed stable reduction, which is defined as a clavicle that is in line with the acromion. The findings show that BiPOD acromioclavicular reconstruction restores bidirectional stability of the acromioclavicular joint at 6 months. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(1):e35-e43.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Biomechanical Analysis of Implanted Clavicle Hook Plates With Different Implant Depths and Materials in the Acromioclavicular Joint: A Finite Element Analysis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Hung; Shih, Cheng-Min; Huang, Kui-Chou; Chen, Kun-Hui; Hung, Li-Kun; Su, Kuo-Chih

    2016-11-01

    Clinical implantation of clavicle hook plates is often used as a treatment for acromioclavicular joint dislocation. However, it is not uncommon to find patients that have developed acromion osteolysis or had peri-implant fracture after hook plate fixation. With the aim of preventing complications or fixation failure caused by implantation of inappropriate clavicle hook plates, the present study investigated the biomechanics of clavicle hook plates made of different materials and with different hook depths in treating acromioclavicular joint dislocation, using finite element analysis (FEA). This study established four parts using computer models: the clavicle, acromion, clavicle hook plate, and screws, and these established models were used for FEA. Moreover, implantations of clavicle hook plates made of different materials (stainless steel and titanium alloy) and with different depths (12, 15, and 18 mm) in patients with acromioclavicular joint dislocation were simulated in the biomechanical analysis. The results indicate that deeper implantation of the clavicle hook plate reduces stress on the clavicle, and also reduces the force applied to the acromion by the clavicle hook plate. Even though a clavicle hook plate made of titanium alloy (a material with a lower Young's modulus) reduces the force applied to the acromion by the clavicle hook plate, slightly higher stress on the clavicle may occur. The results obtained in this study provide a better reference for orthopedic surgeons in choosing different clavicle hook plates for surgery. Copyright © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Biomechanical evaluation of native acromioclavicular joint ligaments and two reconstruction techniques in the presence of the sternoclavicular joint: A cadaver study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masionis, Povilas; Šatkauskas, Igoris; Mikelevičius, Vytautas; Ryliškis, Sigitas; Bučinskas, Vytautas; Griškevičius, Julius; Martin Oliva, Xavier; Monzó Planella, Mariano; Porvaneckas, Narūnas; Uvarovas, Valentinas

    2017-01-01

    Where is over 100 reconstruction techniques described for acromioclavicular (AC) joint reconstruction. Although, it is not clear whether the presence of the sternoclavicular (SC) joint influences the biomechanical properties of native AC ligaments and reconstruction techniques. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the biomechanical properties of native AC joint ligaments and two reconstruction techniques in cadavers with the SC joint still present. We tested eight fresh-frozen cadaver hemithoraces for superior translation (70 N load) and translation increment after 1000 cycles (loading from 20 to 70 N) in a controlled laboratory study. There were three testing groups created: native ligaments, the single coracoclavicular loop (SCL) technique, and the two coracoclavicular loops (TCL) technique. Superior translation was measured after static loading. Translation increment was calculated as the difference between superior translation after cyclic and static loading. Native AC ligaments showed significantly lower translation than the SCL ( p = 0.023) and TCL ( p = 0.046) groups. The SCL had a significantly lower translation increment than native AC ligaments ( p = 0.028). There was no significant difference between reconstruction techniques in terms of translation ( p = 0.865) and translation increment ( p = 0.113). Native AC joint ligaments had better static properties than both reconstruction techniques and worse dynamic biomechanical properties than the SCL technique. The SCL technique appeared to be more secure than the TCL technique. The presence of the SC joint did not have an observable influence on test results.

  18. [Analysis on the long-term effects of modified double endobutton technique in the treatment of Tossy type III acromioclavicular joint dislocations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Rui-Jian; Lu, Jian-Wei; Zhang, Chun

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the long-term clinical effects of modified double Endobutton technique for the treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocations of Tossy type III. A retrospective study was done in 42 patients with acromioclavicular joint dislocations of Tossy type III treated with modified double Endobutton technique from December 2008 to December 2010. There were 24 males and 18 females, ranging in age from 21 to 56 years old (averaged, 32.5 years old). All the patients were treated with open reduction, coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction using double Endobutton technique, and repair of acromioclavicular ligament. The Karlsson system was used to evaluate therapeutic effects. The distance from coracoid to clavicle was measured to evaluate reduction loss. All the patients were followed up, and the duration ranged from 2.0 to 3.2 years (averaged,2.4 years). According to Karlsson system, 32 patients got an A degree and 10 patients got a B degree at three months post-operatively; 26 patients got an A degree and 16 patients got a B degree at the latest follow-up; 6 patients got an A degree at 3 months after operation lowered to B degree at the latest follow-up. The coracoid-clavicle distance increased from (26.91 +/- 0.91) mm at 3 months after operation to (27.41 +/- 1.10) mm at the latest follow-up. Te patients treated with over-reduction during operation or with heavy physical labour work after operation had obvious widened coracoid-clavicle distance. Bone absorption was found around the plate in most cases, mainly in the clavicular side. Treatment for acromioclavicular joint dislocations of Tossy type III with modified double Endobutton technique has satisfactory early clinical results. But with time passing, loss of reduction and bone absorption around the plate could be observed, and clinical outcomes of some cases downgrade during the long-term follow-up.

  19. Acromioclavicular disruption in first class rugby players.

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, J; Bannister, G

    1992-01-01

    In a random sample of 105 first class rugby players, 45% gave a history of injury of the acromioclavicular joint. All continued to play at the highest level. The effects of the injury appeared to be minimal. Supraspinatus impingement syndrome commonly associated with acromioclavicular pathology was sought, but not found.

  20. Biomechanical Comparison of an Intramedullary and Extramedullary Free-Tissue Graft Reconstruction of the Acromioclavicular Joint Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Rishi; Javidan, Pooya; Lee, Thay Q.

    2013-01-01

    Background Several different surgical techniques have been described to address the coracoclavicular (CC) ligaments in acromioclavicular (AC) joint injuries. However, very few techniques focus on reconstructing the AC ligaments, despite its importance in providing stability. The purpose of our study was to compare the biomechanical properties of two free-tissue graft techniques that reconstruct both the AC and CC ligaments in cadaveric shoulders, one with an extramedullary AC reconstruction and the other with an intramedullary AC reconstruction. We hypothesized intramedullary AC reconstruction will provide greater anteroposterior translational stability and improved load to failure characteristics than an extramedullary technique. Methods Six matched cadaveric shoulders underwent translational testing at 10 N and 15 N in the anteroposterior and superoinferior directions, under AC joint compression loads of 10 N, 20 N, and 30 N. After the AC and CC ligaments were transected, one of the specimens was randomly assigned the intramedullary free-tissue graft reconstruction while its matched pair received the extramedullary graft reconstruction. Both reconstructed specimens then underwent repeat translational testing, followed by load to failure testing, via superior clavicle distraction, at a rate of 50 mm/min. Results Intramedullary reconstruction provided significantly greater translational stability in the anteroposterior direction than the extramedullary technique for four of six loading conditions (p < 0.05). There were no significant differences in translational stability in the superoinferior direction for any loading condition. The intramedullary reconstructed specimens demonstrated improved load to failure characteristics with the intramedullary reconstruction having a lower deformation at yield and a higher ultimate load than the extramedullary reconstruction (p < 0.05). Conclusions Intramedullary reconstruction of the AC joint provides greater stability in the

  1. Acromioclavicular dislocation: treatment and rehabilitation. Current perspectives and trends among Brazilian orthopedists☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Utino, Artur Yudi; Nishimura, Eduardo Misao; Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Astur, Diego Costa

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the approaches and procedures used by Brazilian orthopedic surgeons in treatment and rehabilitation of acromioclavicular dislocation of the shoulder. Methods A questionnaire comprising eight closed questions that addressed topics relating to treatment and rehabilitation of acromioclavicular dislocation was applied to Brazilian orthopedic surgeons over the three days of the 45th Brazilian Congress of Orthopedics and Traumatology, in 2013. Results A total of 122 surgeons completely filled out the questionnaire and formed part of the sample analyzed. Most of them came from the southeastern region of the country. In this sample, 67% of the participants would choose surgical treatment for patients with grade 3 acromioclavicular dislocation. Regarding the preferred technique for surgical treatment of acute acromioclavicular dislocation, a majority of the surgeons used subcoracoid ligature with acromioclavicular fixation and transfer of the coracoacromial ligament (25.4%). Regarding complications found after surgery had been performed, 43.4% and 32.8% of the participants, respectively, stated that residual deformity of the operated joint and pain were the complications most seen during the postoperative period. Conclusions Although there was no consensus regarding the treatment and rehabilitation of acromioclavicular dislocation, evolution had occurred in some of the topics analyzed in this questionnaire applied to Brazilian orthopedists. However, further controlled prospective studies are needed in order to evaluate the clinical and scientific benefit of these trends. PMID:26535196

  2. Acromioclavicular dislocation: treatment and rehabilitation. Current perspectives and trends among Brazilian orthopedists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arliani, Gustavo Gonçalves; Utino, Artur Yudi; Nishimura, Eduardo Misao; Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; Belangero, Paulo Santoro; Astur, Diego Costa

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the approaches and procedures used by Brazilian orthopedic surgeons in treatment and rehabilitation of acromioclavicular dislocation of the shoulder. A questionnaire comprising eight closed questions that addressed topics relating to treatment and rehabilitation of acromioclavicular dislocation was applied to Brazilian orthopedic surgeons over the three days of the 45th Brazilian Congress of Orthopedics and Traumatology, in 2013. A total of 122 surgeons completely filled out the questionnaire and formed part of the sample analyzed. Most of them came from the southeastern region of the country. In this sample, 67% of the participants would choose surgical treatment for patients with grade 3 acromioclavicular dislocation. Regarding the preferred technique for surgical treatment of acute acromioclavicular dislocation, a majority of the surgeons used subcoracoid ligature with acromioclavicular fixation and transfer of the coracoacromial ligament (25.4%). Regarding complications found after surgery had been performed, 43.4% and 32.8% of the participants, respectively, stated that residual deformity of the operated joint and pain were the complications most seen during the postoperative period. Although there was no consensus regarding the treatment and rehabilitation of acromioclavicular dislocation, evolution had occurred in some of the topics analyzed in this questionnaire applied to Brazilian orthopedists. However, further controlled prospective studies are needed in order to evaluate the clinical and scientific benefit of these trends.

  3. Acromioclavicular joint dislocation: a comparative biomechanical study of the palmaris-longus tendon graft reconstruction with other augmentative methods in cadaveric models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sengupta S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acromioclavicular injuries are common in sports medicine. Surgical intervention is generally advocated for chronic instability of Rockwood grade III and more severe injuries. Various methods of coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction and augmentation have been described. The objective of this study is to compare the biomechanical properties of a novel palmaris-longus tendon reconstruction with those of the native AC+CC ligaments, the modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction, the ACJ capsuloligamentous complex repair, screw and clavicle hook plate augmentation. Hypothesis There is no difference, biomechanically, amongst the various reconstruction and augmentative methods. Study Design Controlled laboratory cadaveric study. Methods 54 cadaveric native (acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments were tested using the Instron machine. Superior loading was performed in the 6 groups: 1 in the intact states, 2 after modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction (WD, 3 after modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction with acromioclavicular joint capsuloligamentous repair (WD.ACJ, 4 after modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction with clavicular hook plate augmentation (WD.CP or 5 after modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction with coracoclavicular screw augmentation (WD.BS and 6 after modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction with mersilene tape-palmaris-longus tendon graft reconstruction (WD. PLmt. Posterior-anterior (horizontal loading was similarly performed in all groups, except groups 4 and 5. The respective failure loads, stiffnesses, displacements at failure and modes of failure were recorded. Data analysis was carried out using a one-way ANOVA, with Student's unpaired t-test for unpaired data (S-PLUS statistical package 2005. Results Native ligaments were the strongest and stiffest when compared to other modes of reconstruction and augmentation except coracoclavicular screw, in both posterior-anterior and superior directions (p WD.ACJ provided additional

  4. The relationship between chronic type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation and cervical spine pain

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    Vestri Anna R

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was aimed at evaluating whether or not patients with chronic type III acromioclavicular dislocation develop cervical spine pain and degenerative changes more frequently than normal subjects. Methods The cervical spine of 34 patients with chronic type III AC dislocation was radiographically evaluated. Osteophytosis presence was registered and the narrowing of the intervertebral disc and cervical lordosis were evaluated. Subjective cervical symptoms were investigated using the Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ. One-hundred healthy volunteers were recruited as a control group. Results The rate and distribution of osteophytosis and narrowed intervertebral disc were similar in both of the groups. Patients with chronic AC dislocation had a lower value of cervical lordosis. NPQ score was 17.3% in patients with AC separation (100% = the worst result and 2.2% in the control group (p Conclusions Our study shows that chronic type III AC dislocation does not interfere with osteophytes formation or intervertebral disc narrowing, but that it may predispose cervical hypolordosis. The higher average NPQ values were observed in patients with chronic AC dislocation, especially in those that developed cervical hypolordosis.

  5. Reconstrução coracoclavicular com enxerto tendíneo na luxação acromioclavicular crônica Coracoclavicular reconstruction using tendinous graft for chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Henrique Assunção

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apresentar os resultados radiográficos e funcionais de pacientes submetidos ao tratamento da luxação acromioclavicular crônica com reconstrução dos ligamentos coracoclaviculares com enxerto de tendão semitendíneo. MÉTODO: Quinze pacientes, entre abril de 2007 e junho de 2008, foram submetidos a reconstrução dos ligamentos coracoclaviculares com enxerto tendíneo. Dois pacientes foram excluídos do estudo por seguimento inadequado. Treze pacientes foram seguidos clinicamente e radiograficamente, em média, por 16 meses (12-26 meses. Os pacientes foram submetidos a avaliação clinica pré e pós-operatória, utilizando os escores Constant e UCLA. Radiografias pré e pós-operatórias foram comparadas. RESULTADOS: Neste grupo de 13 pacientes com seguimento mínimo de um ano, o escore Constant variou de 60,9 (26-88 na avaliação pré-operatória para 87 (60-98 na última avaliação no período pós-operatório. O escore UCLA foi de 16,8 (11-27 no pré operatório para 33 (29-35 na avaliação pós-operatória (p=0,001. No controle radiográfico com um ano de pós-operatório, encontramos 12 pacientes (92% com a distância coracoclavicular igual comparando o ombro operado ao contralateral. Todos os ombros operados apresentavam-se sem translação na direção antero-posterior no perfil axilar. CONCLUSÃO: O resultado funcional e radiográfico foi muito satisfatório nos pacientes submetidos à reconstrução das luxações acromioclaviculares crônicas, com baixo indice de recidiva. Nivel de Evidência IV, série de casos.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to present the radiographic and functional results of patients undergoing treatment for chronic acromioclavicular dislocation with coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction using tendon graft. METHOD: Between 2007 and 2008, fifteen patients with chronic Rockwood type III through V acromioclavicular joint dislocations underwent reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments

  6. [CT measurement and clinical application of double-row suture anchor reconstruction for the treatment of Tossy type III acromioclavicular joint dislocation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuan-Kai; Liu, Chen; Han, Bing; Feng, Hui; Chen, Qi-Zhong; Sunx, Sun Yi-Yan

    2017-04-25

    To study feasibility and reliability of reconstruction of the acromioclavicular ligament with double-row suture anchor for the treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation through coracoid coronal CT measurement, and to provide a new operation method for treating acromioclavicular joint dislocation. Total 60 healthy people received CT examination of shoulder joint, including 30 males and 30 females, ranging in age from 18 to 50 years old. The coronal width, thickness and 20 degree camber angle in the medial part of the toot of coronal were measured using CT scan. The results were applied to clinical treatment for 12 patients with acromioclavicular joint dislocation of Tossy III type. The width in the medial part of the root of the coracoid was(17.65±1.82) mm(left side) and (17.67±1.80) mm(right side) in males; (16.55±1.78) mm(left side) and (16.52±1.74) mm (right side) in females. The vertical thickness of the roots of the coracoid: (13.11±2.11) mm(left side) and (13.16±2.09) mm(right side) in males;(12.79±2.21) mm(left side) and (12.76±2.19) mm (right side) in females. The thickness of 20 degrees camber angle of the coracoid roots: (16.32±1.74) mm (left side) and (16.30±1.69) mm(right side) in males; (15.68±1.44) mm(left side) and (15.67±1.43) mm(right side) in females. Total 12 patients were treated with anchor nail with extraversion 20 degrees. The postoperative X-ray films showed bone anchors were located in the coracoid process, no bone splitting. Double-row suture anchor of 5 mm diameter nails can be placed into coracoid with extraversion 20 degrees, which is safety.

  7. Radiographic failure and rates of re-operation after acromioclavicular joint reconstruction: a comparison of surgical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, H T; Hsu, L; Sodl, J; Arianjam, A; Yian, E H

    2016-04-01

    To compare radiographic failure and re-operation rates of anatomical coracoclavicular (CC) ligament reconstructional techniques with non-anatomical techniques after chronic high grade acromioclavicular (AC) joint injuries. We reviewed chronic AC joint reconstructions within a region-wide healthcare system to identify surgical technique, complications, radiographic failure and re-operations. Procedures fell into four categories: (1) modified Weaver-Dunn, (2) allograft fixed through coracoid and clavicular tunnels, (3) allograft loop coracoclavicular fixation, and (4) combined allograft loop and synthetic cortical button fixation. Among 167 patients (mean age 38.1 years, (standard deviation (sd) 14.7) treated at least a four week interval after injury, 154 had post-operative radiographs available for analysis. Radiographic failure occurred in 33/154 cases (21.4%), with the lowest rate in Technique 4 (2/42 4.8%, p = 0.001). Half the failures occurred by six weeks, and the Kaplan-Meier survivorship at 24 months was 94.4% (95% confidence interval (CI) 79.6 to 98.6) for Technique 4 and 69.9% (95% CI 59.4 to 78.3) for the other techniques when combined. In multivariable survival analysis, Technique 4 had better survival than other techniques (Hazard Ratio 0.162, 95% CI 0.039 to 0.068, p = 0.013). Among 155 patients with a minimum of six months post-operative insurance coverage, re-operation occurred in 9.7% (15 patients). However, in multivariable logistic regression, Technique 4 did not reach a statistically significant lower risk for re-operation (odds ratio 0.254, 95% CI 0.05 to 1.3, p = 0.11). In this retrospective series, anatomical CC ligament reconstruction using combined synthetic cortical button and allograft loop fixation had the lowest rate of radiographic failure. Anatomical coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction using combined synthetic cortical button and allograft loop fixation had the lowest rate of radiographic failure. ©2016 The British Editorial

  8. Spinal kirschner wire migration after surgical treatment of clavicular fracture or acromioclavicular joint dislocation: Report of a case and meta-analysis

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    Hermann Adonis N'da

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Kirschner wire is the most used device for clavicular and acromioclavicular joint dislocation fixation. Although wire migrations have been extensively reported, spinal migrations remain rare. Moreover, the mechanism of migration is still elusive. The aim of the present paper is to describe a single case of cervical spine migration of a K-wire followed by meta-analysis. Twelve cases of spinal K-wire have been reported in the last 20years, with less than 2 cases per year. Clavicular fixation was the main initial procedure with 66.67% of cases. The average time between surgery and migration was 25.5months. C7-T1 and T2-T3 were the prominent level of migration with each 33.33% of cases, where the migration was transversal in 72.73% of cases. The neural foramen was the most penetrating site of the K-wire in the spine (75% of cases. In all cases the wire was removed via direct access surgery by gentle pulling out along its axis under view control. The greater range of motion in the shoulder seems to be the main mechanism of all kinds of migrations. Keywords: Acromioclavicular joint dislocation, Clavicular fracture, Kirschner wire migration

  9. Sports activity after anatomic acromioclavicular joint stabilisation with flip-button technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porschke, Felix; Schnetzke, Marc; Aytac, Sara; Studier-Fischer, Stefan; Gruetzner, Paul Alfred; Guehring, Thorsten

    2017-07-01

    Sports activity after surgical AC joint stabilisation has not been comprehensively evaluated to date. The aim of this study was to determine rate, level and time to return to sports after AC joint stabilisation and to identify the influence of overhead sports on post-operative sports activity. In this retrospective case series, a total of 68 patients with a high-grade AC joint dislocation (Rockwood type V) were stabilised using a single TightRope technique. Fifty-five patients (80.9 %) with median age of 42.0 (range, 18-65) years completed questionnaires regarding sports activity before and after surgery. Clinical outcome and complications were also evaluated. Forty-three patients participated in sports regularly before injury. Their sports activity was rated according to Allain, and non-overhead and overhead sports were differentiated. At median follow-up of 24 (18-45) months, 41 of 43 patients (95.3 %) had returned to sports. 63 % returned to the same sports activity as before injury. 16.3 % needed to adapt the type of sports to reduce demanding activities. 11.6 % reduced the frequency and 32.5 % the intensity of sports. The median time to return to sports was 9.5 (3-18) months. Overhead athletes (Allain Type III and IV) had to reduce their sports activity significantly more often (11.8 vs. 53.8 %; p = 0.011) and needed more time to return to sports (9.5 vs. 4.5 months; p = 0.009). After stabilisation of AC joint dislocation, the majority of patients returned to sports after a substantial period of time. Overhead athletes, in particular, required more time and had to considerably reduce their sports activity. The findings impact therapeutic decision-making after AC joint injury and help with the prognosis and assessment of rehabilitation progress. IV.

  10. Tratamento artroscópico da luxação acromio-clavicular pelo método "tight rope" (arthrex® Arthroscopic treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation by tight rope technique (arthrex®

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    Luis Alfredo Gómez Vieira

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Apresentar a técnica cirúrgica artroscópica pelo método "Tight Rope" e a avaliação dos resultados com esta técnica no tratamento da luxação acrômio-clavicular aguda. MÉTODOS: entre agosto de 2006 e maio de 2007, 10 ombros de 10 pacientes com luxação acrômio-clavicular aguda foram submetidos a tratamento artroscópcio pela técnica Tight Rope-Arthrex®. O seguimento mínimo foi de 12 meses, com média de 15 meses. A idade variou de 26 e 42 anos com média de 34 anos. Todos os pacientes eram do sexo masculino. Todos os pacientes foram atendidos na fase aguda da lesão sendo avaliados por radiologia simples (série trauma. Os pacientes foram acompanhados semanalmente no primeiro mês e a cada três meses após o procedimento artroscópico. A avaliação clínica foi feita por meio dos critérios da University of Califórnia at Los Angeles (UCLA. RESULTADOS: Todos os pacientes operados agudamente encontravam-se satisfeitos com os resultados do tratamento cirúrgico artroscópico com uma média de 32,5 pontos na escala de avaliação da UCLA. CONCLUSÃO: O tratamento artroscópico da luxação acrômio-clavicular aguda pelo método "Tight Rope" é uma técnica cirúrgica minimamente invasiva que mostrou-se eficiente para o tratamento destas lesões.OBJECTIVE: Presenting the arthroscopic treatment by Tight Rope - Arthrex® system for acute acromioclavicular dislocation and to evaluate results obtained with this procedure. METHODS: Between August 2006 and May 2007, 10 shoulders of 10 patients with acute acromioclavicular dislocation were submitted to arthroscopic repair using the Tight Rope - Arthrex® system. Minimum follow-up was 12 months, with a mean of 15 months. Age ranged from 26 to 42, mean 34 years. All patients were male. Radiology evaluation was made by trauma series x-ray. The patients were assisted in the first month weekly and after three months after the procedure. Clinical evaluation was based on the University

  11. A validation of the Nottingham Clavicle Score: a clavicle, acromioclavicular joint and sternoclavicular joint-specific patient-reported outcome measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Edmund R; Kumar, Vinod; Blacknall, James; Edwards, Kimberley; Geoghegan, John M; Manning, Paul A; Wallace, W Angus

    2017-10-01

    Patients with acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) and sternoclavicular joint (SCJ) injuries and with clavicle fractures are typically younger and more active than those with other shoulder pathologies. We developed the Nottingham Clavicle Score (NCS) specifically for this group of patients to improve sensitivity for assessing the outcomes of treatment of these conditions compared with the more commonly used Constant Score (CS) and Oxford Shoulder Score (OSS). This was a cohort study in which the preoperative and 6-month postoperative NCS evaluations of outcome in 90 patients were compared with the CS, OSS, Imatani Score (IS), and the EQ-5D scores. Reliability was assessed using the Cronbach α. Reproducibility of the NCS was assessed using the test/retest method. Effect sizes were calculated for each score to assess sensitivity to change. Validity was examined by correlations between the NCS and the CS, OSS, IS, and EQ-5D scores obtained preoperatively and postoperatively. Significant correlations were demonstrated preoperatively with the OSS (P = .025) and all subcategories of the EQ-5D (P < .05) and postoperatively with the OSS (P < .001), CS (P = .008), IS (P < .001), and all subcategories of EQ-5D (P < .02). The NCS had the largest effect size (1.92) of the compared scores. Internal consistency was excellent (Cronbach α = 0.87). The NCS has been proven to be a valid, reliable and sensitive outcome measure that accurately measures the level of function and disability in the ACJ, SCJ and clavicle after traumatic injury and in degenerative disease. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Shoulder pain in primary care: diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination tests for non-traumatic acromioclavicular joint pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite numerous methodological flaws in previous study designs and the lack of validation in primary care populations, clinical tests for identifying acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) pain are widely utilised without concern for such issues. The aim of this study was to estimate the diagnostic accuracy of traditional ACJ tests and to compare their accuracy with other clinical examination features for identifying a predominant ACJ pain source in a primary care cohort. Methods Consecutive patients with shoulder pain were recruited prospectively from primary health care clinics. Following a standardised clinical examination and diagnostic injection into the subacromial bursa, all participants received a fluoroscopically guided diagnostic block of 1% lidocaine hydrochloride (XylocaineTM) into the ACJ. Diagnostic accuracy statistics including sensitivity, specificity, predictive values, positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR+ and LR-) were calculated for traditional ACJ tests (Active Compression/O’Brien’s test, cross-body adduction, localised ACJ tenderness and Hawkins-Kennedy test), and for individual and combinations of clinical examination variables that were associated with a positive anaesthetic response (PAR) (P≤0.05) defined as 80% or more reduction in post-injection pain intensity during provocative clinical tests. Results Twenty two of 153 participants (14%) reported an 80% PAR. None of the traditional ACJ tests were associated with an 80% PAR (P0.05). Five clinical examination variables (repetitive mechanism of pain onset, no referred pain below the elbow, thickened or swollen ACJ, no symptom provocation during passive glenohumeral abduction and external rotation) were associated with an 80% PAR (P<0.05) and demonstrated an ability to accurately discriminate between an PAR and NAR (AUC 0.791; 95% CI 0.702, 0.880; P<0.001). Less than two positive clinical features resulted in 96% sensitivity (95% CI 0.78, 0.99) and a LR- 0.09 (95% CI 0.02, 0

  13. Functional and radiological evaluation of acute acromioclavicular dislocation treated with anchors without eyelet: comparison with other techniques

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    Alexandre Tadeu do Nascimento

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To assess the repair results of acromioclavicular dislocations (ACJD grades III and V, with anchors without eyelet, when compared with other techniques, and to evaluate factors that can affect the final result. METHODS: A retrospective study of 36 patients with ACJD grades III and V in the Rockwood classification, 12 treated with anchors without eyelet, 11 with one tightrope, six with two tightropes, and six with subcoracoid cerclage, operated from September 2012 to February 2015. Patients were assessed radiographically and through DASH, UCLA, the visual analog scale of pain (VAS and the Short-Form 36 (SF-36. Surgical time and the possible influence of some factors in the outcome were also assessed. RESULTS: The mean DASH score was 6.7; UCLA, 32.9; VAS, 1.2; and SF-36, 79.47. Radiographically, the final mean measurement was 9.93 mm, with no statistical difference between the groups. The mean surgical time for Group I was 31 min; Group II, 19 min; Group III, 29 min; and Group IV, 59 min. There was a significant difference between Groups II and IV when compared with the study group. The initial and immediate post-operative ACJD measurements ACJD were correlated with the final measure. CONCLUSION: The repair of acute ACJD with anchors without eyelet is as effective as the other methods, with significantly shorter operative time when compared with the subcoracoid cerclage technique. The final radiological result is influenced by the coracoclavicular initial distance and the immediate postoperative measurement.

  14. EXTRA-ARTICULAR FRACTURE OF THE MEDIAL END OF THE CLAVICLE ASSOCIATED WITH TYPE IV ACROMIOCLAVICULAR DISLOCATION: CAAE REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Mário Chaves; Gonçalves, Lucas Braga Jacques; Vilela, Jose Carlos Souza; Leonel, Igor Lima; Costa, Lincoln Paiva; de Andrade, Ronaldo Percopi

    2011-01-01

    Fractures of the clavicle and acromioclavicular dislocations are very common injuries when they occur separately. The combination of an acromioclavicular dislocation and a fracture of the lateral third of the clavicle is not rare. However, there are very few reported cases of acromioclavicular dislocations associated with fractures of the middle third of the clavicle; those associated with fractures of the medial third are even rarer. We report the case of an adult male who suffered an acromioclavicular dislocation (type IV) associated with a displaced extra-articular fracture of the medial end of the clavicle (Almann group 3) in a cycling accident. The patient was treated during the acute phase with open reduction and internal fixation of the two lesions. At the clinical evaluation 12 months after the surgery, the patient was asymptomatic, with full active and passive mobility, and normal strength and endurance of the shoulder girdle. Radiographs and a three-dimensional CT scan showed persistent posterosuperior subluxation of the acromioclavicular joint and anatomical consolidation of the clavicular fracture.

  15. Acromioclavicular joint reconstruction using a tendon graft: a biomechanical study comparing a novel “sutured throughout” tendon graft to a standard tendon graft

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    Naziri Qais

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: With a recurrence rate of over 30%, techniques that offer stronger acromioclavicular (AC joint reconstruction through increased graft strength may provide longevity. The purpose of our study was to determine the biomechanical strength of a novel tendon graft sutured throughout compared to a native tendon graft in Grade 3 anatomical AC joint reconstruction. Methods: For this in vitro experiment, nine paired (n = 18 embalmed cadaveric AC joints of three males and six females (age 86 years, range 51–94 years were harvested. Anatomic repair with fresh bovine Achilles tendon grafts without bone block was simulated. Specimens were divided into two groups; with group 1 using grafts with ultra-high molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE suture ran throughout the entire length. In group 2, reconstruction with only native allografts was performed. The distal scapula and humerus were casted in epoxy compound and mounted on the mechanical testing machine. Tensile tests were performed using a mechanical testing machine at the rate of 50 mm/min. Maximum load and displacement to failure were collected. Results: The average load to failure was significantly higher for group 1 compared to group 2, with mean values of 437.5 N ± 160.7 N and 94.4 N ± 43.6 N, (p = 0.001. The average displacement to failure was not significantly different, with 29.7 mm ± 10.6 mm in group 1 and 25 mm ± 9.1 mm in group 2 (p = 0.25. Conclusion: We conclude that a UHMWPE suture reinforced graft can provide a 3.6 times stronger AC joint reconstruction compared to a native graft.

  16. Open capsular and ligament reconstruction with semitendinosus hamstring autograft successfully controls superior and posterior translation for type V acromioclavicular joint dislocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Raffaele; Ceccarelli, Enrico; Castagna, Alessandro; Calvisi, Vittorio; Flanagin, Brody; Conti, Marco; Krishnan, Sumant G

    2017-07-01

    Appropriate surgical management for type V complete acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation remains controversial. The purpose of this paper is to retrospectively report the clinical and radiographic outcomes of an open surgical technique consisting for AC joint ligamentous and capsular reconstruction using autologous hamstring tendon grafts and semi-permanent sutures. Between January 2005 and December 2011, 32 consecutive patients with symptomatic type V complete AC joint dislocation underwent surgical treatment using the same technique. The median time from injury to surgery was 45 days (range 24-90). The average median postoperative clinical and radiographic follow-up time was 30 months (range 24-33). Clinical outcomes measures included the ASES score, the visual analog score (VAS), and subjective patient satisfaction score. Minimum follow-up was 2 years. ASES score increased from a median of 38.2 ± 6.2 preoperative to 92.1 ± 4.7 postoperatively (p ≤ 0.05). The median VAS score improved from 62 mm (range 45-100 mm) preoperatively to 8 mm (range 0-20 mm) at final follow-up (p ≤ 0.05). No patient experienced pain or discomfort with either direct palpation of the AC joint or with cross-body adduction. Final radiographs demonstrated symmetric AC joint contour in 25/32 (78%) patients. Seven patients (22%) radiographically demonstrated superior translation of the distal clavicle relative to the superior margin of the acromion but less than 50% of the clavicular width. 30/32 patients (93%) were able to return to their pre-injury level of work and sports activities. This novel surgical technique using a free graft and braided suture for simultaneous coracoclavicular ligament and AC joint capsular reconstruction successfully controls superior and posterior translations after type V AC joint dislocation and minimizes the incidence of persistent postoperative AC joint subluxation. Retrospective case series, Level IV.

  17. Concomitant glenohumeral pathologies in high-grade acromioclavicular separation (type III - V).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markel, Jochen; Schwarting, Tim; Malcherczyk, Dominik; Peterlein, Christian-Dominik; Ruchholtz, Steffen; El-Zayat, Bilal Farouk

    2017-11-10

    Acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) dislocations are common injuries of the shoulder associated with physical activity. The diagnosis of concomitant injuries proves complicated due to the prominent clinical symptoms of acute ACJ dislocation. Because of increasing use of minimally invasive surgery techniques concomitant pathologies are diagnosed more often than with previous procedures. The aim of this study was to identify the incidence of concomitant intraarticular injuries in patients with high-grade acromioclavicular separation (Rockwood type III - V) as well as to reveal potential risk constellations. The concomitant pathologies were compiled during routine arthroscopically assisted treatment in altogether 163 patients (147 male; 16 female; mean age 36.8 years) with high-grade acromioclavicular separation (Rockwood type III: n = 60; Rockwood type IV: n = 6; Rockwood type V: n = 97). Acromioclavicular separation occurred less often in women than men (1:9). In patients under 35, the most common cause for ACJ dislocation was sporting activity (37.4%). Rockwood type V was observed significantly more often than the other types with 57.5% (Rockwood type III = 36.8%, Rockwood type IV 3.7%). Concomitant pathologies were diagnosed in 39.3% of the patients with that number rising to as much as 57.3% in patients above 35 years. Most common associated injuries were rotator cuff injuries (32.3%), chondral defects (30.6%) and SLAP-lesions (22.6%). Of all patients, 8.6% needed additional reconstructive surgery. Glenohumeral injuries are a much more common epiphenomenon during acromioclavicular separation than previously ascertained. High risk group for accompanying injuries are patients above 35 years with preexisting degenerative disease. The increasing use of minimally invasive techniques allows for an easier diagnosis and simultaneous treatment of the additional pathologies.

  18. The anterior borders of the clavicle and the acromion are not always aligned in the intact acromioclavicular joint: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Johannes; Boutsiadis, Achilleas; Narbona, Pablo; Lädermann, Alexandre; Arrigoni, Paolo; Adams, Christopher R; Burkhart, Stephen S; Denard, Patrick J

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to find reliable anatomic landmarks of the normal acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) that could enable the precise evaluation of the horizontal displacement of the clavicle after dislocation. The hypothesis was that the anterior borders of the acromion and the clavicle are always aligned in intact ACJs. In 30 cadaveric specimens, the anterior and posterior borders of the ACJ's articular facets and the most prominent anterior and posterior bony landmarks of the acromion and the clavicle were identified. The anterior and posterior overhang of the acromion and the clavicle was measured in relation to the borders of the articular facets. Therefore, the possible anterior and posterior alignment of the ACJ was evaluated. Anteriorly, only 18 ACJs (60%) were aligned whereas 7 (24%) had major overhang of the acromion and 3 (10%) had major overhang of the clavicle. Similarly, 18 cases (60%) were posteriorly aligned, whereas 6 (20%) had major clavicular overhang and 4 (14%) had major overhang of the acromion. In 78% of these cases, the ACJ was aligned as well anteriorly as posteriorly (P < .001). Finally, the larger the width of the acromion (P = .032) or the clavicle (P = .049), the better the posterior joint alignment. Our hypothesis was not verified. The acromion and clavicle are not perfectly aligned in a significant number of specimens with intact ACJs (40% of cases). The most reliable landmarks remain their articular facets. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Fratura extra-articular da extremidade medial da clavícula associada à luxação acromioclavicular tipo IV: relato de caso Extra-articular fracture of the medial end of the clavicle associated with type IV acromioclavicular dislocation: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mário Chaves Correa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Ocorrendo isoladamente, as fraturas da clavícula e as luxações acromioclaviculares são lesões muito comuns. A combinação de uma luxação acromioclavicular e de uma fratura do terço lateral da clavícula não é rara. Entretanto, existem muito poucos casos descritos de luxações acromioclaviculares associadas a fraturas do terço médio da clavícula; aquelas associadas a fraturas do terço medial são ainda mais raras. Nós reportamos o caso de um indivíduo adulto do sexo masculino que sofreu uma luxação acromioclavicular (tipo IV associada a uma fratura extra-articular desviada da extremidade medial da clavícula (grupo 3 de Almann em um acidente ciclístico. O paciente foi tratado na fase aguda com redução aberta e fixação interna das duas lesões. Na avaliação clínica, 12 meses após a cirurgia, o paciente apresentava-se assintomático, com mobilidade ativa e passiva completa, força e resistência normais e simetria das cinturas escapulares. As radiografias e a tomografia computadorizada tridimensional mostravam subluxação posterossuperior persistente da articulação acromioclavicular e consolidação anatômica da fratura clavicular.Fractures of the clavicle and acromioclavicular dislocations are very common injuries when they occur separately. The combination of an acromioclavicular dislocation and a fracture of the lateral third of the clavicle is not rare. However, there are very few reported cases of acromioclavicular dislocations associated with fractures of the middle third of the clavicle; those associated with fractures of the medial third are even rarer. We report the case of an adult male who suffered an acromioclavicular dislocation (type IV associated with a displaced extra-articular fracture of the medial end of the clavicle (Almann group 3 in a cycling accident. The patient was treated during the acute phase with open reduction and internal fixation of the two lesions. At the clinical evaluation 12

  20. Measure of horizontal and vertical displacement of the acromioclavicular joint after cutting ligament using X-ray and opto-electronic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochcongar, Goulven; Emily, Sébastien; Lebel, Benoit; Pineau, Vincent; Burdin, Gilles; Hulet, Christophe

    2012-09-01

    Surgical versus orthopedic treatments of acromioclavicular disjunction are still debated. The aim of this study was to measure horizontal and vertical acromion's displacement after cutting the ligament using standard X-ray and an opto-electronic system on cadaver. Ten cadaveric shoulders were studied. A sequential ligament's section was operated by arthroscopy. The sequence of cutting was chosen to fit with Rockwood's grade. The displacement of the acromion was measured on standard X-ray and with an opto-electronic system allowing measuring of the horizontal displacement. Statistical comparisons were performed using a paired Student's t test with significance set at p acromioclavicular ligament. The contact surface between the acromion and the clavicle decreases statistically after sectioning the acromioclavicular ligament and the coracoclavicular ligament with no effect of sectioning the delto-trapezius muscles. Those results are superposing with those dealing with the anterior translation. The measure concerning the acromioclavicular distance and the coracoclavicular distance are superposing with those of Rockwood. However, there is a significant horizontal translation after cutting the acromioclavicular ligament. Taking into account this displacement, it may be interesting to choose either surgical or orthopedic treatment. There is a correlation between anatomical damage and importance of instability. Horizontal instability is misevaluated in clinical practice.

  1. Plain film diagnostic of the acromio-clavicular dislocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.; Thomae, J.; Jungbluth, K.H.; Hamburg Univ.

    1980-01-01

    The distance between the clavicula and the acromion, between the clavicula and the processus coracoideus and the step height between the acromion and the clavicula arch were measured on roentgen films. Evaluated were plain films of the shoulder and of the chest. 64 patients with dislocation of the acromio-clavicular joint were compared to patients without shoulder lesion. The comparance of both groups showed that measures exceeding the upper limits of the group without lesions are highly suggestive for acromio-clavicular dislocation. If one defines an acromio-clavicular dislocation as proved when two of the measured three distances exceed the upper limit, then an acromio-clavicular dislocation could be seen in 36% of the analysed cases on plain films of the shoulder and in 56% on plain chest films. (orig.) [de

  2. Acromioclavicular Reconstruction using Autogenous Semitendinosus Tendon Graft and the Importance of Postoperative Rehabilitation: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jade PY Ho

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocation (Rockwood type 5 in which the choice of acromioclavicular reconstruction using autogenous semitendinosus tendon graft was made due to its superiority in anatomical reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments, and the impact of postoperative rehabilitation on the recovery of this patient. We also discuss the rationale behind this.

  3. Operative treatment of acute acromioclavicular dislocations Rockwood III and V-Comparative study between K-wires combined with FiberTape(®) vs. TightRope System(®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrgoč, G; Japjec, M; Jurina, P; Gulan, G; Janković, S; Šebečić, B; Starešinić, M

    2015-11-01

    Acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocations usually occur in a young active population as a result of a fall on the shoulder. Rockwood divided these dislocations into six types. Optimal treatment is still a matter of discussion. Many operative techniques have been developed, but the main choice is between open and minimally-invasive arthroscopic procedures. The aim of this study was to compare two different surgical methods on two groups of patients to find out which method is superior in terms of benefit to the patient. The methods were evaluated through objective and subjective scores, with a focus on complications and material costs. A retrospective two-centre study was conducted in patients with acute AC joint dislocation Rockwood types III and V. The two methods conducted were an open procedure using K-wires combined with FiberTape(®) (Arthrex, Naples, USA) (Group 1) and an arthroscopic procedure using the TightRope System(®) (Arthrex, Naples, USA) (Group 2). Groups underwent procedures during a two-year period. Diagnosis was based on the clinical and radiographic examination of both AC joints. Surgical treatment and rehabilitation were performed. Sixteen patients were included in this study: Group 1 comprised 10 patients, all male, average age 41.6 years (range 17-64 years), Rockwood type III (eight patients) and Rockwood type V (two patients); Group 2 had six patients, one female and five male, average age 37.8 years (range 18-58 years), Rockwood type III (two patients) and Rockwood type V (four patients). Time from injury to surgery was shorter and patients needed less time to return to daily activities in Group 1. Duration of the surgical procedure was shorter in Group 2 compared with Group 1. Complications of each method were noted. According to the measured scores and operative outcome between dislocation Rockwood type III and V, no significant difference was found. Implant material used in Group 2 was 4.7 times more expensive than that used in Group 1

  4. Arthroscopic treatment of acromioclavicular dislocation

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    Mihai T. Gavrilă

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A thorough understanding of biomechanical function of both acromioclavicular (AC and coracoclavicular (CC ligaments, stimulated surgeons to repair high-grade AC dislocation using arthroscopic technique. This technique necessitates a clear understanding of shoulder anatomy, especially of the structures in proximity to the clavicle and coracoid process and experiences in arthroscopic surgery. The follow case describes an arthroscopic technique used to treat AC dislocation in young man 30 years old, who suffered an injury at right shoulder. Results were similar to those obtained using open surgery and this encouraged us to continue utilization of this method. As a conclusion, arthroscopic treatment of AC separation is one of the best options as surgical treatment. Early results suggested that immediate anatomic reduction of an acute AC separation usually provides satisfactory clinical results at intermediate-term follow-up.

  5. Estudo transversal sobre o tratamento das lesões acrômioclaviculares agudas Transversal study about acute acromioclavicular lesions

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    Marcel Jun Sugawara Tamaoki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O objetivo do presente estudo transversal é verificar como o ortopedista brasileiro interpreta as lesões acromioclaviculares quanto aos critérios para a indicação do tratamento cirúrgico ou não, seus métodos preferidos, as complicações mais frequentes e os resultados obtidos. MÉTODOS: Durante o 6º Congresso Brasileiro de Cirurgia do Ombro e Cotovelo (CBOC e o 38º Congresso Brasileiro de Ortopedia e Traumatologia (CBOT foram distribuídos 507 questionários, sendo considerados 478 para análise. RESULTADOS: Em relação ao tratamento das LAC tipo I e II, a maioria dos entrevistados utilizam métodos não cirúrgicos. Em contraposição nas LAC IV, V e VI 475 (99,4% dos entrevistados tratam essas lesões cirurgicamente. Nas LAC tipo III não existe uma definição na escolha do tratamento cirúrgico ou não cirúrgico para 386 (80,7% entrevistados, sendo que o fator mais importante para tomada de decisão para a maioria dos entrevistados é a atividade esportiva do paciente e a idade. CONCLUSÃO: Nas LAC tipo III não há consenso, sendo o tratamento determinado conforme as características do paciente, contudo na literatura atual há uma tendência para o tratamento não cirúrgico destas lesões.The objective of the present transversal study is to check how Brazilian orthopedists treat these injuries, their criteria for choosing the treatment, results and complications. METHODS: During the 6th Brazilian Congress of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery (CBOC and the 38th Brazilian Congress of Orthopaedics and Traumatology (CBOT 507 questionnaires were distributed (148 CBOC and 359 CBOT, with 478 being considered for analysis. RESULTS: Regarding type-I and -II ACIs, most of the respondents use traditional non-surgical methods. On the other hand, for type-IV, V and VI injuries, 475 (99.4% of the respondents indicate surgical methods. Concerning type-III injuries, there is no consensus in the selection between traditional and surgical

  6. Shoulder Acromioclavicular and Coracoclavicular Ligament Injuries: Common Problems and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, James D; Johnson, Jeremiah D; DiVenere, Jessica; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2018-04-01

    Injuries to the acromioclavicular joint and coracoclavicular ligaments are common. Many of these injuries heal with nonoperative management. However, more severe injuries may lead to continued pain and shoulder dysfunction. In these patients, surgical techniques have been described to reconstruct the function of the coracoclavicular ligaments to provide stable relationship between the clavicle and scapula. These surgeries have been fraught with high complication rates including clavicle and coracoid fractures, infection, loss of reduction and fixation, hardware migration, and osteolysis. This article reviews common acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular repair and reconstruction techniques and associated complications, and provides recommendations for prevention and management. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Septic Arthritis of The Hip Joint presenting as Acute Abdomen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These cases illustrate the maxim that any painful movement of the hip joint with associated unexplained fever should raise suspicion of septic arthritis. The close relationship of the hip joint to the pelvis sometimes confuses hip diseases with pelvic pathologies. Key Words: Septic arthritis, acute abdomen, pathological ...

  8. [Double Endobutto reconstituting coracoclavicular ligament combined with repairing acromioclavicular ligament at stage I for the treatment of acromioclavicular dislocation with Rockwood type III - V].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wen-yue; Yu, Chong; Huang, Zhong-ming; Han, Lei

    2015-06-01

    To explore clinical efficacy of double Endobutto reconstituting coracoclavicular ligament combined with repairing acromioclavicular ligament in stage I in treating acromioclavicular dislocation with Rockwood type III - V . From January 2010 to September 2013, 56 patients with Rockwood type III - V acromioclavicular dislocation were treated by operation, including 20 males and 36 femlaes, aged from 32 to 52 years old with an average of 38.5 years old. Twenty-five patients were on the left side and 31 cases on the right side. The time from injury to operation was from 3 to 14 days, averaged 7 days. All patients were diagnosed as acromioclavicular dislocation with Rockwood type III - V, and double Endobutto were used to reconstituting coracoclavicular ligament, line metal anchors were applied for repairing acromioclavicular ligament. Postoperative complications were observed, Karlsson and Constant-Murley evaluation standard were used to evaluate clinical effects. All patients were followed up from 8 to 24 months with average of 11 months. According to Karlsson evaluation standard at 6 months after operation,42 cases were grade A, 13 were grade B and 1 was grade C. Constant-Murley score were improved from (42.80±5.43) before operation to (91.75±4.27) at 6 months after operation. All items at 6 months after operation were better than that of preoperative items. Forty-eight patients got excellent results, 7 were moderate and only 1 with bad result. No shoulder joint adhesion, screw loosening or breakage were occurred during following up. Double Endobutto reconstituting coracoclavicular ligament combined with repairing acromioclavicular ligament in stage I for the treatment of acromioclavicular dislocation with Rockwood type III - V could obtain early staisfied clinical effects, and benefit for early recovery of shoulder joint function.

  9. Surgical treatment of acromioclavicular dislocation using the endobutton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teodoro, Renato Loureiro; Nishimi, Alexandre Yukio; Pascarelli, Luciano; Bongiovanni, Roberto Rangel; Velasco, Marcelo Andreotti Perez; Dobashi, Eiffel Tsuyoshi

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the clinical and radiographic results of 23 patients diagnosed with acute type III acromioclavicular dislocation treated with the Endobutton. Twenty-three patients with a diagnosis of type III acromioclavicular dislocation were treated surgically. Twenty-one patients were male (91.3%) and 2 (8.7%) were female. The dominant side was affected in 15 patients (65.21%) and the non-dominant side in 8 patients (34.79%). All patients were operated on by the same surgical team within 4 weeks of the trauma. According to the UCLA score, 14 patients (60.86%) presented excellent results, 7 patients (30.43%) had good results and 2 patients (8.69%) had regular results. The technique was effective in treating acute type III dislocations with a high degree of patient satisfaction. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series.

  10. Bilateral Acromioclavicular Septic Arthritis as an Initial Presentation of Streptococcus pneumoniae Endocarditis

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    Neda Hashemi-Sadraei

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis (IE is infrequently associated with septic arthritis. Moreover, septic arthritis of the acromioclavicular (AC joint is rarely reported in the literature. We report a case of Streptococcus pneumoniae IE in a patient who presented with bilateral AC joint septic arthritis and we review the literature on the topic.

  11. Base of coracoid process fracture with acromioclavicular dislocation in a child

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Fracture of the coracoid process is a rare injury. It can be easily missed when associated with other injuries to the shoulder girdle, for instance, acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) dislocation. Clinical attention is easily drawn to the more obvious ACJ dislocation, hence, the need for further radiological evaluation. We report an unusual case of fracture of the base of coracoid process associated with a true acromioclavicular joint dislocation in a 12 year old boy, with no separation of the epiphyseal plate, as one might expect. Treatment also remains controversial. Our patient underwent open reduction internal fixation of the acromioclavicular joint and coracoid process. He subsequently made an uneventful progress with pain free full range of shoulder movement at 5 months, and was discharged at 9 months. PMID:20955595

  12. Complications following arthroscopic fixation of acromioclavicular separations: a systematic review of the literature

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    Woodmass JM

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Jarret M Woodmass,1 John G Esposito,1 Yohei Ono,1,2 Atiba A Nelson,1 Richard S Boorman,1 Gail M Thornton,1,3 Ian KY Lo1 1Department of Surgery, Section of Orthopaedic Surgery, McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 2Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan; 3Department of Orthopaedics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Purpose: Over the past decade, a number of arthroscopic or arthroscopically assisted reconstruction techniques have emerged for the management of acromioclavicular (AC separations. These techniques provide the advantage of superior visualization of the base of the coracoid, less soft tissue dissection, and smaller incisions. While these techniques have been reported to provide excellent functional results with minimal complications, discrepancies exist within the literature. This systematic review aims to assess the rate of complications following these procedures. Methods: Two independent reviewers completed a search of Medline, Embase, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library entries up to December 2013. The terms “Acromioclavicular Joint (MeSH” OR “acromioclavicular* (text” OR “coracoclavicular* (text” AND “Arthroscopy (MeSH” OR “Arthroscop* (text” were used. Pooled estimates and 95% confidence intervals were calculated assuming a random-effects model. Statistical heterogeneity was quantified using the I2 statistic. Level of evidence: IV Results: A total of 972 abstracts met the search criteria. After removal of duplicates and assessment of inclusion/exclusion criteria, 12 articles were selected for data extraction. The rate of superficial infection was 3.8% and residual shoulder/AC pain or hardware irritation occurred at a rate of 26.7%. The rate of coracoid/clavicle fracture was 5.3% and occurred most commonly with techniques utilizing bony tunnels. Loss of AC joint reduction occurred in 26

  13. Simultaneous anatomic reconstruction of the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments using a single tendon graft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Jin; Campbell, Sean; Scott, Jonathan; McGarry, Michelle H; Lee, Thay Q

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to introduce a novel surgical technique for simultaneous anatomic reconstruction of the acromioclavicular and coracoclavicular ligaments using a single tendon graft and to compare its biomechanical characteristics to those of a coracoid cerclage reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligaments. Six matched pairs of human acromioclavicular joints with an average age of 54.8 ± 7.8 years were used. One shoulder from each pair received the single tendon acromioclavicular-coracoclavicular reconstruction; the contralateral shoulder received the coracoid cerclage reconstruction. Bovine extensor tendon was used for both techniques. The single tendon acromioclavicular-coracoclavicular reconstruction technique provided anatomic restoration of the two coracoclavicular ligaments and the superior and inferior acromioclavicular ligaments simultaneously using one coracoid hole, one acromion hole, and two clavicular holes with interference screws. Anterior-posterior and superior-inferior translations were quantified for all specimens before and after reconstruction, followed by load to failure testing. Following coracoid cerclage reconstruction, total anterior-posterior translation was significantly greater than intact (10.0 ± 5.7 mm; p = 0.008). Following single tendon acromioclavicular-coracoclavicular reconstruction, there was no significant difference in anterior-posterior translation compared to intact (-1.6 ± 2.2 mm; n.s.). The coracoid cerclage technique demonstrated significantly greater anterior-posterior translation than the single tendon acromioclavicular-coracoclavicular technique (p = 0.007). Both techniques restored superior-inferior translation to the intact condition (n.s.). Ultimate load, deformation at ultimate load, and energy absorbed at ultimate load were significantly greater after acromioclavicular-coracoclavicular reconstruction than after coracoid cerclage reconstruction (p acromioclavicular

  14. Relação anatômica do nervo supraescapular com o processo coracoide, articulação acromioclavicular e acrômio Anatomical relationship of the suprascapular nerve to the coracoid process, acromio clavicular joint and acromion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Barcellos Terra

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estabelecer a relação anatômica do nervo supraescapular (NSE localizado na fossa supraescapular com a borda medial da base do coracoide, face articular acromial da articulação acromioclavicular e a borda anterolateral do acrômio. MÉTODOS: Foram dissecados 16 ombros de 16 cadáveres, sendo nove masculinos e sete femininos, mensurando com auxílio do paquímetro a distância do nervo supraescapular (na sua passagem sob o ligamento transverso com pontos fixos determinados na borda medial da base do processo coracoide, na face articular do acrômio da articulação acromioclavicular e na borda anterolateral do acrômio, correlacionando com a idade e o sexo. Foram excluídos cadáveres com intervenção cirúrgica prévia. RESULTADOS: Com relação à medida do nervo supraescapular, na sua fossa à borda medial da base do processo coracoide, obtivemos uma média de 3,9cm (variando de 3,1cm a 5,2cm; com relação à articulação acromioclavicular, a média foi de 4,7 (3,9cm a 5,2cm; e, com relação à borda anterolateral do acrômio, a média foi de 6,1cm (5,7cm a 6,8cm. CONCLUSÃO: É fundamental o conhecimento exato da anatomia dos nervos da região anterior do ombro para evitar lesões iatrogênicas e para conseguir resultados satisfatórios no tratamento cirúrgico das doenças do ombro, seja ele realizado de forma aberta ou artroscópica.OBJECTIVE: To establish the anatomic relationship of the suprascapular nerve (SSN located in the suprascapular notch to the medial border of the base of the coracoid process, the medial acromial surface of the acromioclavicular joint and the anterolateral edge of the acromion. METHODS: We dissected 16 shoulders of 16 cadavers, 9 males and 7 females. The distance from the suprascapular nerve (in its course beneath the transverse ligament to certain fixed points in the medial base of the coracoid process was measured with the aid of a caliper, as well as to the articular surface of the acromion

  15. [Triple no loop Endobutton plate combined with Orthcord line for the treatment of acromioclavicular dislocation of Tossy type III].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ming-Hua; Xie, Shui-Hua; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Wen-Qing; Chen, Wei-Dong; He, Jian-Hua; Ding, Hao; Hu, Qian-Qin; Wang, Xiao-Peng

    2016-07-25

    To explore the clinical effects of the triple no loop Endobutton plate combined with Orthcord line in treating acromioclavicular dislocation of Tossy type III. Between February 2011 and September 2013, 36 patients with acromioclavicular dislocation of Tossy type III were treated with triple no loop Endobutton plate and Orthcord line. There were 21 males and 15 females, aged from 9 to 48 years old with an average of (26.41±14.05) years. Couse of disease was from 2 to 7 days in the patients. The patients had the clinical manifestations such as shoulder pain, extension limited, acromioclavicular tenderness, positive organ point sign. Clinical effects were assessed by acromioclavicular scoring system. Thirty six patients were followed up from 8 to 15 months with an average of (12.2±4.3) months. All incisions got primary healing. At the final follow up, all shoulder pain vanished, acromioclavicular joints without tenderness, negative organ point sign. No redislocation and steel plate loosening were found. According to the acromioclavicular scoring system, 31 cases obtained excellent results, 5 good. The method of triple no loop Endobutton plate combined with Orthcord line for acromioclavicular dislocation of Tossy type III has advantage of less risk and complication, good functional rehabilitation and is an ideal method.

  16. Systematics of glenohumoral and acromioclavicular arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seifarth, A.; Roemer, F.

    2015-01-01

    A common risk factor for osteoarthritis (OA) of the glenohumeral joint is instability and is often observed as a sequel to dislocation. Altered biomechanics will ultimately result in joint degeneration including osteophyte development at the lower margin of the humerus, glenoidal cartilage loss and surface deformity. An OA of the glenohumeral joint is often coexistent with soft tissue derangement of the shoulder. In advanced stages defects of the rotator cuff and OA of the glenohumeral joint may accelerate disease progression. Degenerative changes of the acromioclavicular joint (AC joint) are commonly seen in older persons with only modest correlation with clinical symptoms. Symptomatic OA of the AC joint is often concomitantly observed with degenerative changes of the glenohumeral joint. Standard radiographs are the basis of a structural assessment of shoulder OA but lack correlation with clinical symptoms and are insensitive for the detection of early degenerative changes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides increased sensitivity for the detection of cartilage defects and reveals relevant soft tissue changes, such as lesions of the glenoid labrum and capsuloligamentous structures, which are seen in conjunction with instability. It is also the method of choice to detect clinically relevant bone marrow edema-like lesions or synovial changes that are associated with symptomatic OA. Standard radiographs are not applicable for detection of early degenerative changes. Once OA is suspected clinically, MRI is the method of choice for further structural assessment. The administration of an intravenous contrast agent is useful for assessing synovitis, which commonly correlates with clinical disease manifestations. For preoperative and surgical planning of joint replacement, MRI or CT should be used. (orig.) [de

  17. Acute neuropathic joint in diabetic foot: Plain radiographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Dae Young; Kang, Heung Sik; Sim, Jung Suk; Yoon, Yong Kyu; Kim, Chu Wan

    1994-01-01

    To determine the plain film findings of acute neuropathic joint in diabetic foot. Acute neuropathic joint in diabetic foot was considered when fragmentation of the articular ends of bone and subluxation of the affected joint developed within eight weeks after clinical onset of diabetic gangrene. Eight toes of six diabetics were satisfactory to our criteria. We analyzed plain radiographic findings of the affected joint and soft tissue, interval changes in followed-up radiographs, and deformities after healing. The time interval between clinical onset of gangrene and bone destruction ranges from 2 weeks to 4 weeks(mean 2.6 weeks). Plane radiographs showed fragmentation of the articular ends, subluxation, and soft tissue swelling of the metatarsophalangeal joint or interphalangeal joint. The significant feature of these patients was rapid progression of the lesions. Clinically, all patients had diabetic gangrene in affected toes, however, there was no evidence of osteomyelitis in our series. Amputation was done in 2 cases, and lesions in 3 of the remaining 4 cases were repaired spontaneously with regression of gangrene, leaving radiological residua such as pointed-end, tapered-end, and ball and socket deformity. Rapid disorganisation of the joint with associated evidence of soft tissue gangrene in plain radiograph is believed to be valuable for the diagnosis of diabetic osteoarthropathy

  18. Acute neuropathic joint in diabetic foot: Plain radiographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Dae Young; Kang, Heung Sik; Sim, Jung Suk; Yoon, Yong Kyu; Kim, Chu Wan [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-05-15

    To determine the plain film findings of acute neuropathic joint in diabetic foot. Acute neuropathic joint in diabetic foot was considered when fragmentation of the articular ends of bone and subluxation of the affected joint developed within eight weeks after clinical onset of diabetic gangrene. Eight toes of six diabetics were satisfactory to our criteria. We analyzed plain radiographic findings of the affected joint and soft tissue, interval changes in followed-up radiographs, and deformities after healing. The time interval between clinical onset of gangrene and bone destruction ranges from 2 weeks to 4 weeks(mean 2.6 weeks). Plane radiographs showed fragmentation of the articular ends, subluxation, and soft tissue swelling of the metatarsophalangeal joint or interphalangeal joint. The significant feature of these patients was rapid progression of the lesions. Clinically, all patients had diabetic gangrene in affected toes, however, there was no evidence of osteomyelitis in our series. Amputation was done in 2 cases, and lesions in 3 of the remaining 4 cases were repaired spontaneously with regression of gangrene, leaving radiological residua such as pointed-end, tapered-end, and ball and socket deformity. Rapid disorganisation of the joint with associated evidence of soft tissue gangrene in plain radiograph is believed to be valuable for the diagnosis of diabetic osteoarthropathy.

  19. Avaliação isocinética de 18 pacientes do sexo masculino submetidos à correção cirúrgica da luxação acromioclavicular aguda com seguimento mínimo de dois anos Isokinetic evaluation of eighteen male patients submitted to surgical corretion of acute acromioclavicular luxation with a minimum two-year follow-up

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavio Almeida Salles

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Foram estudados 18 pacientes submetidos ao tratamento cirúrgico de luxação acromioclavicular aguda do grau III da classificação de ALLMAN-TOSSY, todos do sexo masculino com idade média de 36 anos, foram avaliados sob o ponto de vista isocinético com tempo de evolução variando de 24 até 127 meses. A avaliação isocinética foi realizada através de um dinamômetro computadorizado marca CYBEX® modelo 6000 na velocidade angular de 60º/segundo e demonstrou resultados significantes no movimento de abdução no plano neutro, com déficit no pico de torque do lado operado, quando comparado com o lado contra-lateral. Quando comparados os ombros com e sem subluxação, os com subluxação demonstraram défcit no trabalho total tanto na adução quanto na abdução no plano neutro.Eighteen male patients, mean age 36 years, submitted to surgical treatment of ALLMAN-TOSSY grade III acute acromioclavicular luxation were studied. They were isokinetically evaluated during an evolution period ranging from 24 to 127 months. The isokinetic evaluation was carried out with a Cybex® 6000 computerized dynamometer, at a 60º/s angular speed, showing significant results in vertical abduction, with a deficit in peak torque in the operated on shoulder as compared to the contralateral side. When the groups with and without subluxation were compared a deficit in total work was observed in the group with subluxation both in adduction and abduction.

  20. Distal Clavicle Osteolysis after Modified Weaver-Dunn’s Procedure for Chronic Acromioclavicular Dislocation: A Case Report and Review of Complications

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    Eduard Alentorn-Geli

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Distal clavicle osteolysis after acromioclavicular joint stabilization has only been described after the use of hardware for clavicle stabilization or synthetic graft causing a foreign body reaction. This paper reports a very rare case of distal clavicle osteolysis after modified Weaver-Dunn procedure for the treatment of chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocation. The paper also provides a comprehensive review of complications of this surgical technique and discusses a potential vascular etiology and preventive strategies aimed at avoiding clavicle osteolysis.

  1. Acute injury of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breitenseher, M.J.

    1999-01-01

    The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination, and clinical stress tests. If the clinical stress test is positive, stress radiography could be performed. There is no consensus about the usefulness of stress radiography in acute ankle sprain, particularly about the cut-off talar tilt angle beyond which a two-ligament rupture would be certain, ranging from 5 to 30 . Today MRI is not used for this indication, although it allows, with controlled positioning of the foot and with defined sections, visualization of injured lateral collateral ankle ligaments. In ankle injuries, plain radiographs form the established basis of diagnostic imaging and can provide definitive answers in most cases. CT is used in complex fractures for complete visualization. MRI is the method of choice for several diagnostic problem cases, including occult fractures and post-traumatic avascular necrosis. In tendon injuries, MRI is important if ultrasound is not diagnostic. Generally, for the evaluation of acute ankle injuries, MRI is the most important second-step procedure when radiographs are nondiagnostic. (orig.) [de

  2. Temporomandibular joint dislocation due to acute propranolol intoxication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Aghabiklooei

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abbas Aghabiklooei1, Homan Elahi2, Babak Mostafazadeh31Department of Medical Toxicology and Forensic Medicine, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran; 2Firouzgar Hospital, Department of ENT, Tehran, Iran; 3Department of Medical Toxicology and Forensic Medicine, Shaheed Beheshty University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, IranAbstract: Temporomandibular joint (TMJ dislocation has not previously been reported as a complication of beta-blocker toxicity. We are reporting two cases of TMJ dislocation resulted from acute severe intoxication with pure propranolol (PPL for the first time. Bilateral TMJ dislocation happened in two patients who were admitted to intensive care unit with diagnosis of severe acute PPL toxicity. Clinical diagnosis of TMJ dislocation was obtained by physical examination. Successful reduction was performed for both patients without subsequent recurrence in two weeks following hospital discharge. Both of our subjects had no previous history of lower jaw dislocation. There was not any risk factor for dislocation such as convulsion during admission period, recent face trauma, or oral manipulation by the medical team. This study showed that TMJ dislocation may occur after severe acute PPL toxicity probably due to spastic contraction of the lateral pterygoid muscle. This is against previously mentioned hypothesis that stated masseteric muscles contraction as the main cause of a bilateral dislocated TMJ.Keywords: propranolol, toxicity, temporomandibular joint dislocation

  3. Hook plate fixation of acute displaced lateral clavicle fractures: mid-term results and a brief literature overview

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    Tiren Davut

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clavicle hook plate achieves like most other operative techniques, a high percentage of union and a low percentage of complications however concerns about long term complications still exist, particularly the involvement of the acromioclavicular joint. Methods To evaluate the results and long term effects in use of this plate we performed a retrospective analysis with a mean follow up of 65 months (5.4 years of 28 consecutive patients with acute displaced lateral clavicle fractures, treated with the clavicle hook plate. Results Short term functional results in all patients were good to excellent. All but one patient had a united fracture (96%. Nine patients (32% developed impingement symptoms and in 7 patients (25% subacromial osteolysis was found. These findings resolved after plate removal. Twenty-four patients were re-evaluated at a mean follow-up period of 5.4 years. The Constant-Murley score was 97 and the DASH score was 3.5. Four patients (14% developed acromioclavicular joint arthrosis of which one was symptomatic. Three patients (11% had extra articular ossifications of which one was symptomatic. There was no relation between the impingement symptoms, subacromial osteolysis and development of acromioclavicular joint arthrosis or extra articular ossifications. Conclusions The clavicle hook plate is a good primary treatment option for the acute displaced lateral clavicle fracture with few complications. At mid term the results are excellent and no long term complications can be addressed to the use of the plate.

  4. Surgical treatment of dislocated acromioclavicular syndesmolysis remains controversial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slaviša Mihaljevič

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Operative treatment of acromioclavicular (AC joint dislocations Allman-Tossy III type is controversial. There are more than 30 types of operative treatments described. At the Department of Traumatology of Celje General and Teaching Hospital (CGTH we operate the AC joint dislocation by the AC joint opened reduction and fixation using two Kirschner wires and additional figure of eight wire loop over the AC joint. The purpose of the analysis is to evaluate the results of acromioclavicular joint complete dislocation Allman-Tossy III type operative treatment.Patients and methods: In the 2-year period from July 1st 1997, to June 31st, 1999, at the Department of Traumatology of CGTH we operatively treated 59 injured persons with the AC joint dislocation. There were 55 men (93 % and 4 women (7 %. The average age was 40 years (from 20 to 72 years. 56 (95 % injured persons had the AC joint injury of Allman-Tossy III type. In first three weeks (early reconstruction we operated 45 injured persons (76.3 %. The applied material was removed after 8 weeks. 47 (79.7 % injured persons were re-examined at least one year after the injury (27 months in average; 14–39 months. The results were evaluated according to University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA scale for the shoulder function evaluation. The impact of factors on a good treatment result was presented by the odds ratio and uni-variant analysis calculation.Results: Out of 47 injured persons re-examined according to the UCLA scale at least one year after the injury there were 17 injured persons (36.2 % rated with an excellent result (UCLA 34– 35, 22 good (46.8 % (UCLA 28–33, 5 satisfactory (10.6 % (UCLA 21–27 and 3 bad (6.4 % (UCLA 0–20. In total we achieved 83 % of excellent and good results. The injured persons age did not significantly affect the treatment result. Complications occurred in 14 (29.8 % injured patients. If no complications were occurred the odds ratio for good

  5. Post-acute care disparities in total joint arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Roy H; Kamath, Atul F

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the socioeconomic factors that influence hospitalization and post-discharge metrics after joint replacement is important for identifying key areas of improvement in the delivery of orthopaedic care. An institutional administrative data set of 2869 patients from an academic arthroplasty referral center was analyzed to quantify the relationship between socioeconomic factors and post-acute rehabilitation care received, length of stay, and cost of care. The study used International Classification of Disease, ninth edition coding in order to identify cohorts of patients who received joint arthroplasty of the knee and hip between January 2007 and May 2015. The study found that females (odds ratio [OR], 2.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.74-2.46), minorities (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.78-2.51), and non-private insurance holders (OR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.26-1.94) were more likely to be assigned to institutional care after discharge. The study also found that minorities (OR, 1.45; 95% CI, 1.24-1.70) and non-private insurance holders (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.16-1.77) are more likely to exhibit longer length of stay. Mean charges were higher for males when compared to females ($80,010 vs $74,855; P total costs ($19,910 vs $18,613; P  = .001). Socioeconomic factors such as gender, race, and insurance status should be further explored with respect to healthcare policies seeking to influence quality of care and health outcomes.

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of acute joint injuries of the knee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, R.; Ragozzino, A.; Romano, L.; Del Vecchio, E.; Accarino, B.; Barile, V.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging was employed to evaluate muscoloskeletal pathoanathomy, and proved to be extremely useful in characterizing knee pathology. Between October 1986 and Novembre 1987, 24 patients with suspected traumatic ligament injuries were examined with high resolution MR imaging in the RMRC diagnostic center, Naples, with a 0.5T superconducting magnet ( 5000 Magniscan CGR) using a surface coil and a 500/28 (repetition time: TR: ms/echo time: TE-ms), 1200-1600/35-105 spin-echo pulse sequence. Nineteen patients with positive MR imaging exams underwent diagnostic and/or therapeutic arthroscopy. Arthroscopy confirmed MR diagnosis in the whole of cases. In 6 patients with negative MR findings no arthroscopy followed and the patients' successful outcome confirmed the accuracy of MR negative predictive value. Such results prove MR imaging to have a high diagnostic accuracy in the evaluation of acute joint injuries of the knee.Moreover, MR imaging-an uninvasive screening technique-appears to have high potentials for the evaluation of those cases where diagnostic arthroscopy is not required

  7. A modified technique of reconstruction for complete acromioclavicular dislocation: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tienen, Tony G; Oyen, Jan F C H; Eggen, Peter J G M

    2003-01-01

    Many procedures, both nonoperative and operative, have been described for treatment of complete acromioclavicular dislocations. The best primary treatment, however, still remains unclear. We present a new surgical technique in which the clavicle is reduced to an anatomic position, the coracoacromial ligament is transferred to the clavicle, and acromioclavicular joint fixation is accomplished with the use of absorbable, braided suture cord. Twenty-one patients underwent the modified technique of reconstruction. Patients were included only if they had sustained a Rockwood type V acromioclavicular dislocation and were extremely active in competitive sports before dislocation occurred. Eighteen patients returned to their sports without pain within 2.5 months after operation. The mean follow-up was 35.7 months. The average Constant score at last follow-up was 97. Radiographs taken at this time confirmed anatomic reduction in 18 patients, residual subluxation in 2 patients, and, in 1 patient, redislocation of the joint that occurred because of infection. Six patients had radiographic evidence of coracoclavicular ossifications. All patients developed a wide scar. Considering its operative simplicity, the advantage of absorbable augmentation of the clavicular reduction, and the low rate of recurrence, this technique may be an attractive alternative in this particular group of patients.

  8. [Outcomes and complications of Tightrope button plate for repairing acromioclavicular dislocation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yong-Xiang; Ma, Zi-Ping

    2017-10-25

    To study the clinical outcome and complications of Tightrope button plate for repairing acromioclavicular dislocation of Rockwood type III to V. From May 2014 to December 2016, 17 patients with acromioclavicular dislocation of type III-V were treated with Tightrope button plate including 10 males and 7 females with an average age 39.8 years old ranging from 20 to 68 years old. Four patients were treated with arthroscopy and 17 patients were treated with mini-invasive by X-ray assisted. Shoulder function, X-ray and complications after operation were assessed. All patients were followed up for 5 to 23 months with a mean of 10.8 months. All patients got satisfying reduction immediately postoperatively. Among them, 1 case of clavicle end wound foreign body reaction, rupture, effusion, healing after the second suture; 1 case of foreign body granuloma formation at the end of clavicle were resected and removed at 4 months after operation; 3 cases loss reduction(less than 50% of acromioclavicular joint). No coracoid fracture and suture breakage observed. The shoulder mobility was restored in 15 cases at 4 to 6 weeks postoperatively, and the shoulder adhesion in 2 cases was delayed to 5 to 7 months after operation. The Constant scores were improved from 46.9±6.0 preoperatively to 92.7±4.0 at the final follow-up. X-ray evaluation of postoperative coracoclavicular tunnel location, patients' coracoclavicular tunnel with mini-invasive fluoroscopy all closed to the ideal position (across the clavicle vertically through the coracoid base center), while different degree of tunnel position deviation were observed in arthroscopic patients. Tightrope button plate for the treatment of acromioclavicular joint dislocation had advantages of minimally invasive, effective, good clinical results, the majority of common complications does not affect efficacy. Small incision X-ray method can provide more satisfactory and reliable tunnel location.

  9. POSTEROSUPERIOR SURGICAL ACCESS ROUTE FOR TREATMENT OF ACROMIOCLAVICULAR DISLOCATIONS: RESULTS FROM 84 SURGICAL CASES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Molin, Danilo Canesin; Ribeiro, Fabiano Rebouças; Filho, Rômulo Brasil; Filardi, Cantídio Salvador; Tenor, Antonio Carlos; Stipp, Willian Nandi; Petros, Rodrigo Souto Borges

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the results from surgical treatment of 84 cases of acute acromioclavicular dislocation, using a posterosuperior access route. Eighty-four cases of acute acromioclavicular dislocation (grade III in the Allman-Tossy classification) operated between November 2002 and May 2010 were evaluated. The patients' mean age was 34 years. The diagnoses were made using clinical and radiographic evaluations. The patients were operated by the same surgical team, within three weeks of the date of the trauma, using a posterosuperior approach to the shoulder to access the top of the base of the coracoid process for placement of two anchors, which were used in reducing the dislocation. The minimum follow-up was 12 months. The postoperative clinical-radiographic evaluation was done using the modified Karlsson criteria and the University of California at Los Angeles (UCLA) score. 92.8% of the 84 patients treated presented good or excellent results, and 7.2% presented fair or poor results, using the UCLA assessment score. According to the modified Karlsson criteria, 76.2% were assessed as grade A, 17.9% as grade B and 5.9% as grade C. The posterosuperior access route to the shoulder is a new option for accessing the coracoid process and treating acromioclavicular dislocation, with clinical and radiographic results equivalent to those in the literature.

  10. Acromioclavicular dislocation: postoperative evaluation of the coracoclavicular ligaments using magnetic resonance

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    Rafael Salomon Silva Faria

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To radiologically evaluate the healing of the coracoclavicular ligaments after surgical treatment for acromioclavicular dislocation.METHODS: Ten patients who had undergone surgical treatment for acromioclavicular dislocation via a posterosuperior route at least one year earlier were invited to return for radiological assessment using magnetic resonance. This evaluation was done by means of analogy with the scale described in the literature for studying the healing of the anterior cruciate ligament of the knee and for measuring the healed coracoclavicular ligaments.RESULTS: A scar structure of fibrous appearance had formed in 100% of the cases. In 50% of the cases, the images of this structure had a good appearance, while the other 50% were deficient.CONCLUSION: Late postoperative evaluation using magnetic resonance, on patients who had been treated for acute acromioclavicular dislocation using a posterosuperior route in the shoulder, showed that the coracoclavicular ligaments had healed in 100% of the cases, but that this healing was deficient in 50%.

  11. Acromioclavicular dislocation type VI associated with diaphyseal fracture of the clavicle Luxação acromioclavicular tipo VI associada à fratura diafisária da clavícula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evander Azevedo Grossi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose is to present a very unusual case of the acromioclavicular joint inferior dislocation associated with the clavicle fracture. It concerns to a young patient who had a bike fall and had this type of pathology, had been operated and obtained excellent clinic result. The literature mentions many cases of subcoracoide dislocation, but there are only two subacromial similar to ours. The case is described, a literary revision is done and discussed and the treatment is discussed.

  12. Acute sacroiliac joint infection in a rugby player with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Tadashi; Nisimatsu, Hidekazu

    2012-11-01

    In athletes, acute bacterial infection is an unusual cause of pain in the sacroiliac joint. Although an entry site for infection is not always evident, the present case of a 15-year-old rugby player suggests the association between right sacroiliac joint infection and skin lesion of atopic dermatitis (AD) infected with group A streptococcus. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed inflammation around the sacroiliac joint with abscess formation. The infection resolved after a course of antibiotics. Because atopic skin lesion is a potential portal of bacteria, treatment for AD is essential for the prevention of pyogenic arthritis in athletes.

  13. Help Desk Answers: Surgery vs conservative management for AC joint repair: How do the 2 compare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matchin, Bruce; Yee, Bruce; Mott, Timothy

    2016-04-01

    When not considering the grade of acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation, both conservative and surgical management lead to positive outcomes, although surgically managed patients require more time out of work.

  14. Preoperative Anemia Is Associated With Failure of Open Debridement Polyethylene Exchange in Acute and Acute Hematogenous Prosthetic Joint Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenson, Richard D; Butterfield, James A; Irwin, Timothy J; Zurlo, John J; Davis, Charles M

    2018-06-01

    Acute and acute hematogenous prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) are often treated with open debridement and polyethylene exchange (ODPE) in an effort to save the prosthesis, decrease morbidity, and reduce costs. However, failure of ODPE may compromise a subsequent 2-stage treatment. The purpose of this study is to identify patient factors that impact the success of ODPE for acute and acute hematogenous PJIs. A retrospective review examined comorbidities, preoperative laboratory values, and patient history for patients with successful and failed ODPE treatment for acute perioperative or acute hematogenous periprosthetic hip or knee joint infections. Successful treatment was defined as retaining a well-fixed implant without the need for additional surgery for a minimum of 6-month follow-up with or without lifelong oral maintenance antibiotics. Fifty-three of 72 patients (73.6%) underwent successful ODPE. Of the 19 failures, 14 completed 2-stage revision with one subsequent known failure for recurrent infection. Patients with a Staphylococcus aureus infection were more likely to fail ODPE (48.3% vs 11.6%, P = .0012, odds ratio 7.1, 95% confidence interval 2.3-25.3). Patients with a preoperative hematocrit ≤32.1 were also more likely to fail ODPE (55% vs 16%, P = .0013, odds ratio 6.7, 95% confidence interval 2.2-22.4). When neither risk factor was present, 97.1% of PJIs were successfully treated with ODPE. S aureus infection and preoperative hematocrit ≤32.1 are independent risk factors for ODPE failure. ODPE is a safe alternative to 2-stage revision in patients without preoperative anemia and without S aureus infection. Two-thirds of patients with a failed ODPE were successfully treated with a 2-stage reimplantation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Acute injury of the ankle joint; Akutes Trauma des Sprunggelenks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breitenseher, M.J. [Univ. Klinik fuer Radiodiagnostik, Abt. fuer Osteologie und Besondere Klinische Einrichtung Magnet Resonanz, AKH, Wien (Austria)]|[Ludwig-Boltzmann-Institut fuer Radiologisch-Physikalische Tumordiagnostik, Vienna (Austria)

    1999-01-01

    The diagnosis of lateral collateral ankle ligament trauma is based on patient history, clinical examination, and clinical stress tests. If the clinical stress test is positive, stress radiography could be performed. There is no consensus about the usefulness of stress radiography in acute ankle sprain, particularly about the cut-off talar tilt angle beyond which a two-ligament rupture would be certain, ranging from 5 to 30 . Today MRI is not used for this indication, although it allows, with controlled positioning of the foot and with defined sections, visualization of injured lateral collateral ankle ligaments. In ankle injuries, plain radiographs form the established basis of diagnostic imaging and can provide definitive answers in most cases. CT is used in complex fractures for complete visualization. MRI is the method of choice for several diagnostic problem cases, including occult fractures and post-traumatic avascular necrosis. In tendon injuries, MRI is important if ultrasound is not diagnostic. Generally, for the evaluation of acute ankle injuries, MRI is the most important second-step procedure when radiographs are nondiagnostic. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Diagnose einer lateralen Bandverletzung beim frischen Sprunggelenkstrauma fusst auf der Anamnese, der klinischen Untersuchung und klinischen Stresstests. Bei positiven klinischen Stresstests kann eine Stressradiographie durchgefuehrt werden. Es gibt keine Uebereinstimmung fuer den Wert der Stressradiographie beim frischen Supinationstrauma des Sprunggelenks, insbesonders fuer den Winkel der Aufklappbarkeit bei einer Zweibandverletzung, der von 5 -30 reicht. Die MRT wird zur Zeit bei dieser Indikation nur in Einzelfaellen benutzt, obwohl sie mit definierter Fusspositionierung und Ausrichtung der Untersuchungsebene eine ausgezeichnete Beurteilung der Sprunggelenksbaende erlaubt. Bei knoecherner Sprunggelenksverletzungen ist die Verwendung des konventionellen Roentgen die etablierte Methode und meist

  16. Simultaneous Anterior Glenohumeral Dislocation and Ipsilateral Acromioclavicular Separation: A Dual Injury of the Shoulder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıçaslan, Ömer Faruk; Acar, Baver; Atik, Aziz; Kose, Ozkan

    2017-08-19

    Isolated acromioclavicular separations or shoulder dislocations are common injuries. However, a combination of complete acromioclavicular separation and anterior shoulder dislocation is extremely rare. Herein we present a combination of anterior shoulder dislocation and type III acromioclavicular separation that was succesfully treated conservatively. Orthopaedic surgeons should have a high clinical suspicion in daily practice. We believe that both pathologies can be treated conservatively.

  17. Management of acute dislocation of the temporomandibular joint in dental practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McGoldrick, David M

    2010-12-01

    Acute dislocation of the temporomandibular joint is a situation that, although rare, may present to the dentist in practice at any time. A number of activities, such as removal of a tooth, may cause dislocation. The event is painful and distressing for the patient, their family and the dental team. Prompt management minimises discomfort, distress and long-term morbidity to the patient. We describe the aetiology of acute dislocation and outline a number of techniques that will aid the clinican in dealing with this event.

  18. Acute neck pain caused by arthritis of atlanto-axial joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Takashi; Ishikawa, Yoshinori; Abe, Eiji; Konno, Norikazu; Noguchi, Hideaki

    2009-01-01

    We reviewed 27 cases in which the patient complained of acute neck pain. We had performed arthrocentesis of the atlanto-axial joint in every case. An aspirate was obtained in 16 of the cases, and calcium pryophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) crystals were demonstrated in 10 of them. The patients' scores on the visual analogue scale decreased 30 minutes after aspiration of the crystals (p<0.001). CT demonstrated calcification of the transverse ligament in 22 cases, calcification anterior to the body of C2 in 2 cases, and no calcification in 3 cases. The results in these patients suggest that acute neck pain in some elderly patients is related to arthritis of the atlanto-axial joint. (author)

  19. Scintigraphy of sacroiliac joints in acute anterior uveitis. A study of thirty patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, A S; Lentle, B C; Percy, J S; Jackson, F I

    1976-11-01

    HLA-B27 is a transplantation antigen found in a high proportion of patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Recently, an association has been shown to exist between HLA-B27 and acute uveitis, even in the absence of ankylosing spondylitis. We have examined the HLA antigen profile of 45 patients with acute nongranulomatous anterior uveitis and have confirmed this relation. In addition, using 90mtechnetium stannous pyrophosphate we have been able to demonstrate abnormal bone scan in 19 of 30 patients studied. Such abnormalities are limited to the sacroiliac joints but are otherwise the same as those seen in overt ankylosing spondylitis. Seven of the 19 patients did not have HLA-B27. These factors suggest that acute anterior uveitis may often represent a manifestation of a spondylitic diathesis even in the complete absence of any suggestive symptomatic or radiologic change and, in some cases, even though the antigenic marker HLA-B27 may be absent.

  20. Scintigraphy of sacroliac joints in acute anterior uveitis. A study of thirty patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, A.S.; Lentle, B.C.; Percy, J.S.; Jackson, F.I.

    1976-01-01

    HLA-B27 is a transplantation antigen found in a high proportion of patients with ankylosing spondylitis. Recently, an association has been shown to exist between HLA-B27 and acute uveitis, even in the absence of ankylosing spondylitis. We have examined the HLA antigen profile of 45 patients with acute nongranulomatous anterior uveitis and have confirmed this relation. In addition, using 90m technetium stannous pyrophosphate we have been able to demonstrate abnormal bone scan in 19 of 30 patients studied. Such abnormalities are limited to the sacroiliac joints but are otherwise the same as those seen in overt ankylosing spondylitis. Seven of the 19 patients did not have HLA-B27. These factors suggest that acute anterior uveitis may often represent a manifestation of a spondylitic diathesis even in the complete absence of any suggestive symptomatic or radiologic change and, in some cases, even through the antigenic marker HLA-B27 may be absent

  1. Surgical versus conservative management of Type III acromioclavicular dislocation: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Ciuffreda, Mauro; Rizzello, Giacomo; Mannering, Nicholas; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2017-06-01

    The management of Type III acromioclavicular (AC) dislocations is still controversial. We wished to compare the rate of recurrence and outcome scores of operative versus non-operative treatment of patients with Type III AC dislocations. A systematic review of the literature was performed by applying the PRISMA guidelines according to the PRISMA checklist and algorithm. A search in Medline, PubMed, Cochrane and CINAHL was performed using combinations of the following keywords: 'dislocation', 'Rockwood', 'type three', 'treatment', 'acromioclavicular' and 'joint'. Fourteen studies were included, evaluating 646 shoulders. The rate of recurrence in the surgical group was 14%. No statistical significant differences were found between conservative and surgical approaches in terms of postoperative osteoarthritis and persistence of pain, although persistence of pain seemed to occur less frequently in patients undergoing a surgical treatment. Persistence of pain seemed to occur less frequently in patients undergoing surgery. Persistence of pain seems to occur less frequently in patients treated surgically for a Type III AC dislocation. There is insufficient evidence to establish the effects of surgical versus conservative treatment on functional outcome of patients with AC dislocation. High-quality randomized controlled clinical trials are needed to establish whether there is a difference in functional outcome. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  2. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI features of acute gouty arthritis on top of chronic gouty involvement in different joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Emad, Yasser; Ragab, Yasser; El-Naggar, Ahmed; El Shaarawy, Nashwa; Abd-Allah, Mayada A.; Gamal, Rania M.; Fathy, Ahmed; Hawass, Mona; Rasker, Johannes J.

    2015-01-01

    The aims of the current study are to describe gadolinium-enhanced MRI features of an acute flare of established gouty arthritis in different joints and to examine a possible association between serum uric acid and MRI signs indicative of ongoing inflammation and/or structural joint damage as well as

  3. Facet joint injuries in acute cervical spine trauma : evaluation with CT and MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Jeon Ju; Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Jeong Hwa; Lee, Keon; Kwon, Hyeok Po; Kwon, Jung Hyeok; Yun, Seong Mun [Dongkang General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-05-01

    To evaluate injury patterns of facet joints and associated soft tissue injuries in patients with acute traumatic cervical facet joint injuries. From among patients with cervical spine trauma, 27 with facet joint injuries, as seen on CT and MRI, were chosen for this study. CT scans were analyzed with regard to the location of facet joint injury, the presence or absence of facet dislocation or fracture, and other associated fractures. MR images were analyzed with regard to ligament injury, intervertebral disc injury, intervertebral disc herniation, and spinal cord injury. The most common location of facet joint injury was C6-7 level(n=10), followed by C5-6(n=8). Among these 27 patients with facet joint injuries, 12(44%) had bilateral injuries and 15(56%) unilateral injuries. Facet fractures were present in 17 cases(63%) and the fracture of inferior facet was more frequent than superior. Patterns of fracture were vertical, transverse, or comminuted, but vertical fracture was the most common. Various degrees of dislocation were observed in patients with facet fractures. Fractures other than facet included pillar(n=11), lamina(n=6), transverse process(n=14), body(n=13), and spinous process(n=3). On MR images, anterior longitudinal ligament injury was found in 8 patients(30%), posterior longitudinal ligament injury in 4(15%), and interspinous ligament injury in 20(74%). Twelve patients(44%) had spinal cord injuries including edema(n=8) and hemorrhage(n=4). Among patients with disc abnormalities, 11(41%) had intervertebral disc injuries, and traumatic disc herniations were found in nine. Traumatic cervical facet joint injuries were manifested as various patterns and frequently associated with other fractures or soft tissue injuries. Analysis of CT and MR findings of these injury patterns helped formulate a therapeutic plan and determine of prognosis.

  4. Pressure Pain Threshold as a Predictor of Acute Postoperative Pain Following Total Joint Arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghverdian, Brandon A; Wright, David J; Schwarzkopf, Ran

    2016-10-26

    Acute pain in the postoperative period after total joint arthroplasty (TJA) has a significant effect on early rehabilitation, hospital length of stay, and the development of chronic pain. Consequently, efforts have been made to predict the occurrence of postoperative pain using preoperative and intraoperative factors. In this study, we tested the usefulness of preoperative pressure pain threshold (PPT) values in the prediction of three outcomes for patients who underwent TJA: visual analog scale pain scores, hospital length of stay, and opioid consumption. Using a digital pressure algometer, we measured the preoperative PPT in 41 patients expected to undergo TJA at three different body sites: the first web space of the hand, the operative joint, and the contralateral joint. We correlated each PPT separately with postoperative visual analog scale pain scores, hospital length of stay, and opioid consumption. No significant correlation was found between preoperative PPT and the three postoperative outcomes. This finding held true when patients were subdivided by surgery type (total knee arthroplasty vs. total hip arthroplasty). There was no significant difference in PPT between the three body testing sites. This study failed to prove the usefulness of PPT in the prediction of acute postoperative pain, pain medication consumption, and length of stay. The pressure algometer has previously found a place in the assessment of pain in a variety of clinical settings, but its utility has not yet been demonstrated in patients undergoing TJA.

  5. Medicare Program; Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement Payment Model for Acute Care Hospitals Furnishing Lower Extremity Joint Replacement Services. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-24

    This final rule implements a new Medicare Part A and B payment model under section 1115A of the Social Security Act, called the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) model, in which acute care hospitals in certain selected geographic areas will receive retrospective bundled payments for episodes of care for lower extremity joint replacement (LEJR) or reattachment of a lower extremity. All related care within 90 days of hospital discharge from the joint replacement procedure will be included in the episode of care. We believe this model will further our goals in improving the efficiency and quality of care for Medicare beneficiaries with these common medical procedures.

  6. Acute and joint toxicity of three agrochemicals to Chinese tiger frog (Hoplobatrachus chinensis) tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Li; Shao, Wei-Wei; Ding, Guo-Hua; Fan, Xiao-Li; Yu, Miao-Ling; Lin, Zhi-Hua

    2014-07-01

    We studied acute and joint toxicity of three different agrochemicals (chlorantraniliprole, flubendiamide-abamectin and penoxsulam) to Chinese tiger frog (Hoplobatrachus chinensis) tadpoles with the method of stability water tests. Results showed that the three agrochemicals increased tadpole mortality. For acute toxicity, the LC50 values after 24, 48 and 72 h of chlorantraniliprole, flubendiamide-abamectin and penoxsulam exposure were 5.37, 4.90 and 4.68 mg/L; 0.035, 0.025 and 0.021 mg/L; 1.74, 1.45 and 1.29 mg/L, respectively. The safety concentrations (SC) of chlorantraniliprole, flubendiamide-abamectin and penoxsulam to the tadpoles were 1.23, 0.30 and 0.003 mg/L, respectively. Based on these findings, chlorantraniliprole and penoxsulam were moderately toxic, while flubendiamide-abamectin was highly toxic. All pairwise joint toxicity tests showed moderate toxicity. The LC50 values after 24, 48 and 72 h of exposure were 7.08, 6.61 and 6.03 mg/L for chlorantraniliprole+penoxsulam, with corresponding values of 2.455, 2.328 and 2.183 mg/L for chlorantraniliprole+flubendiamide-abamectin, and 1.132, 1.084 and 1.050 mg/L for penoxsulam+flubendiamide-abamectin, with safe concentrations of 1.73, 0.63 and 0.30 mg/L, respectively. For toxic evaluations of pairwise combinations of the three agrochemicals, only the joint toxicity of chlorantraniliprole and flubendiamide-abamectin after 24 h was found to be synergistic, whereas all other tests were antagonistic. Our findings provide valuable information on the toxic effects of agrochemicals on amphibians and how various types of agrochemicals can be reasonably used in agricultural areas.

  7. Medial joint line bone bruising at MRI complicating acute ankle inversion injury: What is its clinical significance?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, V.O.; Moran, D.E.; Shine, S.; Eustace, S.J.

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To assess the incidence and clinical significance of medial joint line bone bruising following acute ankle inversion injury. Materials and methods: Forty-five patients who underwent ankle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) within 2 weeks of acute ankle inversion injury were included in this prospective study. Integrity of the lateral collateral ligament complex, presence of medial joint line bone bruising, tibio-talar joint effusion, and soft-tissue swelling were documented. Clinical follow-up at 6 months was carried out to determine the impact of injury on length of time out of work, delay in return to normal walking, delay in return to sports activity, and persistence of medial joint line pain. Results: Thirty-seven patients had tears of the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL). Twenty-six patients had medial joint line bone bruising with altered marrow signal at the medial aspect of the talus and congruent surface of the medial malleolus. A complete ATFL tear was seen in 92% of the patients with medial joint line bone bruising (p = 0.05). Patients with an ATFL tear and medial joint line bone bruising had a longer delay in return to normal walking (p = 0.0002), longer delay in return to sports activity (p = 0.0001), and persistent medial joint line pain (p = 0.0003). There was no statistically significant difference in outcome for the eight patients without ATFL tears. Conclusion: Medial joint line bone bruising following an acute ankle inversion injury was significantly associated with a complete ATFL tear, longer delay in the return to normal walking and sports activity, as well as persistent medial joint line pain. Its presence should prompt detailed assessment of the lateral collateral ligament complex, particularly the ATFL

  8. Non-operative treatment of a fracture to the coracoid process with acromioclavicular dislocation in an adolescent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Pedersen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Coracoid process fractures are rare and often associated with dislocations of the acromioclavicular (AC joint. There is little evidence about the treatment of these injuries in adolescents, but the few case reports published recommend surgery. We report a case of a dislocated epiphyseal fracture to the base of the coracoid process with AC joint dislocation in a 14-year-old ice-hockey player following direct impact to his left shoulder. Since magnetic resonance tomography revealed intact AC and coracoclavicular ligaments, we initiated non-operative treatment with immobilization and unloading of the shoulder by an abduction brace allowing limited rotation for 6 weeks. This treatment resulted in complete recovery after 8 weeks and return to full sports on first league level after 3 month. In conclusion, non-operative treatment of coracoid base fractures with concomitant AC-joint injury in the adolescent can result in excellent functional results and early recovery.

  9. A Biomechanical Analysis of Different Clavicular Tunnel Diameters in Anatomic Acromioclavicular Ligament Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Andreas; Beitzel, Knut; Alaee, Farhang; Dukas, Alex; Herbst, Elmar; Obopilwe, Elifho; Apostolakos, John; DiVenere, Jessica; Singh, Hardeep; Cote, Mark P; Mazzocca, Augustus D

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the biomechanical stability of a tendon-to-clavicle bone interface fixation of a graft in revision acromioclavicular reconstruction. Fifteen fresh-frozen cadaveric shoulders were used. All specimens underwent bone density evaluation. For the primary reconstruction, a 5-mm semitendinosus allograft was inserted into a 5-mm bone tunnel at 25 and 45 mm from the lateral end of the clavicle using a 5.5 × 8-mm PEEK (polyether ether ketone) tenodesis screw. Each single graft was fixed in a cryo-clamp and cyclically loaded from 5 to 70 N for 3,000 cycles, followed by load-to-failure testing at a rate of 120 mm/min to simulate the revision case. To simulate tunnel widening, the tunnels of the revision series were over-drilled with an 8-mm drill, and a 5-mm semitendinosus graft with an 8 × 12-mm PEEK tenodesis screw was inserted. Biomechanical testing was then repeated. The bone mineral density analysis showed a significantly higher density at the 45-mm hole compared with the 25-mm hole (P = .001). The ultimate load to failure increased from the 5.5-mm screw to the 8-mm screw at the 45-mm hole position (P = .001). There was no statistically significant difference at the 25-mm hole position (P = .934). No statistical significance for graft elongation comparing the 5.5-mm screw and the 8-mm screw at the 25-mm (P = .156) and 45-mm (P = .334) positions could be found. Comparable biomechanical stability for the tendon-to-bone interface fixation in different clavicular tunnel diameters simulating primary and revision reconstruction was achieved. There is a lack of literature regarding revision acromioclavicular joint reconstruction, but our biomechanical results show comparable stability to primary reconstruction. These data provide support for the use of anatomic acromioclavicular ligament reconstruction in revision cases. Copyright © 2016 Arthroscopy Association of North America. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Via de acesso cirúrgico posterossuperior para o tratamento das luxações acromioclaviculares: resultados de 84 casos operados Posterosuperior surgical access route for treatment of acromioclavicular dislocations: results from 84 surgical cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Canesin Dal Molin

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar os resultados do tratamento cirúrgico de 84 luxações acromioclaviculares agudas com a utilização da via de acesso posterossuperior do ombro. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliados 84 casos de luxações acromioclaviculares agudas grau III da classificação de Allman-Tossy operados de novembro de 2002 a maio de 2010. A média de idade dos pacientes foi de 34 anos. O diagnóstico foi realizado por avaliação clínica e radiográfica. Os pacientes foram operados pela mesma equipe cirúrgica em até três semanas da data do trauma realizando-se a via de acesso posterossuperior do ombro com acesso ao topo da base do processo coracoide para colocação de duas âncoras utilizadas na redução da luxação. O seguimento mínimo foi de 12 meses. A avaliação clínica-radiográfica pós-operatória foi realizada pelos critérios de Karlsson modificados e do escore da Universidade da Califórnia em Los Angeles (UCLA. RESULTADOS: Dos 84 pacientes operados, 92,8% apresentavam resultados bons ou excelentes e 7,2% de resultados regulares ou fracos pelo escore de avaliação da UCLA. Pelos critérios de Karlsson modificados 76,2% foram avaliados como grau A, 17,9% como grau B e 5,9% como grau C. CONCLUSÃO: A VIA de acesso posterossuperior do ombro é uma nova opção para acesso ao processo coracoide e tratamento das luxações acromioclaviculares, com resultados clínicos e radiográficos equivalentes aos da literatura.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the results from surgical treatment of 84 cases of acute acromioclavicular dislocation, using a posterosuperior access route. METHODS: Eighty-four cases of acute acromioclavicular dislocation (grade III in the Allman-Tossy classification operated between November 2002 and May 2010 were evaluated. The patients' mean age was 34 years. The diagnoses were made using clinical and radiographic evaluations. The patients were operated by the same surgical team, within three weeks of the date of the trauma, using a

  11. [Sacroiliac joint dysfunction presented with acute low back pain: three case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamauchi, Shuji; Morimoto, Daijiro; Isu, Toyohiko; Sugawara, Atsushi; Kim, Kyongsong; Shimoda, Yusuke; Motegi, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Ryoji; Isobe, Masanori

    2010-07-01

    Sacroiliac joint (SIJ) can cause low back pain when its joint capsule and ligamentous tissue are damaged. We report our experience in treating three SIJ dysfunction patients presenting with acute low back pain (a 38 year-old male, a 24 year-old male, and a 32 year-old female). SIJ dysfunction was diagnosed using the one-finger test, the modified Newton test, and SIJ injection. In all three patients, lumbar MRI demonstrated slightly degenerated lumbar lesions (lumbar canal stenosis, lumbar disc hernia). Two patients had paresthesia or pain in the leg and all three patients showed iliac muscle tenderness in the groin, which was thought to be a referred symptom because of improvement after SIJ injection. The two male patients returned to work and the problems have not recurred. Although our female patient resumed daily life as a housewife, her condition recurred at intervals of 2-3 months and she required regular SIJ injections. The prevalence of SIJ dysfunction of low back pain is about 10%, so it should be considered as a differential diagnosis when treating low back pain and designing treatment for lumbar spinal disorders.

  12. The applications and clinical significance of IMA, H-FABP joint CKMB in acute myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Hui Zeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the applications and clinical significance of ischemia-modified protein (IMA, heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP joint creatine kinase isoenzyme (CK-MB in acute myocardial infarction (AMI. Methods: From January 2014 to December 2014, 84 clinical materials of patients with AMI in Department of cardiology were collected, and 80 cases of normal projects were the control group. IMA was determinated with albumincobalt ion binding assay. The levels of H-FABP and CK-MB of 84 cases of AMI patients and 80 cases of normal subjects were determinated with immunoturbidimetric. The value of IMA, H-FABP and CK-MB of AMI patients were analyzed with subject-specific curve (ROC. Results: The levels of serum IMA, H-FABP and CK-MB of AMI group were significantly higher than those of the control group. Differences showed statistical significance (P < 0.05. The levels of serum IMA, H-FABP and CK-MB increased as the increase of coronary lesion vessels in patients with AMI (P < 0.05. The levels of IMA, H-FABP and CK-MB of the death group were significantly higher than those of the surviving group (P < 0.05. ROC curve analysis showed that when IMA, H-FABP and CK-MB joint detections of sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were greater than singleindex detection (P < 0.05. Conclusions: The expression levels of IMA, H-FABP and CK-MB are closely related to the occurrence and development of disease progression in patients with AMI. IMA, H-FABP joint CK-MB detection can improve the sensitivity and specificity for early diagnosis of AMI.

  13. [Case control study on the treatment of acromioclavicular dislocation with Endobutton plates combined with an anchor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jin-Tao; Lu, Jian-Wei; Fu, Li-Feng

    2016-09-25

    To compare the clinical effect of Endobutton plates combined with an anchor and clavicle hook plate in the treatment of acromioclavicular dislocation. From January 2012 to August 2014, 83 patients with Rockwood type III acromioclavicular dislocation underwent surgical treatments. Among them, 34 patients were treated with Endobutton plate and anchor repair(Endobutton group), including 23 males and 11 females, and the mean age was(39.0±6.3) years old (26 to 51 years old); the average time from injury to operation was(4.1±1.3) days(3 to 7 days);the injured side:14 left, 20 right; the dislocation in 28 patients dues to fall, 6 patients dues traffic accident. There were 49 patients treated with clavicular hook plate(hook plate group), including 33 males and 16 females;the mean age was(37.9±6.3) years old (27 to 53 years old); the average time from injury to operation was(4.1±1.1) days (2 to 7 days);the injured side: 18 left, 31 right;the dislication in 36 patients dues to fall, 13 patients dues traffic accidents. The indexes such as intraoperative bleeding volume, operation time, incision size, postoperative complication and postoperative coracoclavicular space, shoulder joint function, and life quality were compared between two groups. In the hook plate group with 49 patients, the plates in 43 patients were removed at the secondary operation, and 32 patients had shoulder pain or limited active range. Thirty four patients in the Endobutton group had no pain symptoms and limited active range. All the patients did not suffer acromioclavicular dislocation again. There was no significant difference between the two groups in operation time, and intraoperative bleeding volume( P >0.05). The incision length in the hook plate group was longer than that in Endobutton group( P 0.05). There were no significant differences of Constant score and SF-36 between two groups 2 months after operation( P >0.05). Sixteen months after operation, the Constant score in the injured side of

  14. A clinical trial comparing Lanconone® with ibuprofen for rapid relief in acute joint pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girandola, Robert N; Srivastava, Shalini; Loullis, Costas C

    2016-04-06

    To study the effect of Lanconone® (1000 mg) on acute pain on exertion as compared to the standard of care, Ibuprofen (400 mg). The study recruited 72 subjects diagnosed with mild to moderate knee joint pain on exertion. Subjects with Pain Visual Analogue Scale of more than 40 mm were included. Uphill walking was provided as the stressor using Naughton's protocol on a treadmill. The subjects walked for 10 minutes continuously followed by a rest period and baseline pain score for index knee joint was recorded. Subjects were administered a single dose of Lanconone® (1000 mg)/Ibuprofen (400 mg). Thereafter the same stressor was provided at 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 6 hours, subsequently, pain scores were recorded on a visual analogue scale. Double stopwatch method was used to evaluate the onset of pain relief and time taken to meaningful pain relief. Both Lanconone® and Ibuprofen showed the first perceived pain relief at 65.31 ± 35.57 mins as compared to 60.82 ± 32.56 mins respectively. The mean time taken to experience meaningful pain relief in Lanconone® group was 196.59 ± 70.85 mins compared to 167.13 ± 71.41 mins amongst Ibuprofen group. The meaningful pain relief continued for 6 hours. The current study successfully demonstrated rapid pain-relieving potential of Lanconone® which was comparable to Ibuprofen. No adverse event related to the interventions was reported in the study. Clinical trials.gov NCT02417506 . 21 January 2015.

  15. Cardiovascular coupling analysis with high-resolution joint symbolic dynamics in patients suffering from acute schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulz, Steffen; Tupaika, Nadine; Voss, Andreas; Berger, Sandy; Bär, Karl-Jürgen; Haueisen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Besides the well-known cardiac risk factors for schizophrenia, increasing concerns have been raised regarding the cardiac side-effects of antipsychotic medications. A bivariate analysis of autonomic regulation, based on cardiovascular coupling, can provide additional information about heart rate (HR) and blood pressure regulatory patterns within the complex interactions of the cardiovascular system. We introduce a new high-resolution coupling analysis method (HRJSD) based on joint symbolic dynamics (JSD), which is characterized by three symbols, a threshold (individual dynamic variability, physiological) for time series transformation and eight coupling pattern families. This is based on a redundancy reduction strategy used to quantify and characterize cardiovascular couplings. In this study, short-term (30 min) HR and systolic blood pressure (SP) time series of 42 unmedicated (UNMED) and 42 medicated patients (MED) suffering from acute schizophrenia were analysed to establish the suitability of the new method for quantifying the effects of antipsychotics on cardiovascular couplings. We were able to demonstrate that HRJSD, applying the threshold based on spontaneous baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) estimation, revealed eight significant pattern families that were able to quantify the anti-cholinergic effects of antipsychotics and the related changes of cardiovascular regulation (coupling) in MED in comparison to UNMED. This was in contrast to the simple JSD, BRS (sequence method) and only partly to standard linear HR variability indices. HRJSD provides strong evidence that autonomic regulation in MED seems to be, to some extent, predominated by invariable HR responses in combination with alternating SP values in contrast to UNMED, indicating an impairment of the baroreflex control feedback loop in MED. Surrogate data analysis was applied to test for the significance and nonlinearity of cardiovascular couplings in the original data due to medical treatment with

  16. Inter-joint coordination strategies during unilateral stance following first-time, acute lateral ankle sprain: A brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Cailbhe; Bleakley, Chris; Hertel, Jay; Caulfield, Brian; Ryan, John; Sweeney, Kevin; Delahunt, Eamonn

    2015-07-01

    This investigation combined measures of inter-joint coordination and stabilometry to evaluate eyes-open (condition 1) and eyes-closed (condition 2) static unilateral stance performance in a group of participants with an acute, first-time lateral ankle sprain injury in comparison to a control group. Sixty-six participants with an acute first-time lateral ankle sprain and 19 non-injured controls completed three 20-second unilateral stance task trials in conditions 1 and 2. An adjusted coefficient of multiple determination statistic was used to compare stance limb 3-D kinematic data for similarity in the aim of establishing patterns of inter-joint coordination for these groups. Between-group analyses revealed significant differences in stance limb inter-joint coordination strategies for conditions 1 and 2. Injured participants displayed increases in ankle-hip linked coordination compared to controls in condition 1 (sagittal/frontal plane: 0.12 [0.09] vs 0.06 [0.04]; η(2)=.16) and condition 2 (sagittal/frontal plane: 0.18 [0.13] vs 0.08 [0.06]; η(2)=0.37). Participants with acute first-time lateral ankle sprain exhibit a hip-dominant coordination strategy for static unilateral stance compared to non-injured controls. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The ACS NSQIP Risk Calculator Is a Fair Predictor of Acute Periprosthetic Joint Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingert, Nathaniel C; Gotoff, James; Parrilla, Edgardo; Gotoff, Robert; Hou, Laura; Ghanem, Elie

    2016-07-01

    Periprosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a severe complication from the patient's perspective and an expensive one in a value-driven healthcare model. Risk stratification can help identify those patients who may have risk factors for complications that can be mitigated in advance of elective surgery. Although numerous surgical risk calculators have been created, their accuracy in predicting outcomes, specifically PJI, has not been tested. (1) How accurate is the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (ACS NSQIP) Surgical Site Infection Calculator in predicting 30-day postoperative infection? (2) How accurate is the calculator in predicting 90-day postoperative infection? We isolated 1536 patients who underwent 1620 primary THAs and TKAs at our institution during 2011 to 2013. Minimum followup was 90 days. The ACS NSQIP Surgical Risk Calculator was assessed in its ability to predict acute PJI within 30 and 90 days postoperatively. Patients who underwent a repeat surgical procedure within 90 days of the index arthroplasty and in whom at least one positive intraoperative culture was obtained at time of reoperation were considered to have PJI. A total of 19 cases of PJI were identified, including 11 at 30 days and an additional eight instances by 90 days postoperatively. Patient-specific risk probabilities for PJI based on demographics and comorbidities were recorded from the ACS NSQIP Surgical Risk Calculator website. The area under the curve (AUC) for receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves was calculated to determine the predictability of the risk probability for PJI. The AUC is an effective method for quantifying the discriminatory capacity of a diagnostic test to correctly classify patients with and without infection in which it is defined as excellent (AUC 0.9-1), good (AUC 0.8-0.89), fair (AUC 0.7-0.79), poor (AUC 0.6-0.69), or fail/no discriminatory capacity (AUC 0.5-0.59). A p value of fair accuracy in predicting 30

  18. Utilization of Total Joint Arthroplasty in Physician-Owned Specialty Hospitals vs Acute Care Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Antonia F; Pflug, Emily; O'Brien, Daniel; Maltenfort, Mitchell G; Parvizi, Javad

    2017-07-01

    The recent emergence of physician-owned specialty hospitals has sparked controversy about overutilization. Thus, the purpose of this study was to compare utilization patterns of total joint arthroplasty (TJA) between physician-specialty hospitals (PSHs) and acute care hospitals (ACHs). A retrospective study was conducted from January 2010 to August 2014 comparing primary TJA patients between a PSH and an ACH; 103 PSH patients were matched to 103 ACH patients by age, gender, BMI, and ASA classification with similar case distribution between facilities. All surgeons in the study operated at both hospitals and were shareholders of the PSH. Information on nonoperative treatments, and timing to the initial appointment, consent, and surgery were analyzed using univariate analysis. Nonoperative treatments before surgery were similar between hospitals (P = 1.00). The time from the initial appointment to consent was longer for PSH (P = .0001). However, the time from consent to the date of surgery (P = .04) and the timing from symptoms to initial appointment (P = .006) was shorter for PSH. The time from initial appointment to the day of surgery was similar between groups (P = .20). Patients were more likely to be consented for surgery on their first clinic visit when undergoing surgery at ACH (87 of 103, 84.4%) compared to PSH (61 of 103; 59.2%; P total knee arthroplasty (P = .001) and total hip arthroplasty patients (P = .001) at PSH. Facility ownership in PSH resulted in similar conservative treatment before TJA. The time to surgical consent after the initial appointment was longer PSH, whereas the time from consent to the date of surgery was shorter at the PSH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Analysis of the Effects of Normal Walking on Ankle Joint Contact Characteristics After Acute Inversion Ankle Sprain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Ji Yong; Park, Kyung Soon; Seon, Jong Keun; Jeon, Insu

    2015-12-01

    To show the causal relationship between normal walking after various lateral ankle ligament (LAL) injuries caused by acute inversion ankle sprains and alterations in ankle joint contact characteristics, finite element simulations of normal walking were carried out using an intact ankle joint model and LAL injury models. A walking experiment using a volunteer with a normal ankle joint was performed to obtain the boundary conditions for the simulations and to support the appropriateness of the simulation results. Contact pressure and strain on the talus articular cartilage and anteroposterior and mediolateral translations of the talus were calculated. Ankles with ruptured anterior talofibular ligaments (ATFLs) had a higher likelihood of experiencing increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations than ATFL-deficient ankles. In particular, ankles with ruptured ATFL + calcaneofibular ligaments and all ruptured ankles had a similar likelihood as the ATFL-ruptured ankles. The push off stance phase was the most likely situation for increased ankle joint contact pressures, strains and translations in LAL-injured ankles.

  20. Prognostic factors to succeed in surgical treatment of chronic acromioclavicular dislocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, J; Duparc, F; Baverel, L; Bahurel, J; Toussaint, B; Bertiaux, S; Clavert, P; Gastaud, O; Brassart, N; Beaudouin, E; De Mourgues, P; Berne, D; Duport, M; Najihi, N; Boyer, P; Faivre, B; Meyer, A; Nourissat, G; Poulain, S; Bruchou, F; Ménard, J F

    2015-12-01

    Treatment of chronic acromioclavicular joint dislocation (ACJD) remains a poorly known and controversial subject. Given the many surgical options, it is not always easy to determine which steps are indispensable. This article reports a multicenter prospective study. The clinical and radiological follow-up involved a comparative analysis of the preoperative and postoperative data at 1 year, including pain (visual analogue scale), subjective functional incapacity (QuickDASH), and the objective Constant score, as well as a comparative analysis of vertical and horizontal movements measured on simple x-rays. Based on a series of 140 operated ACJDs, we included 24 chronic ACJDs. The mean time to surgery was 46 weeks (range, 1 month to 4 years). The patients' mean age was 41 years, with a majority of males (75%), 72% of whom participated in recreational sports. Professionally, 40% of the subjects had jobs involving manual labor. We noted 40% grade III, 24% grade IV, and 36% grade V injury according to the Rockwood classification. In 92% of cases, coracoclavicular stabilization was provided by a double button implant, reinforced with a biological graft in 88% of the cases. In 29%, millimeters to centimeters of the distal clavicle were resected and acromioclavicular stabilization was associated in 54%. We observed complications in 33% of the cases. At 1 year postoperative, 21 patients underwent clinical and radiological follow-up (87.5%). Only 35% of the patients were satisfied or very satisfied, whereas 100% of them would recommend the operation. Full-time work was resumed in 91% of the cases and all sports could be resumed in 86%. The pre- and postoperative values at 1 year changed as follows: the mean Constant score improved from 61 to 87 (p=0.00002); the subjective QuickDASH score decreased from 41 to 9 (p=0.00002); and radiologically significant reduction of the initial displacement was observed in the vertical plane (pacromioclavicular stabilization, and

  1. Associations between preoperative physical therapy and post-acute care utilization patterns and cost in total joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Richard; Granata, Jaymes; Ruhil, Anirudh V S; Vogel, Karen; McShane, Michael; Wasielewski, Ray

    2014-10-01

    Health-care costs following acute hospital care have been identified as a major contributor to regional variation in Medicare spending. This study investigated the associations of preoperative physical therapy and post-acute care resource use and its effect on the total cost of care during primary hip or knee arthroplasty. Historical claims data were analyzed using the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Limited Data Set files for Diagnosis Related Group 470. Analysis included descriptive statistics of patient demographic characteristics, comorbidities, procedures, and post-acute care utilization patterns, which included skilled nursing facility, home health agency, or inpatient rehabilitation facility, during the ninety-day period after a surgical hospitalization. To evaluate the associations, we used bivariate and multivariate techniques focused on post-acute care use and total episode-of-care costs. The Limited Data Set provided 4733 index hip or knee replacement cases for analysis within the thirty-nine-county Medicare hospital referral cluster. Post-acute care utilization was a significant variable in the total cost of care for the ninety-day episode. Overall, 77.0% of patients used post-acute care services after surgery. Post-acute care utilization decreased if preoperative physical therapy was used, with only 54.2% of the preoperative physical therapy cohort using post-acute care services. However, 79.7% of the non-preoperative physical therapy cohort used post-acute care services. After adjusting for demographic characteristics and comorbidities, the use of preoperative physical therapy was associated with a significant 29% reduction in post-acute care use, including an $871 reduction of episode payment driven largely by a reduction in payments for skilled nursing facility ($1093), home health agency ($527), and inpatient rehabilitation ($172). The use of preoperative physical therapy was associated with a 29% decrease in the use of any post-acute care

  2. New insights in the treatment of acromioclavicular separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bergen, Christiaan J A; van Bemmel, Annelies F; Alta, Tjarco D W; van Noort, Arthur

    2017-01-01

    A direct force on the superior aspect of the shoulder may cause acromioclavicular (AC) dislocation or separation. Severe dislocations can lead to chronic impairment, especially in the athlete and high-demand manual laborer. The dislocation is classified according to Rockwood. Types I and II are treated nonoperatively, while types IV, V and VI are generally treated operatively. Controversy exists regarding the optimal treatment of type III dislocations in the high-demand patient. Recent evidence suggests that these should be treated nonoperatively initially. Classic surgical techniques were associated with high complication rates, including recurrent dislocations and hardware breakage. In recent years, many new techniques have been introduced in order to improve the outcomes. Arthroscopic reconstruction or repair techniques have promising short-term results. This article aims to provide a current concepts review on the treatment of AC dislocations with emphasis on recent developments. PMID:29312844

  3. Acute Ankle Sprain in a Mouse Model: Changes in Knee-Joint Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard-Turner, Tricia; Wikstrom, Erik A; Guderian, Sophie; Turner, Michael J

    2017-06-02

      Ankle sprains remain the most common orthopaedic injury. Conducting long-term studies in humans is difficult and costly, so the long-term consequences of an ankle sprain are not entirely known.   To measure knee-joint space after a single surgically induced ankle sprain in mice.   Randomized controlled trial.   University research laboratory.   Thirty male mice (CBA/2J) were randomly placed into 1 of 3 surgical groups: the transected calcaneofibular ligament (CFL) group, the transected anterior talofibular ligament/CFL group, or a sham treatment group. The right ankle was operated on in all mice.   Three days after surgery, all of the mice were individually housed in cages containing a solid-surface running wheel, and daily running-wheel measurements were recorded. Before surgery and every 6 weeks after surgery, a diagnostic ultrasound was used to measure medial and lateral knee-joint space in both hind limbs.   Right medial (P = .003), right lateral (P = .002), left medial (P = .03), and left lateral (P = .002) knee-joint spaces decreased across the life span. The mice in the anterior talofibular ligament/CFL group had decreased right medial (P = .004) joint space compared with the sham and CFL groups starting at 24 weeks of age and continuing throughout the life span. No differences occurred in contralateral knee-joint degeneration among any of the groups.   Based on current data, mice that sustained a surgically induced severe ankle sprain developed greater joint degeneration in the ipsilateral knee. Knee degeneration could result from accommodation to the laxity of the ankle or biomechanical alterations secondary to ankle instability. A single surgically induced ankle sprain could significantly affect knee-joint function.

  4. MRI evaluation of osteonecrosis in knee joints after intravenous administration of corticosteroids in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Yong'an; Liu Hualiang; Dong Yanqing; Liu Ying; Li Kuncheng; Wang Zhongwei; Li Ping

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate MRI features of osteonecrosis in knee joints after intravenous administration of exogenous corticosteroids in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). Methods: MRI was done in 18 patients (medical staff from 4 hospitals) suffered from SARS and treated with intravenous use of exogenous corticosteroids in hip joints and knee joints to indicate the findings and characteristics of osteonecrosis as well as their relation with hormone amount. Results: Eleven patients showed lesions of osteonecrosis in knee joints with bilateral in 7 and unilateral in 4, and 3 patients were complicated with avascular necrosis in bilateral femoral heads. Among the 38 lesions in knee joints, 34 lesions were located in medial condylu, lateral condylus and shaft of femur, and 4 in medial condylus or lateral condylus of tibia. Large-middle lesions showed geographic focus of typically heterogeneous signal (low or intermediate signal intensity on T 1 WI and high or intermediate signal intensity T 2 WI) within the marrow that was surrounded by characteristic low signal intensity, serpentine border on T 1 , T 2 WI. This border showed a classic double-line sign on T 2 WI in 4 lesions. Small lesions showed low signal intensity on T 1 and low or high signal intensity on T 2 WI. Subchondral avascular necrosis in middle-upper femoral heads showed intermediate signal intensity on T 1 weighted images and high or complicated signal intensity on T 2 WI encircled with characteristic low signal intensity, serpentine border on T 1 and T 2 WI. This border showed a classic double-line sign on T 2 weighted images in avascular necrosis of bilateral femoral heads in 1 case. Conclusion: In these cases, osteonecrosis in knee joints was more than in femoral heads in patients with SARS after intravenous use of exogenous corticosteroids, mostly located in medial condylus, lateral condylus and shaft of femur as well as in medial condylus or lateral condylus of tibia. So, MRI should

  5. Systematics of glenohumoral and acromioclavicular arthritis; Systematik der glenohumeralen und akromioklavikulaeren Arthrose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifarth, A. [Klinikum Augsburg, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Augsburg (Germany); Roemer, F. [Klinikum Augsburg, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Augsburg (Germany); Universitaetsklinikum Erlangen, Radiologisches Institut, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-03-01

    A common risk factor for osteoarthritis (OA) of the glenohumeral joint is instability and is often observed as a sequel to dislocation. Altered biomechanics will ultimately result in joint degeneration including osteophyte development at the lower margin of the humerus, glenoidal cartilage loss and surface deformity. An OA of the glenohumeral joint is often coexistent with soft tissue derangement of the shoulder. In advanced stages defects of the rotator cuff and OA of the glenohumeral joint may accelerate disease progression. Degenerative changes of the acromioclavicular joint (AC joint) are commonly seen in older persons with only modest correlation with clinical symptoms. Symptomatic OA of the AC joint is often concomitantly observed with degenerative changes of the glenohumeral joint. Standard radiographs are the basis of a structural assessment of shoulder OA but lack correlation with clinical symptoms and are insensitive for the detection of early degenerative changes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides increased sensitivity for the detection of cartilage defects and reveals relevant soft tissue changes, such as lesions of the glenoid labrum and capsuloligamentous structures, which are seen in conjunction with instability. It is also the method of choice to detect clinically relevant bone marrow edema-like lesions or synovial changes that are associated with symptomatic OA. Standard radiographs are not applicable for detection of early degenerative changes. Once OA is suspected clinically, MRI is the method of choice for further structural assessment. The administration of an intravenous contrast agent is useful for assessing synovitis, which commonly correlates with clinical disease manifestations. For preoperative and surgical planning of joint replacement, MRI or CT should be used. (orig.) [German] Eine haeufige Ursache der Omarthrose ist die Mikro- und Makroinstabilitaet, oft infolge von Luxationen. Bei veraenderter Biomechanik kommt es im Verlauf

  6. Development of a Lubricant Therapy to Prevent Development of Osteoarthritis after Acute Injury of Synovial Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    submitted and accepted to the Tissue Engineering & Regenerative Medicine International Society, North America Conference (December 2016): Raleigh AR...bone, ligament , or meniscus) increases the likelihood of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA) [1]. PTOA may be due, in part, to a decrease in...Mechanisms of joint degradation may be elucidated in animal models of PTOA, such as with anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT). Following

  7. The acutely ACL injured knee assessed by MRI: changes in joint fluid, bone marrow lesions, and cartilage during the first year

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frobell, R B; Le Graverand, M-P; Buck, R

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate changes in the knee during the first year after acute rupture of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) of volumes of joint fluid (JF), bone marrow lesions (BMLs), and cartilage volume (VC), and cartilage thickness (ThCcAB) and cartilage surface area (AC). To identify fac...

  8. The effect of acute unilateral inflammation of the equine temporomandibular joint on the kinematics of mastication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, T T; Carmalt, J L; Treen, T T; Lanovaz, J L

    2016-07-01

    Diseases of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) are well reported in man and some domestic animals other than the horse. The pathophysiology of equine TMJ disease and the effects of disease on the kinematics of mastication are unknown. To determine whether transient unilateral inflammation of the equine TMJ results in alterations in the masticatory cycle. An experimental controlled study utilising 6 horses of various ages with normal dentition. Each horse was equipped with an optical motion tracking (kinematic) system. Horses were observed chewing grass hay over 3 min intervals. Regardless of the initial side of the power stroke in the masticatory cycle, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was injected in the left TMJ in each horse and the horses were reassessed after 6 h. Four horses developed effusion of the injected TMJs; 2 of these also began quidding. All horses injected on the original side of the power stroke switched sides while the 2 injected on the contralateral side did not. All horses developed reduced vertical pitch (vertical opening) of the mandible. Overall, rostrocaudal movement of the mandible did not change; however, the timing of this movement relative to the phase of the masticatory cycle did. Injection with LPS did not affect the amount of lateral movement of the mandible. Injection of LPS into the TMJ significantly altered the masticatory cycle compared with baseline values representing avoidance behaviour due to inflammation of the joint, despite which the horses continued to eat using the contralateral mandible. Lipopolysaccharide administration also led to quidding and a loss of feed efficiency (in some individuals). © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  9. [Open lateral clavicle resection in acromioclavicular osteoarthritis: favourable results after 1 year].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stroet, M.A.J. te; Schreurs, B.W.; Waal Malefijt, M.C. de

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the follow-up outcomes of open lateral clavicle resection 1 year postoperatively in patients with acromioclavicular osteoarthritis. The operation involves resection of a small part of the lateral clavicle. DESIGN: Prospective descriptive. METHOD: Data were collected from all

  10. Acromioclavicular Dislocation Associated with Coracoid Process Fracture: Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozkan Kose

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Acromioclavicular dislocation associated with coracoid process fracture is a rare injury. Herein we reported two further cases with such combination of injuries and reviewed all previously published cases in current literature. In this review, we discussed the demographic characteristics, mechanism of injury, diagnosis, and treatment options extensively.

  11. Bilateral weighted radiographs are required for accurate classification of acromioclavicular separation: an observational study of 59 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, E F; Forrest, N P; Forester, A

    2015-10-01

    Misinterpretation of the Rockwood classification system for acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) separations has resulted in a trend towards using unilateral radiographs for grading. Further, the use of weighted views to 'unmask' a grade III injury has fallen out of favour. Recent evidence suggests that many radiographic grade III injuries represent only a partial injury to the stabilising ligaments. This study aimed to determine (1) whether accurate classification is possible on unilateral radiographs and (2) the efficacy of weighted bilateral radiographs in unmasking higher-grade injuries. Complete bilateral non-weighted and weighted sets of radiographs for patients presenting with an acromioclavicular separation over a 10-year period were analysed retrospectively, and they were graded I-VI according to Rockwood's criteria. Comparison was made between grading based on (1) a single antero-posterior (AP) view of the injured side, (2) bilateral non-weighted views and (3) bilateral weighted views. Radiographic measurements for cases that changed grade after weighted views were statistically compared to see if this could have been predicted beforehand. Fifty-nine sets of radiographs on 59 patients (48 male, mean age of 33 years) were included. Compared with unilateral radiographs, non-weighted bilateral comparison films resulted in a grade change for 44 patients (74.5%). Twenty-eight of 56 patients initially graded as I, II or III were upgraded to grade V and two of three initial grade V patients were downgraded to grade III. The addition of a weighted view further upgraded 10 patients to grade V. No grade II injury was changed to grade III and no injury of any severity was downgraded by a weighted view. Grade III injuries upgraded on weighted views had a significantly greater baseline median percentage coracoclavicular distance increase than those that were not upgraded (80.7% vs. 55.4%, p=0.015). However, no cut-off point for this value could be identified to predict an

  12. Regional variation in acute care length of stay after orthopaedic surgery total joint replacement surgery and hip fracture surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, John D; Weng, Haoling H; Soohoo, Nelson F; Ettner, Susan L

    2013-01-01

    To examine change in regional variations in acute care length of stay (LOS) after orthopedic surgery following expiration of the New York (NY) State exemption to the Prospective Payment System and implementation of the Medicare Short Stay Transfer Policy. Time series analyses were conducted to evaluate change in LOS across regions after policy implementations. Small area analyses were conducted to examine residual variation in LOS. The dataset included A 100% sample of fee-for-service Medicare patients undergoing surgical repair for hip fracture or elective joint replacement surgery between 1996 and 2001. Data files from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services 1996-2001 Medicare Provider Analysis and Review file, 1999 Provider of Service file, and data from the 2000 United States Census were used for analysis. In 1996, LOS in NY after orthopedic procedures was much longer than the remainder of the country. After policy changes, LOS fell. However, significant residual variation in LOS persisted. This residual variation was likely partly explained by differences variation in regional managed care market penetration, patient management practices and unmeasured characteristics associated with the hospital location. NY hospitals responded to changes in reimbursement policy, reducing variation in LOS. However, even after 5 years of financial pressure to constrain costs, other factors still have a strong impact on delivery of patient care.

  13. Long-term outcome of acute prosthetic joint infections due to gram-negative bacilli treated with retention of prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaén, N; Martínez-Pastor, J C; Muñoz-Mahamud, E; García-Ramiro, S; Bosch, J; Mensa, J; Soriano, A

    2012-09-01

    To update the clinical information of the 47 patients with a prosthetic joint infection due to Gram-negative bacilli included in a previous study and to reassess the predictors of failure after a longer follow-up. Using the electronic files of our hospital, all the information regarding readmissions to the hospital, new surgical procedures and the reason for the new surgery (infection, aseptic loosening), and the last visit in the hospital were registered. The medical chart of the 35 patients that were considered in remission in the previous publication was reviewed. In 30 patients no clinical evidence of failure was detected and no additional surgery on the previously infected prosthesis was necessary and they were considered in long-term remission. In 5 cases a late complication was identified. One case had a reinfection due to coagulase-negative staphylococci after 22 months from the open debridement and required a 2-stage revision surgery. The other 4 cases developed an aseptic loosening and it was necessary to perform a 1-stage exchange. Receiving a fluoroquinolone when all the Gram-negatives involved in the infection were susceptible to fluoroquinolones was the only factor associated with remission in the univariate analysis (p=0.002). After a long-term follow-up, our results support the importance of using fluoroquinolones in acute PJI due to Gram-negative bacilli.

  14. Joint effects of febrile acute infection and an interferon-γ polymorphism on breast cancer risk.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Su

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is an inverse relationship between febrile infection and the risk of malignancies. Interferon gamma (IFN-γ plays an important role in fever induction and its expression increases with incubation at fever-range temperatures. Therefore, the genetic polymorphism of IFN-γ may modify the association of febrile infection with breast cancer risk. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Information on potential breast cancer risk factors, history of fever during the last 10 years, and blood specimens were collected from 839 incident breast cancer cases and 863 age-matched controls between October 2008 and June 2010 in Guangzhou, China. IFN-γ (rs2069705 was genotyped using a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry platform. Odds ratios (OR and 95% confidence intervals (CIs were calculated using multivariate logistic regression. We found that women who had experienced ≥1 fever per year had a decreased risk of breast cancer [ORs and 95% CI: 0.77 (0.61-0.99] compared to those with less than one fever a year. This association only occurred in women with CT/TT genotypes [0.54 (0.37-0.77] but not in those with the CC genotype [1.09 (0.77-1.55]. The association of IFN-γ rs2069705 with the risk of breast cancer was not significant among all participants, while the CT/TT genotypes were significantly related to an elevated risk of breast cancer [1.32 (1.03-1.70] among the women with <1 fever per year and to a reduced risk of breast cancer [0.63 (0.40-0.99] among women with ≥1 fever per year compared to the CC genotype. A marked interaction between fever frequencies and the IFN-γ genotypes was observed (P for multiplicative and additive interactions were 0.005 and 0.058, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate a possible link between febrile acute infection and a decreased risk of breast cancer, and this association was modified by IFN-γ rs2069705.

  15. X-ray diagnosis in acute and chronic sport injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinek, H; Egkher, E; Schratter, H

    1982-09-01

    Stress X-ray and arthrography are of importance in the diagnosis of joint injuries. Stress X-rays are of great value to testify instability of acromioclavicular joint, metacarpophalangeal joint of the thumb, but also the knee and the ankle joint. With arthrography it is possible to show up a rupture of the rotator cuff of the shoulder and also a lesion of the triangular disc of the wrist. Indication, technique and the interpretation of the stress X-rays and the arthrogramms are discussed.

  16. [Acute and overuse injuries of the shoulder in sports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyscher, R; Kraus, K; Finke, B; Scheibel, M

    2014-03-01

    During sports the shoulder complex is exposed to considerable load especially where throwing is important and various pathological changes can occur. In the last two decades the shoulder in athletes has become a special term in clinical sports medicine Selective literature review in PubMed and consideration of personal experience, research results as well as national and international recommendations In general acute lesions of the shoulder caused by sudden sport injuries, such as traumatic luxation, acromioclavicular (AC) joint disruption, traumatic tendon ruptures, labral lesions, cartilage defects and fractures have to be distinguished from chronic or long-standing pathologies due to recurrent microtrauma, such as overuse bursitis and tendinitis, as well as secondary forms of impingement along with rotator cuff tears and labral lesions. Besides common pathological changes that can be observed in almost all overhead-sports, there are also injuries that are more sport-specific due to the particular load profile in each sport. These injuries are especially common in racquet and throwing sports (e.g. golf, tennis, handball and volleyball) as well as in individual and artistic sports (e.g. swimming, gymnastics, dancing and rowing), contact and extreme sports (e.g. judo, mixed martial arts, bodybuilding, weightlifting, motocross and downhill mountain biking). Knowledge about sport-specific load profiles as well as about the variety of treatment options is crucial for successful treatment of these injuries.

  17. A Novel Surgical Technique for Fixation of Recurrent Acromioclavicular Dislocations: AC Dog Bone Technique in Combination with Autogenous Semitendinosus Tendon Graft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Holweg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Various surgical techniques have been described for the fixation of acromioclavicular (AC dislocations. However, recurrent dislocation is one of the main complications associated with the majority of these techniques. We report a case of postoperative AC joint redislocation. In order to overcome recurrent dislocation after revision surgery, a reconstruction of the conoid and trapezoid ligament with the use of a free tendon graft in combination with a FiberTape was provided within a novel surgical technique. After 12 months, the patient was very satisfied with the functional outcome. The patient achieved excellent results in the Constant (98 points, SPADI (0 points, and QuickDASH score (0 points. The described technique results in an anatomic reconstruction of the AC joint. The nonrigid nature of the intervention seems to restore the normal arthrokinematics by reconstructing the coracoclavicular ligaments with an autograft which is then protected by the AC Dog Bone artificial ligaments during the healing period. The arthroscopic approach to the AC joint with minimal exposure reduces the risks and complications of the intervention. This is the first case in literature that utilizes the artificial dog bone ligament securing the autograft in an anatomic AC reconstruction.

  18. Three-dimensional scapular dyskinesis in hook-plated acromioclavicular dislocation including hook motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eugene; Lee, Seunghee; Jeong, Hwa-Jae; Park, Jai Hyung; Park, Se-Jin; Lee, Jaewook; Kim, Woosub; Park, Hee Jin; Lee, So Yeon; Murase, Tsuyoshi; Sugamoto, Kazuomi; Ikemoto, Sumika

    2018-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the 3-dimensional scapular dyskinesis and the kinematics of a hook plate relative to the acromion after hook-plated acromioclavicular dislocation in vivo. Reported complications of acromioclavicular reduction using a hook plate include subacromial erosion and impingement. However, there are few reports of the 3-dimensional kinematics of the hook and scapula after the aforementioned surgical procedure. We studied 15 cases of acromioclavicular dislocation treated with a hook plate and 15 contralateral normal shoulders using computed tomography in the neutral and full forward flexion positions. Three-dimensional motion of the scapula relative to the thorax during arm elevation was analyzed using a computer simulation program. We also measured the distance from the tip of the hook plate to the greater tuberosity, as well as the angular motion of the plate tip in the subacromial space. Decreased posterior tilting (22° ± 10° vs 31° ± 8°) in the sagittal plane and increased external rotation (19° ± 9° vs 7° ± 5°) in the axial plane were evident in the affected shoulders. The mean values of translation of the hook plate and angular motion against the acromion were 4.0 ± 1.6 mm and 15° ± 8°, respectively. The minimum value of the distance from the hook plate to the humeral head tuberosity was 6.9 mm during arm elevation. Acromioclavicular reduction using a hook plate may cause scapular dyskinesis. Translational and angular motion of the hook plate against the acromion could lead to subacromial erosion. However, the hook does not seem to impinge directly on the humeral head. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterizing chronic and acute health risks of residues of veterinary drugs in food: latest methodological developments by the joint FAO/WHO expert committee on food additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boobis, Alan; Cerniglia, Carl; Chicoine, Alan; Fattori, Vittorio; Lipp, Markus; Reuss, Rainer; Verger, Philippe; Tritscher, Angelika

    2017-11-01

    The risk assessment of residues of veterinary drugs in food is a field that continues to evolve. The toxicological end-points to be considered are becoming more nuanced and in light of growing concern about the development of antimicrobial resistance, detailed analysis of the antimicrobial activity of the residues of veterinary drugs in food is increasingly incorporated in the assessment. In recent years, the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) has refined its approaches to provide a more comprehensive and fit-for-purpose risk assessment. This publication describes in detail the consideration of acute and chronic effects, the estimation of acute and chronic dietary exposure, current approaches for including microbiological endpoints in the risk assessment, and JECFA's considerations for the potential effects of food processing on residues from veterinary drugs. JECFA now applies these approaches in the development of health-based guidance values (i.e. safe exposure levels) for residues of veterinary drugs. JECFA, thus, comprehensively addresses acute and chronic risks by using corresponding estimates for acute and chronic exposure and suitable correction for the limited bioavailability of bound residues by the Gallo-Torres model. On a case-by-case basis, JECFA also considers degradation products that occur from normal food processing of food containing veterinary drug residues. These approaches will continue to be refined to ensure the most scientifically sound basis for the establishment of health-based guidance values for veterinary drug residues.

  20. Predicting Failure in Early Acute Prosthetic Joint Infection Treated With Debridement, Antibiotics, and Implant Retention: External Validation of the KLIC Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwik, Claudia A M; Jutte, Paul C; Tornero, Eduard; Ploegmakers, Joris J W; Knobben, Bas A S; de Vries, Astrid J; Zijlstra, Wierd P; Dijkstra, Baukje; Soriano, Alex; Wouthuyzen-Bakker, Marjan

    2018-03-27

    Debridement, antibiotics, and implant retention (DAIR) is a widely used treatment modality for early acute prosthetic joint infection (PJI). A preoperative risk score was previously designed for predicting DAIR failure, consisting of chronic renal failure (K), liver cirrhosis (L), index surgery (I), cemented prosthesis (C), and C-reactive protein >115 mg/L (KLIC). The aim of this study was to validate the KLIC score in an external cohort. We retrospectively evaluated patients with early acute PJI treated with DAIR between 2006 and 2016 in 3 Dutch hospitals. Early acute PJI was defined as infection-related death within 60 days after debridement. A total of 386 patients were included. Failure occurred in 148 patients (38.3%). Patients with KLIC scores of ≤2, 2.5-3.5, 4-5, 5.5-6.5, and ≥7 had failure rates of 27.9%, 37.1%, 49.3%, 54.5%, and 85.7%, respectively (P < .001). The receiver-operating characteristic curve showed an area under the curve of 0.64 (95% confidence interval 0.59-0.69). A KLIC score higher than 6 points showed a specificity of 97.9%. The KLIC score is a relatively good preoperative risk score for DAIR failure in patients with early acute PJI and appears to be most useful in clinical practice for patients with low or high KLIC scores. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Lumbar facet joint septic arthritis presenting atypically as acute abdomen – A case report and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysha Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: The atypical presentation of facet joint septic arthritis is one of the reasons why early diagnosis is elusive. Definitive diagnoses with MRI and bacterial culture as well as prolonged antibiotic therapy are recommended in this condition.

  2. Effect of high-voltage electrical stimulation on the albumin and histamine serum concentrations, edema, and pain in acute joint inflammation of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria C. Sandoval

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The mechanism by which high-voltage electrical stimulation (HVPC acts on edema reduction is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect of HVPC with negative polarity (- applied to the ankle of rats with acute joint inflammation. METHOD: Sixty-four rats were divided into four groups (n=16: inflamed+HVPC(-, 0.03 mL application of ι-carrageenan (3% to the tibiotarsal joint plus HVPC(-; inflamed+HVPC placebo, carrageenan application and HVPC placebo; normal+HVPC(-, HVPC application(-; and normal control, no intervention. The HVPC(- 100 Hz at a submotor level was applied daily for 45 min on three consecutive days. The variables were pain, hind-foot volume, and serum histamine and albumin assessed before and during the 48 hours following inflammation. The variables were compared using the t test, one-way ANOVA, nested ANOVA for repeated measures, and the post hoc Bonferroni test. Analysis of covariance was applied to adjust the effects of HVPC(- by measurements of pain, inflammation, albumin, and histamine at 24 h, and the final weight was compared to the other groups. The significance level was set at p0.05. Albumin was reduced in the groups that received the intervention, but there was no differences between them. There was only a 24 hour increase in histamine with the normal+HVPC(- (p=0.0001 and inflamed+HVPC placebo groups (p=0.01 compared to the normal control group. CONCLUSIONS: The results of the present study suggest that HVPC(- with the parameters employed did not reduce pain or edema and did not change serum albumin or histamine levels,, which indicates the inability of this resource to have a positive effect when treating treat acute joint inflammation.

  3. Isolated septic facet joint arthritis as a rare cause of acute and chronic low back pain – a case report and literature review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klekot, Dominika; Zimny, Anna; Czapiga, Bogdan; Sąsiadek, Marek

    2012-01-01

    The most common cause of low back pain is degenerative disease of the intervertebral disc and other structures of the lumbar spine. However, in some cases other less frequent causes of such pain can be seen, for example septic facet joint arthritis. Until now, only 40 cases of such inflammatory changes within the spine have been reported in the literature. The disease is probably underestimated due to improper diagnostic pathway. The authors describe a case of a 53-year-old woman who was repeatedly hospitalized during a five-month period because of an acute, severe low back pain, with sphincter dysfunction, partially resembling sciatic symptoms. Physical examinations revealed also focal tenderness in the area of the lumbar spine. Inflammatory markers (ESR – erythrocyte sedimentation rate, CRP – C-reactive protein) were elevated. Conservative analgetic treatment brought only partial and temporary relief of the pain and symptoms. The final accurate diagnosis of isolated septic facet joint arthritis at the level of L5/S1 was established after several months from the onset of the first symptoms, after performing various imaging examinations, including bone scintigraphy as well as CT and MRI of the lumbosacral spine. The patient fully recovered after antibiotic therapy and surgery, which was proven in several follow-up examinations showing no relevant pathology of the lumbar spine. The authors broadly describe the etiology and clinical symptoms of the septic facet joint arthritis as well as the significant role of imaging methods, especially MRI, in diagnostic process. The authors also discuss currently available treatment options, both conservative and surgical. The diagnostic procedure of septic facet joint arthritis requires several steps to be taken. Establishing a correct diagnosis may be difficult, that is why it is important to remember about rare causes of low back pain and to perform detailed physical examination, laboratory tests and choose appropriate

  4. Five-year follow-up of knee joint cartilage thickness changes after acute anterior cruciate ligament rupture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckstein, F; Wirth, W; Lohmander, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture involves increased risk of osteoarthritis. We explored cartilage thickness changes over five years after ACL rupture. Methods: 121 young active adults (26% women, age 18-35 years) with acute traumatic ACL rupture were studied (the KANON-trial). ...

  5. Acute peripheral joint injury: cost and effectiveness of low-field-strength MR imaging--results of randomized controlled trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikken, J.J.; Oei, E.H.; Ginai, A.Z.; Krestin, G.P.; Verhaar, J.A.N.; Vugt, A.B. van; Hunink, M.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess prospectively if a short imaging examination performed with low-field-strength dedicated magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in addition to radiography is effective and cost saving compared with the current diagnostic imaging strategy (radiography alone) in patients with recent acute

  6. Safety screw fixation technique in a case of coracoid base fracture with acromioclavicular dislocation and coracoid base cross-sectional size data from a computed axial tomography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Yoshiteru; Hirano, Tetsuya; Miyatake, Katsutoshi; Fujii, Koji; Takeda, Yoshitsugu

    2014-07-01

    Coracoid base fracture accompanied by acromioclavicular joint dislocation with intact coracoclavicular ligaments is a rare injury. Generally, an open reduction with screw fixation is the first treatment choice, as it protects the important structures around the coracoid process. This report presents a new technique of screw fixation for coracoid base fracture and provides anatomic information on cross-sectional size of the coracoid base obtained by computed tomography (CT). An axial image of the coracoid base was visualized over the neck of the scapula, and a guidewire was inserted into this circle under fluoroscopic guidance. The wire was inserted easily into the neck of scapula across the coracoid base fracture with imaging in only 1 plane. In addition, 25 measurements of the coracoid base were made in 25 subjects on axial CT images. Average length of the long and short axes at the thinnest part of the coracoid base was 13.9 ± 2.0 mm (range 10.6-17.0) and 10.5 ± 2.2 mm (6.6-15.1), respectively. This new screw fixation technique and measurement data on the coracoid base may be beneficial for safety screw fixation of coracoid base fracture.

  7. The effects of acute joint exposure to radiation and certain pesticides on the peripheric blood in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, V.V.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of joint external γ-radiation and some pesticides on the peripheric blood is studied. Lindane, trichlorfon and tetramethylthiuram disulfide are used as toxic chemicals. It is shown that the combined effect has caused, like radiation, stable leukopenia, but less expressed than the effect of gamma radiation. It is especially obvious in the case of combining ionizing radiation and TMTD when the number of leukocytes averaged by 25% more than in the case of injury by radiation alone. Lymphocytes are most sensitive blood cell elements earily responsing to radiation and chemical organism injuries, both qualitatively and quantitatively. The results of analyzing the dynamics of the most qualitative and quantitative paramaters of leukocytes permit to state the summation of mutual effects of factors of radiation and chemical nature

  8. A Study of Acute and Chronic Tissue Changes in Surgical and Traumatically-Induced Experimental Models of Knee Joint Injury Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Micro-Computed Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischenich, Kristine M.; Pauly, Hannah M.; Button, Keith D.; Fajardo, Ryan S.; DeCamp, Charles E.; Haut, Roger C.; Haut Donahue, Tammy L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to monitor the progression of joint damage in two animal models of knee joint trauma using two non-invasive, clinically available imaging modalities. Methods A 3-T clinical magnet and micro-computed tomography (mCT) was used to document changes immediately following injury (acute) and post-injury (chronic) at time points of 4, 8, or 12 weeks. Joint damage was recorded at dissection and compared to the chronic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) record. Fifteen Flemish Giant rabbits were subjected to a single tibiofemoral compressive impact (ACLF), and 18 underwent a combination of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) and meniscal transection (mACLT). Results All ACLF animals experienced ACL rupture, and 13 also experienced acute meniscal damage. All ACLF and mACLT animals showed meniscal and articular cartilage damages at dissection. Meniscal damage was documented as early as 4 weeks and worsened in 87% of the ACLF animals and 71% of the mACLT animals. Acute cartilage damage also developed further and increased in occurrence with time in both models. A progressive decrease in bone quantity and quality was documented in both models. The MRI data closely aligned with dissection notes suggesting this clinical tool may be a non-invasive method for documenting joint damage in lapine models of knee joint trauma. Conclusions The study investigates the acute to chronic progression of meniscal and cartilage damage at various time points, and chronic changes to the underlying bone in two models of posttraumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA), and highlights the dependency of the model on the location, type, and progression of damage over time. PMID:27756698

  9. An EMG-Controlled SMA Device for the Rehabilitation of the Ankle Joint in Post-Acute Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittaccio, S.; Viscuso, S.

    2011-07-01

    The capacity of flexing one's ankle is an indispensible segment of gait re-learning, as imbalance, wrong compensatory use of other joints and risk of falling may depend on the so-called drop-foot. The rehabilitation of ankle dorsiflexion may be achieved through active exercising of the relevant musculature (especially tibialis anterior, TA). This can be troublesome for patients affected by weakness and flaccid paresis. Thus, as needs evolve during patient's improvements, a therapeutic device should be able to guide and sustain gradual recovery by providing commensurate aid. This includes exploiting even initial attempts at voluntary motion and turns those into effective workout. An active orthosis powered by two rotary actuators containing NiTi wire was designed to obtain ankle dorsiflexion. A computer routine that analyzes the electromyographic (sEMG) signal from TA muscle is used to control the orthosis and trigger its activation. The software also provides instructions and feed-back for the patient. Tests on the orthosis proved that it can produce strokes up to 36° against resisting torques exceeding 180 Ncm. Three healthy subjects were able to control the orthosis by modulating their TA sEMG activity. The movement produced in the preliminary tests is interesting for lower limb rehabilitation, and will be further improved by optimizing body-orthosis interface. It is hoped that this device will enhance early rehabilitation and recovery of ankle mobility in stroke patients.

  10. Short- versus long-duration levofloxacin plus rifampicin for acute staphylococcal prosthetic joint infection managed with implant retention: a randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lora-Tamayo, Jaime; Euba, Gorane; Cobo, Javier; Horcajada, Juan Pablo; Soriano, Alex; Sandoval, Enrique; Pigrau, Carles; Benito, Natividad; Falgueras, Luis; Palomino, Julián; Del Toro, María Dolores; Jover-Sáenz, Alfredo; Iribarren, José Antonio; Sánchez-Somolinos, Mar; Ramos, Antonio; Fernández-Sampedro, Marta; Riera, Melchor; Baraia-Etxaburu, Josu Mirena; Ariza, Javier

    2016-09-01

    Levofloxacin plus rifampicin (L+R) is the treatment of choice for acute staphylococcal prosthetic joint infection (PJI) managed with debridement and implant retention (DAIR). Long courses have been empirically recommended, but some studies have suggested that shorter treatments could be as effective. Our aim was to prove that a short treatment schedule was non-inferior to the standard long schedule. An open-label, multicentre, randomised clinical trial (RCT) was performed. Patients with an early post-surgical or haematogenous staphylococcal PJI, managed with DAIR and initiated on L+R were randomised to receive 8 weeks of treatment (short schedule) versus a long schedule (3 months or 6 months for hip or knee prostheses, respectively). The primary endpoint was cure rate. From 175 eligible patients, 63 were included (52% women; median age, 72 years): 33 patients (52%) received the long schedule and 30 (48%) received the short schedule. There were no differences between the two groups except for a higher rate of polymicrobial infection in the long-schedule group (27% vs. 7%; P = 0.031). Median follow-up was 540 days. In the intention-to-treat analysis, cure rates were 58% and 73% in patients receiving the long and short schedules, respectively (difference -15.7%, 95% CI -39.2% to 7.8%). Forty-four patients (70%) were evaluable per-protocol: cure rates were 95.0% and 91.7% for the long and short schedules, respectively (difference 3.3%, 95% CI -11.7% to 18.3%). This is the first RCT suggesting that 8 weeks of L+R could be non-inferior to longer standard treatments for acute staphylococcal PJI managed with DAIR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  11. First experience with single-source dual-energy computed tomography in six patients with acute arthralgia: a feasibility experiment using joint aspiration as a reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diekhoff, Torsten; Kiefer, Tobias; Hamm, Bernd; Hermann, Kay-Geert A. [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Ziegeler, Katharina; Feist, Eugen [Charite - Universitaetsmedizin Berlin Campus Mitte, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Freie Universitaet Berlin, Department of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Berlin (Germany); Mews, Juergen [Toshiba Medical Systems Europe, BV, Zoetermeer (Netherlands)

    2015-11-15

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) is an emerging imaging technique for examining patients with suspected gout. Single-source dual-energy CT (S-DECT) is a new way of obtaining DECT information on conventional CT scanners rather than using special dual-source CT systems. We tested the feasibility of S-DECT (320-row CT; Aquilion ONE, Toshiba Medical Systems, Otawara, Japan) in 6 patients (5 men, 1 woman; mean age 61.3, range 48 to 69 years) with acute arthralgia and suspected gout, and compared the S-DECT findings with the results of joint aspiration. Three patients had a diagnosis of gouty arthritis with negatively birefringent crystals in synovial fluid, in addition to gouty tophi in S-DECT. Three patients had no detectable crystals by polarization microscopy and no tophi on DECT. Their final diagnoses were rheumatoid arthritis, activated osteoarthritis, and septic arthritis in one case each. This initial experience suggests that S-DECT might be a valuable alternative to dual-source CT. Hence, more patients may benefit from its additional diagnostic abilities in the future. (orig.)

  12. First experience with single-source dual-energy computed tomography in six patients with acute arthralgia: a feasibility experiment using joint aspiration as a reference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diekhoff, Torsten; Kiefer, Tobias; Hamm, Bernd; Hermann, Kay-Geert A.; Ziegeler, Katharina; Feist, Eugen; Mews, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) is an emerging imaging technique for examining patients with suspected gout. Single-source dual-energy CT (S-DECT) is a new way of obtaining DECT information on conventional CT scanners rather than using special dual-source CT systems. We tested the feasibility of S-DECT (320-row CT; Aquilion ONE, Toshiba Medical Systems, Otawara, Japan) in 6 patients (5 men, 1 woman; mean age 61.3, range 48 to 69 years) with acute arthralgia and suspected gout, and compared the S-DECT findings with the results of joint aspiration. Three patients had a diagnosis of gouty arthritis with negatively birefringent crystals in synovial fluid, in addition to gouty tophi in S-DECT. Three patients had no detectable crystals by polarization microscopy and no tophi on DECT. Their final diagnoses were rheumatoid arthritis, activated osteoarthritis, and septic arthritis in one case each. This initial experience suggests that S-DECT might be a valuable alternative to dual-source CT. Hence, more patients may benefit from its additional diagnostic abilities in the future. (orig.)

  13. Air acupuncture therapy combined with manipulation on 90 cases of acute sprain and bruising of ankle joint%气针加手法治疗急性踝关节扭挫伤90例

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永红; 李斌

    2003-01-01

    @@ BACKGROUND: Air acupuncture therapy is to make use of time and space stimuli of air in acupoint and promote blood circulation to remove blood stasis, relieve swelling and pain through interstitial osmosis and absorption. Manipulation to acute sprain and bruising of ankle joint can achieve anatomic reduction as soon as possible, clear incarceration of synovium, promote circulation of qi and relieve pain and increase blood circulation of affected tissue.

  14. Fratura extra-articular da extremidade medial da clavícula associada à luxação acromioclavicular tipo IV: relato de caso

    OpenAIRE

    Correa, Mário Chaves; Gonçalves, Lucas Braga Jacques; Vilela, Jose Carlos Souza; Leonel, Igor Lima; Costa, Lincoln Paiva; Andrade, Ronaldo Percopi de

    2011-01-01

    Ocorrendo isoladamente, as fraturas da clavícula e as luxações acromioclaviculares são lesões muito comuns. A combinação de uma luxação acromioclavicular e de uma fratura do terço lateral da clavícula não é rara. Entretanto, existem muito poucos casos descritos de luxações acromioclaviculares associadas a fraturas do terço médio da clavícula; aquelas associadas a fraturas do terço medial são ainda mais raras. Nós reportamos o caso de um indivíduo adulto do sexo masculino que sofreu uma luxaçã...

  15. Outcome of Acute Prosthetic Joint Infections Due to Gram-Negative Bacilli Treated with Open Debridement and Retention of the Prosthesis▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Pastor, Juan C.; Muñoz-Mahamud, Ernesto; Vilchez, Félix; García-Ramiro, Sebastián; Bori, Guillem; Sierra, Josep; Martínez, José A.; Font, Lluis; Mensa, Josep; Soriano, Alex

    2009-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the outcome of acute prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) due to gram-negative bacilli (GNB) treated without implant removal. Patients with an acute PJI due to GNB diagnosed from 2000 to 2007 were prospectively registered. Demographics, comorbidity, type of implant, microbiology data, surgical treatment, antimicrobial therapy, and outcome were recorded. Classification and regression tree analysis, the Kaplan-Meier survival method, and the Cox regression model were applied. Forty-seven patients were included. The mean age was 70.7 years, and there were 15 hip prostheses and 32 knee prostheses. The median number of days from the time of arthroplasty was 20. The most frequent pathogens were members of the Enterobacteriaceae family in 41 cases and Pseudomonas spp. in 20 cases. Among the Enterobacteriaceae, 14 were resistant to ciprofloxacin, while all Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates were susceptible to ciprofloxacin. The median durations of intravenous and oral antibiotic treatment were 14 and 64 days, respectively. A total of 35 (74.5%) patients were in remission after a median follow-up of 463 days (interquartile range, 344 to 704) days. By use of the Kaplan-Meier survival curve, a C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration of ≤15 mg/dl (P = 0.03) and receipt of a fluoroquinolone, when all GNB isolated were susceptible (P = 0.0009), were associated with a better outcome. By use of a Cox regression model, a CRP concentration of ≤15 mg/dl (odds ratio [OR], 3.57; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05 to 12.5; P = 0.043) and receipt of a fluoroquinolone (OR, 9.09; 95% CI, 1.96 to 50; P = 0.005) were independently associated with better outcomes. Open debridement without removal of the implant had a success rate of 74.5%, and the factors associated with good prognosis were a CRP concentration at the time of diagnosis ≤15 mg/dl and treatment with a fluoroquinolone. PMID:19687237

  16. Lesión de la articulación acromio-clavicular en jugadores de rugby

    OpenAIRE

    Olaizola, Joaquín

    2014-01-01

    El rugby es un deporte de contacto que se realiza al aire libre en un campo de juego con una pelota. El objetivo del presente trabajo fue conocer la incidencia de la lesión en la articulación Acromio-Clavicular. Para ello deberemos conocer cuáles son los músculos de la articulación del hombro que participan en el gesto deportivo. Con los resultados obtenidos lograremos que estos deportistas sepan qué músculos deben fortalecer y mantener a través de actividades complementarias evitando futuras...

  17. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare cellulitis occurring with septic arthritis after joint injection: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murdoch David M

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellulitis caused by Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare has rarely been described. Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare is a rare cause of septic arthritis after intra-articular injection, though the causative role of injection is difficult to ascertain in such cases. Case presentation A 57-year-old with rheumatoid arthritis treated with prednisone and azathioprine developed bilateral painful degenerative shoulder arthritis. After corticosteroid injections into both acromioclavicular joints, he developed bilateral cellulitis centered over the injection sites. Skin biopsy showed non-caseating granulomas, and culture grew Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare. Joint aspiration also revealed Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare infection. Conclusion Although rare, skin and joint infections caused by Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare should be considered in any immunocompromised host, particularly after intra-articular injection. Stains for acid-fast bacilli may be negative in pathologic samples even in the presence of infection; cultures of tissue specimens should always be obtained.

  18. Fratura extra-articular da extremidade medial da clavícula associada à luxação acromioclavicular tipo IV: relato de caso Extra-articular fracture of the medial end of the clavicle associated with type IV acromioclavicular dislocation: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Mário Chaves Correa; Lucas Braga Jacques Gonçalves; Jose Carlos Souza Vilela; Igor Lima Leonel; Lincoln Paiva Costa; Ronaldo Percopi de Andrade

    2011-01-01

    Ocorrendo isoladamente, as fraturas da clavícula e as luxações acromioclaviculares são lesões muito comuns. A combinação de uma luxação acromioclavicular e de uma fratura do terço lateral da clavícula não é rara. Entretanto, existem muito poucos casos descritos de luxações acromioclaviculares associadas a fraturas do terço médio da clavícula; aquelas associadas a fraturas do terço medial são ainda mais raras. Nós reportamos o caso de um indivíduo adulto do sexo masculino que sofreu uma luxaçã...

  19. Modified closed-loop double-endobutton technique for repair of rockwood type III acromioclavicular dislocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhou, Xin; Qi, Ji; Zeng, Yan; Zhang, Shaoqun; Liu, Gang; Ping, Ruiyue; Li, Yikai; Fu, Shijie

    2018-01-01

    Acromioclavicular dislocation (ACD) is a common injury. According to the Rockwood classification, ACD is classified into six types (type I–VI); however, for type III injuries, it remains controversial whether or not operative treatment should be applied. Numerous studies have advocated early surgical treatment to ensure early rehabilitation activities. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate a modified closed-loop double-endobutton technique (MCDT), that may be used to repair Rockwood type III ACD. In the current study, 61 patients with Rockwood type III ACD were enrolled during a period of 5 years at the Affiliated Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital of Southwest Medical University. Patients were divided into three groups according to the surgical method used, the MCDT group (n=20), the common closed-loop double-endobutton technique (CCDT) group (n=21), and the clavicular hook plate fixation (CHPF) group (n=20). Preoperative and intraoperative information were recorded. Furthermore, the functional scores of injured shoulder were evaluated prior to surgery and following surgery with a 1-year follow-up. Among the three groups, postoperative functional scores were significantly more improved compared with those prior to surgery (P0.05). Postoperative functional scores in the MCDT and CCDT groups were significantly more improved compared those in the CHPF group (P<0.05). In addition, the duration of surgery in the MCDT group was significantly shorter compared with that in the CCDT group (P<0.05). Furthermore, compared with the CHPF group, the incision length was significantly shorter with reduced hemorrhage in the MCDT group (P<0.05). In conclusion, the results of the current study suggest that MCDT is more simple, convenient and efficient compared with CCDT, and is worth popularizing. PMID:29399102

  20. Joint ventures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karsten Engsig

    Afhandlingen analysere de konkurrenceretlige og selskabsretlige regler som er bestemmende for hvordan et joint venture samarbejde er struktureret......Afhandlingen analysere de konkurrenceretlige og selskabsretlige regler som er bestemmende for hvordan et joint venture samarbejde er struktureret...

  1. Dorsoradial capsulodesis for trapeziometacarpal joint instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayan, Ghazi; Do, Viet

    2013-02-01

    We describe an alternative method for treating chronic trapeziometacarpal (TM) joint instability after acute injury or chronic repetitive use of the thumb by performing a dorsoradial capsulodesis procedure. The procedure is done by imbricating the redundant TM joint dorsoradial ligament and capsule after reducing the joint by pronating the thumb. The dorsoradial capsulodesis is a reasonable reconstructive option for chronic TM joint instability and subluxation. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Coracoclavicular joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kun Sang; Park, Chan Il; Ahn, Jae Doo; Lim, Chong Won [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1970-10-15

    The coracoclvicular joint, a rear abnormality which may be the cause of pain in the shoulder and limitation of motion of the shoulder joint, is discussed. A case of coracoclvicular joint with shoulder pain was observed in 65 yrs old Korean male.

  3. Transposición del ligamento coracoacromial en el tratamiento quirúrgico de la luxación acromioclavicular aguda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osvaldo Pereda Cardoso

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: la luxación de la articulación acromioclavicular es frecuente en la práctica ortopédica diaria, estimándose su incidencia en aproximadamente el 10 % de todas las luxaciones alrededor del hombro. Existen numerosas técnicas quirúrgicas descritas para su tratamiento con resultados variables. Objetivo: describir la evolución clínica del dolor, la movilidad del hombro y la reincorporación de los pacientes a sus actividades habituales, con el uso de la técnica de transposición del ligamento acromioclavicular. Métodos: se realizó un estudio de descriptivo de 22 pacientes con diagnóstico de luxación acromioclavicular aguda tratados quirúrgicamente mediante la técnica mencionada; se tuvo en cuenta la evolución clínica del dolor, la movilidad del hombro y la reincorporación de los pacientes a sus actividades después de la cirugía, y para ello se empleó el test funcional de Imatani. Resultados: la transposición del ligamento coracoacromial resultó ser una técnica útil y relativamente sencilla para el tratamiento quirúrgico de la luxación acromioclavicular aguda, con muy buenos resultados inmediatos, se logró considerable disminución o alivio total del dolor y recuperación completa o casi completa del rango de movilidad de la articulación del hombro, que le permite al paciente una vez rehabilitado, reincorporarse a sus actividades habituales. Conclusiones: la transposición del ligamento coracoacromial resultó útil en el tratamiento quirúrgico de la luxación acromioclavicular aguda, en cuanto al alivio del dolor, la movilidad y reincorporación a las actividades habituales.

  4. The temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, W.

    1984-01-01

    Whilst the temporomandibular joint is in many ways unique, it is subject to all the diseases and disorders found in joints in other parts of the human skeleton. By far the most common disorder is injury, followed by arthropathy, acute and chronic dislocations, ankylosis, and in rare instances, neoplasms. The diagnosis and management of the temporomandibular joint are the primary responsibility of the oral surgeon. Nevertheless, this anatomical region is an area in which the cooperation of medical and dental disciplines may be required for the satisfactory conclusion of treatment. The more so when the disease process involves either associated psychosomatic illness or malignancy. The mainstay of the diagnosis is a careful radiological examination of the joint. There exists a delicate relationship between the dentition, the muscles of mastication, and the temporomandibular articulation, which is controlled by arthrokinetic reflex activity of the branches of the 5th cranial nerve. Imbalance between one or more of the components of this integrated system frequently leads to disturbances in function. Pain-dysfunction disorders constitute the larger part of temporomandibular joint disturbances generally encountered

  5. Temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westesson, P.L.; Hatala, M.; Tallents, R.H.; Katzberg, R.W.; Musgrave, M.; Levitt, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper determines the frequency of MR signs of abnormal temporomandibular joints (TMJs) in asymptomatic volunteers. Forty-two volunteers with 84 clinically normal TMJs were imaged in the sagittal and coronal planes with surface coil MR imaging. Sagittal closed and open and coronal closed views were obtained bilaterally in all volunteers. The images were classified as normal (superior disk position) or abnormal (disk displacement of degenerative joint disease). Eighteen joints in 11 volunteers were abnormal; 12 had disk displacement with reduction and six had disk displacement without reduction, with associated degenerative joint disease in three of the six. Asymptomatic internal derangement and degenerative joint disease occur in about one-fourth of asymptomatic volunteers

  6. Joint diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissman, S.D.

    1989-01-01

    The authors discuss how x-ray examination is essential in the diagnosis and evaluation of the arthritides. Most arthritides are first suspected by the clinician, and x-ray evaluation of these entities along with laboratory testing is important for confirmation of the clinical diagnosis and in staging of the disease process. Several arthritides are often diagnosed first by the podiatrist on x-ray evaluation, including pseudogout, ankylosing spondylitis, early rheumatoid arthritis, degenerative joint disease, and tuberculosis of bone. The joint responds to insult in only a limited number of ways that become apparent on x-ray. The soft tissues surrounding the joint, the articulating bones, and alignment of the joint space may all be involved by the arthritic process. On roentgenographic examination, the soft tissues must be examined for edema, masses, calcifications, and atrophy. The articulating bones must be examined for demineralization, erosions, osteophytes, periosteal reaction, cysts and sclerosis

  7. Joint pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or conditions. It may be linked to arthritis , bursitis , and muscle pain . No matter what causes it, ... Autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and lupus Bursitis Chondromalacia patellae Crystals in the joint: Gout (especially ...

  8. Joint Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for the latest publication of The Joint Commission Journal on Quality and Patient Safety (JQPS). . How We Work Process improvement program breeds quality culture, empowers staff An article in Quality Progress, June ...

  9. Luxação acromioclavicular: tratamento e reabilitação. Perspectivas e tendências atuais do ortopedista brasileiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo Gonçalves Arliani

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Resumo Objetivo: Avaliar as condutas e os procedimentos feitos pelos cirurgiões ortopédicos do Brasil no tratamento e na reabilitação das luxacões acromioclaviculares do ombro. Métodos: Foi aplicado um questionário de oito questões fechadas que abordavam tópicos relacionados ao tratamento e à reabilitação das luxacões acromioclaviculares aos cirurgiões ortopédicos brasileiros nos três dias do 45° Congresso Brasileiro de Ortopedia e Traumato logia de 2013. ResuItados: Preencheram completamente o questionário e fizeram parte da amostra ana lisada 122 cirurgiões. A maior parte era proveniente da Região Sudeste. Na amostra, 67% dos participantes optariam pelo tratamento cirúrgico em pacientes com luxação acro mioclavicular grau 3. Em relacão à técnica preferida para tratamento cirúrgico das luxacões acromioclaviculares agudas, a maioria dos cirurgiões usa amarrilho subcoracoide com fixacão acromioclavicular e transferência do ligamento coracoacromial (25,4%. Quando perguntados sobre complicates encontradas após a cirurgia, 43,4% e 32,8% dos partici pantes, respectivamente, responderam que deformidade residual na articulação operada e dor foram as complicates mais vistas no período pós-operatório. Conclusoes: Apesar de não haver consenso no tratamento e na reabilitação das luxacões acro mioclaviculares, há evolucão em alguns tópicos analisados no questionário aplicado para os ortopedistas nacionais. No entanto, mais estudos prospectivos controlados são necessários para avaliar o benefício clínico e científico dessas tendências.

  10. TU-G-BRA-08: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY): Hybrid PET-MRI Imaging of Acute Radiation Induced Cardiac Toxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sherif, O; Xhaferllari, I; Gaede, S; Sykes, J; Butler, J; Wisenberg, G; Prato, F

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the presence of low-dose radiation induced cardiac toxicity in a canine model using hybrid positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Research ethics board approval was obtained for a longitudinal imaging study of 5 canines after cardiac irradiation. Animals were imaged at baseline, 1 week post cardiac irradiation, and 1 month post cardiac irradiation using a hybrid PET- MRI system (Biograph mMR, Siemens Healthcare). The imaging protocol was designed to assess acute changes in myocardial perfusion and inflammation. Myocardial perfusion imaging was performed using N13-ammonia tracer followed by a dynamic PET acquisition scan. A compartmental tracer kinetic model was used for absolute perfusion quantification. Myocardial inflammation imaging was performed using F18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) tracer. The standard uptake value (SUV) over a region encompassing the whole heart was used to compare FDG scans. All animals received a simulation CT scan (GE Medical Systems) for radiation treatment planning. Radiation treatment plans were created using the Pinncale3 treatment planning system (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems) and designed to resemble the typical cardiac exposure during left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy. Cardiac irradiations were performed in a single fraction using a TrueBeam linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems). Results: The delivered dose (mean ± standard deviation) to heart was 1.8±0.2 Gy. Reductions in myocardial stress perfusion relative to baseline were observed in 2 of the 5 animals 1 month post radiation. A global inflammatory response 1 month post radiation was observed in 4 of the 5 animals. The calculated SUV at 1 month post radiation was significantly higher (p=0.05) than the baseline SUV. Conclusion: Low doses of cardiac irradiation (< 2 Gy) may lead to myocardial perfusion defects and a global inflammatory response that can be detectable as early as 1 month post irradiation

  11. TU-G-BRA-08: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY): Hybrid PET-MRI Imaging of Acute Radiation Induced Cardiac Toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sherif, O; Xhaferllari, I; Gaede, S [Western Univeristy, London, ON (United Kingdom); London Regional Cancer Program, London, ON (United Kingdom); Sykes, J; Butler, J [Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON (United Kingdom); Wisenberg, G; Prato, F [Western Univeristy, London, ON (United Kingdom); Lawson Health Research Institute, London, ON (United Kingdom)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To identify the presence of low-dose radiation induced cardiac toxicity in a canine model using hybrid positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods: Research ethics board approval was obtained for a longitudinal imaging study of 5 canines after cardiac irradiation. Animals were imaged at baseline, 1 week post cardiac irradiation, and 1 month post cardiac irradiation using a hybrid PET- MRI system (Biograph mMR, Siemens Healthcare). The imaging protocol was designed to assess acute changes in myocardial perfusion and inflammation. Myocardial perfusion imaging was performed using N13-ammonia tracer followed by a dynamic PET acquisition scan. A compartmental tracer kinetic model was used for absolute perfusion quantification. Myocardial inflammation imaging was performed using F18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) tracer. The standard uptake value (SUV) over a region encompassing the whole heart was used to compare FDG scans. All animals received a simulation CT scan (GE Medical Systems) for radiation treatment planning. Radiation treatment plans were created using the Pinncale3 treatment planning system (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems) and designed to resemble the typical cardiac exposure during left-sided breast cancer radiotherapy. Cardiac irradiations were performed in a single fraction using a TrueBeam linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems). Results: The delivered dose (mean ± standard deviation) to heart was 1.8±0.2 Gy. Reductions in myocardial stress perfusion relative to baseline were observed in 2 of the 5 animals 1 month post radiation. A global inflammatory response 1 month post radiation was observed in 4 of the 5 animals. The calculated SUV at 1 month post radiation was significantly higher (p=0.05) than the baseline SUV. Conclusion: Low doses of cardiac irradiation (< 2 Gy) may lead to myocardial perfusion defects and a global inflammatory response that can be detectable as early as 1 month post irradiation

  12. Joint Intentionality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koreň Ladislav

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available According to the shared intentionality hypothesis proposed by Michael Tomasello, two cognitive upgrades – joint and collective intentionality, respectively – make human thinking unique. Joint intentionality, in particular, is a mindset supposed to account for our early, species-specific capacity to participate in collaborative activities involving two (or a few agents. In order to elucidate such activities and their proximate cognitive-motivational mechanism, Tomasello draws on philosophical accounts of shared intentionality. I argue that his deference to such cognitively demanding accounts of shared intentional activities is problematic if his theoretical ambition is in part to show that and how early (prelinguistic and precultural capacities for joint action contribute to the development of higher cognitive capacities.

  13. The infiltration of the AC joint performed by one specialist: Ultrasound versus palpation a prospective randomized pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabeti-Aschraf, M., E-mail: manuel.sabeti-aschraf@meduniwien.ac.a [Vienna Medical School, Department for Orthopaedics and Orthopaedic Surgery, AKH-Wien, Waehringer Guertel18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Ochsner, A. [Vienna Medical School, Department for Orthopaedics and Orthopaedic Surgery, AKH-Wien, Waehringer Guertel18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Schueller-Weidekamm, C. [Vienna Medical School, Department for Radiology, AKH-Wien, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Schmidt, M. [Vienna Medical School, Department for Orthopaedics and Orthopaedic Surgery, AKH-Wien, Waehringer Guertel18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Funovics, Ph.T. [Vienna Medical School, Department for Radiology, AKH-Wien, Waehringer Guertel 18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Skrbensky, G. von [Vienna Medical School, Department for Orthopaedics and Orthopaedic Surgery, AKH-Wien, Waehringer Guertel18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Goll, A. [Vienna Medical School, Core Unit for Medical Statistics and Wien, Waehringer Guertel18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Schatz, K.D. [Vienna Medical School, Department for Orthopaedics and Orthopaedic Surgery, AKH-Wien, Waehringer Guertel18-20, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2010-07-15

    Introduction: The acromio-clavicular (AC) joint is very susceptible to degenerative processes that result in pain and functional impairment. One common modality of treatment has been local infiltration of the joint space. Although this procedure has produced notable positive results, needle misplacement occurs frequently. The aim of this investigation is to evaluate the effects of an intra articular infiltration by comparing precise needle placement into the joint space using high-resolution-ultrasound with the conventional palpation technique. Methods: This prospective and randomized pilot study analysed 20 patients who were assigned either to the 'ultrasound' or the 'palpation' group. Clinical examinations were performed before treatment and at 1 h, 1 week and 3 weeks after a single infiltration of local anaesthetic and corticoid carried out by one specialist. Results: In both groups significant improvement in pain and function was obtained up to one-week post injection. Function remained significantly improved until the last follow-up and did not differ between the two groups. The agent was administered in all patients into the joint space in the ultrasound group. Conclusion: Ultrasound guided infiltration of the AC joint is an easily achieved procedure without any complications. However, clinical follow-up did not differ between free-hand and ultrasound-guided AC joint space infiltration.

  14. The infiltration of the AC joint performed by one specialist: Ultrasound versus palpation a prospective randomized pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabeti-Aschraf, M.; Ochsner, A.; Schueller-Weidekamm, C.; Schmidt, M.; Funovics, Ph.T.; Skrbensky, G. von; Goll, A.; Schatz, K.D.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: The acromio-clavicular (AC) joint is very susceptible to degenerative processes that result in pain and functional impairment. One common modality of treatment has been local infiltration of the joint space. Although this procedure has produced notable positive results, needle misplacement occurs frequently. The aim of this investigation is to evaluate the effects of an intra articular infiltration by comparing precise needle placement into the joint space using high-resolution-ultrasound with the conventional palpation technique. Methods: This prospective and randomized pilot study analysed 20 patients who were assigned either to the 'ultrasound' or the 'palpation' group. Clinical examinations were performed before treatment and at 1 h, 1 week and 3 weeks after a single infiltration of local anaesthetic and corticoid carried out by one specialist. Results: In both groups significant improvement in pain and function was obtained up to one-week post injection. Function remained significantly improved until the last follow-up and did not differ between the two groups. The agent was administered in all patients into the joint space in the ultrasound group. Conclusion: Ultrasound guided infiltration of the AC joint is an easily achieved procedure without any complications. However, clinical follow-up did not differ between free-hand and ultrasound-guided AC joint space infiltration.

  15. Joint imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hengst, W.

    1984-01-01

    Joint imaging is a proven diagnostic procedure which has become indispensable to the detection and treatment of different joint diseases in almost all disciplines. The method is suited for early diagnosis of joint affections both in soft tissue and bone which cannot be detected by X-ray or other procedures. The local activity accumulation depends on the rate of metabolism and is visualized in the scan, which in turn enables the extension and floridity of focal lesions to be evaluated and followed-up. Although joint scans may often give hints to probabilities relevant to differential diagnosis, the method is non-specific and only useful if based on the underlying clinical picture and X-ray finding, if possible. The radiation exposure is very low and does not represent a hazard in cases of adequate assessment of indication. In pregnant women and children the assessment of indication has to be based on very strict principles. The method is suited for out-patient diagnosis and can be applied in all installations equipped with a gamma camera and a technetium generator. (orig.) [de

  16. Joint purpose?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pristed Nielsen, Helene

    2013-01-01

    Starting from Crenshaw´s point that antiracism often fails to interrogate patriarchy and that feminism often reproduces racist practices (1991: 1252), this paper asks: What are the theoretical reasons for believing that feminism and anti-racism can be regarded as fighting for the joint purpose...

  17. MR arthrography of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trattnig, S.; Rand, T.; Breitenseher, M.; Ba-Ssalamah, A.; Schick, S.; Imhof, H.

    1999-01-01

    Due to its superior soft tissue contrast conventional MRI is the imaging method of choice in the evaluation of ankle joint disorders. Conventional MR imaging can accurately demonstrate normal or acutely injured ligaments; however, in subacute and chronic injury joint fluid necessary for delineation of injured ligaments is absent and MR arthrography should be performed. MR arthrography uses the intraarticular injection of contrast material to distend the joint, yielding improved discrimination of intraarticular structures. This joint distension with MR arthrography is also helpful in the staging of osteochondritis dissecans, since in cases of unstable lesions tracking of contrast material into the interface can be more easily demonstrated. Finally, high contrast and joint distension by MR arthrography improves the detection of intraarticular loose bodies, which often require surgery. MR artrography, although invasive, may provide additional information in various ankle joint disorders. (orig.) [de

  18. Arthrography of the ankle joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crespi Porro, R.; Zellner, A.; Puricelli, G.; Quaglia, R.; Chelazzi, G.

    1984-01-01

    Arthrography of the ankle joint was first carried out by Johnson and Palmer at the Military Hospital in Stockholm in 1940. Arthrography can be used for judging the integrity of the articular cartilage, of osteochondritis dissecans, arthritis or adhesive capsulitis. The literature shows, however, that more than 95% of the patients on whom this examination has been performed has suffered from acute trauma. (orig.) [de

  19. Joint Operation Planning

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2006-01-01

    .... It sets forth joint doctrine to govern the joint operation planning activities and performance of the Armed Forces of the United States in joint operations, and provides the joint doctrinal basis...

  20. Temporomandibular joint involvement caused by Borrelia Burgdorferi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesnicar, Gorazd; Zerdoner, Danijel

    2007-12-01

    Lyme borreliosis is an endemic disease in Slovenia with an incidence of around 150 patients per 100,000 inhabitants. Although the large joints are most typically affected in Lyme borreliosis, there are also periods of disease activity with arthritis or arthralgias involving smaller joints, including the temporo-mandibular joint. During the years between 2000 and 2003, two patients with Lyme borreliosis affecting the temporo-mandibular joints were treated. The patients presented with fatigue and pain in diverse muscle groups accompanied by arthralgia, which was most pronounced in the temporomandibular joint area. None of the patients were febrile or had joint effusions. Both patients were examined by means of biochemical and serological examinations for Borrelia burgdorferi using ELISA assay and Western blot test (both for IgM and IgG), plain radiographs, MR and CT scans, and scinti-scan of the temporo-mandibular joints They both had positive serum markers for an acute B. burgdorferi infection and were treated with intravenous ceftriaxone. None of the patients had clinical or laboratory signs of chronic Lyme disease activity two and four years following therapy, respectively. Roentgenographic and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of the temporo-mandibular joints had not shown any persistent sign of acute inflammation. There are only few reports of patients with manifest temporo-mandibular joint involvement of Lyme borreliosis in the literature. This report emphasizes the importance of differential diagnosis of acute temporo-mandibular joint arthralgia, of early diagnosis of Lyme borreliosis, and of the necessity for prompt antibiotic treatment.

  1. Joint Instability and Osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darryl Blalock

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA. Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA.

  2. Joint instability and osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blalock, Darryl; Miller, Andrew; Tilley, Michael; Wang, Jinxi

    2015-01-01

    Joint instability creates a clinical and economic burden in the health care system. Injuries and disorders that directly damage the joint structure or lead to joint instability are highly associated with osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, understanding the physiology of joint stability and the mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA is of clinical significance. The first section of this review discusses the structure and function of major joint tissues, including periarticular muscles, which play a significant role in joint stability. Because the knee, ankle, and shoulder joints demonstrate a high incidence of ligament injury and joint instability, the second section summarizes the mechanisms of ligament injury-associated joint instability of these joints. The final section highlights the recent advances in the understanding of the mechanical and biological mechanisms of joint instability-induced OA. These advances may lead to new opportunities for clinical intervention in the prevention and early treatment of OA.

  3. Evidence-based radiology (part 2): Is there sufficient research to support the use of therapeutic injections into the peripheral joints?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, Cynthia; Hodler, Juerg [Orthopaedic University Hospital of Balgrist, Radiology, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2010-01-15

    This review article addresses the best evidence currently available for the effectiveness of injection therapy for musculoskeletal conditions involving the peripheral joints. The research is presented by anatomical region and areas of controversy and the need for additional research are identified. Randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses and systematic reviews are lacking that address the effectiveness of therapeutic injections to the sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, ankle and foot joints. No research studies of any kind have been reported for therapeutic injections of the sternoclavicular joint. With the exception of the knee, possibly the hip and patients with inflammatory arthropathies, research does not unequivocally support the use of therapeutic joint injections for most of the peripheral joints, including the shoulder. Additionally, controversy exists in some areas as to whether or not corticosteroids provide better outcomes compared to local anesthetic injections alone. When viscosupplementation injections are compared to corticosteroids in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee, the evidence supports the use of viscosupplementation for more prolonged improvement in outcomes, with corticosteroids being good for short-term relief. (orig.)

  4. Evidence-based radiology (part 2): Is there sufficient research to support the use of therapeutic injections into the peripheral joints?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, Cynthia; Hodler, Juerg

    2010-01-01

    This review article addresses the best evidence currently available for the effectiveness of injection therapy for musculoskeletal conditions involving the peripheral joints. The research is presented by anatomical region and areas of controversy and the need for additional research are identified. Randomized controlled trials, meta-analyses and systematic reviews are lacking that address the effectiveness of therapeutic injections to the sternoclavicular, acromioclavicular, ankle and foot joints. No research studies of any kind have been reported for therapeutic injections of the sternoclavicular joint. With the exception of the knee, possibly the hip and patients with inflammatory arthropathies, research does not unequivocally support the use of therapeutic joint injections for most of the peripheral joints, including the shoulder. Additionally, controversy exists in some areas as to whether or not corticosteroids provide better outcomes compared to local anesthetic injections alone. When viscosupplementation injections are compared to corticosteroids in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee, the evidence supports the use of viscosupplementation for more prolonged improvement in outcomes, with corticosteroids being good for short-term relief. (orig.)

  5. International joint ventures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karsten Engsig

    2001-01-01

    The article analysis problems connected with corporate joint ventures. Among others the possible conflicts between the joint venture agreement and the statutes of the companies is examined, as well as certain problems connected to the fact that the joint venture partners have created commen control...... over their joint company....

  6. Analysis of Human Osteological Remains Multi-County Areas, North Dakota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-03-01

    suggested diagno- sis for this lesion complex is degenerative arthritis involving the ster- noclavicular, acromioclavicular , shoulder, and elbow joints...irregular marginal lipping. The lesion complex is suggestive of degen- erative arthritis involving the acromioclavicular , shoulder, and elbow joints. A...enlarged by exostosis. This lesion complex is diagnosed as degenerative arthritis involving the sterno- clavicular, acromioclavicular , and shoulder joints

  7. Joint Replacement (Finger and Wrist Joints)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy Joint Replacement Email to a friend * required fields ...

  8. Consensus Report by the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators and Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplantation Consortium Joint Working Committees on Supportive Care Guidelines for Management of Veno-Occlusive Disease in Children and Adolescents, Part 3: Focus on Cardiorespiratory Dysfunction, Infections, Liver Dysfunction, and Delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinsky, Nadia; Frazier, Warren; Auletta, Jeffery J; Dvorak, Christopher C; Ardura, Monica; Song, Enkyung; McArthur, Jennifer; Jeyapalan, Asumthia; Tamburro, Robert; Mahadeo, Kris M; Traube, Chani; Duncan, Christine N; Bajwa, Rajinder P S

    2018-02-01

    Some patients with veno-occlusive disease (VOD) have multiorgan dysfunction, and multiple teams are involved in their daily care in the pediatric intensive care unit. Cardiorespiratory dysfunction is critical in these patients, requiring immediate action. The decision of whether to use a noninvasive or an invasive ventilation strategy may be difficult in the setting of mucositis or other comorbidities in patients with VOD. Similarly, monitoring of organ functions may be very challenging in these patients, who may have fulminant hepatic failure with or without hepatic encephalopathy complicated by delirium and/or infections. In this final guideline of our series on supportive care in patients with VOD, we address some of these questions and provide evidence-based recommendations on behalf of the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators and Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplantation Consortium Joint Working Committees. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. 关节对应取穴法配合运动针刺治疗急性踝关节扭伤疗效分析%Analysis of the Efficacy of Joint-corresponding Point Selection plus Exercise Acupuncture in Treating Acute Ankle Sprain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    裴春勤; 魏瑛

    2017-01-01

    目的 观察关节对应取穴法配合运动针刺治疗急性踝关节扭伤的临床疗效.方法 选取70例急性踝关节扭伤的患者,随机分为两组,每组35例.治疗组采用关节对应取穴配合运动针刺法治疗,对照组采用弹力绷带固定,两组均配合冰敷、制动抬高等辅助措施.7d为1个疗程,共治疗2个疗程.观察并记录治疗前后两组患者疼痛、压痛、肿胀、活动范围评分变化,并比较疗效.结果 治疗组愈显率为88.6%,对照组愈显率为54.3%,治疗组明显优于对照组(P<0.01).治疗后两组关节疼痛、压痛、肿胀、活动范围评分减少(P<0.01);治疗后治疗组关节压痛、活动范围评分低于对照组(P<0.05).结论 应用关节对应取穴法配合运动针刺治疗急性踝关节扭伤临床疗效明显.%Objective To investigate the clinical efficacy of joint-corresponding point selection plus exercise acupuncture in treating acute ankle sprain.Method Enrolled 70 patients with acute ankle sprain were randomly allocated to two groups.The treatment group received joint-corresponding point selection plus exercise acupuncture and the control group,elastic bandage fixation.Both groups were given ice compress,mobilizationand elevation as auxiliary measures.Treatment was provided seven days as one coursefor a total of two courses.The pain, tenderness, swelling andrange of activitieswere scored in the two groups of patients before and after treatment.Thetherapeutic effects were compared.Result The total efficacy rate was 88.6% in the treatment groupand54.3% in the control group.The therapeutic effect was significantly better in the treatment group than in the control group (P<0.01). Joint pain, tenderness, swelling and activity scores decreased in the two groups after treatment (P<0.01). Joint tenderness and activity scores were lower in the treatment group than in the control group after treatment (P<0.01).Conclusion Joint-corresponding point selection plus exercise

  10. Hip joint injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medicine into the joint. The provider uses a real-time x-ray (fluoroscopy) to see where to place ... Wakefield RJ. Arthrocentesis and injection of joints and soft tissue. In: Firestein GS, Budd RC, Gabriel SE, ...

  11. Sacroiliac joint pain - aftercare

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000610.htm Sacroiliac joint pain - aftercare To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The sacroiliac joint (SIJ) is a term used to describe ...

  12. Reliability of Tubular Joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    In this paper the preliminary results obtained by tests on tubular joints are presented. The joints are T-joints and the loading is static. It is the intention in continuation of these tests to perform tests on other types of joints (e.g. Y-joints) and also with dynamic loading. The purpose...... of the test is partly to obtain empirical data for the ultimate load-carrying capacity of tubular T-joints and partly to obtain some experience in performing tests with tubular joints. It is well known that tubular joints are usually designed in offshore engineering on the basis of empirical formulas obtained...... by experimental test results. Therefore, there is a need for performing experimental tests in this area....

  13. Hip joint replacement - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100006.htm Hip joint replacement - series—Normal anatomy To use the ... to slide 5 out of 5 Overview The hip joint is made up of two major parts: ...

  14. Design of mechanical joints

    CERN Document Server

    Blake, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    A cornerstone publication that covers the basic principles and practical considerations of design methodology for joints held by rivets, bolts, weld seams, and adhesive materials, Design of Mechanical Joints gives engineers the practical results and formulas they need for the preliminary design of mechanical joints, combining the essential topics of joint mechanics...strength of materials...and fracture control to provide a complete treatment of problems pertinent to the field of mechanical connections.

  15. Managing Joint Production Motivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindenberg, Siegwart; Foss, Nicolai Juul

    2011-01-01

    We contribute to the microfoundations of organizational performance by proffering the construct of joint production motivation. Under such motivational conditions individuals see themselves as part of a joint endeavor, each with his or her own roles and responsibilities; generate shared...... representations of actions and tasks; cognitively coordinate cooperation; and choose their own behaviors in terms of joint goals. Using goal-framing theory, we explain how motivation for joint production can be managed by cognitive/symbolic management and organizational design....

  16. Expression of CGRP in the temporomandibular joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caviedes Bucheli, Javier; Medina Buitrago, Diana Marcela

    2002-01-01

    The presence and content of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is evaluated in the hyperplastic retrodiscal tissue of the temporomandibular joint in patients with joint degenerative disease by radioimmunoassay. Study population has included 8 female patients in pre-menopausic status, without to be pregnant, without to be lactating for a year and with diagnostic of joint degenerative disease (osteoarthrosis). Pain levels are registered with visual analog scale, where 0 is absence of pain and 16 acute pain. A bone degeneration is classified as mild, moderate and severe, according to findings of nuclear magnetic resonance. The 15 retrodiscal hyperplastic tissue samples are taken from patients undergoing to open surgery of temporomandibular joint. The specimens were placed in plastic blocks with freezing medium and are stored at -70 degrees celsius until neuropeptide extraction by radioimmunoassay with kit for CGRP. A directly proportional relationship is established between the degree of bone degeneration and neuropeptide expression and between the osteoarthrosis classification with analogue visual scale. Findings have shown definitive correlation between pain levels and expression of neuropeptide. CGRP is expressed in the retrodiscal tissue of temporomandibular joint in human with joint degenerative disease and is directly related with levels osteoarthrosis and pain [es

  17. The Superior Labrum, Anterior-to-Posterior ’SLAP’ Lesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-10-01

    motion and equal sensation bilaterally. Testing was negative for impingement, rotator cuff disease, biceps tendon pathology, acromioclavicular ...impingement syndrome, acromioclavicular joint pain, bicipital tendonitis or symptomatic shoulder instability. The original description of SLAP

  18. Acute nephritic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes in children ...

  19. Mechanics of Suture Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaning; Song, Juha; Ortiz, Christine; Boyce, Mary; Ortiz Group/DMSE/MIT Team; Boyce Group/ME/MIT Team

    2011-03-01

    Biological sutures are joints which connect two stiff skeletal or skeletal-like components. These joints possess a wavy geometry with a thin organic layer providing adhesion. Examples of biological sutures include mammalian skulls, the pelvic assembly of the armored fish Gasterosteus aculeatus (the three-spined stickleback), and the suture joints in the shell of the red-eared slider turtle. Biological sutures allow for movement and compliance, control stress concentrations, transmit loads, reduce fatigue stress and absorb energy. In this investigation, the mechanics of the role of suture geometry in providing a naturally optimized joint is explored. In particular, analytical and numerical micromechanical models of the suture joint are constructed. The anisotropic mechanical stiffness and strength are studied as a function of suture wavelength, amplitude and the material properties of the skeletal and organic components, revealing key insights into the optimized nature of these ubiquitous natural joints.

  20. Expansion joints for LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzenus, M.; Hundhausen, W.; Jansing, W.

    1979-10-15

    This discourse recounts efforts put into the SNR-2 project; specifically the development of compensation devices. The various prototypes of these compensation devices are described and the state of development reviewed. The expansion joints were developed on the basis of specific design criteria whereby differentiation is made between expansion joints of small and large nominal diameter. Expansion joints for installation in the sodium-filled primary piping are equipped with safety bellows in addition to the actual working bellows.

  1. The clinical aspects of the acute facet syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbaek, Lise; Kongsted, Alice; Jensen, Tue Secher

    2009-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The term 'acute facet syndrome' is widely used and accepted amongst chiropractors, but poorly described in the literature, as most of the present literature relates to chronic facet joint pain. Therefore, research into the degree of consensus on the subject amongst a large g...... from the facet joints has been described in the literature. Furthermore, the acute, uncomplicated facet syndrome was considered to have an uncomplicated clinical course, responding quickly to spinal manipulative therapy....

  2. The management of acute myocardial infarction: guidelines and audit standards. Report of a workshop of the Joint Audit Committee of the British Cardiac Society and the Royal College of Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bono, D P; Hopkins, A

    1994-01-01

    Successful management of acute myocardial infarction depends in the first instance on the patient recognising the symptoms and seeking help as quickly as possible. Once in hospital, fast track admission procedures and protocols for pain relief, early thrombolysis and appropriate ancillary measures (eg aspirin, i.v. betablockers) should be promptly instituted. Specialist advice and, if necessary, transfer to specialist unit should be considered if additional complications arise. Follow-up management after discharge from hospital requires cooperation between primary and secondary care to prolong survival by reducing risk factors, using aspirin, betablockers and angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors and instituting a suitable rehabilitation programme. Audit measures are included in the report to help general practitioners and hospital doctors review their practice and assess it against the standards set.

  3. JET Joint Undertaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, B.E.

    1987-03-01

    The paper presents the progress report of the Joint European Torus (JET) Joint Undertaking, 1986. The report contains a survey of the scientific and technical achievements on JET during 1986; the more important articles referred to in this survey are reproduced as appendices to this Report. The last section discusses developments which might improve the overall performance of the machine. (U.K.)

  4. 13. Sacroiliac joint pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vanelderen, P.; Szadek, K.M.; Cohen, S.P.; Witte, J.; Lataster, A.; Patijn, J.; Mekhail, N.; van Kleef, M.; van Zundert, J.

    2010-01-01

    The sacroiliac joint accounts for approximately 16% to 30% of cases of chronic mechanical low back pain. Pain originating in the sacroiliac joint is predominantly perceived in the gluteal region, although pain is often referred into the lower and upper lumbar region, groin, abdomen, and/ or lower

  5. Transversely Compressed Bonded Joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg; Schmidt, Jacob Wittrup; Stang, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The load capacity of bonded joints can be increased if transverse pressure is applied at the interface. The transverse pressure is assumed to introduce a Coulomb-friction contribution to the cohesive law for the interface. Response and load capacity for a bonded single-lap joint was derived using...

  6. Joint Newspaper Operating Agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Marie

    The number of competing daily newspapers in American cities has dwindled until only about 50 cities boast two papers. Of the newspapers in those cities, 23 now maintain separate editorial operations but have joint printing, advertising, and circulation departments. The concept of joint operation is 50 years old, dating from the Depression years…

  7. Joint Hub Network Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cruijssen, F.C.A.M.; Borm, P.E.M.; Dullaert, W.; Hamers, H.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces a framework for joint hub network development. Building a joint physical hub for transhipment of goods is expensive and therefore involves considerable risks for the cooperating companies. In a practical setting, it is unlikely that an entire network will be built at once.

  8. Elbow joint instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Henriksen, M G; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole

    1994-01-01

    The effect of simultaneous ulnar and radial collateral ligament division on the kinematics of the elbow joint is studied in a cadaveric model. Severance of the anterior part of the ulnar collateral ligament and the annular ligament led to significant elbow joint instability in valgus and varus...

  9. Bistable Articulated Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graighead, Norwood D., II; Preliasco, R. J.; Hult, T. D.

    1986-01-01

    Joint with four-bar-linkage geometry has following attributes: Springs to fully extended fully folded positions. Automatically locks in its extended position. Joint combines zero backlash, positive locking, and centerline pivoting. Used in folding tool handles, portable antenna booms, and many other deployable structures.

  10. MP Joint Arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All Topics A-Z Videos Infographics Symptom Picker Anatomy Bones Joints Muscles Nerves Vessels Tendons About Hand Surgery What is a Hand Surgeon? What is a Hand Therapist? Media Find a Hand Surgeon Home Anatomy MP Joint Arthritis Email to a friend * required ...

  11. Creep of timber joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van de Kuilen, J.W.G.

    2008-01-01

    A creep analysis has been performed on nailed, toothed-plates and split-ring joints in a varying uncontrolled climate. The load levels varied between 30% and 50% of the average ultimate short term strength of these joints, tested in accordance with ISO 6891. The climate in which the tests were

  12. MR diagnosis of temporomandibular joint. A study of joint effusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneda, Takashi; Yamashiro, Mitsuaki; Ozawa, Kaoru; Suzuki, Hiromi; Okada, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Hirotsugu

    1998-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the relationship between correlation of MR joint effusion of the temporomandibular joint and disk position, to evaluate the relationship between joint effusion and aging, and to assess the frequency of MR joint effusion of bilateral temporomandibular joints. The temporomandibular joints of 192 patients with clinical symptoms of temporomandibular joint disorders were imaged bilaterally using high field, surface-coil MR imaging. Oblique sagittal and coronal proton density-weighted and T2-weighted images were obtained. Imaging findings of joint effusion were correlated with disk position, aging, and bilateral temporomandibular joints. MR showed effusion in 4% of the joints with normal superior disk position, 36% of the joints with disk displacement with reduction, and 45% of the joints with disk displacement without reduction. There were significant differences in the incidence of joint effusion between normal disk position and anterior disk displacement with or without reduction. Younger patients less than 40 years were significant higher the incidence of joint effusion than those of older patients. A significant association was seen between joint effusion and aging. MR showed effusion in 17% of the unilateral temporomandibular joint, 24% of the bilateral temporomandibular joints. There was no significant difference between unilateral and bilateral case. These results indicated that joint effusion using MR imaging was associated with varied temporomandibular joint pathologic states. (author)

  13. Generalised joint hypermobility and knee joint hypermobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Tina; Henriksen, Peter; Hansen, Sebrina

    2018-01-01

    . Respondents with GJHk and KJH reported lower HRQoL. CONCLUSION: GJHk and KJH were frequently reported in the Danish adult population, mostly in women. Respondents with GJHk and KJH were two times more likely to report knee joint-related symptoms such as pain, reduced performance of usual activity and lower...

  14. Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pancreatitis Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy Timothy Gardner, MD Acute pancreatitis is defined as ... pancreatitis in pregnancy. Reasons for Acute Pancreatitis and Pregnancy While acute pancreatitis is responsible for almost 1 ...

  15. Consensus Report by Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators and Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplantation Consortium Joint Working Committees: Supportive Care Guidelines for Management of Veno-Occlusive Disease in Children and Adolescents, Part 1: Focus on Investigations, Prophylaxis, and Specific Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajwa, Rajinder P S; Mahadeo, Kris M; Taragin, Benjamin H; Dvorak, Christopher C; McArthur, Jennifer; Jeyapalan, Asumthia; Duncan, Christine N; Tamburro, Robert; Gehred, Alison; Lehmann, Leslie; Richardson, Paul; Auletta, Jeffery J; Woolfrey, Ann E

    2017-11-01

    Veno-occlusive disease (VOD) is a common and potentially fatal complication in children undergoing hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). It occurs in about one-third of all patients undergoing transplantation and is fatal in 50% of patients with severe disease. Early intervention and specific treatment with defibrotide are associated with improved outcomes. However, there is a lack of supportive care guidelines for management of the multiorgan dysfunction seen in most cases. There is high variability in the management of VOD, which may contribute to the increased morbidity and mortality. Although there is ample research in the specific treatment of VOD, there is paucity of literature regarding the management of ascites, transfusions requirements, fluids and electrolyte dysfunction, delirium, and investigations in children with VOD. The joint working committees of the Pediatric Acute Lung Injury and Sepsis Investigators and the Pediatric Blood and Marrow Transplantation Consortium collaborated to develop a series of evidence-based supportive care guidelines for management of VOD. The quality of evidence was rated and recommendations were made using Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation criteria. This manuscript is part 1 of the series and focuses on the need to develop these guidelines; methodology used to establish the guidelines; and investigations needed for diagnosis, prophylaxis, and treatment of VOD in children. Copyright © 2017 The American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. MRI abnormalities of sacroiliac joints in early spondylarthropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Puhakka, K B; Jurik, A G; Schiøttz-Christensen, Berit

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe changes in chronic and acute magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities of the sacroiliac joints (SIJs) in early spondylarthropathy (SpA), and to associate these findings with computed tomography (CT), X-ray, and clinical findings during a 1-year follow-up. METHODS...

  17. Acute pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Rupjyoti; Vege, Santhi S

    2015-09-01

    To summarize recent data on classification systems, cause, risk factors, severity prediction, nutrition, and drug treatment of acute pancreatitis. Comparison of the Revised Atlanta Classification and Determinant Based Classification has shown heterogeneous results. Simvastatin has a protective effect against acute pancreatitis. Young black male, alcohol, smoldering symptoms, and subsequent diagnosis of chronic pancreatitis are risk factors associated with readmissions after acute pancreatitis. A reliable clinical or laboratory marker or a scoring system to predict severity is lacking. The PYTHON trial has shown that oral feeding with on demand nasoenteric tube feeding after 72 h is as good as nasoenteric tube feeding within 24 h in preventing infections in predicted severe acute pancreatitis. Male sex, multiple organ failure, extent of pancreatic necrosis, and heterogeneous collection are factors associated with failure of percutaneous drainage of pancreatic collections. The newly proposed classification systems of acute pancreatitis need to be evaluated more critically. New biomarkers are needed for severity prediction. Further well designed studies are required to assess the type of enteral nutritional formulations for acute pancreatitis. The optimal minimally invasive method or combination to debride the necrotic collections is evolving. There is a great need for a drug to treat the disease early on to prevent morbidity and mortality.

  18. Joint Electromagnetic Spectrum Management Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    promulgate command-specific policy and guidance for EMS use, the joint restricted frequency list (JRFL) process, the joint communications–electronics...joint communications–electronics operating instructions (JCEOI) and joint restricted frequency list (JRFL). Examples of FM include providing the...joint restricted frequency list Figure III-4. Joint Frequency Management Office Spectrum Management Process Chapter III III-10 JP 6-01 assignments

  19. Joint Quantum Institute

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Joint Quantum Institute (JQI) is pursuing that goal through the work of leading quantum scientists from the Department of Physics of the University of Maryland...

  20. Temporomandibular Joint Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Baby Bottle Tooth Decay? Pacifiers Have Negative and Positive Effects What is Dental Amalgam (Silver Filling)? Check Menstrual Calendar for Tooth Extraction Temporomandibular Joint Disorder Learn what those dental words mean. Check out how your teeth and mouth ...

  1. Hip joint replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hip arthroplasty; Total hip replacement; Hip hemiarthroplasty; Arthritis - hip replacement; Osteoarthritis - hip replacement ... Your hip joint is made up of 2 major parts. One or both parts may be replaced during surgery: ...

  2. Knee joint replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to make everyday tasks easier. Practice using a cane, walker , crutches , or a wheelchair correctly. On the ... ask your doctor Knee joint replacement - discharge Preventing falls Preventing falls - what to ask your doctor Surgical ...

  3. Concrete pavement joint deterioration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Concrete pavements are an important part of our national infrastructure. In recent years the relatively small number of reported joints deteriorating prematurely in concrete pavements around Indiana has increased. Changes over the past 45 years in IN...

  4. Sacroiliac joint dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilaslan, Hakan; Arslan, Ahmet; Koç, Omer Nadir; Dalkiliç, Turker; Naderi, Sait

    2010-07-01

    Sacroiliac joint dysfunction is a disorder presenting with low back and groin pain. It should be taken into consideration during the preoperative differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation, lumbar spinal stenosis and facet syndrome. Four cases with sacroiliac dysfunction are presented. The clinical and radiological signs supported the evidence of sacroiliac dysfunction, and exact diagnosis was made after positive response to sacroiliac joint block. A percutaneous sacroiliac fixation provided pain relief in all cases. The mean VAS scores reduced from 8.2 to 2.2. It is concluded that sacroiliac joint dysfunction diagnosis requires a careful physical examination of the sacroiliac joints in all cases with low back and groin pain. The diagnosis is made based on positive response to the sacroiliac block. Sacroiliac fixation was found to be effective in carefully selected cases.

  5. Joint Hub Network Development

    OpenAIRE

    Cruijssen, F.C.A.M.; Borm, P.E.M.; Dullaert, W.; Hamers, H.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces a framework for joint hub network development. Building a joint physical hub for transhipment of goods is expensive and therefore involves considerable risks for the cooperating companies. In a practical setting, it is unlikely that an entire network will be built at once. Rather, the partners will have a more cautious attitude and build the hub facilities one-by-one. In the proposed framework, every time a new hub is introduced, partners will have the opportunity to dec...

  6. Prosthetic Joint Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Saima; Darouiche, Rabih O.

    2012-01-01

    Prosthetic joint infections represent a major therapeutic challenge for both healthcare providers and patients. This paper reviews the predisposing factors, pathogenesis, microbiology, diagnosis, treatment and prophylaxis of prosthetic joint infection. The most optimal management strategy should be identified based on a number of considerations including type and duration of infection, antimicrobial susceptibility of the infecting pathogen, condition of infected tissues and bone stock, patient wishes and functional status. PMID:22847032

  7. Benign joint hypermobility syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwona Słowińska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS, commonly known as loose ligament syndrome, is a non-inflammatory rheumatic condition. It is characterised by a greater than normal range of motion of the joints of the limbs and spine. The prevalence of the syndrome in preschool-age children is estimated to be between 2% and 30%, depending on ethnic background (with higher prevalence in Asian and African populations, occurring most often in families with a history of the condition and more frequently in girls. This paper presents a case report of a 12-year-old girl. A broad differential diagnostic approach to recurrent joint inflammation with joint effusion and pain made it possible to establish a diagnosis of benign joint hypermobility syndrome. The child met the Brighton criteria; her Beighton score was 7 out of 9. Patient education aimed at eliminating abnormal joint movement and an appropriate rehabilitation programme play key roles in the treatment of BJHS.

  8. Arthrodesis of the thumb interphalangeal joint and finger distal interphalangeal joints with a headless compression screw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Christopher; Earp, Brandon E; Floyd, W Emerson; Blazar, Philip E

    2014-01-01

    To study the results of using a small, headless compression screw (AcuTwist) for thumb interphalangeal (IP) joint and finger distal interphalangeal (DIP) joint arthrodeses. Between November 2007 and January 2012, 48 primary arthrodeses of the thumb IP joint or DIP joint in the other digits were performed in 29 consecutive patients with AcuTwist devices. Indications for arthrodesis included 19 cases of osteoarthritis in 25 fingers, 3 cases of lupus in 9 fingers, 2 cases of post-traumatic osteoarthritis in 2 fingers, and 1 case and finger each of acute trauma, neuromuscular disorder, postinfectious osteoarthritis, boutonniere deformity, and Dupuytren contracture. Charts were reviewed for clinical data, and radiographs were assessed for alignment and healing. Age averaged 59 years and follow-up averaged 12 months (range, 2-50 mo). Union occurred in 43 out of 46 fingers (94%). There were no cases of nail deformity, wound complications, tip hypersensitivity, or clinically notable malalignment. Three arthrodeses failed to fuse, including 2 asymptomatic nonunions and 1 fixation loss requiring revision with autograft. The complication rate was 9%. Distal digital joint arthrodesis with the AcuTwist resulted in a fusion rate of 94% with a complication rate of 9%. Our rate of fusion compares favorably with prior series using other methods of fixation. Therapeutic IV. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Jointness for the Rest of Us: Reforming Joint Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    transferred to the Joint Staff. 13 DOD’s instinct to “overly centralize planning, organization, and management.”20 The authors contend that this...2. 3 John F. Schank and others, Who is Joint? Reevaluating the Joint Duty Assignment List : A Study Prepared for the Joint Staff, by the RAND...and code those billets as such. Once identified, DOD must expand the Joint Duty Assignment List (JDAL) to include billets that offer enlisted personnel

  10. Acute Pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertilsson, Sara; Håkansson, Anders; Kalaitzakis, Evangelos

    2017-01-01

    Aims: We aimed to evaluate the potential relation between the incidence of (alcoholic and non-alcoholic) acute pancreatitis (AP) and alcohol consumption in the general population, and whether the occurrence of AP shows any seasonal variation, particularly in relation to periods with expected...... consumption in the general population do not appear to be related to changes in the incidence of AP and there are no significant seasonal differences in the occurrence of AP in Sweden. Short summary: The incidence of acute pancreatitis (AP) is increasing, and alcohol is still recognized as one of the most...

  11. Forming a multinational joint venture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, N.K.; Garb, R.H.; Statton, T.D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the basis and mechanics for forming a multinational joint venture. The topics of the paper include the motivations for a joint venture, selection of the appropriate co-venturer, management of the multinational joint venture, and the joint venture agreement. The authors state that a joint venture is not applicable or desirable in all instances and to be successful, must be carefully planned

  12. Facet joint syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zigrai, M.; Zakovic, J.; Brezinova, M.; Pavlovicova, M.

    2002-01-01

    It is the purpose of the study to demonstrate the clinical relevance of degenerative changes in the facet joint of patients with low back pain irradiating to the lower extremities, and discuss some problems relating to diagnosis and different diagnosis. 119 patients presenting the listed bellow syndromes are covered by the study: scoliosis, polytopic pain vertebral syndrome, paresis and history of trauma. all patients undergo comprehensive neurological examination with special attention focused on the spine: CT and plain x-rays are taken of the lumbosacral segment to assess the condition of the facet joints. The neurological examination demonstrates in all cases pain syndrome in the lumbar spine referred to one or both lower extremities. In 56% it is a matter of persisting pain, and in 44% - recurrent. More than half of the patients complain of sacroiliac (SI) dislocation and palpatory pain. Unilateral or bilateral degenerative changes are documented by imaging studies in all patients, including: subchondral thickening, osteopathy narrowing the lateral or central part of the spinal canal with ensuing nerve root compression. The lumbosacral zygoapophyseal joints are source of pseudoradicular pain. A correlation between clinical picture and GT changes is noted in all patients with facet joint syndrome. CT is an indispensable method in diagnosing facet joint syndrome. (authors)

  13. Temporomandibular joint examination reviewed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Guarda Nardini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The temporo-mandibular joint (TMJ it’s a joint closely related to the skull base, the spine, and the jaws; all these anatomical structures must be taken in consideration when evaluating pain involving the tmj. In order to detect patients affected by pathology or dysfunctions of the tmj, physical examination is of great value in orienting the diagnosis. Inspection must consider the symmetry of the body, the dental status and the type of occlusion. Palpation is a way to assess contractiont involving the muscles of the masticatory system and of the neck. Auscultation, based on articular noise provides means to determine whether we are dealing with degeneration of the joint or a dislocation of the intrarticular disc. In order to confirm the diagnosis obtained with the clinical evaluation, it’s useful to perform imaging techniques as opt, tomography and TC of the tmj and electromyokineosiography – index of the mandibular functionality and of the muscles status. MRI and dynamic MRI are among the non invasive exams which give the greatest amount of information, regarding the disc position and the joint degeneration. Arthroscopy is an invasive technique that allows early diagnosis of degeneration and is helpful to reveal early inflammatory processes of the joint.

  14. Distal radioulnar joint injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binu P Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Distal radioulnar joint is a trochoid joint relatively new in evolution. Along with proximal radioulnar joint , forearm bones and interosseous membrane, it allows pronosupination and load transmission across the wrist. Injuries around distal radioulnar joint are not uncommon, and are usually associated with distal radius fractures,fractures of the ulnar styloid and with the eponymous Galeazzi or Essex_Lopresti fractures. The injury can be purely involving the soft tissue especially the triangular fibrocartilage or the radioulnar ligaments.The patients usually present with ulnar sided wrist pain, features of instability, or restriction of rotation. Difficulty in carrying loads in the hand is a major constraint for these patients. Thorough clinical examination to localize point of tenderness and appropriate provocative tests help in diagnosis. Radiology and MRI are extremely useful, while arthroscopy is the gold standard for evaluation. The treatment protocols are continuously evolving and range from conservative, arthroscopic to open surgical methods. Isolated dislocation are uncommon. Basal fractures of the ulnar styloid tend to make the joint unstable and may require operative intervention. Chronic instability requires reconstruction of the stabilizing ligaments to avoid onset of arthritis. Prosthetic replacement in arthritis is gaining acceptance in the management of arthritis.

  15. Formation of Exfoliation Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martel, S. J.

    2004-12-01

    The Earth's internal stresses interact with the topographic surface to affect many phenomena. Exfoliation joints, or sheeting joints, are widespread manifestations of this interaction. These opening-mode fractures form subparallel to the Earth's surface, bounding roughly concentric slabs of rock that resemble the layers of an onion. They occur worldwide in all major bedrock types, attain in-plane dimensions of hundreds of meters, exert a strong influence on groundwater flow, and help produce spectacular scenery, as in Yosemite National Park. The mechanism that causes them has been enigmatic. They are widely regarded as forming in response to "removal of overburden", but large fractures do not open in rocks merely by relieving a compressive stress. High fluid pressures, thermal effects, rock heterogeneity, and weathering also are rejected as primary causes of these fractures. Tensile stresses normal to the surface are required for large exfoliation fractures to open. Intriguingly, high surface-parallel compressive stresses are widely documented where exfoliation joints occur. Both numerical and analytical solutions for two-dimensional elastic bodies show that localized tensile stresses perpendicular to the ground surface must develop beneath certain topographies subject to strong compressive stresses parallel to the surface. This highly non-intuitive effect reflects the profound influence that topography can have on stresses near the surface of the Earth, and it can explain how exfoliation joints open. The theoretical results also indicate that exfoliation joint distributions could be used to infer the horizontal stresses near the Earth's surface.

  16. MR imaging findings of acute gouty arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Gyung Kyu; Lee, Jee Young; Suh, Jin Suck

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical and MR imaging features of acute gouty arthritis and to define the characteristic findings that would be helpful for differentiating acute gouty arthritis from septic arthritis. The authors retrospectively studied seven patients who suffered from acute gouty arthritis. The MR imaging findings were analyzed by two musculoskeletal radiologists who focused on joint effusion, subchondral bone erosion, bone marrow edema, synovial thickening (regular and even, or irregular and nodular), and the soft tissue changes (edema or abscess). The clinical records of the patients were reviewed with regard to age and gender, the clinical presentation and the laboratory findings (serum uric acid, WBC, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein and synovial fluid culture). The patients consisted of six men and one woman whose mean age was 41 years (age range:24-65 years). The joints involved were the knee (n=6), and ankle (n=1). Two patients had medical histories of gouty attacks that involved the first metatarsophalangeal joint. In six cases, the serum uric acid level during acute attacks was elevated. In all the patients, the affected joint became swollen, hot, erythematous and extremely tender, and this was accompanied by a high ESR and a high C-reactive protein level at the time of presentation. The results of Gram stain and culture of the synovial fluid were negative. In all patients, the MR images showed large amounts of joint effusion, thick irregular and nodular synovial thickening and soft tissue edema without subchondral bone erosions and soft tissue abscess. In one case, subchondral bone marrow edema of the medial femoral condyle was present. In five cases, there were multiple low signal foci in the joint on the spin-echo T2-weighted MR image. Even though the MR imaging findings of acute gouty arthritis are nonspecific, it should be considered as a possible diagnosis when a large amount of joint effusion

  17. Total ankle joint replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Ankle arthritis results in a stiff and painful ankle and can be a major cause of disability. For people with end-stage ankle arthritis, arthrodesis (ankle fusion) is effective at reducing pain in the shorter term, but results in a fixed joint, and over time the loss of mobility places stress on other joints in the foot that may lead to arthritis, pain and dysfunction. Another option is to perform a total ankle joint replacement, with the aim of giving the patient a mobile and pain-free ankle. In this article we review the efficacy of this procedure, including how it compares to ankle arthrodesis, and consider the indications and complications. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. JOINT INVOLVEMENT IN SYPHILIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. I. Zlobina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Joint involvement in syphilis has been considered as casuistry in recent years. At the same time, the high incidence of primary syphilis and the notified cases of late neurosyphilis may suggest that joint involvement in this disease is by no means always verified. Traditionally there are two forms of syphilitic arthritis: primary synovial (involving the articular membranes and sac and primary bone (involving the articular bones and cartilages ones. The paper describes the authors' clinical case of the primary bone form of articular syphilis in a 34-year-old man. 

  19. Expansion joints for LMFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzenus, M.; Hundhausen, W.; Jansing, W.

    1980-01-01

    This discourse recounts efforts put into the SNR-2 project; specifically the development of compensation devices. The various prototypes of these compensation devices are described and the state of the development reviewed. Large Na (sodium)-heat transfer systems require a lot of valuable space if the component lay-out does not include compensation devices. So, in order to condense the spatial requirement as much as possible, expansion joints must be integrated into the pipe system. There are two basic types to suit the purpose: axial expansion joints and angular expansion joints. The expansion joints were developed on the basis of specific design criteria whereby differentiation is made between expansion joints of small and large nominal diameter. Expansion joints for installation in the sodium-filled primary piping are equipped with safety bellows in addition to the actual working bellows. Expansion joints must be designed and mounted in a manner to completely withstand seismic forces. The design must exclude any damage to the bellows during intermittent operations, that is, when sodium is drained the bellows' folds must be completely empty; otherwise residual solidified sodium could destroy the bellows when restarting. The expansion joints must be engineered on the basis of the following design data for the secondary system of the SNR project: working pressure: 16 bar; failure mode pressure: 5 events; failure mode: 5 sec., 28.5 bar, 520 deg. C; working temperature: 520 deg. C; temperature transients: 30 deg. C/sec.; service life: 200,000 h; number of load cycles: 10 4 ; material: 1.4948 or 1.4919; layer thickness of folds: 0.5 mm; angular deflection (DN 800): +3 deg. C or; axial expansion absorption (DN 600): ±80 mm; calculation: ASME class. The bellows' development work is not handled within this scope. The bellows are supplied by leading manufacturers, and warrant highest quality. Multiple bellows were selected on the basis of maximum elasticity - a property

  20. Sacroiliac Joint Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto Quijano, David A; Otero Loperena, Eduardo

    2018-02-01

    Sacroiliac joint (SIJ) pain is an important cause of lower back problems. Multiple SIJ injection techniques have been proposed over the years to help in the diagnosis and treatment of this condition. However, the SIJ innervation is complex and variable, and truly intra-articular injections are sometimes difficult to obtain. Different sacroiliac joint injections have shown to provide pain relief in patients suffering this ailment. Various techniques for intraarticular injections, sacral branch blocks and radiofrequency ablation, both fluoroscopy guided and ultrasound guided are discussed in this paper. Less common techniques like prolotherapy, platelet rich plasma injections and botulism toxin injections are also discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Prosthetic Joint Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tande, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Prosthetic joint infection (PJI) is a tremendous burden for individual patients as well as the global health care industry. While a small minority of joint arthroplasties will become infected, appropriate recognition and management are critical to preserve or restore adequate function and prevent excess morbidity. In this review, we describe the reported risk factors for and clinical manifestations of PJI. We discuss the pathogenesis of PJI and the numerous microorganisms that can cause this devastating infection. The recently proposed consensus definitions of PJI and approaches to accurate diagnosis are reviewed in detail. An overview of the treatment and prevention of this challenging condition is provided. PMID:24696437

  2. Imaging findings of charcot joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Quanfei; Zhou Chunxiang; Chen Yingming; Jiang Bo

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the MRI characters of Charcot joint, and to evaluate the diagnostic value of X-ray, CT, and MRI on Charcot joint. Methods: Eight patients with 8 Charcot joints underwent X-ray, CT, and MR examinations. 6 of them had syringomyelia, 1 patient had injury of the spinal cord, and 1 case had diabetes. All 8 patients had sensory reduction or deficit in the sick extremities. Results: There were two types of Charcot joint, hypertrophic and atrophic. Radiographic and CT features of hypertrophic joint (n=3) showed hyperostotic osteosclerosis and mammoth osteophytes in the sick bones, periarticular ossification, and articular disorganization. Radiographic and CT features of atrophic joint (n=5) showed extensive bone resorption (destruction), periarticular debris, and articular disorganization. Main MRI features of Charcot joint included hydrarthrosis within joint capsule, thickened, loose, and elongated joint capsule with para-joint, peri-diaphysis, and inter-muscular extension in a pseudopodia pattern. The irregular joint capsule wall was presented as mild hypointensity on T 1 WI, slight hyper-intensity on T 2 WI, and was markedly enhanced after Gd-DTPA was administrated, which was considered as a characteristic manifestation of the lesion. Soft tissue mass containing hypo-intense stripes on both T 1 WI and T 2 WI was commonly noted adjacent to the involved joint. Conclusion: X-rays plain film is the first choice for the diagnosis of Charcot joint, and MRI is pretty useful in the diagnosis of Charcot joint

  3. Acute abdomen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wig J

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available 550 cases of acute abdomen have been analysed in detail includ-ing their clinical presentation and operative findings. Males are more frequently affected than females in a ratio of 3: 1. More than 45% of patients presented after 48 hours of onset of symptoms. Intestinal obstruction was the commonest cause of acute abdomen (47.6%. External hernia was responsible for 26% of cases of intestinal obstruction. Perforated peptic ulcer was the commonest cause of peritonitis in the present series (31.7% while incidence of biliary peritonitis was only 2.4%.. The clinical accuracy rate was 87%. The mortality in operated cases was high (10% while the over-all mortality rate was 7.5%.

  4. Acute Blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meekins, Jessica M

    2015-09-01

    Sudden loss of vision is an ophthalmic emergency with numerous possible causes. Abnormalities may occur at any point within the complex vision pathway, from retina to optic nerve to the visual center in the occipital lobe. This article reviews specific prechiasm (retina and optic nerve) and cerebral cortical diseases that lead to acute blindness. Information regarding specific etiologies, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis for vision is discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Temporomandibular Joint Septic Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianfranco Frojo, MD

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. Infection of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ is a rare pediatric condition resulting from the introduction of pathogens into the joint by hematogenous seeding, local extension, or trauma. Early recognition of the typical signs and symptoms including fever, trismus, preauricular swelling, and TMJ region tenderness are critical in order to initiate further evaluation and prevent feared complications of fibrosis, ankylosis, abnormal facial structure, or persistence of symptoms. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography with ancillary laboratory analysis including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and white blood cell count are beneficial in confirming the suspected diagnosis and monitoring response to therapy. Initial intervention should include empiric parenteral antibiotics, early mandibular mobilization, and joint decompression to provide synovial fluid for analysis including cultures. This report describes a case of TMJ bacterial arthritis in a healthy 6-year-old male who was promptly treated nonsurgically with intravenous antibiotics and localized needle joint decompression with return to normal function after completion of oral antibiotics and physical therapy.

  6. Joint-Use Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casstevens, Susan

    2017-01-01

    The joint-use library is a place where people of all ages, interests, and income levels can find items of interest at no personal cost. The mission of A. H. Meadows Public and High School Library in Midlothian, Texas, is to offer what other public libraries provide: educational and entertainment resources to a community. Yet, the staff also wants…

  7. Keyed shear joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klaus

    This report gives a summary of the present information on the behaviour of vertical keyed shear joints in large panel structures. An attemp is made to outline the implications which this information might have on the analysis and design of a complete wall. The publications also gives a short...

  8. Jointness: A Selected Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-08-01

    AD-A431-767) http://handle.dtic.mil/100.2/ADA431767 Lamb , William L. Moving beyond Goldwater-Nichols: The Case for Continued Reform of the DoD...in Support of the Joint Force’." Army Aviation 55 (May 2006): 22-24. Magnuson, Stew . "Turf Battles: Strategic Command’s Expanded Portfolio

  9. Gonococcal Prosthetic Joint Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gassiep, Ian; Gilpin, Bradley; Douglas, Joel; Siebert, David

    2017-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoea is a common sexually transmitted infection worldwide. Disseminated gonococcal infection is an infrequent presentation and rarely can be associated with septic arthritis. Incidence of this infection is rising, both internationally and in older age groups. We present the first documented case of N. gonorrhoea prosthetic joint infection which was successfully treated with laparoscopic debridement and antimicrobial therapy.

  10. Preceding trauma in childhood hematogenous bone and joint infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pääkkönen, Markus; Kallio, Markku J T; Lankinen, Petteri; Peltola, Heikki; Kallio, Pentti E

    2014-03-01

    Preceding trauma may play a role in the etiology and pathogenesis of hematogenous bone and joint infections. Among 345 children with an acute hematogenous bone and/or joint infection, 20% reported trauma during a 2-week period leading to infection. Blunt impact, bruises, or excoriations were commonly reported. The rate was similar to that in the general pediatric population obtained from the literature. In the study group, patients with and without trauma were similar in age, serum C-reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate, length of hospitalization, and late sequelae. Preceding minor trauma did not prove to be significant as an etiological or as a prognostic factor.

  11. Arthrography in sport injuries of the knee joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, H

    1983-09-01

    The arthrography is one of the most important diagnostic methods of sport injuries of the knee joint. The examination must give an exact information to the surgeon; a good technique and standard X-rays are an absolute postulate. The submitted examinations are based on 6687 arthrographies during a period of 5 years. The arthrography should not be carried out before the acute symptomatology has ceased, usually after an interval of 2-3 weeks. Most frequent are the meniscus injuries by rotary traumas of the knee-joint. Football as the most popular sport is responsible for more than 50% of the injuries, followed by skiing, handball and jogging.

  12. Arthrography in sport injuries of the knee joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, H.

    1983-01-01

    The arthrography is one of the most important diagnostic methods of sport injuries of the knee joint. The examination must give an exact information to the surgeon; a good technique and standard X-rays are an absolute postulate. The submitted examinations are based on 6687 arthrographies during a period of 5 years. The arthrography should not be carried out before the acute symptomatology has ceased, usually after an interval of 2-3 weeks. Most frequently are the meniscus injuries by rotary traumas of the knee-joint. Football as the most popular sport is responsible for more than 50% of the injuries, followed by skiing, handball and jogging. (orig.)

  13. An analysis of a joint shear model for jointed media with orthogonal joint sets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koteras, J.R.

    1991-10-01

    This report describes a joint shear model used in conjunction with a computational model for jointed media with orthogonal joint sets. The joint shear model allows nonlinear behavior for both joint sets. Because nonlinear behavior is allowed for both joint sets, a great many cases must be considered to fully describe the joint shear behavior of the jointed medium. An extensive set of equations is required to describe the joint shear stress and slip displacements that can occur for all the various cases. This report examines possible methods for simplifying this set of equations so that the model can be implemented efficiently form a computational standpoint. The shear model must be examined carefully to obtain a computationally efficient implementation that does not lead to numerical problems. The application to fractures in rock is discussed. 5 refs., 4 figs

  14. Temporomandibular joint space in children without joint disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larheim, T.A.

    1981-01-01

    Bilateral assessment of the temporomandibular joint space in children without joint disease is reported. Twenty-eight children were examined with conventional radiography and 23 with tomography. High prevalence of asymmetric joint spaces with both techniques indicated that great care should be taken when using narrowing or widening of the joint space as a diagnostic criterion in children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Other signs, such as restricted translation of the mandibular head, and clinical symptoms should be evaluated. (Auth.)

  15. Anaerobic prosthetic joint infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Neel B; Tande, Aaron J; Patel, Robin; Berbari, Elie F

    2015-12-01

    In an effort to improve mobility and alleviate pain from degenerative and connective tissue joint disease, an increasing number of individuals are undergoing prosthetic joint replacement in the United States. Joint replacement is a highly effective intervention, resulting in improved quality of life and increased independence [1]. By 2030, it is predicted that approximately 4 million total hip and knee arthroplasties will be performed yearly in the United States [2]. One of the major complications associated with this procedure is prosthetic joint infection (PJI), occurring at a rate of 1-2% [3-7]. In 2011, the Musculoskeletal Infectious Society created a unifying definition for prosthetic joint infection [8]. The following year, the Infectious Disease Society of America published practice guidelines that focused on the diagnosis and management of PJI. These guidelines focused on the management of commonly encountered organisms associated with PJI, including staphylococci, streptococci and select aerobic Gram-negative bacteria. However, with the exception of Propionibacterium acnes, management of other anaerobic organisms was not addressed in these guidelines [1]. Although making up approximately 3-6% of PJI [9,10], anaerobic microorganisms cause devastating complications, and similar to the more common organisms associated with PJI, these bacteria also result in significant morbidity, poor outcomes and increased health-care costs. Data on diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI is mostly derived from case reports, along with a few cohort studies [3]. There is a paucity of published data outlining factors associated with risks, diagnosis and management of anaerobic PJI. We therefore reviewed available literature on anaerobic PJI by systematically searching the PubMed database, and collected data from secondary searches to determine information on pathogenesis, demographic data, clinical features, diagnosis and management. We focused our search on five commonly

  16. Sonographic evaluation of acute osteomyelitis in infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Ji Young; Lee, Sun Wha; Kim, Yoo Kyung [College of Medicine, Ewha Womans Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-03-01

    To analyze the related sonographic findings and to determine the value of sonography in establishing the diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis in infants. The sonographic findings of eleven infants aged 10 days-4 months (mean, 45 days) with acute osteomyelitis were retrospectively evaluated. The involved bones were the femur (n=5), humerus (n=2), tibia (n=2), rib(n=1), sternum (n=1), and calcaneus (n=1). Discontinuity or destruction of cortical margins, echotexture of the metaphysis and epiphysis, the presence of subperiosteal hypoechoic lesion, adjacent soft tissue swelling, distension of the joint capsule, the echotexture of joint effusion, and dislocation or subluxation of the involved joint were evaluated. The sonographic findings were compared with the plain radiographic (n=12) and MR (n=5) findings, with special attention to the identification of the metaphyseal or epiphyseal bony lesions and the involvement of adjacent joints. The sonographic findings of osteomyelitis were cortical discontinuity or destruction (n=12), hypoechoic lesions with an echogenic rim in the metaphysis (n=12), subperiosteal hypoechoic lesions (n=8), soft tissue swelling (n=9), a distended hip joint, with echogenic fluid (n=5), ill-demarcated echogenic lesions in the capital femoral epiphysis (n=5), and a subluxated hip joint (n=3). Plain radiographs revealed well or ill-defined osteolytic lesions in the metaphysis, accompanied by cortical destruction (n=8), new periosteal bone formation (n=3) and reactive sclerosis (n=2). Abnormality of the femoral epiphyses and joint involvement were not detected on plain radiographs, and in four cases no abnormality was noted. MR imaging showed that at T1WI, affected bony lesions were of low signal intensity and enhaned, with high signal intensity at T2WI. In all cases, both metaphyseal and epiphyseal lesions were demonstrated at MRI, but in one of the three cases in which an epiphyseal lesion was seen at MRI, this was not detected at US. Sonography is

  17. Sonographic evaluation of acute osteomyelitis in infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Ji Young; Lee, Sun Wha; Kim, Yoo Kyung

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the related sonographic findings and to determine the value of sonography in establishing the diagnosis of acute osteomyelitis in infants. The sonographic findings of eleven infants aged 10 days-4 months (mean, 45 days) with acute osteomyelitis were retrospectively evaluated. The involved bones were the femur (n=5), humerus (n=2), tibia (n=2), rib(n=1), sternum (n=1), and calcaneus (n=1). Discontinuity or destruction of cortical margins, echotexture of the metaphysis and epiphysis, the presence of subperiosteal hypoechoic lesion, adjacent soft tissue swelling, distension of the joint capsule, the echotexture of joint effusion, and dislocation or subluxation of the involved joint were evaluated. The sonographic findings were compared with the plain radiographic (n=12) and MR (n=5) findings, with special attention to the identification of the metaphyseal or epiphyseal bony lesions and the involvement of adjacent joints. The sonographic findings of osteomyelitis were cortical discontinuity or destruction (n=12), hypoechoic lesions with an echogenic rim in the metaphysis (n=12), subperiosteal hypoechoic lesions (n=8), soft tissue swelling (n=9), a distended hip joint, with echogenic fluid (n=5), ill-demarcated echogenic lesions in the capital femoral epiphysis (n=5), and a subluxated hip joint (n=3). Plain radiographs revealed well or ill-defined osteolytic lesions in the metaphysis, accompanied by cortical destruction (n=8), new periosteal bone formation (n=3) and reactive sclerosis (n=2). Abnormality of the femoral epiphyses and joint involvement were not detected on plain radiographs, and in four cases no abnormality was noted. MR imaging showed that at T1WI, affected bony lesions were of low signal intensity and enhaned, with high signal intensity at T2WI. In all cases, both metaphyseal and epiphyseal lesions were demonstrated at MRI, but in one of the three cases in which an epiphyseal lesion was seen at MRI, this was not detected at US. Sonography is

  18. Longitudinal joint specifications and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Deterioration of longitudinal joints is widely recognized as one of the major factors contributing to failure of asphalt pavements. Finding : ways to improve the durability of longitudinal joints will lead to improved service lives and lower life cyc...

  19. Determination of Parachute Joint Factors using Seam and Joint Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollmann, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    This paper details the methodology for determining the joint factor for all parachute components. This method has been successfully implemented on the Capsule Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) for the NASA Orion crew module for use in determining the margin of safety for each component under peak loads. Also discussed are concepts behind the joint factor and what drives the loss of material strength at joints. The joint factor is defined as a "loss in joint strength...relative to the basic material strength" that occurs when "textiles are connected to each other or to metals." During the CPAS engineering development phase, a conservative joint factor of 0.80 was assumed for each parachute component. In order to refine this factor and eliminate excess conservatism, a seam and joint testing program was implemented as part of the structural validation. This method split each of the parachute structural joints into discrete tensile tests designed to duplicate the loading of each joint. Breaking strength data collected from destructive pull testing was then used to calculate the joint factor in the form of an efficiency. Joint efficiency is the percentage of the base material strength that remains after degradation due to sewing or interaction with other components; it is used interchangeably with joint factor in this paper. Parachute materials vary in type-mainly cord, tape, webbing, and cloth -which require different test fixtures and joint sample construction methods. This paper defines guidelines for designing and testing samples based on materials and test goals. Using the test methodology and analysis approach detailed in this paper, the minimum joint factor for each parachute component can be formulated. The joint factors can then be used to calculate the design factor and margin of safety for that component, a critical part of the design verification process.

  20. Swivel Joint For Liquid Nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, James F.

    1988-01-01

    Swivel joint allows liquid-nitrogen pipe to rotate through angle of 100 degree with respect to mating pipe. Functions without cracking hard foam insulation on lines. Pipe joint rotates on disks so mechanical stress not transmitted to thick insulation on pipes. Inner disks ride on fixed outer disks. Disks help to seal pressurized liquid nitrogen flowing through joint.

  1. Joint audits - benefit or burden?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus; Thinggaard, Frank

    a joint audit regime to a single auditor/voluntary joint audit regime. The dataset used in this paper has been collected for the full population of non-financial Danish companies listed on the Copenhagen Stock Exchange (CSE) in the years 2004 and 2005. We find that a majority of firms perceive joint...

  2. Acute Appendicitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tind, Sofie; Qvist, Niels

    2017-01-01

    and treatment of AA it is important that the classifications are consistent. Furthermore, in the clinical settings, incorrect classification might lead to over diagnosing and a prolonged antibiotic treatment. The aim of our study was to investigate the concordance between perioperative diagnosis made......BACKGROUND: The classification of acute appendicitis (AA) into various grades is not consistent, partly because it is not clear whether the perioperative or the histological findings should be the foundation of the classification. When comparing results from the literature on the frequency...

  3. Joint International Accelerator School

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Accelerator School

    2014-01-01

    The CERN and US Particle Accelerator Schools recently organised a Joint International Accelerator School on Beam Loss and Accelerator Protection, held at the Hyatt Regency Hotel, Newport Beach, California, USA from 5-14 November 2014. This Joint School was the 13th in a series of such schools, which started in 1985 and also involves the accelerator communities in Japan and Russia.   Photo courtesy of Alfonse Pham, Michigan State University.   The school attracted 58 participants representing 22 different nationalities, with around half from Europe and the other half from Asia and the Americas. The programme comprised 26 lectures, each of 90 minutes, and 13 hours of case study. The students were given homework each day and had an opportunity to sit a final exam, which counted towards university credit. Feedback from the participants was extremely positive, praising the expertise and enthusiasm of the lecturers, as well as the high standard and quality of their lectures. Initial dis...

  4. Posterolateral elbow joint instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Bo Sanderhoff; Søjbjerg, Jens Ole; Nielsen, K K

    1998-01-01

    Thirty-five osteoligamentous elbows were included in a study on the kinematics of posterolateral elbow joint instability during the pivot shift test (PST) before and after separate ligament cuttings in the lateral collateral ligament complex (LCLC). Division of the annular ligament or the lateral...... ulnar collateral ligament caused no laxity during the PST. Division of the lateral collateral ligament caused maximal laxity of 4 degrees and 23 degrees during forced PST in valgus and external rotation (supination), respectively. Cutting of the LCLC at the ulnar or the humeral insertion was necessary...... for any PST stressed elbow joint laxity to occur. Total division of the LCLC induced a maximal laxity of 7.9 degrees and 37 degrees during forced PST in valgus and external rotation (supination), respectively. This study suggests the lateral collateral ligament to be the primary soft tissue constraint...

  5. JET Joint Undertaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, B.E.; Lallia, P.; O'Hara, G.W.; Pollard, I.E.

    1987-06-01

    The paper presents the annual report of the Joint European Torus (JET) Joint Undertaking, 1986. The report is divided into two parts: a part on the scientific and technical programme of the project, and a part setting out the administration and organisation of the Project. The first part includes: a summary of the main features of the JET apparatus, the JET experimental programme, the position of the Project in the overall Euratom programme, and how JET relates to other large fusion devices throughout the world. In addition, the technical status of JET is described, as well as the results of the JET operations in 1986. The final section of the first part outlines the proposed future programme of JET. (U.K.)

  6. Peripheral degenerative joint diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilzio Antonio da Silva

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease, is the most commonrheumatic disorder mainly in a geriatric population. Manifestationsare pain, stiffness and functional loss in the affected joint.According to etiology it is classifi ed as primary (or idiopathicand secondary. Some risk factors for disease development aregenetics, race, age, sex, obesity, occupational activities andarticular biomechanics. Pathogenesis is the same for any cause orlocalization, being catabolic alterations, with synthesis, inhibitionand reparing intent of the cartilage matrix. Metalloproteinases andcytokines (IL-1,IL-6,TNF-α actions promote infl ammatory reactionand cartilage degradation. Pain, the most important symptom,does not correlate with radiologic fi ndings. Peripheral osteoarthritisoccurs predominantly in the knee, hip and hand. Diagnosis is basedon clinical features, laboratorial tests and radiological changes.Rheumatological associations’ guidelines for treatment includenon-pharmacologic (education, physiotherapy, assistive devices,and pharmacologic (analgesics, anti-infl ammatory drugs therapyand surgery. Arthroplasty seems to work better than medicines, butshould be used if other treatments have failed.

  7. Arthrography of the ankle joint in chronic instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dory, M.A.

    1986-05-01

    Papers on arthrography of injuries of the lateral ligaments of the ankle relate mainly to recent distortion of the joint. Arthrography performed at a later stage after injury generally is considered useless. In fact, changes in chronic instability are observed; they are subtle and consist either of small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or communication of the joint with the peroneal tendon sheaths. Arthrography was assessed in 61 cases of recurrent lateral sprains of the ankle more than 2 weeks after acute injury; 38 were considered as positive. Twenty-five patients had operative evaluation, with four false negative and one false positive results. Small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or opacification of the peroneal tendon sheaths are sequelae of an acute sprain with tear of the anterior talofibular and/or the calcaneofibular ligaments. Although false negative results occur, arthrography is useful in the preoperative assessment of chronic ankle instability.

  8. Arthrography of the ankle joint in chronic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dory, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Papers on arthrography of injuries of the lateral ligaments of the ankle relate mainly to recent distortion of the joint. Arthrography performed at a later stage after injury generally is considered useless. In fact, changes in chronic instability are observed; they are subtle and consist either of small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or communication of the joint with the peroneal tendon sheaths. Arthrography was assessed in 61 cases of recurrent lateral sprains of the ankle more than 2 weeks after acute injury; 38 were considered as positive. Twenty-five patients had operative evaluation, with four false negative and one false positive results. Small recesses adjacent to the lateral malleolus or opacification of the peroneal tendon sheaths are sequelae of an acute sprain with tear of the anterior talofibular and/or the calcaneofibular ligaments. Although false negative results occur, arthrography is useful in the preoperative assessment of chronic ankle instability. (orig.)

  9. Joint Counterdrug Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-02-17

    Chapter II Joint Pub 3-07.4 cocaine HCL production. There are over 150 groups trafficking in cocaine, with cartels centered in Medellin and Cali. These...nontraditional mapping products and several digital mapping data bases for geological information and intelligence systems. • Defense Security Assistance Agency...variety of means. Dissemination means include personal contact, physical transfer or courier of hard copy textual and graphic materials, digital and

  10. Jet Joint Undertaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keen, B.E.; O'Hara, G.W.; Pollard, I.E.

    1988-07-01

    The paper presents the Jet Joint Undertaking annual report 1987. A description is given of the JET and Euratom and International Fusion Programmes. The technical status of JET is outlined, including the development and improvements made to the system in 1987. The results of JET Operation in 1987 are described within the areas of: density effects, temperature improvements, energy confinement studies and other material effects. The contents also contain a summary of the future programme of JET. (U.K.)

  11. Joint Fire Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-30

    intelligence application package for theater battle management core system ( TBMCS ) functionality at wing and squadron levels. The automated four... TBMCS , Joint Surveillance and Target Attack Radar System (Ground Control Station), and Global Command and Control System, as well as with Allied FA...The TBMCS is a force level integrated air C2 system. TBMCS provides hardware, software, and communications interfaces to support the preparation

  12. Australias Joint Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    headquarters command and control architecture , including consideration of our suggestion of formalising the strategic J staff system for the support of... architecture … to support successful joint operations.”28 Our analysis involving consultation with a number of senior officers indicates that a more...transported armies into battle since ancient Egyptian times.57 The cooperation between the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) and the Australian Army began with

  13. The impact of joint ventures on U.S. hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jeffrey P

    2006-01-01

    This quantitative research study assesses the organizational characteristics, market factors, and profitability of US hospitals that operate joint ventures with other health care organizations. Data was obtained from the 2001 American Hospital Association annual survey, the Area Resource File, and the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services Minimum Data Set. These data files provide essential information on individual acute care hospitals, the communities they serve, and the level of financial performance. Descriptive statistics were evaluated and a logistic regression model was utilized to examine hospitals operating joint ventures. The study found hospitals that operate joint ventures are located in communities with more elderly patients, lower unemployment, and lower HMO penetration. From an operating performance perspective, hospitals that operate joint ventures have a higher occupancy rate, a higher average length of stay, more clinical services, lower long-term debt, and a greater number of managed care contracts. The results also appear to indicate that joint ventures have a positive financial impact on US hospitals. The study has managerial implications supporting the use of joint ventures to improve hospital performance and policy implications on resource allocation.

  14. Formation of tough composite joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brun, M.K.

    1997-05-01

    Joints which exhibit tough fracture behavior were formed in a composite with a Si/SiC matrix reinforced with Textron SCS-6 fibers with either boron nitride or silicon nitride fiber coatings. In composites with BN coatings fibers were aligned uniaxially, while composites with Si 3 N 4 -coated fibers had a 0/90 degree architecture. Lapped joints (joints with overlapping fingers) were necessary to obtain tough behavior. Geometrical requirements necessary to avoid brittle joint failure have been proposed. Joints with a simple overlap geometry (only a few fingers) would have to be very long in order to prevent brittle failure. Typical failure in these joints is caused by a crack propagating along the interfaces between the joint fingers. Joints of the same overall length, but with geometry changed to be symmetric about the joint centerline and with an extra shear surface exhibited tough fractures accompanied with extensive fiber pullout. The initial matrix cracking of these joints was relatively low because cracks propagated easily through the ends of the fingers. Joints with an optimized stepped sawtooth geometry produced composite-like failures with the stress/strain curves containing an elastic region followed by a region of rising stress with an increase of strain. Increasing the fiber/matrix interfacial strength from 9 to 25 MPa, by changing the fiber coating, increased matrix cracking and ultimate strength of the composite significantly. The best joints had matrix cracking stress and ultimate strength of 138 and 240 MPa, respectively. Joint failure was preceded by multiple matrix cracking in the entire composite. The high strength of the joints will permit building of structures containing joints with only a minor reduction of design stresses

  15. Laboratory characterization of rock joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsiung, S.M.; Kana, D.D.; Ahola, M.P.; Chowdhury, A.H.; Ghosh, A.

    1994-05-01

    A laboratory characterization of the Apache Leap tuff joints under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loads has been undertaken to obtain a better understanding of dynamic joint shear behavior and to generate a complete data set that can be used for validation of existing rock-joint models. Study has indicated that available methods for determining joint roughness coefficient (JRC) significantly underestimate the roughness coefficient of the Apache Leap tuff joints, that will lead to an underestimation of the joint shear strength. The results of the direct shear tests have indicated that both under cyclic pseudostatic and dynamic loadings the joint resistance upon reverse shearing is smaller than that of forward shearing and the joint dilation resulting from forward shearing recovers during reverse shearing. Within the range of variation of shearing velocity used in these tests, the shearing velocity effect on rock-joint behavior seems to be minor, and no noticeable effect on the peak joint shear strength and the joint shear strength for the reverse shearing is observed

  16. Acute lower extremity ischaemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute lower extremity ischaemia. Acute lower limb ischaemia is a surgical emergency. ... is ~1.5 cases per 10 000 persons per year. Acute ischaemia ... Table 2. Clinical features discriminating embolic from thrombotic ALEXI. Clinical features.

  17. Acute kidney failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Renal failure - acute; ARF; Kidney injury - acute Images Kidney anatomy References Devarajan P. Biomarkers for assessment of renal function during acute kidney injury. In: Alpern RJ, Moe OW, Caplan M, ...

  18. IMPLEMENTATION OF ESG FOR INTERNATIONAL JOINT EDUCATION PROGRAMMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera I. Zabotkina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: joint international programmes stimulate staff and student mobility, provide joint studies, provide development of joint study programmes of excellence, and open up new possibilities for cooperation between countries. Promotion and development of joint international programmes depend on effective quality assurance system which is high on the universities` priority list. ESG provide solid basis for the quality assurance system development at both institutional and programme levels. The problems of ESG interpretation in compliance with national legislative systems and education traditions in the countries participating in Bologna process are paid much attention to. Our emphases are on the practical aspects of ESG (2015 version implementation. The article concentrates on one of the most acute problems facing Russian Higher Education Institutions in the field of development and promotion of joint international programs: the problem of setting up modern quality assurance systems compatible with those in European HEIs is closely correlating with the profile of the journal “Integration of Education”. The journal centers around the publications on the enhancement and dissemination of the best practices on integration of regional education in Russia and abroad. Materials and Methods: methodical and practical aspects of the implementation of the ESG provisions for international joint educational programs on the basis of the European approach to education quality are the materials of study. The descriptive method, analysis of documents about education quality, and synthesis were used as research methods. Results: the authors come up with concrete recommendations for the implementation of the ESG renewed version (2015 in Quality Assurance systems of joint international programmes. This approach enhances the practical value of ESG. Modern Quality Assurance system is one of the main prerequisites for the successful collaboration among higher

  19. Temporomandibular joint motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, M.; Kawamura, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Itou, S.; Odori, T.; Ishii, Y.; Torizuka, K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates MR imaging with the therapeutic effect after splint therapy in internal derangement of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ). Fifteen patients (19 TMJs) with internal derangement of the TMJ and five normal volunteers (10 TMJs) were examined with sagittal T1-weighted spin-echo and gradient recalled acquisition in a steady state (GRASS) MR imaging. MR studies of the patients undergoing splint therapy were performed with an without splints. Pseudodynamic images of TMJ motion provide information that was not available from spin-echo T1-weighted images

  20. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board has examined the internal appeal lodged by a former member of the personnel, a beneficiary of the CERN Pension Fund, against the calculation of his pension in the framework of the Progressive Retirement Programme.   The person concerned has not objected to the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General being brought to the attention of the members of the personnel. In application of Article R VI 1.18 of the Staff Regulations, these documents will therefore be available from 26 July to 11 August 2013 at the following link. HR Department Head Office

  1. JOINT ADVISORY APPEALS BOARD

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Luc Vos with regard to advancement. As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 14 to 28 June 2002. Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  2. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board has examined the internal appeal lodged by a member of the personnel against the decision to grant him only a periodic one-step advancement for the 2006 reference year. The person concerned has not objected to the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General being brought to the attention of the members of the personnel. In application of Article R VI 1.18 of the Staff Regulations, these documents will therefore be posted on the notice board of the Main building (bldg. 500) from 1 September to 14 September 2008. Human Resources Department (73911)

  3. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Poul Frandsen concerning his assimilation into the new career structure. As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 13 to 24 January 2003. Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  4. JOINT ADVISORY APPEALS BOARD

    CERN Multimedia

    Personnel Division

    1999-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Joào Bento with regard to residential category. As the appellant has not objected, the recommendations of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article RÊVIÊ1.20 of the Staff Regulations.The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N¡ 60) from 29 October to 12 November 1999.Personnel DivisionTel. 74128

  5. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine an appeal lodged by a member of the personnel with regard to advancement. The person concerned has requested that the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General be brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (No. 60) from 24 March to 10 April 2006. Human Resources Department Tel. 74128

  6. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

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    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine an internal appeal lodged by a member of the personnel with regard to the decision not to grant him an indefinite contract. The person concerned has requested that the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General be brought to the notice of the members of the personnel, in accordance with Article R VI 1.18 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice board of the Main building (Bldg. 60) from 24 September to 7 October 2007. Human Resources Department

  7. JOINT ADVISORY APPEALS BOARD

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Olivier Francis Martin with regard to indefinite contract. As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 8 to 25 June 2001.

  8. JOINT ADVISORY APPEALS BOARD

    CERN Multimedia

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    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Jack Blanchard with regard to 'non recognition of specific functions'. As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 12th to 26th April 2002. Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  9. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mrs Judith Igo-Kemenes concerning the application of procedures foreseen by Administrative Circular N§ 26 (Rev. 3). As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 6 to 20 June 2003. Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  10. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mrs Maria DIMOU with regard to a periodic one-step increase. As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 30 April to 14 May 2004. Human Resources Department Tel. 74128

  11. JOINT ADVISORY APPEALS BOARD

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Joël Lahaye with regard to non-resident allowance. As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 18 May to 1st June 2001.

  12. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

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    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board has examined the internal appeal lodged by a member of the personnel with regard to the decision not to award him a periodic one-step advancement for the 2006 reference year. The person concerned has not objected to the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General being brought to the notice of the members of the personnel. In application of Article R VI 1.18 of the Staff Regulations, these documents will therefore be posted on the notice board of the Main building (Bldg. 500) from 17 March to 30 March 2008. Human Resources Department Tel. 73911

  13. JOINT ADVISORY APPEALS BOARD

    CERN Multimedia

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    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Bertrand Nicquevert with regard to the non-resident allowance. As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 29 November to 13 December 2002. Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  14. JOINT ADVISORY APPEALS BOARD

    CERN Multimedia

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    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Antonio Millich with regard to advancement. As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 27 September to 11 October 2002. Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  15. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

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    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine an appeal lodged by a member of the personnel with regard to a periodic one-step increase. As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 1 to 15 April 2005. Human Resources Department Tel. 74128

  16. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

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    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board has examined the internal appeal lodged by a member of the personnel against the decision to grant him only a periodic one-step advancement for the 2006 reference year. The person concerned has not objected to the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General being brought to the attention of the members of the personnel. In application of Article R VI 1.18 of the Staff Regulations, these documents will therefore be posted on the notice board of the Main Building (Bldg. 500) from 1 September to 14 September 2008. Human Resources Department (73911)

  17. JOINT ADVISORY APPEALS BOARD

    CERN Multimedia

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    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Gert Jan Bossen with regard to dependent child allowance. As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 1st to 15 March 2002. Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  18. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board has examined the internal appeal lodged by a member of the personnel with regard to the decision not to grant him an indefinite contract. The person concerned has not objected to the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General being brought to the notice of the members of the personnel. In application of Article R VI 1.18 of the Staff Regulations, these documents will therefore be posted on the notice board of the Main Building (Bldg. 500) from 26 May to 6 June 2008. Human Resources Department (73911)

  19. JOINT ADVISORY APPEALS BOARD

    CERN Multimedia

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    2002-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Serge Peraire with regard to exceptional advancement. As the appellant has not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 17 to 31 May 2002. Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  20. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2008-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine an internal appeal lodged by a member of the personnel with regard to the decision not to grant him an indefinite contract. The person concerned has not objected to the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General being brought to the notice of the members of the personnel, in accordance with Article R VI 1.18 of the Staff Regulations. These documents will therefore be posted on the notice board of the Main Building (Bldg. 60) from 21 January to 3 February 2008. Human Resources Department (73911)

  1. Patellofemoral joint motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanford, W.; Phelan, J.; Albright, J.; Kathol, M.; Rooholamini, S.A.; El-Khoury, G.Y.; Palutsis, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the use of ultrafast computed tomography (CT) to obtain dynamic images of the patellofemoral joint during active motion. Thirty-eight patients underwent measurements of tangent offset, bisect offset, congruence angle, patellar tilt angle, lateral patellofemoral angle, sulcus angle, and sulcus depth made during leg movement. Selected parameters were compared with Merchant views. Significant correlations were obtained between Merchant views and comparable ultrafast CT views for all parameters except sulcus angle. Correlations between the other parameters were poor. Cine strips showed two patterns of movement; the patella remained centered either throughout excursion or until the last 20 0 of full extension, when it would sublux laterally

  2. Joint Advisory Appeals Board

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Aloïs Girardoz with regard to classification and advancement. As the appellant has not objected, the Board's report and the Director-General's decision will be brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 15 to 29 August 2003. Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  3. Management of chronic ankle pain using joint mobilization and ASTYM® treatment: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Slaven, Emily J; Mathers, Jessie

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of ankle sprains predominately focuses on the acute management of this condition; less emphasis is placed on the treatment of ankle sprains in the chronic phase of recovery. Manual therapy, in the form of joint mobilization and manipulation, has been shown to be effective in the management of this condition, but the combination of joint mobilization and manipulation in tandem with ASTYM® treatment has not been explored. The purpose of this case report is to chronicle the management ...

  4. Ergonomic Assessment of Handheld Laser Technology in De-painting Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-03-11

    abducted (similar to cradling a phone). This awkward posture can cause unnecessary stress at the shoulder ( acromioclavicular joint and the...awkward posture can cause unnecessary stress at the shoulder ( acromioclavicular joint and the glenohumeral joint) and may contribute to bursitis or

  5. Glenohumeral Joint Injections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Christopher; Dhawan, Aman; Harwood, Daniel; Gochanour, Eric; Romeo, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Context: Intra-articular injections into the glenohumeral joint are commonly performed by musculoskeletal providers, including orthopaedic surgeons, family medicine physicians, rheumatologists, and physician assistants. Despite their frequent use, there is little guidance for injectable treatments to the glenohumeral joint for conditions such as osteoarthritis, adhesive capsulitis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Evidence Acquisition: We performed a comprehensive review of the available literature on glenohumeral injections to help clarify the current evidence-based practice and identify deficits in our understanding. We searched MEDLINE (1948 to December 2011 [week 1]) and EMBASE (1980 to 2011 [week 49]) using various permutations of intra-articular injections AND (corticosteroid OR hyaluronic acid) and (adhesive capsulitis OR arthritis). Results: We identified 1 and 7 studies that investigated intra-articular corticosteroid injections for the treatment of osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis, respectively. Two and 3 studies investigated the use of hyaluronic acid in osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis, respectively. One study compared corticosteroids and hyaluronic acid injections in the treatment of osteoarthritis, and another discussed adhesive capsulitis. Conclusion: Based on existing studies and their level of evidence, there is only expert opinion to guide corticosteroid injection for osteoarthritis as well as hyaluronic acid injection for osteoarthritis and adhesive capsulitis. PMID:24427384

  6. Phytomedicine in Joint Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorin Dragos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic joint inflammatory disorders such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis have in common an upsurge of inflammation, and oxidative stress, resulting in progressive histological alterations and disabling symptoms. Currently used conventional medication (ranging from pain-killers to biological agents is potent, but frequently associated with serious, even life-threatening side effects. Used for millennia in traditional herbalism, medicinal plants are a promising alternative, with lower rate of adverse events and efficiency frequently comparable with that of conventional drugs. Nevertheless, their mechanism of action is in many cases elusive and/or uncertain. Even though many of them have been proven effective in studies done in vitro or on animal models, there is a scarcity of human clinical evidence. The purpose of this review is to summarize the available scientific information on the following joint-friendly medicinal plants, which have been tested in human studies: Arnica montana, Boswellia spp., Curcuma spp., Equisetum arvense, Harpagophytum procumbens, Salix spp., Sesamum indicum, Symphytum officinalis, Zingiber officinalis, Panax notoginseng, and Whitania somnifera.

  7. Jointly Sponsored Research Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Everett A. Sondreal; John G. Hendrikson; Thomas A. Erickson

    2009-03-31

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-98FT40321 funded through the Office of Fossil Energy and administered at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) supported the performance of a Jointly Sponsored Research Program (JSRP) at the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) with a minimum 50% nonfederal cost share to assist industry in commercializing and effectively applying highly efficient, nonpolluting energy systems that meet the nation's requirements for clean fuels, chemicals, and electricity in the 21st century. The EERC in partnership with its nonfederal partners jointly performed 131 JSRP projects for which the total DOE cost share was $22,716,634 (38%) and the nonfederal share was $36,776,573 (62%). Summaries of these projects are presented in this report for six program areas: (1) resource characterization and waste management, (2) air quality assessment and control, (3) advanced power systems, (4) advanced fuel forms, (5) value-added coproducts, and (6) advanced materials. The work performed under this agreement addressed DOE goals for reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions through efficiency, capture, and sequestration; near-zero emissions from highly efficient coal-fired power plants; environmental control capabilities for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, fine respirable particulate (PM{sub 2.5}), and mercury; alternative transportation fuels including liquid synfuels and hydrogen; and synergistic integration of fossil and renewable resources.

  8. Joint resistance measurements of pancake and terminal joints for JT-60SA EF coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Obana, Tetsuhiro, E-mail: obana.tetsuhiro@LHD.nifs.ac.jp [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Takahata, Kazuya; Hamaguchi, Shinji; Mito, Toshiyuki; Imagawa, Shinsaku [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Kizu, Kaname; Murakami, Haruyuki; Yoshida, Kiyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • To evaluate the joint fabrication technology for the JT-60SA EF coils, joint resistance measurements were conducted with a joint sample. • The joint sample was composed of pancake and terminal joints. • The measurements demonstrated that both joints fulfilled the design requirement. • Considering the measurements, the characteristics of both joints were investigated using an analytical model that represents the joints. -- Abstract: To evaluate the joint fabrication technology for the JT-60SA EF coils, joint resistance measurements were conducted using a sample consisting of pancake and terminal joints. Both joints are shake-hands lap joints composed of cable-in-conduit conductors and a pure copper saddle-shaped spacer. The measurements demonstrated that both joints fulfilled the design requirement. Considering these measurements, the characteristics of both joints were investigated using analytical models that represent the joints. The analyses indicated that the characteristics of the conductors used in the joints affect the characteristics of the joints.

  9. Altered joint tribology in osteoarthritis: Reduced lubricin synthesis due to the inflammatory process. New horizons for therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szychlinska, M A; Leonardi, R; Al-Qahtani, M; Mobasheri, A; Musumeci, G

    2016-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common form of joint disease. This review aimed to consolidate the current evidence that implicates the inflammatory process in the attenuation of synovial lubrication and joint tissue homeostasis in OA. Moreover, with these findings, we propose some evidence for novel therapeutic strategies for preventing and/or treating this complex disorder. The studies reviewed support that inflammatory mediators participate in the onset and progression of OA after joint injury. The flow of pro-inflammatory cytokines following an acute injury seems to be directly associated with altered lubricating ability in the joint tissue. The latter is associated with reduced level of lubricin, one of the major joint lubricants. Future research should focus on the development of new therapies that attenuate the inflammatory process and restore lubricin synthesis and function. This approach could support joint tribology and synovial lubrication leading to improved joint function and pain relief. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiosynoviorthesis in haemaphilic joint disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pad Bosch, P.J.I. van't; Putte, L.B.A. van de; Boerbooms, A.M.T.; Geerdink, P.J.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of radiosynoviorthesis on chronic haemophilic arthropathic joints were studied in six patients with severe haemophilia by a follow up study which spanned two and a half years. On clinical grounds the treatment was successful because pain and bleeding frequency diminished, although radiographic examination showed further deterioration of the treated joint. Chromosome damage was not detected. We conclude that radiosynoviorthesis is apparently changing the bleeding pattern of articular tissues without arresting the destruction and deformation of joints. (orig.) [de

  11. Acute Pancreatitis in acute viral hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K.C.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The association of acute viral hepatitis and acute pancreatitis is well described. This study was conducted to find out the frequency of pancreatic involvement in acute viral hepatitis in the Nepalese population. Methods: Consecutive patients of acute viral hepatitis presenting with severe abdominal pain between January 2005 and April 2010 were studied. Patients with history of significant alcohol consumption and gall stones were excluded. Acute viral hepatitis was diagnosed by clinical examination, liver function test, ultrasound examination and confirmed by viral serology. Pancreatitis was diagnosed by clinical presentation, biochemistry, ultrasound examination and CT scan. Results: Severe abdominal pain was present in 38 of 382 serologically-confirmed acute viral hepatitis patients. Twenty five patients were diagnosed to have acute pancreatitis. The pancreatitis was mild in 14 and severe in 11 patients. The etiology of pancreatitis was hepatitis E virus in 18 and hepatitis A virus in 7 patients. Two patients died of complications secondary to shock. The remaining patients recovered from both pancreatitis and hepatitis on conservative treatment. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis occurred in 6.5 % of patients with acute viral hepatitis. Cholelithiasis and gastric ulcers are the other causes of severe abdominal pain. The majority of the patients recover with conservative management. Keywords: acute viral hepatitis, acute pancreatitis, pain abdomen, hepatitis E, hepatitis A, endemic zone

  12. Leveraging Technology for Joint Training

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Walker, Jack

    1997-01-01

    .... While this innovation will have a significant impact on education and training, it will not fulfill its potential unless joint and component commanders understand what the technologies represent...

  13. Acute abdomen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beger, H.G.; Kern, E.

    1987-01-01

    The book first presents the anatomy and physiology of the abdomen and continues with chapters discussing clinical and laboratory aspects and a suitable order of diagnostic examinations with reference to the acute processes, explaining the diagnostic tools: ultrasonography, radiography including angiography and CT, tapping techniques and endoscopy together with their basic principles, examination techniques, and diagnosis. One chapter presents a complete survey of the processes involving the entire abdomen - as e.g. peritonitis, ileus, abdominal trauma, intraperitoneal hemorrage. This chapter profoundly discusses the diagnostics and therapies including emergency measures and surgery. Problems requiring consultation among varous specialists, in internal medicine, gynecology, urology, or pediatrics, are discussed in great detail. Information for the anesthetist is given for cases of emergency. More than one third of the book is devoted to organ-specific information, dicussing the pathogenesis, diagnostics, and therapy of the oesophagus, stomach, large and small intestine, bile ducts, pankreas, liver, spleen, and the abdominal vessels and the abdominal wall. (orig.) With 153 figs., 90 tabs [de

  14. Temporomandibular joint movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, M.; Itou, S.; Ishii, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Kawamura, Y.; Matsuda, T.; Hayashi, N.; Ishii, J.

    1992-01-01

    Ten temporomandibular joints (TMJs) of 5 healthy volunteers and 19 TMJs of internal derangements in 16 patients with splint therapy were examined with MR imaging. T1-weighted images were obtained only in the closed mouth position, and gradient recalled acquisition in steady state (GRASS) images were obtained in active opening and closing phases, allowing a pseudodynamic display of TMJ movement. All patients received protrusive splint treatment. The usefulness of MR imaging to assess the efficacy of splint therapy was evaluated. Corrected disk position with the splint in place was clearly demonstrated in 9 TMJs, corresponding with elimination of reciprocal clicking. Ten other TMJs of anterior disk displacement without reduction showed uncorrected disk position by the splint. This information could confirm the therapeutic efficacy, or suggest other treatment alternatives. GRASS MR imaging can provide accurate and physiologic information about disk function in initial and follow-up assessment of protrusive splint therapy. (orig.)

  15. JOINT ADVISORY APPEALS BOARD

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    The Joint Advisory Appeals Board was convened to examine the appeal lodged by Mr Neil Calder, Mrs Sudeshna Datta Cockerill, Mrs Andrée Fontbonne, Mrs Moniek Laurent and Mr Ulrich Liptow with regard to membership in the Pension Fund under the period with a Paid Associate contract, appeals dealt with on a collective basis. As the appellants have not objected, the report of the Board and the final decision of the Director-General are brought to the notice of the personnel in accordance with Article R VI 1.20 of the Staff Regulations. The relevant documents will therefore be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (N° 60) from 10 to 31 August 2001.

  16. Temporomandibular joint arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Hyung Sik; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Myoung Joon; Jun, Young Hwan; Chang, Duk Soo; Jung, Don Young; Jung, In Won

    1988-01-01

    The stress and occlusion disturbance are very important etiologic factors in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain dysfunction syndromes. Authors performed TMJ arthrograms in the patients with TMJ problem such as pain, click sound, limited motion and locking, etc. The following results noted: 1. The arthrographic findings of 22 TMJ were analyzed. a) Normal: 6 cases b) Anterior disc displacement with rediction: 6 cases · Early reduction: 2 cases · Intermediate reduction: 3 cases · Late reduction: 1 case c) Anterior disc displacement without reduction: 6 cases · Two cases had adhesion between the posterior portion of disc and the posterior surfaces of the articular eminence. 2. Among 22 cases, the clinical findings of 16 cases (73%) were compatible with arthrographic findings. 6 cases showed disparity between them.

  17. Sacroiliac joint: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khushali Tilvawala

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Sacroiliac joint (SIJ pain is one of the common but underdiagnosed source of mechanical low back pain. The incidence is estimated to be in the range of 15%–30% in patients with nonradicular low back pain. The signs and symptoms of SIJ pain mimic pain arising from other causes of low back pain. There is no single symptom or physical examination finding that can firmly diagnose SIJ as a source of patient's pain. There is good evidence suggesting that a combination of three or more positive provocative tests strongly suggests SIJ dysfunction. Intra-articular injection with local anesthetic is considered the gold standard for diagnosis of SIJ pain. Many treatment modalities are available for SIJ pain, ranging from conservative management to surgical interventions. This review article covers all the aspects of SIJ pain, with treatment section mainly covering evidence-based interventional procedures.

  18. Acute otitis externa

    OpenAIRE

    Hui, Charles PS

    2013-01-01

    Acute otitis externa, also known as ‘swimmer’s ear’, is a common disease of children, adolescents and adults. While chronic suppurative otitis media or acute otitis media with tympanostomy tubes or a perforation can cause acute otitis externa, both the infecting organisms and management protocol are different. This practice point focuses solely on managing acute otitis externa, without acute otitis media, tympanostomy tubes or a perforation being present.

  19. Prevalence of Concomitant Sacroiliac joint Dysfunction in Patients With Image Proven Herniated Lumbar Discs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salah Alalawi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Background:Sacroiliac joint (SIJ dysfunction is a widely known but poorly defined cause of low back pain. To our knowledge, few published studies have been conducted to evaluate systematically the prevalence and significance of concomitant sacroiliac joint dysfunction in patients with herniated lumbar discs. As concomitant SIJ dysfunction in low back pain patients is likely to respond to particular noninvasive interventions such as manipulation,improved understanding of the relationship between these two diagnoses would improve clinical decision making and research.Methods:This study was designated to estimate the prevalence of concomitant sacroiliac joint dysfunction in sub acute low back pain patients with image proven discopathy and evaluate the theory that sacroiliac joint dysfunction can be a source of pain and functional disability in discopathy. A total of 202 patients with sub acute radicular back pain and MRI proven herniated lumbar discs underwent standardized   physiatrist history and physical examination, specified for detection of concomitant sacroiliac joint dysfunction.Results: Sacroiliac joint dysfunction is a concomitant finding in 72.3% of evaluated patients.There was significantly higher SIJ dysfunction prevalence in female patients (p <0.0001. Conclusion: SIJ dysfunction is a significant pathogenic factor with high possibility of occurrence in low back pain. Thus, in the presence of radicular and sacroiliac joint symptoms, SIJ dysfunction, regardless of intervertebral disc pathology, must be considered in clinical decisiomaking.

  20. Acute pseudo-septic arthritis following viscosuplementation of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 70-year-old woman with a history of medial femoro-tibial compartment of knee osteoarthritis was admitted for acute arthritis six days after a second intra-articular injection of Hyaluronic acid. The joint fluid was inflammatory, with no crystals, and laboratory tests showed marked inflammation leading to antibiotic treatment for ...

  1. Haemodynamics in acute arthritis of the knee in puppies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bünger, C; Hjermind, J; Harving, S

    1984-01-01

    not significantly changed. A decrease of femoral muscle blood flow was encountered. Intraosseous pressure recordings during venous tamponade of the knee-joint capsules suggested a qualitative change of bone vasculature in acute arthritis. The juxta-articular bone blood flow in arthritis appears to be influenced...

  2. Theoretical analysis of rolled joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, R.K.

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for theoretically analysing the case of an externally restrained sandwich joint formed by a hypothetical uniform hydrostatic expansion process is outlined. Reference is made to a computer program based on this theory. Results illustrating the effect of major joint variables on residual contact pressure are presented and analysed. The applicability and limitations of this theory are discussed. (author)

  3. Arthroscopy of the ankle joint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, C. N.; Scholte, D.

    1997-01-01

    Ankle arthroscopy has become a standard procedure for a variety of indications. Joint distraction is applied by many authors. A recent retrospective multicentre study provoked the following questions. Is there an indication for diagnostic arthroscopy? Can arthroscopic surgery of the ankle joint be

  4. From joint to single audits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus; Thinggaard, Frank

    2018-01-01

    This study analyses audit quality differences between audits by a single big audit firm and joint audits with either one or two big audit firms. We exploit the unique situation in Denmark beginning on 1 January 2005, at which time a long-standing mandatory joint audit system for listed companies ...

  5. Degenerative joint disease on MRI and physical activity: a clinical study of the knee joint in 320 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bachmann, G.F.; Rauber, K.; Damian, M.S.; Rau, W.S.; Basad, E.

    1999-01-01

    We examined 320 patients with MRI and arthroscopy after an acute trauma to evaluate MRI in diagnosis of degenerative joint disease of the knee in relation to sports activity and clinical data. Lesions of cartilage and menisci on MRI were registered by two radiologists in consensus without knowledge of arthroscopy. Arthroscopy demonstrated grade-1 to grade-4 lesions of cartilage on 729 of 1920 joint surfaces of 320 knees, and MRI diagnosed 14 % of grade-1, 32 % of grade-2, 94 % of grade-3, and 100 % of grade-4 lesions. Arthroscopy explored 1280 meniscal areas and showed degenerations in 10 %, tears in 11.4 %, and complex lesions in 9.2 %. Magnetic resonance imaging was in agreement with arthroscopy in 81 % showing more degenerations but less tears of menisci than arthroscopy. Using a global system for grading the total damage of the knee joint into none, mild, moderate, or severe changes, agreement between arthroscopy and MRI was found in 82 %. Magnetic resonance imaging and arthroscopy showed coherently that degree of degenerative joint changes was significantly correlated to patient age or previous knee trauma. Patients over 40 years had moderate to severe changes on MRI in 45 % and patients under 30 years in only 22 %. Knee joints with a history of trauma without complete structural or functional reconstitution showed marked changes on MRI in 57 %, whereas stable joints without such alterations had degenerative changes in only 26 %. There was no correlation of degenerative disease to gender, weight, type, frequency, and intensity of sports activity. Therefore, MRI is an effective non-invasive imaging method for exact localization and quantification of chronic joint changes of cartilage and menisci that recommends MRI for monitoring in sports medicine. (orig.) (orig.)

  6. Transition joints in INDUS-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sridhar, R.; Amalraj, William; Shukla, S.K.; Jain, A.K.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A large number of welding joints are being employed in the fabrication of Indus-2 synchrotron storage ring being constructed at CAT. Apart from the TIG welded joints of aluminium alloy vacuum chambers, there are many other joints which are made between dissimilar metals. Stainless steel pipes are friction welded with aluminium pipes and are to be used as pumping ducts between vacuum pumps and the vacuum chambers. Similarly stainless steel flanges are fastened with aluminium flanges through a diamond seal. These joints are tested for a leak tightness of 2 x 10 -10 torr lit/sec of helium. This paper describes the details of the friction welded joints and their application in the Indus-2 synchrotron storage ring

  7. Induction brazing of complex joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Poul; Zhang, Wenqi; Bay, Niels

    2003-01-01

    , or if the hottest area is located outside the joint interface, a number of defects may appear: the braze metal may flow away from the joint, the flux may burn off, poor binding of the braze metal may appear or the braze metal may be overheated. Joint geometry as well as electro-magnetic properties of the work piece...... presents a combined numerical and experimental method for fast determination of appropriate coil geometry and position in induction brazing tube-to-plate joints of different ratios between tube and plate thickness and different combinations of the materials stainless steel, brass and copper. The method has...... proven to give successful results in brazing tube-plate joints of copper-brass, copper-stainless steel, stainless steel-brass, and stainless steel-stainless steel....

  8. Space Station alpha joint bearing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everman, Michael R.; Jones, P. Alan; Spencer, Porter A.

    1987-01-01

    Perhaps the most critical structural system aboard the Space Station is the Solar Alpha Rotary Joint which helps align the power generation system with the sun. The joint must provide structural support and controlled rotation to the outboard transverse booms as well as power and data transfer across the joint. The Solar Alpha Rotary Joint is composed of two transition sections and an integral, large diameter bearing. Alpha joint bearing design presents a particularly interesting problem because of its large size and need for high reliability, stiffness, and on orbit maintability. The discrete roller bearing developed is a novel refinement to cam follower technology. It offers thermal compensation and ease of on-orbit maintenance that are not found in conventional rolling element bearings. How the bearing design evolved is summarized. Driving requirements are reviewed, alternative concepts assessed, and the selected design is described.

  9. Correlation of the Features of the Lumbar Multifidus Muscle With Facet Joint Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bo; Jiang, Kaibiao; Li, Xinfeng; Zhang, Jidong; Liu, Zude

    2017-09-01

    Facet joint osteoarthritis is considered a consequence of the aging process; however, there is evidence that it may be associated with degenerative changes of other structures. The goal of this study was to investigate the correlation between lumbar multifidus muscle features and facet joint osteoarthritis. This retrospective study included 160 patients who had acute or chronic low back pain and were diagnosed with facet joint osteoarthritis on computed tomography scan. Morphometric parameters, including cross-sectional area, muscle-fat index, and percentage of bilateral multifidus asymmetry at L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1, were evaluated with T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Patients with facet joint osteoarthritis had a smaller cross-sectional area and a higher muscle-fat index than those without facet joint osteoarthritis (Posteoarthritis at all 3 spinal levels (Posteoarthritis only at L4-L5 (P=.005). Asymmetry of the bilateral multifidus cross-sectional area was independently associated with facet joint osteoarthritis at L5-S1 (P=.009), but did not seem to be responsible for asymmetric degeneration of the bilateral facet joints. A higher multifidus muscle-fat index was independently associated with facet joint osteoarthritis, and bilateral multifidus size asymmetry was associated with the development of facet joint osteoarthritis at L5-S1. It seems more accurate to consider facet joint osteoarthritis a failure of the whole joint structure, including the paraspinal musculature, rather than simply a failure of the facet joint cartilage. [Orthopedics. 2017; 40(5):e793-e800.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Joint action aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicary, Staci; Sperling, Matthias; von Zimmermann, Jorina; Richardson, Daniel C; Orgs, Guido

    2017-01-01

    Synchronized movement is a ubiquitous feature of dance and music performance. Much research into the evolutionary origins of these cultural practices has focused on why humans perform rather than watch or listen to dance and music. In this study, we show that movement synchrony among a group of performers predicts the aesthetic appreciation of live dance performances. We developed a choreography that continuously manipulated group synchronization using a defined movement vocabulary based on arm swinging, walking and running. The choreography was performed live to four audiences, as we continuously tracked the performers' movements, and the spectators' affective responses. We computed dynamic synchrony among performers using cross recurrence analysis of data from wrist accelerometers, and implicit measures of arousal from spectators' heart rates. Additionally, a subset of spectators provided continuous ratings of enjoyment and perceived synchrony using tablet computers. Granger causality analyses demonstrate predictive relationships between synchrony, enjoyment ratings and spectator arousal, if audiences form a collectively consistent positive or negative aesthetic evaluation. Controlling for the influence of overall movement acceleration and visual change, we show that dance communicates group coordination via coupled movement dynamics among a group of performers. Our findings are in line with an evolutionary function of dance-and perhaps all performing arts-in transmitting social signals between groups of people. Human movement is the common denominator of dance, music and theatre. Acknowledging the time-sensitive and immediate nature of the performer-spectator relationship, our study makes a significant step towards an aesthetics of joint actions in the performing arts.

  11. Joint seal in tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colquhoun, J.; White, G.V.

    1981-01-01

    A seal for a joint or gap between edges of adjacent wall sections (e.g. of concrete) of a liquid-containing vessel, such as a nuclear reactor cooling pond, comprises a sheet metal strip having longitudinally-extending edge parts, secured to the respective vessel-section edges, and a central part which is longitudinally corrugated to provide sufficient flexibility to accommodate slight relative movements between the vessel-section edges (e.g. due to thermal expansions). The edges of the sheet metal of the strip are turned in so that the edge parts of the strip are formed as generally U-section channels. These accommodate longitudinally extending securing bars which are bolted to the vessel wall sections by bolts which pass through the bars, through the free-edged wall of the channel section and through a longitudinally extending resilient seal pad compressed between that wall of the channel section and the vessel wall section to which it is secured. The other wall of the channel section (integral with the corrugated central part of the strip) has access windows through which the bolts are inserted and tightened, the windows being then closed off in liquid-tight manner by welding closure caps over them. (author)

  12. Temporomandibular Joint Regenerative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xavier Van Bellinghen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The temporomandibular joint (TMJ is an articulation formed between the temporal bone and the mandibular condyle which is commonly affected. These affections are often so painful during fundamental oral activities that patients have lower quality of life. Limitations of therapeutics for severe TMJ diseases have led to increased interest in regenerative strategies combining stem cells, implantable scaffolds and well-targeting bioactive molecules. To succeed in functional and structural regeneration of TMJ is very challenging. Innovative strategies and biomaterials are absolutely crucial because TMJ can be considered as one of the most difficult tissues to regenerate due to its limited healing capacity, its unique histological and structural properties and the necessity for long-term prevention of its ossified or fibrous adhesions. The ideal approach for TMJ regeneration is a unique scaffold functionalized with an osteochondral molecular gradient containing a single stem cell population able to undergo osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation such as BMSCs, ADSCs or DPSCs. The key for this complex regeneration is the functionalization with active molecules such as IGF-1, TGF-β1 or bFGF. This regeneration can be optimized by nano/micro-assisted functionalization and by spatiotemporal drug delivery systems orchestrating the 3D formation of TMJ tissues.

  13. THE HYDROGEN ION CONCENTRATION OF JOINT EXUDATES IN RHEUMATIC FEVER AND OTHER FORMS OF ARTHRITIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boots, R H; Cullen, G E

    1922-09-30

    1. The hydrogen ion concentration of joint exudates aspirated from patients ill with acute rheumatic fever, arthritis of undetermined origin, and bacterial arthritis was determined. The hydrogen ion concentrations of the joint exudates from patients with acute rheumatic fever approximated the normal reaction of blood, varying from pH 7.27 to 7.42. Exudates from patients with arthritis of undetermined origin varied in pH from 7.33 to 7.47. The pH of a joint effusion occurring in a patient with myocardial insufficiency was 7.34. Bacteriologically, all of these fluids were sterile by ordinary means of cultivation. An exudate aspirated from a knee infected with Staphylococcus aureus had a pH of 6.69, while that from a patient having an arthritis due to Streptococcus hoemolyticus was also acid, having a pH of 6.19. 2. Since a definitely acid medium is necessary for the liberation of free salicylic acid and since all of the joint fluids from patients with acute rheumatic fever were slightly alkaline, no free salicylic acid could possibly exist in such joint fluids following the administration of salicylates.

  14. The joint in psoriatic arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortezavi, Mahta; Thiele, Ralph; Ritchlin, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA), a chronic inflammatory joint disease associated with psoriasis, is notable for diversity in disease presentation, course and response to treatment. Equally varied are the types of musculoskeletal involvement which include peripheral and axial joint disease, dactylitis and enthesitis. In this review, we focus on the psoriatic joint and discuss pathways that underlie synovial, cartilage and bone inflammation and highlight key histopathologic features. The pivotal inflammatory mechanisms and pathobiology of PsA parallel findings in other forms of spondyloarthritis but are distinct from disease pathways described in rheumatoid synovitis and bone disease. The diagnosis of PsA from both a clinical and imaging perspective is also discussed.

  15. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000103.htm Acute respiratory distress syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening lung ...

  16. Joint action aesthetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Staci Vicary

    Full Text Available Synchronized movement is a ubiquitous feature of dance and music performance. Much research into the evolutionary origins of these cultural practices has focused on why humans perform rather than watch or listen to dance and music. In this study, we show that movement synchrony among a group of performers predicts the aesthetic appreciation of live dance performances. We developed a choreography that continuously manipulated group synchronization using a defined movement vocabulary based on arm swinging, walking and running. The choreography was performed live to four audiences, as we continuously tracked the performers' movements, and the spectators' affective responses. We computed dynamic synchrony among performers using cross recurrence analysis of data from wrist accelerometers, and implicit measures of arousal from spectators' heart rates. Additionally, a subset of spectators provided continuous ratings of enjoyment and perceived synchrony using tablet computers. Granger causality analyses demonstrate predictive relationships between synchrony, enjoyment ratings and spectator arousal, if audiences form a collectively consistent positive or negative aesthetic evaluation. Controlling for the influence of overall movement acceleration and visual change, we show that dance communicates group coordination via coupled movement dynamics among a group of performers. Our findings are in line with an evolutionary function of dance-and perhaps all performing arts-in transmitting social signals between groups of people. Human movement is the common denominator of dance, music and theatre. Acknowledging the time-sensitive and immediate nature of the performer-spectator relationship, our study makes a significant step towards an aesthetics of joint actions in the performing arts.

  17. Joint action aesthetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicary, Staci; Sperling, Matthias; von Zimmermann, Jorina; Richardson, Daniel C.

    2017-01-01

    Synchronized movement is a ubiquitous feature of dance and music performance. Much research into the evolutionary origins of these cultural practices has focused on why humans perform rather than watch or listen to dance and music. In this study, we show that movement synchrony among a group of performers predicts the aesthetic appreciation of live dance performances. We developed a choreography that continuously manipulated group synchronization using a defined movement vocabulary based on arm swinging, walking and running. The choreography was performed live to four audiences, as we continuously tracked the performers’ movements, and the spectators’ affective responses. We computed dynamic synchrony among performers using cross recurrence analysis of data from wrist accelerometers, and implicit measures of arousal from spectators’ heart rates. Additionally, a subset of spectators provided continuous ratings of enjoyment and perceived synchrony using tablet computers. Granger causality analyses demonstrate predictive relationships between synchrony, enjoyment ratings and spectator arousal, if audiences form a collectively consistent positive or negative aesthetic evaluation. Controlling for the influence of overall movement acceleration and visual change, we show that dance communicates group coordination via coupled movement dynamics among a group of performers. Our findings are in line with an evolutionary function of dance–and perhaps all performing arts–in transmitting social signals between groups of people. Human movement is the common denominator of dance, music and theatre. Acknowledging the time-sensitive and immediate nature of the performer-spectator relationship, our study makes a significant step towards an aesthetics of joint actions in the performing arts. PMID:28742849

  18. Anatomical basics, variations, and degenerative changes of the shoulder joint and shoulder girdle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prescher, Andreas E-mail: dkeyserlingk@post.klinikum.rwth-aachen.de

    2000-08-01

    -lesions may occur and at the glenoid rim, where the labrum is often not fixed to the bony margin, avulsions of the labrum may occur. This well-established anatomical condition must not be mistaken for a manifest Bankart-lesion. The glenohumeral ligaments, which are located in the ventral articular capsule, have a stabilizing function for the ventral part of the glenoid labrum. The glenohumeral ligaments lift the articular lip where it crosses the glenoid notch. This 'labrum-lift effect' supports the stabilizing features of the articular lip and the glenohumeral ligaments. The rotator cuff is composed of the tendons of the teres minor, infraspinatus, supraspinatus, and subscapularis muscles. This cuff has a poorly vascularized area, due to mechanical conditions, about 1.5 cm from the major tubercle, which causes degenerative changes and eventually may lead to ruptures. Results of the impingement-syndrome and the osteoarthrotic changes of the shoulder and acromioclavicular joint are also presented and discussed. Finally, the coracoclavicular joint, which probably represents no congenital entity but appears due to a changed, lowered position of the shoulder girdle, is discussed. The paper also presents instructive figures of anatomical preparations that can be used to make more precise radiological and differential diagnoses. All preparations were done by the author and are part of a series of more than 300 preparations of the shoulder joint and girdle.

  19. Education: A Joint Transformation Enabler

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alexander, Renita

    2003-01-01

    ... in an organization not known for its adaptability. Underlying the pursuit of transformational concepts necessary to respond to 21st century challenges is an emphasis on joint operations and doctrine...

  20. Finishing touch to joint venture

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "A new process for polishing titanium and its alloys has been announced following an agreement between Bripol (an Anopol/Delmet joint venture) of Birmingham and the European Organisation for Nuclear Reseach (CERN) in Geneva" (1 paragraph).

  1. MRI of the hip joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Czerny, C.; Noebauer-Huhmann, I.M.; Imhof, H.

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is performed to diagnose many pathologic conditions affecting the hip joint. Either conventional MRI (without contrast enhancement of the joint cavity) or MR arthrography is used to detect and most accurately differentiate hip joint pathologies. Conventional MRI is performed in cases of bone marrow edema, necrosis, arthrosis and especially the so-called ''activated arthrosis'', as well as in inflammatory and tumorous entities. MR arthography, which has only recently become available for use, is excellently suited for diagnosing lesions of the acetabular labrum, cartilage lesions, and free articular bodies. This article provides an overview about MRI characteristics and their accuracy of hip joint diseases and the impact on the therapeutic procedure. (orig.)

  2. Campus/Industry Joint Ventures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Eugene J.

    1985-01-01

    Opportunities for joint economic ventures of colleges and industry are discussed, and a variety of ventures undertaken by Duke University are outlined, including a health club, hotel, and office building. Tax and financing considerations are noted. (MSE)

  3. Engine mounts and structural joints

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    mental studies are presented, and limitations of the passive device are briefly discussed. .... For the sake of simplifying formulations, several studies have used .... that the component mode synthesis methods work well when the joint stiffness is ...

  4. Practical aspects of joint implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaelowa, A.

    1995-01-01

    Article 4, 2a of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change states the possibility of joint policies of different countries to achieve national greenhouse gas reduction commitments (Joint Implementation). The cost of reducing greenhouse gas emissions can be reduced drastically if industrialized countries shift abatement activities to developing countries as marginal cost of reduction is much higher in the former countries. In this way economic efficiency of abatement measures can be raised to the point where marginal cost is equal all over the world. At the Conference of the Parties in Berlin in March 1995, criteria for Joint Implementation are to be established. The paper discusses possible forms of Joint Implementation and develops criteria

  5. Joint Logistics, Fact or Fiction?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carroll, Walton

    1998-01-01

    ...) and the evolution of Joint doctrine to meet these new demands. The focus of this examination remains at the strategic level and the ability of the Services to meet the logistical demands of the modern theater battlefield...

  6. Joint Performance and Planning System

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — A joint State/USAID system hosted by State that integrates resource and performance information at the program level and enables more flexible and frequent entry of...

  7. Torsion testing of bed joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klavs Feilberg; Pedersen, Carsten Mørk

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a simple test method for determining the torsion strength of a single bed joint between two bricks and presents results from testing using this test method. The setup for the torsion test is well defined, require minimal preparation of the test specimen and the test can...... be carried out directly in a normal testing machine. The torsion strength is believed to be the most important parameter in out-of-plane resistance of masonry walls subjected to bending about an axis perpendicular to the bed joints. The paper also contains a few test results from bending of small walls about...... an axis perpendicular to the bed joints, which indicate the close connection between these results and results from torsion tests. These characteristics make the torsion strength well suited to act as substitute parameter for the bending strength of masonry about an axis perpendicular to the bed joints....

  8. Mechanically Evoked Torque and Electromyographic Responses During Passive Elbow Extension in Upper Limb Tension Test Position

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-25

    axis during passive elbow extension. A padded shoulder block was placed superior to the subject’s acromioclavicular joint to stabilize the shoulder...girdle position. A pressure sensor was used between the padded shoulder block and the acromioclavicular joint to monitor and standardize the pressure

  9. Popular treatment modalities in the management of sacroiliac joint dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.D. Watson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of sacroiliac joint (SIJ dysfunction presents aclinical challenge for physiotherapists. The aim of this study was to investigatecurrent physiotherapy practise in the management of acute and chronic SIJdysfunction. A chart audit of 677 SIJ patient reports (N=677 from 75 differentprivate physiotherapy practises were analysed to determine the following:(1 the prevalence of the use of exercise therapy, and the types of exercise used inthe management of SIJ dysfunction, and (2 the prevalence of other therapeuticmodalities utilised alongside exercise therapy. The results of the study indicated thatuse of exercise therapy, specifically stretches and mobility exercises, is a popular treatment choice by physiotherapists.Joint mobilisations and soft tissue massage often accompanied exercise. Despite research outcomes suggesting both astrengthening and stabilisation program for the lumbo-pelvic complex, these approaches were less favoured.

  10. AcuTable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dibbern, Simon; Rasmussen, Kasper Vestergaard; Ortiz-Arroyo, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we describe AcuTable, a new tangible user interface. AcuTable is a shapeable surface that employs capacitive touch sensors. The goal of AcuTable was to enable the exploration of the capabilities of such haptic interface and its applications. We describe its design and implementation...

  11. Acute mastoiditis in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthonsen, Kristian; Høstmark, Karianne; Hansen, Søren

    2013-01-01

    Conservative treatment of acute otitis media may lead to more complications. This study evaluates changes in incidence, the clinical and microbiological findings, the complications and the outcome of acute mastoiditis in children in a country employing conservative guidelines in treating acute...

  12. Management of Prosthetic Joint Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tande, Aaron J; Gomez-Urena, Eric O; Berbari, Elie F; Osmon, Douglas R

    2017-06-01

    Although uncommon, prosthetic joint infection is a devastating complication. This challenging condition requires a coordinated management approach to achieve good patient outcomes. This review details the general principles to consider when managing patients with prosthetic joint infection. The different medical/surgical treatment strategies and how to appropriately select a strategy are discussed. The data to support each strategy are presented, along with discussion of antimicrobial strategies in specific situations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Joint probabilities and quantum cognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acacio de Barros, J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the existence of joint probability distributions for quantumlike response computations in the brain. We do so by focusing on a contextual neural-oscillator model shown to reproduce the main features of behavioral stimulus-response theory. We then exhibit a simple example of contextual random variables not having a joint probability distribution, and describe how such variables can be obtained from neural oscillators, but not from a quantum observable algebra.

  14. Joint probabilities and quantum cognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acacio de Barros, J. [Liberal Studies, 1600 Holloway Ave., San Francisco State University, San Francisco, CA 94132 (United States)

    2012-12-18

    In this paper we discuss the existence of joint probability distributions for quantumlike response computations in the brain. We do so by focusing on a contextual neural-oscillator model shown to reproduce the main features of behavioral stimulus-response theory. We then exhibit a simple example of contextual random variables not having a joint probability distribution, and describe how such variables can be obtained from neural oscillators, but not from a quantum observable algebra.

  15. Continuum description for jointed media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.K.

    1982-04-01

    A general three-dimensional continuum description is presented for a material containing regularly spaced and approximately parallel jointing planes within a representative elementary volume. Constitutive relationships are introduced for linear behavior of the base material and nonlinear normal and shear behavior across jointing planes. Furthermore, a fracture permeability tensor is calculated so that deformation induced alterations to the in-situ values can be measured. Examples for several strain-controlled loading paths are presented

  16. Value of knee joint arthrography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luzsa, Gyoergy; Kiss Toth, Peter

    1985-01-01

    On the basis of the literature and the analysis of 204 examinations, the method and clinical application of knee joint arthrography are reviewed. 50 out of the 54 operated cases were perfectly diagnosed. The double contrast knee joint arthrography can be applied to detect meniscus changes, popliteal cysts, synovial disorders and chondral defects. The effectiveness of arthrography and arthroscopy was compared and the introduction of the former in each county seat is suggested. (author)

  17. Branching miter joints : principles and artwork

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeff, T.; Verhoeff, K.; Hart, G.W.; Sarhangi, R.

    2010-01-01

    A miter joint connects two beams, typically of the same cross section, at an angle such that the longitudinal beam edges continue across the joint. When more than two beams meet in one point, like in a tree, we call this a branching joint. In a branching miter joint, the beams’ longitudinal edges

  18. 12 CFR 347.107 - Joint ventures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Joint ventures. 347.107 Section 347.107 Banks... INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.107 Joint ventures. (a) Joint ventures. If a bank, directly or indirectly, acquires or holds an equity interest in a foreign organization that is a joint venture, and the bank or its...

  19. About the Joint Chiefs of Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content (Press Enter). Toggle navigation Joint Chiefs of Staff Joint Chiefs of Staff Joint Chiefs of Staff Facebook Twitter YouTube Flickr Blog Instagram Search JCS: Search Search Search JCS: Search Home Media News Photos Videos Publications About The Joint Staff Chairman Vice Chairman

  20. Degenerative Joint Diseases and Neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Mariella; Skaper, Stephen D; Coaccioli, Stefano; Varrassi, Giustino; Paladini, Antonella

    2017-04-01

    Rheumatic and joint diseases, as exemplified by osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, are among the most widespread painful and disabling pathologies across the globe. Given the continuing rise in life expectancy, their prevalence is destined to grow. Osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease, is, in particular, on its way to becoming the fourth leading cause of disability worldwide by 2020, with the rising incidence of obesity in addition to age being important factors. It is estimated that 25% of osteoarthritic individuals are unable to perform daily activities. Accompanying osteoarthritis is rheumatoid arthritis, which is a chronic systemic disease that often causes pain and deformity. At least 50% of those affected are unable to remain gainfully employed within 10 years of disease onset. A growing body of evidence now points to inflammation, locally and more systemically, as a promoter of damage to joints and bones, as well as joint-related functional deficits. The pathogenesis underlying joint diseases remains unclear; however, it is currently believed that cross-talk between cartilage and subchondral bone-and loss of balance between these two structures in joint diseases-is a critical element. This view is amplified by the presence of mast cells, whose dysregulation is associated with alterations of junction structures (cartilage, bone, synovia, matrix, nerve endings, and blood vessels). In addition, persistent activation of mast cells facilitates the development of spinal neuroinflammation mediated through their interaction with microglia. Unfortunately, current treatment strategies for rheumatic and articular disease are symptomatic and do little to limit disease progression. Research now should be directed at therapeutic modalities that target osteoarticular structural elements and thereby delaying disease progression and joint replacement. © 2016 World Institute of Pain.

  1. [Classification and Treatment of Sacroiliac Joint Dislocation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Zhen; Huang, Zhong; Li, Liang; Meng, Wei-Kun; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Hui; Wang, Guang-Lin; Huang, Fu-Guo

    2017-09-01

    To develop a renewed classification and treatment regimen for sacroiliac joint dislocation. According to the direction of dislocation of sacroiliac joint,combined iliac,sacral fractures,and fracture morphology,sacroiliac joint dislocation was classified into 4 types. Type Ⅰ (sacroiliac anterior dislocation): main fracture fragments of posterior iliac wing dislocated in front of sacroiliac joint. Type Ⅱ (sacroiliac posterior dislocation): main fracture fragments of posterior iliac wing dislocated in posterior of sacroiliac joint. Type Ⅲ (Crescent fracturedislocation of the sacroiliac joint): upward dislocation of posterior iliac wing with oblique fracture through posterior iliac wing. Type ⅢA: a large crescent fragment and dislocation comprises no more than onethird of sacroiliac joint,which is typically inferior. Type ⅢB: intermediatesize crescent fragment and dislocation comprises between one and twothirds of joint. Type ⅢC: a small crescent fragment where dislocation comprises most,but not the entire joint. Different treatment regimens were selected for different types of fractures. Treatment for type Ⅰ sacroiliac joint dislocation: anterior iliac fossa approach pry stripping reset; sacroiliac joint fixed with sacroiliac screw through percutaneous. Treatment for type Ⅱ sacroiliac joint dislocation: posterior sacroiliac joint posterior approach; sacroiliac joint fixed with sacroiliac screw under computer guidance. Treatment for type ⅢA and ⅢB sacroiliac joint dislocation: posterior sacroiliac joint approach; sacroiliac joint fixed with reconstruction plate. Treatment for type ⅢC sacroiliac joint dislocation: sacroiliac joint closed reduction; sacroiliac joint fixed with sacroiliac screw through percutaneous. Treatment for type Ⅳ sacroiliac joint dislocation: posterior approach; sacroiliac joint fixed with spinal pelvic fixation. Results of 24 to 72 months patient follow-up (mean 34.5 months): 100% survival,100% wound healing,and 100

  2. Acute hand and wrist injuries in athletes: evaluation and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, W J; Slowman, L S

    2001-01-01

    Acute hand and wrist injuries in the athlete constitute a unique orthopaedic challenge. Because of the particular demands on the athlete (e.g., financial implications, coaching and administration pressures, self-esteem issues), a specialized management approach is often necessary. Common sites of injury include the ulnar collateral ligament of the thumb metacarpophalangeal joint, proximal interphalangeal joint, metacarpals and phalanges, scaphoid, hamate, and distal radius. Treatment of these injuries varies depending on the patient's age, sport, position played, and level of competition, but departures from standard practice as regards surgery, rehabilitation, and return to competition should never compromise care.

  3. Rheumatoid arthritis affecting temporomandibular joint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amandeep Sodhi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a chronic, systemic, autoimmune inflammatory disorder that is characterized by joint inflammation, erosive properties and symmetric multiple joint involvement. Temporomandibular joint (TMJ is very rare to be affected in the early phase of the disease, thus posing diagnostic challenges for the dentist. Conventional radiographs fail to show the early lesions due to its limitations. More recently cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT has been found to diagnose the early degenerative changes of TMJ and hence aid in the diagnosis of the lesions more accurately. Our case highlights the involvement of TMJ in RA and the role of advanced imaging (CBCT in diagnosing the bony changes in the early phase of the disease.

  4. Leaving a joint audit system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Claus; Thinggaard, Frank

    2014-01-01

    determinants model and an audit fee change model and include interaction terms. Findings: The authors find short-term fee reductions in companies switching to single audits, but only where the former joint audit contained a dominant auditor. The authors argue that in this situation bargaining power is more...... with the auditors than in a equally shared joint audit, and that the auditors' incentives to offer an initial fee discount are bigger. Research limitations/implications: The number of observations is constrained by the small Danish capital market. Future research could take a more qualitative research approach......, to examine whether the use of a single audit firm rather than two has an effect on audit quality. The area calls for further theory development covering audit fee and audit quality in joint audit settings. Practical implications: Comapnies should consider their relationship with their auditors before...

  5. Joint US/German Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Gulledge, Thomas; Jones, Albert

    1993-01-01

    This proceedings volume contains selected and refereed contributions that were presented at the conference on "Recent Developments and New Perspectives of Operations Research in the Area of Production Planning and Control" in Hagen/Germany, 25. - 26. June 1992. This conference was organized with the cooperation of the FernuniversiHit Hagen and was jointly hosted by the "Deutsche Gesellschaft fur Operations Research (DGOR)" and the "Manufacturing Special Interest Group of the Operations Research Society of America (ORSA-SIGMA)". For the organization of the conference we received generous financial support from the sponsors listed at the end of this volume. We wish to express our appreciation to all supporters for their contributions. This conference was the successor of the JOInt ORSA/DGOR-conference in Gaithersburg/Maryland, USA, on the 30. and 31. July 1991. Both OR-societies committed themselves in 1989 to host joint conferences on special topics of interest from the field of operations research. This goal ...

  6. Evaluation of Rock Joint Coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audy, Ondřej; Ficker, Tomáš

    2017-10-01

    A computer method for evaluation of rock joint coefficients is described and several applications are presented. The method is based on two absolute numerical indicators that are formed by means of the Fourier replicas of rock joint profiles. The first indicator quantifies the vertical depth of profiles and the second indicator classifies wavy character of profiles. The absolute indicators have replaced the formerly used relative indicators that showed some artificial behavior in some cases. This contribution is focused on practical computations testing the functionality of the newly introduced indicators.

  7. [Divorce and joint physical custody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golse, B

    2014-04-01

    This work first recalls the definition of joint physical custody, as well as the current legal procedure for obtaining it, its practical implementation, the financial implications for parents, and finally some statistics. Some psychological and psychopathological reflections on the impact of divorce on children are then presented before considering the question of joint physically custody with regard to attachment theory and depending on the age of the child (a great caution seems to be required before three years). The article concludes with a brief discussion of parental alienation syndrome. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  8. What Determines Joint Venture Termination?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Bo Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    Joint venture (JV) research continues to flourish as researchers seek to advance our understanding of why so many JVs fail. Cui and Kumar (this issue) take a contingency approach to explain how and why business relatedness may provide new insights as to what determines JV termination. This commen......Joint venture (JV) research continues to flourish as researchers seek to advance our understanding of why so many JVs fail. Cui and Kumar (this issue) take a contingency approach to explain how and why business relatedness may provide new insights as to what determines JV termination...

  9. Appearance of acute gouty arthritis on indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palestro, C.J.; Vega, A.; Kim, C.K.; Swyer, A.J.; Goldsmith, S.J.

    1990-01-01

    Indium-111-labeled leukocyte scintigraphy was performed on a 66-yr-old male with polyarticular acute gouty arthritis. Images revealed intense labeled leukocyte accumulation in a pattern indistinguishable from septic arthritis, in both knees and ankles, and the metatarsophalangeal joint of both great toes, all of which were involved in the acute gouty attack. Joint aspirate as well as blood cultures were reported as no growth; the patient was treated with intravenous colchicine and ACTH for 10 days with dramatic improvement noted. Labeled leukocyte imaging, repeated 12 days after the initial study, revealed near total resolution of joint abnormalities, concordant with the patient's clinical improvement. This case demonstrates that while acute gouty arthritis is a potential pitfall in labeled leukocyte imaging, in the presence of known gout, it may provide a simple, objective, noninvasive method of evaluating patient response to therapy

  10. Dual joint space arthrography in temporomandibular joint disorders: Comparison with single inferior joint space arthrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hyung Sik; Chang, Duk Soo; Lee, Kyung Soo; Kim, Woo Sun; Sung, Jung Ho; Jun, Young Hwan [Capital Armed Forces General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1989-02-15

    The temporomandibular joint(TMJ) is really a complex of two synovial space separated by fibrocartilaginous disc. Single inferior joint space arthrography is commonly performed for evaluation of TMJ disorders, which is known to be superior in demonstrating joint dynamics. But it reveals only the inferior surface of the disc. Therefore, dual space arthrography is superior to demonstrate the soft tissue anatomic feature of the joint such as disc position and shape. Authors performed 83 TMJ arthrograms in TMJ problems. Initially, the inferior joint space was done and then the superior space was sequentially contrasted. The follow results were noted: 1. In all cases, dual space arthrography revealed accurate disc shape and positions. 2. Concordant findings between the two techniques: 68 cases (82%). Discordance between the two techniques: 15 cases (18%) 3. Possible causes of discordance between inferior and dual space arthrography. a) Normal varians of anterior recess: 3 cases b) Posterior disc displacement: 4 cases c) Influence of the patient's head position change :4 cases d) False perforation: 2 cases e) Reduction change: 2 cases 4. In 5 cases with anterior displacement, dual space arthrography gave additional findings such as adhesion within the superior space, which could not be evaluated by single inferior space.

  11. Acute Idiopathic Scrotal Edema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micheál Breen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of acute idiopathic scrotal edema (AISE in a 4-year-old boy who presented with acute scrotal pain and erythema. The clinical features, ultrasound appearance, and natural history of this rare diagnosis are reviewed. In this report, we highlight the importance of good ultrasound technique in differentiating the etiology of the acute scrotum and demonstrate the color Doppler “Fountain Sign” that is highly suggestive of AISE.

  12. [Meniscoids of the intervertebral joints].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, J; Hert, J; Sevcík, P

    2002-01-01

    A large amount of material was used to study the distribution, location and shape of meniscoids in intervertebral joints of the human spine, from the atlanto-occipital joint to the sacrum, in order to find out how many of intervertebral joints had mobile meniscoids. These might be regarded as possible causes of spinal blockade or other vertebrogenous complaints. The materials provided by the Department of Anatomy and Department of Forensic Medicine at the Faculty of Medicine of Charles University in Pilznen included 20 cadaverous spines from humans aged 20 to 80 years. Access to each joint was provided by dissection of the articular capsule from the lower articular processes of the vertebra situated above. In the orthograde view, all meniscoids were described in terms of shape, size, consistence and location. Their structure was ascertained by histological examination of cross sections stained with haematoxylin and eosin. Meniscoids varying in shape and size were found in all of the intervertebral joints. They were classified by their histological structure as synovial, fat and fibrous meniscoids. The first category was observed frequently, the last only rarely. A total of 29 mobile meniscoids were recorded, most of them in the lumbar spine. Most of the meniscoids present in the cervical spine were of synovial and less frequently of fat types. Meniscoids found in the thoracic spine were poorly developed synovial ones and those present in the lumbar spine were of all types and were also largest in size. The most conspicuous meniscoids were seen in the spines that showed degenerative changes in intervertebral joints. Large fat pads were found in atlanto-occipital and atlanto-axial joints. Mobile meniscoids, most of them present in the lumbar spine (6.4% of all joints.), were connected with the capsule by a thin pedicle and it was possible to move them over a half of the articular surface. Some inter-individual changes were also found; in some spines, the most

  13. Histological and autoradiographic studies on rat joints after experimental nervous shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohl, C.

    1981-01-01

    22 SPF-Wistar-rats of both sexes, ranging in age from 49 to 56 days, were used in this investigation. Of these, 6 served as controls. The remaining 16 rats received i.v. injections of E. coli-neurotoxin serotyp 0 139 : K 82 (B). 6 rats died in acute shock. The surviving animals received 4 injections of the neurotoxin. The maximum weight loss 24 h p.i. amounted to an average of 8.3% in the females and 10.4% in the males. The clinical symptoms after the inducement of skock are slight to severe apathy, rough coat, dyspnoe and nervous symptoms which are expressed in various degrees of oversensitivity to touch or sound. The light microscopic examination of the synovial membrane from control animals coincides with the findings of previous investigations. In acute shock the joints show a middle to high degree of hyperemia, slight sticking effect, and isolated microthrombi in the vessels of the subsynoviocytic tissue as well as increased exsudation in the joint cavities. Edemas of the subsynoviocytic tissue are found to a small extent. The joints of animals in protracted shock show none of the changes evident in acute shock. Autoradiological examinations were performed on 13 rats which had been injected with 1 μCi/g body weight 3H-thymidine 1 hour before killing. Joints were embedded in paraffin- and methyl-methacrylat. Comparison cuts from the same stifle joint resulted each time in reproducable labeling indices. This can be taken as a confirmation of the applicability of 3H-autoradiography in the case of joint cuts embedded in methacrylat. (orig./MG) [de

  14. Prosthesis of the wrist-joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldmeier, C.

    1983-02-25

    Function of the hand-joint and the well-being of patients can be severely affected by arthrosis of the wrist-joint. Therapeutically, arthrodesis usually results in a painfree status of stiffness. A painless and well functioning joint can be achieved by alloplastic joint replacement or resurfacing. The possibilities and clinical results in cases of arthrosis of the carpo-metacarpal joint of the thumb, pseudarthrosis of the scaphoid, aseptic necrosis of the Lunate and severe arthrosis of the radio-carpal joint are demonstrated.

  15. Prosthesis of the wrist-joint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feldmeier, C.

    1983-01-01

    Function of the hand-joint and the well-being of patients can be severely affected by arthrosis of the wrist-joint. Therapeutically, arthrodesis usually results in a painfree status of stiffness. A painless and well functioning joint can be achieved by alloplastic joint replacement or resurfacing. The possibilities and clinical results in cases of arthrosis of the carpo-metacarpal joint of the thumb, pseudarthrosis of the scaphoid, aseptic necrosis of the Lunate and severe arthrosis of the radio-carpal joint are demonstrated. (orig.) [de

  16. A Modelling Method of Bolt Joints Based on Basic Characteristic Parameters of Joint Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuansheng, Li; Guangpeng, Zhang; Zhen, Zhang; Ping, Wang

    2018-02-01

    Bolt joints are common in machine tools and have a direct impact on the overall performance of the tools. Therefore, the understanding of bolt joint characteristics is essential for improving machine design and assembly. Firstly, According to the experimental data obtained from the experiment, the stiffness curve formula was fitted. Secondly, a finite element model of unit bolt joints such as bolt flange joints, bolt head joints, and thread joints was constructed, and lastly the stiffness parameters of joint surfaces were implemented in the model by the secondary development of ABAQUS. The finite element model of the bolt joint established by this method can simulate the contact state very well.

  17. Joint Attention and Anthropological Difference

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urban, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2014), s. 59-70 ISSN 1718-0198 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP401/10/1164 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : joint attention * anthropological difference * phenomenology * great apes * shared intentionality Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  18. National Guard Bureau Joint Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Civic Leader's Guide ARNG Vision 2020 Posture Statement Strategic Direction CNGB ARNG Financial Report Marshal Office of the Joint Surgeon PARC Small Business Programs Chaplain Diversity NGB-GOMO Resources Legislative Liaison Small Business Programs Social Media State Websites Videos Featured Videos On Every Front

  19. Recruitment of knee joint ligaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blankevoort, L.; Huiskes, H.W.J.; Lange, de A.

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of earlier reported data on the in vitro kinematics of passive knee-joint motions of four knee specimens, the length changes of ligament fiber bundles were determined by using the points of insertion on the tibia and femur. The kinematic data and the insertions of the ligaments were

  20. Durability of building joint sealants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher C. White; Kar Tean Tan; Donald L. Hunston; R. Sam Williams

    2009-01-01

    Predicting the service life of building joint sealants exposed to service environments in less than real time has been a need of the sealant community for many decades. Despite extensive research efforts to design laboratory accelerated tests to duplicate the failure modes occurring in field exposures, little success has been achieved using conventional durability...

  1. Multilevel joint competing risk models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunarathna, G. H. S.; Sooriyarachchi, M. R.

    2017-09-01

    Joint modeling approaches are often encountered for different outcomes of competing risk time to event and count in many biomedical and epidemiology studies in the presence of cluster effect. Hospital length of stay (LOS) has been the widely used outcome measure in hospital utilization due to the benchmark measurement for measuring multiple terminations such as discharge, transferred, dead and patients who have not completed the event of interest at the follow up period (censored) during hospitalizations. Competing risk models provide a method of addressing such multiple destinations since classical time to event models yield biased results when there are multiple events. In this study, the concept of joint modeling has been applied to the dengue epidemiology in Sri Lanka, 2006-2008 to assess the relationship between different outcomes of LOS and platelet count of dengue patients with the district cluster effect. Two key approaches have been applied to build up the joint scenario. In the first approach, modeling each competing risk separately using the binary logistic model, treating all other events as censored under the multilevel discrete time to event model, while the platelet counts are assumed to follow a lognormal regression model. The second approach is based on the endogeneity effect in the multilevel competing risks and count model. Model parameters were estimated using maximum likelihood based on the Laplace approximation. Moreover, the study reveals that joint modeling approach yield more precise results compared to fitting two separate univariate models, in terms of AIC (Akaike Information Criterion).

  2. Joint Advisory Appeals Board report

    CERN Document Server

    Lalande, Amanda

    2018-01-01

    With regard to the internal appeal procedure, Article R VI 1.18 of the Staff Rules and Regulations states that unless the member of the personnel objects, (the) decision and report of the JAAB (Joint Advisory Appeals Board) shall be brought to the attention of the members of the personnel.

  3. Imaging of hip joint arthroplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayerhoefer, M.E.; Fruehwald-Pallamar, J.; Czerny, C.

    2009-01-01

    The hip joint is the largest joint in the human body and consequently, its evaluation by diagnostic imaging is highly important. This includes imaging of hip joint arthroplasty, which is used to avoid joint immobility following a wide spectrum of diseases, such as end-stage degenerative disease, avascular necrosis of the femoral head or post-traumatic fractures. Conventional radiography is still the standard imaging modality for the evaluation of hip arthroplasty both directly following surgery and for periodical follow-up. In the majority of cases conventional radiography enables adequate assessment of early and late complications that can arise following hip arthroplasty, such as loosening, prosthetic or periprosthetic fracture, luxation, infection and soft tissue calcification. If the diagnosis cannot be established by means of radiography, advanced imaging methods such as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), with or without injection of contrast media, may provide additional information. This is particularly true for the depiction of inflammatory processes. Regardless of the imaging modality used patients' clinical symptoms must also be taken into account in order to establish the correct diagnosis. (orig.) [de

  4. UK manufacturers construction joint venture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    This report examines the legal and commercial framework for UK manufacturers to collaborate in a construction venture for a small combustion/steam cycle power plant fueled with biomass. The integration of technology and project plan, the working capital and capitalisation, financial aspects, the market plan, turnkey packages, joint venture entities, and collaboration are discussed. (UK)

  5. Delayed onset of a spinal epidural hematoma after facet joint injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Velickovic

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of chronic back pain is a challenging problem. Facet joint infiltration is an established treatment for chronic low back pain caused by arthrosis of the lumbar facet joints. Due to the increasing number of patients with chronic low back pain, this therapy has become more frequent. We treated a 51-year-old male patient, who developed an epidural hematoma 2 months after infiltration therapy. Our case shows that even a delayed onset of spinal epidural hematoma is possible and should be kept in mind as a possible cause of acute myelopathy after spinal intervention.

  6. [Allogeneic vascularized transplantation in cases of bone and joint defects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, G O; Kirschner, M H; Gonschorek, O; Bühren, V

    1999-06-01

    This paper presents preliminary results of allogeneic vascularized transplantations of three femoral diaphyses and four total human knee joints. Grafts were harvested from multi-organ-donors and immediately transplanted. Osteosyntheses were performed employing intramedullary nails. Vascular pedicles of the grafts were anastomosed in end-to-side technique. Immunosuppression mainly based on Cyclosporine and Azathioprine. Grafts' perfusion was demonstrated by DSA and Duplex-sonograms, bone metabolism by SPECT-scintigraphy. Five months following transplantation osteotomies demonstrated consolidation in conventional X-rays. Biopsies of the grafted bone revealed intact osteocytes and arthroscopy demonstrated intact synovial, chondral and ligamentous structures. From the technical aspect vascularized transplantation of the femoral diaphyses and total knee joints is feasible. The main problems are of immunologic nature. Transplantations were performed respecting the ABO-compatibility but with a large HLA-mismatch. Acute and chronic rejection crises may damage the grafts. At least in synovial joints live-long immunosuppression of the recipients seems to be unavoidable.

  7. Develop a wearable ankle robot for in-bed acute stroke rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yupeng; Xu, Tao; Wang, Liang; Yang, Chung Yong; Guo, Xin; Harvey, Richard L; Zhang, Li-Qun

    2011-01-01

    Movement training is important in motor recovery post stroke and early intervention is critical to stroke rehabilitation. However, acute stroke survivors are actively trained with activities helpful for recovery of mobility in only 13% of the time in the acute phase. Considering the first few months post stroke is critical in stroke recovery (neuroplasticity), there is a strong need for movement therapy and manipulate/mobilize the joints. There is a lack of in-bed robotic rehabilitation in acute stroke. This study seeks to meet the clinic need and deliver intensive passive and active movement therapy using a wearable robot to enhance motor function in acute stroke. Passively, the wearable robot stretches the joint to its extreme positions safely and forcefully. Actively, movement training is conducted and game playing is used to guide and motivate the patient in movement training.

  8. Pediatric acute lung injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahlem, P.; van Aalderen, W. M. C.; Bos, A. P.

    2007-01-01

    Among ventilated children, the incidence of acute lung injury (ALI) was 9%; of that latter group 80% developed the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The population-based prevalence of pediatric ARDS was 5.5 cases/100.000 inhabitants. Underlying diseases in children were septic shock (34%),

  9. Acute hamstringblessures bij sporters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reurink, Gustaaf; Tol, Johannes L.; de Vos, Robert-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Acute hamstring injuries are the most common injuries in participants in popular sports such as football and track and field athletics. The diagnosis is made if there is a history of acute-onset pain in the posterior thigh, and presence of the triad of pain on contraction, stretching and palpation.

  10. ACUTE COMPARTMENT SYNDROME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    muscle destruction, muscle fibrosis, contractures and permanent disability and at worst case scenario of amputation (3,4). As reported by Frink et al (3) on their study on acute compartment syndrome it can occur even when there is no fracture. Also general surgeons have reported acute compartment syndrome.

  11. [Acute kidney injury

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hageman, D.; Kooman, J.P.; Lance, M.D.; van Heurn, L.W.; Snoeijs, M.G.

    2012-01-01

    - 'Acute kidney injury' is modern terminology for a sudden decline in kidney function, and is defined by the RIFLE classification (RIFLE is an acronym for Risk, Injury, Failure, Loss and End-stage kidney disease).- Acute kidney injury occurs as a result of the combination of reduced perfusion in the

  12. Leukocytosis in acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammersgaard, L P; Jørgensen, H S; Nakayama, H

    1999-01-01

    Leukocytosis is a common finding in the acute phase of stroke. A detrimental effect of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has been suggested, and trials aiming at reducing the leukocyte response in acute stroke are currently being conducted. However, the influence of leukocytosis on stroke outcome has...

  13. A Unique Case of Relapsing Polychondritis Presenting with Acute Pericarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John V. Higgins

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Relapsing polychondritis (RP is an inflammatory disease of the cartilaginous tissue primarily affecting the cartilaginous structures of the ear, nose, joints, and the respiratory system. Cardiovascular complications of RP are associated with high morbidity and mortality and occur most commonly as valvular disease. Pericarditis is a less common complication, occurring in 4% of patients with RP and has not previously been described at presentation. We describe a case of relapsing polychondritis with acute pericarditis at presentation.

  14. Skilled nursing facilities after joint replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... care providers in the weeks before your joint replacement. They can advise you about whether going directly ... of many people who have had a joint replacement? Can they tell you how many? A good ...

  15. Does Service Interdependence Take Jointness Too Far?

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Downs, Christopher G

    2008-01-01

    ... integration to support and improve the warfighting effectiveness of joint force commanders. The ability to effectively employ joint forces has increased the lethality, agility, and operational precision of the United States military...

  16. Medical Doctrine - Are We Really Joint

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siniscalchi, Kimberly

    1997-01-01

    ... 4.02, Doctrine for Health Service Support in Joint Operations, is analyzed to determine if it provides adequate guidance for seamless health service support in joint operations for war and contingencies other than war...

  17. Theater Logistics Management: A Case for a Joint Distribution Solution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garcia, Jr, Mario V

    2008-01-01

    ...) and Joint Force Commanders (JFC). It explores the factors affecting theater distribution and joint theater logistics management including Joint Reception Staging Onward Movement and Integration (JRSOI) operations...

  18. Jointness for the Rest of Us: Reforming Joint Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    requirements. For this reason, improving joint development is not only important for increasing employee job satisfaction , it is essential if DOD...to enhance civilian skill sets and aid in the retention of experienced employees . Further, the report...to the job fully trained. This belief is reinforced by the fact that many mid-and senior-level DOD civilian employees are former members of the armed

  19. Seismic response of rock joints and jointed rock mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghosh, A.; Hsiung, S.M.; Chowdhury, A.H.

    1996-06-01

    Long-term stability of emplacement drifts and potential near-field fluid flow resulting from coupled effects are among the concerns for safe disposal of high-level nuclear waste (HLW). A number of factors can induce drift instability or change the near-field flow patterns. Repetitive seismic loads from earthquakes and thermal loads generated by the decay of emplaced waste are two significant factors. One of two key technical uncertainties (KTU) that can potentially pose a high risk of noncompliance with the performance objectives of 10 CFR Part 60 is the prediction of thermal-mechanical (including repetitive seismic load) effects on stability of emplacement drifts and the engineered barrier system. The second KTU of concern is the prediction of thermal-mechanical-hydrological (including repetitive seismic load) effects on the host rock surrounding the engineered barrier system. The Rock Mechanics research project being conducted at the Center for Nuclear Waste Regulatory Analyses (CNWRA) is intended to address certain specific technical issues associated with these two KTUs. This research project has two major components: (i) seismic response of rock joints and a jointed rock mass and (ii) coupled thermal-mechanical-hydrological (TMH) response of a jointed rock mass surrounding the engineered barrier system (EBS). This final report summarizes the research activities concerned with the repetitive seismic load aspect of both these KTUs

  20. 30 CFR 36.24 - Engine joints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Engine joints. 36.24 Section 36.24 Mineral... Construction and Design Requirements § 36.24 Engine joints. (a) Cylinder head. The joint between the cylinder head and block of the engine shall be fitted with a metal or metal-clad gasket satisfactory to MSHA...