WorldWideScience

Sample records for actomyosin ring constriction

  1. Constriction model of actomyosin ring for cytokinesis by fission yeast using a two-state sliding filament mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yong-Woon [Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3255 (United States); Mascagni, Michael, E-mail: Mascagni@fsu.edu [Departments of Computer Science, Mathematics and Scientific Computing, and Graduate Program in Molecular Biophysics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306-4530 (United States)

    2014-09-28

    We developed a model describing the structure and contractile mechanism of the actomyosin ring in fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The proposed ring includes actin, myosin, and α-actinin, and is organized into a structure similar to that of muscle sarcomeres. This structure justifies the use of the sliding-filament mechanism developed by Huxley and Hill, but it is probably less organized relative to that of muscle sarcomeres. Ring contraction tension was generated via the same fundamental mechanism used to generate muscle tension, but some physicochemical parameters were adjusted to be consistent with the proposed ring structure. Simulations allowed an estimate of ring constriction tension that reproduced the observed ring constriction velocity using a physiologically possible, self-consistent set of parameters. Proposed molecular-level properties responsible for the thousand-fold slower constriction velocity of the ring relative to that of muscle sarcomeres include fewer myosin molecules involved, a less organized contractile configuration, a low α-actinin concentration, and a high resistance membrane tension. Ring constriction velocity is demonstrated as an exponential function of time despite a near linear appearance. We proposed a hypothesis to explain why excess myosin heads inhibit constriction velocity rather than enhance it. The model revealed how myosin concentration and elastic resistance tension are balanced during cytokinesis in S. pombe.

  2. Mechanism of cytokinetic contractile ring constriction in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Matthew R; Laplante, Caroline; Chin, Harvey F; Guirao, Boris; Karatekin, Erdem; Pollard, Thomas D; O'Shaughnessy, Ben

    2014-06-09

    Cytokinesis involves constriction of a contractile actomyosin ring. The mechanisms generating ring tension and setting the constriction rate remain unknown because the organization of the ring is poorly characterized, its tension was rarely measured, and constriction is coupled to other processes. To isolate ring mechanisms, we studied fission yeast protoplasts, in which constriction occurs without the cell wall. Exploiting the absence of cell wall and actin cortex, we measured ring tension and imaged ring organization, which was dynamic and disordered. Computer simulations based on the amounts and biochemical properties of the key proteins showed that they spontaneously self-organize into a tension-generating bundle. Together with rapid component turnover, the self-organization mechanism continuously reassembles and remodels the constricting ring. Ring constriction depended on cell shape, revealing that the ring operates close to conditions of isometric tension. Thus, the fission yeast ring sets its own tension, but other processes set the constriction rate. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Congenital constriction ring syndrome of the limbs: A prospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the upper limb malformations involved 42 digits; in the lower limb malformations involved 33 toes, one foot and fi ve legs. Four main types of lesions were found: constriction rings, intrauterine amputations, acrosyndactyly, and simple syndactyly. Conclusion: Congenital constriction ring syndrome is of uncertain aetiology ...

  4. TOR complex 2 localises to the cytokinetic actomyosin ring and controls the fidelity of cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Karen; Kirkham, Sara; Halova, Lenka; Atkin, Jane; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Cobley, David; Krug, Karsten; Maček, Boris; Mulvihill, Daniel P; Petersen, Janni

    2016-07-01

    The timing of cell division is controlled by the coupled regulation of growth and division. The target of rapamycin (TOR) signalling network synchronises these processes with the environmental setting. Here, we describe a novel interaction of the fission yeast TOR complex 2 (TORC2) with the cytokinetic actomyosin ring (CAR), and a novel role for TORC2 in regulating the timing and fidelity of cytokinesis. Disruption of TORC2 or its localisation results in defects in CAR morphology and constriction. We provide evidence that the myosin II protein Myp2 and the myosin V protein Myo51 play roles in recruiting TORC2 to the CAR. We show that Myp2 and TORC2 are co-dependent upon each other for their normal localisation to the cytokinetic machinery. We go on to show that TORC2-dependent phosphorylation of actin-capping protein 1 (Acp1, a known regulator of cytokinesis) controls CAR stability, modulates Acp1-Acp2 (the equivalent of the mammalian CAPZA-CAPZB) heterodimer formation and is essential for survival upon stress. Thus, TORC2 localisation to the CAR, and TORC2-dependent Acp1 phosphorylation contributes to timely control and the fidelity of cytokinesis and cell division. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  5. Modeling cytokinesis of eukaryotic cells driven by the actomyosin contractile ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jia; Wang, Qi

    2016-12-01

    A three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic model for cytokinesis of eukaryotic cells is developed, in which we model dynamics of actomyosins in the cell cortex, in particular, along the cytokinetic ring formed in the cortex and in the neighborhood of the cell's division plane explicitly. Specifically, the active force actuated by the actomyosin's activity along the cytokinetic ring is modeled by a surface force whose strength is proportional to the actomyosin concentration while the cell morphology is tracked by a phase field model. The model is then solved in 3D space and time using a finite difference method on graphic processing units. Dynamical morphological patterns of eukaryotic cells during cytokinesis are numerically simulated with the model. These simulated morphological patterns agree quantitatively with experimental observations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Congenital constriction ring syndrome of the limbs; a prospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients and Methods: A five year prospective study of patients presenting at a Plastic Surgical Clinic in Ghana with the characteristics of the congenital constriction ring syndrome was undertaken. The patients were examined clinically and the findings recorded. X-ray and clinical photographs of the affected limbs were ...

  7. Drak Is Required for Actomyosin Organization During Drosophila Cellularization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish B. Chougule

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The generation of force by actomyosin contraction is critical for a variety of cellular and developmental processes. Nonmuscle myosin II is the motor that drives actomyosin contraction, and its activity is largely regulated by phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain. During the formation of the Drosophila cellular blastoderm, actomyosin contraction drives constriction of microfilament rings, modified cytokinesis rings. Here, we find that Drak is necessary for most of the phosphorylation of the myosin regulatory light chain during cellularization. We show that Drak is required for organization of myosin II within the microfilament rings. Proper actomyosin contraction of the microfilament rings during cellularization also requires Drak activity. Constitutive activation of myosin regulatory light chain bypasses the requirement for Drak, suggesting that actomyosin organization and contraction are mediated through Drak’s regulation of myosin activity. Drak is also involved in the maintenance of furrow canal structure and lateral plasma membrane integrity during cellularization. Together, our observations suggest that Drak is the primary regulator of actomyosin dynamics during cellularization.

  8. A child presented with bilateral congenital constriction ring in lower extremity: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiman, Richa; Gangopadhyay, Ajay N; Gupta, Dinesh K; Srivastava, Punit; Upadhyaya, Vijay D; Sharma, Shiv P; Kumar, Vijayendra

    2009-07-23

    The congenital constriction ring of lower extremity is very uncommon and rare condition. The actual incidence in general population is not known. In English literature, very few cases are reported time to time as congenital constriction band syndrome associated with musculoskeletal disorder like congenital talipes equino varus. The lesion can involve skin only or goes to deeper structure up to bone, which can lead to gangrene of foot or auto amputation. We are presenting a case of bilateral congenital constriction ring in lower limb who presented at age of 4 year without any other associated congenital anomaly, simply managed by Z-plasty, which improves quality of life after physiotherapy. Congenital constriction ring of lower limb is extremely rare condition in children. Early diagnosis and management is mandatory, either in single stage or by stage procedure, to prevent auto-amputation of limb and to improve quality of life on feet.

  9. Robust gap repair in the contractile ring ensures timely completion of cytokinesis.

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, AM; Osório, DS; Pereira, AJ; Maiato, H; Pinto, IM; Rubinstein, B; Gassmann, R; Telley, IA; Carvalho, AX

    2016-01-01

    Cytokinesis in animal cells requires the constriction of an actomyosin contractile ring, whose architecture and mechanism remain poorly understood. We use laser microsurgery to explore the biophysical properties of constricting rings in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. Laser cutting causes rings to snap open. However, instead of disintegrating, ring topology recovers and constriction proceeds. In response to severing, a finite gap forms and is repaired by recruitment of new material in an acti...

  10. Successful removal of a penile constriction wedding ring in a rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Penile strangulation is a rarely described medical emergency. Removal of the strangulating object is challenging, with a lack of proper guidelines. Objective. To describe the challenges faced during an attempt to urgently remove a metal object (wedding ring) constricting an erect penis. Method. We report a ...

  11. Successful removal of a penile constriction wedding ring in a rural area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fhima, A; Lahouel, N

    2016-11-02

    Penile strangulation is a rarely described medical emergency. Removal of the strangulating object is challenging, with a lack of proper guidelines. To describe the challenges faced during an attempt to urgently remove a metal object (wedding ring) constricting an erect penis. We report a case of penile strangulation with a wedding ring in an adult man who presented at Van Velden Hospital casualty department, Limpopo, South Africa, and review the related literature. The ring was successfully removed using an aspiration technique (via a pink needle). No proper guidelines exist for the treatment of this condition, so the 'best method' is the one with a successful outcome.

  12. Congenital Constriction Ring of Limbs in Subjects with History of Maternal Substance Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, S.; Lal, K.; Fatima, N. G.; Haque, S.; Samo, A.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital Constriction Ring (CCR) is a rare malformation which manifests itself in the form of ring-like constrictive bands. Due to its heterogeneous nature, its etiology remains unclear. Here, we present a series of seven independent individuals afflicted with CCR, which primarily involved the digits. The phenotypic manifestations included terminal phalangeal reduction, anonychia, digit hypoplasia, and acrosyndactyly. Mesoaxial digits in hands and preaxial digits in feet were most frequently affected. Camptodactyly and clubfoot were witnessed in four and one subject, respectively. Curiously, mothers of six of these subjects revealed that they consumed copious amounts of Multani mitti(Fuller's clay) and/or Naswar(nonsmoke-tobacco), during their respective pregnancies. Maternal substance use during pregnancy is not an unusual practice, however, its relationship with CCR as pregnancy outcome remains unexplored. Case-control studies are warranted to elucidate the relationship between the exposure to these substances and the etiology of CCR and/or other limb defects in the offspring. (author)

  13. Cooperation between Paxillin-like Protein Pxl1 and Glucan Synthase Bgs1 Is Essential for Actomyosin Ring Stability and Septum Formation in Fission Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C G Cortés

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In fungal cells cytokinesis requires coordinated closure of a contractile actomyosin ring (CAR and synthesis of a special cell wall structure known as the division septum. Many CAR proteins have been identified and characterized, but how these molecules interact with the septum synthesis enzymes to form the septum remains unclear. Our genetic study using fission yeast shows that cooperation between the paxillin homolog Pxl1, required for ring integrity, and Bgs1, the enzyme responsible for linear β(1,3glucan synthesis and primary septum formation, is required for stable anchorage of the CAR to the plasma membrane before septation onset, and for cleavage furrow formation. Thus, lack of Pxl1 in combination with Bgs1 depletion, causes failure of ring contraction and lateral cell wall overgrowth towards the cell lumen without septum formation. We also describe here that Pxl1 concentration at the CAR increases during cytokinesis and that this increase depends on the SH3 domain of the F-BAR protein Cdc15. In consequence, Bgs1 depletion in cells carrying a cdc15ΔSH3 allele causes ring disassembly and septation blockage, as it does in cells lacking Pxl1. On the other hand, the absence of Pxl1 is lethal when Cdc15 function is affected, generating a large sliding of the CAR with deposition of septum wall material along the cell cortex, and suggesting additional functions for both Pxl1 and Cdc15 proteins. In conclusion, our findings indicate that CAR anchorage to the plasma membrane through Cdc15 and Pxl1, and concomitant Bgs1 activity, are necessary for CAR maintenance and septum formation in fission yeast.

  14. Robust gap repair in the contractile ring ensures timely completion of cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Ana M; Osório, Daniel S; Pereira, Antonio J; Maiato, Helder; Pinto, Inês Mendes; Rubinstein, Boris; Gassmann, Reto; Telley, Ivo Andreas; Carvalho, Ana Xavier

    2016-12-19

    Cytokinesis in animal cells requires the constriction of an actomyosin contractile ring, whose architecture and mechanism remain poorly understood. We use laser microsurgery to explore the biophysical properties of constricting rings in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos. Laser cutting causes rings to snap open. However, instead of disintegrating, ring topology recovers and constriction proceeds. In response to severing, a finite gap forms and is repaired by recruitment of new material in an actin polymerization-dependent manner. An open ring is able to constrict, and rings repair from successive cuts. After gap repair, an increase in constriction velocity allows cytokinesis to complete at the same time as controls. Our analysis demonstrates that tension in the ring increases while net cortical tension at the site of ingression decreases throughout constriction and suggests that cytokinesis is accomplished by contractile modules that assemble and contract autonomously, enabling local repair of the actomyosin network. Consequently, cytokinesis is a highly robust process impervious to discontinuities in contractile ring structure. © 2016 Silva et al.

  15. Drechslerella stenobrocha genome illustrates the mechanism of constricting rings and the origin of nematode predation in fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Nematode-trapping fungi are a unique group of organisms that can capture nematodes using sophisticated trapping structures. The genome of Drechslerella stenobrocha, a constricting-ring-forming fungus, has been sequenced and reported, and provided new insights into the evolutionary origins of nematode predation in fungi, the trapping mechanisms, and the dual lifestyles of saprophagy and predation. Results The genome of the fungus Drechslerella stenobrocha, which mechanically traps nematodes using a constricting ring, was sequenced. The genome was 29.02 Mb in size and was found rare instances of transposons and repeat induced point mutations, than that of Arthrobotrys oligospora. The functional proteins involved in nematode-infection, such as chitinases, subtilisins, and adhesive proteins, underwent a significant expansion in the A. oligospora genome, while there were fewer lectin genes that mediate fungus-nematode recognition in the D. stenobrocha genome. The carbohydrate-degrading enzyme catalogs in both species were similar to those of efficient cellulolytic fungi, suggesting a saprophytic origin of nematode-trapping fungi. In D. stenobrocha, the down-regulation of saprophytic enzyme genes and the up-regulation of infection-related genes during the capture of nematodes indicated a transition between dual life strategies of saprophagy and predation. The transcriptional profiles also indicated that trap formation was related to the protein kinase C (PKC) signal pathway and regulated by Zn(2)–C6 type transcription factors. Conclusions The genome of D. stenobrocha provides support for the hypothesis that nematode trapping fungi evolved from saprophytic fungi in a high carbon and low nitrogen environment. It reveals the transition between saprophagy and predation of these fungi and also proves new insights into the mechanisms of mechanical trapping. PMID:24507587

  16. Successful removal of a penile constriction wedding ring in a rural ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Penile strangulation has been reportedacross all age groups. In children, strangulating materials may be placed on the penis as treatment for enuresis and incontinence, and as a punitive measure for masturbation. In adults, it is done mainly for erotic reasons.[1-3]. We report a case of a strangulating penile ring and the ...

  17. Pericarditis - constrictive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constrictive pericarditis ... Most of the time, constrictive pericarditis occurs due to things that cause inflammation to develop around the heart, such as: Heart surgery Radiation therapy to the chest ...

  18. Active Materials Integrated with Actomyosin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hiroaki; Makuta, Masahiro; Nishigami, Yukinori; Ichikawa, Masatoshi

    2017-10-01

    Muscles are the engine of our body, and actomyosin is the engine of a cell. Both muscle and the actomyosin use the same proteins, namely, actin, and myosin, which are the pair of cytoskeleton and motor proteins generating a force to realize deformation. The properties of force generation by actomyosin at a single-molecule level have been studied for many years. Moreover, the active properties of higher-order structures integrated by actomyosin are attracting the attention of researchers. Here, we review the recent progress in the study of reconstituted actomyosin systems in vitro toward real-space models of nonequilibrium systems, collective motion, biological phenomena, and active materials.

  19. Congenital Constrictions

    OpenAIRE

    K Pavithran; Ramachandran Nair

    1984-01-01

    A young man having congenital annular constrictions of the legs with lymph-oedema of the left foot below the constriction, webbing of the fingers of both hands, anonychia of two fingers and intrauterine amputation of terminal phalanges of two finger and one big toe is reported.

  20. Congenital Constrictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Pavithran

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available A young man having congenital annular constrictions of the legs with lymph-oedema of the left foot below the constriction, webbing of the fingers of both hands, anonychia of two fingers and intrauterine amputation of terminal phalanges of two finger and one big toe is reported.

  1. ALKBH4-dependent demethylation of actin regulates actomyosin dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, M.-M.; Shi, Y.; Niu, Y.

    2013-01-01

    -type but not catalytically inactive ALKBH4. Similar to actin and myosin knock-out mice, homozygous Alkbh4 mutant mice display early embryonic lethality. These findings imply that ALKBH4-dependent actin demethylation regulates actomyosin function by promoting actin-non-muscle myosin II interaction.......-dependent processes such as cytokinesis and cell migration. ALKBH4-deficient cells display elevated K84me1 levels. Non-muscle myosin II only interacts with unmethylated actin and its proper recruitment to and interaction with actin depend on ALKBH4. ALKBH4 co-localizes with the actomyosin-based contractile ring...

  2. Limb malformations with associated congenital constriction rings in two unrelated Egyptian males, one with a disorganization-like spectrum and the other with a probable distinct type of septo-optic dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temtamy, Samia A; Aglan, Mona S; Ashour, Adel M; El-Badry, Tarek H

    2010-01-01

    In this report, we describe two unrelated Egyptian male infants with limb malformations and constriction rings. The first case is developing normally but has severe limb anomalies, congenital constriction rings, scoliosis because of vertebral anomalies, a left accessory nipple, a small tumor-like swelling on his lower back with tiny skin tubular appendages, a hypoplastic scrotum, and an anchored penis. The second case is developmentally delayed with limb malformations, congenital constriction rings, a lumbar myelomeningeocele, hemangioma, and tiny tubular skin appendages on the back. The patient also had bilateral optic atrophy. The constellation of features in our patients cannot be fully explained by the amniotic disruption complex. The first patient may represent an additional case of the human homolog of the mouse disorganization mutant. The presence of bilateral optic atrophy in the second case, although without an absent septum pellucidum nor other brain anomalies resembles the infrequently reported disorder of septo-optic dysplasia with limb anomalies. Both cases were sporadic and could be caused by a new dominant mutation because of the high paternal age of case 1 and the history of paternal occupational exposure to heat for both fathers. We draw attention to the phenotypic overlap between the disorganization-like syndrome and septo-optic dysplasia with limb anomalies.

  3. Constrictive pericarditis (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constrictive pericarditis is a disorder caused by inflammation of the pericardium, the sac-like covering of the heart. Eventual ... heart, resulting in symptoms of heart failure. Constrictive pericarditis may be life threatening if untreated.

  4. Ezrin enhances line tension along transcellular tunnel edges via NMIIa driven actomyosin cable formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefani, Caroline; Gonzalez-Rodriguez, David; Senju, Yosuke; Doye, Anne; Efimova, Nadia; Janel, Sébastien; Lipuma, Justine; Tsai, Meng Chen; Hamaoui, Daniel; Maddugoda, Madhavi P.; Cochet-Escartin, Olivier; Prévost, Coline; Lafont, Frank; Svitkina, Tatyana; Lappalainen, Pekka; Bassereau, Patricia; Lemichez, Emmanuel

    2017-06-01

    Transendothelial cell macroaperture (TEM) tunnels control endothelium barrier function and are triggered by several toxins from pathogenic bacteria that provoke vascular leakage. Cellular dewetting theory predicted that a line tension of uncharacterized origin works at TEM boundaries to limit their widening. Here, by conducting high-resolution microscopy approaches we unveil the presence of an actomyosin cable encircling TEMs. We develop a theoretical cellular dewetting framework to interpret TEM physical parameters that are quantitatively determined by laser ablation experiments. This establishes the critical role of ezrin and non-muscle myosin II (NMII) in the progressive implementation of line tension. Mechanistically, fluorescence-recovery-after-photobleaching experiments point for the upstream role of ezrin in stabilizing actin filaments at the edges of TEMs, thereby favouring their crosslinking by NMIIa. Collectively, our findings ascribe to ezrin and NMIIa a critical function of enhancing line tension at the cell boundary surrounding the TEMs by promoting the formation of an actomyosin ring.

  5. Multidisciplinary emergent removal of a metal penoscrotal constriction device

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nason, GJ

    2017-03-01

    Strangulation of the genital organs is a rare presentation to the emergency department which requires urgent intervention to avoid long term complications. Penoscrotal constriction devices are either used for autoerotic stimulus or to increase sexual performance by maintaining an erection for a longer period. We report a case of a man who presented with penile strangulation following the application of a titanium penoscrotal constriction ring during sexual intercourse seven hours previously. The Fire Brigade department attended with an electric operated angle grinder to facilitate removal of the ring as standard medical equipment (orthopaedic saws, bolt and bone cutters) were insufficient. Fully functional recovery was achieved.

  6. Turgor Pressure and Possible Constriction Mechanisms in Bacterial Division

    OpenAIRE

    Masaki Osawa; Harold P. Erickson

    2018-01-01

    Bacterial cytokinesis begins with the assembly of FtsZ into a Z ring at the center of the cell. The Z-ring constriction in Gram-negative bacteria may occur in an environment where the periplasm and the cytoplasm are isoosmotic, but in Gram-positive bacteria the constriction may have to overcome a substantial turgor pressure. We address three potential sources of invagination force. (1) FtsZ itself may generate force by curved protofilaments bending the attached membrane. This is sufficient to...

  7. Contraction of cross-linked actomyosin bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshinaga, Natsuhiko; Marcq, Philippe

    2012-08-01

    Cross-linked actomyosin bundles retract when severed in vivo by laser ablation, or when isolated from the cell and micromanipulated in vitro in the presence of ATP. We identify the timescale for contraction as a viscoelastic time τ, where the viscosity is due to (internal) protein friction. We obtain an estimate of the order of magnitude of the contraction time τ ≈ 10-100 s, consistent with available experimental data for circumferential microfilament bundles and stress fibers. Our results are supported by an exactly solvable, hydrodynamic model of a retracting bundle as a cylinder of isotropic, active matter, from which the order of magnitude of the active stress is estimated.

  8. Integrins Regulate Apical Constriction via Microtubule Stabilization in the Drosophila Eye Disc Epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilaiwan M. Fernandes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available During morphogenesis, extracellular signals trigger actomyosin contractility in subpopulations of cells to coordinate changes in cell shape. To illuminate the link between signaling-mediated tissue patterning and cytoskeletal remodeling, we study the progression of the morphogenetic furrow (MF, the wave of apical constriction that traverses the Drosophila eye imaginal disc preceding photoreceptor neurogenesis. Apical constriction depends on actomyosin contractility downstream of the Hedgehog (Hh and bone morphogenetic protein (BMP pathways. We identify a role for integrin adhesion receptors in MF progression. We show that Hh and BMP regulate integrin expression, the loss of which disrupts apical constriction and slows furrow progression; conversely, elevated integrins accelerate furrow progression. We present evidence that integrins regulate MF progression by promoting microtubule stabilization, since reducing microtubule stability rescues integrin-mediated furrow acceleration. Thus, integrins act as a genetic link between tissue-level signaling events and morphological change at the cellular level, leading to morphogenesis and neurogenesis in the eye.

  9. Disordered Actomyosin Is Sufficient to Promote Cooperative and Telescopic Contractility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murrell, Michael; Linsmeier, Ian; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Kim, Tae Yoon; Jung, Wonyeong; Oakes, Patrick

    While the molecular interactions between myosin motors and F-actin are well known, the relationship between F-actin organization and myosin-mediated force generation remains poorly understood. Here, we explore the accumulation of myosin-induced stresses within a 2D biomimetic model of the actomyosin cortex, where myosin activity is controlled spatially and temporally using light. By controlling the geometry and the duration of myosin activation, we show that contraction of disordered actomyosin is highly cooperative, telescopic with the activation area and generates a pattern of mechanical stresses consistent with those observed in contractile cells. We quantitatively reproduce these properties using an in vitro isotropic model of the actomyosin cytoskeleton, and explore the physical origins of telescopic contractility in disordered networks using agent-based simulations. NSF CMMI-1525316.

  10. Molecular Simulations of Actomyosin Network Self-Assembly and Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komianos, James; Popov, Konstantin; Papoian, Garegin; Papoian Lab Team

    Actomyosin networks are an integral part of the cytoskeleton of eukaryotic cells and play an essential role in determining cellular shape and movement. Actomyosin network growth and remodeling in vivo is based on a large number of chemical and mechanical processes, which are mutually coupled and spatially and temporally resolved. To investigate the fundamental principles behind the self-organization of these networks, we have developed a detailed mechanochemical, stochastic model of actin filament growth dynamics, at a single-molecule resolution, where the nonlinear mechanical rigidity of filaments and their corresponding deformations under internally and externally generated forces are taken into account. Our work sheds light on the interplay between the chemical and mechanical processes governing the cytoskeletal dynamics, and also highlights the importance of diffusional and active transport phenomena. Our simulations reveal how different actomyosin micro-architectures emerge in response to varying the network composition. Support from NSF Grant CHE-1363081.

  11. Hydralazine-induced constrictive pericarditis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franssen, CFC; ElGamal, MIH; Gans, ROB; Hoorntje, SJ

    A 59-year-old man was diagnosed as having constrictive pericarditis 17 months after a typical hydralazine-induced autoimmune syndrome, This late complication of hydralazine has been reported only once. Ten years later the patient was found to have anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies directed

  12. Turgor Pressure and Possible Constriction Mechanisms in Bacterial Division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaki Osawa

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial cytokinesis begins with the assembly of FtsZ into a Z ring at the center of the cell. The Z-ring constriction in Gram-negative bacteria may occur in an environment where the periplasm and the cytoplasm are isoosmotic, but in Gram-positive bacteria the constriction may have to overcome a substantial turgor pressure. We address three potential sources of invagination force. (1 FtsZ itself may generate force by curved protofilaments bending the attached membrane. This is sufficient to constrict liposomes in vitro. However, this force is on the order of a few pN, and would not be enough to overcome turgor. (2 Cell wall (CW synthesis may generate force by pushing the plasma membrane from the outside. However, this would probably require some kind of Brownian ratchet to separate the CW and membrane sufficiently to allow a glycan strand to slip in. The elastic element is not obvious. (3 Excess membrane production has the potential to contribute significantly to the invagination force. If the excess membrane is produced under the CW, it would force the membrane to bleb inward. We propose here that a combination of FtsZ pulling from the inside, and excess membrane pushing membrane inward may generate a substantial constriction force at the division site. This combined force generation mechanism may be sufficient to overcome turgor pressure. This would abolish the need for a Brownian ratchet for CW growth, and would permit CW to operate by reinforcing the constrictions generated by FtsZ and excess membrane.

  13. Stenting of major airway constriction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xiaomei

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the correlated issues in the stenting treatment of major airway constriction. Methods: Nineteen cases of major airway stenting procedure were studied retrospectively. The clinical choice of stents of different advantages or deficiencies were discussed. The importance of intravenous anesthesia supporting, life-parameters monitoring during the procedures and the prevention of complications were analysed. Results: Under intravenous and local anesthesia, 19 Wallstents had been successively placed and relieved 19 cases of major airway constrictions due to malignant or benign diseases (15 of tumors, 3 of tuberculosis, 1 of tracheomalacia). Intravenous anesthesia and life-parameters monitoring had made the procedures more safe and precise. Conclusions: Major airway stenting is an reliable method for relieving tracheobronchial stenosis; and intravenous anesthesia supporting and life-parameters monitoring guarantee the satisfactions of procedures

  14. A tripartite complex containing MRCK modulates lamellar actomyosin retrograde flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ivan; Yong, Jeffery; Dong, Jing Ming; Lim, Louis; Leung, Thomas

    2008-10-03

    Actomyosin retrograde flow underlies the contraction essential for cell motility. Retrograde flow in both lamellipodia and lamella is required for membrane protrusion and for force generation by coupling to cell adhesion. We report that the Rac/Cdc42-binding kinase MRCK and myosin II-related MYO18A linked by the adaptor protein LRAP35a form a functional tripartite complex, which is responsible for the assembly of lamellar actomyosin bundles and of a subnuclear actomyosin network. LRAP35a binds independently to MYO18A and MRCK. This binding leads to MRCK activation and its phosphorylation of MYO18A, independently of ROK and MLCK. The MRCK complex moves in concert with the retrograde flow of actomyosin bundles, with MRCK being able to influence other flow components such as MYO2A. The promotion of persistent protrusive activity and inhibition of cell motility by the respective expression of wild-type and dominant-negative mutant components of the MRCK complex show it to be crucial to cell protrusion and migration.

  15. Geometrical Origins of Contractility in Disordered Actomyosin Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lenz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Movement within eukaryotic cells largely originates from localized forces exerted by myosin motors on scaffolds of actin filaments. Although individual motors locally exert both contractile and extensile forces, large actomyosin structures at the cellular scale are overwhelmingly contractile, suggesting that the scaffold serves to favor contraction over extension. While this mechanism is well understood in highly organized striated muscle, its origin in disordered networks such as the cell cortex is unknown. Here, we develop a mathematical model of the actin scaffold’s local two- or three-dimensional mechanics and identify four competing contraction mechanisms. We predict that one mechanism dominates, whereby local deformations of the actin break the balance between contraction and extension. In this mechanism, contractile forces result mostly from motors plucking the filaments transversely rather than buckling them longitudinally. These findings shed light on recent in vitro experiments and provide a new geometrical understanding of contractility in the myriad of disordered actomyosin systems found in vivo.

  16. Clogging in constricted suspension flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Alvaro; Lhuissier, Henri; Rossi, Massimiliano; Kähler, Christian J.

    2018-02-01

    The flow of a charged-stabilized suspension through a single constricted channel is studied experimentally by tracking the particles individually. Surprisingly, the behavior is found to be qualitatively similar to that of inertial dry granular systems: For small values of the neck-to-particle size ratio (D /d reported for granular systems and agree for moderate particle volume fraction (ϕ ≈20 % ) with a simple stochastic model for the number of particles at the neck. For larger neck sizes (D /d >3 ), even at the largest ϕ (≈60 %) achievable in the experiments, an uninterrupted particle flow is observed, which resembles that of an hourglass. This particularly small value of D /d (≃3 ) at the transition to a practically uninterrupted flow is attributed to the low effective friction between the particles, achieved by the particle's functionalization and lubrication.

  17. Regional differences in actomyosin contraction shape the primary vesicles in the embryonic chicken brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filas, Benjamen A; Oltean, Alina; Majidi, Shabnam; Bayly, Philip V; Taber, Larry A; Beebe, David C

    2012-01-01

    In the early embryo, the brain initially forms as a relatively straight, cylindrical epithelial tube composed of neural stem cells. The brain tube then divides into three primary vesicles (forebrain, midbrain, hindbrain), as well as a series of bulges (rhombomeres) in the hindbrain. The boundaries between these subdivisions have been well studied as regions of differential gene expression, but the morphogenetic mechanisms that generate these constrictions are not well understood. Here, we show that regional variations in actomyosin-based contractility play a major role in vesicle formation in the embryonic chicken brain. In particular, boundaries did not form in brains exposed to the nonmuscle myosin II inhibitor blebbistatin, whereas increasing contractile force using calyculin or ATP deepened boundaries considerably. Tissue staining showed that contraction likely occurs at the inner part of the wall, as F-actin and phosphorylated myosin are concentrated at the apical side. However, relatively little actin and myosin was found in rhombomere boundaries. To determine the specific physical mechanisms that drive vesicle formation, we developed a finite-element model for the brain tube. Regional apical contraction was simulated in the model, with contractile anisotropy and strength estimated from contractile protein distributions and measurements of cell shapes. The model shows that a combination of circumferential contraction in the boundary regions and relatively isotropic contraction between boundaries can generate realistic morphologies for the primary vesicles. In contrast, rhombomere formation likely involves longitudinal contraction between boundaries. Further simulations suggest that these different mechanisms are dictated by regional differences in initial morphology and the need to withstand cerebrospinal fluid pressure. This study provides a new understanding of early brain morphogenesis. (paper)

  18. Self-organization of myosin II in reconstituted actomyosin bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachowiak, Matthew R; McCall, Patrick M; Thoresen, Todd; Balcioglu, Hayri E; Kasiewicz, Lisa; Gardel, Margaret L; O'Shaughnessy, Ben

    2012-09-19

    Cells assemble a variety of bundled actomyosin structures in the cytoskeleton for activities such as cell-shape regulation, force production, and cytokinesis. Although these linear structures exhibit varied architecture, two common organizational themes are a punctate distribution of myosin II and distinct patterns of actin polarity. The mechanisms that cells use to assemble and maintain these organizational features are poorly understood. To study these, we reconstituted actomyosin bundles in vitro that contained only actin filaments and myosin II. Upon addition of ATP, the bundles contracted and the uniformly distributed myosin spontaneously reorganized into discrete clusters. We developed a mathematical model in which the motion of myosin II filaments is governed by the polarities of the actin filaments with which they interact. The model showed that the assembly of myosins into clusters is driven by their tendency to migrate to locations with zero net actin filament polarity. With no fitting parameters, the predicted distribution of myosin cluster separations was in close agreement with our experiments, including a -3/2 power law decay for intermediate length scales. Thus, without an organizing template or accessory proteins, a minimal bundle of actin and myosin has the inherent capacity to self-organize into a heterogeneous banded structure. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hour glass constriction in advanced carpal tunnel syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Dehghani

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: We recommend epineurolysis for mild to moderate constriction and also end-to-end repair may be needed if extensive and severe constriction was found. It means that if we manage mild to moderate constriction sooner, it can prevent the need for further surgical procedure because of sever constriction.

  20. Dynein Transmits Polarized Actomyosin Cortical Flows to Promote Centrosome Separation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro De Simone

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The two centrosomes present at the onset of mitosis must separate in a timely and accurate fashion to ensure proper bipolar spindle assembly. The minus-end-directed motor dynein plays a pivotal role in centrosome separation, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive, particularly regarding how dynein coordinates this process in space and time. We addressed these questions in the one-cell C. elegans embryo, using a combination of 3D time-lapse microscopy and computational modeling. Our analysis reveals that centrosome separation is powered by the joint action of dynein at the nuclear envelope and at the cell cortex. Strikingly, we demonstrate that dynein at the cell cortex acts as a force-transmitting device that harnesses polarized actomyosin cortical flows initiated by the centrosomes earlier in the cell cycle. This mechanism elegantly couples cell polarization with centrosome separation, thus ensuring faithful cell division.

  1. Thermodynamics of nucleotide binding to actomyosin V and VI: a positive heat capacity change accompanies strong ADP binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robblee, James P; Cao, Wenxiang; Henn, Arnon; Hannemann, Diane E; De La Cruz, Enrique M

    2005-08-02

    We have measured the energetics of ATP and ADP binding to single-headed actomyosin V and VI from the temperature dependence of the rate and equilibrium binding constants. Nucleotide binding to actomyosin V and VI can be modeled as two-step binding mechanisms involving the formation of collision complexes followed by isomerization to states with high nucleotide affinity. Formation of the actomyosin VI-ATP collision complex is much weaker and slower than for actomyosin V. A three-step binding mechanism where actomyosin VI isomerizes between two conformations, one competent to bind ATP and one not, followed by rapid ATP binding best accounts for the data. ADP binds to actomyosin V more tightly than actomyosin VI. At 25 degrees C, the strong ADP-binding equilibria are comparable for actomyosin V and VI, and the different overall ADP affinities arise from differences in the ADP collision complex affinity. The actomyosin-ADP isomerization leading to strong ADP binding is entropy driven at >15 degrees C and occurs with a large, positive change in heat capacity (DeltaC(P) degrees ) for both actomyosin V and VI. Sucrose slows ADP binding and dissociation from actomyosin V and VI but not the overall equilibrium constants for strong ADP binding, indicating that solvent viscosity dampens ADP-dependent kinetic transitions, presumably a tail swing that occurs with ADP binding and release. We favor a mechanism where strong ADP binding increases the dynamics and flexibility of the actomyosin complex. The heat capacity (DeltaC(P) degrees ) and entropy (DeltaS degrees ) changes are greater for actomyosin VI than actomyosin V, suggesting different extents of ADP-induced structural rearrangement.

  2. Nanoscale constrictions in superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, Mark David; Naether, Uta; Ciria, Miguel; Zueco, David; Luis, Fernando; Sesé, Javier; Atkinson, James; Barco, Enrique del; Sánchez-Azqueta, Carlos; Majer, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    We report on the design, fabrication, and characterization of superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators with nanoscopic constrictions. By reducing the size of the center line down to 50 nm, the radio frequency currents are concentrated and the magnetic field in its vicinity is increased. The device characteristics are only slightly modified by the constrictions, with changes in resonance frequency lower than 1% and internal quality factors of the same order of magnitude as the original ones. These devices could enable the achievement of higher couplings to small magnetic samples or even to single molecular spins and have applications in circuit quantum electrodynamics, quantum computing, and electron paramagnetic resonance.

  3. Nanoscale constrictions in superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, Mark David; Naether, Uta; Ciria, Miguel; Zueco, David; Luis, Fernando, E-mail: fluis@unizar.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón, CSIC—Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Sesé, Javier [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón, Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Atkinson, James; Barco, Enrique del [Department of Physics, University of Central Florida, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Sánchez-Azqueta, Carlos [Dpto. de Ingeniería Electrónica y Telecomunicaciones, Universidad de Zaragoza, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Majer, Johannes [Vienna Center for Quantum Science and Technology, Atominstitut, TU Wien, 1020 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-10-20

    We report on the design, fabrication, and characterization of superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators with nanoscopic constrictions. By reducing the size of the center line down to 50 nm, the radio frequency currents are concentrated and the magnetic field in its vicinity is increased. The device characteristics are only slightly modified by the constrictions, with changes in resonance frequency lower than 1% and internal quality factors of the same order of magnitude as the original ones. These devices could enable the achievement of higher couplings to small magnetic samples or even to single molecular spins and have applications in circuit quantum electrodynamics, quantum computing, and electron paramagnetic resonance.

  4. Pregnancy complicating irradiation-induced constrictive pericarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakri, Younes N.; Martan, Ahmed; Amri, Aladin (King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Obstetrics and Gynecology); Amri, M. (King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Dept. of Cardiovascular Diseases)

    1992-01-01

    A case is reported of a 24 year-old primigravida who had severe effusive constrictive pericarditis secondary to mediastinal irradiation following chemotherapy for Hodgkins disease. Pregnancy was threatened by serious maternal cardiovascular complications and a non-viable fetus was born spontaneously and prematurely. Patient was completely asymptomatic before pregnancy. (au).

  5. Simulation of viscoelastic flow through constrictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szabo, Peter; Rallison, J. M.; Hinch, E. J.

    1997-01-01

    The flow of a FENE-fluid through a 4:1:4 constriction in a tube is computed by a split Lagrangian-Eulerian finite element method.In steady flow it is found that the upstream vortex grows with increasing Deborah number, while the downstream vortex diminishes and disappears.The steady pressure drop...

  6. Constrictive Pericarditis Associated with Atypical Antipsychotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-chin Jean Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the successful surgical intervention in a case of constrictive pericarditis after long-term use of atypical antipsychotics. Pericarditis developed in our patient with a longstanding history of schizophrenia treated with atypical antipsychotics. Pericardiectomy was undertaken, and the patient's presenting symptom of shortness of breath resolved subsequently with an uneventful postoperative course.

  7. Changes of the eye optics after iris constriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Montés-Micó

    2010-10-01

    Conclusion: Iris constriction slightly modifies the optics of the eye. The small hyperopic shift of the best image plane after iris constriction may be explained by a change in the lens shape and/or position.

  8. Flow of Tunable Elastic Microcapsules through Constrictions

    OpenAIRE

    do Nascimento, D?bora F.; Avenda?o, Jorge A.; Mehl, Ana; Moura, Maria J. B.; Carvalho, Marcio S.; Duncanson, Wynter J.

    2017-01-01

    We design and fabricate elastically tunable monodisperse microcapsules using microfluidics and cross-linkable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). The overall stiffness of the microcapsules is governed by both the thickness and cross-link ratio of the polymer shell. Flowing suspensions of microcapsules through constricted spaces leads to transient blockage of fluid flow, thus altering the flow behavior. The ability to tune microcapsule mechanical properties enables the design of elastic microcapsules...

  9. Effects of nanosized constriction on thermal transport properties of graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Thermal transport properties of graphene with nanosized constrictions are investigated using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The results show that the nanosized constrictions have a significant influence on the thermal transport properties of graphene. The thermal resistance of the nanosized constrictions is on the order of 107 to 109 K/W at 150 K, which reduces the thermal conductivity by 7.7% to 90.4%. It is also found that the constriction resistance is inversely proportional to the width of the constriction and independent of the heat current. Moreover, we developed an analytical model for the ballistic thermal resistance of the nanosized constrictions in two-dimensional nanosystems. The theoretical prediction agrees well with the simulation results in this paper, which suggests that the thermal transport across the nanosized constrictions in two-dimensional nanosystems is ballistic in nature. PACS 65.80.CK; 61.48.Gh; 63.20.kp; 31.15.xv PMID:25232292

  10. Asymmetric constriction of dividing Escherichia coli cells induced by expression of a fusion between two min proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowlett, Veronica Wells; Margolin, William

    2014-06-01

    The Min system, consisting of MinC, MinD, and MinE, plays an important role in localizing the Escherichia coli cell division machinery to midcell by preventing FtsZ ring (Z ring) formation at cell poles. MinC has two domains, MinCn and MinCc, which both bind to FtsZ and act synergistically to inhibit FtsZ polymerization. Binary fission of E. coli usually proceeds symmetrically, with daughter cells at roughly 180° to each other. In contrast, we discovered that overproduction of an artificial MinCc-MinD fusion protein in the absence of other Min proteins induced frequent and dramatic jackknife-like bending of cells at division septa, with cell constriction predominantly on the outside of the bend. Mutations in the fusion known to disrupt MinCc-FtsZ, MinCc-MinD, or MinD-membrane interactions largely suppressed bending division. Imaging of FtsZ-green fluorescent protein (GFP) showed no obvious asymmetric localization of FtsZ during MinCc-MinD overproduction, suggesting that a downstream activity of the Z ring was inhibited asymmetrically. Consistent with this, MinCc-MinD fusions localized predominantly to segments of the Z ring at the inside of developing cell bends, while FtsA (but not ZipA) tended to localize to the outside. As FtsA is required for ring constriction, we propose that this asymmetric localization pattern blocks constriction of the inside of the septal ring while permitting continued constriction of the outside portion.

  11. Constrictive Pericarditis as a Never Ending Story: What's New?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Nowadays, we have a better understanding of the natural history of constrictive pericarditis such as transient constriction. In addition, we have acquired the correct understanding of hemodynamic features that are unique to constrictive pericarditis. This understanding has allowed us to diagnose constrictive pericarditis reliably with Doppler echocardiography and differentiation between constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy is no longer a clinical challenge. The advent of imaging modalities such as CT or MR is another advance in the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis. We can accurately measure pericardial thickness and additional information such as the status of coronary artery and the presence of myocardial fibrosis can be obtained. We no longer perform cardiac catheterization for the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis. However, these advances are useless unless we suspect and undergo work-up for constrictive pericarditis. In constrictive pericarditis, the most important diagnostic tool is clinical suspicion. In a patient with signs and symptoms of increased systemic venous pressure i.e. right sided heart failure, that are disproportionate to pulmonary or left sided heart disease, possibility of constrictive pericarditis should always be included in the differential diagnosis. PMID:22493608

  12. Actomyosin organisation for adhesion, spreading, growth and movement in chick fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Rees, D A

    1979-01-01

    Examination of the actomyosin structures and their relation to adhesion, movement and growth in the first fibroblasts migrating from chick heart explants shows striking differences with fibroblasts adapted to grow in culture. The latter have focal adhesions which seem to immobilize them for ancho......Examination of the actomyosin structures and their relation to adhesion, movement and growth in the first fibroblasts migrating from chick heart explants shows striking differences with fibroblasts adapted to grow in culture. The latter have focal adhesions which seem to immobilize them...

  13. Actomyosin polarisation through PLC-PKC triggers symmetry breaking of the mouse embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Meng; Leung, Chuen Yan; Shahbazi, Marta N; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

    2017-10-13

    Establishment of cell polarity in the mammalian embryo is fundamental for the first cell fate decision that sets aside progenitor cells for both the new organism and the placenta. Yet the sequence of events and molecular mechanism that trigger this process remain unknown. Here, we show that de novo polarisation of the mouse embryo occurs in two distinct phases at the 8-cell stage. In the first phase, an apical actomyosin network is formed. This is a pre-requisite for the second phase, in which the Par complex localises to the apical domain, excluding actomyosin and forming a mature apical cap. Using a variety of approaches, we also show that phospholipase C-mediated PIP 2 hydrolysis is necessary and sufficient to trigger the polarisation of actomyosin through the Rho-mediated recruitment of myosin II to the apical cortex. Together, these results reveal the molecular framework that triggers de novo polarisation of the mouse embryo.The molecular trigger that establishes cell polarity in the mammalian embryo is unclear. Here, the authors show that de novo polarisation of the mouse embryo at the 8-cell stage is directed by Phospholipase C and Protein kinase C and occurs in two phases: polarisation of actomyosin followed by the Par complex.

  14. The Balloon Foot ; A Rare Presentation Of Congenital Constricting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a case of a rare manifestation of congenital constricting annular band (CAB) in the lower extremity resulting in a severe excessive swelling of the foot which we have termed Balloon foot. The ballooned foot is caused by a progressive deepening of the circumferential constriction into the soft tissue of the lower ...

  15. Shoulder Duplication in Constriction Band Syndrome: a Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davod Jafari

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A 2.5 year old girl is presented with both hands constriction bands leading to distal amputations and the rare deformity of shoulder duplication in the right side accompanying constriction skin marking over the affected shoulder. The cephalomedial scapula articulated with the clavicle and the caudolateral scapula articulated with humeral head. The most important physical finding which could explain the pathophysiology of this rare anomaly, was constriction band marking over the right shoulder. Shoulder range of motion was limited but still functional and no surgical intervention was required for the scapular duplication.

  16. Understanding cell passage through constricted microfluidic channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartas-Ayala, Marco A.; Karnik, Rohit

    2012-11-01

    Recently, several microfluidic platforms have been proposed to characterize cells based on their behaviour during cell passage through constricted channels. Variables like transit time have been analyzed in disease states like sickle cell anemia, malaria and sepsis. Nevertheless, it is hard to make direct comparisons between different platforms and cell types. We present experimental results of the relationship between solid deformable particle properties, i.e. stiffness and relative particle size, and flow properties, i.e. particle's velocity. We measured the hydrodynamic variables during the flow of HL-60 cells, a white myeloid cell type, in narrow microfluidic square channels using a microfluidic differential manometer. We measured the flow force required to move cells of different sizes through microchannels and quantified friction forces opposing cell passage. We determined the non-dimensional parameters that influence the flow of cells and we used them to obtain a non dimensional expression that can be used to predict the forces needed to drive cells through microchannels. We found that the friction force needed to flow HL-60 through a microfluidic channel is the sum of two parts. The first part is a static friction force that is proportional to the force needed to keep the force compressed. The second part is a factor that is proportional to the cell velocity, hence a dynamic term, and slightly sensitive to the compressive force. We thank CONACYT (Mexican Science and Technology Council) for supporting this project, grant 205899.

  17. An actomyosin-based barrier inhibits cell mixing at compartmental boundaries in Drosophila embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, Bruno; Pélissier-Monier, Anne; Brand, Andrea H; Sanson, Bénédicte

    2010-01-01

    Partitioning tissues into compartments that do not intermix is essential for the correct morphogenesis of animal embryos and organs. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain compartmental cell sorting, mainly differential adhesion, but also regulation of the cytoskeleton or of cell proliferation. Nevertheless, the molecular and cellular mechanisms that keep cells apart at boundaries remain unclear. Here we demonstrate, in early Drosophila melanogaster embryos, that actomyosin-based barriers stop cells from invading neighbouring compartments. Our analysis shows that cells can transiently invade neighbouring compartments, especially when they divide, but are then pushed back into their compartment of origin. Actomyosin cytoskeletal components are enriched at compartmental boundaries, forming cable-like structures when the epidermis is mitotically active. When MyoII (non-muscle myosin II) function is inhibited, including locally at the cable by chromophore-assisted laser inactivation (CALI), in live embryos, dividing cells are no longer pushed back, leading to compartmental cell mixing. We propose that local regulation of actomyosin contractibility, rather than differential adhesion, is the primary mechanism sorting cells at compartmental boundaries.

  18. Cathode-constriction and column-constriction in high current vacuum arcs subjected to an axial magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zaiqin; Ma, Hui; Liu, Zhiyuan; Geng, Yingsan; Wang, Jianhua

    2018-04-01

    The influence of the applied axial magnetic field on the current density distribution in the arc column and electrodes is intensively studied. However, the previous results only provide a qualitative explanation, which cannot quantitatively explain a recent experimental data on anode current density. The objective of this paper is to quantitatively determine the current constriction subjected to an axial magnetic field in high-current vacuum arcs according to the recent experimental data. A magnetohydrodynamic model is adopted to describe the high current vacuum arcs. The vacuum arc is in a diffuse arc mode with an arc current ranged from 6 kArms to 14 kArms and an axial magnetic field ranged from 20 mT to 110 mT. By a comparison of the recent experimental work of current density distribution on the anode, the modelling results show that there are two types of current constriction. On one hand, the current on the cathode shows a constriction, and this constriction is termed as the cathode-constriction. On the other hand, the current constricts in the arc column region, and this constriction is termed as the column-constriction. The cathode boundary is of vital importance in a quantitative model. An improved cathode constriction boundary is proposed. Under the improved boundary, the simulation results are in good agreement with the recent experimental data on the anode current density distribution. It is demonstrated that the current density distribution at the anode is sensitive to that at the cathode, so that measurements of the anode current density can be used, in combination with the vacuum arc model, to infer the cathode current density distribution.

  19. Experimental model of trigger finger through A1 pulley constriction in a human cadaveric hand: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kristina J; Thomson, J Grant

    2013-10-01

    Although it can be reasonably assumed that trigger digits occur as the result of a size mismatch in the pulley-tendon system, it is unclear whether locking, histological changes, and nodule formation occur owing to an intrinsically too small pulley or an enlarged digital flexor tendon. Our purposes in this feasibility study were to (1) create a model of trigger digit by pulley constriction in nonpreserved human tissue, (2) measure the change in work of flexion as the force of pulley constriction increased, (3) compare the work of flexion between nontriggering and triggering conditions, and (4) determine whether triggering can occur at the A2, A3, and A4 pulleys under similar conditions. Using a tensiometer, we studied the work of flexion in 4 fingers (thumb, index, middle, and ring) in a human cadaveric hand. The load of flexion was measured as the A1 to A4 pulleys were incrementally constricted in order to induce triggering. Work of flexion was analyzed for differences among trial conditions. Triggering was successfully induced in all 4 digits through constriction of the A1 pulley. No triggering occurred in any of the A2, A3, or A4 pulley systems in this model. We successfully created a trigger model in a human cadaveric hand. Our results demonstrate that the A1 pulley can cause triggering from manual constriction of the pulley alone. A trigger model such as this may allow investigations of pathophysiology, and this may result in novel treatment strategies and modalities. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Contractile actomyosin arcs promote the activation of primary mouse T cells in a ligand-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinsung Hong

    Full Text Available Mechano-transduction is an emerging but still poorly understood component of T cell activation. Here we investigated the ligand-dependent contribution made by contractile actomyosin arcs populating the peripheral supramolecular activation cluster (pSMAC region of the immunological synapse (IS to T cell receptor (TCR microcluster transport and proximal signaling in primary mouse T cells. Using super resolution microscopy, OT1-CD8+ mouse T cells, and two ovalbumin (OVA peptides with different affinities for the TCR, we show that the generation of organized actomyosin arcs depends on ligand potency and the ability of myosin 2 to contract actin filaments. While weak ligands induce disorganized actomyosin arcs, strong ligands result in organized actomyosin arcs that correlate well with tension-sensitive CasL phosphorylation and the accumulation of ligands at the IS center. Blocking myosin 2 contractility greatly reduces the difference in the extent of Src and LAT phosphorylation observed between the strong and the weak ligand, arguing that myosin 2-dependent force generation within actin arcs contributes to ligand discrimination. Together, our data are consistent with the idea that actomyosin arcs in the pSMAC region of the IS promote a mechano-chemical feedback mechanism that amplifies the accumulation of critical signaling molecules at the IS.

  1. Effect of microbial transglutaminase on the natural actomyosin cross-linking in chicken and beef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahhmed, Abdulatef Mrghni; Nasu, Tetsuo; Huy, Dang Quang; Tomisaka, Yoshito; Kawahara, Satoshi; Muguruma, Michio

    2009-06-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the difference between chicken and beef in the interaction of actomyosin (myosin B) with microbial transglutaminase (MTG). The gel strength of myosin B was improved in both species and was significantly greater in beef than in chicken (Pactivity. SEMI also suggested that all MTG-dependent mega-structures of protein molecules generated in chicken and beef may vary greatly in size, configuration and complexity after treatment with MTG. We concluded that the optimal cross-links in myosin B induced by MTG are heterogeneous in chicken and beef.

  2. [Changes in ultrastructure and actomyosin complex of cardiomyocytes in experimental hypergravitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikogosova, M O; Kaĭfadzhian, M A; Barinian, S B; Akopian, A A

    1991-04-01

    There were studied the cardiomyocyte ultrastructure, contractile function, actomyosin complex composition and property of the rat ventricular myocardium after repeated gravitational overloading and following rest. In the hypergravitation period cardiomyocyte changes carry destructive character or are regenerative processes manifestation. They are comparable with myocardial contractile function state and with displacements in molecular structure of myofibrillar apparatus. At rest conditions the liquidation of cardiomyocytes destructive changes falls behind the normalization of contractile and regulatory cells of physico-chemical characteristics. The possible reasons of this phenomenon are discussed.

  3. Actomyosin organisation for adhesion, spreading, growth and movement in chick fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Rees, D A

    1979-01-01

    for anchorage-dependent growth, rather than facilitate their movement. The fibroblasts specialized for movement from the explants, though equally well spread, make contact with substratum through extensive areas of relatively unspecialized membrane, have less well developed stress fibres and a low growth rate.......Examination of the actomyosin structures and their relation to adhesion, movement and growth in the first fibroblasts migrating from chick heart explants shows striking differences with fibroblasts adapted to grow in culture. The latter have focal adhesions which seem to immobilize them...

  4. Granular flow over inclined channels with constrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunuguntla, Deepak; Weinhart, Thomas; Thornton, Anthony; Bokhove, Onno

    2013-04-01

    Study of granular flows down inclined channels is essential in understanding the dynamics of natural grain flows like landslides and snow avalanches. As a stepping stone, dry granular flow over an inclined channel with a localised constriction is investigated using both continuum methods and particle simulations. Initially, depth-averaged equations of motion (Savage & Hutter 1989) containing an unknown friction law are considered. The shallow-layer model for granular flows is closed with a friction law obtained from particle simulations of steady flows (Weinhart et al. 2012) undertaken in the open source package Mercury DPM (Mercury 2010). The closed two-dimensional (2D) shallow-layer model is then width-averaged to obtain a novel one-dimensional (1D) model which is an extension of the one for water flows through contraction (Akers & Bokhove 2008). Different flow states are predicted by this novel one-dimensional theory. Flow regimes with distinct flow states are determined as a function of upstream channel Froude number, F, and channel width ratio, Bc. The latter being the ratio of the channel exit width and upstream channel width. Existence of multiple steady states is predicted in a certain regime of F - Bc parameter plane which is in agreement with experiments previously undertaken by (Akers & Bokhove 2008) and for granular flows (Vreman et al. 2007). Furthermore, the 1D model is verified by solving the 2D shallow granular equations using an open source discontinuous Galerkin finite element package hpGEM (Pesch et al. 2007). For supercritical flows i.e. F > 1 the 1D asymptotics holds although the two-dimensional oblique granular jumps largely vary across the converging channel. This computationally efficient closed 1D model is validated by comparing it to the computationally more expensiveaa three-dimensional particle simulations. Finally, we aim to present a quasi-steady particle simulation of inclined flow through two rectangular blocks separated by a gap

  5. Micromagnetic simulations of magnetic nanowires with constrictions by FIB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, H.H.; Ong, E.T.; Liu, T.; Li, H.L.; Liu, Z.J.; Li, E.P.; Wu, H.Y.; Adeyeye, A.O.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic structures and magnetization processes of individual Ni nanowires with constrictions are investigated by means of micromagnetic modeling. The physical problem is modeled with the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation, and the fast Fourier transform on multipoles (FFTM) method is employed to speed up the calculation of the demagnetization field. It is demonstrated that the FFTM algorithm is efficient and accurate for studying magnetization transition configuration in nanowire. The new approach is then used to study the switching phenomenon of the nanowire. And the simulation results show that the switching field increases a little with presence of constriction. The investigation of the magnetization processes illustrates the edge domain forms near constriction region for nanowire with diameter=30 nm and vortex domain for 200 nm case

  6. Long-evolution ascites in a patient with constrictive pericarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonçalo Nunes

    Full Text Available Constrictive pericarditis (CP is an uncommon disease resulting from chronic pericardial inflammation, fibrosis and calcification. Since there are atypical forms of presentation, with subtle or nonexistent cardiorespiratory symptoms, diagnosis may be challenging and difficult. Recurrent ascites in patients with congestive hepatopathy due to constrictive pericarditis is, in most cases, reversible after pericardiectomy. Nevertheless, development of persistent liver dysfunction may be a long-term complication. The present case describes a 23 years old man with growth delay, dyspnoea and long evolution ascites, whose exhaustive etiological investigation led to diagnosis. Afterwards the patient underwent elective surgery with symptom and general condition improvement. Ascites differential diagnosis and its association with constrictive pericarditis are briefly reviewed in this article.

  7. Size, but not experience, affects the ontogeny of constriction performance in ball pythons (Python regius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penning, David A; Dartez, Schuyler F

    2016-03-01

    Constriction is a prey-immobilization technique used by many snakes and is hypothesized to have been important to the evolution and diversification of snakes. However, very few studies have examined the factors that affect constriction performance. We investigated constriction performance in ball pythons (Python regius) by evaluating how peak constriction pressure is affected by snake size, sex, and experience. In one experiment, we tested the ontogenetic scaling of constriction performance and found that snake diameter was the only significant factor determining peak constriction pressure. The number of loops applied in a coil and its interaction with snake diameter did not significantly affect constriction performance. Constriction performance in ball pythons scaled differently than in other snakes that have been studied, and medium to large ball pythons are capable of exerting significantly higher pressures than those shown to cause circulatory arrest in prey. In a second experiment, we tested the effects of experience on constriction performance in hatchling ball pythons over 10 feeding events. By allowing snakes in one test group to gain constriction experience, and manually feeding snakes under sedation in another test group, we showed that experience did not affect constriction performance. During their final (10th) feedings, all pythons constricted similarly and with sufficiently high pressures to kill prey rapidly. At the end of the 10 feeding trials, snakes that were allowed to constrict were significantly smaller than their non-constricting counterparts. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Stability of A-B phase boundary in a constriction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viljas, Janne; Thuneberg, Erkki

    2003-05-01

    We report on a Ginzburg-Landau calculation of the stability of a boundary between A and B phases of superfluid {sup 3}He in a two-dimensional constriction. In the macroscopic limit the stability follows a well-known relation, which depends on the surface tension {sigma}{sub AB} of the A-B boundary. In the narrow-constriction limit the surface tension is not well defined, but the interface is always stable, and a weak link between the A and B phases is obtained.

  9. Cholesterol inhibits entotic cell-in-cell formation and actomyosin contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Banzhan; Zhang, Bo; Chen, Ang; Yuan, Long; Liang, Jianqing; Wang, Manna; Zhang, Zhengrong; Fan, Jie; Yu, Xiaochen; Zhang, Xin; Niu, Zubiao; Zheng, You; Gu, Songzhi; Liu, Xiaoqing; Du, Hongli; Wang, Jufang; Hu, Xianwen; Gao, Lihua; Chen, Zhaolie; Huang, Hongyan; Wang, Xiaoning; Sun, Qiang

    2018-01-01

    Cell-in-cell structure is prevalent in human cancer, and associated with several specific pathophysiological phenomena. Although cell membrane adhesion molecules were found critical for cell-in-cell formation, the roles of other membrane components, such as lipids, remain to be explored. In this study, we attempted to investigate the effects of cholesterol and phospholipids on the formation of cell-in-cell structures by utilizing liposome as a vector. We found that Lipofectamine-2000, the reagent commonly used for routine transfection, could significantly reduce entotic cell-in-cell formation in a cell-specific manner, which is correlated with suppressed actomyosin contraction as indicated by reduced β-actin expression and myosin light chain phosphorylation. The influence on cell-in-cell formation was likely dictated by specific liposome components as some liposomes affected cell-in-cell formation while some others didn't. Screening on a limited number of lipids, the major components of liposome, identified phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), stearamide (SA), lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and cholesterol (CHOL) as the inhibitors of cell-in-cell formation. Importantly, cholesterol treatment significantly inhibited myosin light chain phosphorylation, which resembles the effect of Lipofectamine-2000, suggesting cholesterol might be partially responsible for liposomes' effects on cell-in-cell formation. Together, our findings supporting a role of membrane lipids and cholesterol in cell-in-cell formation probably via regulating actomyosin contraction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Actomyosin-based Self-organization of cell internalization during C. elegans gastrulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pohl Christian

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrulation is a key transition in embryogenesis; it requires self-organized cellular coordination, which has to be both robust to allow efficient development and plastic to provide adaptability. Despite the conservation of gastrulation as a key event in Metazoan embryogenesis, the morphogenetic mechanisms of self-organization (how global order or coordination can arise from local interactions are poorly understood. Results We report a modular structure of cell internalization in Caenorhabditis elegans gastrulation that reveals mechanisms of self-organization. Cells that internalize during gastrulation show apical contractile flows, which are correlated with centripetal extensions from surrounding cells. These extensions converge to seal over the internalizing cells in the form of rosettes. This process represents a distinct mode of monolayer remodeling, with gradual extrusion of the internalizing cells and simultaneous tissue closure without an actin purse-string. We further report that this self-organizing module can adapt to severe topological alterations, providing evidence of scalability and plasticity of actomyosin-based patterning. Finally, we show that globally, the surface cell layer undergoes coplanar division to thin out and spread over the internalizing mass, which resembles epiboly. Conclusions The combination of coplanar division-based spreading and recurrent local modules for piecemeal internalization constitutes a system-level solution of gradual volume rearrangement under spatial constraint. Our results suggest that the mode of C. elegans gastrulation can be unified with the general notions of monolayer remodeling and with distinct cellular mechanisms of actomyosin-based morphogenesis.

  11. Matrix elasticity regulates lamin-A,C phosphorylation and turnover with feedback to actomyosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxboim, Amnon; Swift, Joe; Irianto, Jerome; Spinler, Kyle R; Dingal, P C Dave P; Athirasala, Avathamsa; Kao, Yun-Ruei C; Cho, Sangkyun; Harada, Takamasa; Shin, Jae-Won; Discher, Dennis E

    2014-08-18

    Tissue microenvironments are characterized not only in terms of chemical composition but also by collective properties such as stiffness, which influences the contractility of a cell, its adherent morphology, and even differentiation. The nucleoskeletal protein lamin-A,C increases with matrix stiffness, confers nuclear mechanical properties, and influences differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), whereas B-type lamins remain relatively constant. Here we show in single-cell analyses that matrix stiffness couples to myosin-II activity to promote lamin-A,C dephosphorylation at Ser22, which regulates turnover, lamina physical properties, and actomyosin expression. Lamin-A,C phosphorylation is low in interphase versus dividing cells, and its levels rise with states of nuclear rounding in which myosin-II generates little to no tension. Phosphorylated lamin-A,C localizes to nucleoplasm, and phosphorylation is enriched on lamin-A,C fragments and is suppressed by a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor. Lamin-A,C knockdown in primary MSCs suppresses transcripts predominantly among actomyosin genes, especially in the serum response factor (SRF) pathway. Levels of myosin-IIA thus parallel levels of lamin-A,C, with phosphosite mutants revealing a key role for phosphoregulation. In modeling the system as a parsimonious gene circuit, we show that tension-dependent stabilization of lamin-A,C and myosin-IIA can suitably couple nuclear and cell morphology downstream of matrix mechanics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Atypical Presentation of Constrictive Pericarditis in a Holstein Heifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed M. Elhanafy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The field diagnosis of constrictive pericardial effusion is often established on the pertinent pathognomonic physical examination findings, but the condition cannot be ruled out based on absence of these cardinal signs. Constrictive pericardial effusion is not always manifested by bilateral jugular venous distention and pulsation, brisket edema, and muffled heart sounds, all of which are considered the key points in the field diagnosis of pericardial effusion and hardware disease. This case will also document that the outcomes of hematology, serum biochemistry panels, and blood gas analysis can be totally inconsistent with passive venous congestion and constrictive pericardial effusion in cattle. Chest radiographic findings revealed radio dense, wire-like objects; the findings were suggestive but not conclusive for pericardial or pleural effusions, due to indistinguishable diaphragmatic outline and cardiopulmonary silhouette. Cardiac ultrasonography was found to be an excellent paraclinical diagnostic procedure for cases that potentially have traumatic pericarditis and constrictive pericardial effusion. Ultrasound-guided pericardiocentesis was also a valuable diagnostic aid in establishing a definitive diagnosis.

  13. Vortex rings

    CERN Document Server

    Akhmetov, D G

    2009-01-01

    This text on vortex rings covers their theoretical foundation, systematic investigations, and practical applications such as the extinction of fires at gushing oil wells. It pays special attention to the formation and motion of turbulent vortex rings.

  14. Mitotic cells contract actomyosin cortex and generate pressure to round against or escape epithelial confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorce, Barbara; Escobedo, Carlos; Toyoda, Yusuke; Stewart, Martin P.; Cattin, Cedric J.; Newton, Richard; Banerjee, Indranil; Stettler, Alexander; Roska, Botond; Eaton, Suzanne; Hyman, Anthony A.; Hierlemann, Andreas; Müller, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about how mitotic cells round against epithelial confinement. Here, we engineer micropillar arrays that subject cells to lateral mechanical confinement similar to that experienced in epithelia. If generating sufficient force to deform the pillars, rounding epithelial (MDCK) cells can create space to divide. However, if mitotic cells cannot create sufficient space, their rounding force, which is generated by actomyosin contraction and hydrostatic pressure, pushes the cell out of confinement. After conducting mitosis in an unperturbed manner, both daughter cells return to the confinement of the pillars. Cells that cannot round against nor escape confinement cannot orient their mitotic spindles and more likely undergo apoptosis. The results highlight how spatially constrained epithelial cells prepare for mitosis: either they are strong enough to round up or they must escape. The ability to escape from confinement and reintegrate after mitosis appears to be a basic property of epithelial cells. PMID:26602832

  15. [The role of Doppler echocardiography in chronic constrictive pericarditis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdhaoui, A; Bouraoui, H; Ernez-Hajri, S; Jeridi, G; Saadaoui, A; Ammar, H

    2001-11-01

    Constrictive péricarditis (CCP) is a rare but serious disease. It still poses diagnostic difficulties. The purpose of our work is to study the contribution of the echocardiographic Doppler in the diagnosis of the CCP. The authors report six cases of CCP proven after surgery. Study by ultrasound Doppler of intracardiac blood flow and their respiratory variations showed the existence of abnormalities. The decrease of 25% of the mitral E wave in inspiration compared to the value observed in expiration, the increase of 100% of the ebb in sus hépatic vein in expiration and the modifications of the flux in pulmonary insufficiency are the most reliable signs for the diagnosis of the CCP. This method seems so interesting for the diagnosis and to estimate the degree of constriction of the CCP.

  16. A rare combination of amniotic constriction band with osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Krupa Hitesh; Shah, Hitesh

    2015-11-11

    Amniotic constriction bands and osteogenesis imperfecta are disorders arising from a collagen defect. We report a rare association of amniotic bands with osteogenesis imperfecta in a child. The child was born with multiple amniotic bands involving the right leg, both hands and both feet. Multiple fractures of long bones of lower limbs occurred in childhood due to trivial trauma. Deformities of the femur and tibia due to malunion with osteopenia and blue sclerae were present. The patient was treated with z plasty of constriction band of the right tibia and bisphosphonate for osteogenesis imperfecta. This rare association of both collagen diseases may provide further insight for the pathogenesis of these diseases. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  17. Effect of internal architecture on microgel deformation in microfluidic constrictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lynna; Wang, Kai Xi; Doyle, Patrick S

    2017-03-01

    The study of how soft particles deform to pass through narrow openings is important for understanding the transit of biological cells, as well as for designing deformable drug delivery carriers. In this work, we systematically explore how soft microparticles with various internal architectures deform during passage through microfluidic constrictions. We synthesize hydrogel particles with well-defined internal structure using lithography-based UV polymerization in microfluidic channels (stop-flow lithography). Using this in situ technique, we explore a range of 2D particle architectures and their effect on particle deformation. We observe that particles undergo buckling of internal supports and reorient at the constriction entrance in order to adopt preferred shapes that correspond to minimum energy configurations. Using finite element simulations of elastic deformation under compression, we accurately predict the optimal deformation configuration of these structured particles.

  18. Granulomatosis with polyangiitis and constrictive pericarditis--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, A E; Henriksen, P A; Amft, E N

    2014-01-01

    Polyangiitis with granulomatosis, previously known as Wegener's granulomatosis, is a systemic necrotising granulomatous vasculitis. It predominantly affects the upper and lower respiratory tracts and the kidneys, but can potentially affect any organ system. It is diagnosed by clinical features, immunology (anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) and histology. Cardiac involvement occurs in 6 to 44% of cases. We present a case of polyangiitis with granulomatosis and constrictive pericarditis, which occurred despite vigorous immunosuppression and which required surgical pericardectomy.

  19. Planetary Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiscareno, Matthew S.

    Planetary rings are the only nearby astrophysical disks and the only disks that have been investigated by spacecraft (especially the Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn). Although there are significant differences between rings and other disks, chiefly the large planet/ring mass ratio that greatly enhances the flatness of rings (aspect ratios as small as 10- 7), understanding of disks in general can be enhanced by understanding the dynamical processes observed at close range and in real time in planetary rings.We review the known ring systems of the four giant planets, as well as the prospects for ring systems yet to be discovered. We then review planetary rings by type. The A, B, and C rings of Saturn, plus the Cassini Division, comprise our solar system's only dense broad disk and host many phenomena of general application to disks including spiral waves, gap formation, self-gravity wakes, viscous overstability and normal modes, impact clouds, and orbital evolution of embedded moons. Dense narrow rings are found both at Uranus (where they comprise the main rings entirely) and at Saturn (where they are embedded in the broad disk) and are the primary natural laboratory for understanding shepherding and self-stability. Narrow dusty rings, likely generated by embedded source bodies, are surprisingly found to sport azimuthally confined arcs at Neptune, Saturn, and Jupiter. Finally, every known ring system includes a substantial component of diffuse dusty rings.Planetary rings have shown themselves to be useful as detectors of planetary processes around them, including the planetary magnetic field and interplanetary impactors as well as the gravity of nearby perturbing moons. Experimental rings science has made great progress in recent decades, especially numerical simulations of self-gravity wakes and other processes but also laboratory investigations of coefficient of restitution and spectroscopic ground truth. The age of self-sustained ring systems is a matter of

  20. Relationship between conductive hearing loss and maxillary constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyvandi, A A; Jamilian, A; Moradi, E

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the relationship between conductive hearing loss and maxillary constriction. A total of 120 people, aged from 7 to 40 years, who were referred to an audiologist when taking out health insurance or for school pre-registration check-up, were selected for this study. A total of 60 participants who had hearing threshold levels greater than 15 dB in both ears were chosen as the conductive hearing loss group. The remaining 60, with normal hearing thresholds of less than 15 dB, were used as the control group. All participants were referred to an orthodontic clinic. Participants who had a posterior crossbite and high palatal vault were considered to suffer from maxillary constriction. There were no significant differences between the sex ratios and mean ages of the groups. However, participants with conductive hearing loss were 3.5 times more likely than controls to suffer from maxillary constriction. Patients who suffer from conductive hearing loss are likely to show a maxillary abnormality when examined by an orthodontist.

  1. The decay of confined vortex rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, K. C.; Niebel, C. L.; Jung, S.; Vlachos, P. P.

    2012-07-01

    Vortex rings are produced during the ejection of fluid through a nozzle or orifice, which occurs in a wide range of biological conditions such as blood flow through the valves of the heart or through arterial constrictions. Confined vortex ring dynamics, such as these, have not been previously studied despite their occurrence within the biological flow conditions mentioned. In this work, we investigate laminar vortex rings using particle image velocimetry and develop a new semi-empirical model for the evolution of vortex ring circulation subject to confinement. Here we introduce a decay parameter β which exponentially grows with increasing vortex ring confinement ratio, the ratio of the vortex ring diameter ( D VR) to the confinement diameter ( D), with the relationship β=4.38 exp(9.5D_VR/D), resulting in a corresponding increase in the rate of vortex ring circulation decay. This work enables the prediction of circulation decay rate based on confinement, which is important to understanding naturally occurring confined vortex ring dynamics.

  2. Epithelial rotation is preceded by planar symmetry breaking of actomyosin and protects epithelial tissue from cell deformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Viktorinová

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Symmetry breaking is involved in many developmental processes that form bodies and organs. One of them is the epithelial rotation of developing tubular and acinar organs. However, how epithelial cells move, how they break symmetry to define their common direction, and what function rotational epithelial motions have remains elusive. Here, we identify a dynamic actomyosin network that breaks symmetry at the basal surface of the Drosophila follicle epithelium of acinar-like primitive organs, called egg chambers, and may represent a candidate force-generation mechanism that underlies the unidirectional motion of this epithelial tissue. We provide evidence that the atypical cadherin Fat2, a key planar cell polarity regulator in Drosophila oogenesis, directs and orchestrates transmission of the intracellular actomyosin asymmetry cue onto a tissue plane in order to break planar actomyosin symmetry, facilitate epithelial rotation in the opposite direction, and direct the elongation of follicle cells. In contrast, loss of this rotational motion results in anisotropic non-muscle Myosin II pulses that are disorganized in plane and causes cell deformations in the epithelial tissue of Drosophila eggs. Our work demonstrates that atypical cadherins play an important role in the control of symmetry breaking of cellular mechanics in order to facilitate tissue motion and model epithelial tissue. We propose that their functions may be evolutionarily conserved in tubular/acinar vertebrate organs.

  3. Epithelial rotation is preceded by planar symmetry breaking of actomyosin and protects epithelial tissue from cell deformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viktorinová, Ivana; Henry, Ian; Tomancak, Pavel

    2017-11-01

    Symmetry breaking is involved in many developmental processes that form bodies and organs. One of them is the epithelial rotation of developing tubular and acinar organs. However, how epithelial cells move, how they break symmetry to define their common direction, and what function rotational epithelial motions have remains elusive. Here, we identify a dynamic actomyosin network that breaks symmetry at the basal surface of the Drosophila follicle epithelium of acinar-like primitive organs, called egg chambers, and may represent a candidate force-generation mechanism that underlies the unidirectional motion of this epithelial tissue. We provide evidence that the atypical cadherin Fat2, a key planar cell polarity regulator in Drosophila oogenesis, directs and orchestrates transmission of the intracellular actomyosin asymmetry cue onto a tissue plane in order to break planar actomyosin symmetry, facilitate epithelial rotation in the opposite direction, and direct the elongation of follicle cells. In contrast, loss of this rotational motion results in anisotropic non-muscle Myosin II pulses that are disorganized in plane and causes cell deformations in the epithelial tissue of Drosophila eggs. Our work demonstrates that atypical cadherins play an important role in the control of symmetry breaking of cellular mechanics in order to facilitate tissue motion and model epithelial tissue. We propose that their functions may be evolutionarily conserved in tubular/acinar vertebrate organs.

  4. Storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Neill, Gerald K.

    1963-04-15

    The development of storage rings is discussed. Advantages of such devices are pointed out as well as their limits, requirements, and design and fabrication problems. Information gained by the operation of small electron storage rings is included, and three experiments are proposed for colliding-beam facilities. (D.C.W.)

  5. Purely electrical detection of a skyrmion in constricted geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamamoto, Keita; Ezawa, Motohiko [Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nagaosa, Naoto [Department of Applied Physics, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); RIKEN Center for Emergent Matter Science (CEMS), Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2016-03-14

    How to detect the skyrmion position is a crucial problem in future skyrmionics since it corresponds to the reading process of information. We propose a method to detect the skyrmion position purely electrically by measuring the Hall conductance in a constricted geometry. The Hall conductance becomes maximum when a skyrmion is at the lead position. It is possible to detect the skyrmion position even at room temperature. We find an optimized width of the sample determined by the skyrmion radius. We also investigate the effects of elastic and inelastic scatterings, and finite temperature. Our results will be a basis of future skyrmion electronics.

  6. Rolie-Poly fluid flowing through constrictions: Two distinct instabilities

    KAUST Repository

    Reis, T.

    2013-05-01

    Elastic instabilities of entangled polymer melts are common in industrial processes but the physics responsible is not well understood. We present a numerical linear stability study of a molecular based constitutive model which grants us physical insight into the underlying mechanics involved. Two constriction flows are considered - one shear dominated, the other extension dominated - and two distinct instabilities are found. The influence of the molecular structure and the behaviour of the polymer dynamics are investigated and in both cases chain relaxation and orientation play a crucial role. This suggests a molecular-based physical interpretation of the underlying mechanisms responsible for flow instabilities. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Effects of high pressure freezing (HPF) on denaturation of natural actomyosin extracted from prawn (Metapenaeus ensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lina; Sun, Da-Wen; Zhu, Zhiwei; Zhang, Zhihang

    2017-08-15

    Effects of protein denaturation caused by high pressure freezing, involving Pressure-Factors (pressure, time) and Freezing-Factors (temperature, phase transition, recrystallization, ice crystal types), are complicated. In the current study, the conformation and functional changes of natural actomyosin (NAM) under pressure assisted freezing (PAF, 100,150,300,400,500MPa P -20°C/25min ), pressure shift freezing (PSF, 200MPa P -20°C/25min ), and immersion freezing ( 0.1MPa P -20°C/5min ) after pressure was released to 0.1MPa, as compared to normal immersion freezing process (IF, 0.1MPa P -20°C/30min ). Results indicated that PSF ( 200MPa P -20°C/30min ) could reduce the denaturation of frozen NAM and a pressure of 300MPa was the critical point to induce such a denaturation. During the periods of B→D in PSF or B→C→D in PAF, the generation and growth of ice crystals played an important role on changing the secondary and tertiary structure of the treated NAM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The RhoGEF TEM4 Regulates Endothelial Cell Migration by Suppressing Actomyosin Contractility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Mitin

    Full Text Available Persistent cellular migration requires efficient protrusion of the front of the cell, the leading edge where the actin cytoskeleton and cell-substrate adhesions undergo constant rearrangement. Rho family GTPases are essential regulators of the actin cytoskeleton and cell adhesion dynamics. Here, we examined the role of the RhoGEF TEM4, an activator of Rho family GTPases, in regulating cellular migration of endothelial cells. We found that TEM4 promotes the persistence of cellular migration by regulating the architecture of actin stress fibers and cell-substrate adhesions in protruding membranes. Furthermore, we determined that TEM4 regulates cellular migration by signaling to RhoC as suppression of RhoC expression recapitulated the loss-of-TEM4 phenotypes, and RhoC activation was impaired in TEM4-depleted cells. Finally, we showed that TEM4 and RhoC antagonize myosin II-dependent cellular contractility and the suppression of myosin II activity rescued the persistence of cellular migration of TEM4-depleted cells. Our data implicate TEM4 as an essential regulator of the actin cytoskeleton that ensures proper membrane protrusion at the leading edge of migrating cells and efficient cellular migration via suppression of actomyosin contractility.

  9. A new hypothesis for foregut and heart tube formation based on differential growth and actomyosin contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Hadi S; Garcia, Kara E; Taber, Larry A

    2017-07-01

    For decades, it was commonly thought that the bilateral heart fields in the early embryo fold directly towards the midline, where they meet and fuse to create the primitive heart tube. Recent studies have challenged this view, however, suggesting that the heart fields fold diagonally. As early foregut and heart tube morphogenesis are intimately related, this finding also raises questions concerning the traditional view of foregut formation. Here, we combine experiments on chick embryos with computational modeling to explore a new hypothesis for the physical mechanisms of heart tube and foregut formation. According to our hypothesis, differential anisotropic growth between mesoderm and endoderm drives diagonal folding. Then, active contraction along the anterior intestinal portal generates tension to elongate the foregut and heart tube. We test this hypothesis using biochemical perturbations of cell proliferation and contractility, as well as computational modeling based on nonlinear elasticity theory including growth and contraction. The present results generally support the view that differential growth and actomyosin contraction drive formation of the foregut and heart tube in the early chick embryo. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Determinantal rings

    CERN Document Server

    Bruns, Winfried

    1988-01-01

    Determinantal rings and varieties have been a central topic of commutative algebra and algebraic geometry. Their study has attracted many prominent researchers and has motivated the creation of theories which may now be considered part of general commutative ring theory. The book gives a first coherent treatment of the structure of determinantal rings. The main approach is via the theory of algebras with straightening law. This approach suggest (and is simplified by) the simultaneous treatment of the Schubert subvarieties of Grassmannian. Other methods have not been neglected, however. Principal radical systems are discussed in detail, and one section is devoted to each of invariant and representation theory. While the book is primarily a research monograph, it serves also as a reference source and the reader requires only the basics of commutative algebra together with some supplementary material found in the appendix. The text may be useful for seminars following a course in commutative ring theory since a ...

  11. ring system

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1,3,2-DIAZABORACYCLOALKANE. RING SYSTEM. Negussie Retta" and Robert H. Neilson. 'Department of Chemistry, Addis Ababa University, P.O. Box 1176, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. Department of Chemistry, Texas Christian University.

  12. Vascular ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... trachea) and esophagus can lead to breathing and digestive problems. The more the ring presses down, the more severe the symptoms will be. Breathing problems may include: ... Digestive symptoms are rare, but may include: Choking Difficulty ...

  13. Satiety and eating patterns in two species of constricting snakes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Torben P; Jacobsen, Magnus W.; Wang, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Satiety has been studied extensively in mammals, birds and fish but very little information exists on reptiles. Here we investigate time-dependent satiation in two species of constricting snakes, ball pythons (Python regius) and yellow anacondas (Eunectes notaeus). Satiation was shown to depend...... on both fasting time and prey size. In the ball pythons fed with mice of a relative prey mass RPM (mass of the prey/mass of the snake×100) of 15%, we observed a satiety response that developed between 6 and 12h after feeding, but after 24h pythons regained their appetite. With an RPM of 10% the pythons...... a significant decrease in handling time between the first and the second prey and a positive correlation between handling time and the mass of the snake....

  14. Low-flow mediated constriction: the yin to FMD's yang?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Ruth E; Green, Daniel J; Cable, N Timothy; Thijssen, Dick H J; Dawson, Ellen A

    2014-05-01

    Given the prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD), early detection is crucial. Although traditional cardiovascular risk factors relate to future CVD, the predictive value of these risk factors can be relatively limited. Contemporary scientific attention has focused on alternative direct measures of arterial function. Based on the ability of the endothelium to acutely dilate in response to an increase in flow, 'flow mediated dilation' (FMD) was introduced approximately 20 years ago and is now an established non-invasive index of endothelial function predictive of future cardiovascular events. Recently, 'low-flow mediated constriction' (L-FMC) has been proposed as a complementary addition to FMD. The technique is based on the constrictor response to decreased flow and is claimed to improve the sensitivity and specificity of FMD. The aim of this review is to examine literature pertaining to this novel technique and to provide insight into the potential use of L-FMC in future research.

  15. Equivalence ratio and constriction effects on RBCC thrust augmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koupriyanov, M.; Etele, J.

    2011-06-01

    A theoretical analysis of a variable area rocket based combined cycle engine with and without simultaneous mixing and combustion is presented. The flowfield is solved using a steady, quasi-one-dimensional, inviscid control volume formulation with combustion effects included via a generalized equilibrium calculation. Compression augmentation is shown to be sensitive to the equivalence ratio within the primary rocket chamber, where ejector section performance is greatest at both low and high equivalence ratios but near a minimum at stoichiometric conditions. The thrust generated by the RBCC engine compared to that generated by the same rocket in isolation can be increased by as much as 12% at constriction ratios of between 45% and 50%. Thrust augmentation is also shown to vary with equivalence ratio, where for a fixed geometry the maximum thrust is generated at equivalence ratios slightly below unity.

  16. [Diagnostic difficulties in a case of constricted tubular visual field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogaru, Oana-Mihaela; Rusu, Monica; Hâncu, Dacia; Horvath, Kárin

    2013-01-01

    In the paper below we present the clinical case of a 48 year old female with various symptoms associated with functional visual disturbance -constricted tubular visual fields, wich lasts from 6 years; the extensive clinical and paraclinical ophthalmological investigations ruled out the presence of an organic disorder. In the present, we suspect a diagnosis of hysteria, still uncertain, wich represented over time a big challenge in psychology and ophthalmology. The mechanisms and reasons for hysteria are still not clear and it could represent a fascinating research theme. The tunnel, spiral or star-shaped visual fields are specific findings in hysteria for patients who present visual disturbance. The question of whether or not a patient with hysterical visual impairment can or cannot "see" is still unresolved.

  17. Surgical treatment of 2 cases of irradiation induced constrictive pericarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osawa, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Wataru; Yoshii, Shinpei [Yamanashi Medical Univ., Tamaho (Japan)] (and others)

    1999-11-01

    A 72-years-old man underwent radiation therapy (62 Gy) for esophageal carcinoma. Twelve months later, symptoms of heart failure such as syncope, cough and hepatomegaly manifested. On catheter study, a dip and plateau pattern of right ventricular pressure curve was evident. Pericardiectomy without extracorporeal circulation was performed. Operative findings and pathological results were compatible with radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis. He recovered from the heart failure, and has been doing well 3 months after the surgery. A 54-years-old man underwent thymectomy for malignant thymoma. He underwent a radiation therapy (52 Gy) postoperatively. After 12 months from the irradiation, syncope and dyspnea manifested. On catheter study, a dip and plateau pattern of right ventricular pressure curve was observed. Pericardiectomy with extracorporeal circulation was performed. He recovered from the heart failure after pericardiectomy, however he died of radiation-induced pneumonitis 6 months later. (author)

  18. Stochastic Ratcheting on a Funneled Energy Landscape Is Necessary for Highly Efficient Contractility of Actomyosin Force Dipoles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komianos, James E.; Papoian, Garegin A.

    2018-04-01

    Current understanding of how contractility emerges in disordered actomyosin networks of nonmuscle cells is still largely based on the intuition derived from earlier works on muscle contractility. In addition, in disordered networks, passive cross-linkers have been hypothesized to percolate force chains in the network, hence, establishing large-scale connectivity between local contractile clusters. This view, however, largely overlooks the free energy of cross-linker binding at the microscale, which, even in the absence of active fluctuations, provides a thermodynamic drive towards highly overlapping filamentous states. In this work, we use stochastic simulations and mean-field theory to shed light on the dynamics of a single actomyosin force dipole—a pair of antiparallel actin filaments interacting with active myosin II motors and passive cross-linkers. We first show that while passive cross-linking without motor activity can produce significant contraction between a pair of actin filaments, driven by thermodynamic favorability of cross-linker binding, a sharp onset of kinetic arrest exists at large cross-link binding energies, greatly diminishing the effectiveness of this contractility mechanism. Then, when considering an active force dipole containing nonmuscle myosin II, we find that cross-linkers can also serve as a structural ratchet when the motor dissociates stochastically from the actin filaments, resulting in significant force amplification when both molecules are present. Our results provide predictions of how actomyosin force dipoles behave at the molecular level with respect to filament boundary conditions, passive cross-linking, and motor activity, which can explicitly be tested using an optical trapping experiment.

  19. Stochastic Ratcheting on a Funneled Energy Landscape Is Necessary for Highly Efficient Contractility of Actomyosin Force Dipoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E. Komianos

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Current understanding of how contractility emerges in disordered actomyosin networks of nonmuscle cells is still largely based on the intuition derived from earlier works on muscle contractility. In addition, in disordered networks, passive cross-linkers have been hypothesized to percolate force chains in the network, hence, establishing large-scale connectivity between local contractile clusters. This view, however, largely overlooks the free energy of cross-linker binding at the microscale, which, even in the absence of active fluctuations, provides a thermodynamic drive towards highly overlapping filamentous states. In this work, we use stochastic simulations and mean-field theory to shed light on the dynamics of a single actomyosin force dipole—a pair of antiparallel actin filaments interacting with active myosin II motors and passive cross-linkers. We first show that while passive cross-linking without motor activity can produce significant contraction between a pair of actin filaments, driven by thermodynamic favorability of cross-linker binding, a sharp onset of kinetic arrest exists at large cross-link binding energies, greatly diminishing the effectiveness of this contractility mechanism. Then, when considering an active force dipole containing nonmuscle myosin II, we find that cross-linkers can also serve as a structural ratchet when the motor dissociates stochastically from the actin filaments, resulting in significant force amplification when both molecules are present. Our results provide predictions of how actomyosin force dipoles behave at the molecular level with respect to filament boundary conditions, passive cross-linking, and motor activity, which can explicitly be tested using an optical trapping experiment.

  20. Actin in dividing cells: contractile ring filaments bind heavy meromyosin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, T E

    1973-06-01

    Many microfilaments and microtubules are well preserved after glycerol-extraction of HeLa cells at room temperature (22 degrees ). Incubation in heavy meromyosin from rabbit skeletal muscle results in conspicuous and characteristic "decoration" of microfilaments of the contractile ring. Decoration is completely prevented by 10 mM ATP or 2 mM pyrophosphate, and fails to occur if heavy meromyosin is either omitted or replaced by egg albumin, a nonspecific protein. Decorated microfilaments have a substructure consisting of polarized, repeating arrowheads 27-35 nm apart. The specificity of these results strongly suggests that microfilaments of the contractile ring in HeLa cells are closely related to muscle actin. Very thin undecorated strands among the microfilaments of the contractile ring possibly represent a myosin component. These findings are discussed in terms of: the actomyosin-like properties of the contractile ring as a mechanochemical organelle that causes cell cleavage; the probable universal occurrence of actin-like protein in all dividing animal cells; and the contractile ring's combined sensitivity to cytochalasin B and its affinity for heavy meromyosin, a combination unique among microfilamentous organelles.

  1. Resistance coefficient during ice slurry flow through pipe sudden constriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ł. Mika

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to the adverse environmental effects of some commonly-used refrigerants, efforts are still underway to find new cooling mediumsthat would be safer to the ozone layer and would not increase the greenhouse effect. Ice slurry as a new ecological coolant suits theprocesses requiring the preservation of constant and equal temperature in the cooling process of the full section of the cooled solid. Thanks to that, ice slurry can find a wide potential application in such branches of industry, as heat treatment, materials engineering, or foundry. In this paper, flow systems which are commonly used in fittings elements such as diameter’s reductions in ice slurry pipelines, are experimentally investigated. In the study reported in this paper, the consideration was given to the specific features of the slurry flow in which the flow qualities depend mainly on the volume fraction of solid particles. The results of the experimental studies on the flow resistance, presented herein, enabled to determine the resistance coefficient during the ice slurry flow through the pipe sudden constriction. The volume fraction of solid particles in the slurry ranged from 5 to 30%. The recommended and non-recommended range of the Reynolds number for the ice slurry flow through the pipe sudden constriction were presented in this paper. The experimental studies were conducted on a few variants of the most common reductions of copper pipes. Further studies on the determination of the resistance coefficient in the remaining fittings elements of the pipeline were recommended in the paper as well as the further theoretical studies intended to determine the theoretical relations to calculate the resistance coefficient in all the fittings elements in the pipeline (on the basis of the experimental studies and to elaborate the calculation pattern of the entire ice slurry system.

  2. A non-equilibrium simulation of thermal constriction in a cascaded arc hydrogen plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peerenboom, K. S. C.; van Dijk, J.; W. J. Goedheer,; Kroesen, G. M. W.

    2014-01-01

    The cascaded arc hydrogen plasma of Pilot-PSI is studied in a non-LTE model. We demonstrate that the effect of vibrationally excited molecules on the heavy-particle-assisted dissociation is crucial for obtaining thermal constriction. To the best of our knowledge, thermal constriction has not been

  3. Electrical transport through constrictions in the charge-density wave conductor NbSe3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O´Neill, K.; Slot, E.; Thorne, R.; Van der Zant, H.

    2005-01-01

    We have investigated the electrical transport properties of insulating and metallic constrictions of dimensions 100nm-10_m in the charge-density wave (CDW) conductor NbSe3. The constrictions are made in a variety of ways: focused ion beam, reactive ion etching through a resist mask, and in a

  4. Brothers with constrictive pericarditis – A novel mutation in a rare disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra V. Patil

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Familial constrictive pericarditis is extremely rare. We report a case of two brothers both suffering constrictive pericarditis along with having multiple painless joint deformities. Genetic workup confirmed the clinical diagnosis of camptodactyly-arthropathy-coxa vara-pericarditis (CACP syndrome CACP syndrome and also revealed a rare mutation in the causative gene.

  5. Ring accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisler, G.; Faehl, R.

    1983-01-01

    We present two-dimensional simulations in (r-z) and r-theta) cylinderical geometries of imploding-liner-driven accelerators of rings of charged particles. We address issues of azimuthal and longitudinal stability of the rings. We discuss self-trapping designs in which beam injection and extraction is aided by means of external cusp fields. Our simulations are done with the 2-1/2-D particle-in-cell plasma simulation code CLINER, which combines collisionless, electromagnetic PIC capabilities with a quasi-MHD finite element package

  6. Topological rings

    CERN Document Server

    Warner, S

    1993-01-01

    This text brings the reader to the frontiers of current research in topological rings. The exercises illustrate many results and theorems while a comprehensive bibliography is also included. The book is aimed at those readers acquainted with some very basic point-set topology and algebra, as normally presented in semester courses at the beginning graduate level or even at the advanced undergraduate level. Familiarity with Hausdorff, metric, compact and locally compact spaces and basic properties of continuous functions, also with groups, rings, fields, vector spaces and modules, and with Zorn''s Lemma, is also expected.

  7. Contribution of the actomyosin motor to the temperature-dependent translational diffusion of water by cytoplasmic streaming in Elodea canadensis cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vorob'ev, V N; Anisimov, A V; Dautova, N R

    2004-12-01

    The extent to which the actomyosin motor responsible for cytoplasmic streaming contributes to the translational diffusion of water in Elodea canadensis cells was studied by a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spin-echo technique. The relative contribution of the actomyosin motor was determined from the corresponding apparent diffusion coefficient by the Einstein-Smolukhovsky relation. It is equal to the difference between the diffusional displacements of the cytoplasmic and the bulk water (deltaX). The NMR data show that the temperature dependence of deltaX is humpshaped, which is characteristic of enzyme reactions. At the same time, the apparent diffusion coefficient of cytoplasmic water increases with an increase in temperature. The most significant contribution of the actomyosin motor to deltaX is observed at temperatures below 20 degrees C. Within the temperature range of 20 to 33 degrees C, deltaX changes only slightly, and a further increase in temperature reduces deltaX to zero.

  8. Ring interferometry

    CERN Document Server

    Malykin, Grigorii B; Zhurov, Alexei

    2013-01-01

    This monograph is devoted to the creation of a comprehensive formalism for quantitative description of polarized modes' linear interaction in modern single-mode optic fibers. The theory of random connections between polarized modes, developed in the monograph, allows calculations of the zero shift deviations for a fiber ring interferometer. The monograph addresses also the

  9. Cytosolic phospholipase A2α mediates Pseudomonas aeruginosa LPS-induced airway constriction of CFTR -/- mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lagranderie Micheline

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lungs of cystic fibrosis (CF patients are chronically infected with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Increased airway constriction has been reported in CF patients but underplaying mechanisms have not been elucidated. Aim: to examine the effect of P. aeruginosa LPS on airway constriction in CF mice and the implication in this process of cytosolic phospholipase A2α (cPLA2α, an enzyme involved in arachidonic acid (AA release. Methods Mice were instilled intra-nasally with LPS. Airway constriction was assessed using barometric plethysmograph. MIP-2, prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, leukotrienes and AA concentrations were measured in BALF using standard kits and gas chromatography. Results LPS induced enhanced airway constriction and AA release in BALF of CF compared to littermate mice. This was accompanied by increased levels of PGE2, but not those of leukotrienes. However, airway neutrophil influx and MIP-2 production remained similar in both mouse strains. The cPLA2α inhibitor arachidonyl trifluoro-methyl-ketone (ATK, but not aspirin which inhibit PGE2 synthesis, reduced LPS-induced airway constriction. LPS induced lower airway constriction and PGE2 production in cPLA2α -/- mice compared to corresponding littermates. Neither aspirin nor ATK interfered with LPS-induced airway neutrophil influx or MIP-2 production. Conclusions CF mice develop enhanced airway constriction through a cPLA2α-dependent mechanism. Airway inflammation is dissociated from airway constriction in this model. cPLA2α may represent a suitable target for therapeutic intervention in CF. Attenuation of airway constriction by cPLA2α inhibitors may help to ameliorate the clinical status of CF patients.

  10. Droplet squeezing through a narrow constriction: Minimum impulse and critical velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhifeng; Drapaca, Corina; Chen, Xiaolin; Xu, Jie

    2017-07-01

    Models of a droplet passing through narrow constrictions have wide applications in science and engineering. In this paper, we report our findings on the minimum impulse (momentum change) of pushing a droplet through a narrow circular constriction. The existence of this minimum impulse is mathematically derived and numerically verified. The minimum impulse happens at a critical velocity when the time-averaged Young-Laplace pressure balances the total minor pressure loss in the constriction. Finally, numerical simulations are conducted to verify these concepts. These results could be relevant to problems of energy optimization and studies of chemical and biomedical systems.

  11. Snap-off in constricted capillary with elastic interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, P.; Alvarado, V.; Carvalho, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    Snap-off of bubbles and drops in constricted capillaries occurs in many different situations, from bio-fluid to multiphase flow in porous media. The breakup process has been extensively analyzed both by theory and experiments, but most work has been limited to pure interfaces, at which the surface stress is isotropic and fully defined by the interfacial tension and interface curvature. Complex interfaces may present viscous and elastic behavior leading to a complex stress state that may change the dynamics of the interface deformation and breakup. We extend the available asymptotic model based on lubrication approximation to include elastic interfacial stress. Drop breakup time is determined as a function of the capillary geometry and liquid properties, including the interfacial elastic modulus. Results show that the interfacial elasticity has a stabilizing effect by slowing down the growth of the liquid collar, leading to a larger break-up time. This stabilizing effect has been observed experimentally in different, but related flows [Alvarado et al., "Interfacial visco-elasticity of crude oil-brine: An alternative EOR mechanism in smart waterflooding," in SPE-169127 Improved Oil Recovery Symposium (Society of Petroleum Engineers, 2014)].

  12. Suspended particle transport through constriction channel with Brownian motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanasaki, Itsuo; Walther, Jens H.

    2017-08-01

    It is well known that translocation events of a polymer or rod through pores or narrower parts of micro- and nanochannels have a stochastic nature due to the Brownian motion. However, it is not clear whether the objects of interest need to have a larger size than the entrance to exhibit the deviation from the dynamics of the surrounding fluid. We show by numerical analysis that the particle injection into the narrower part of the channel is affected by thermal fluctuation, where the particles have spherical symmetry and are smaller than the height of the constriction. The Péclet number (Pe) is the order parameter that governs the phenomena, which clarifies the spatio-temporal significance of Brownian motion compared to hydrodynamics. Furthermore, we find that there exists an optimal condition of Pe to attain the highest flow rate of particles relative to the dispersant fluid flow. Our finding is important in science and technology from nanopore DNA sequencers and lab-on-a-chip devices to filtration by porous materials and chromatography.

  13. Clogging arches in grains, colloids, and pedestrians flowing through constrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuriguel, Iker

    When a group of particles pass through a narrow orifice, the flow might become intermittent due to the development of clogs that obstruct the constriction. This effect has been observed in many different fields such as mining transport, microbial growing, crowd dynamics, colloids, granular and active matter. In this work we introduce a general framework in which research in some of such scenarios can be encompassed. In particular, we analyze the statistical properties of the bottleneck flow in different experiments and simulations: granular media within vibrated silos, colloids, a flock of sheep and pedestrian evacuations. We reveal a common phenomenology that allows us to rigorously define a transition to a clogged state. Using this definition we explore the main variables involved, which are then grouped into three generic parameters. In addition, we will present results of the geometrical characteristics that the clogging arches have which are related with their stability against perturbations. We experimentally analyse the temporal evolution of the arches evidencing important differences among the structures that are easily destroyed and those that seem to resist forever (longer than the temporal window employed in our measurements). Ministerio de Economía y Competitividad (Spanish Government). Project No. FIS2014-57325.

  14. The behaviour of fibroblasts migrating from chick heart explants: changes in adhesion, locomotion and growth, and in the distribution of actomyosin and fibronectin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Rees, D A

    1979-01-01

    towards efficient locomotion whilst maintaining a high degree of spreading. Also during the first 48 h there is little production of extracellular fibronectin and the growth rate is low. Later, these fibroblasts develop focal contacts and focal adhesions together with actomyosin bundles, with a parallel...

  15. Effects of channel constriction on upstream steering of flow around Locke Island, Columbia River, Washington

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loy, G. E.; Furbish, D. J.; Covey, A.

    2010-12-01

    Landsliding of the White Bluffs along the Columbia River in Washington State has constricted the width of the river on one side of Locke Island, a two-kilometer long island positioned in the middle of the channel. Associated changes in flow are thought to be causing relatively rapid erosion of Locke Island on the constricted side. This island is of cultural significance to Native American tribes of south-central Washington, so there are social as well as scientific reasons to understand how the alteration of stream channel processes resulting from the landsliding might be influencing observed erosion rates. Simple hydrodynamic calculations suggest that the constriction on one side of the island creates an upstream backwater effect. As a consequence a cross-stream pressure gradient upstream of the island results in steering of flow around the island into the unobstructed thread. This diversion of water decreases the discharge through the constriction. Therefore, flow velocities within the constriction are not necessarily expected to be higher than those in the unobstructed thread, contrary to initial reports suggesting that higher velocities within the constriction are the main cause of erosion. We set up streamtable experiments with lapse rate imaging to illustrate the backwater effects of the channel constriction and the associated cross-stream steering of flow around a model island. Our experiments are scaled by channel roughness and slope rather than geometrically, as the main focus is to understand the mechanical behavior of flow in this type of island-landslide system. In addition, we studied the stream velocities and flow steering as well as the magnitude of the backwater effect in both the constricted and unobstructed channels using tracer particles in the time-lapse images. These experimental data are compared with calculated upstream backwater distances determined from the known water-surface slope, flow depth, total discharge, and bed roughness

  16. Thermoreflectance imaging of electromigration evolution in asymmetric aluminum constrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hao; Ahn, Woojin; Maize, Kerry; Si, Mengwei; Ye, Peide; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful; Shakouri, Ali; Bermel, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Electromigration (EM) is a phenomenon whereby the flow of current in metal wires moves the underlying atoms, potentially inducing electronic interconnect failures. The continued decrease in commercial lithographically defined feature sizes means that EM presents an increasing risk to the reliability of modern electronics. To mitigate these risks, it is important to look for novel mechanisms to extend lifetime without forfeiting miniaturization. Typically, only the overall increase in the interconnect resistance and failure voltage are characterized. However, if the current flows non-uniformly, spatially resolving the resulting hot spots during electromigration aging experiments may provide better insights into the fundamental mechanisms of this process. In this study, we focus on aluminum interconnects containing asymmetric reservoir and void pairs with contact pads on each end. Such reservoirs are potential candidates for self-healing. Thermoreflectance imaging was used to detect hot spots in electrical interconnects at risk of failure as the voltage was gradually increased. It reveals differential heating with increasing voltage for each polarity. We find that while current flow going from a constriction to a reservoir causes a break at the void, the identical structure with the opposite polarity can sustain higher current (J = 21 × 106 A/cm2) and more localized joule heating and yet is more stable. Ultimately, a break takes place at the contact pad where the current flows from narrow interconnect to larger pads. In summary, thermoreflectance imaging with submicron spatial resolution provides valuable information about localized electromigration evolution and the potential role of reservoirs to create more robust interconnects.

  17. Bubble propagation in Hele-Shaw channels with centred constrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Gómez, Andrés; Thompson, Alice B.; Hazel, Andrew L.; Juel, Anne

    2018-04-01

    We study the propagation of finite bubbles in a Hele-Shaw channel, where a centred occlusion (termed a rail) is introduced to provide a small axially uniform depth constriction. For bubbles wide enough to span the channel, the system’s behaviour is similar to that of semi-infinite fingers and a symmetric static solution is stable. Here, we focus on smaller bubbles, in which case the symmetric static solution is unstable and the static bubble is displaced towards one of the deeper regions of the channel on either side of the rail. Using a combination of experiments and numerical simulations of a depth-averaged model, we show that a bubble propagating axially due to a small imposed flow rate can be stabilised in a steady symmetric mode centred on the rail through a subtle interaction between stabilising viscous forces and destabilising surface tension forces. However, for sufficiently large capillary numbers Ca, the ratio of viscous to surface tension forces, viscous forces in turn become destabilising thus returning the bubble to an off-centred propagation regime. With decreasing bubble size, the range of Ca for which steady centred propagation is stable decreases, and eventually vanishes through the coalescence of two supercritical pitchfork bifurcations. The depth-averaged model is found to accurately predict all the steady modes of propagation observed experimentally, and provides a comprehensive picture of the underlying steady bifurcation structure. However, for sufficiently large imposed flow rates, we find that initially centred bubbles do not converge onto a steady mode of propagation. Instead they transiently explore weakly unstable steady modes, an evolution which results in their break-up and eventual settling into a steady propagating state of changed topology.

  18. A pressure-gradient mechanism for vortex shedding in constricted channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghosian, M. E.; Cassel, K. W.

    2013-01-01

    Numerical simulations of the unsteady, two-dimensional, incompressible Navier–Stokes equations are performed for a Newtonian fluid in a channel having a symmetric constriction modeled by a two-parameter Gaussian distribution on both channel walls. The Reynolds number based on inlet half-channel height and mean inlet velocity ranges from 1 to 3000. Constriction ratios based on the half-channel height of 0.25, 0.5, and 0.75 are considered. The results show that both the Reynolds number and constriction geometry have a significant effect on the behavior of the post-constriction flow field. The Navier–Stokes solutions are observed to experience a number of bifurcations: steady attached flow, steady separated flow (symmetric and asymmetric), and unsteady vortex shedding downstream of the constriction depending on the Reynolds number and constriction ratio. A sequence of events is described showing how a sustained spatially growing flow instability, reminiscent of a convective instability, leads to the vortex shedding phenomenon via a proposed streamwise pressure-gradient mechanism. PMID:24399860

  19. Prevalence, hemodynamics, and cytokine profile of effusive-constrictive pericarditis in patients with tuberculous pericardial effusion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mpiko Ntsekhe

    Full Text Available Effusive constrictive pericarditis (ECP is visceral constriction in conjunction with compressive pericardial effusion. The prevalence of proven tuberculous ECP is unknown. Whilst ECP is distinguished from effusive disease on hemodynamic grounds, it is unknown whether effusive-constrictive physiology has a distinct cytokine profile. We conducted a prospective study of prevalence and cytokine profile of effusive-constrictive disease in patients with tuberculous pericardial effusion.From July 2006 through July 2009, the prevalence of ECP and serum and pericardial levels of inflammatory cytokines were determined in adults with tuberculous pericardial effusion. The diagnosis of ECP was made by combined pericardiocentesis and cardiac catheterization.Of 91 patients evaluated, 68 had tuberculous pericarditis. The 36/68 patients (52.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 41.2-65.4 with ECP were younger (29 versus 37 years, P=0.02, had a higher pre-pericardiocentesis right atrial pressure (17.0 versus 10.0 mmHg, P 15 mmHg (odds ratio [OR] = 48, 95%CI: 8.7-265; P 200 pg/ml (OR=10, 95%CI: 1.1, 93; P=0.04 were independently associated with ECP.Effusive-constrictive disease occurs in half of cases of tuberculous pericardial effusion, and is characterized by greater elevation in the pre-pericardiocentesis right atrial pressure and pericardial and serum IL-10 levels compared to patients with effusive non-constrictive tuberculous pericarditis.

  20. Prevalence, Hemodynamics, and Cytokine Profile of Effusive-Constrictive Pericarditis in Patients with Tuberculous Pericardial Effusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ntsekhe, Mpiko; Matthews, Kerryn; Syed, Faisal F.; Deffur, Armin; Badri, Motasim; Commerford, Patrick J.; Gersh, Bernard J.; Wilkinson, Katalin A.; Wilkinson, Robert J.; Mayosi, Bongani M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Effusive constrictive pericarditis (ECP) is visceral constriction in conjunction with compressive pericardial effusion. The prevalence of proven tuberculous ECP is unknown. Whilst ECP is distinguished from effusive disease on hemodynamic grounds, it is unknown whether effusive-constrictive physiology has a distinct cytokine profile. We conducted a prospective study of prevalence and cytokine profile of effusive-constrictive disease in patients with tuberculous pericardial effusion. Methods From July 2006 through July 2009, the prevalence of ECP and serum and pericardial levels of inflammatory cytokines were determined in adults with tuberculous pericardial effusion. The diagnosis of ECP was made by combined pericardiocentesis and cardiac catheterization. Results Of 91 patients evaluated, 68 had tuberculous pericarditis. The 36/68 patients (52.9%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 41.2-65.4) with ECP were younger (29 versus 37 years, P=0.02), had a higher pre-pericardiocentesis right atrial pressure (17.0 versus 10.0 mmHg, P 15 mmHg (odds ratio [OR] = 48, 95%CI: 8.7-265; P 200 pg/ml (OR=10, 95%CI: 1.1, 93; P=0.04) were independently associated with ECP. Conclusion Effusive-constrictive disease occurs in half of cases of tuberculous pericardial effusion, and is characterized by greater elevation in the pre-pericardiocentesis right atrial pressure and pericardial and serum IL-10 levels compared to patients with effusive non-constrictive tuberculous pericarditis. PMID:24155965

  1. Dose- and time-dependent effects of actomyosin inhibition on live mouse outflow resistance and aqueous drainage tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, MinHee K; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Gonzalez, Jose M; Tan, James C

    2016-02-17

    Actomyosin contractility modulates outflow resistance of the aqueous drainage tissues and intraocular pressure, a key pathogenic factor of glaucoma. We established methodology to reliably analyze the effect of latrunculin-B (Lat-B)-induced actin depolymerization on outflow physiology in live mice. A voltage-controlled microperfusion system for delivering drugs and simultaneously analyzing outflow resistance was tested in live C57BL/6 mice. Flow rate and perfusion pressure were reproducible within a coefficient of variation of 2%. Outflow facility for phosphate-buffered saline (0.0027 ± 0.00036 μL/min/mmHg; mean ± SD) and 0.02% ethanol perfusions (Lat-B vehicle; 0.0023 ± 0.0005 μL/min/mmHg) were similar and stable over 2 hours (p > 0.1 for change), indicating absence of a 'washout' artifact seen in larger mammals. Outflow resistance changed in graded fashion, decreasing dose- and time-dependently over 2 hours for Lat-B doses of 2.5 μM (p = 0.29), 5 μM (p = 0.039) and 10 μM (p = 0.001). Resulting outflow resistance was about 10 times lower with 10 μM Lat-B than vehicle control. The filamentous actin network was decreased and structurally altered in the ciliary muscle (46 ± 5.6%) and trabecular meshwork (37 ± 8.3%) of treated eyes relative to vehicle controls (p < 0.005; 5 μM Lat-B). Mouse actomyosin contractile mechanisms are important to modulating aqueous outflow resistance, mirroring mechanisms in primates. We describe approaches to reliably probe these mechanisms in vivo.

  2. Ringing phenomenon of the fiber ring resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Diqing; Ma, Huilian; Jin, Zhonghe

    2007-08-01

    A resonator fiber-optic gyro (R-FOG) is a high-accuracy inertial rotation sensor based on the Sagnac effect. A fiber ring resonator is the core sensing element in the R-FOG. When the frequency of the fiber ring resonator input laser is swept linearly with time, ringing of the output resonance curve is observed. The output field of the fiber ring resonator is derived from the superposition of the light transmitted through the directional coupler directly and the multiple light components circulated in the fiber ring resonator when the frequency of the laser is swept. The amplitude and phase of the output field are analyzed, and it is found that the difference in time for different light components in the fiber ring resonator to reach a point of destructive interference causes the ringing phenomenon. Finally the ringing phenomenon is observed in experiments, and the experimental results agree with the theoretical analysis well.

  3. A Case of Constrictive Pericarditis Associated with Melioidosis in an Immunocompetent Patient Treated by Pericardiectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hou Tee; Ramsamy, Gunasekaran; Lee, Chuey Yan; Syed Hamid, Syed Rasul G.; Kan, Foong Kee; Nordin, Rusli Bin

    2018-01-01

    Patient: Male, 38 Final Diagnosis: Constrictive pericarditis Symptoms: Shortness of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Pericardiocentesis • pericardiectomy Specialty: Cardiology Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Melioidosis is a rare tropical bacterial infection caused by the Gram-negative soil saprophyte, Burkholderia pseudomallei. Melioidosis can mimic a variety of diseases due to its varied presentation, and unless it is treated rapidly, it can be fatal. A rare case of melioidosis, with pericarditis and pericardial effusion, is described, which demonstrates the value of early diagnosis with echocardiography and pericardiocentesis. Case Report: A 38-year-old native (Iban) East Malaysian man presented with shortness of breath and tachycardia. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) showed cardiac tamponade. Urgent pericardiocentesis drained a large amount of purulent pericardial fluid that grew Burkholderia pseudomallei. Despite appropriate dose and duration of intravenous treatment with ceftazidime followed by meropenem, the patient developed recurrent pericardial effusion and right heart failure due to constrictive pericarditis. The diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis was confirmed by computed tomography (CT) and surgical exploration. Following pericardiectomy, his symptoms resolved, but patient follow-up was recommended for possible sequelae of constrictive pericarditis. Conclusions: After the onset of melioidosis pericarditis, the authors recommend follow-up and surveillance for possible complication of constrictive pericarditis. PMID:29551765

  4. Roles of oxygen radicals and elastase in citric acid-induced airway constriction of guinea-pigs

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Y -L; Chiou, W -Y; Lu, F J; Chiang, L Y

    1999-01-01

    Antioxidants attenuate noncholinergic airway constriction. To further investigate the relationship between tachykinin-mediated airway constriction and oxygen radicals, we explored citric acid-induced bronchial constriction in 48 young Hartley strain guinea-pigs, divided into six groups: control; citric acid; hexa(sulphobutyl)fullerenes+citric acid; hexa(sulphobutyl)fullerenes+phosphoramidon+citric acid; dimethylthiourea (DMTU)+citric acid; and DMTU+phosphoramidon+citric acid. Hexa(sulphobutyl...

  5. ASSOCIATIVE RINGS SOLVED AS LIE RINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. B. Smirnov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper has proved that an associative ring which is solvable of a n- class as a Lie ring has a nilpotent ideal of the nilpotent class not more than 3×10n–2  and a corresponding quotient ring satisfies an identity [[x1, x2, [x3, x4

  6. Radical theory of rings

    CERN Document Server

    Gardner, JW

    2003-01-01

    Radical Theory of Rings distills the most noteworthy present-day theoretical topics, gives a unified account of the classical structure theorems for rings, and deepens understanding of key aspects of ring theory via ring and radical constructions. Assimilating radical theory's evolution in the decades since the last major work on rings and radicals was published, the authors deal with some distinctive features of the radical theory of nonassociative rings, associative rings with involution, and near-rings. Written in clear algebraic terms by globally acknowledged authorities, the presentation

  7. Electronic triple-dot transport through a bilayer graphene island with ultrasmall constrictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, D.; Varlet, A.; Simonet, P.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K.

    2013-08-01

    A quantum dot has been etched in bilayer graphene connected by two small constrictions to the leads. We show that this structure does not behave like a single quantum dot but consists of at least three sites of localized charge in series. The high symmetry and electrical stability of the device allowed us to triangulate the positions of the different sites of localized charge and find that one site is located in the island and one in each of the constrictions. Nevertheless we measure many consecutive non-overlapping Coulomb-diamonds in series. In order to describe these findings, we treat the system as a strongly coupled serial triple quantum dot. We find that the non-overlapping Coulomb diamonds arise due to higher order cotunneling through the outer dots located in the constrictions. We extract all relevant capacitances, simulate the measured data with a capacitance model and discuss its implications on electrical transport.

  8. Recurrent tongue tip constriction in a captive giant anteater (Myrmecophaga tridactyla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Hanspeter W; Clauss, Marcus; Feige, Karsten; Thio, Tanja; Isenbügel, Ewald; Hatt, Jean-Michel

    2007-03-01

    A male giant anteater (Myrmecophage tridactyla) was treated twice for tongue tip constrictions. Clinical signs were partial anorexia, soft stool, bleeding from the mouth, and intermittent lingual discomfort. In the first presentation, wood fibers constricting the distal part of the tongue were detected by endoscopy and were removed. In the second presentation, bands of collagenous fibers were identified and resected. Dietary elements were responsible for both cases: elongated wood fibers were present in peat, which was included as a supplement to improve stool consistency, and collagenous fibers originated from fascias of lean meat, which served as a protein source in this diet. Preventive measures included sieving of the peat to eliminate long fibers and grinding of the meat, respectively, prior to diet presentation. A homogenous diet, utilizing cellulose rather than peat and dry cat food rather than meat, will avoid tongue tip constriction as described in these cases.

  9. Oil-in-water emulsions flow through constricted micro-capillarities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, Oswaldo Robles; Carvalho, Marcio da Silveira [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro (PUC-Rio), RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2010-07-01

    The effect of the oil concentration and the drop size distribution on the characteristics of the flow of an emulsion through a constricted capillary was experimentally analyzed and quantified by the ratio of the pressure drop of the continuous phase flow to the pressure drop of the emulsion flow, at the same flow rate. The results confirm that the ratio between the capillary constriction diameter and the oil drop size is one of the most important parameters for this flow. For large oil drop size emulsions, the deformation of the drop as it flows through the constriction leads to a high extra pressure drop at low capillary numbers. For small oil drop size emulsions, the extra pressure drop is a function of the viscosity ratio and the disperse phase concentration. (author)

  10. A case of constrictive pericarditis developing 2 years after radiation therapy for carcinoma of the esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Youichi; Kuroda, Hiroaki; Ishiguro, Shingo; Hamasaki, Takafumi; Ashida, Yasushi; Tonomoto, Nagahisa; Miyasaka, Shigeto; Mori, Tohru

    1997-01-01

    A case of constrictive pericarditis developing 2 years after radiation therapy for esophageal carcinoma is reported. A man of 48 years old was diagnosed as early esophageal carcinoma and treated with radiation theraphy of 60 Gy. After 12 months, he developed acute pericarditis, which remitted spontaneously. After 18 months, he developed constrictive pericarditis, which did response to medical treatment, and became NYHA grade 4. After 25 months, pericardial sac and epicardium were resected. But dilatation of right ventricular dimension was not enough and hemodynamics did not recover. However, subjective symptom was extremely improved, and he left the hospital by walk at 29 days after the surgery. (K.H.)

  11. Densely calcified tuberculous constrictive pericarditis with concurrent active pulmonary tuberculosis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Laudari

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Though pulmonary tuberculosis is a common chronic infection in the developing countries like Nepal, the incidence of tubercular constrictive pericarditis is very low. Here we report a patient of active pulmonary tuberculosis with sputum positive for acid fast bacilli along with densely calcified constrictive pericarditis which has been reported as a very rare presentation in the literature.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v10i2.12955 Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2014, Vol.10(2; 41-43

  12. Stirling engine piston ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1983-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  13. Alternative loop rings

    CERN Document Server

    Goodaire, EG; Polcino Milies, C

    1996-01-01

    For the past ten years, alternative loop rings have intrigued mathematicians from a wide cross-section of modern algebra. As a consequence, the theory of alternative loop rings has grown tremendously. One of the main developments is the complete characterization of loops which have an alternative but not associative, loop ring. Furthermore, there is a very close relationship between the algebraic structures of loop rings and of group rings over 2-groups. Another major topic of research is the study of the unit loop of the integral loop ring. Here the interaction between loop rings and group ri

  14. Two-boundary first exit time of Gauss-Markov processes for stochastic modeling of acto-myosin dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Onofrio, Giuseppe; Pirozzi, Enrica

    2017-05-01

    We consider a stochastic differential equation in a strip, with coefficients suitably chosen to describe the acto-myosin interaction subject to time-varying forces. By simulating trajectories of the stochastic dynamics via an Euler discretization-based algorithm, we fit experimental data and determine the values of involved parameters. The steps of the myosin are represented by the exit events from the strip. Motivated by these results, we propose a specific stochastic model based on the corresponding time-inhomogeneous Gauss-Markov and diffusion process evolving between two absorbing boundaries. We specify the mean and covariance functions of the stochastic modeling process taking into account time-dependent forces including the effect of an external load. We accurately determine the probability density function (pdf) of the first exit time (FET) from the strip by solving a system of two non singular second-type Volterra integral equations via a numerical quadrature. We provide numerical estimations of the mean of FET as approximations of the dwell-time of the proteins dynamics. The percentage of backward steps is given in agreement to experimental data. Numerical and simulation results are compared and discussed.

  15. Renal myogenic constriction protects the kidney from age-related hypertensive renal damage in the Fawn-Hooded rat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vavrinec, Peter; Henning, Robert H.; Goris, Maaike; Landheer, Sjoerd W.; Buikema, Hendrik; van Dokkum, Richard P. E.

    Introduction:Intact myogenic constriction plays a role in renal blood flow autoregulation and protection against pressure-related (renal) injury. However, to what extent alterations in renal artery myogenic constriction are involved in development of renal damage during aging is unknown. Therefore,

  16. Real Closed Rings and Real Closed * Rings

    OpenAIRE

    Capco, Jose

    2007-01-01

    Here we try to distinguish and compare different notions of real closedness mainly one developed by N. Schwartz in his Habilitationschrift and the other developed by A. Sankaranand K. Varadarajan which we shall call real closed *. We stick to the definition of real closed rings as defined and characterized N. Schwartz and we try to determine and characterize real closed rings that are real closed *. The main result is that real closed rings have unique real closure * and that real closure of ...

  17. Gas discharge with liquid electrolyte cathode in the mode of occurrence of the constricted channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazmeev, Kh K; Tazmeev, A Kh

    2014-01-01

    Gas discharge between liquid electrolyte and a copper electrode at capacities that make up tens of kilowatts is experimentally investigated. As the liquid electrolyte we used the aqueous solution of sodium chloride. Identification of conditions of occurrence of the constricted channels. The electrical and spectral characteristics of the discharge in such conditions were studied

  18. Ameliorative potential of Ocimum sanctum in chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GURPREET KAUR

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate the ameliorative potential of Ocimumsanctum and its saponin rich fraction in chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain in rats. The chronic constriction injury was induced by placing four loose ligatures around the sciatic nerve, proximal to its trifurcation. The mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, paw heat hyperalgesia and cold tail hyperalgesia were assessed by performing the pinprick, acetone, hot plate and cold tail immersion tests, respectively. Biochemically, the tissue thio-barbituric acid reactive species, super-oxide anion content (markers of oxidative stress and total calcium levels were measured. Chronic constriction injury was associated with the development of mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, heat and cold hyperalgesia along with an increase in oxidative stress and calcium levels. However, administration of Ocimumsanctum (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o. and its saponin rich fraction (100 and 200 mg/kg p.o. for 14 days significantly attenuated chronic constriction injury-induced neuropathic pain as well as decrease the oxidative stress and calcium levels. It may be concluded that saponin rich fraction of Ocimum sanctum has ameliorative potential in attenuating painful neuropathic state, which may be attributed to a decrease in oxidative stress and calcium levels.

  19. A non-equilibrium simulation of thermal constriction in a cascaded arc hydrogen plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peerenboom, K S C; Goedheer, W J; Van Dijk, J; Kroesen, G M W

    2014-01-01

    The cascaded arc hydrogen plasma of Pilot-PSI is studied in a non-LTE model. We demonstrate that the effect of vibrationally excited molecules on the heavy-particle-assisted dissociation is crucial for obtaining thermal constriction. To the best of our knowledge, thermal constriction has not been obtained before in a non-LTE simulation. Probably, realistic numerical studies of this type of plasma were hindered by numerical problems, preventing the non-LTE simulations to show characteristic physical mechanisms such as thermal constriction. In this paper we show that with the help of appropriate numerical strategies thermal constriction can be obtained in a non-LTE simulation. To this end, a new source term linearization technique is developed, which ensures physical solutions even near chemical equilibrium where the composition is dominated by chemical source terms. Results of the model are compared with experiments on Pilot-PSI and show good agreement with pressure and voltage measurements in the source. (paper)

  20. Atrial flutter ablation in a case of diuretic resistant constrictive pericarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F. Pittaway

    2015-07-01

    This is the first reported case of symptomatic improvement in a patient with constrictive pericarditis and persistent atrial flutter with targeted treatment of the dysrhythmia. This offers a possible short-term palliation option in a group of patients where definitive surgical management carries too high a risk.

  1. Study on Characteristics of Constricted DC Plasma Using Particle-In-Cell Simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Jong Gap; Park, Yeong Shin; Hwang, Yong Seok

    2010-01-01

    In dc glow discharge, when anode size is smaller than cathode, very small and bright plasma ball occurs in front of anode. This plasma is called constricted dc plasma and characterized by a high plasma density in positive glow, so called plasma ball, compared to the conventional dc plasma. For the reason, this plasma is utilized to ion or electron beam sources since the beam currents are enhanced by the dense anode glow. However, correlations between characteristics of the plasma (plasma density, electron temperature and space potential) and discharge conditions (anode size, discharge voltage, discharge current, pressure) have been a little investigated definitely clear in previous study because of the trouble of a diagnosis. The plasma ball which is the most essential part of the constricted plasma is too small to diagnose precisely without disturbing plasma. Therefore, we tried to analyze the constricted plasma through computer simulation with Particle-In-Cell (PIC) code. In this study, simulation result of constricted dc plasma as well as conventional dc glow discharge will be addressed and compared with each others

  2. Fully-coupled mathematical modeling of actomyosin-cytosolic two-phase flow in a highly deformable moving Keratocyte cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikmaneshi, M R; Firoozabadi, B; Saidi, M S

    2018-01-23

    Interaction between intracellular dynamics and extracellular matrix (ECM) generally occurred into very thin fragment of moving cell, namely lamellipodia, enables all movable cells to crawl on ECM. In fast-moving cells such as fish Keratocytes, Lamellipodia including most cell area finds a fan-like shape during migration, with a variety of aspect ratio function of fish type. In this work, our purpose is to present a novel and more complete two-dimensional continuum mathematical model of actomyosin-cytosolic two-phase flow of a self-deforming Keratocyte with circular spreaded to steady fan-like shape. In the new approach, in addition to the two-phase flow of the F-actin and cytosol, the G-actin transport was spatiotemporally modeled. We also for the first time modeled the effect of variable volume fraction of the moving F-actin porous network on solute transport in the cytosolic fluid. Our novel fully-coupled mathematical model provides a better understanding of intracellular dynamics of fast-migrating Keratocytes; such as the F-actin centripetal and cytosolic fountain-like flows, free-active myosin distribution, distribution sequence of the G-actin, F-actin, and myosin, and myosin-induced pressure flied of cytoplasm as well as the map of intracellular forces like myosin contraction and adhesion traction. All these results are qualitatively and quantitatively in good agreement with experimental observations. According to a range of value of parameters used in this model, our steady state of moving Keratocyte finds fan-like shape with the same aspect ratio as wide category of fish Keratocytes. This new model can predict shape of Keratocytes in other range of parameter values. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Filament turnover tunes both force generation and dissipation to control long-range flows in a model actomyosin cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, William M; McCall, Patrick M; Gardel, Margaret L; Munro, Edwin M

    2017-12-01

    Actomyosin-based cortical flow is a fundamental engine for cellular morphogenesis. Cortical flows are generated by cross-linked networks of actin filaments and myosin motors, in which active stress produced by motor activity is opposed by passive resistance to network deformation. Continuous flow requires local remodeling through crosslink unbinding and and/or filament disassembly. But how local remodeling tunes stress production and dissipation, and how this in turn shapes long range flow, remains poorly understood. Here, we study a computational model for a cross-linked network with active motors based on minimal requirements for production and dissipation of contractile stress: Asymmetric filament compliance, spatial heterogeneity of motor activity, reversible cross-links and filament turnover. We characterize how the production and dissipation of network stress depend, individually, on cross-link dynamics and filament turnover, and how these dependencies combine to determine overall rates of cortical flow. Our analysis predicts that filament turnover is required to maintain active stress against external resistance and steady state flow in response to external stress. Steady state stress increases with filament lifetime up to a characteristic time τm, then decreases with lifetime above τm. Effective viscosity increases with filament lifetime up to a characteristic time τc, and then becomes independent of filament lifetime and sharply dependent on crosslink dynamics. These individual dependencies of active stress and effective viscosity define multiple regimes of steady state flow. In particular our model predicts that when filament lifetimes are shorter than both τc and τm, the dependencies of effective viscosity and steady state stress on filament turnover cancel one another, such that flow speed is insensitive to filament turnover, and shows a simple dependence on motor activity and crosslink dynamics. These results provide a framework for understanding

  4. Groups, rings, modules

    CERN Document Server

    Auslander, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    This classic monograph is geared toward advanced undergraduates and graduate students. The treatment presupposes some familiarity with sets, groups, rings, and vector spaces. The four-part approach begins with examinations of sets and maps, monoids and groups, categories, and rings. The second part explores unique factorization domains, general module theory, semisimple rings and modules, and Artinian rings. Part three's topics include localization and tensor products, principal ideal domains, and applications of fundamental theorem. The fourth and final part covers algebraic field extensions

  5. The big squeeze: scaling of constriction pressure in two of the world's largest snakes, Python reticulatus and Python molurus bivittatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penning, David A; Dartez, Schuyler F; Moon, Brad R

    2015-11-01

    Snakes are important predators that have radiated throughout many ecosystems, and constriction was important in their radiation. Constrictors immobilize and kill prey by using body loops to exert pressure on their prey. Despite its importance, little is known about constriction performance or its full effects on prey. We studied the scaling of constriction performance in two species of giant pythons (Python reticulatus and Python molurus bivittatus) and propose a new mechanism of prey death by constriction. In both species, peak constriction pressure increased significantly with snake diameter. These and other constrictors can exert pressures dramatically higher than their prey's blood pressure, suggesting that constriction can stop circulatory function and perhaps kill prey rapidly by over-pressurizing the brain and disrupting neural function. We propose the latter 'red-out effect' as another possible mechanism of prey death from constriction. These effects may be important to recognize and treat properly in rare cases when constrictors injure humans. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Birth Control Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Birth Control Ring KidsHealth / For Teens / Birth Control Ring What's in this article? What Is ... español Anillo vaginal anticonceptivo What Is It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ...

  7. The Min system and other nucleoid-independent regulators of Z ring positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William eMargolin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rod-shaped bacteria such as E. coli have mechanisms to position their cell division plane at the precise center of the cell, to ensure that the daughter cells are equal in size. The two main mechanisms are the Min system and nucleoid occlusion (NO, both of which work by inhibiting assembly of FtsZ, the tubulin-like scaffold that forms the cytokinetic Z ring. Whereas NO prevents Z rings from constricting over unsegregated nucleoids, the Min system is nucleoid-independent and even functions in cells lacking nucleoids and thus NO. The Min proteins of E. coli and B. subtilis form bipolar gradients that inhibit Z ring formation most at the cell poles and least at the nascent division plane. This article will outline the molecular mechanisms behind Min function in E. coli and B. subtilis, and discuss distinct Z ring positioning systems in other bacterial species.

  8. Physics of quantum rings

    CERN Document Server

    Fomin, Vladimir M

    2013-01-01

    This book deals with a new class of materials, quantum rings. Innovative recent advances in experimental and theoretical physics of quantum rings are based on the most advanced state-of-the-art fabrication and characterization techniques as well as theoretical methods. The experimental efforts allow to obtain a new class of semiconductor quantum rings formed by capping self-organized quantum dots grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Novel optical and magnetic properties of quantum rings are associated with non-trivial topologies at the nanoscale. An adequate characterization of quantum rings is po

  9. Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma Presenting as Constrictive Pericarditis: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Nabati

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Constrictive pericarditis (CP is an uncommon post inflammatory disorder. It is described as pericardial thickening, myocardial constriction, and impaired diastolic filling. The most common etiologies are idiopathy, mediastinal radiotherapy, and prior cardiac surgery. Less common etiologies include viral infections, collagen vascular disorders, renal failure, sarcoidosis, tuberculosis, and blunt chest trauma. CP can less commonly be caused by malignancy. We report a very rare case of non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL presenting twice with attacks of decompensated heart failure. Echocardiography revealed that CP was responsible for the patient's symptoms as the first manifestation of NHL. Chest computed tomography scan and biopsy findings were compatible with the diagnosis of NHL. The patient received R-CHOP (cyclophosphamide, hydroxydaunorubicin, Oncovin®, and prednisone or prednisolone, combined with the monoclonal antibody rituximab chemotherapy. Three months later, there was significant improvement in the patient’s symptoms and considerable decrease in pericardial thickness.

  10. From diffusive to ballistic transport in etched graphene constrictions and nanoribbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somanchi, Sowmya; Peiro, Julian; Staggenborg, Maximilian; Beschoten, Bernd [JARA-FIT and 2nd Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Terres, Bernat; Stampfer, Christoph [JARA-FIT and 2nd Institute of Physics, RWTH Aachen University (Germany); Peter Gruenberg Institute (PGI-9), Forschungszentrum Juelich (Germany); Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba (Japan)

    2017-11-15

    Graphene nanoribbons and constrictions are envisaged as fundamental components of future carbon-based nanoelectronic and spintronic devices. At nanoscale, electronic effects in these devices depend heavily on the dimensions of the active channel and the nature of edges. Hence, controlling both these parameters is crucial to understand the physics in such systems. This review is about the recent progress in the fabrication of graphene nanoribbons and constrictions in terms of low temperature quantum transport. In particular, recent advancements using encapsulated graphene allowing for quantized conductance and future experiments towards exploring spin effects in these devices are presented. The influence of charge carrier inhomogeneity and the important length scales which play a crucial role for transport in high quality samples are also discussed. (copyright 2017 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Annexin A4 and A6 induce membrane curvature and constriction during cell membrane repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boye, Theresa Louise; Maeda, Kenji; Pezeshkian, Weria

    2017-01-01

    that annexin A4 binds to artificial membranes and generates curvature force initiated from free edges, whereas annexin A6 induces constriction force. In cells, plasma membrane injury and Ca2+ influx recruit annexin A4 to the vicinity of membrane wound edges where its homo-trimerization leads to membrane......Efficient cell membrane repair mechanisms are essential for maintaining membrane integrity and thus for cell life. Here we show that the Ca2+- and phospholipid-binding proteins annexin A4 and A6 are involved in plasma membrane repair and needed for rapid closure of micron-size holes. We demonstrate...... curvature near the edges. We propose that curvature force is utilized together with annexin A6-mediated constriction force to pull the wound edges together for eventual fusion. We show that annexin A4 can counteract various plasma membrane disruptions including holes of several micrometers indicating...

  12. [Post exertion bronchospasm--usefulness of different methods for evaluating bronchial constriction after exertional provocation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaszczyk, G

    1997-01-01

    55 children with bronchial asthma were tested using three exercise provocation tests: a treadmill, stairways running and cycloergometer. The results were evaluated on the base of the lung function tests, auscultation and airways resistance measurement with occlusion method. Of these three tests the treadmill test seemed to be the most useful to prove bronchial hyperreactivity towards exercise. Stairways running occurred to be very congenial. The study also proved usefulness of auscultation in evaluating of bronchial constriction after exercise.

  13. Intrauterine ductus arteriosus constriction: analysis of a historic cohort of 20 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luchese Stelamaris

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To describe the relative incidence, presentation, and evolvement of fetuses with early ductus constriction. METHODS: Twenty fetal echocardiograms indicating ductus constriction were reviewed in a population of 7000 pregnants. RESULTS: The cases were divided into group A (related to maternal use of cyclooxygenase inhibitors [n=7] and group B (idiopathics [n=13]. Mean gestational age was 32.5±3.1 (27-38 weeks and maternal age was 28.2±8.5 (17-42 years. Mean systolic velocity in the ductus was 2.22±0.34 (1.66-2.81 m/s, diastolic velocity 0.79±0.28 (0.45-1.5 m/s, and pulsatility index 1.33±0.36 (0.52-1.83. Two cases of ductal occlusion were noted. In 65% of the cases, an increase occurred in the right cavities; in 90% of the cases, tricuspid or pulmonary regurgitation, or both, occurred, with functional pulmonary atresia in 1 case. Diastolic velocity was greater in group A (1.13±0.33 than in group B (0.68±0.15 (P=0.008. The other data were similar in the 2 groups. The evolvement was not favorable in 4 patients from group B, including 1 death and 2 cases of persistent pulmonary hypertension. CONCLUSION: The high incidence of idiopathic constriction of the ductus arteriosus suggests that its diagnosis is underestimated and that many cases of persistence of fetal circulation in newborns may be related to constriction of the ductus arteriosus not diagnosed during intrauterine life. Group B had a lower severity but a risk of an unfavorable evolvement, suggesting a distinct alteration.

  14. Detection of posture-induced constriction of the cervical cerebrospinal fluid space by scintiscanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Otto, H.J. (Medizinische Akademie, Magdeburg (German Democratic Republic). Radiologische Klinik); Koch, R.D.; Krause, P. (Medizinische Akademie, Magdeburg (German Democratic Republic). Nervenklinik)

    1983-06-01

    Scintiscanning of the cervical cerebrospinal fluid space at maximum ante- and retroflexion in 24 patients revealed the method to be recommended for use in the case of cervical myelopathy when the polymorphous early symptoms appear and before myelography as well as for follow-up examination. The detection of posture-induced constriction of the lumen provides additional information and increases the sensitivity considerably because, particularly during retroflexion, minor inflammatory reactions lead to scintigraphically detectable reduction in the liquor space.

  15. Distinct constrictive processes, separated in time and space,divide Caulobacter inner and outer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, Ellen M.; Comolli, Luis R.; Chen, Joseph C.; Downing,Kenneth H.; Moerner, W.E.; McAdams, Harley H.

    2005-05-01

    Cryo-electron microscope tomography (cryoEM) and a fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP) assay were used to characterize progression of the terminal stages of Caulobacter crescentus cell division. Tomographic cryoEM images of the cell division site show separate constrictive processes closing first the inner, and then the outer, membrane in a manner distinctly different from septum-forming bacteria. The smallest observed pre-fission constrictions were 60 nm for both the inner and outer membrane. FLIP experiments had previously shown cytoplasmic compartmentalization, when cytoplasmic proteins can no longer diffuse between the two nascent progeny cell compartments, occurring 18 min before daughter cell separation in a 135 min cell cycle. Here, we used FLIP experiments with membrane-bound and periplasmic fluorescent proteins to show that (1) periplasmic compartmentalization occurs after cytoplasmic compartmentalization, consistent with the cryoEM observations, and (2) inner membrane and periplasmic proteins can diffuse past the FtsZ constriction site, indicating that the cell division machinery does not block membrane diffusion.

  16. Transport in constricted quantum Hall systems: beyond the Kane-Fisher paradigm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lal, Siddhartha

    2007-08-01

    A simple model of edge transport in a constricted quantum Hall system with a lowered local fi lling factor is studied. The current backscattered from the constriction is explained from a matching of the properties of the edge-current excitations in the constriction (ν 2 ) and bulk (ν 1 ) regions. We develop a hydrodynamic theory for bosonic edge modes inspired by this model, stressing the importance of boundary conditions in elucidating the nature of current transport. By invoking a generalised quasiparticle-quasihole symmetry of the quantum Hall circuit system, we fi nd that a competition between two tunneling process determines the fate of the low-bias transmission conductance. A novel generalisation of the Kane-Fisher quantum impurity model is found, describing transitions from a weak-coupling theory at partial transmission to strong- coupling theories for perfect transmission and reflection as well as a new symmetry dictated fixed point. These results provide satisfactory explanations for recent experimental results at fi lling-factors of 1/3 and 1. (author)

  17. Comparison of turbulent models in the case of a constricted tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elcner Jakub

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The validation of a proper solution is an indispensable phase of every numerical simulation. Nowadays, many turbulent models are available, whose application leads to slightly different solution of flow behaviour depending on the boundary conditions of a specific problem. It is essential to select the proper turbulence model appropriate for the given situation. The aim of this study is to select the most suitable two-equation eddy-viscosity model, which can be further used during calculations of airflow in human airways. For this purpose, geometry of a constricted tube with well-documented experimental measurements was chosen. The flow in the constricted tube was calculated using Spallart-Almaras, k-omega, k-epsilon and SST model approach using commercial software. The outcome of the comparison is a choice of the suitable model which is capable of simulating the transition of the boundary layer from laminar to turbulent flow. This transition typically arises in the upper part of the respiratory system, where the airways are constricted, specifically in the area, where the oral cavity continues through the glottis to trachea. The simulations were performed in a commercial solver Star-CCM+.

  18. Actomyosin kinetics of pure fast and slow rat myosin isoforms studied by in vitro motility assay approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canepari, Monica; Maffei, Manuela; Longa, Emanuela; Geeves, Michael; Bottinelli, Roberto

    2012-07-01

    An in vitro motility assay approach was used to investigate the mechanisms of the functional differences between myosin isoforms, by studying the effect of MgATP and MgADP on actin sliding velocity (V(f)) of pure slow and fast rat skeletal myosin at different temperatures. The value of V(f) depended on [MgATP] according to Michaelis-Menten kinetics, with an apparent constant (K(m)) of 54.2, 64.4 and 200 μm for the fast isoform and 18.6, 36.5 and 45.5 μM for the slow isoform at 20, 25 and 35°C, respectively. The presence of 2 mM MgADP decreased V(f) and yielded an inhibition constant (K(i)) of 377, 463 and 533 μM for the fast isoform at 20, 25 and 35°C, respectively, and 120 and 355 μM for the slow isoform at 25 and 35°C, respectively. The analysis of K(m) and K(i) suggested that slow and fast isoforms differ in the kinetics limiting V(f). Moreover, the higher sensitivity of the fast myosin isoform to a drop in [MgATP] is consistent with the higher fatigability of fast fibres than slow fibres. From the Michaelis-Menten relation in the absence of MgADP, we calculated the rate of actomyosin dissociation by MgATP (k(+ATP)) and the rate of MgADP release (k(-ADP)). We found values of k(+ATP) of 4.8 × 10(6), 6.5 × 10(6) and 6.6 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) for the fast isoform and 3.3 × 10(6), 2.9 × 10(6) and 6.7 × 10(6) M(-1) s(-1) for the slow isoform and values of k(-ADP) of 263, 420 and 1320 s(-1) for the fast isoform and 62, 107 and 306 s(-1) for the slow isoform at 20, 25 and 35°C, respectively. The results suggest that k(-ADP) could be the major determinant of functional differences between the fast and slow myosin isoforms at physiological temperatures.

  19. Losartan protects mesenteric arteries from ROS-associated decrease in myogenic constriction following 5/6 nephrectomy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vavrinec, Peter; van Dokkum, Richard P. E.; Goris, Maaike; Buikema, Hendrik; Henning, Robert H.

    Background: Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with hypertension, proteinuria, loss of myogenic constriction (MC) of mesenteric arteries and increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) under experimental conditions. Previous results showed that ACE (angiotensin-converting enzyme

  20. Ect2/Pbl acts via Rho and polarity proteins to direct the assembly of an isotropic actomyosin cortex upon mitotic entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, André; Vlassaks, Evi; Pichaud, Franck; Baum, Buzz

    2015-03-09

    Entry into mitosis is accompanied by profound changes in cortical actomyosin organization. Here, we delineate a pathway downstream of the RhoGEF Pbl/Ect2 that directs this process in a model epithelium. Our data suggest that the release of Pbl/Ect2 from the nucleus at mitotic entry drives Rho-dependent activation of Myosin-II and, in parallel, induces a switch from Arp2/3 to Diaphanous-mediated cortical actin nucleation that depends on Cdc42, aPKC, and Par6. At the same time, the mitotic relocalization of these apical protein complexes to more lateral cell surfaces enables Cdc42/aPKC/Par6 to take on a mitosis-specific function-aiding the assembly of a relatively isotropic metaphase cortex. Together, these data reveal how the repolarization and remodeling of the actomyosin cortex are coordinated upon entry into mitosis to provide cells with the isotropic and rigid form they need to undergo faithful chromosome segregation and division in a crowded tissue environment. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. One-stage release of congenital constriction band in lower limb from new born to 3 years

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Sakti Prasad; Sahoo, PK; Mohanty, RN; Das, SK

    2010-01-01

    Background: Congenital constriction band is the most common cause of terminal congenital malformation of a limb and lymphoedema. Superficial bands do not need any treatment, but deeper bands are managed with excision and Z-plasty. The circumferential bands are released in two to three stages to prevent vascular compromise. The purpose of this study was to present the outcome of one-stage release. Materials and Methods: Nineteen children, 12 boys and 7 girls, with 24 congenital constriction...

  2. Isolated human and rat cerebral arteries constrict to increases in flow: role of 20-HETE and TP receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toth, Peter; Rozsa, Bernadett; Springo, Zsolt; Doczi, Tamas; Koller, Akos

    2011-01-01

    Elevation of intraluminal pressure increases vasomotor tone, which thought to have a substantial role in regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Interestingly, responses of cerebral vessels to increases in flow varied and have not been studied in human cerebral arteries. We hypothesized that increases in flow elicit constrictions of isolated human and rat cerebral arteries and aimed to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Human cerebral arteries and rat middle cerebral arteries constricted to increases in flow (P<0.05). Simultaneous increase in intraluminal flow+pressure further reduced the diameter compared with pressure-induced changes (P<0.05), leading to constant estimated CBF. Flow-induced constrictions were abolished by HET0016 (inhibitor of synthesis of 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (20-HETE) or inhibition of COXs or blocking TP (thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2, receptors and attenuated by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS). Flow-enhanced ROS formation was significantly reduced by HET0016. In conclusion, in human and rat cerebral arteries (1) increases in flow elicit constrictions, (2) signaling mechanism of flow-induced constriction of cerebral arteries involves enhanced production of ROS, COX activity, and mediated by 20-HETE via TP receptors, and (3) we propose that simultaneous operation of pressure- and flow-induced constrictions is necessary to provide an effective autoregulation of CBF. PMID:21610722

  3. Brane world black rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahay, Anurag; Sengupta, Gautam

    2007-01-01

    Five dimensional neutral rotating black rings are described from a Randall-Sundrum brane world perspective in the bulk black string framework. To this end we consider a rotating black string extension of a five dimensional black ring into the bulk of a six dimensional Randall-Sundrum brane world with a single four brane. The bulk solution intercepts the four brane in a five dimensional black ring with the usual curvature singularity on the brane. The bulk geodesics restricted to the plane of rotation of the black ring are constructed and their projections on the four brane match with the usual black ring geodesics restricted to the same plane. The asymptotic nature of the bulk geodesics are elucidated with reference to a bulk singularity at the AdS horizon. We further discuss the description of a brane world black ring as a limit of a boosted bulk black 2 brane with periodic identification

  4. Token Ring Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adela Ionescu

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ring topology is a simple configuration used to connect processes that communicate among themselves. A number of network standards such as token ring, token bus, and FDDI are based on the ring connectivity. This article will develop an implementation of a ring of processes that communicate among themselves via pipe links. The processes are nodes in the ring. Each process reads from its standard input and writes in its standard output. N-1 process redirects the its standard output to a standard input of the process through a pipe. When the ring-structure is designed, the project can be extended to simulate networks or to implement algorithms for mutual exclusion

  5. Token ring technology report

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Please note this is a Short Discount publication. This report provides an overview of the IBM Token-Ring technology and products built by IBM and compatible vendors. It consists of two sections: 1. A summary of the design trade-offs for the IBM Token-Ring. 2. A summary of the products of the major token-ring compatible vendors broken down by adapters and components, wiring systems, testing, and new chip technology.

  6. Spannungsgesteuerter Ring-Oszillator

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Z.; Thiede, A.

    1999-01-01

    The oscillator (1) of integrated monolithic design has several analogue amplifier units (2) connected in a ring. The individual amplifiers are frequency selective in regard to a resonance frequency. The phase displacements of the amplifiers are chosen so that the total phase displacement over the ring at the resonance frequencies of the amplifiers amounts to 3600 or a whole number multiple of that. The number of amplifiers selected corresponds to the overall quality factor for the ring oscill...

  7. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E. (Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada))

    1990-08-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy.

  8. Vortex and source rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branlard, Emmanuel Simon Pierre

    2017-01-01

    The velocity field, vector potential and velocity gradient of a vortex ring is derived in this chapter. The Biot-Savart law for the vector potential and velocity is expressed in a first section. Then, the flow is derived at specific locations: on the axis, near the axis and in the far field where...... is dedicated to vortex rings. Source rings are only briefly mentioned....

  9. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E.

    1990-01-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy

  10. The ring laser gyro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, W. W.; Gea-Banacloche, J.; Pedrotti, L. M.; Sanders, V. E.; Schleich, W.; Scully, M. O.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents a review of both active and passive ring laser devices. The operating principles of the ring laser are developed and discussed, with special emphasis given to the problems associated with the achievement of greater sensitivity and stability. First-principle treatments of the nature of quantum noise in the ring laser gyro and various methods designed to avoid low-rotation-rate lock-in are presented. Descriptions of state-of-the-art devices and current and proposed applications (including a proposed test of metric theories of gravity using a passive cavity ring laser) are given.

  11. Procyanidin C1 Causes Vasorelaxation Through Activation of the Endothelial NO/cGMP Pathway in Thoracic Aortic Rings

    OpenAIRE

    Byun, Eui-Baek; Sung, Nak-Yun; Yang, Mi-So; Song, Du-Sup; Byun, Eui-Hong; Kim, Jae-Kyung; Park, Jong-Heum; Song, Beom-Seok; Lee, Ju-Woon; Park, Sang-Hyun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Kim, Jae-Hun

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to clarify the efficacy of procyanidin C1 (Pro C1) for modulating vascular tone. Pro C1 induced a potent vasorelaxant effect on phenylephrine-constricted endothelium-intact thoracic aortic rings, but had no effect on denuded thoracic aortic rings. Moreover, Pro C1 caused a significant increase in nitric oxide (NO) production in endothelial cells. Pro C1-induced vasorelaxation and Pro C1-induced NO production were significantly decreased in the presence of a nonspecif...

  12. EBT ring physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckan, N.A.

    1980-04-01

    This workshop attempted to evaluate the status of the current experimental and theoretical understanding of hot electron ring properties. The dominant physical processes that influence ring formation, scaling, and their optimal behavior are also studied. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the 27 included papers

  13. Children of Sex Rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Patricia; Baird, Margaret

    1990-01-01

    Outlines three major differentiating categories of children who were sexually abused by sex rings: level of fear, ability to trust, and disclosure confusion. Addresses denial and resistance regarding child sexual exploitation by a ring among practitioners in the child welfare system. (Author/BB)

  14. Illustration of Saturn's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This illustration shows a close-up of Saturn's rings. These rings are thought to have formed from material that was unable to form into a Moon because of tidal forces from Saturn, or from a Moon that was broken up by Saturn's tidal forces.

  15. Relativistic ring models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ujevic, Maximiliano [Universidade Federal do ABC (UFABC), Santo Andre, SP (Brazil). Centro de Ciencias Naturais e Humanas; Letelier, Patricio S.; Vogt, Daniel [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Matematica, Estatistica e Computacao Cientifica. Dept. de Matematica Aplicada

    2011-07-01

    Full text: Relativistic thick ring models are constructed using previously found analytical Newtonian potential-density pairs for flat rings and toroidal structures obtained from Kuzmin-Toomre family of discs. This was achieved by inflating previously constructed Newtonian ring potentials using the transformation |z|{yields}{radical}z{sup 2} + b{sup 2}, and then finding their relativistic analog. The models presented have infinite extension but the physical quantities decays very fast with the distance, and in principle, one could make a cut-off radius to consider it finite. In particular, we present systems with one ring, two rings and a disc with a ring. Also, the circular velocity of a test particle and its stability when performing circular orbits are presented in all these models. Using the Rayleigh criterion of stability of a fluid at rest in a gravitational field, we find that the different systems studied present a region of non-stability that appears in the intersection of the disc and the ring, and between the rings when they become thinner. (author)

  16. Imaging rings in ring imaging Cherenkov counters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratcliff, Blair N

    2002-11-25

    The general concepts used to form images in Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) counters are described and their performance properties compared. Particular attention is paid to issues associated with imaging in the time dimension, especially in Detectors of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light (DIRCs).

  17. [Median nerve constrictive operation combined with tendon transfer to treat brain paralysis convulsive deformity of hand].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shanjun; Zhou, Tianjian

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the median nerve constrictive operation combined with tendon transfer to treat the brain paralysis convulsive deformity of the hand. The clinical data from 21 cases with brain paralysis convulsive deformity of the hand were analyzed retrospectively between August 2009 and April 2012. Of them, there were 13 males and 8 females with an average age of 15 years (range, 10-29 years). The causes of the convulsive cerebral palsy included preterm deliveries in 11 cases, hypoxia asphyxia in 7, traumatic brain injury in 2, and encephalitis sequela in 1. The disease duration was 2-26 years (mean, 10.6 years). All the 21 patients had cock waists, crooking fingers, and contracture of adductors pollicis, 12 had the forearm pronation deformity. According to Ashworth criteria, there were 2 cases at level I, 5 cases at level II, 8 cases at level III, 4 cases at level IV, and 2 cases at level V. All patients had no intelligence disturbances. The forearm X-ray film showed no bone architectural changes before operation. The contraction of muscle and innervation was analyzed before operation. The median nerve constrictive operation combined with tendon transfer was performed. The functional activities and deformity improvement were evaluated during follow-up. After operation, all the patients' incision healed by first intension, without muscle atrophy and ischemic spasm. All the 21 cases were followed up 1.5-4.5 years (mean, 2.3 years). No superficial sensory loss occurred. The effectiveness was excellent in 13 cases, good in 6 cases, and poor in 2 cases, with an excellent and good rate of 90.4% at last follow-up. The median nerve constrictive operation combined with tendon transfer to treat brain paralysis convulsive deformity of the hand can remove and prevent the recurrence of spasm, achieve the orthopedic goals, to assure the restoration of motor function and the improvement of the life quality.

  18. Rings and their modules

    CERN Document Server

    Bland, Paul E

    2011-01-01

    This book is an introduction to the theory of rings and modules that goes beyond what one normally obtains in a graduate course in abstract algebra. In addition to the presentation of standard topics in ring and module theory, it also covers category theory, homological algebra and even more specialized topics like injective envelopes and projective covers, reflexive modules and quasi-Frobenius rings, and graded rings and modules. The book is a self-contained volume written in a very systematic style: allproofs are clear and easy for the reader to understand and allarguments are based onmaterials contained in the book. A problem sets follow each section. It is suitable for graduate and PhD students who have chosen ring theory for their research subject.

  19. Break-up of droplets in a concentrated emulsion flowing through a narrow constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Liat; Fan, Lin; Chen, Yunhan; Swoboda, Ryan; Tang, Sindy K Y

    2014-01-21

    This paper describes the break-up of droplets in a concentrated emulsion during its flow as a 2D monolayer in a microchannel consisting of a narrow constriction. Analysis of the behavior of a large number of drops (N > 4000) shows that the number of break-ups increases with increasing flow rate, entrance angle to the constriction, and size of the drops relative to the width of the constriction. As single drops do not break at the highest flow rate used in the system, break-ups arise primarily from droplet-droplet interactions. Analysis of droplet properties at a high temporal resolution of 10 microseconds makes it possible to relate droplet deformation with droplet break-up probability. Similar to previous studies on single drops, no break-up is observed below a set of critical flow rates and droplet deformations. Unlike previous studies, however, not all drops undergo break-up above the critical values. Instead, the probability of droplet break-up increases with flow rate and the deformation of the drops. The probabilistic nature of the break-up process arises from the stochastic variations in the packing configuration of the drops as they enter the constriction. Local break-up dynamics involves two primary drops. A close look at the interactions between the pair of drops reveals that the competing time scales of droplet rearrangement relative to the relaxation of the opposing drop govern whether break-up occurs or not. Practically, these results can be used to calculate the maximum throughput of the serial interrogation process often employed in droplet microfluidics. For 40 pL-drops, the highest throughput with less than 1% droplet break-up was measured to be approximately 7000 drops per second. In addition, the results presented are useful for understanding the behavior of concentrated emulsions in applications such as mobility control in enhanced oil recovery, and for extrapolating critical parameters such as injection rates to ensure the stability of the

  20. Squeezing bio-capsules into a constriction: deformation till break-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goff, Anne; Kaoui, Badr; Kurzawa, Gaetan; Haszon, Boglárka; Salsac, Anne-Virginie

    2017-10-25

    We study experimentally the deformation and break-up of liquid-filled capsules trapped at an axisymmetric step constriction, and subjected to increasing pressure drops. We considered biological (trout fish eggs) and bioartificial (made of ovalbumin and alginate) ones, with the objective to characterize the transition to break-up. We find that both capsule populations behave as a brittle material. They do not exhibit any plastic deformation prior to break-up. Moreover critical pressure drop exhibits a stochastic behavior as known for the fracture of disordered media. The break-up probability follows a three-parameter Weibull distribution, from which one can deduce the capsule rupture characteristics.

  1. ACUTE CONSTRICTIVE PERICARDITIS FOLLOWING LUNG TRANSPLANTATION FOR LYMPHANGIOLEIOMYOMATOSIS: A CASE REPORT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billings, Martha E.; Mulligan, Michael; Raghu, Ganesh

    2009-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare cystic progressive lung disease with many extra-pulmonary manifestations which may complicate allograft function after transplantation. We present a LAM patient, one-year status-post bilateral lung transplant, with new dyspnea and declining spirometry without rejection, infection or recurrence. Investigation revealed acute constrictive pericarditis which has not previously been reported in LAM lung transplant patients. This represents a novel complication likely due to progression of extra-pulmonary LAM that should be considered in LAM transplant patients with dyspnea. PMID:19134542

  2. Differentiation of constrictive pericarditis from restrictive cardiomyopathy: the case for high-resolution dynamic tomographic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Robert M.; Otoadese, Eramosele A.; Oren, Ron M.

    1995-05-01

    The syndrome of constrictive pericarditis (CP) presents a diagnostic challenge to the clinician. This study was undertaken to determine whether cine computed tomography (CT), a cardiac imaging technique with excellent temporal and spatial resolution, can reliably demonstrate the unique abnormalities of pericardial anatomy and ventricular physiology present in patients with this condition. A second goal of this study was to determine whether the presence of diseased thickened pericardium, by itself, imparts cardiac impairment due to abnormalities of ventricular diastolic function. Methods: Twelve patients with CP suspected clinically, in whom invasive hemodynamic study was consistent with the diagnosis of CP, underwent cine CT. They were subdivided into Group 1 (CP, N equals 5) and Group 2 (No CP, N equals 7) based on histopathologic evaluation of tissue obtained at the time of surgery or autopsy. A third group consisted of asymptomatic patients with incidentally discovered thickened pericardium at the time of cine CT scanning: Group 3 (ThP, N equals 7). Group 4 (Nl, N equals 7) consisted of healthy volunteer subjects. Results: Pericardial thickness measurements with cine CT clearly distinguished Group 1 (mean equals 10 +/- 2 mm) from Group 2 (mean equals 2 +/- 1 mm), with diagnostic accuracy of 100% compared to histopathological findings. In addition, patients in Group 1 had significantly more brisk early diastolic filling of both left and right ventricles than those in Group 2, which clearly distinguished all patients with, from all patients without CP. Patients in Group 3 had pericardial thicknesses similar to those in Group 1 (mean equals 9 +/- 1 mm, p equals NS), but had patterns of diastolic ventricular filling that were nearly identical to Group 4 (Nl). Conclusions: The abnormalities of anatomy and ventricular function present in the syndrome of constrictive pericarditis are clearly and decisively identified by cine CT. This allows a reliable distinction

  3. Evaluation and Comparison of the Position of the Apical Constriction in Single-root and Multiple-root Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Farhad

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Precise knowledge of the location of the apical constriction is essential to root canal treatment and long-term prognosis. Considering the differences in the apical constriction and size of the roots in single- and multiple-root teeth in various races, examination and comparison of the location of the apical constriction in single-root and multiple-root teeth are of paramount importance. The present studies aimed to measure and compare the distance of the apical constriction from the apical foramen and anatomical apex in single-root and multiple-root teeth. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 60 roots of single-rooted teeth and 60 roots of multiple-rooted teeth were collected from the patients referring to the health centers in Isfahan, Iran. After cleansing and disinfecting the surface of the roots, the surface of the teeth was washed with hypochlorite. Based on the direction of the apical foramen, a longitudinal cut was made in the same direction, and the roots were examined microscopically at the magnification of 25. Following that, the distance of the apical constriction from the apical foramen and anatomical apex was measured using a digital camera. In addition, mean and standard deviation of the obtained distance values were determined. Distances in the single-root and multiple-root teeth were compared using independent t-test, at the significance level of Results: Mean distance between the apical constriction and apical foramen was 0.86±0.33 mm in the single-root teeth and 0.072±0.27 mm in the multiple-root teeth. Mean distance between the apical constriction and anatomical apex was 1.14±0.36 mm in the single-root teeth and 1.03±0.36 mm in the multiple-root teeth. Moreover, the results of independent t-test showed the distance of the apical constriction from the apical foramen to be significant between single-root and multiple-rooted teeth (P=0.013. However, the distance between the apical constriction

  4. A Rare Case of Pneumopericardium in the Setting of Tuberculous Constrictive Pericarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro L. Abrahan IV

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A 28-year-old Filipino male was admitted due to high-grade fevers and dyspnea on a background of chronic cough and weight loss. Due to clinical and echocardiographic signs of cardiac tamponade, emergency pericardiocentesis was performed on his first hospital day. Five days after, chest radiographs showed new pockets of radiolucency within the cardiac shadow, indicative of pneumopericardium. On repeat echo, air microbubbles admixed with loculated effusion were visualized in the anterior pericardial space. Constrictive physiology was also supported by a thickened pericardium, septal bounce, exaggerated respiratory variation in AV valve inflow, and IVC plethora. A chest CT scan confirmed the presence of an air-fluid level within the pericardial sac. The patient was started on a quadruple antituberculosis regimen and IV piperacillin-tazobactam to cover for superimposed acute bacterial pericarditis. Pericardiectomy was performed as definitive management, with stripped pericardium measuring 5–7 mm thick and caseous material extracted from the pericardial sac. Histopathology was consistent with tuberculosis. This report highlights pneumopericardium as a rare complication of pericardiocentesis. We focused on the utility of echocardiography for diagnosing and monitoring this condition on a background of tuberculous constrictive pericarditis, ultimately convincing us that pericardiectomy was necessary, instead of the usual conservative measures for pneumopericardium.

  5. Nebulized perflubron and carbon dioxide rapidly dilate constricted airways in an ovine model of allergic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mays, Tamer Y; Choudhury, Parichita; Leigh, Richard; Koumoundouros, Emmanuel; Van der Velden, Joanne; Shrestha, Grishma; Pieron, Cora A; Dennis, John H; Green, Francis Hy; Snibson, Ken J

    2014-09-16

    The low toxicity of perfluorocarbons (PFCs), their high affinity for respiratory gases and their compatibility with lung surfactant have made them useful candidates for treating respiratory diseases such as adult respiratory distress syndrome. We report results for treating acute allergic and non-allergic bronchoconstriction in sheep using S-1226 (a gas mixture containing carbon dioxide and small volumes of nebulized perflubron). The carbon dioxide, which is highly soluble in perflubron, was used to relax airway smooth muscle. Sheep previously sensitized to house dust mite (HDM) were challenged with HDM aerosols to induce early asthmatic responses. At the maximal responses (characterised by an increase in lung resistance), the sheep were either not treated or treated with one of the following; nebulized S-1226 (perflubron + 12% CO2), nebulized perflubron + medical air, 12% CO2, salbutamol or medical air. Lung resistance was monitored for up to 20 minutes after cessation of treatment. Treatment with S-1226 for 2 minutes following HDM challenge resulted in a more rapid, more profound and more prolonged decline in lung resistance compared with the other treatment interventions. Video bronchoscopy showed an immediate and complete (within 5 seconds) re-opening of MCh-constricted airways following treatment with S-1226. S-1226 is a potent and rapid formulation for re-opening constricted airways. Its mechanism(s) of action are unknown. The formulation has potential as a rescue treatment for acute severe asthma.

  6. A case of radiation-induced chronic constrictive pericarditis developing 16 years after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirose, Yoshiaki; Ishida, Yoshio; Hayashida, Kohei; Toyama, Takuji; Hamada, Seiki; Miyatake, Kunio; Imakita, Masami (National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Osaka (Japan)); Uehara, Toshiisa; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    1993-09-01

    We reported a 51-yr-old female with radiation-induced chronic constrictive pericarditis. At age 29, she had received mastectomy and postoperative irradiation because of left breast cancer. At age 45, she had syncope and was diagnosed with complete atrioventricular block and a pacemaker was implanted. At that time, pericardial thickening with effusion was noted. The following year, tricuspid regurgitation was noted. On catheter study, a dip and plateau pattern of the right ventricular pressure curve appeared. At age 50, tricuspid regurgitation worsened due to the lead wire of the pacemaker compressing the leaflet, and the pacemaker was reimplanted. However, the following year, she complained of general fatigue and dyspnea and was admitted to our hospital. On [sup 67]Ga study, diffuse accumulation in the cardiac region appeared. There was no perfusion defect detected in the myocardium, but right myocardial damage was suspected by thallium study. In [sup 99m]Tc-HSA RI angiography, right atrium dilatation appeared and a pericardial halo around the ventricles was seen. She underwent pericardectomy, tricuspid replacement and pacemaker reimplanted, but she died. On autpsy, pericardial thickening and adhesion, right myocardial fibrosis, the fibrotic change of the bundle branches were seen. We reported a case of radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis. Radionuclide studies were useful in diagnosing and following the patient. (author).

  7. Solving University Course Timetabling Problems Using Constriction Particle Swarm Optimization with Local Search

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Fang Shih

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Course timetabling is a combinatorial optimization problem and has been confirmed to be an NP-complete problem. Course timetabling problems are different for different universities. The studied university course timetabling problem involves hard constraints such as classroom, class curriculum, and other variables. Concurrently, some soft constraints need also to be considered, including teacher’s preferred time, favorite class time etc. These preferences correspond to satisfaction values obtained via questionnaires. Particle swarm optimization (PSO is a promising scheme for solving NP-complete problems due to its fast convergence, fewer parameter settings and ability to fit dynamic environmental characteristics. Therefore, PSO was applied towards solving course timetabling problems in this work. To reduce the computational complexity, a timeslot was designated in a particle’s encoding as the scheduling unit. Two types of PSO, the inertia weight version and constriction version, were evaluated. Moreover, an interchange heuristic was utilized to explore the neighboring solution space to improve solution quality. Additionally, schedule conflicts are handled after a solution has been generated. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed scheme of constriction PSO with interchange heuristic is able to generate satisfactory course timetables that meet the requirements of teachers and classes according to the various applied constraints.

  8. Ring chromosome 13

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C A; Hertz, Jens Michael; Petersen, M B

    1992-01-01

    A stillborn male child with anencephaly and multiple malformations was found to have the karyotype 46,XY,r(13) (p11q21.1). The breakpoint at 13q21.1, determined by high resolution banding, is the most proximal breakpoint ever reported in patients with ring chromosome 13. In situ hybridisation...... with the probe L1.26 confirmed the derivation from chromosome 13 and DNA polymorphism analysis showed maternal origin of the ring chromosome. Our results, together with a review of previous reports of cases with ring chromosome 13 with identified breakpoints, could neither support the theory of distinct clinical...

  9. Faithfully quadratic rings

    CERN Document Server

    Dickmann, M

    2015-01-01

    In this monograph the authors extend the classical algebraic theory of quadratic forms over fields to diagonal quadratic forms with invertible entries over broad classes of commutative, unitary rings where -1 is not a sum of squares and 2 is invertible. They accomplish this by: (1) Extending the classical notion of matrix isometry of forms to a suitable notion of T-isometry, where T is a preorder of the given ring, A, or T = A^2. (2) Introducing in this context three axioms expressing simple properties of (value) representation of elements of the ring by quadratic forms, well-known to hold in

  10. Chylous ascites and chylothorax due to constrictive pericarditis in a patient infected with HIV: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Summachiwakij Sarawut

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Chylothorax and chylous ascites are uncommon and usually associated with trauma or neoplasms. To the best of our knowledge, constrictive pericarditis leading to chylothorax and chylous ascites in a person infected with HIV has never previously been described. Case presentation A 39-year-old Thai man was referred to our institute with progressive dyspnea, edema and abdominal distension. His medical history included HIV infection and pulmonary tuberculosis that was complicated by tuberculous pericarditis and cardiac tamponade. Upon further investigation, we found constrictive pericarditis, chylothorax and chylous ascites. A pericardiectomy was performed which resulted in gradual resolution of the ascites and chylous effusion. Conclusions Although constrictive pericarditis is an exceptionally rare cause of chylothorax and chylous ascites, it should nonetheless be considered in the differential diagnosis as a potentially reversible cause.

  11. The g-2 ring

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The precise measurement of "g-2", the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, required a special muon storage ring with electrostatic focussing and very accurate knowledge of the magnetic bending field. For more details see under photo 7405430.

  12. Saturn's dynamic D ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, M.M.; Burns, J.A.; Showalter, M.R.; Porco, C.C.; Nicholson, P.D.; Bosh, A.S.; Tiscareno, M.S.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has provided the first clear images of the D ring since the Voyager missions. These observations show that the structure of the D ring has undergone significant changes over the last 25 years. The brightest of the three ringlets seen in the Voyager images (named D72), has transformed from a narrow, <40-km wide ringlet to a much broader and more diffuse 250-km wide feature. In addition, its center of light has shifted inwards by over 200 km relative to other features in the D ring. Cassini also finds that the locations of other narrow features in the D ring and the structure of the diffuse material in the D ring differ from those measured by Voyager. Furthermore, Cassini has detected additional ringlets and structures in the D ring that were not observed by Voyager. These include a sheet of material just interior to the inner edge of the C ring that is only observable at phase angles below about 60??. New photometric and spectroscopic data from the ISS (Imaging Science Subsystem) and VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) instruments onboard Cassini show the D ring contains a variety of different particle populations with typical particle sizes ranging from 1 to 100 microns. High-resolution images reveal fine-scale structures in the D ring that appear to be variable in time and/or longitude. Particularly interesting is a remarkably regular, periodic structure with a wavelength of ??? 30 ?? km extending between orbital radii of 73,200 and 74,000 km. A similar structure was previously observed in 1995 during the occultation of the star GSC5249-01240, at which time it had a wavelength of ??? 60 ?? km. We interpret this structure as a periodic vertical corrugation in the D ring produced by differential nodal regression of an initially inclined ring. We speculate that this structure may have formed in response to an impact with a comet or meteoroid in early 1984. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Child sex rings.

    OpenAIRE

    Wild, N J; Wynne, J M

    1986-01-01

    Details of 11 child sex rings identified in one working class community were obtained by interviewing investigating police officers and examining health and social services records. The rings contained 14 adult male perpetrators and 175 children aged 6-15 years. Most perpetrators used child ringleaders to recruit victims; others became a "family friend" or obtained a position of authority over children. Secrecy was encouraged and bribery, threats, and peer pressure used to induce participatio...

  14. Storage ring group summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, N.M.

    1980-01-01

    The Storage Ring Group set out to identify and pursue salient problems in accelerator physics for heavy ion fusion, divorced from any particular reference design concept. However, it became apparent that some basic parameter framework was required to correlate the different study topics. As the Workshop progressed, ring parameters were modified and updated. Consequently, the accompanying papers on individual topics will be found to refer to slightly varied parameters, according to the stage at which the different problems were tackled

  15. Matrimonial ring structures

    OpenAIRE

    Hamberger, Klaus; Houseman, Michael; Daillant, Isabelle; White, Douglas R.; Barry, Laurent

    2006-01-01

    The paper deals with matrimonial rings, a particular kind of cycles in kinship networks which result when spouses are linked to each other by ties of consanguinity or affinity. By taking a network-analytic perspective, the paper endeavours to put this classical issue of structural kinship theory on a general basis, such as to allow conclusions which go beyond isolated discussions of particular ring types (like "cross-cousin marriage", "sister exchange", and so forth). The paper provides a def...

  16. One-stage release of congenital constriction band in lower limb from new born to 3 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Sakti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Congenital constriction band is the most common cause of terminal congenital malformation of a limb and lymphoedema. Superficial bands do not need any treatment, but deeper bands are managed with excision and Z-plasty. The circumferential bands are released in two to three stages to prevent vascular compromise. The purpose of this study was to present the outcome of one-stage release. Materials and Methods: Nineteen children, 12 boys and 7 girls, with 24 congenital constriction bands constituted the clinical material. The mean age at presentation was 57 days (range 12 hours to 3 years Band was unilateral in 14 and bilateral in five limbs. In unilateral cases, right side was involved in nine cases and left side in five. The constriction band is seen at the junction of middle and distal third. The patients having constriction bands in lower limbs and age less than 3 years were included in the study. One stage circumferential release of congenital constriction band was performed. Our youngest patient was operated at the age of six months. Club feet, (n=8 and lymphedema (n=7 were associated anomalies. Club feet and band were released in one stage in three limbs. The results were evaluated by criteria described by Joseph Upton and Cissy Tan. Results: There were 18 excellent, six satisfactory results. No wound problem occurred. No vascular compromise was noted during or after the procedure. On follow-up, distal swelling reduced. Conclusion: One-stage circumferential release of congenital constriction band in lower limbs with or without lymphodema is a safe and easy procedure.

  17. Amnioserosa cell constriction but not epidermal actin cable tension autonomously drives dorsal closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasakarnis, Laurynas; Frei, Erich; Caussinus, Emmanuel; Affolter, Markus; Brunner, Damian

    2016-11-01

    Tissue morphogenesis requires coordination of multiple force-producing components. During dorsal closure in fly embryogenesis, an epidermis opening closes. A tensioned epidermal actin/MyosinII cable, which surrounds the opening, produces a force that is thought to combine with another MyosinII force mediating apical constriction of the amnioserosa cells that fill the opening. A model proposing that each force could autonomously drive dorsal closure was recently challenged by a model in which the two forces combine in a ratchet mechanism. Acute force elimination via selective MyosinII depletion in one or the other tissue shows that the amnioserosa tissue autonomously drives dorsal closure while the actin/MyosinII cable cannot. These findings exclude both previous models, although a contribution of the ratchet mechanism at dorsal closure onset remains likely. This shifts the current view of dorsal closure being a combinatorial force-component system to a single tissue-driven closure event.

  18. Tongluo Zhitong Prescription Alleviates Allodynia, Hyperalgesia, and Dyskinesia in the Chronic Constriction Injury Model of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyong Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuropathic pain is common in clinical practice. Exploration of new drug therapeutics has always been carried out for more satisfactory effects and fewer side-effects. In the present study, we aimed to investigate effects of Tongluo Zhitong Prescription (TZP, a compounded Chinese medicine description, on neuropathic pain model of rats with chronic constriction injury (CCI. The CCI model was established by loosely ligating sciatic nerve with catgut suture, proximal to its trifurcation. The static and dynamic allodynia, heat hyperalgesia, mechanical allodynia, cold allodynia, and gait were assessed. Our results showed that TZP alleviated CCI-induced static and dynamic allodynia, suppressed heat hyperalgesia and cold and mechanical allodynia, and improved gait function. These results suggest that TZP could alleviate neuropathic pain. Further experiments are needed to explore its mechanisms.

  19. Antiallodynic Effect of Herbal Medicine Yokukansan on Peripheral Neuropathy in Rats with Chronic Constriction Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Suzuki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Yokukansan, one of the traditional Japanese herbal medicines, ameliorated neuropathic pain symptoms in patients. In this study, we investigated the effects of yokukansan on neuropathic pain in chronic constriction injury (CCI model. Oral administration of yokukansan significantly inhibited mechanical and cold allodynia in the von Frey hair or acetone test, respectively. In comparison, amitriptyline, a tricyclic antidepressant, demonstrated moderate, but not significant, antiallodynic effects in the mechanical and cold tests. Yokukansan significantly inhibited the cerebrospinal fluid dialysate level of glutamate that had increased by the stimulation of brush or acetone. Glutamate transporter inhibitors, DL-threo-beta-hydroxy aspartate and dihydrokainate, decreased the yokukansan-induced antiallodynic actions in CCI rats. Our results suggest that yokukansan was confirmed to have antiallodynic effects in CCI rats, which are related to a blockade of glutamatergic neurotransmission via activation of glutamate transporters in the spinal cord.

  20. Constrictive pericarditis-induced shunting through a PFO: Persistence despite pericardiectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Schuiteman, DO

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A patent foramen ovale (PFO is found in around 25–30% of patients. The discovery is often made only on autopsy, as most PFOs are clinically silent and any inter-atrial blood exchange typically shunts from the left to right heart [1]. Thus, when a patient presents with hypoxic respiratory failure, concern for presence of a PFO is rarely at the top of the differential. However, in the setting of elevated right heart pressures, PFOs can become of great hemodynamic importance and can lead to deadly complications, including right to left shunting and refractory hypoxic respiratory failure. We present an unusual care of constrictive pericarditis leading to significant shunting through a PFO, and resultant hypoxic respiratory failure which only resolved with PFO closure.

  1. Electronic conductance model in constricted MoS{sub 2} with nanopores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarathy, Aditya [Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Leburton, Jean-Pierre, E-mail: jleburto@illinois.edu [Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    We describe a self-consistent model for electronic transport in a molybdenum di-sulphide (MoS{sub 2}) layer containing a nanopore in a constricted geometry. Our approach is based on a semi-classical thermionic Poisson-Boltzmann technique using a two-valley model within the effective mass approximation to investigate perturbations caused by the nanopore on the electronic current. In particular, we show that the effect of the nanopore on the conductance is reduced as the nanopore is moved from the center to the layer edges. Our model is applied to the detection of DNA translocating through the nanopore, which reveals current features similar to those as predicted in nanopore graphene layers.

  2. Abnormal portal vein waveform as an indicator of constrictive pericarditis – a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Ścieszka

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 17-year-old patient referred to our outpatient Doppler Department due to clinical suspicion of liver cirrhosis. The patient presented with non-specifi c symptoms, such as malaise, pain in the right subcostal region, peripheral oedema. Until then, diagnostic imaging, including echocardiography was inconclusive. We performed the Doppler sonography of the portal system, which revealed normal diameter of the portal vein with abnormal, phasic and markedly pulsatile waveform. Hepatic veins distention with pathological reverse fl ow during systole was reported. Additionally, inferior vena cava was dilated and remained unchanged through the respiratory cycle. Basing on the above image a heart disease, which had not been taken into differential diagnosis before, was suggested. The following echocardiography, together with computed tomography, enabled a diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis. Successful pericardiotomy was performed. Such a complicated diagnostics happened to demonstrate an uncommon example of the use of portal vein waveform in making the proper cardiologic diagnosis.

  3. BERKELEY: ALS ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Everybody at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Center for Beam Physics is pleased with the rapid progress in commissioning LBL's Advanced Light Source (ALS) electron storage ring, the foundation for this third-generation synchrotron radiation facility. Designed for a maximum current of 400 mA, the ALS storage ring reached 407 mA just 24 days after storing the first beam on 16 March. ALS construction as a US Department of Energy (DOE) national user facility to provide high-brightness vacuum ultra-violet and soft x-ray radiation began in October 1987. One technical requirement marking project completion was to accumulate a 50-mA current in the storage ring. The ALS passed this milestone on 24 March, a week ahead of the official deadline. Once injected, the electron beam decays quasi-exponentially primarily because of interactions with residual gas molecules in the storage-ring vacuum chamber. Eventually, when the pressure in the vacuum chamber with beam decreases toward the expected operating level of 1 nano Torr, it will only be necessary to refill the storage ring at intervals of four to eight hours. At present the vacuum is improving rapidly as surfaces are irradiated (scrubbed) by the synchrotron radiation itself. At 100 mA, beam lifetime was about one hour (9 April)

  4. The oxidative response in the chronic constriction injury model of neuropathic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Edward C T H; Bahrami, Soheyl; Kozlov, Andrey V; Kurvers, Harry A J M; Ter Laak, Henk J; Nohl, Hans; Redl, Heinz; Goris, R Jan A

    2009-03-01

    In the chronic constriction injury model of rat neuropathic pain, oxidative stress as well as antioxidants superoxide dismutase and reduced glutathione (GSH) are important determinants of neuropathological and behavioral consequences. Studies of the chronic constriction injury model observed (indirect) signs of inflammation. We, therefore, investigated the level of oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes in skeletal muscle tissue of the rat hind paw and (jugular vein) plasma at d 7 after nerve injury. The level of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) was determined as a measure of oxidative stress. Reduced GSH levels and the ceruloplasmin/transferrin ratio were determined as measures of overall antioxidant activity. RONS and overall antioxidant activity were measured in skeletal muscle tissue of the hind paw and jugular vein plasma. The level of RONS in muscle was determined using spin trapping combined with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. Using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, we also determined plasma levels of transferrin and ceruloplasmin. GSH levels were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. In skeletal muscle tissue, the level of RONS was lower in nerve-injured hind paws than in controls. The plasma level (jugular vein) of RONS did not differ between nerve-injured and control rats. In skeletal muscle tissue, the level of GSH was higher in nerve-injured hind paws than in controls. The ceruloplasmin/transferrin ratio tended to be higher in (jugular vein) plasma of nerve-injured rats as compared to controls. This study shows that, at d 7 after nerve injury, oxidative stress-induced changes are present also in skeletal muscle tissue of the rat hind paw. Our findings of a decreased level of RONS in combination with an increased level of the antioxidant GSH suggest that an overshoot of antioxidant activity overrules initial oxidative stress.

  5. Application of cast iron-platinum keeper to a collapsible denture for a patient with constricted oral opening: a clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkubo, Chikahiro; Watanabe, Ikuya; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Hosoi, Toshio

    2003-07-01

    Insertion of a denture is especially difficult for patents with a constricted oral opening. This report describes the fabrication of a collapsible removable partial denture with a cast iron-platinum attachment for a partially edentulous woman with a constricted oral opening resulting from rheumatoid arthritis and a craniotomy for a subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  6. Estimation of current constriction losses via 3D tomography reconstructions in electrochemical devices: a case study of a solid oxide cell electrode/electrolyte interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Jørgensen, Peter Stanley

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, the methodology for accurate estimations of the current constriction resistance in solid state electrochemical devices via 3D tomography reconstructions is developed. The methodology is used to determine the current constriction resistances at the Ni:YSZ anode/YSZ electrolyte...

  7. A case report of combined radical pericardiectomy and beating heart coronary artery bypass grafting in a patient with tubercular chronic constrictive pericarditis with coronary artery disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gauranga Majumdar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We here report a successful midterm outcome following combined off-pump radical pericardiectomy and coronary artery bypass surgery (CABG in a 65-year-old male patient who was suffering from chronic constrictive calcified tubercular pericarditis with coronary artery disease. Simultaneous off-pump CABG and radical pericardiectomy for nonsurgical constrictive pericarditis is reported very rarely in English literature.

  8. Importance of Clinical and Laboratory Findings in the Diagnosis and Surgical Prognosis of Patients with Constrictive Pericarditis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Fernandes

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: International studies have reported the value of the clinical profile and laboratory findings in the diagnosis of constrictive pericarditis. However, Brazilian population data are scarce. Objective: To assess the clinical characteristics, sensitivity of imaging tests and factors related to the death of patients with constrictive pericarditis undergoing pericardiectomy. Methods: Patients with constrictive pericarditis surgically confirmed were retrospectively assessed regarding their clinical and laboratory variables. Two methods were used: transthoracic echocardiography and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. Mortality predictors were determined by use of univariate analysis with Cox proportional hazards model and hazard ratio. All tests were two-tailed, and an alpha error ≤ 5% was considered statically significant. Results: We studied 84 patients (mean age, 44 ± 17.9 years; 67% male. Signs and symptoms of predominantly right heart failure were present with jugular venous distention, edema and ascites in 89%, 89% and 62% of the cases, respectively. Idiopathic etiology was present in 69.1%, followed by tuberculosis (21%. Despite the advanced heart failure degree, low BNP levels (median, 157 pg/mL were found. The diagnostic sensitivities for constriction of echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging were 53.6% and 95.9%, respectively. There were 9 deaths (10.7%, and the risk factors were: anemia, BNP and C reactive protein levels, pulmonary hypertension >55 mm Hg, and atrial fibrillation. Conclusions: Magnetic resonance imaging had better diagnostic sensitivity. Clinical, laboratory and imaging markers were associated with death.

  9. [Evaluation of cone-beam computed tomography on upper airway changes after alternating rapid palatal expansion and constriction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, D T; Zhou, Y H; Liu, W T

    2017-08-18

    To evaluate the changes of different parts of upper airway after alternating rapid palatal expansion and constriction via three dimensional measurement, compared with the protocol of rapid palatal expansion alone. In the study, 36 patients with retrognathic maxilla were selected and randomized to either group A or group B. The patients in group A were treated with rapid palatal expansion alone. The patients in group B were treated with alternating rapid palatal expansion and constriction. Three dimensional analyses were performed on all pre- and post-treatment cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images with the software Dolphin. Two subjects in group B were lost to follow up during the treatment. The gender distributions, ages and all measuring items before treatment had no significant difference between group A and group B (P>0.05). Nasal floor width, nasal lateral width, nasal volume, and nasopharynx volume increased significantly in each group after rapid palatal expansion alone or rapid palatal expansion and constriction (P0.05). No significant difference was observed in the nasal floor width and nasal lateral width increment among the anterior, median and posterior parts in each group either (P>0.05). No significant difference in all the measuring items was observed between the two groups (P>0.05). Alternating rapid palatal expansion and constriction could increase the volume of nasal and naopharynx cavities by the similar way of rapid palatal expansion alone, and had no obvious effect on oropharynx and hypopharynx cavities.

  10. Constriction of collateral arteries induced by "head-up tilt" in patients with occlusive arterial disease of the legs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerskov, K; Henriksen, O; Tønnesen, K H

    1981-01-01

    not change the pressure gradient from femoral to popliteal artery in the patients with occlusion of the superficial femoral artery, indicating that the flow resistance offered by the collateral arteries had increased. In a bilateral sympathectomised patient the increase in collateral resistance was almost...... absent indicating that the constriction of the collateral arteries is mainly mediated via sympathetic vasoconstrictor fibres....

  11. Posturally induced microvascular constriction in patients with different stages of leg ischaemia: effect of local skin heating

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ubbink, D. T.; Jacobs, M. J.; Tangelder, G. J.; Slaaf, D. W.; Reneman, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    1. Skin microcirculation was investigated in 12 asymptomatic subjects and 76 patients, grouped according to their ankle-to-brachial systolic blood pressure index, in order to evaluate to what extent posturally induced microvascular constriction is dependent on the stage of leg ischaemia at different

  12. Almost ring theory

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    This book develops thorough and complete foundations for the method of almost etale extensions, which is at the basis of Faltings' approach to p-adic Hodge theory. The central notion is that of an "almost ring". Almost rings are the commutative unitary monoids in a tensor category obtained as a quotient V-Mod/S of the category V-Mod of modules over a fixed ring V; the subcategory S consists of all modules annihilated by a fixed ideal m of V, satisfying certain natural conditions. The reader is assumed to be familiar with general categorical notions, some basic commutative algebra and some advanced homological algebra (derived categories, simplicial methods). Apart from these general prerequisites, the text is as self-contained as possible. One novel feature of the book - compared with Faltings' earlier treatment - is the systematic exploitation of the cotangent complex, especially for the study of deformations of almost algebras.

  13. Decay ring design

    CERN Document Server

    Chancé, A; Bouquerel, E; Hancock, S; Jensen, E

    The study of the neutrino oscillation between its different flavours needs pureand very intense fluxes of high energy, well collimated neutrinos with a welldetermined energy spectrum. A dedicated machine seems to be necessarynowadays to reach the required flux. A new concept based on the β-decayof radioactive ions which were accelerated in an accelerator chain was thenproposed. After ion production, stripping, bunching and acceleration, the unstableions are then stored in a racetrack-shaped superconducting decay ring.Finally, the ions are accumulated in the decay ring until being lost. The incomingbeam is merged to the stored beam by using a specific RF system, whichwill be presented here.We propose here to study some aspects of the decay ring, such as its opticalproperties, its RF system or the management of the losses which occur in thering (mainly by decay or by collimation).

  14. Enhanced oxygen dissociation in a propagating constricted discharge formed in a self-pulsing atmospheric pressure microplasma jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Daniel; Burhenn, Sebastian; Kirchheim, Dennis; Schulz-von der Gathen, Volker

    2013-11-01

    We report on the propagation of a constricted discharge feature in a repetitively self-pulsing microplasma jet operated in helium with a 0.075 vol% molecular oxygen admixture in ambient air environment. The constricted discharge is about 1 mm in width and repetitively ignites at the point of smallest electrode distance in a wedge-shaped electrode configuration, propagates through the discharge channel towards the nozzle, extinguishes, and re-ignites at the inlet at frequencies in the kHz range. It co-exists with a homogeneous, volume-dominated low temperature (T ⋍ 300 K) α-mode glow. Time-resolved measurements of nitrogen molecule C-state and nitrogen molecule ion B-state emission bands reveal an increase of the rotational temperature within the constricted discharge to about 600 K within 50 µs. Its propagation velocity was determined by phase-resolved diagnostics to be similar to the gas velocity, in the order of 40 m s-1. Two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy synchronized to the self-pulsing reveals spatial regions of increased oxygen atom densities co-propagating with the constricted discharge feature. The generated oxygen pulse density is about ten times higher than in the co-existing homogeneous α-mode. Densities reach about 1.5 × 1016 cm-3 at average temperatures of 450 K at the nozzle. This enhanced dissociation of about 80% is attributed to the continuous interaction of the constricted discharge to the co-propagating gas volume.

  15. Fusion rings and fusion ideals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Troels Bak

    This dissertation investigates fusion rings, which are Grothendieck groups of rigid, monoidal, semisimple, abelian categories. Special interest is in rational fusion rings, i.e., fusion rings which admit a finite basis, for as commutative rings they may be presented as quotients of polynomial rings...... by the so-called fusion ideals. The fusion rings of Wess-Zumino-Witten models have been widely studied and are well understood in terms of precise combinatorial descriptions and explicit generating sets of the fusion ideals. They also appear in another, more general, setting via tilting modules for quantum...

  16. Fusion Rings for Quantum Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning Haahr; Stroppel, Catharina

    2012-01-01

    We study the fusion rings of tilting modules for a quantum group at a root of unity modulo the tensor ideal of negligible tilting modules. We identify them in type A with the combinatorial rings from [12] and give a similar description of the sp2n-fusion ring in terms of noncommutative symmetric...... functions. Moreover we give a presentation of all fusion rings in classical types as quotients of polynomial rings. Finally we also compute the fu- sion rings for type G2....

  17. Lattices for antiproton rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autin, B.

    1984-01-01

    After a description of the constraints imposed by the cooling of Antiprotons on the lattice of the rings, the reasons which motivate the shape and the structure of these machines are surveyed. Linear and non-linear beam optics properties are treated with a special amplification to the Antiproton Accumulator. (orig.)

  18. Flushing Ring for EDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earwood, L.

    1985-01-01

    Removing debris more quickly lowers cutting time. Operation, cutting oil and pressurized air supplied to ring placed around workpiece. Air forces oil through small holes and agitates oil as it flows over workpiece. High flow rate and agitation dislodge and remove debris. Electrical discharge removes material from workpiece faster.

  19. SXLS storage ring design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1991-01-01

    X-ray lithography has emerged as a strong candidate to meet the demands of ever finer linewidths on integrated circuits, particularly for linewidths less than .25 microns. Proximity printing X-ray lithography makes use of soft X-rays to shadow print an image of a mask onto a semiconductor wafer to produce integrated circuits. To generate the required X-rays in sufficient quantities to make commercial production viable, electron storage rings have been proposed as the soft X-ray sources. Existing storage rings have been used to do the initial development work and the success of these efforts has led the lithographers to request that new rings be constructed that are dedicated to X-ray lithography. As a result of a series of workshops held at BNL [10.3] which were attended by both semiconductor and accelerator scientists, the following set of zeroth order specifications' on the light and electron beam of a storage ring for X-ray lithography were developed: critical wavelength of light: λ c = 6 to 10 angstroms, white light power: P = 0.25 to 2.5 watts/mrad, horizontal collection angle per port: θ = 10 to 50 mrad, electron beam sizes: σ x ∼ σ y y ' < 1 mrad

  20. Ring Bubbles of Dolphins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Karim; Marten, Ken; Psarakos, Suchi; White, Don J.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses how dolphins create and play with three types of air-filled vortices. The underlying physics is discussed. Photographs and sketches illustrating the dolphin's actions and physics are presented. The dolphins engage in this behavior on their own initiative without food reward. These behaviors are done repeatedly and with singleminded effort. The first type is the ejection of bubbles which, after some practice on the part of the dolphin, turn into toroidal vortex ring bubbles by the mechanism of baroclinic torque. These bubbles grow in radius and become thinner as they rise vertically to the surface. One dolphin would blow two in succession and guide them to fuse into one. Physicists call this a vortex reconnection. In the second type, the dolphins first create an invisible vortex ring in the water by swimming on their side and waving their tail fin (also called flukes) vigorously. This vortex ring travels horizontally in the water. The dolphin then turns around, finds the vortex and injects a stream of air into it from its blowhole. The air "fills-out" the core of the vortex ring. Often, the dolphin would knock-off a smaller ring bubble from the larger ring (this also involves vortex reconnection) and steer the smaller ring around the tank. One other dolphin employed a few other techniques for planting air into the fluke vortex. One technique included standing vertically in the water with tail-up, head-down and tail piercing the free surface. As the fluke is waved to create the vortex ring, air is entrained from above the surface. Another technique was gulping air in the mouth, diving down, releasing air bubbles from the mouth and curling them into a ring when they rose to the level of the fluke. In the third type, demonstrated by only one dolphin, the longitudinal vortex created by the dorsal fin on the back is used to produce 10-15 foot long helical bubbles. In one technique she swims in a curved path. This creates a dorsal fin vortex since

  1. FUZZY RINGS AND ITS PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karyati Karyati

    2017-01-01

      One of algebraic structure that involves a binary operation is a group that is defined  an un empty set (classical with an associative binary operation, it has identity elements and each element has an inverse. In the structure of the group known as the term subgroup, normal subgroup, subgroup and factor group homomorphism and its properties. Classical algebraic structure is developed to algebraic structure fuzzy by the researchers as an example semi group fuzzy and fuzzy group after fuzzy sets is introduced by L. A. Zadeh at 1965. It is inspired of writing about semi group fuzzy and group of fuzzy, a research on the algebraic structure of the ring is held with reviewing ring fuzzy, ideal ring fuzzy, homomorphism ring fuzzy and quotient ring fuzzy with its properties. The results of this study are obtained fuzzy properties of the ring, ring ideal properties fuzzy, properties of fuzzy ring homomorphism and properties of fuzzy quotient ring by utilizing a subset of a subset level  and strong level  as well as image and pre-image homomorphism fuzzy ring.   Keywords: fuzzy ring, subset level, homomorphism fuzzy ring, fuzzy quotient ring

  2. Intercellular Adhesion-Dependent Cell Survival and ROCK-Regulated Actomyosin-Driven Forces Mediate Self-Formation of a Retinal Organoid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Lowe

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study we dissected retinal organoid morphogenesis in human embryonic stem cell (hESC-derived cultures and established a convenient method for isolating large quantities of retinal organoids for modeling human retinal development and disease. Epithelialized cysts were generated via floating culture of clumps of Matrigel/hESCs. Upon spontaneous attachment and spreading of the cysts, patterned retinal monolayers with tight junctions formed. Dispase-mediated detachment of the monolayers and subsequent floating culture led to self-formation of retinal organoids comprising patterned neuroretina, ciliary margin, and retinal pigment epithelium. Intercellular adhesion-dependent cell survival and ROCK-regulated actomyosin-driven forces are required for the self-organization. Our data supports a hypothesis that newly specified neuroretina progenitors form characteristic structures in equilibrium through minimization of cell surface tension. In long-term culture, the retinal organoids autonomously generated stratified retinal tissues, including photoreceptors with ultrastructure of outer segments. Our system requires minimal manual manipulation, has been validated in two lines of human pluripotent stem cells, and provides insight into optic cup invagination in vivo.

  3. Evaluating GPS biologging technology for studying spatial ecology of large constricting snakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brian; Hart, Kristen M.; Mazzotti, Frank J.; Basille, Mathieu; Romagosa, Christina M.

    2018-01-01

    Background: GPS telemetry has revolutionized the study of animal spatial ecology in the last two decades. Until recently, it has mainly been deployed on large mammals and birds, but the technology is rapidly becoming miniaturized, and applications in diverse taxa are becoming possible. Large constricting snakes are top predators in their ecosystems, and accordingly they are often a management priority, whether their populations are threatened or invasive. Fine-scale GPS tracking datasets could greatly improve our ability to understand and manage these snakes, but the ability of this new technology to deliver high-quality data in this system is unproven. In order to evaluate GPS technology in large constrictors, we GPS-tagged 13 Burmese pythons (Python bivittatus) in Everglades National Park and deployed an additional 7 GPS tags on stationary platforms to evaluate habitat-driven biases in GPS locations. Both python and test platform GPS tags were programmed to attempt a GPS fix every 90 min.Results: While overall fix rates for the tagged pythons were low (18.1%), we were still able to obtain an average of 14.5 locations/animal/week, a large improvement over once-weekly VHF tracking. We found overall accuracy and precision to be very good (mean accuracy = 7.3 m, mean precision = 12.9 m), but a very few imprecise locations were still recorded (0.2% of locations with precision > 1.0 km). We found that dense vegetation did decrease fix rate, but we concluded that the low observed fix rate was also due to python microhabitat selection underground or underwater. Half of our recovered pythons were either missing their tag or the tag had malfunctioned, resulting in no data being recovered.Conclusions: GPS biologging technology is a promising tool for obtaining frequent, accurate, and precise locations of large constricting snakes. We recommend future studies couple GPS telemetry with frequent VHF locations in order to reduce bias and limit the impact of catastrophic

  4. Pupillary Response and Phenotype in ASD: Latency to Constriction Discriminates ASD from Typically Developing Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Georgina T F; James, Stephen M; VanDam, Mark

    2018-02-01

    Brain imaging data describe differences in the ASD brain, including amygdala overgrowth, neural interconnectivity, and a three-phase model of neuroanatomical changes from early post-natal development through late adolescence. The pupil reflex test (PRT), a noninvasive measure of brain function, may help improve early diagnosis and elucidate underlying physiology in expression of ASD endophenotype. Commonly observed characteristics of ASD include normal visual acuity but difficulty with eye gaze and photosensitivity, suggesting deficient neuromodulation of cranial nerves. Aims of this study were to confirm sensitivity of the PRT for identifying adolescents with ASD, determine if a phenotype for a subtype of ASD marked by pupil response is present in adolescence, and determine whether differences could be observed on a neurologic exam testing cranial nerves II and III (CNII; CNIII). Using pupillometry, constriction latency was measured serving as a proxy for recording neuromodulation of cranial nerves underlying the pupillary reflex. The swinging flashlight method, used to perform the PRT for measuring constriction latency and return to baseline, discriminated ASD participants from typically developing adolescents on 72.2% of trials. Results further confirmed this measure's sensitivity within a subtype of ASD in later stages of development, serving as a correlate of neural activity within the locus-coeruleus norepinephrine (LC-NE) system. A brainstem model of atypical PRT in ASD is examined in relation to modulation of cranial nerves and atypical arousal levels subserving the atypical pupillary reflex. Autism Res 2018, 11: 364-375. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Milder forms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can be difficult to diagnose based on behavioral testing alone. This study used eye-tracking equipment and a hand-held penlight to measure the pupil reflex in adolescents with "high functioning" ASD and in adolescents

  5. Internal pudendal artery from type 2 diabetic female rats demonstrate elevated endothelin-1-mediated constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allahdadi, Kyan J; Hannan, Johanna L; Ergul, Adviye; Tostes, Rita C; Webb, R Clinton

    2011-09-01

    Diabetes is a risk factor for female sexual dysfunction (FSD). FSD has several etiologies, including a vasculogenic component that could be exacerbated in diabetes. The internal pudendal artery supplies blood to the vagina and clitoris and diabetes-associated functional abnormalities in this vascular bed may contribute to FSD. The Goto-Kakizaki (GK) rat is a non-obese model of type 2 diabetes with elevated endothelin-1 (ET-1) activity. We hypothesize that female GK rats have diminished sexual responses and that the internal pudendal arteries demonstrate increased ET-1 constrictor sensitivity. Female Wistar and GK rats were used. Apomorphine (APO)-mediated genital vasocongestive arousal (GVA) was measured. Functional contraction (ET-1 and phenylephrine) and relaxation (acetylcholine, ACh) in the presence or absence of the ETA receptor antagonist (ETA R; atrasentan) or Rho-kinase inhibitor (Y-27632) were assessed in the internal pudendal and mesenteric arteries. Protein expression of ET-1 and RhoA/Rho-kinase signaling pathway was determined in the internal pudendal and mesenteric arteries. APO-mediated GVAs; contraction and relaxation of internal pudendal and mesenteric arteries; ET-1/RhoA/Rho-kinase protein expression. GK rats demonstrated no APO-induced GVAs. Internal pudendal arteries, but not mesenteric arteries, from GK rats exhibited greater contractile sensitivity to ET-1 compared with Wistar arteries. ETA R blockade reduced ET-1-mediated constriction in GK internal pudendal and mesenteric arteries. Rho-kinase inhibition reduced ET-1-mediated constriction of GK internal pudendal but not mesenteric arteries; however, it had no effect on arteries from Wistar rats. RhoA protein expression was elevated in GK internal pudendal arteries. At the highest concentrations, ACh-mediated relaxation was greater in the GK internal pudendal artery; however, no difference was observed in the mesenteric artery. Female GK rats demonstrate decreased sexual responses that may be

  6. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  7. e-læring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helms, Niels Henrik

    e-læring kan defineres på ganske mange måder. Ordet e-læring består jo tydeligt nok af to elementer. E + læring ligesom e-handel eller e-banking, og umiddelbart vil de fleste nok sige, at det så handler om læring vha. internettet. I bidraget advokeres for en læringsmæssig frem for normativ tilgang....

  8. Design of low energy ring(s)

    CERN Document Server

    Lachaize, Antoine

    During the last two years, several upgrades of the initial baseline scenario were studied with the aim of increasing the average intensity of ion beams in the accelerator chain of the Beta Beam complex. This is the reason why the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron (RCS) specifications were reconsidered many times [1], [2], [3].General considerations on the optical design were presented at the Beta Beam Task Meetings held at CERN and at Saclay in 2005 [4]. More detailed beam optics studies were performed during the next months. Lattices, RF system parameters, multi-turn injection scheme, fast extraction, closed orbit correction and chromaticity correction systems were proposed for different versions of the RCS [5], [6], [7].Finally, the RCS specifications have stabilized in November 2006 after the fourth Beta Beam Task Meeting when it was decided to fix the maximum magnetic rigidity of ion beams to 14.47 T.m (3.5 GeV equivalent proton energy) and to adopt a ring physical radius of 40 m in order to facilitate injectio...

  9. Clean elements in abelian rings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    equivalent to being clean for an abelian ring is 'topologically boolean'. In line with [1] we say that a ring R (not necessarily commutative) is right (resp. left) topologically boolean, or a right (resp. left) tb-ring for short, if for every pair of distinct maximal right (resp. left) ideals of R there is an idempotent in exactly one of them.

  10. Flow of colloidal solids and fluids through constrictions: dynamical density functional theory versus simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Urs; Smallenburg, Frank; Löwen, Hartmut

    2016-06-22

    Using both dynamical density functional theory and particle-resolved Brownian dynamics simulations, we explore the flow of two-dimensional colloidal solids and fluids driven through a linear channel with a constriction. The flow is generated by a constant external force acting on all colloids. The initial configuration is equilibrated in the absence of flow and then the external force is switched on instantaneously. Upon starting the flow, we observe four different scenarios: a complete blockade, a monotonic decay to a constant particle flux (typical for a fluid), a damped oscillatory behaviour in the particle flux, and a long-lived stop-and-go behaviour in the flow (typical for a solid). The dynamical density functional theory describes all four situations but predicts infinitely long undamped oscillations in the flow which are always damped in the simulations. We attribute the mechanisms of the underlying stop-and-go flow to symmetry conditions on the flowing solid. Our predictions are verifiable in real-space experiments on magnetic colloidal monolayers which are driven through structured microchannels and can be exploited to steer the flow throughput in microfluidics.

  11. New observations from MR velocity-encoded flow measurements concerning diastolic function in constrictive pericarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauner, Kerstin; Horng, A.; Reiser, M.; Huber, A. [Ludwig-Maximilian University, Department of Clinical Radiology, University Hospitals-Campus Grosshadern, Munich (Germany); Schmitz, Ch. [Ludwig-Maximilian University, Department of Cardiac Surgery, University Hospitals-Campus Grosshadern, Munich (Germany)

    2010-08-15

    To assess diastolic function in patients with constrictive pericarditis (CP) by using velocity-encoded flow measurements at the atrioventricular valves and to evaluate whether conclusions regarding increased ventricular pressure can be drawn. Twenty-two patients with CP and 20 healthy subjects were examined on a 1.5-T MR system. In addition to evaluation of pericardial thickness, ventricular volumes and septal movement, velocity-encoded flow measurements were performed at the level of the atrioventricular valves for assessment of diastolic function. Amplitudes of the e- and a-waves were measured and e- to a-wave ratios were calculated. The correlation of transtricuspid e- to a-wave ratios and right ventricular end-diastolic pressures (RVEDP) was calculated. Right ventricular volumes were significantly smaller in patients with CP (p < 0.001). Abnormal septal movement was detected in all patients except one with CP and in none of the healthy subjects. In patients with CP mean transtricuspid e- to a-wave ratios were significantly smaller compared with healthy subjects. Individual transtricuspid e- to a-wave ratios were highly correlated with RVEDP (r = 0.6, p = 0.01). An elaborate MR examination can identify patients with CP. Velocity-encoded flow measurements with calculation of transtricuspid e- to a-wave ratios are a valuable tool for detection of diastolic dysfunction in patients with CP. The value of e- to a-wave ratios may indicate elevated RVEDP. (orig.)

  12. Effect of Right Heart Systolic Function on Outcomes in Patients with Constrictive Pericarditis Undergoing Pericardiectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Lin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: To determine the influence of right ventricular function in patients with constrictive pericarditis (CP undergoing surgery and to compare the outcomes of patients who received surgery with those managed medically. Methods: Patients with the diagnosis of CP and healthy volunteers were recruited from January 2006 to November 2011. Patients with CP chose to either receive pericardiectomy or medical management. Echocardiographic measurements were performed to evaluate heart function, and survival was recorded. Results: A total of 58 patients with CP (36 received pericardiectomy, 22 managed medically, and 43 healthy volunteers were included. CP patients who received surgery had a higher survival rate than those managed medically (P = 0.003, and higher survival was also seen in the subgroup of CP patients with severely impaired right systolic function. Albumin level, left ventricular end-diastolic dimension, and tricuspid regurgitation velocity were associated with survival in CP patients who received surgery. Conclusions: Preoperative right heart function does not affect surgical outcomes. Patients with severely impaired preoperative right systolic function obtain a greater survival advantage with surgery than with medical treatment.

  13. Ameliorative effect of ethyl pyruvate in neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury of sciatic nerve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha J. Bansode

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study was designed to investigate the ameliorative effects of ethyl pyruvate (EP in chronic constriction injury (CCI-induced painful neuropathy in rats. Materials and Methods: EP 50 and 100 mg/kg was administered for 21 consecutive days starting from the day of surgery. The effects of EP in the paw pressure, acetone drop, and tail heat immersion tests were assessed, reflecting the degree of mechanical hyperalgesia, cold allodynia, and spinal thermal sensation, respectively. Axonal degeneration of the sciatic nerve was assessed histopathologically. The levels of thiobarbituric acid reactive species, reduced glutathione (GSH, catalase (CAT, and superoxide dismutase (SOD were determined to assess oxidative stress. Key Findings: Administration of 50 and 100 mg/kg EP attenuated the reduction of nociceptive threshold in the paw pressure, acetone drop, and tail heat immersion tests. EP 100 mg/kg significantly attenuated reactive changes in histopathology and increase in oxidative stress. Conclusion: EP 100 mg/kg showed beneficial activity against nerve trauma-induced neuropathy. Hence, it can be used as a better treatment option in neuropathic pain (NP. The observed antinociceptive effects of EP may possibly be attributed to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity.

  14. Haloperidol aggravates transverse aortic constriction-induced heart failure via mitochondrial dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuharu Shinoda

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Haloperidol is an antipsychotic drug that inhibits the dopamine D2 receptor among others. Haloperidol also binds the sigma-1 receptor (σ1R and inhibits it irreversibly. A serious outcome of haloperidol treatment of schizophrenia patients is death due to sudden cardiac failure. Although the cause remains unclear, we hypothesized that these effects were mediated by chronic haloperidol inhibition of cardiac σ1R. To test this, we treated neonatal rat cardiomyocytes with haloperidol, exposed them to angiotensin II and assessed hypertrophy, σ1R expression, mitochondrial Ca2+ transport and ATP levels. In this context, haloperidol treatment altered mitochondrial Ca2+ transport resulting in decreased ATP content by inactivating cardiac σ1R and/or reducing its expression. We also performed transverse aortic constriction (TAC and then treated mice with haloperidol. After two weeks, haloperidol-treated mice showed enhanced heart failure marked by deteriorated cardiac function, reduced ATP production and increasing mortality relative to TAC only mice. ATP supplementation via sodium pyruvate rescued phenotypes seen in haloperidol-treated TAC mice. We conclude that σ1R inactivation or downregulation in response to haloperidol treatment impairs mitochondrial Ca2+ mobilization, depleting ATP depletion from cardiomyocytes. These findings suggest a novel approach to mitigate haloperidol-related adverse effects in schizophrenia patients by ATP supplementation.

  15. Pressure Overload by Transverse Aortic Constriction Induces Maladaptive Hypertrophy in a Titin-Truncated Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qifeng Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the giant sarcomeric protein titin (TTN are a major cause for inherited forms of dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM. We have previously developed a mouse model that imitates a TTN truncation mutation we found in a large pedigree with DCM. While heterozygous Ttn knock-in mice do not display signs of heart failure under sedentary conditions, they recapitulate the human phenotype when exposed to the pharmacological stressor angiotensin II or isoproterenol. In this study we investigated the effects of pressure overload by transverse aortic constriction (TAC in heterozygous (Het Ttn knock-in mice. Two weeks after TAC, Het mice developed marked impairment of left ventricular ejection fraction (p<0.05, while wild-type (WT TAC mice did not. Het mice also trended toward increased ventricular end diastolic pressure and volume compared to WT littermates. We found an increase in histologically diffuse cardiac fibrosis in Het compared to WT in TAC mice. This study shows that a pattern of DCM can be induced by TAC-mediated pressure overload in a TTN-truncated mouse model. This model enlarges our arsenal of cardiac disease models, adding a valuable tool to understand cardiac pathophysiological remodeling processes and to develop therapeutic approaches to combat heart failure.

  16. Investigation of helium ion production in constricted direct current plasma ion source with layered-glows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuna; Chung, Kyoung-Jae; Park, Yeong-Shin; Hwang, Y. S.

    2014-02-01

    Generation of helium ions is experimentally investigated with a constricted direct current (DC) plasma ion source operated at layered-glow mode, in which electrons could be accelerated through multiple potential structures so as to generate helium ions including He2+ by successive ionization collisions in front of an extraction aperture. The helium discharge is sustained with the formation of a couple of stable layers and the plasma ball with high density is created near the extraction aperture at the operational pressure down to 0.6 Torr with concave cathodes. The ion beam current extracted with an extraction voltage of 5 kV is observed to be proportional to the discharge current and inversely proportional to the operating pressure, showing high current density of 130 mA/cm2 and power density of 0.52 mA/cm2/W. He2+ ions, which were predicted to be able to exist due to multiple-layer potential structure, are not observed. Simple calculation on production of He2+ ions inside the plasma ball reveals that reduced operating pressure and increased cathode area will help to generate He2+ ions with the layered-glow DC discharge.

  17. Evaluating the efficacy of vacuum constrictive device and causes of its failure in impotent patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khayyamfar, Feraidoon; Forootan, Seyed Kazem; Ghasemi, Hassan; Miri, Seyed Roohollah; Farhadi, Ehsan

    2014-01-04

    This study evaluates the efficacy of Vacuum constrictive device (VCD) and the reasons for its failure. In this cross-sectional study, 1500 men with organic erectile dysfunction(ED) were enrolled from July 2003 to July 2010. The treatment efficacy was analyzed using International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) and questioning patient's partner regarding the man's ability to perform vaginal penetration (APVP). The patient's spouses, who responded negatively to APVP, were evaluated by a midwife for virginity, vaginal atrophy and abstained sex. Totally 1310 (87.4%) patients attained full erection at first training session, remaining 188 (12.6%) were able to have full erection one week after practicing with VCD, 1419 (94.6%)were able to have successful intercourse and responded positively to APVP, 81 (5.4%) were unable to have intercourse as stated by their wife's (negative response to APVP) that in 43 (53%),30 (37%), and 8 (9.8%) cases the causes of failures were their wife's virginity, sex abstinence, and senile vaginal atrophy, respectively. Regarding erectile issue of IIEF scores in patients responded positive to APVP there were significant improvement from the scores of 9.3 ± 3.0 to 27.5 ± 5.0 after treatment (P training and appropriate devices, VCD could induce sufficient erection in all patients. VCD in patients with virgin wife is ineffective, and female factors affect on success rate in VCD therapy.

  18. Noradrenergic constriction of cerebral arteries as detected by transcranial Doppler (TCD) in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatta, S; Canova, D; Bosone, D; Micieli, G; Passatore, M

    2003-10-01

    Interpretation of transcranial Doppler (TCD) recordings requires assumptions about flow or diameter of the insonated vessel. This study aimed at assessing if activation of the sympathetic system could affect blood velocity (bv) in basal cerebral arteries. In anaesthetized rabbits, stimulation of cervical sympathetic nerve (cervSN) was used selectively to activate the sympathetic pathway to the head while monitoring bv in all major cerebral arteries. cervSN stimulation at 10 Hz produced: 1. in internal carotid artery (ICA) and ICA-supplied arteries (ICA-s), a consistent bv increase ranging between 20 and 70%, 2. in the basilar artery, a transient decrease by 15-30%. These effects were mimicked, in both territories, by injection of phenylephrine into the ICA. Because cerebral blood flow is known to be reduced by cervSN stimulation, the increase in bv in ICA and ICA-s must be ascribed to constriction of the insonated vessels. These effects should be considered when monitoring bv during sympathetic activation tests or exercise.

  19. Effect of Right Heart Systolic Function on Outcomes in Patients with Constrictive Pericarditis Undergoing Pericardiectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xue; Xu, Rui-Yi; Liu, Jian-Zhou; Chen, Wei; Chen, Lian-Feng; Yang, Peng-Hua; Fang, Li-Gang

    2016-01-01

    Background: To determine the influence of right ventricular function in patients with constrictive pericarditis (CP) undergoing surgery and to compare the outcomes of patients who received surgery with those managed medically. Methods: Patients with the diagnosis of CP and healthy volunteers were recruited from January 2006 to November 2011. Patients with CP chose to either receive pericardiectomy or medical management. Echocardiographic measurements were performed to evaluate heart function, and survival was recorded. Results: A total of 58 patients with CP (36 received pericardiectomy, 22 managed medically), and 43 healthy volunteers were included. CP patients who received surgery had a higher survival rate than those managed medically (P = 0.003), and higher survival was also seen in the subgroup of CP patients with severely impaired right systolic function. Albumin level, left ventricular end-diastolic dimension, and tricuspid regurgitation velocity were associated with survival in CP patients who received surgery. Conclusions: Preoperative right heart function does not affect surgical outcomes. Patients with severely impaired preoperative right systolic function obtain a greater survival advantage with surgery than with medical treatment. PMID:26830985

  20. Inhibition of Uncoupling Protein 2 Attenuates Cardiac Hypertrophy Induced by Transverse Aortic Constriction in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Bing Ji

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2 is critical in regulating energy metabolism. Due to the significant change in energy metabolism of myocardium upon pressure overload, we hypothesize that UCP2 could contribute to the etiology of cardiac hypertrophy. Methods: Adult male C57BL/6J mice were subjected to pressure overload by using transverse aortic constriction (TAC, and then received genipin (a UCP2 selective inhibitor; 25 mg/kg/d, ip or vehicle for three weeks prior to histologic assessment of myocardial hypertrophy. ATP concentration, ROS level, and myocardial apoptosis were also examined. A parallel set of experiments was also conducted in UCP2-/- mice. Results: TAC induced left ventricular hypertrophy, as reflected by increased ventricular weight/thickness and increased size of myocardial cell (vs. sham controls. ATP concentration was decreased; ROS level was increased. Apoptosis and fibrosis markers were increased. TAC increased mitochondrial UCP2 expression in the myocardium at both mRNA and protein levels. Genipin treatment attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and the histologic/biochemical changes described above. Hypertrophy and associated changes induced by TAC in UCP2-/- mice were much less pronounced than in WT mice. Conclusions: Blocking UCP2 expression attenuates cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload.

  1. Dataset of red light induced pupil constriction superimposed on post-illumination pupil response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaobo Lei

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We collected and analyzed pupil diameter data from of 7 visually normal participants to compare the maximum pupil constriction (MPC induced by “Red Only” vs. “Blue+Red” visual stimulation conditions.The “Red Only” condition consisted of red light (640±10 nm stimuli of variable intensity and duration presented to dark-adapted eyes with pupils at resting state. This condition stimulates the cone-driven activity of the intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC. The “Blue+Red” condition consisted of the same red light stimulus presented during ongoing blue (470±17 nm light-induced post-illumination pupil response (PIPR, representing the cone-driven ipRGC activity superimposed on the melanopsin-driven intrinsic activity of the ipRGCs (“The Absence of Attenuating Effect of Red light Exposure on Pre-existing Melanopsin-Driven Post-illumination Pupil Response” Lei et al. (2016 [1].MPC induced by the “Red Only” condition was compared with the MPC induced by the “Blue+Red” condition by multiple paired sample t-tests with Bonferroni correction. Keywords: Pupil light reflex, Chromatic pupillometry, Melanopsin, Post-illumination pupil response

  2. Ring Confidential Transactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Noether

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article introduces a method of hiding transaction amounts in the strongly decentralized anonymous cryptocurrency Monero. Similar to Bitcoin, Monero is a cryptocurrency which is distributed through a proof-of-work “mining” process having no central party or trusted setup. The original Monero protocol was based on CryptoNote, which uses ring signatures and one-time keys to hide the destination and origin of transactions. Recently the technique of using a commitment scheme to hide the amount of a transaction has been discussed and implemented by Bitcoin Core developer Gregory Maxwell. In this article, a new type of ring signature, A Multilayered Linkable Spontaneous Anonymous Group signature is described which allows one to include a Pedersen Commitment in a ring signature. This construction results in a digital currency with hidden amounts, origins and destinations of transactions with reasonable efficiency and verifiable, trustless coin generation. The author would like to note that early drafts of this were publicized in the Monero Community and on the #bitcoin-wizards IRC channel. Blockchain hashed drafts are available showing that this work was started in Summer 2015, and completed in early October 2015. An eprint is also available at http://eprint.iacr.org/2015/1098.

  3. Blood pressure is the major driving force for plaque formation in aortic-constricted ApoE-/- mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Maria E.; Wickman, Anna; Skøtt, Ole

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Using an aortic constriction model in mice, we studied whether the increase in pressure or the activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and its main receptors is the main driving force for plaque progression. METHODS: Male ApoE mice underwent sham surgery or placement of a supr......OBJECTIVE: Using an aortic constriction model in mice, we studied whether the increase in pressure or the activation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and its main receptors is the main driving force for plaque progression. METHODS: Male ApoE mice underwent sham surgery or placement...... of a suprarenal silver clip around the aorta (AoC). Half the group was treated with the selective AT1 receptor antagonist losartan (30 mg/kg per day) for 4 weeks. RESULTS: Anesthetized mean arterial pressure (MAP) was increased in AoC mice compared to sham (106 +/- 3 versus 90 +/- 1 mmHg, P

  4. The alkylation response protein AidB is localized at the new poles and constriction sites in Brucella abortus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dotreppe Delphine

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brucella abortus is the etiological agent of a worldwide zoonosis called brucellosis. This alpha-proteobacterium is dividing asymmetrically, and PdhS, an essential histidine kinase, was reported to be an old pole marker. Results We were interested to identify functions that could be recruited to bacterial poles. The Brucella ORFeome, a collection of cloned predicted coding sequences, was placed in fusion with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP coding sequence and screened for polar localizations in B. abortus. We report that AidB-YFP was systematically localized to the new poles and at constrictions sites in B. abortus, either in culture or inside infected HeLa cells or RAW264.7 macrophages. AidB is an acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (ACAD homolog, similar to E. coli AidB, an enzyme putatively involved in destroying alkylating agents. Accordingly, a B. abortus aidB mutant is more sensitive than the wild-type strain to the lethality induced by methanesulphonic acid ethyl ester (EMS. The exposure to EMS led to a very low frequency of constriction events, suggesting that cell cycle is blocked during alkylation damage. The localization of AidB-YFP at the new poles and at constriction sites seems to be specific for this ACAD homolog since two other ACAD homologs fused to YFP did not show specific localization. The overexpression of aidB, but not the two other ACAD coding sequences, leads to multiple morphological defects. Conclusions Data reported here suggest that AidB is a marker of new poles and constriction sites, that could be considered as sites of preparation of new poles in the sibling cells originating from cell division. The possible role of AidB in the generation or the function of new poles needs further investigation.

  5. TRPA1 and TRPV1 contribute to propofol-mediated antagonism of U46619-induced constriction in murine coronary arteries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pritam Sinharoy

    Full Text Available Transient receptor potential (TRP ion channels have emerged as key components contributing to vasoreactivity. Propofol, an anesthetic is associated with adverse side effects including hypotension and acute pain upon infusion. Our objective was to determine the extent to which TRPA1 and/or TRPV1 ion channels are involved in mediating propofol-induced vasorelaxation of mouse coronary arterioles in vitro and elucidate the potential cellular signal transduction pathway by which this occurs.Hearts were excised from anesthetized mice and coronary arterioles were dissected from control C57Bl/6J, TRPA1-/-, TRPV1-/- and double-knockout mice (TRPAV-/-. Isolated microvessels were cannulated and secured in a temperature-controlled chamber and allowed to equilibrate for 1 hr. Vasoreactivity studies were performed in microvessels pre-constricted with U46619 to assess the dose-dependent relaxation effects of propofol on coronary microvascular tone.Propofol-induced relaxation was unaffected in vessels obtained from TRPV1-/- mice, markedly attenuated in pre-constricted vessels obtained from TRPA1-/- mice and abolished in vessels obtained from TRPAV-/- mice. Furthermore, NOS inhibition with L-NAME or endothelium denuding abolished the proporfol-induced depressor response in pre-constricted vessels obtained from all mice. In the absence of L-NAME, BKCa inhibition with penitrem A markedly attenuated propofol-mediated relaxation in vessels obtained from wild-type mice and to a lesser extent in vessels obtained from TRPV1-/-, mice with no effect in vessels obtained from TRPA1-/- or TRPAV-/- mice.TRPA1 and TRPV1 appear to contribute to the propofol-mediated antagonism of U46619-induced constriction in murine coronary microvessels that involves activation of NOS and BKCa.

  6. Alignment Strategy for Constricted Maxillary Dental Arch in Patients With Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Using Fixed Orthodontic Appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoon-Hee; Park, Sumin; Baek, Seung-Hak

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the alignment pattern of the constricted maxillary dental arch by fixed orthodontic treatment (FOT) in the well-aligned and constricted arches of unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) patients. 19 UCLP patients were divided into Group 1 (well-aligned arch, n = 9) and Group 2 (constricted arch, n = 10). After the cephalometric and maxillary dental arch variables before (T1) and after FOT (T2) were measured, statistical analysis was performed. There were no significant differences in the surgical timing of cheiloplasty, palatoplasty, and secondary alveolar bone grafting and in the surgical method of cheiloplasty between the 2 groups. However, Group 2 had a higher percentage of palatoplasty method, which could leave the denuded bone for secondary healing than Group 1 (P dental arch compared to Group 1 at the T1 stage (inter-second premolar width, greater segment angle [GSA], and lesser segment angle [LSA], all P dental arch shape, different strategy is necessary to obtain proper alignment by FOT.

  7. DPD simulation on the dynamics of a healthy and infected red blood cell in flow through a constricted channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoque, Sazid Zamal; Anand, D. Vijay; Patnaik, B. S. V.

    2017-11-01

    The state of the red blood cell (either healthy or infected RBC) will influence its deformation dynamics. Since the pathological condition related to RBC, primarily originates from a single cell infection, therefore, it is important to relate the deformation dynamics to the mechanical properties (such as, bending rigidity and membrane elasticity). In the present study, numerical simulation of a healthy and malaria infected RBC in a constricted channel is analyzed. The flow simulations are carried out using finite sized dissipative particle dynamics (FDPD) method in conjunction with a discrete model that represents the membrane of the RBC. The numerical equivalent of optical tweezers test is validated against the experimental studies. Two different types of constrictions, viz., a converging-diverging type tapered channel and a stenosed microchannel are considered for the simulation. The effect of degree of constriction and the flow rate effect on the RBC is investigated. It was observed that, as the flow rate decreases, the infected RBC completely blocks the micro vessel. The transit time for infected cell drastically increases compared to healthy RBC. Our simulations indicate that, there is a critical flow rate below which infected RBC cannot pass through the micro capillary.

  8. Test of the movement expansion model: anticipatory vowel lip protrusion and constriction in French and English speakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noiray, Aude; Cathiard, Marie-Agnès; Ménard, Lucie; Abry, Christian

    2011-01-01

    The modeling of anticipatory coarticulation has been the subject of longstanding debates for more than 40 yr. Empirical investigations in the articulatory domain have converged toward two extreme modeling approaches: a maximal anticipation behavior (Look-ahead model) or a fixed pattern (Time-locked model). However, empirical support for any of these models has been hardly conclusive, both within and across languages. The present study tested the temporal organization of vocalic anticipatory coarticulation of the rounding feature from [i] to [u] transitions for adult speakers of American English and Canadian French. Articulatory data were synchronously recorded using an Optotrak for lip protrusion and a dedicated Lip-Shape-Tracking-System for lip constriction. Results show that (i) protrusion is an inconsistent parameter for tracking anticipatory rounding gestures across individuals, more specifically in English; (ii) labial constriction (between-lip area) is a more reliable correlate, allowing for the description of vocalic rounding in both languages; (iii) when tested on the constriction component, speakers show a lawful anticipatory behavior expanding linearly as the intervocalic consonant interval increases from 0 to 5 consonants. The Movement Expansion Model from Abry and Lallouache [(1995a) Bul. de la Comm. Parlée 3, 85-99; (1995b) Proceedings of ICPHS 4, 152-155.] predicted such a regular behavior, i.e., a lawful variability with a speaker-specific expansion rate, which is not language-specific.

  9. SOR-ring failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Hideo

    1981-01-01

    It was in the autumn of 1976 that the SOR-ring (synchrotron radiation storage ring) has commenced the regular operation. Since then, the period when the operation was interrupted due to the failures of SOR-ring itself is in total about 8 weeks. Failures and accidents have occurred most in the vacuum system. Those failure experiences are described on the vacuum, electromagnet, radio-frequency acceleration and beam transport systems with their interrupted periods. The eleven failures in the vacuum system have been reported, such as bellows breakage in a heating-evacuating period, leakage from the bellows of straight-through valves (made in U.S.A. and Japan), and leakage from the joint flange of the vacuum system. The longest interruption was 5 weeks due to the failure of a domestically manufactured straight-through valve. The failures of the electromagnet system involve the breakage in a cooling water system, short circuit of a winding in the Q magnet power transformer, blow of a fuse protecting the deflection magnet power source by the current less than the rating, and others. The failures of the RF acceleration system include the breakage of an output electronic tube the breakage of a cavity ceramic, RF voltage fluctuation due to the contact deterioration at a cavity electrode, and the failure of grid bias power source. It is necessary to select the highly reliable components for the vacuum system because the vacuum system failures require longer time for recovery, and very likely to induce secondary and tertiary failures. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  10. Constrictional strain during oblique rifting: A record from transtensional basins in the Gulf Extensional Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, C.; Quigley, M.; Fletcher, J. M.

    2011-12-01

    Oblique opening of the Gulf of California provides a unique opportunity to study the mode of deformation in transtensional rift systems. Sedimentation in rifted basins is primarily controlled by the characteristics of the basin-bounding fault and the available sediment supply, and can thus be used as a proxy to understand tectonic processes during oblique shear. Transtensional basins are generally seen as composites between rift and pull-apart basins, with facies distributions that are controlled by interacting normal and strike-slip faults. Yet, transtensional shear may also be accommodated by more distributed constrictional strain that is not localised along fault zones. The Santa Rosa basin, located in the Sierra San Felipe of northern Baja California, is one of a series of transtensional syn-rift basins along the oblique-divergent plate boundary of the northern Gulf of California. The basin represents an asymmetric half-graben in the hanging wall of the Santa Rosa detachment, a low-angle normal fault with ~4-5km of E- to SE-directed displacement. The basin-fill dips NW into the detachment and displays form lines that mimic the corrugations of the detachment. The basin is broadly sigmoidal in shape, is truncated in the south by a dextral transfer zone and pinches out against the hanging wall basement in the north. The syn-rift stratigraphy is dominated by a sequence of alluvial fans shed from the hanging wall and footwall that interfinger with fine grained playa deposits. Stratigraphic analysis reveals systematic basin-scale variations in facies distributions, both along and across the axis of the basin. In a transverse direction, the basin-fill records a fining-upward cycle from conglomerate at the base to alternating sandstone-mudstone in the depocentre, which in turn interfingers with the proximal fault-scarp facies of the Santa Rosa detachment. Facies patterns also vary parallel to the basin axis even though finite displacement on the detachment was

  11. Femtoslicing in Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Shaukat

    2005-01-01

    The generation of ultrashort synchrotron radiation pulses by laser-induced energy modulation of electrons and their subsequent transverse displacement, now dubbed "femtoslicing," was demonstrated at the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley. More recently, a femtoslicing user facility was commissioned at the BESSY storage ring in Berlin, and another project is in progress at the Swiss Light Source. The paper reviews the principle of femtoslicing, its merits and shortcomings, as well as the variations of its technical implementation. Various diagnostics techniques to detect successful laser-electron interaction are discussed and experimental results are presented.

  12. Proton storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rau, R.R.

    1978-04-01

    A discussion is given of proton storage ring beam dynamic characteristics. Topics considered include: (1) beam energy; (2) beam luminosity; (3) limits on beam current; (4) beam site; (5) crossing angle; (6) beam--beam interaction; (7) longitudinal instability; (8) effects of scattering processes; (9) beam production; and (10) high magnetic fields. Much of the discussion is related to the design parameters of ISABELLE, a 400 x 400 GeV proton---proton intersecting storage accelerator to be built at Brookhaven National Laboratory

  13. Influence of peri-duodenal non-constrictive cuff on the body weight of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao; Mattar, Samer G; Kassab, Ghassan S

    2015-02-01

    Weight loss has been found to improve or resolve cardiovascular comorbidities. There is a significant need for reversible device approaches to weight loss. Non-constrictive cuff (NCC) is made of implantable silicone rubber with an internal diameter greater than the duodenum. Ten or 11 NCC were individually mounted along the duodenum from the pyloric sphincter toward the distal duodenum to cover ~22 mm in the length. Twelve Wistar rats were implanted with NCC, and six served as sham, and both groups were observed over 4 months. Six rats with implant had their NCC removed and were observed for additional 4 weeks. The food intake decreased from 40.1 to 28.1 g/day after 4 months of NCC implant. The body weight gain decreased from 1.76 to 0.46 g/day after 4 months of NCC implant. The fasting glucose decreased from 87.7 to 75.3 mg/dl at terminal day. The duodenal muscle layer covered by the NCC increased from 0.133 to 0.334 mm. After 4 weeks of NCC removal, the food intake, body weight gain, and fasting glucose recovered to 36.2, 2.51 g/day, and 83.9 mg/dl. The duodenal muscle layer covered by the NCC decreased to 0.217 mm. The NCC implant placed on the proximal duodenum is safe in rats for a 4-month period. The efficacy of the NCC implant is significant for decrease in food intake, body weight gain, and fasting glucose in a normal rat model. The removal of NCC implant confirmed a cause-effect relation with food intake and hence body weight.

  14. B vitamins relieve neuropathic pain behaviors induced by infraorbital nerve constriction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopruszinski, Caroline M; Reis, Renata C; Chichorro, Juliana G

    2012-12-10

    There is mounting evidence that use of B vitamins can help control neuropathic pain. This study investigated if treatment with B1, B6 and B12 vitamins, alone or in combination with carbamazepine, can ameliorate distinct nociceptive behaviors in a model of trigeminal neuropathic pain. Male Wistar rats were submitted to infraorbital nerve constriction or sham surgery and received a 5-day treatment with one of the B vitamins, a single carbamazepine injection or the association of both treatments and were tested for facial thermal and mechanical hyperalgesia at different time intervals. Repeated treatment with B1 (thiamine), B6 (pyridoxine) and B12 (cyanocobalamin) vitamins (at 180, 180 and 18 mg/kg/day, respectively, for 5 days) prevented the development of heat hyperalgesia after infraorbital nerve injury, but only B12 and B6 treatments attenuated cold and mechanical hyperalgesia, respectively. A single injection of carbamazepine (30 mg/kg) significantly reduced thermal, but not mechanical, hyperalgesia after nerve injury. Combinations of lower doses of each B vitamin (B1 and B6 at 18 mg/kg/day and B12 at 1.8 mg/kg/day for 5 days) with carbamazepine (10mg/kg) markedly reduced heat hyperalgesia after infraorbital nerve injury. Treatment with B12 (1.8 mg/kg/day) combined with carbamazepine (10mg/kg) also synergized to attenuate cold hyperalgesia at some time points, but combination of B6 (18 mg/kg/day) with carbamazepine (30 mg/kg) failed to modify mechanical hyperalgesia. We suggest that B vitamins might constitute a relevant adjuvant to control some aspects of the pain afflicting patients suffering from trigeminal neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Pulsed Radiofrequency on Rat Sciatic Nerve Chronic Constriction Injury: A Preliminary Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Duo-Yi; Meng, Lan; Ji, Nan; Luo, Fang

    2015-01-01

    Background: Pulsed radiofrequency (PRF) application to the dorsal root ganglia can reduce neuropathic pain (NP) in animal models, but the effect of PRF on damaged peripheral nerves has not been examined. We investigated the effect of PRF to the rat sciatic nerve (SN) on pain-related behavior and SN ultrastructure following chronic constriction injury (CCI). Methods: The analgesic effect was measured by hindpaw mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT) and thermal withdrawal latency (TWL). Twenty rats with NP induced by ligating the common SN were then randomly divided into a PRF treatment group and a sham group. The contralateral SN served as a control. The MWT and TWL were determined again 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14 days after the PRF or sham treatment. On day 14, ipsilateral and contralateral common SNs were excised and examined by electron microscopy. Results: Ipsilateral MWT was significantly reduced and TWL significantly shorter compared to the contralateral side 14 days after CCI (both P = 0.000). In the PRF group, MWT was significantly higher and TWL significantly longer 14 days after the PRF treatment compared to before PRF treatment (both P = 0.000), while no such difference was observed in the sham group (P > 0.05). Electron microscopy revealed extensive demyelination and collagen fiber formation in the ipsilateral SN of sham-treated rats but sparse demyelination and some nerve fiber regrowth in the PRF treatment group. Conclusions: Hyperalgesia is relieved, and ultrastructural damage ameliorated after direct PRF treatment to the SN in the CCI rat model of NP. PMID:25673460

  16. Disorders in melanopsin effect of pupil constriction as a risk factor causing eye diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Kaptsov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Risks of eye damage and eyesight deterioration to a great extent depend on how efficient a biomechanical eye system is under energy-saving lighting conditions. The system's efficiency is determined by its adequacy in managing pupils and ciliary muscle. We analyzed mathematical models describing changes in pupil's diameter which were determined by light-technical parameters of illumination environment (luminance level and brightness. We highlighted the importance of ganglionic cells and the role they play in managing pupil's diameter (miosis when they are exposed to blue light within 480 nm spectrum. Basing on the assessment of a pupil's constriction under exposure to various light stimuli (blue, red, and green ones we worked out a melanopsin effect concept of a pupil's retention at miosis and showed that it could be a diagnostic sign of some diseases (age-related direct retinopathy, pancreatic diabetes under exposure to a blue light impulse with a certain wave length. Under exposure to blue light within 480 nm spectrum ganglionic cells form a managing signal for a sphincter muscle of a pupil and ciliary muscle which provides accommodation (as per Helmholtz and regulates aqueous humor flow in ciliary channel. All modern energy-saving light sources have a low energy level at wave length equal to 480 nm due to gap in their spectrum in comparison with sunlight spectrum with the same light temperature and luminance level. Inadequate management of pupil's diameter under artificial lighting conditions leads to melanopsin effect disorders and causes disharmony in managing aqueous humor outflow. All the above-stated factors under long-term visual load cause eye diseases risks in modern illumination environment. We detected that contemporary mathematic models describing pupil's diameter fluctuations needed to be refined allowing for new knowledge on functional peculiarities of retina cells and energy-saving light sources spectrum.

  17. A case of chronic effusive-constrictive pericarditis with slight myocardial involvement caused by radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horimoto, Masashi; Funayama, Naoki; Takenaka, Takashi; Igarashi, Takeki; Sekiguchi, Morie.

    1985-01-01

    A 25-year-old female was admitted with shortness of breath and abdominal swelling. Six years before the admission, she had received resection of 7th to 9th left ribs and subsequent radiation of 5,000 rads to the thorax for the treatment of rib osteoblastoma. One year after the radiation, marked pericardial effusion associated with acute pericarditis was observed and was improved by digitalization and diuretic therapy. Since two years after the radiation, she had felt easy fatigability, swelling of face and foot, and transient faintness on more than 10 meters running. On admission, chest X-ray photograph showed increased pulmonary vascularity without cardiac enlargement. Electrocardiogram indicated systolic right ventricular strain, mitral P, and nonspecific S-T segment depression in left precordial leads. Two-dimensional echocardiography presented pericardial effusion with posterior pericardial thickening, while M-mode echocardiography showed diastolic posterior movement of interventricular septum and diastolic flattening of left ventricular posterior wall. Cardiac catheterization revealed marked elevation of mean right atrial pressure, pulmonary arterial diastolic pressure, right and left ventricular end-diastolic pressure, accompanied with their equalization. In addition, pressure waves of right and left ventricle showed diastolic dip and plateau. Phono-cardiogram and apexcardiogram presented pericardial knock sound and systolic retraction, respectively. Cardiac angiography showed diastolic restriction of left ventricle without any stenosis of coronary artery. Computed tomography (CT) of the chest revealed thickening of anterior and left lateral pericardium with expansion of inferior vena cava, and abdominal CT revealed ascites with slight enlargements of liver and spleen. From above obtained data, chronic effusive-constrictive pericarditis, which was attributed to radiation, was strongly suggested. (J.P.N.)

  18. Long term visual outcome after arteriolar constriction in patients with branch retinal vein occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehak, Jiri; Dusek, Ladislav; Sin, Martin; Babkova, Barbora; Pracharova, Zuzana; Rehak, Matus

    2014-12-01

    To evaluate the final best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) in patients with branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) treated with either (1) laser arteriolar constriction (ACo) or (2) the standard treatment recommended by the Branch Vein Occlusion Study Group (grid laser photocoagulation (GLP) or only observation (if indication criteria for GLP were not met). 358 BRVOs were treated in three different ways: early ACo (n=133) performed ≤9 weeks after onset of BRVO, late ACo (n=62) performed >9 weeks after onset and controls which included GLP and observation (n=163). The groups were further divided according to initial BCVA into: ≤0.1; 0.16-0.3 and ≥0.4. Based on the proportion of 1 year BCVA≤0.1 as a risk category, the results of early ACo (3.8%) were significantly better than for the controls (22.7%, P<0.001) and late ACo (16.1%, P=0.006). The greatest difference in final BCVA was in patients with the worst initial VA (≤0.1). In the intermediate initial BCVA group 0.16-0.3, a significant difference was only found between the early ACo group and controls (P=0.007). There was no significant difference between any treatment group and prevalence of a final BCVA≤0.1 for patients with an initial BCVA≥0.4. Early ACo significantly reduces the prevalence of a final BCVA≤0.1 in patients with BRVO and an initial BCVA≤0.3 compared to controls (standard treatment treated with GLP or observed).

  19. Dasatinib Attenuates Pressure Overload Induced Cardiac Fibrosis in a Murine Transverse Aortic Constriction Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sundaravadivel Balasubramanian

    Full Text Available Reactive cardiac fibrosis resulting from chronic pressure overload (PO compromises ventricular function and contributes to congestive heart failure. We explored whether nonreceptor tyrosine kinases (NTKs play a key role in fibrosis by activating cardiac fibroblasts (CFb, and could potentially serve as a target to reduce PO-induced cardiac fibrosis. Our studies were carried out in PO mouse myocardium induced by transverse aortic constriction (TAC. Administration of a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, dasatinib, via an intraperitoneally implanted mini-osmotic pump at 0.44 mg/kg/day reduced PO-induced accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM proteins and improved left ventricular geometry and function. Furthermore, dasatinib treatment inhibited NTK activation (primarily Pyk2 and Fak and reduced the level of FSP1 positive cells in the PO myocardium. In vitro studies using cultured mouse CFb showed that dasatinib treatment at 50 nM reduced: (i extracellular accumulation of both collagen and fibronectin, (ii both basal and PDGF-stimulated activation of Pyk2, (iii nuclear accumulation of Ki67, SKP2 and histone-H2B and (iv PDGF-stimulated CFb proliferation and migration. However, dasatinib did not affect cardiomyocyte morphologies in either the ventricular tissue after in vivo administration or in isolated cells after in vitro treatment. Mass spectrometric quantification of dasatinib in cultured cells indicated that the uptake of dasatinib by CFb was greater that that taken up by cardiomyocytes. Dasatinib treatment primarily suppressed PDGF but not insulin-stimulated signaling (Erk versus Akt activation in both CFb and cardiomyocytes. These data indicate that dasatinib treatment at lower doses than that used in chemotherapy has the capacity to reduce hypertrophy-associated fibrosis and improve ventricular function.

  20. Hourglass-like constriction of the suprascapular nerve: a contraindication for minimally invasive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigasio, Adolfo; Marcoccio, Ignazio

    2018-02-01

    Suprascapular nerve (SSN) entrapment is usually ascribed to static or dynamic compression. When no cause of compression is found, SSN entrapment is defined as idiopathic. Focal hourglass-like constriction (H-LC) of the SSN that results in muscle paralysis represents an unusual condition that may be misinterpreted and erroneously diagnosed as SSN entrapment or as neuralgic amyotrophy. With the aim of finding clinical and surgical clues that could differentiate the traditional form of idiopathic SSN entrapment from the rare H-LC, a series of 6 cases of SSN palsy caused by H-LC is presented. All but 1 supraspinatus muscle recovered M5 muscle strength. The Constant shoulder score was excellent in 3 patients, good in 1, fair in 1, and poor in 1. If a diagnosis is not made in time, H-LC may evolve from mild to severe nerve torsion that may require a shift in surgical procedure from epineurotomy and external neurolysis to focal resection and suture. If an incorrect therapy is chosen, the chance of recovery might be definitively compromised with the persistence of muscle palsy. Conversely, when SSN palsy persists despite notch decompression, especially when it is performed with a limited open approach or arthroscopically, concerns about the real etiology and location of nerve compression responsible for the nerve palsy may arise. When approaching SSN pathology, H-LC should be considered as a potential cause of nerve palsy, as it may represent a contraindication for a limited open approach or arthroscopic decompression. Copyright © 2017 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Fusion Rings for Quantum Groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henning Haahr; Stroppel, Catharina

    2014-01-01

    We study the fusion rings of tilting modules for a quantum group at a root of unity modulo the tensor ideal of negligible tilting modules. We identify them in type A with the combinatorial rings from Korff, C., Stroppel, C.: The sl(ˆn)k-WZNW fusion ring: a combinato-rial construction and a realis......We study the fusion rings of tilting modules for a quantum group at a root of unity modulo the tensor ideal of negligible tilting modules. We identify them in type A with the combinatorial rings from Korff, C., Stroppel, C.: The sl(ˆn)k-WZNW fusion ring: a combinato-rial construction...... and a realisation as quotient of quantum cohomology. Adv. Math. 225(1), 200–268, (2010) and give a similar description of the sp2n-fusion ring in terms of non-commutative symmetric functions. Moreover we give a presentation of all fusion rings in classical types as quotients of polynomial rings. Finally we also...... compute the fusion rings for type G2....

  2. Viscosity of ring polymer melts

    KAUST Repository

    Pasquino, Rossana

    2013-10-15

    We have measured the linear rheology of critically purified ring polyisoprenes, polystyrenes, and polyethyleneoxides of different molar masses. The ratio of the zero-shear viscosities of linear polymer melts η0,linear to their ring counterparts η0,ring at isofrictional conditions is discussed as a function of the number of entanglements Z. In the unentangled regime η0,linear/η 0,ring is virtually constant, consistent with the earlier data, atomistic simulations, and the theoretical expectation η0,linear/ η0,ring = 2. In the entanglement regime, the Z-dependence of ring viscosity is much weaker than that of linear polymers, in qualitative agreement with predictions from scaling theory and simulations. The power-law extracted from the available experimental data in the rather limited range 1 < Z < 20, η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.2±0.3, is weaker than the scaling prediction (η0,linear/η0,ring ∼ Z 1.6±0.3) and the simulations (η0,linear/ η0,ring ∼ Z2.0±0.3). Nevertheless, the present collection of state-of-the-art experimental data unambiguously demonstrates that rings exhibit a universal trend clearly departing from that of their linear counterparts, and hence it represents a major step toward resolving a 30-year-old problem. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  3. Saturn ring temperature variations with approaching ring equinox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, L.; Leyrat, C.; Flandes, A.; Altobelli, N.; Pilorz, S.; Ferrari, C.; Edgington, S.

    2009-04-01

    Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) has acquired a wide-ranging set of thermal measurements of Saturn's main rings (A, B, C and Cassini Division) at solar elevations ranging from less than one degree to 24 degrees. At Saturn equinox in August the solar elevation angle will reach zero as the sun traverses from the south to north side of the rings. For the data acquired to date, temperatures were retrieved for the lit and unlit rings over a variety of ring geometries that include solar elevation, as well as spacecraft elevation, phase angle and local hour angle. To first order, the largest temperature changes on the lit face of the rings are driven by variations in phase angle while differences in temperature with changing spacecraft elevation and local time are a secondary effect. Decreasing ring temperature with decreasing solar elevation are observed for both the lit and unlit faces of the rings after phase angle and local time effects are taken into account. As the solar elevation continues to decrease, the ring temperatures are decreasing in a non-linear fashion. The difference in temperature between the lit and unlit sides of the rings is decreasing also with decreasing solar elevation. Using ring thermal models developed by Leyrat we extrapolate to the expected minimum ring temperatures at equinox for our planned CIRS ring observations. This research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract with NASA and at CEA Saclay supported by the "Programme National de Planetologie". Copyright 2009 California Institute of Technology. Government sponsorship acknowledged.

  4. Ring Image Analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.

    2012-01-01

    Ring Image Analyzer software analyzes images to recognize elliptical patterns. It determines the ellipse parameters (axes ratio, centroid coordinate, tilt angle). The program attempts to recognize elliptical fringes (e.g., Newton Rings) on a photograph and determine their centroid position, the short-to-long-axis ratio, and the angle of rotation of the long axis relative to the horizontal direction on the photograph. These capabilities are important in interferometric imaging and control of surfaces. In particular, this program has been developed and applied for determining the rim shape of precision-machined optical whispering gallery mode resonators. The program relies on a unique image recognition algorithm aimed at recognizing elliptical shapes, but can be easily adapted to other geometric shapes. It is robust against non-elliptical details of the image and against noise. Interferometric analysis of precision-machined surfaces remains an important technological instrument in hardware development and quality analysis. This software automates and increases the accuracy of this technique. The software has been developed for the needs of an R&TD-funded project and has become an important asset for the future research proposal to NASA as well as other agencies.

  5. Flexible ring seal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbes, Claude; Gournier, Andre; Rouaud, Christian; Villepoix, Raymond de.

    1976-01-01

    The invention concerns a flexible metal ring seal, able to ensure a perfect seal between two bearings due to the crushing and elastic deformation properties akin to similar properties in elastomers. Various designs of seal of this kind are already known, particularly a seal made of a core formed by a helical wire spring with close-wound turns and with high axial compression ratio, closed on itself and having the shape of an annulus. This wire ring is surrounded by at least one envelope having at rest the shape of a toroidal surface of which the generating circle does not close on itself. In a particular design mode, the seal in question can include, around the internal spring, two envelopes of which one in contact with the spring is composed of a low ductility elastic metal, such as mild steel or stainless steel and the other is, on the contrary, made of a malleable metal, such as copper or nickel. The first envelope evenly distributes the partial crushing of the spring, when the seal is tightened, on the second envelope which closely fits the two surfaces between which the seal operates. The stress-crushing curve characteristic of the seal comprises two separate parts, the first with a relatively sharp slope corresponds to the start of the seal compression phase, enabling at least some of these curves to reach the requisite seal threshold very quickly, then, beyond this, a second part, practically flat, where the stress is appreciably constant for a wide operating bracket [fr

  6. NRL ion ring program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapetanakos, C.A.; Golden, J.; Drobot, A.; Mahaffey, R.A.; Marsh, S.J.; Pasour, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    An experiment is under way to form a storng proton ring using the 200 ka, 1.2 MeV, 50 nsec hollow proton beam recently generated at NRL. The 5 m long magnetic field configuration consists of a magnetic cusp, a compressing magnetic field, a gate field and a magnetic mirror. The midplane value of the magnetic mirror is such that the major radius of the ring will be about 10 cm. The degree of field reversal that will be achieved with 5 x 10 16 protons per pulse from the existing beam depends upon the field reversal is possible with the 600 kA proton beam that would be generated from the low inductance coaxial triode coupled to the upgraded Gamble II generator. The propagation and trapping of an intense proton beam in the experimental magnetic field configuration is investigated numerically. The results show that the self magnetic has a very pronounced effect on the dynamics of the gyrating protons

  7. On thickness of Saturn rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brahic, Andre; Laques, Pierre; Lecacheux, Jean; Servan, Bernard; Despiau, Raymond; Michet, Daniel; Renard, Leopold

    1980-01-01

    Electronographic plates of Saturn were taken during the transit of the Earth through the ring plane. Observing conditions were more favorable than those prevailing in 1966. Thanks to the quality of the detectors and the telescopes, it has been possible to make a more precise photometric determination of the brightness of the ring seen edge on and to measure the brightness variation with respect to the distance to the center of the planet. Extrapolating to the case where the elevation of the Earth above the ring plane is strictly zero, we deduce an apparent photometric ring thickness equal to 1.5+-0.3 km. For an homogeneous layer of small particles colliding inelastically, theory predicts a thickness of the order of a few particles radii, i.e. a few tens of meters. The observed brightness could be explained by the E ring, the brightness of large chunks, condensations and warping of the ring [fr

  8. Saturn's Rings and Associated Ring Plasma Cavity: Evidence for Slow Ring Erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, W. M.; Kurth, W. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Persoon, A. M.; MacDowall, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    We re-examine the radio and plasma wave observations obtained during the Cassini Saturn orbit insertion period, as the spacecraft flew over the northern ring surface into a radial distance of 1.3 Rs (over the C-ring). Voyager era studies suggest the rings are a source of micro-meteoroid generated plasma and dust, with theorized peak impact-created plasma outflows over the densest portion of the rings (central B-ring). In sharp contrast, the Cassini Radio and Plasma Wave System (RPWS) observations identify the presence of a ring-plasma cavity located in the central portion of the B-ring, with little evidence of impact-related plasma. While previous Voyager era studies have predicted unstable ion orbits over the C- ring, leading to field-aligned plasma transport to Saturns ionosphere, the Cassini RPWS observations do not reveal evidence for such instability-created plasma fountains. Given the passive ring loss processes observed by Cassini, we find that the ring lifetimes should extend >10(exp 9) years, and that there is limited evidence for prompt destruction (loss in <100 Myrs).

  9. Caustic rings of dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikivie, P.

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that the infall of collisionless dark matter onto isolated galaxies produce a series of caustic rings in the halo dark matter distribution. The properties of these caustics are investigated. It is found in particular that the density profile of the caustic behaves as the inverse distance to the ring. Bumps in the rotation curve of NGC 3198 are interpreted as due to caustic rings of dark matter

  10. Acceleration of magnetized plasma rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartman, D.; Eddleman, J.; Hammer, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    One scheme is considered, acceleration of a ring between coaxial electrodes by a B/sub theta/ field as in a coaxial rail-gun. If the electrodes are conical, a ring accelerated towards the apex of the cone undergoes self-similar compression (focussing) during acceleration. Because the allowable acceleration force F/sub a/ = kappa U/sub m//R (kappa - 2 , the accelerating distance for conical electrodes is considerably shortened over that required for coaxial electrodes. In either case however, since the accelerating flux can expand as the ring moves, most of the accelerating field energy can be converted into kinetic energy of the ring leading to high efficiency

  11. Saturn's Rings Edge-on

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    In one of nature's most dramatic examples of 'now-you see-them, now-you-don't', NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured Saturn on May 22, 1995 as the planet's magnificent ring system turned edge-on. This ring-plane crossing occurs approximately every 15 years when the Earth passes through Saturn's ring plane.For comparison, the top picture was taken by Hubble on December 1, 1994 and shows the rings in a more familiar configuration for Earth observers.The bottom picture was taken shortly before the ring plane crossing. The rings do not disappear completely because the edge of the rings reflects sunlight. The dark band across the middle of Saturn is the shadow of the rings cast on the planet (the Sun is almost 3 degrees above the ring plane.) The bright stripe directly above the ring shadow is caused by sunlight reflected off the rings onto Saturn's atmosphere. Two of Saturn's icy moons are visible as tiny starlike objects in or near the ring plane. They are, from left to right, Tethys (slightly above the ring plane) and Dione.This observation will be used to determine the time of ring-plane crossing and the thickness of the main rings and to search for as yet undiscovered satellites. Knowledge of the exact time of ring-plane crossing will lead to an improved determination of the rate at which Saturn 'wobbles' about its axis (polar precession).Both pictures were taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. The top image was taken in visible light. Saturn's disk appears different in the bottom image because a narrowband filter (which only lets through light that is not absorbed by methane gas in Saturn's atmosphere) was used to reduce the bright glare of the planet. Though Saturn is approximately 900 million miles away, Hubble can see details as small as 450 miles across.The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science.This image and other images and

  12. Integrated Ring Resonators The Compendium

    CERN Document Server

    Rabus, Dominik G

    2007-01-01

    The optical filter, which has emerged in the last few years in integrated optics, is resonator based. Ring-resonator filters do not require facets or gratings for optical feedback and are thus particularly suited for monolithic integration with other components. Ring resonators find applications not only in optical networks, but also as sensors. The required passband shape of ring resonator-filters can be custom designed by the use of configurations of various ring coupled resonators. This book describes the current state-of-the-art on these devices with respect to design, fabrication and application.

  13. ring og refleksion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, B.; Rattleff, Pernille; Høyrup, S.

    State of the art inden for forskning om læring på arbejdspladsen samt gennemgang af læringsteori og refleksionsbegrebet hos Dewey, Dreyfus, Schön, Argyris, Kolb, Jarvis, Mezirow og Brookfield. Afsluttes med diskussion af syntetiseret model for læring på arbejdspladsen.......State of the art inden for forskning om læring på arbejdspladsen samt gennemgang af læringsteori og refleksionsbegrebet hos Dewey, Dreyfus, Schön, Argyris, Kolb, Jarvis, Mezirow og Brookfield. Afsluttes med diskussion af syntetiseret model for læring på arbejdspladsen....

  14. Coiffured black rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bena, Iosif; Ross, Simon F.; Warner, Nicholas P.

    2014-08-01

    We describe a new type of hair on supersymmetric black string and black ring solutions, which produces the largest known violation of black hole uniqueness, parameterized by an arbitrary function and hence an infinite number of continuous parameters. The new solutions can have non-trivial density profiles for the electric fields along the horizon, and yet have a geometry that is regular, although generically not infinitely differentiable, at the horizon. Both neutral and charged probes can cross the horizon without experiencing divergent forces. We also find restricted examples, parameterized by a few arbitrary continuous parameters, where the charge densities fluctuate but the metric does not and hence is completely differentiable. Our new class of solutions owes its existence to a mechanism reminiscent of the Q-ball: in the simplest examples the metric has more symmetry than the matter that supports it.

  15. Ring-constrained Join

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yiu, Man Lung; Karras, Panagiotis; Mamoulis, Nikos

    2008-01-01

    We introduce a novel spatial join operator, the ring-constrained join (RCJ). Given two sets P and Q of spatial points, the result of RCJ consists of pairs (p, q) (where p ε P, q ε Q) satisfying an intuitive geometric constraint: the smallest circle enclosing p and q contains no other points in P, Q....... This new operation has important applications in decision support, e.g., placing recycling stations at fair locations between restaurants and residential complexes. Clearly, RCJ is defined based on a geometric constraint but not on distances between points. Thus, our operation is fundamentally different...... from the conventional distance joins and closest pairs problems. We are not aware of efficient processing algorithms for RCJ in the literature. A brute-force solution requires computational cost quadratic to input size and it does not scale well for large datasets. In view of this, we develop efficient...

  16. On separable extensions of group rings and quaternion rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Szeto

    1978-01-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of the present paper are (1 to give a necessary and sufficient condition for the uniqueness of the separable idempotent for a separable group ring extension RG(R may be a non-commutative ring, and (2 to give a full description of the set of separable idempotents for a quaternion ring extension RQ over a ring R, where Q are the usual quaternions i,j,k and multiplication and addition are defined as quaternion algebras over a field. We shall show that RG has a unique separable idempotent if and only if G is abelian, that there are more than one separable idempotents for a separable quaternion ring RQ, and that RQ is separable if and only if 2 is invertible in R.

  17. High intraluminal pressure via H2O2 upregulates arteriolar constrictions to angiotensin II by increasing the functional availability of AT1 receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagi, Zsolt; Erdei, Nora; Koller, Akos

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we found that high intraluminal pressure leads to production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and also upregulates several components of the renin-angiotensin system in the wall of small arteries. We hypothesized that acute exposure of arterioles to high intraluminal pressure in vitro via increasing ROS production enhances the functional availability of type 1 angiotensin II (Ang II) receptors (AT1 receptors), resulting in sustained constrictions. In arterioles (∼180 μm) isolated from rat skeletal muscle, Ang II elicited dose-dependent constrictions, which decreased significantly by the second application [maximum (max.): from 59% ± 4% to 26% ± 5% at 10−8 M; P < 0.05] in the presence of 80 mmHg of intraluminal pressure. In contrast, if the arterioles were exposed to high intraluminal pressure (160 mmHg for 30 min), Ang II-induced constrictions remained substantial on the second application (max.: 51% ± 3% at 10−8 M). In the presence of Tiron and polyethylene glycol (PEG)-catalase, known to reduce the level of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), second applications of Ang II evoked similarly reduced constrictions, even after high-pressure exposure (29% ± 4% at 10−8 M). Furthermore, when arterioles were exposed to H2O2 (for 30 min, 10−7 M, at normal 80 mmHg pressure), Ang II-induced constrictions remained substantial on second applications (59% ± 5% at 10−8 M). These findings suggest that high pressure, likely via inducing H2O2 production, increases the functional availability of AT1 receptors and thus enhances Ang II-induced arteriolar constrictions. We propose that in hypertension–regardless of etiology–high intraluminal pressure, via oxidative stress, enhances the functional availability of AT1 receptors augmenting Ang II-induced constrictions. PMID:18567710

  18. Cognitive Machine-Learning Algorithm for Cardiac Imaging: A Pilot Study for Differentiating Constrictive Pericarditis From Restrictive Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Partho P; Huang, Yen-Min; Bansal, Manish; Ashrafi, Ali; Fisher, Matt; Shameer, Khader; Gall, Walt; Dudley, Joel T

    2016-06-01

    Associating a patient's profile with the memories of prototypical patients built through previous repeat clinical experience is a key process in clinical judgment. We hypothesized that a similar process using a cognitive computing tool would be well suited for learning and recalling multidimensional attributes of speckle tracking echocardiography data sets derived from patients with known constrictive pericarditis and restrictive cardiomyopathy. Clinical and echocardiographic data of 50 patients with constrictive pericarditis and 44 with restrictive cardiomyopathy were used for developing an associative memory classifier-based machine-learning algorithm. The speckle tracking echocardiography data were normalized in reference to 47 controls with no structural heart disease, and the diagnostic area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the associative memory classifier was evaluated for differentiating constrictive pericarditis from restrictive cardiomyopathy. Using only speckle tracking echocardiography variables, associative memory classifier achieved a diagnostic area under the curve of 89.2%, which improved to 96.2% with addition of 4 echocardiographic variables. In comparison, the area under the curve of early diastolic mitral annular velocity and left ventricular longitudinal strain were 82.1% and 63.7%, respectively. Furthermore, the associative memory classifier demonstrated greater accuracy and shorter learning curves than other machine-learning approaches, with accuracy asymptotically approaching 90% after a training fraction of 0.3 and remaining flat at higher training fractions. This study demonstrates feasibility of a cognitive machine-learning approach for learning and recalling patterns observed during echocardiographic evaluations. Incorporation of machine-learning algorithms in cardiac imaging may aid standardized assessments and support the quality of interpretations, particularly for novice readers with limited experience. © 2016

  19. DELPHI's Ring Imaging Cherenkov Chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    The hundreds of mirrors around this Ring Imaging Cherenkov Chamber reflect cones of light created by fast moving particles to a detector. The velocity of a particle can be measured by the size of the ring produced on the detector. DELPHI, which ran from 1989 to 2000 on the LEP accelerator, was primarily concerned with particle identification.

  20. Caustic rings of dark matter

    OpenAIRE

    Sikivie, Pierre

    1997-01-01

    It is shown that the infall of collisionless dark matter onto isolated galaxies produces a series of caustic rings in the halo dark matter distribution. The properties of these caustics are investigated. The density profile of the caustic is derived for a specific case. Bumps in the rotation curve of NGC 3198 are interpreted as due to caustic rings of dark matter.

  1. Pyrimidine-pyridine ring interconversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plas, van der H.C.

    2003-01-01

    This chapter discusses the pyrimidine-to-pyridine ring transformation and pyridine-to-pyrimidine ring transformation. In nucleophile-induced pyrimidine-to-pyridine rearrangements, two types of reactions can be distinguished depending on the structure of the nucleophile: (1) reactions in which the

  2. Subadditive responses to extremely short blue and green pulsed light on visual evoked potentials, pupillary constriction and electroretinograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soomin; Uchiyama, Yuria; Shimomura, Yoshihiro; Katsuura, Tetsuo

    2017-11-17

    The simultaneous exposure to blue and green light was reported to result in less melatonin suppression than monochromatic exposure to blue or green light. Here, we conducted an experiment using extremely short blue- and green-pulsed light to examine their visual and nonvisual effects on visual evoked potentials (VEPs), pupillary constriction, electroretinograms (ERGs), and subjective evaluations. Twelve adult male subjects were exposed to three light conditions: blue-pulsed light (2.5-ms pulse width), green-pulsed light (2.5-ms pulse width), and simultaneous blue- and green-pulsed light with white background light. We measured the subject's pupil diameter three times in each condition. Then, after 10 min of rest, the subject was exposed to the same three light conditions. We measured the averaged ERG and VEP during 210 pulsed-light exposures in each condition. We also determined subjective evaluations using a visual analog scale (VAS) method. The pupillary constriction during the simultaneous exposure to blue- and green-pulsed light was significantly lower than that during the blue-pulsed light exposure despite the double irradiance intensity of the combination. We also found that the b/|a| wave of the ERGs during the simultaneous exposure to blue- and green-pulsed light was lower than that during the blue-pulsed light exposure. We confirmed the subadditive response to pulsed light on pupillary constriction and ERG. However, the P100 of the VEPs during the blue-pulsed light were smaller than those during the simultaneous blue- and green-pulsed light and green-pulsed light, indicating that the P100 amplitude might depend on the luminance of light. Our findings demonstrated the effect of the subadditive response to extremely short pulsed light on pupillary constriction and ERG responses. The effects on ipRGCs by the blue-pulsed light exposure are apparently reduced by the simultaneous irradiation of green light. The blue versus yellow (b/y) bipolar cells in the

  3. Binomial Rings: Axiomatisation, Transfer and Classification

    OpenAIRE

    Xantcha, Qimh Richey

    2011-01-01

    Hall's binomial rings, rings with binomial coefficients, are given an axiomatisation and proved identical to the numerical rings studied by Ekedahl. The Binomial Transfer Principle is established, enabling combinatorial proofs of algebraical identities. The finitely generated binomial rings are completely classified. An application to modules over binomial rings is given.

  4. Burnside Rings of Fusion Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Sune Precht

    In this thesis we study the interactions between saturated fusion systems and group actions of the underlying p-groups. For a saturated fusion system F on a finite p-group S we construct the Burnside ring of F in terms of the finite S-sets whose actions respect the structure of the fusion system...... of Burnside rings given by multiplication with the characteristic idempotent, and we show that this map is the transfer map previously constructed. Applying these results, we show that for every saturated fusion system the ring generated by all (non-idempotent) characteristic elements in the p-local double...... Burnside ring is isomorphic to the p-local Burnside ring of the fusion system, and we disprove a conjecture by Park-Ragnarsson-Stancu on the composition product of fusion systems....

  5. Ionization cooling ring for muons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Palmer

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Practical ionization cooling rings could lead to lower cost or improved performance in neutrino factory or muon collider designs. The ring modeled here uses realistic three-dimensional fields. The performance of the ring compares favorably with the linear cooling channel used in the second U.S. Neutrino Factory Study. The normalized 6D emittance of an ideal ring is decreased by a factor of approximately 240, compared with a factor of only 15 for the linear channel. We also examine such real-world effects as windows on the absorbers and rf cavities and leaving empty lattice cells for injection and extraction. For realistic conditions the ring decreases the normalized 6D emittance by a factor of 49.

  6. Evaluation of ring impedance of the Photon Factory storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiuchi, T.; Izawa, M.; Tokumoto, S.; Hori, Y.; Sakanaka, S.; Kobayashi, M.; Kobayakawa, H.

    1992-05-01

    The loss parameters of the ducts in the Photon Factory (PF) storage ring were evaluated using the wire method and the code TBCI. Both the measurement and the calculation were done for a different bunch length (σ) ranging from 23 to 80 ps. The PF ring impedance was estimated to be |Z/n|=3.2 Ω using the broadband impedance model. The major contribution to the impedance comes from the bellows and the gate valve sections. Improvements of these components will lower the ring impedance by half. (author)

  7. Decay ring status / studies

    CERN Document Server

    Chance, A

    2008-01-01

    The aim of "beta-beams" is to produce highly energetic pure electron neutrino and anti-neutrino beams coming from β-decay of radioactive ions. In CERN baseline, after accelerating, the ions 6He2+ and 18Ne10+ are stored in a racetrack-shaped-decay ring until they are lost [1]. Consequently, the injection compensates the losses which occurred between two cycles. Two main loss sources were identified: the β decay and the injection scheme. After giving the optics, we will see how to protect the magnetic elements from the decay products. The injections scheme will be then detailed with its implications. We will see that the injection process makes a collimation section in energy necessary. Since the magnetic elements are not perfect, we will take into account the magnet misalignment and the multipole defects in the dipoles. We will talk then about the closed orbit distortion due to misalignment defects and about the long-term transverse stability with the dynamic aperture.

  8. JAERI storage ring JSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokomizo, H.; Harada, S.; Yanagida, K.; Yokoyama, M.; Nagai, T.; Suzuki, Y.; Mashiko, K.; Ishizaki, N.; Tayama, H.

    1990-01-01

    A design study for a next generation 8 GeV synchrotron radiation facility is in progress in Japan, and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN) have join forces in this project. A compact electron storage ring JSR has been under construction in the linac building in the Tokai Research Establishment of JAERI to serve for studies of various kind of accelerator technologies, examination of insertion devices and beam monitors, and training of young researchers. This paper describes the lattice design, injection system, magnets, vacuum system, RF system, control system and beam monitors and presents some operation results regarding the electron beam injection and storage. The JSR is presently in good condition concerning it's fundamental functions such as injection, storage at around 150 MeV and 300 MeV, and acceleration from 150 MeV and 300 MeV. Photon induced gas desorption is still large because the vacuum chamber has not been aged heavily by synchrotron radiation. (N.K.)

  9. Is the bell ringing?

    CERN Multimedia

    Francesco Poppi

    2010-01-01

    During the Nobel prize-winning UA1 experiment, scientists in the control room used to ring a bell if a particularly interesting event had occurred. Today, the “CMS Exotica hotline” routine produces a daily report that lists the exotic events that were recorded the day before.   Display of an event selected by the Exotica routine. Take just a very small fraction of the available data (max. 5%); define the events that you want to keep and set the parameters accordingly; run the Exotica routine and only look at the very few images that the system has selected for you. This is the recipe that a small team of CMS researchers has developed to identify the signals coming from possible new physics processes. “This approach does not replace the accurate data analysis on the whole set of data. However, it is a very fast and effective way to focus on just a few events that are potentially very interesting”, explains Maurizio Pierini (CERN), who developed the...

  10. Particle properties and processes in Uranus' rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, L. W.; Brahic, A.; Burns, J. A.; Marouf, Essam A.

    1991-01-01

    The particle properties and processes in the Uranian rings are analyzed from Voyager observations and ground-based data. Occultation observations of the epsilon ring are interpreted to yield an effective size of the ring particles that exceeds 70 cm, a surface mass density that exceeds 80 g/sq cm, and a ring vertical thickness greater than tens of meters for solid ice particles. The particles forming the classic rings are dark and gray, with albedo of 0.014 +/-0.004. It is argued that the small amount of dust that exists in the classical rings and between the rings in bands is created by erosion of ring particles and unseen satellites resulting from collisions and micrometeoroid bombardment. As proposed for regions of the other known ring systems, new ring material can be continually created by the destruction of small moons near the rings, which may explain the youthful appearance of the Uranian rings.

  11. Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenly, John, B.

    2005-07-31

    This Final Technical Report presents the results of the program, Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion, which was carried out under Department of Energy funding during the period August, 1993 to January, 2005. The central objective of the program was to study the properties of field-reversed configurations formed by ion rings. In order to reach this objective, our experimental program, called the Field-reversed Ion Ring Experiment, FIREX, undertook to develop an efficient, economical technology for the production of field-reversed ion rings. A field-reversed configuration (FRC) in which the azimuthal (field-reversing) current is carried by ions with gyro-radius comparable to the magnetic separatrix radius is called a field-reversed ion ring. A background plasma is required for charge neutralization of the ring, and this plasma will be confined within the ring's closed magnetic flux. Ion rings have long been of interest as the basis of compact magnetic fusion reactors, as the basis for a high-power accelerator for an inertial fusion driver, and for other applications of high power ion beams or plasmas of high energy density. Specifically, the FIREX program was intended to address the longstanding question of the contribution of large-orbit ions to the observed stability of experimental FRCs to the MHD tilt mode. Typical experimental FRCs with s {approx} 2-4, where s is the ratio of separatrix radius to ion gyro-radius, have been stable to tilting, but desired values for a fusion reactor, s > 20, should be unstable. The FIREX ring would consist of a plasma with large s for the background ions, but with s {approx} 1 for the ring ions. By varying the proportions of these two populations, the minimum proportion of large-orbit ions necessary for stability could be determined. The incorporation of large-orbit ions, perhaps by neutral-beam injection, into an FRC has been advanced for the purpose of stabilizing, heating, controlling angular momentum, and aiding the formation

  12. Treatment of Unstable Pelvic Ring Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Weon-Yoo

    2014-06-01

    Pelvic fractures are classified according to the stability of the pelvic ring. Unlike stable pelvic fractures, which heal without complications, unstable fractures may lead to pelvic ring deformities, which cause severe complications. An orthopedic surgeon must determine the stability of the pelvic ring by radiography and physical examination of the patient in order to ensure early, prompt treatment. This article includes anatomy of the pelvic ring, classification of pelvic ring injuries, its treatment algorithm, and corresponding cases involving unstable pelvic ring injury.

  13. Distributively generated matrix near rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, S.J.

    1993-04-01

    It is known that if R is a near ring with identity then (I,+) is abelian if (I + ,+) is abelian and (I,+) is abelian if (I*,+) is abelian [S.J. Abbasi, J.D.P. Meldrum, 1991]. This paper extends these results. We show that if R is a distributively generated near ring with identity then (I,+) is included in Z(R), the center of R, if (I + ,+) is included in Z(M n (R)), the center of matrix near ring M n (R). Furthermore (I,+) is included in Z(R) if (I*,+) is included in Z(M n (R)). (author). 5 refs

  14. Researches on the Piston Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehihara, Keikiti

    1944-01-01

    In internal combustion engines, steam engines, air compressors, and so forth, the piston ring plays an important role. Especially, the recent development of Diesel engines which require a high compression pressure for their working, makes, nowadays, the packing action of the piston ring far more important than ever. Though a number of papers have been published in regard to researches on the problem of the piston ring, none has yet dealt with an exact measurement of pressure exerted on the cylinder wall at any given point of the ring. The only paper that can be traced on this subject so far is Mr. Nakagawa's report on the determination of the relative distribution of pressure on the cylinder wall, but the measuring method adopted therein appears to need further consideration. No exact idea has yet been obtained as to how the obturation of gas between the piston and cylinder, the frictional resistance of the piston, and the wear of the cylinder wall are affected by the intensity and the distribution of the radial pressure of the piston ring. Consequently, the author has endeavored, by employing an apparatus of his own invention, to get an exact determination of the pressure distribution of the piston ring. By means of a newly devised ring tester, to which piezoelectricity of quartz was applied, the distribution of the radial pressure of many sample rings on the market was accurately determined. Since many famous piston rings show very irregular pressure distribution, the author investigated and achieved a manufacturing process of the piston ring which will exert uniform pressure on the cylinder wall. Temperature effects on the configuration and on the mean spring power have also been studied. Further, the tests were performed to ascertain how the gas tightness of the piston ring may be affected by the number or spring power. The researches as to the frictional resistance between the piston ring and the cylinder wall were carried out, too. The procedure of study, and

  15. SMARANDACHE NON-ASSOCIATIVE RINGS

    OpenAIRE

    Vasantha, Kandasamy

    2002-01-01

    An associative ring is just realized or built using reals or complex; finite or infinite by defining two binary operations on it. But on the contrary when we want to define or study or even introduce a non-associative ring we need two separate algebraic structures say a commutative ring with 1 (or a field) together with a loop or a groupoid or a vector space or a linear algebra. The two non-associative well-known algebras viz. Lie algebras and Jordan algebras are mainly built using a vecto...

  16. Deceleration of electron rings by ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schumacher, U.; Hofmann, I.; Merkel, P.; Reiser, M.

    1976-02-01

    The deceleration of intense relativistic electron rings by ions created by impact ionization in the electron rings is calculated analytically and numerically. It turns out that the stopping of rings with initial axial velocities of about β 0 = 0.1 is possible under conditions that easily can be realized experimentally in the Maryland ERA. The stopping length of the electron rings, however, depends sensitively on the initial axial ring velocities β 0 (as β 0 3 ). If the method of ring deceleration by ions is used, the reproducibility of the initial ring parameters (especially that of β 0 ) should be very good to get reliable electron ring loading and acceleration. (orig.) [de

  17. Yeast Interacting Proteins Database: YNL152W, YMR032W [Yeast Interacting Proteins Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available YNL152W INN1 Essential protein that associates with the contractile actomyosin ring... Bait description Essential protein that associates with the contractile actomyosin ring, required for ingre

  18. Minimal Gromov-Witten rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Przyjalkowski, V V

    2008-01-01

    We construct an abstract theory of Gromov-Witten invariants of genus 0 for quantum minimal Fano varieties (a minimal class of varieties which is natural from the quantum cohomological viewpoint). Namely, we consider the minimal Gromov-Witten ring: a commutative algebra whose generators and relations are of the form used in the Gromov-Witten theory of Fano varieties (of unspecified dimension). The Gromov-Witten theory of any quantum minimal variety is a homomorphism from this ring to C. We prove an abstract reconstruction theorem which says that this ring is isomorphic to the free commutative ring generated by 'prime two-pointed invariants'. We also find solutions of the differential equation of type DN for a Fano variety of dimension N in terms of the generating series of one-pointed Gromov-Witten invariants

  19. Autumn study on storage rings

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The first two weeks of October have seen storage ring people from accelerator Laboratories throughout the world at CERN to study the fundamental problems of very high energy protonproton colliding beam machines.

  20. Quasi-isochronous storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robin, D.; Forest, E.; Pellegrini, C.; Amiry, A.

    1993-01-01

    A study is made of the single-particle dynamics of an electron-positron storage ring where the phase-slip factor is made small in order to make the ring nearly isochronous and reduce the bunch length. What is found is that a quasi-isochronous ring makes it possible to obtain a bunch length in the millimeter range, about one order of magnitude shorter than present values. In this study we have extended the work of others on isochronous storage rings by quantitatively including higher-order terms in the longitudinal equations of motion. Scaling laws are then derived relating the linear term with the next-highest-order term. These scaling laws, which are derived from a two-dimensional Hamiltonian (one dimension of position and one of momentum), establish criteria for stability. These scaling laws are then checked with full six-dimensional tracking on one particular lattice

  1. ring i familien

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kryger, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Artiklen diskutere de senere års eksplosionsagtig interesse for børns læring i familien, og sætter et kritisk lys på den snævre investeringslogik (læring skal give afkast i form af økonomisk produktivitet), der har ledsaget mange af de programmer, der er sat i gang for at fremme denne ”familielær......Artiklen diskutere de senere års eksplosionsagtig interesse for børns læring i familien, og sætter et kritisk lys på den snævre investeringslogik (læring skal give afkast i form af økonomisk produktivitet), der har ledsaget mange af de programmer, der er sat i gang for at fremme denne...

  2. Ring lasers - a brief history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Tony

    2017-10-01

    Used these days in inertial navigation, ring lasers are also used in recording the tiniest variations in the Earth's spin, as well in detecting earthquakes and even the drift of continents. How did it all begin?

  3. Prototype moving-ring reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, A.C. Jr.; Ashworth, C.P.; Abreu, K.E.

    1982-01-01

    We have completed a design of the Prototype Moving-Ring Reactor. The fusion fuel is confined in current-carrying rings of magnetically-field-reversed plasma (Compact Toroids). The plasma rings, formed by a coaxial plasma gun, undergo adiabatic magnetic compression to ignition temperature while they are being injected into the reactor's burner section. The cylindrical burner chamber is divided into three burn stations. Separator coils and a slight axial guide field gradient are used to shuttle the ignited toroids rapidly from one burn station to the next, pausing for 1/3 of the total burn time at each station. D-T- 3 He ice pellets refuel the rings at a rate which maintains constant radiated power

  4. Outcomes of vaginal hysterectomy and constricting colporrhaphy with concurrent levator myorrhaphy and high perineorrhaphy in women older than 75 years of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Töz E

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Emrah Töz, Aykut Özcan, Nesin Apaydin, İbrahim Uyar, Betül Kocakaya, Gülin Okay Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Tepecik Education and Research Hospital, İzmir, Turkey Objectives: We performed constricting anterior and posterior colporrhaphy, levator myorrhaphy, and high perineorrhaphy with concurrent hysterectomy, and investigated the intraoperative complications, and short-term outcomes of these constricting procedures in patients aged 75 years or older.Methods: We searched our hospital database for cases, between January 2011 and January 2014, of women aged over 75 years who underwent surgery for pelvic organ prolapse of stage 2 or higher, via vaginal hysterectomy, constricting anterior and posterior colporrhaphy, levator myorrhaphy, and high perineorrhaphy, with or without treatment of urinary incontinence. All volunteers were evaluated via pelvic examination using the pelvic organ prolapse quantification system, the modified Decision Regret Scale–Pelvic Floor Disorders form, the Satisfaction Decision Scale–Pelvic Floor Disorders form, and the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory form.Results: Fifty-four patients were included in the study. The mean follow-up time was 24.4 months after constricting surgery (range: 8–44 months. There were four cases (7% of de novo urge incontinence (the symptoms resolved upon prescription of anticholinergic medication. Two patients developed de novo stress urinary incontinence after the procedure and were treated via transobturator sling surgery using Safyre T® polypropylene monofilament slings. No anatomical or subjective recurrence of prolapse was noted during the follow-up period. No patient required additional surgery for recurrence of prolapse.Conclusion: Constricting anterior and posterior colporrhaphy, levator myorrhaphy, and high perineorrhaphy with concurrent hysterectomy is a feasible, safe, and effective surgical option in elderly patients at low anesthesiological risk. The decision

  5. The Composition of Saturn's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R. N.; Cuzzi, J.; Filacchione, G.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Curchin, J. M.; Hoefen, T. M.; Nicholson, P. D.; Hedman, M.; Brown, R. H.; Buratti, B. J.; Baines, K. H.; Nelson, R. M.

    2008-12-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has obtained a unique collection of data about Saturn's rings, as it has observed the rings from 0 to 180 degrees in phase angle, and on both lit and unlit sides. Identification of trace contaminants, especially organic compounds, requires that spectra of the rings be uncontaminated by light from Saturn. The Cassini Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) has acquired 0.35 to 5.1 micron, high spatial resolution spectroscopic data near the shadow of Saturn on the rings where scattered light is at a minimum. At low phase angles, the ring spectra show classic crystalline-ice spectral features except for a contaminant causing a UV absorption. VIMS spectra at 180-degree phase angle are generally flat, with only a weak positive feature at 2.86 microns in spectra of the F-ring. The general transmission decrease is due to large ring particles completely blocking light. The 2.86-micron feature indicates the presence of fine ice dust, where the ice's index of refraction is near 1.0, and light is not refracted or diffracted. There are no indications of interparticle scattering in the VIMS data at any phase angle. The lack of interparticle scattering indicates that the dense A and B rings must be very thin, approaching a monolayer, but rigorous constraints have yet to be modeled. Previous studies used tholins and amorphous carbon for the contaminant causing the UV absorption, but these models display additional absorptions and spectral structure in the near infrared not seen in VIMS data. Clark et al. (Icarus, v193, p372, 2008) modeled the changing blue peak and UV absorber observed on Phoebe, Iapetus, Hyperion, and Dione with amorphous carbon and nano-sized hematite. Nanohematite has muted spectral features compared to larger grained hematite, due to crystal field effects at the surfaces of small grains. Nanohematite has a strong UV absorber that matches the steep UV slope observed in spectra of Saturn's rings and has no strong IR absorptions

  6. Collector ring project at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolinskii, A; Blell, U; Dimopoulou, C; Gorda, O; Leibrock, H; Litvinov, S; Laier, U; Schurig, I; Weinrich, U; Berkaev, D; Koop, I; Starostenko, A; Shatunov, P

    2015-01-01

    The collector ring is a dedicated ring for fast cooling of ions coming from separators at the FAIR project. To accommodate optimal technical solutions, a structure of a magnet lattice was recently reviewed and modified. Consequently, more appropriate technical solutions for the main magnets could be adopted. A general layout and design of the present machine is shown. The demanding extraction schemes have been detailed and open design issues were completed. (paper)

  7. Synlig læring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandsen, Mads

    2017-01-01

    Introduktionen af John Hatties synlig læring i den danske skoleverden møder stadig meget kritik. Mange lærere og pædagoger oplever synlig læring som en tornado, der vil opsuge og ødelægge deres særlige danske udgave af den kontinentale dannelsestænkning, didaktik og pædagogik. Spørgsmålet er om...

  8. MUON STORAGE RINGS - NEUTRINO FACTORIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PARSA, Z.

    2000-01-01

    The concept of a muon storage ring based Neutrino Source (Neutrino Factory) has sparked considerable interest in the High Energy Physics community. Besides providing a first phase of a muon collider facility, it would generate more intense and well collimated neutrino beams than currently available. The BNL-AGS or some other proton driver would provide an intense proton beam that hits a target, produces pions that decay into muons. The muons must be cooled, accelerated and injected into a storage ring with a long straight section where they decay. The decays occurring in the straight sections of the ring would generate neutrino beams that could be directed to detectors located thousands of kilometers away, allowing studies of neutrino oscillations with precisions not currently accessible. For example, with the neutrino source at BNL, detectors at Soudan, Minnesota (1,715 km), and Gran Sasso, Italy (6,527 km) become very interesting possibilities. The feasibility of constructing and operating such a muon-storage-ring based Neutrino-Factory, including geotechnical questions related to building non-planar storage rings (e.g. at 8degree angle for BNL-Soudan, and 3degree angle for BNL-Gran Sasso) along with the design of the muon capture, cooling, acceleration, and storage ring for such a facility is being explored by the growing Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration (NFMCC). The authors present overview of Neutrino Factory concept based on a muon storage ring, its components, physics opportunities, possible upgrade to a full muon collider, latest simulations of front-end, and a new bowtie-muon storage ring design

  9. Optofluidic ring resonator dye lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuze; Suter, Jonathan D.; Fan, Xudong

    2010-02-01

    We overview the recent progress on optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) dye lasers developed in our research group. The fluidics and laser cavity design can be divided into three categories: capillary optofluidic ring resonator (COFRR), integrated cylindrical optofluidic ring resonator (ICOFRR), and coupled optofluidic ring resonator (CpOFRR). The COFRR dye laser is based on a micro-sized glass capillary with a wall thickness of a few micrometers. The capillary circular cross-section forms the ring resonator and supports the whispering gallery modes (WGMs) that interact evanescently with the gain medium in the core. The laser cavity structure is versatile to adapt to the gain medium of any refractive index. Owing to the high Q-factor (>109), the lasing threshold of 25 nJ/mm2 is achieved. Besides directly pump the dye molecules, lasing through fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the donor and acceptor dye molecules is also studied in COFRR laser. The energy transfer process can be further controlled by designed DNA scaffold labeled with donor/acceptor molecules. The ICOFRR dye laser is based on a cylindrical ring resonator fused onto the inner surface of a thick walled glass capillary. The structure has robust mechanical strength to sustain rapid gain medium circulation. The CpOFRR utilizes a cylindrical ring resonator fused on the inner surface of the COFRR capillary. Since the capillary wall is thin, the individual WGMs of the cylindrical ring resonator and the COFRR couples strongly and forms Vernier effect, which provides a way to generate a single mode dye laser.

  10. Resonance capture and Saturn's rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, C.W.

    1986-05-01

    We have assigned the resonances apparently responsible for the stabilization of the Saturn's shepherd satellites and for the substructure seen in the F-ring and the ringlets in the C-ring. We show that Saturn's narrow ringlets have a substructure determined by three-body resonances with Saturn's ringmoons and the sun. We believe such resonances have important implications to satellite formation. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  11. Ring insertions as light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, G.K.

    1975-01-01

    Bending magnets can be inserted in the long straight sections of electron storage rings to produce synchrotron radiation. If the design is carefully proportioned, the bending magnets create only a small perturbation of the properties of the ring. The resulting spectra have favorable optical properties as sources for spectroscopy and diffraction studies. The characteristics of the source are discussed, and the geometrical requirements of the magnets are presented

  12. Commuting Π-regular rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shervin Sahebi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available ‎$R$ is called commuting regular ring (resp‎. ‎semigroupif‎ for each $x,y\\in R$ there exists $a\\in R$‎ such that$xy=yxayx$‎. ‎In this paper‎, ‎we introduce the concept of‎‎commuting $\\pi$-regular rings (resp‎. ‎semigroups and‎‎study various properties of them.

  13. The Circular RFQ Storage Ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruggiero, A. G.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents a novel idea of storage ring for the accumulation of intense beams of light and heavy ions at low energy. The new concept is a natural development of the combined features of conventional storage rings and ion traps, and is basically a linear RFQ bent on itself. The advantages are: smaller beam dimensions, higher beam intensity, and a more compact storage device

  14. Standard Fibre Optic Ring LANs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beale, N. C. L.

    1985-08-01

    The paper begins with a reminder of the particular need for standards in LANs. We then describe the requirements of High Integrity LANs. Current developments in LAN standards are then outlined. It is argued that the requirements of industrial LANs lead ideally to reconfiguring fibre optic rings, for which there are two major emerging standards. These two (IEEE 802.5 and ANSI FDDI) and the Cambridge Ring are discussed and compared. One implementation - the HILAN is discussed.

  15. Familial ainhum: A case report of multiple toe involvement in a father and son, staging of ainhum with insight into different types of constricting bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B T Priya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ainhum, also known as dactylolysis spontanea, is a painful constriction of the base of the fifth toe, frequently followed by spontaneous amputation a few years later. The disease is often symmetrical on both the feet, but, occasionally, other toes are also affected and rarely the distal phalanx of the fifth finger. Pseudoainhum is a similar condition that occurs as a secondary event resulting from certain hereditary and nonhereditary diseases that lead to annular constriction of digits. We hereby present a case of familial ainhum in father and son with multiple toes affected, autoamputation, and more involvement of fourth toe than the fifth toe, which is a very rare finding.

  16. Of Rings and Volcanoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Office National d'Etudes et de Recherches Aérospatiales (ONERA) , Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (LAOG) and the DESPA and DASGAL laboratories of the Observatoire de Paris in France, in collaboration with ESO. The CONICA infra-red camera was built, under an ESO contract, by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA) (Heidelberg) and the Max-Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE) (Garching) in Germany, in collaboration with ESO. Saturn - Lord of the rings ESO PR Photo 04a/02 ESO PR Photo 04a/02 [Preview - JPEG: 460 x 400 pix - 54k] [Normal - JPEG: 1034 x 800 pix - 200k] Caption : PR Photo 04a/02 shows the giant planet Saturn, as observed with the VLT NAOS-CONICA Adaptive Optics instrument on December 8, 2001; the distance was 1209 million km. It is a composite of exposures in two near-infrared wavebands (H and K) and displays well the intricate, banded structure of the planetary atmosphere and the rings. Note also the dark spot at the south pole at the bottom of the image. One of the moons, Tethys, is visible as a small point of light below the planet. It was used to guide the telescope and to perform the adaptive optics "refocussing" for this observation. More details in the text. Technical information about this photo is available below. This NAOS/CONICA image of Saturn ( PR Photo 04a/02 ), the second-largest planet in the solar system, was obtained at a time when Saturn was close to summer solstice in the southern hemisphere. At this moment, the tilt of the rings was about as large as it can be, allowing the best possible view of the planet's South Pole. That area was on Saturn's night side in 1982 and could therefore not be photographed during the Voyager encounter. The dark spot close to the South Pole is a remarkable structure that measures approximately 300 km across. It was only recently observed in visible light from the ground with a telescope at the Pic du Midi Observatory in the Pyrenees (France) - this is the first infrared image to

  17. Estrogen increases smooth muscle expression of alpha2C-adrenoceptors and cold-induced constriction of cutaneous arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, A H; Maiti, K; Mitra, S; Chotani, M A; Flavahan, S; Bailey, S R; Thompson-Torgerson, C S; Flavahan, N A

    2007-09-01

    Raynaud's phenomenon, which is characterized by intense cold-induced constriction of cutaneous arteries, is more common in women compared with men. Cold-induced constriction is mediated in part by enhanced activity of alpha(2C)-adrenoceptors (alpha(2C)-ARs) located on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMs). Experiments were therefore performed to determine whether 17beta-estradiol regulates alpha(2C)-AR expression and function in cutaneous VSMs. 17beta-Estradiol (0.01-10 nmol/l) increased expression of the alpha(2C)-AR protein and the activity of the alpha(2C)-AR gene promoter in human cultured dermal VSMs, which was assessed following transient transfection of the cells with a promoter-reporter construct. The effect of 17beta-estradiol was associated with increased accumulation of cAMP and activation of the cAMP-responsive Rap2 GTP-binding protein. Transient transfection of VSMs with a dominant-negative mutant of Rap2 inhibited the 17beta-estradiol-induced activation of the alpha(2C)-AR gene promoter, whereas a constitutively active mutant of Rap2 increased alpha(2C)-AR promoter activity. The effects of 17beta-estradiol were inhibited by the estrogen receptor (ER) antagonist, ICI-182780 (1 micromol/l), and were mimicked by a cell-impermeable form of the hormone (estrogen:BSA) or by the selective ER-alpha receptor agonist 4,4',4'''-(4-propyl-[(1)H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)tris-phenol (PPT; 10 nmol/l) or the selective ER-beta receptor agonist 2,3-bis(4-hydroxyphenyl)-propionitrile (DPN; 10 nmol/l). Therefore, 17beta-estradiol increased expression of alpha(2C)-ARs by interacting with cell surface receptors to cause a cAMP/Rap2-dependent increase in alpha(2C)-AR transcription. In mouse tail arteries, 17beta-estradiol (10 nmol/l) increased alpha(2C)-AR expression and selectively increased the cold-induced amplification of alpha(2)-AR constriction, which is mediated by alpha(2C)-ARs. An estrogen-dependent increase in expression of cold-sensitive alpha(2C)-ARs may contribute

  18. Caveolin-1: Functional Insights into Its Role in Muscarine- and Serotonin-Induced Smooth Muscle Constriction in Murine Airways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Keshavarz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available An increased bronchoconstrictor response is a hallmark in the progression of obstructive airway diseases. Acetylcholine and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin are the major bronchoconstrictors. There is evidence that both cholinergic and serotonergic signaling in airway smooth muscle (ASM involve caveolae. We hypothesized that caveolin-1 (cav-1, a structural protein of caveolae, plays an important regulatory role in ASM contraction. We analyzed airway contraction in different tracheal segments and extra- and intrapulmonary bronchi in cav-1 deficient (cav-1−/− and wild-type mice using organ bath recordings and videomorphometry of methyl-beta-cyclodextrin (MCD treated and non-treated precision-cut lung slices (PCLS. The presence of caveolae was investigated by electron microscopy. Receptor subtypes driving 5-HT-responses were studied by RT-PCR and videomorphometry after pharmacological inhibition with ketanserin. Cav-1 was present in tracheal epithelium and ASM. Muscarine induced a dose dependent contraction in all airway segments. A significantly higher Emax was observed in the caudal trachea. Although, caveolae abundancy was largely reduced in cav-1−/− mice, muscarine-induced airway contraction was maintained, albeit at diminished potency in the middle trachea, in the caudal trachea and in the bronchus without changes in the maximum efficacy. MCD-treatment of PLCS from cav-1−/− mice reduced cholinergic constriction by about 50%, indicating that cholesterol-rich plasma domains account for a substantial portion of the muscarine-induced bronchoconstriction. Notably, cav-1-deficiency fully abrogated 5-HT-induced contraction of extrapulmonary airways. In contrast, 5-HT-induced bronchoconstriction was fully maintained in cav-1-deficient intrapulmonary bronchi, but desensitization upon repetitive stimulation was enhanced. RT-PCR analysis revealed 5-HT1B, 5-HT2A, 5-HT6, and 5-HT7 receptors as the most prevalent subtypes in the airways. The

  19. Rhythmic ring-ring stacking drives the circadian oscillator clockwise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yong-Gang; Tseng, Roger; Kuo, Nai-Wei; LiWang, Andy

    2012-10-16

    The oscillator of the circadian clock of cyanobacteria is composed of three proteins, KaiA, KaiB, and KaiC, which together generate a self-sustained ∼24-h rhythm of phosphorylation of KaiC. The mechanism propelling this oscillator has remained elusive, however. We show that stacking interactions between the CI and CII rings of KaiC drive the transition from the phosphorylation-specific KaiC-KaiA interaction to the dephosphorylation-specific KaiC-KaiB interaction. We have identified the KaiB-binding site, which is on the CI domain. This site is hidden when CI domains are associated as a hexameric ring. However, stacking of the CI and CII rings exposes the KaiB-binding site. Because the clock output protein SasA also binds to CI and competes with KaiB for binding, ring stacking likely regulates clock output. We demonstrate that ADP can expose the KaiB-binding site in the absence of ring stacking, providing an explanation for how it can reset the clock.

  20. Accretion in Saturn's F Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, B. K.; Esposito, L. W.; Stewart, G.

    2012-12-01

    Saturn's F ring is the solar system's principal natural laboratory for direct observation of accretion and disruption processes. The ring resides in the Roche zone, where tidal disruption competes with self-gravity, which allows us to observe the lifecycle of moonlets. Just as nearby moons create structure at the B ring edge (Esposito et al. 2012) and the Keeler gap (Murray 2007), the F ring "shepherding" moons Prometheus and Pandora stir up ring material and create observably changing structures on timescales of days to decades. In fact, Beurle et al (2010) show that Prometheus makes it possible for "distended, yet gravitationally coherent clumps" to form in the F ring, and Barbara and Esposito (2002) predicted a population of ~1 km bodies in the ring. In addition to the observations over the last three decades, the Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) has detected 27 statistically significant features in 101 occultations by Saturn's F ring since July 2004. Seventeen of those 27 features are associated with clumps of ring material. Two features are opaque in occultation, which makes them candidates for solid objects, which we refer to as Moonlets. The 15 other features partially block stellar signal for 22 m to just over 3.7 km along the radial expanse of the occultation. Upon visual inspection of the occultation profile, these features resemble Icicles, thus we will refer to them as such here. The density enhancements responsible for such signal attenuations are likely due to transient clumping of material, evidence that aggregations of material are ubiquitous in the F ring. Our lengthy observing campaign reveals that Icicles are likely transient clumps, while Moonlets are possible solid objects. Optical depth is an indicator of clumping because more-densely aggregated material blocks more light; therefore, it is natural to imagine moonlets as later evolutionary stage of icicle, when looser clumps of material compact to form a feature that appears

  1. Double acting stirling engine piston ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1986-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  2. New development of cardiac tamponade on underlying effusive–constrictive pericarditis: an uncommon initial presentation of scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Stalin R; Akram, Rakhshanda; Velayati, Arash; Chadow, Hal

    2013-01-01

    A 40-year-old man with a medical history of hypertension was admitted for weight loss, generalised weakness, joint pains and mottling of fingertips. The initial laboratory data revealed microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopenia and acute renal failure. Intravenous steroids were started for possible diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus based on admission assessment. Intravenous immunoglobulin and plasmapharesis were subsequently added to the treatment plan to cover thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura while his autoimmune panel was pending. The echocardiogram study on day 2 revealed cardiac tamponade for which he underwent pericardiocentesis and right heart catheterisation. The atrial waveforms postpericardiocentesis demonstrated effusive–constrictive pericarditis. His clinical condition kept on deteriorating with reaccumulation of pericardial effusion and further complicated by hemoperitoneum and colonic obstruction. He had cardiorespiratory arrest on his fourth admission day and was not revived. Anti-Scl-70 antibody came back positive. Autopsy findings confirmed the presence of fibrinous pericarditis and hemoperitoneum. PMID:23853085

  3. Manipulation of vortex rings for flow control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyoda, Kuniaki; Hiramoto, Riho

    2009-01-01

    This paper reviews the dynamics of vortex rings and the control of flow by the manipulation of vortex rings. Vortex rings play key roles in many flows; hence, the understanding of the dynamics of vortex rings is crucial for scientists and engineers dealing with flow phenomena. We describe the structures and motions of vortex rings in circular and noncircular jets, which are typical examples of flows evolving into vortex rings. For circular jets the mechanism of evolving, merging and breakdown of vortex rings is described, and for noncircular jets the dynamics of three-dimensional deformation and interaction of noncircular vortex rings under the effect of self- and mutual induction is discussed. The application of vortex-ring manipulation to the control of various flows is reviewed with successful examples, based on the relationship between the vortex ring dynamics and the flow properties. (invited paper)

  4. Structure and dynamics of ringed galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buta, R.J.

    1984-01-01

    In many spiral and SO galaxies, single or multiple ring structures are visible in the disk. These inner rings (r), outer rings (R), and nuclear rings (nr) were investigated by means of morphology, photometry, and spectroscopy in order to provide basic data on a long neglected phenomenon. The metric properties of each ring are investigated and found to correlate with the structure of the parent galaxy. When properly calibrated, inner rings in barred (SB) systems can be used as geometric extragalactic distance indicators to distances in excess of 100 Mpc. Other statistics are presented that confirm previous indications that the rings have preferred shapes, relative sizes, and orientations with respect to bars. A survey is made of the less homogeneous non-barred (SA) ringed systems, and the causes of the inhomogeneity are isolated. It is shown that rings can be identified in multiple-ring SA systems that are exactly analogous to those in barred spirals

  5. Effects of exposure to intermittent versus continuous red light on human circadian rhythms, melatonin suppression, and pupillary constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho Mien, Ivan; Chua, Eric Chern-Pin; Lau, Pauline; Tan, Luuan-Chin; Lee, Ivan Tian-Guang; Yeo, Sing-Chen; Tan, Sara Shuhui; Gooley, Joshua J

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to light is a major determinant of sleep timing and hormonal rhythms. The role of retinal cones in regulating circadian physiology remains unclear, however, as most studies have used light exposures that also activate the photopigment melanopsin. Here, we tested the hypothesis that exposure to alternating red light and darkness can enhance circadian resetting responses in humans by repeatedly activating cone photoreceptors. In a between-subjects study, healthy volunteers (n = 24, 21-28 yr) lived individually in a laboratory for 6 consecutive days. Circadian rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, body temperature, and heart rate were assessed before and after exposure to 6 h of continuous red light (631 nm, 13 log photons cm(-2) s(-1)), intermittent red light (1 min on/off), or bright white light (2,500 lux) near the onset of nocturnal melatonin secretion (n = 8 in each group). Melatonin suppression and pupillary constriction were also assessed during light exposure. We found that circadian resetting responses were similar for exposure to continuous versus intermittent red light (P = 0.69), with an average phase delay shift of almost an hour. Surprisingly, 2 subjects who were exposed to red light exhibited circadian responses similar in magnitude to those who were exposed to bright white light. Red light also elicited prolonged pupillary constriction, but did not suppress melatonin levels. These findings suggest that, for red light stimuli outside the range of sensitivity for melanopsin, cone photoreceptors can mediate circadian phase resetting of physiologic rhythms in some individuals. Our results also show that sensitivity thresholds differ across non-visual light responses, suggesting that cones may contribute differentially to circadian resetting, melatonin suppression, and the pupillary light reflex during exposure to continuous light.

  6. Effects of exposure to intermittent versus continuous red light on human circadian rhythms, melatonin suppression, and pupillary constriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Ho Mien

    Full Text Available Exposure to light is a major determinant of sleep timing and hormonal rhythms. The role of retinal cones in regulating circadian physiology remains unclear, however, as most studies have used light exposures that also activate the photopigment melanopsin. Here, we tested the hypothesis that exposure to alternating red light and darkness can enhance circadian resetting responses in humans by repeatedly activating cone photoreceptors. In a between-subjects study, healthy volunteers (n = 24, 21-28 yr lived individually in a laboratory for 6 consecutive days. Circadian rhythms of melatonin, cortisol, body temperature, and heart rate were assessed before and after exposure to 6 h of continuous red light (631 nm, 13 log photons cm(-2 s(-1, intermittent red light (1 min on/off, or bright white light (2,500 lux near the onset of nocturnal melatonin secretion (n = 8 in each group. Melatonin suppression and pupillary constriction were also assessed during light exposure. We found that circadian resetting responses were similar for exposure to continuous versus intermittent red light (P = 0.69, with an average phase delay shift of almost an hour. Surprisingly, 2 subjects who were exposed to red light exhibited circadian responses similar in magnitude to those who were exposed to bright white light. Red light also elicited prolonged pupillary constriction, but did not suppress melatonin levels. These findings suggest that, for red light stimuli outside the range of sensitivity for melanopsin, cone photoreceptors can mediate circadian phase resetting of physiologic rhythms in some individuals. Our results also show that sensitivity thresholds differ across non-visual light responses, suggesting that cones may contribute differentially to circadian resetting, melatonin suppression, and the pupillary light reflex during exposure to continuous light.

  7. Treatment of Unstable Pelvic Ring Injuries

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Weon-Yoo

    2014-01-01

    Pelvic fractures are classified according to the stability of the pelvic ring. Unlike stable pelvic fractures, which heal without complications, unstable fractures may lead to pelvic ring deformities, which cause severe complications. An orthopedic surgeon must determine the stability of the pelvic ring by radiography and physical examination of the patient in order to ensure early, prompt treatment. This article includes anatomy of the pelvic ring, classification of pelvic ring injuries, its...

  8. Ring wormholes via duality rotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary W. Gibbons

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We apply duality rotations and complex transformations to the Schwarzschild metric to obtain wormhole geometries with two asymptotically flat regions connected by a throat. In the simplest case these are the well-known wormholes supported by phantom scalar field. Further duality rotations remove the scalar field to yield less well known vacuum metrics of the oblate Zipoy–Voorhees–Weyl class, which describe ring wormholes. The ring encircles the wormhole throat and can have any radius, whereas its tension is always negative and should be less than −c4/4G. If the tension reaches the maximal value, the geometry becomes exactly flat, but the topology remains non-trivial and corresponds to two copies of Minkowski space glued together along the disk encircled by the ring. The geodesics are straight lines, and those which traverse the ring get to the other universe. The ring therefore literally produces a hole in space. Such wormholes could perhaps be created by negative energies concentrated in toroidal volumes, for example by vacuum fluctuations.

  9. Dream of Isochronous Ring Again

    CERN Document Server

    Hama, H

    2005-01-01

    More than 20 years ago, D.A.G. Deacon proposed an isochronous storage ring for FEL to avoid bunch heating and decreasing instantaneous gain [1]. Some of low momentum compaction (alpha) operations have been carried out, and recently coherent infrared radiation are observed on a 3rd generation light source. Because the 3rd generation rings are optimized to obtain very low emittance beam, the dispersion function in the arc sections are much reduced by introducing large bending radius, so that those are very big machines. Meanwhile N.A. Vinokurov et al. recently proposed a ring type SASE FEL based on a complete isochronous bending transport [2]. At least, experimental and theoretical study of the isochronous ring so far suggests nonlinear effects resulted from higher order dispersion and chromaticity declines the "complete" isochronous system. On the other hand, in a wavelength region of THz, tolerance of the path length along a turn of the ring seems to be within our reach. A concept to preserve of a form factor...

  10. Primitivity and weak distributivity in near rings and matrix near rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, S.J.

    1993-08-01

    This paper shows the structure of matrix near ring constructed over a weakly distributive and primative near ring. It is proved that a weakly distributive primitive near ring is a ring and the matrix near rings constructed over it is also a bag. (author). 14 refs

  11. Proton storage ring summer workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, G.P.; Cooper, R.K.

    1977-10-01

    During the week of August 16, 1976 a Workshop was held at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) on the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) for the Weapons Neutron Research Facility (WNRF). Written contributions were solicited from each of the participants in the Workshop, and the contributions that were received are presented. The papers do not represent polished or necessarily complete work, but rather represent ''first cuts'' at their respective areas. Topics covered include: (1) background information on the storage ring; (2) WNRF design; (3) rf transient during filling; (4) rf capture; (5) beam bunch compression; (6) transverse space charge limits; (7) transverse resistive instability in the PSR; (8) longitudinal resistive instability; (9) synchrotron frequency splitting; (10) E Quintus Unum--off resonance; (11) first harmonic bunching in the storage ring; (12) kicker considerations; (13) beam extraction; (14) ferrite kicker magnets; and (15) E Quintus Unum: a possible ejection scheme

  12. Adiabatic compression of ion rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larrabee, D.A.; Lovelace, R.V.

    1982-01-01

    A study has been made of the compression of collisionless ion rings in an increasing external magnetic field, B/sub e/ = zB/sub e/(t), by numerically implementing a previously developed kinetic theory of ring compression. The theory is general in that there is no limitation on the ring geometry or the compression ratio, lambdaequivalentB/sub e/ (final)/B/sub e/ (initial)> or =1. However, the motion of a single particle in an equilibrium is assumed to be completely characterized by its energy H and canonical angular momentum P/sub theta/ with the absence of a third constant of the motion. The present computational work assumes that plasma currents are negligible, as is appropriate for a low-temperature collisional plasma. For a variety of initial ring geometries and initial distribution functions (having a single value of P/sub theta/), it is found that the parameters for ''fat'', small aspect ratio rings follow general scaling laws over a large range of compression ratios, 1 3 : The ring radius varies as lambda/sup -1/2/; the average single particle energy as lambda/sup 0.72/; the root mean square energy spread as lambda/sup 1.1/; and the total current as lambda/sup 0.79/. The field reversal parameter is found to saturate at values typically between 2 and 3. For large compression ratios the current density is found to ''hollow out''. This hollowing tends to improve the interchange stability of an embedded low β plasma. The implications of these scaling laws for fusion reactor systems are discussed

  13. Tree rings and radiocarbon calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbetti, M.

    1999-01-01

    Only a few kinds of trees in Australia and Southeast Asia are known to have growth rings that are both distinct and annual. Those that do are therefore extremely important to climatic and isotope studies. In western Tasmania, extensive work with Huon pine (Lagarostrobos franklinii) has shown that many living trees are more than 1,000 years old, and that their ring widths are sensitive to temperature, rainfall and cloud cover (Buckley et al. 1997). At the Stanley River there is a forest of living (and recently felled) trees which we have sampled and measured. There are also thousands of subfossil Huon pine logs, buried at depths less than 5 metres in an area of floodplain extending over a distance of more than a kilometre with a width of tens of metres. Some of these logs have been buried for 50,000 years or more, but most of them belong to the period between 15,000 years and the present. In previous expeditions in the 1980s and 1990s, we excavated and sampled about 350 logs (Barbetti et al. 1995; Nanson et al. 1995). By measuring the ring-width patterns, and matching them between logs and living trees, we have constructed a tree-ring dated chronology from 571 BC to AD 1992. We have also built a 4254-ring floating chronology (placed by radiocarbon at ca. 3580 to 7830 years ago), and an earlier 1268-ring chronology (ca. 7,580 to 8,850 years ago). There are many individuals, or pairs of logs which match and together span several centuries, at 9,000 years ago and beyond

  14. Superconducting proton ring for PETRA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baynham, E.

    1979-01-01

    A powerful new facility for colliding beam physics could be provided by adding a proton storage ring in the range of several hundred GeV to the electron-positron storage ring PETRA at DESY. This can be achieved in an economic way utilizing the PETRA tunnel and taking advantage of the higher magnetic fields of superconducting magnets which would be placed above or below the PETRA magnets. A central field of 4 Tesla in the bending magnets corresponds to a proton energy of 225 GeV. (orig.)

  15. INVITED TALK: Dynamics Of Planetary Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiscareno, Matthew S.

    2011-04-01

    Planetary rings are the only nearby astrophysical disks, and the only disks that have been investigated by spacecraft (especially the Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn). Although there are significant differences between rings and other disks, chiefly the large planet/ring mass ratio that greatly enhances the flatness of rings (aspect ratios as small as 1e-7), understanding of disks in general can be enhanced by understanding the dynamical processes observed at close-range and in real-time in planetary rings. We will review the known ring systems of the four giant planets, as well as the prospects for ring systems yet to be discovered. We will then review planetary rings by type. The A, B, and C rings of Saturn, plus the Cassini Division, comprise our solar system's only dense broad disk and host many phenomena of general application to disks including spiral waves, gap formation, self-gravity wakes, viscous overstability and normal modes, impact clouds, and orbital evolution of embedded moons. Dense narrow rings are found both at Uranus (where they comprise the main rings entirely) and at Saturn (where they are embedded in the broad disk), and are the primary natural laboratory for understanding shepherding and self-stability. Narrow dusty rings, likely generated by embedded source bodies, are surprisingly found to sport azimuthally-confined arcs both at Saturn, Jupiter, and Neptune. Finally, every known ring system includes a substantial component of diffuse dusty rings.

  16. Soft Neutrosophic Ring and Soft Neutrosophic Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mumtaz Ali

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we extend the theory of neutrosophic rings and neutrosophic fields to soft sets and construct soft neutrosophic rings and soft neutrosophic fields. We also extend neutrosophic ideal theory to form soft neutrosophic ideal over a neutrosophic ring and soft neutrosophic ideal of a soft neutrosophic ring. We have given many examples to illustrate the theory of soft neutrosophic rings and soft neutrosophic fields and display many properties of these. At the end of this paper we gave soft neutrosophic ring homomorphism.

  17. Thomson's Jumping Ring Over a Long Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Amiri, Farhang

    2018-03-01

    The classic jumping ring apparatus consists of a coil with an iron core that extends out of the coil. A copper or aluminum ring placed over the iron core jumps upward when AC power is applied to the coil. In this paper we will examine a modified design of the jumping ring apparatus, called the "long-coil design." It allows the ring to jump upward or downward, depending on the starting position of the ring. These features shed significant light on the study of the force that causes the ring to jump.

  18. E-læring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heilesen, Simon

    2001-01-01

    E-læring er et modeord og et mantra. Undervisning bliver ikke automatisk bedre af, at der sættes et ”e-” foran. Forbedring og fornyelse af undervisningen er betinget af, at vi forstår computermediets muligheder og skaber forandring ved at tilpasse det til de undervisningsformer, vi ønsker....

  19. ring og it

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

      Antologien er et bidrag til didaktiske diskussioner om brug af f.eks. programpakker til sprogundervisning, præsentationsprogrammel og konferencesystemer på de videregående uddannelser. Antologien diskuterer ideen om, at multimediale medier og internettet kan understøtte læring, undervisning og ...

  20. Ring laser frequency biasing mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, R.E.

    1975-01-01

    A ring laser cavity including a magnetically saturable member for differentially phase shifting the contradirectional waves propagating in the laser cavity, the phase shift being produced by the magneto-optic interaction occurring between the light waves and the magnetization in the cavity forming component as the light waves are reflected therefrom is described

  1. Counting problems for number rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brakenhoff, Johannes Franciscus

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis we look at three counting problems connected to orders in number fields. First we study the probability that for a random polynomial f in Z[X] the ring Z[X]/f is the maximal order in Q[X]/f. Connected to this is the probability that a random polynomial has a squarefree

  2. Wands of the Black Ring

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravda, Vojtěch; Pravdová, Alena

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 7 (2005), s. 1277-1287 ISSN 0001-7701 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP202/03/P017; GA AV ČR KJB1019403 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10190503 Keywords : algebraic classification * Petrov classification * black ring Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 1.550, year: 2005

  3. On commutativity theorems for rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. A. S. Abujabal

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available Let R be an associative ring with unity. It is proved that if R satisfies the polynomial identity [xny−ymxn,x]=0(m>1,n≥1, then R is commutative. Two or more related results are also obtained.

  4. International Tree Ring Data Bank (ITRDB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Tree ring data from the International Tree Ring Data Bank and World Data Center for Paleoclimatology archives. Data include raw treering measurements (most are...

  5. Planetary science: Shepherds of Saturn's ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crida, Aurélien

    2015-09-01

    Saturn's F ring is chaperoned on both sides by the tiny moons Prometheus and Pandora. Numerical simulations show that this celestial ballet can result from the collision of two aggregates that evolved out of Saturn's main rings.

  6. Planetary ring systems properties, structures, and evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Murray, Carl D

    2018-01-01

    Planetary rings are among the most intriguing structures of our solar system and have fascinated generations of astronomers. Collating emerging knowledge in the field, this volume reviews our current understanding of ring systems with reference to the rings of Saturn, Uranus, Neptune, and more. Written by leading experts, the history of ring research and the basics of ring–particle orbits is followed by a review of the known planetary ring systems. All aspects of ring system science are described in detail, including specific dynamical processes, types of structures, thermal properties and their origins, and investigations using computer simulations and laboratory experiments. The concluding chapters discuss the prospects of future missions to planetary rings, the ways in which ring science informs and is informed by the study of other astrophysical disks, and a perspective on the field's future. Researchers of all levels will benefit from this thorough and engaging presentation.

  7. Use of a Novel Two Color PALM Method to Examine Structural Properties of Drp1 Helical Rings during Mammalian Mitochondrial Fission In Situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbloom, Alyssa Blair

    membranes with large populations of membrane bound rsKame and PAmCherry1 in HeLa and EpH4 cells. We were able to observe and clearly differentiate the two mitochondrial membrane structures and their various morphologies in situ. With the functional two-color PALM method, we returned to our original investigation of the Drp1 fission ring in situ. In fixed HeLa cells, we continued to label the outer membrane with PAmCherry1 and fused rsKame to the N-terminus of Drp1, separated by a linker. The resultant PALM images allowed for the observation of two previously observed and one hitherto unseen distinct Drp1 morphologies: Constrict, Terminal, and Split. The Constrict morphology was defined as the Drp1 structures that clearly encircle the mitochondrial tubule at various stages of membrane constriction. The Terminal morphology was defined as the Drp1 structures found at the termini of mitochondria, presumably post membrane scission. The Split morphology is a novel morphology and was defined as two Drp1 foci flanking the mitochondrial tubule but not completely encircling it. Quantification of the diameter and length of the Drp1 helical ring structures showed that the mean length of the Drp1 helical rings was consistent between all three morphologies, though a slight decrease was observed for the Terminal morphology, likely due to degradation. We observed a decrease of approximately 40 nm between the Constrict and Terminal mean diameters, consistent with a dynamic change in the Drp1 ring size due to membrane constriction towards membrane scission during mitochondrial fission. The Split morphology had a wide distribution of diameters and warrants further study. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  8. Nonlinear analysis of ring oscillator circuits

    KAUST Repository

    Ge, Xiaoqing

    2010-06-01

    Using nonlinear systems techniques, we analyze the stability properties and synchronization conditions for ring oscillator circuits, which are essential building blocks in digital systems. By making use of its cyclic structure, we investigate local and global stability properties of an n-stage ring oscillator. We present a sufficient condition for global asymptotic stability of the origin and obtain necessity if the ring oscillator consists of identical inverter elements. We then give a synchronization condition for identical interconnected ring oscillators.

  9. On P-coherent endomorphism rings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A ring is called right -coherent if every principal right ideal is finitely presented. Let M R be a right -module. We study the -coherence of the endomorphism ring of M R . It is shown that is a right -coherent ring if and only if every endomorphism of M R has a pseudokernel in add M R ; S is a left -coherent ring if and ...

  10. Tree-ring anomalies in Toona ciliata

    OpenAIRE

    Heinrich, Ingo; Banks, John Charles Gripper

    2006-01-01

    New increment core samples of Toona ciliata collected in the Australian tropics and subtropics compared to already existing material from the Upper Kangaroo Valley, near Sydney exhibit distinct differences in tree-ring structures. This necessitated a closer examination of the wood anatomy, possible false rings and the species’ crossdating capacity in northeast Australia. During tree-ring analysis two growth anomalies (extensive zones of narrow and indistinct rings) and three types of false ri...

  11. The Hi-Ring DCN Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galili, Michael; Kamchevska, Valerija; Ding, Yunhong

    2016-01-01

    We will review recent work on the proposed hierarchical ring-based architecture (HiRing) proposed for data center networks. We will discuss the architecture and initial demonstrations of optical switching performance and time-domain synchronization......We will review recent work on the proposed hierarchical ring-based architecture (HiRing) proposed for data center networks. We will discuss the architecture and initial demonstrations of optical switching performance and time-domain synchronization...

  12. Random Implantation of Asymmetric Intracorneal Rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Peris-Martínez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracorneal ring employment for treating ectasia is widespread. Although the mechanism of action of intracorneal rings in the regularization of the corneal surface after its implantation is well known in most cases, there are still many doubts. We present a case of implanted intracorneal rings, where, despite the peculiar position of the rings, the patient gains lines of visual acuity and keratoconus remains stable.

  13. Edge-on View of Saturn's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    TOP - This is a NASA Hubble Space Telescope snapshot of Saturn with its rings barely visible. Normally, astronomers see Saturn with its rings tilted. Earth was almost in the plane of Saturn's rings, thus the rings appear edge-on.In this view, Saturn's largest moon, Titan, is casting a shadow on Saturn. Titan's atmosphere is a dark brown haze. The other moons appear white because of their bright, icy surfaces. Four moons - from left to right, Mimas, Tethys, Janus, and Enceladus - are clustered around the edge of Saturn's rings on the right. Two other moons appear in front of the ring plane. Prometheus is on the right edge; Pandora, on the left. The rings also are casting a shadow on Saturn because the Sun was above the ring plane.BOTTOM - This photograph shows Saturn with its rings slightly tilted. The moon called Dione, on the lower right, is casting a long, thin shadow across the whole ring system due to the setting Sun on the ring plane. The moon on the upper left of Saturn is Tethys.Astronomers also are studying the unusual appearance of Saturn's rings. The bottom image displays a faint, narrow ring, the F-ring just outside the main ring, which normally is invisible from Earth. Close to the edge of Saturn's disk, the front section of rings seem brighter and more yellow than the back due to the additional lumination by yellowish Saturn.The color images were assembled from separate exposures taken August 6 (top) and November 17 (bottom), 1995 with the Wide Field Planetary Camera-2.The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science.This image and other images and data received from the Hubble Space Telescope are posted on the World Wide Web on the Space Telescope Science Institute home page at URL http://oposite.stsci.edu/pubinfo/

  14. Optical fiber having wave-guiding rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerly, Michael J [Danville, CA; Dawson, Jay W [Livermore, CA; Beach, Raymond J [Livermore, CA; Barty, Christopher P. J. [Hayward, CA

    2011-03-15

    A waveguide includes a cladding region that has a refractive index that is substantially uniform and surrounds a wave-guiding region that has an average index that is close to the index of the cladding. The wave-guiding region also contains a thin ring or series of rings that have an index or indices that differ significantly from the index of the cladding. The ring or rings enable the structure to guide light.

  15. Familial transmission of a ring chromosome 21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael

    1987-01-01

    A ring chromosome 21 was found in a phenotypically normal mother and her son. The clinical findings in the son were bilateral retention of the testes and a slightly delayed puberty onset. Consequences of a ring formation of a chromosome 21 in phenotypically normal patients are presented...... and discussed, and the previously reported cases of familially transmitted G-group ring chromosomes are reviewed....

  16. Self-gravitation in Saturn's rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salo, H.; Lukkari, J.

    1982-01-01

    In a ring-shaped collisional system self-gravitation reduces the equilibrium values of the geometric and optical thickness. In Saturn's rings both effects are appreciable. The previously found discrepancy between the calculated profile and the observed profile of the rings is chiefly caused by the omission of self-gravitation. (Auth.)

  17. Anomalous dark growth rings in black cherry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert P. Long; David W. Trimpey; Michael C. Wiemann; Susan L. Stout

    2012-01-01

    Anomalous dark growth rings have been observed in black cherry (Prunus serotina) sawlogs from northwestern Pennsylvania making the logs unsuitable for veneer products. Thirty-six cross sections with dark rings, each traceable to one of ten stands, were obtained from a local mill and sections were dated and annual ring widths were measured. One or...

  18. A Ring Construction Using Finite Directed Graphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardzell, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we discuss an interesting class of noncommutative rings which can be constructed using finite directed graphs. This construction also creates a vector space. These structures provide undergraduate students connections between ring theory and graph theory and, among other things, allow them to see a ring unity element that looks quite…

  19. PERICARDITIS CONSTRICTIVA EN UNA MUJER DE 36 AÑOS / Constrictive Pericarditis in a 36 year-old woman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Negrín Valdés

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available ResumenPaciente femenina, de 36 años de edad, con antecedentes de dos gestaciones, dos partos y ningún aborto, que en el año 2003 tras su segundo parto, distócico por cesárea, desarrolla una pericarditis de causa no precisada que produjo un derrame pericárdico grave con signos de taponamiento cardíaco, y requirió ingreso hospitalario y pericardiocentesis. Siete años después se identifican, en la consulta de Cardiología, síntomas clínicos de una pericarditis constrictiva, corroborada por ecocardiograma y cateterismo derecho; actualmente ingresa para pericardiectomía, evaluada como alto riesgo quirúrgico. / Abstract36 year-old female patient, with a history of two pregnancies, two births and no abortion, who in 2003 after her second delivery (cesarean for dystocia she developed pericarditis of undetermined cause that produced a severe pericardial effusion with signs of cardiac tamponade and required hospital admission and pericardiocentesis. Seven years later, in the Cardiology service, clinical symptoms of constrictive pericarditis are identified and confirmed by echocardiography and right heart catheterization. This patient has been recently admitted for pericardiectomy, and evaluated as high surgical risk.

  20. Constriction – Construction, a short history of specialised wearing apparel for athletic activities from the fourteenth century to nineteenth century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baptiste Soline Anthore

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available During the twentieth century, clothing permits a real freedom of bodily movement. However, when examining past athletic activity, we must take into account the period approach to the body: liberty of movement is at the same time controlled by morality, gestures and clothing. The French term “tenue” initially referred to behaviour, but since the end of the eighteenth century concerns the manner of dressing, and later by extension, the “dignity of conduct”. In the past times concerned with “sporting” activities such as the HEMA (Historical European Martial Arts, physical appearance is affected by rules of etiquette imposed by morality and civility. From the Middle Ages to the nineteenth century, each period offers a different overview of the dress standards in relation to the different approaches to corporal identity, and the constriction first necessary for military activities becomes indivisible from the moral and physical construction. As a practitioner of the 21st century, the question raises about our relationship, not only with our bodies but also with past cultures. As demonstrated by some concrete examples, if it is desired to fully approach the ancient practices, it is therefore necessary to also adopt the garment, in the same way as the accessories.

  1. Excited State Studies of Polyacenes Using the All-Order Constricted Variational Density Functional Theory with Orbital Relaxation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, Florian; Krykunov, Mykhaylo

    2015-10-22

    For the polyacenes series from naphthalene to hexacene, we present the vertical singlet excitation energies 1 (1)La and 1 (1)Lb, as well as the first triplet excitation energies obtained by the all-order constricted variational density functional theory with orbital relaxation (R-CV(∞)-DFT). R-CV(∞)-DFT is a further development of variational density functional theory (CV(∞)-DFT), which has already been successfully applied for the calculation of the vertical singlet excitation energies (1)La and (1)Lb for polyacenes,15 and we show that one obtains consistent excitation energies using the local density approximation as a functional for singlet as well as for triplet excitations when going beyond the linear response theory. Furthermore, we apply self-consistent field density functional theory (ΔSCF-DFT) and compare the obtained excitation energies for the first triplet excitations T1, where, due to the character of the transition, ΔSCF-DFT and R-CV(∞)-DFT become numerically equivalent, and for the singlet excitations 1 (1)La and 1 (1)Lb, where the two methods differ.

  2. Analgesic effect of piracetam on peripheral neuropathic pain induced by chronic constriction injury of sciatic nerve in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ashish K; Bhati, Yogendra; Tripathi, Chakra D; Sharma, Krishna K

    2014-08-01

    Despite immense advances in the treatment strategies, management of neuropathic pain remains unsatisfactory. Piracetam is a prototype of nootropic drugs, used to improve cognitive impairment. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of piracetam on peripheral neuropathic pain in rats. Neuropathic pain was induced by the chronic constriction injury of the sciatic nerve. Following this, piracetam was intraperitoneally administered for 2 weeks in doses of 50, 100 and 200 mg/kg, and pain was assessed by employing the behavioural tests for thermal hyperalgesia (hot plate and tail flick tests) and cold allodynia (acetone test). After the induction of neuropathic pain, significant development of thermal hyperalgesia and cold allodynia was observed. The administration of piracetam (50 mg/kg) did not have any significant effect on all the behavioural tests. Further, piracetam (100 mg/kg) also had no effect on the hot plate and tail flick tests; however it significantly decreased the paw withdrawal duration in the acetone test. Piracetam in a dose of 200 mg/kg significantly modulated neuropathic pain as observed from the increased hot plate and tail flick latencies, and decreased paw withdrawal duration (in acetone test). Therefore, the present study suggests the potential use of piracetam in the treatment of neuropathic pain, which merits further clinical investigation.

  3. Constrictive Pericarditis in the Presence of Remaining Remnants of a Left Ventricular Assist Device in a Heart Transplanted Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Rivinius

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Constrictive pericarditis (CP is a severe subform of pericarditis with various causes and clinical findings. Here, we present the unique case of CP in the presence of remaining remnants of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD in a heart transplanted patient. A 63-year-old man presented at the Heidelberg Heart Center outpatient clinic with progressive dyspnea, fatigue, and loss of physical capacity. Heart transplantation (HTX was performed at another heart center four years ago and postoperative clinical course was unremarkable so far. Pharmacological cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI stress test was performed to exclude coronary ischemia. The test was negative but, accidentally, a foreign body located in the epicardial adipose tissue was found. The foreign body was identified as the inflow pump connection of an LVAD which was left behind after HTX. Echocardiography and cardiac catheterization confirmed the diagnosis of CP. Surgical removal was performed and the epicardial tubular structure with a diameter of 30 mm was carefully removed accompanied by pericardiectomy. No postoperative complications occurred and the patient recovered uneventfully with a rapid improvement of symptoms. On follow-up 3 and 6 months later, the patient reported about a stable clinical course with improved physical capacity and absence of dyspnea.

  4. Anaesthetic Management of a 1-Month-Old Puppy Undergoing Lateral Thoracotomy for Vascular Ring Anomaly Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Martin Jurado

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 1-month-old male flat-coated retriever was anaesthetized for correction of oesophageal constriction caused by a vascular ring anomaly. Anaesthesia was uneventfully induced with intravenous fentanyl, diazepam, and propofol and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen and air. An intercostal block with bupivacaine and lidocaine was performed, and additional analgesia with an infusion of fentanyl was provided. Fluid therapy consisted in 5% glucose in lactated Ringer’s solution and hetastarch 6%, which proved adequate to maintain normoglycemia and normovolemia. A lateral thoracotomy was performed, and the ligamentum arteriosum was ligated. Intraoperatively, heart rate (HR varied between 120 and 180 beats min−1 without accompanying changes in blood pressure. No arrhythmias were observed or bleeding occurred. The dog recovered uneventfully. Postoperative analgesia consisted in fentanyl infusion adjusted to the patient's requirement and metamizol. This paper describes for the first time the use of balanced anaesthesia and multimodal analgesia in a paediatric dog undergoing thoracotomy.

  5. Laser driven structured quantum rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castiglia, Giuseppe; Corso, Pietro Paolo; De Giovannini, Umberto; Fiordilino, Emilio; Frusteri, Biagio

    2015-06-01

    In this work we study harmonic emission from structured quantum rings (SQRs). In SQRs, electrons trapped in two-dimensional structures are further confined by an external potential composed of N scattering centers arranged on a circle. We build a suitable one-dimensional model Hamiltonian describing this class of systems and analytically solve the associated Schödinger equation. We find that the solution can be expressed in terms of Mathieu functions and focus on the specific case of N = 6. By exactly solving the time-dependent Schödinger equation, we then show how the harmonic response to linearly polarized lasers strongly depends on the ring physical parameters. The results illustrate how the additional degrees of freedom introduced by these parameters provide important handles to control the emitted spectrum that in some cases extends into the XUV region.

  6. Fiber Ring Optical Gyroscope (FROG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The design, construction, and testing of a one meter diameter fiber ring optical gyro, using 1.57 kilometers of single mode fiber, are described. The various noise components: electronic, thermal, mechanical, and optical, were evaluated. Both dc and ac methods were used. An attempt was made to measure the Earth rotation rate; however, the results were questionable because of the optical and electronic noise present. It was concluded that fiber ring optical gyroscopes using all discrete components have many serious problems that can only be overcome by discarding the discrete approach and adapting an all integrated optic technique that has the laser source, modulator, detector, beamsplitters, and bias element on a single chip.

  7. Behavioral Mapless Navigation Using Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monroe, Randall P.; Miller, Samuel A.; Bradley, Arthur T.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents work on the development and implementation of a novel approach to robotic navigation. In this system, map-building and localization for obstacle avoidance are discarded in favor of moment-by-moment behavioral processing of the sonar sensor data. To accomplish this, we developed a network of behaviors that communicate through the passing of rings, data structures that are similar in form to the sonar data itself and express the decisions of each behavior. Through the use of these rings, behaviors can moderate each other, conflicting impulses can be mediated, and designers can easily connect modules to create complex emergent navigational techniques. We discuss the development of a number of these modules and their successful use as a navigation system in the Trinity omnidirectional robot.

  8. Livslang læring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larson, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Pædagogisk sociologi beskæftiger sig blandt andet med de politiske rammebetingelser for opdragelse, undervisning, socialisering og uddannelse. I dette kapitel præsenteres en komparativ undersøgelse af EU’s politik med hensyn til livslang læring på den ene side, og den danske politik og lovgivning...... tilgang kaldet ‘What is the problem represented to be?’...

  9. ring og vejledning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambjørn, Lone

    Formålet med kompendiet om forskellige aspekter omkring sproglig læring er at ruste de studerende til studiet på en højere læreranstalt; at højne effektiviteten i deres sproglige læringsproces; at lære de studerende at arbejde uafhængigt af underviseren; at give de studerende de nødvendige redska...

  10. Two superconducting storage rings: ISABELLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanford, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    The general features of the design and the status of the ISABELLE storage ring project at the present time are reported. It brings up to date the results reported at the National Particle Accelerator Conference in March 1977. The most significant change since that time has been an upgrading of the energy of the overall facility, and acceptance of the project by the Department of Energy

  11. ring mellem elever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgsen, Marianne; Davidsen, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    I denne rapport præsenteres resultater fra følgeforskningen til projektet Læring gennem Bevægelse, som er gennemført på Søndervangskolen i Hammel i perioden august 2009 - maj 2010. Projektet er gennemført i samspil mellem lærere, it-vejleder, elever og skolens ledelse. Projektets overordnede formål...

  12. ring mellem elever

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jacob; Georgsen, Marianne

    I denne rapport tilbyder vi et indblik i det gennemførte projekt, og forfatterne har valgt nogle forhold ud, som belyses og diskuteres, mens andre ikke berøres eller diskuteres nævneværdigt i denne rapport. Det skyldes blandt andet projektets mange facetter, som dækker både læring, teknologi, pæd...

  13. Progressiv læring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2017-01-01

    undervisningen. • At der afsættes tid til implementeringen, og at det gøres tydeligt, at implementering tager tid. • At organiseringen af undervisningen på skolerne tilpasses, så det letter anvendelsen af principperne i Progressiv Læring. • At lærernes kompetenceudvikling er forankret på skolen både emnemæssigt...

  14. Bud detachment in hydra requires activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor and a Rho–ROCK–myosin II signaling pathway to ensure formation of a basal constriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holz, Oliver; Apel, David; Steinmetz, Patrick; Lange, Ellen; Hopfenmüller, Simon; Ohler, Kerstin; Sudhop, Stefanie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hydra propagates asexually by exporting tissue into a bud, which detaches 4 days later as a fully differentiated young polyp. Prerequisite for detachment is activation of fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling. The mechanism which enables constriction and tissue separation within the monolayered ecto‐ and endodermal epithelia is unknown. Results: Histological sections and staining of F‐actin by phalloidin revealed conspicuous cell shape changes at the bud detachment site indicating a localized generation of mechanical forces and the potential enhancement of secretory functions in ectodermal cells. By gene expression analysis and pharmacological inhibition, we identified a candidate signaling pathway through Rho, ROCK, and myosin II, which controls bud base constriction and rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. Specific regional myosin phosphorylation suggests a crucial role of ectodermal cells at the detachment site. Inhibition of FGFR, Rho, ROCK, or myosin II kinase activity is permissive for budding, but represses myosin phosphorylation, rearrangement of F‐actin and constriction. The young polyp remains permanently connected to the parent by a broad tissue bridge. Conclusions: Our data suggest an essential role of FGFR and a Rho‐ROCK‐myosin II pathway in the control of cell shape changes required for bud detachment. Developmental Dynamics 246:502–516, 2017. © 2017 The Authors Developmental Dynamics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Anatomists PMID:28411398

  15. Pharmacological reversal of endothelin-1 mediated constriction of the spiral modiolar artery: a potential new treatment for sudden sensorineural hearing loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Wolfgang

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vasospasm of the spiral modiolar artery (SMA may cause ischemic stroke of the inner ear. Endothelin-1 (ET-1 induces a strong, long-lasting constriction of the SMA by increasing contractile apparatus Ca2+ sensitivity via Rho-kinase. We therefore tested several Rho-kinase inhibitors and a cell-permeable analogue of cAMP (dbcAMP for their ability to reverse ET-1-induced constriction and Ca2+-sensitization. Methods The present study employed SMA isolated from gerbil temporal bones. Ca2+sensitivity was evaluated by correlating vascular diameter and smooth muscle cell [Ca2+]i, measured by fluo-4-microfluorometry and videomicroscopy. Results The Rho-kinase inhibitors Y-27632, fasudil, and hydroxy-fasudil reversed ET-1-induced vasoconstriction with an IC50 of 3, 15, and 111 μmol/L, respectively. DbcAMP stimulated a dose-dependent vasodilation (Ec50 = 1 mmol/L and a reduction of [Ca2+]i (EC50 = 0.3 μmol/L of ET-1-preconstricted vessels (1 nmol/L. Fasudil and dbcAMP both reversed the ET-1-induced increase in Ca2+ sensitivity. Conclusion Rho-kinase inhibition and dbcAMP reversed ET-1-induced vasoconstriction and Ca2+-sensitization. Therefore, Rho-kinase inhibitors or cAMP modulators could possess promise as pharmacological tools for the treatment of ET-1-induced constriction, ischemic stroke and sudden hearing loss.

  16. Multi-wavelength studies of Saturn's rings to constrain ring particle properties and ring structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, L.; Deau, E.; Morishima, R.; Filacchione, G.; Hedman, M.; Nicholson, P.; Colwell, J.; Bradley, T.

    2012-04-01

    A great deal can be learned about the nature of Saturn's ring particles and their regoliths by modeling the changes in brightness, color and temperature with changing viewing geometry over a wide range of wavelengths, from ultraviolet through the thermal infrared. Data from Cassini's Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS), Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS), Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) and Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) are jointly being studied using scans of the lit and unlit main rings (A, B, C and Cassini Division) at multiple geometries and solar elevations. Using multi-wavelength data sets allow us to test different thermal models by combining the effects of particle albedo, regolith grain size and surface roughness with thermal emissivity and inertia, particle spin rate and spin axis orientation. With the high spatial resolution of the Cassini data it is now possible to analyze these effects at smaller spatial scales and characterize regions such as the C ring plateaus and ringlets, where albedo differences may be present. In the CIRS data, over a range of solar elevations from -23 degrees to -8 degrees, the bulk of the temperature variations are confined primarily to phase angle. Only small temperature differences are observed with changing spacecraft elevation. Similar behavior is seen in the ISS color data. Color and temperature dependence with changing solar elevation angle are also observed. VIMS observations show that the IR ice absorption band depths are (almost) independent of phase angle, out to ~140 deg phase, suggesting that interparticle light scattering is relatively unimportant except at very high phase angles. These results imply that the individual properties of the ring particles may play a larger role than the collective properties of the rings, in particular at visible wavelengths. The temperature and color variation with phase angle may be a result of scattering within the regolith and on possibly rough surfaces

  17. Chest Wall Constriction after the Nuss Procedure Identified from Chest Radiograph and Multislice Computed Tomography Shortly after Removal of the Bar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Pei-Yeh; Zeng, Qi; Wong, Kin-Sun; Wang, Chao-Jan; Chang, Chee-Jen

    2016-01-01

    This study radiographically examined the changes in the chest walls of patients with pectus excavatum (PE) after Nuss bar removal, to define the deformation caused by the bar and stabilizer. In the first part of the study, we compared the changes in chest radiographs of patients with PE to a preoperation PE control group. In the second part, we used multislice computed tomography (CT) scans to provide three-dimensional reconstructions with which to evaluate the changes to the thoracic wall. Part 1 From June 2006 to August 2011, 1,125 patients with PE who had posteroanterior chest radiographs taken before undergoing the Nuss procedure at four hospitals were enrolled as a preoperative control group. At the same time, 203 patients who had the bar removed were enrolled as the study group. The maximum dimensions of the outer boundary of the first to ninth rib pairs (R1-R9, rib pair width), chest height, and chest width were measured. Part 2 Thirty-one consecutive patients with PE (20 males and 11 females) who underwent Nuss bar removal were evaluated 7 to 30 days after operation. During this period, a further 34 patients with PE who had undergone CT imaging before bar insertion were evaluated and compared with the postoperative group. Part 1 The width of the lower ribs (R4-R9) after bar removal was significantly less than in the age-matched controls. The ribs adjacent to the bar (R5-R7) showed the greatest restriction. The width of the upper ribs (R1-R3) 2 to 3 years after bar placement did not differ significantly from the controls. Patients who were operated on after 10 years of age had less of a restrictive effect. Three years of bar placement resulted in more restriction than a 2-year period, particularly in patients younger than 10 years old. Part 2: A significant constriction of the chest wall was observed in 13 patients after removal of the Nuss bar. Constriction at ribs 5 to 8 was found to be present adjacent to the site of bar insertion. However

  18. Synergistic interaction between total glucosides and total flavonoids on chronic constriction injury induced neuropathic pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juan; Lv, Chen; Wang, Hai-na; Cao, Yi

    2013-04-01

    Shaoyao Gancao Decoction (SGD), a famous herbal medicine, consists of two herbs (Paeoniae Radix and Glycyrrhizae Radix) and is traditionally used for the treatment of pain. To investigate the synergistic potential of total glucosides of Paeoniae Radix (TGP) and total flavonoids of Glycyrrhizae Radix (TFL). Oral administration of TGP and TFL alone at the doses of 60,120 and 240 mg/kg or in combination were given only one time to the neuropathic pain rat induced by chronic constriction injury. Paw pressure and heat immersion tests were performed to assess degrees of mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia, respectively. Synergistic interactions between TGP and TFL were characterized using isobolographic analysis. Expressions of Sirt1 protein were detected by immunohistochemistry. On day 14 after surgery, single oral administration of TGP and TFL both produced significant anti-allodynic and anti-hyperalgesic effects in dose-dependent and time-dependent manners. The ED(50) value of TGP was 249.4 ± 10.8 mg/kg while TFL was 871.4 ± 30.5 mg/kg. Isobolographic analysis revealed that the combination of TGP with TFL at the fixed ratios of 3:1 exerted the highest sub-additive (synergistic) interaction, of which the experimental ED(50) value was 95.1 ± 9.0 mg/kg. SGD could also downregulate Sirt1 protein expression, which was 4.2-fold higher than that of model rats in dorsal root ganglion. Analgesic effects of SGD may contribute to simultaneous inhibition of Sirt1 overexpression and could warrant further evaluation as a possible agent for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  19. Evolution of a meander in a constricted reach of a dryland alluvial channel: Little Colorado River, Arizona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, D.

    2013-12-01

    Lateral migration of river meander systems is complex, particularly in drylands where fluvial processes are discontinuous. Analysis of aerial photography and GPS tracking of cutbank erosion can further empirical knowledge of meander development. Moreover, discharge records link landscape response to hydroclimatic variability. In the semiarid Little Colorado River valley, extreme erosive episodes typically result from snowmelt flow, or lately, rain-on-snow events. The 90-km reach of the Little Colorado River (LCR), from Winslow to Leupp, Arizona, meanders within a 5-km-wide valley. Near Winslow, however, the LCR is disconnected from its floodplain by a 12-km-long levee. The levee restricts the floodplain to only 450 m wide in one location. In this severely constricted river stretch, a flood event in January 2008 relocated a meander bend. Bend development followed a common sequence of migration phases long noted in the literature, but at a very rapid pace. During the flood event one meander limb migrated ~200 m, following the general northwesterly flow direction of the river. Movement vectors of meander inflection points, apex, and apical line characterize changes in bend morphology. Before the 2008 flood event the apical line of the meander bend had azimuth 50°; after the 2008 flood event the apical line of the meander bend had azimuth 345°. Since that event, the meander bend has migrated an additional ~200 m through a combination of translation, extension, and rotation. The data provide information on geomorphic response to bimodal precipitation patterns in a human-perturbed channel reach.

  20. A quasi-3D compartmental multi-scale approach to detect and quantify diseased regional lung constriction using spirometry data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, Ravishekar Ravi; Singh, Narender; Przekwas, Andrzej

    2018-02-27

    Spirometry is a widely used pulmonary function test to detect the airflow limitations associated with various obstructive lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and even obesity-related complications. These conditions arise due to the change in the airway resistance, alveolar compliance, and inductance values. Currently, zero-dimensional (0D) compartmental models are commonly used for calibrating these resistance, compliance, and inductance values, i.e., solving the inverse spirometry problem. However, 0D compartments cannot capture the flow physics or the spatial geometry effects, thereby generating a low fidelity prediction of the diseased lung. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models offer higher fidelity solutions but may be impractical for certain applications due to the duration of these simulations. Recently, a novel, fast-running and robust Quasi-3D (Q3D) wire model for simulating the airflow in the human lung airway was developed by CFD Research Corporation (CFDRC). This Q3D method preserved the 3D spatial nature of the airways and was favorably validated against CFD solutions. In the present study, the Q3D compartmental multi-scale combination is further improved to predict regional lung constriction of diseased lungs using spirometry data. The Q3D mesh is resolved up to the eighth lung airway generation. The remainder of the airways and the alveoli sections are modeled using a compartmental approach. The Q3D geometry is then split into different spatial sections and the resistance values in these regions are obtained using parameter inversion. Finally, the airway diameter values are then reduced to create the actual diseased lung model, corresponding to these resistance values. This diseased lung model can be used for patient-specific drug deposition predictions and the subsequent optimization of the orally inhaled drug products. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Dynamic effects of TNF-α on synaptic transmission in mice over time following sciatic nerve chronic constriction injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongmei; Zhang, Haijun; Dougherty, Patrick M

    2013-10-01

    Nerve injury-induced central sensitization can manifest as an increase in excitatory synaptic transmission and/or as a decrease in inhibitory synaptic transmission in spinal dorsal horn neurons. Cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) are induced in the spinal cord under various injury conditions and contribute to neuropathic pain. In this study we examined the effect of TNF-α in modulating excitatory and inhibitory synaptic input to spinal substantia gelatinosa (SG) neurons over time in mice following chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve. Whole cell patch-clamp studies from SG neurons showed that TNF-α enhanced overall excitability of the spinal cord early in time following nerve injury 3 days after CCI compared with that in sham control mice. In contrast, the effects of TNF were blunted 14 days after CCI in nerve-injured mice compared with sham surgery mice. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the expression of TNF-α receptor 1 (TNFR1) was increased at 3 days but decreased at 14 days following CCI in the ipsilateral vs. the contralateral spinal cord dorsal horn. These results suggest that TNF-α acting at TNFR1 is important in the development of neuropathic pain by facilitating excitatory synaptic signaling in the acute phases after nerve injury but has a reduced effect on spinal neuron signaling in the later phases of nerve injury-induced pain. Failure of the facilatory effects of TNF-α on excitatory synaptic signaling in the dorsal horn to resolve following nerve injury may be an important component in the transition between acute and chronic pain conditions.

  2. Left Atrial Systolic and Diastolic Dysfunction in Patients with Chronic Constrictive Pericarditis: A Study Using Speckle Tracking and Conventional Echocardiography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Liu

    Full Text Available Left atrial (LA function plays an important role in the maintenance of cardiac output, however, in patients with constrictive pericarditis (CP, whether pericardial restriction and adhesion can lead to LA dysfunction, and the characteristics of LA function remain unclear. The aim of the study is to compare the left atrial (LA function of patients with CP to that of healthy study participants using speckle tracking echocardiography (STE and conventional echocardiography.Thirty patients with CP and 30 healthy volunteers (controls were enrolled in the study. The underlying cause of CP was viral pericarditis in 24 (80% patients and unknown in 6 (20% patients. The LA maximum volume (Vmax, LA minimal volume (Vmin, and LA volume before atrial contraction (Vpre-a were measured using biplane modified Simpson's method. The LA expansion index (LA reservoir function was determined as follows: ([LAVmax - LAVmin]/LAVmin ×100. The passive emptying index (LA conduit function was calculated as follows: ([LAVmax - LAVpre-a]/LAVmax ×100, and the active emptying index (booster pump function was calculated as follows: ([LAVpre-a - LAVmin]/LAVpre-a ×100. All the patients underwent two-dimensional STE. The LA global systolic strain (S, systolic strain rate (SrS, early diastolic strain rate (SrE and late diastolic strain rate (SrA were measured. The LA expansion index, passive emptying index, the active emptying index and the LA global S, SrS, SrE, SrA were found to be significantly lower in patients with CP than in the control participants (P <0.001. LA function was correlated with the early diastolic velocity of the lateral mitral annulus (P <0.05.Although left ventricular systolic function was preserved in patients with CP, the LA reservoir, conduit, and booster functions were impaired. Pericardial restriction and impairment of the LA myocardium may play an important role in the reduction of LA function in patients with CP.

  3. Polyurethane Foams with Pyrimidine Rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kania Ewelina

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Oligoetherols based on pyrimidine ring were obtained upon reaction of barbituric acid with glycidol and alkylene carbonates. These oligoetherols were then used to obtain polyurethane foams in the reaction of oligoetherols with isocyanates and water. The protocol of foam synthesis was optimized by the choice of proper kind of oligoetherol and synthetic composition. The thermal resistance was studied by dynamic and static methods with concomitant monitoring of compressive strength. The polyurethane foams have similar physical properties as the classic ones except their enhanced thermal resistance. They stand long-time heating even at 200°C. Moreover thermal exposition of foams results generally in increase of their compressive strength.

  4. Ring with changeable radiation dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collica, C.; Epifano, L.; Farella, R.

    1976-01-01

    A ring for housing a disc of radiation measuring material is described comprising a band having a circular shape and a housing integral with the band. The housing comprises a hollow cylindrical section substantially normal to the band surface and terminating in an inwardly disposed annular flange which defines a substantially circular aperture. In a preferred embodiment of the invention a retaining protrusion formed on the inside of the cylindrical section and spaced from the annular flange is provided to retain a plurality of discs mounted in the housing in layered fashion

  5. Storage ring proton EDM experiment

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    sensitivity of 10^-29 e-cm.  The strength of the method originates from the fact that there are high intensity polarized proton beams available and the fact that the so-called geometric phase systematic error background cancels with clock-wise and counter-clock-wise storage possible in electric rings. The ultimate sensitivity of the method is 10^-30 e-cm. At this level it will either detect a non-zero EDM or it will eliminate electro-weak baryogenesis.

  6. Longitudinal dynamics in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colton, E.P.

    1986-01-01

    The single-particle equations of motion are derived for charged particles in a storage ring. Longitudinal space charge is included in the potential assuming an infinitely conducting circular beam pipe with a distributed inductance. The framework uses Hamilton's equations with the canonical variables phi and W. The Twiss parameters for longitudinal motion are also defined for the small amplitude synchrotron oscillations. The space-charge Hamiltonian is calculated for both parabolic bunches and ''matched'' bunches. A brief analysis including second-harmonic rf contributions is also given. The final sections supply calculations of dynamical quantities and particle simulations with the space-charge effects neglected

  7. Interface-læring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorhauge, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Interface-læring er den læringsoplevelse, der kan opstå i grænsefladen mellem to væsensforskellige læringsmiljøer, når de mødes og griber ind i hinanden. Et gymnasium og et museum er eksempler på to sådanne læringsmiljøer. Artiklen præsenterer nogle af de væsentligste resultater fra min ph.d. afh...

  8. Boom and Bust Cycles in Saturn's Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, L. W.; Meinke, B. K.; Sremcevic, M.; Albers, N.

    2010-12-01

    Cassini UVIS occultation data show clumping in Saturn’s F ring and at the B ring outer edge, indicating aggregation and disaggregation at these locations perturbed by Mimas and Prometheus. Timescales range from hours to months. The maximum clumping lags the moon by roughly π in the forcing frame. This indicates a direct relation between the moon and the ring clumping. We propose that the collective behavior of the ring particles resembles a predator-prey system: the aggregate mean size is the prey, which feeds the velocity dispersion; conversely, increasing dispersion breaks up the aggregates. For realistic values of the parameters this creates a limit cycle behavior, as for the ecology of foxes and hares or the boom-bust economic cycle. Solving for the long-term behavior of this forced system gives a periodic response at the perturbing frequency, with a phase lag roughly consistent with the UVIS occultation measurements. We conclude that the agitation by the moons at both these locations in the F ring and at the B ring outer edge drives aggregation and disaggregation in the forcing frame. This agitation of the ring material allows fortuitous formation of solid objects from the temporary clumps, via stochastic processes like compaction, adhesion, sintering or reorganization that drives the denser parts of the aggregate to the center or ejects the lighter elements. These more persistent objects would then orbit at the Kepler rate. Such processes can create the equinox objects seen at the B ring edge and in the F ring, explain the ragged nature of those ring regions and allow for rare events to aggregate ring particles into solid objects, recycling the ring material and extending the ring lifetime.

  9. The cryogenic storage ring CSR

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Hahn, R.; Becker, A.; Berg, F.; Blaum, K.; Breitenfeldt, C.; Fadil, H.; Fellenberger, F.; Froese, M.; George, S.; Göck, J.; Grieser, M.; Grussie, F.; Guerin, E. A.; Heber, O.; Herwig, P.; Karthein, J.; Krantz, C.; Kreckel, H.; Lange, M.; Laux, F.; Lohmann, S.; Menk, S.; Meyer, C.; Mishra, P. M.; Novotný, O.; O'Connor, A. P.; Orlov, D. A.; Rappaport, M. L.; Repnow, R.; Saurabh, S.; Schippers, S.; Schröter, C. D.; Schwalm, D.; Schweikhard, L.; Sieber, T.; Shornikov, A.; Spruck, K.; Sunil Kumar, S.; Ullrich, J.; Urbain, X.; Vogel, S.; Wilhelm, P.; Wolf, A.; Zajfman, D.

    2016-06-01

    An electrostatic cryogenic storage ring, CSR, for beams of anions and cations with up to 300 keV kinetic energy per unit charge has been designed, constructed, and put into operation. With a circumference of 35 m, the ion-beam vacuum chambers and all beam optics are in a cryostat and cooled by a closed-cycle liquid helium system. At temperatures as low as (5.5 ± 1) K inside the ring, storage time constants of several minutes up to almost an hour were observed for atomic and molecular, anion and cation beams at an energy of 60 keV. The ion-beam intensity, energy-dependent closed-orbit shifts (dispersion), and the focusing properties of the machine were studied by a system of capacitive pickups. The Schottky-noise spectrum of the stored ions revealed a broadening of the momentum distribution on a time scale of 1000 s. Photodetachment of stored anions was used in the beam lifetime measurements. The detachment rate by anion collisions with residual-gas molecules was found to be extremely low. A residual-gas density below 140 cm-3 is derived, equivalent to a room-temperature pressure below 10-14 mbar. Fast atomic, molecular, and cluster ion beams stored for long periods of time in a cryogenic environment will allow experiments on collision- and radiation-induced fragmentation processes of ions in known internal quantum states with merged and crossed photon and particle beams.

  10. Replantation of ring avulsion amputations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabapathy R

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Replantation of ring avulsion injuries is a challenge because of the long segment damage to the vessels and intrinsic damage caused to soft tissues at the proximal edge of the amputation. Eight patients with total ring avulsion amputations underwent microsurgical replantation in the period 1994 to 2002. Arterial repair was done by direct vessel suture in three patients, interposition vein grafts in two and cross anastomosis of the digital arteries in three patients. Venous anastomosis was carried out by mobilization and direct suture in seven patients and vessel transfer from the adjacent finger in one patient. Seven of the eight replantations were successful, while one patient had a partial failure. At a minimum follow-up of one year, these patients showed good functional and cosmetic recovery. All successful patients were happy with the outcome and none have requested for amputation, even those whose results were not functionally adequate. However, in addition to technical factors, it is important to evaluate the patient's motivation to undergo not only the long surgery, but also multiple secondary procedures and regular supervised physiotherapy. We also describe a simple method which prevents the soft tissues inside the degloved digit from becoming wrapped around the K wire during bony fixation, thus making one step of this technically challenging procedure a little easier.

  11. New diols with imidazoquinazoline ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szyszkowska, Agnieszka; Klasek, Antonin; Pawlędzio, Sylwia; Trzybiński, Damian; Woźniak, Krzysztof; Zarzyka, Iwona

    2018-02-01

    The objective of these studies was to synthesize and characterize new diols with an imidazoquinazoline ring. New diols were obtained in reactions of 2,6-bis-(ethoxycarbonylmethyl)-1-phenylimidazo[1,5-c]quinazoline-3,5-dione with excess of ethylene glycol or in reaction of 1-phenyl-2H,6H-imidazo[1,5-c]quinazoline-3,5-dione with 2-M excess of ethylene oxide. The products were isolated at high yield and characterized by instrumental methods (IR, 1H- and 13C-NMR, MS-ESI, UV, TGA). The structure of 2,6-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-phenylimidazo[1,5-c]quinazoline-3,5-dione (BEFIQ) was also investigated by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. BEFIQ crystallizes in the monoclinic P21/n space group with two molecules in the asymmetric unit of the crystal lattice. The nature of the packing of molecules in the crystal lattice of BEFIQ was investigated by Hirshfeld surface analysis. The described methods enable the synthesis of new diols with an imidazoquinazoline ring. The new diols are quite soluble in typical organic solvents. Therefore, they can be used as raw materials for the synthesis of thermally stable polymers, and they can also have biological activity.

  12. A first course in noncommutative rings

    CERN Document Server

    Lam, T Y

    2001-01-01

    A First Course in Noncommutative Rings, an outgrowth of the author's lectures at the University of California at Berkeley, is intended as a textbook for a one-semester course in basic ring theory. The material covered includes the Wedderburn-Artin theory of semisimple rings, Jacobson's theory of the radical, representation theory of groups and algebras, prime and semiprime rings, local and semilocal rings, perfect and semiperfect rings, etc. By aiming the level of writing at the novice rather than the connoisseur and by stressing th the role of examples and motivation, the author has produced a text that is suitable not only for use in a graduate course, but also for self- study in the subject by interested graduate students. More than 400 exercises testing the understanding of the general theory in the text are included in this new edition.

  13. Foundations of commutative rings and their modules

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Fanggui

    2016-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the basics and recent developments of commutative algebra. A glance at the contents of the first five chapters shows that the topics covered are ones that usually are included in any commutative algebra text. However, the contents of this book differ significantly from most commutative algebra texts: namely, its treatment of the Dedekind–Mertens formula, the (small) finitistic dimension of a ring, Gorenstein rings, valuation overrings and the valuative dimension, and Nagata rings. Going further, Chapter 6 presents w-modules over commutative rings as they can be most commonly used by torsion theory and multiplicative ideal theory. Chapter 7 deals with multiplicative ideal theory over integral domains. Chapter 8 collects various results of the pullbacks, especially Milnor squares and D+M constructions, which are probably the most important example-generating machines. In Chapter 9, coherent rings with finite weak global dimensions are probed, and the local ring of weak gl...

  14. Report of the eRHIC Ring-Ring Working Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenauer, E. C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Berg, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Blaskiewicz, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Brennan, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fedotov, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Fischer, W. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Litvinenko, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Montag, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Palmer, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Parker, B. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Peggs, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ptitsyn, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ranjbar, V. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tepikian, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Trbojevic, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Willeke, F. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-10-13

    This report evaluates the ring-ring option for eRHIC as a lower risk alternative to the linac-ring option. The reduced risk goes along with a reduced initial luminosity performance. However, a luminosity upgrade path is kept open. This upgrade path consists of two branches, with the ultimate upgrade being either a ring-ring or a linac-ring scheme. The linac-ring upgrade could be almost identical to the proposed linac-ring scheme, which is based on an ERL in the RHIC tunnel. This linac-ring version has been studied in great detail over the past ten years, and its significant risks are known. On the other hand, no detailed work on an ultimate performance ring-ring scenario has been performed yet, other than the development of a consistent parameter set. Pursuing the ring-ring upgrade path introduces high risks and requires significant design work that is beyond the scope of this report.

  15. ring og den kulturhistoriske skole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broström, Stig

    2007-01-01

    -forskere uddrager den grundlæggende forståelse af forholdet mellem læring og udvikling. Nemlig at læring og udvikling indgår i en dialektisk enhed og virker gensidigt ind på hinanden - dog således at læring kommer ført, den trækker udviklingen med sig og så at sige leder udviklingen. Vygotskys tese vedrørende...

  16. On the potential of large ring lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stedman, G. E.; Hurst, R. B.; Schreiber, K. U.

    2007-11-01

    We describe a new ring laser with area A = 833 m 2 and update performance statistics for several such machines. Chaio and Anandan [R.Y. Chaio, J. Anandan, Gen. Relat. Gravit. 14 (1982) 515-521] judged ring lasers inferior to matter interferometers as possible detectors of gravitational waves. However, we note that geophysically interesting results have been obtained from large ring lasers and that there is still a lot of room for improvements.

  17. Arkitektur krop og læring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulløv, E.; Coninck-Smith, N. D.; Pedersen, S. H.

    Når vi taler om læring, tænker vi sædvanligvis på resultatet af bevidst tilrettelagt undervisningsforløb. Megen læring sker imidlertid ubevidst via den påvirkning, omgivelserne øver på vores kroppe og vores sanser. I arkitektur, krop og læring gives en teoretisk og analytisk fremstilling af forsk......, Gebauer, Wulf, Lorentzer, Merleau-Ponty, Barth, Ehn....

  18. RRF rings which are not LRF

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    All the rings we consider will be associative rings with an identity element 1 TИ 0 and all the modules considered will be unital modules. In what follows A denotes a ring, mod-A. (respectively A-mod) will denote the category of right (respectively left) A-modules. Recall (Definition 2.1 in [9]) that an A-module M is said to be ...

  19. Relatively Orthocomplemented Skew Nearlattices in Rickart Rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cīırulis Jānis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A class of (right Rickart rings, called strong, is isolated. In particular, every Rickart *-ring is strong. It is shown in the paper that every strong Rickart ring R admits a binary operation which turns R into a right normal band having an upper bound property with respect to its natural order ≤; such bands are known as right normal skew nearlattices. The poset (R, ≤ is relatively orthocomplemented; in particular, every initial segment in it is orthomodular.

  20. Saturn’s ring temperatures at equinox

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spilker, Linda J.; Ferrari, C.; Morishima, R.

    2013-10-01

    Modeling the thermal emission of Saturn's rings is challenging due to the numerous heating sources as well as the structural properties of the disk and of the particles that are closely related. At equinox, however, the main rings are externally heated by Saturn alone and the problem is somewhat simplified. We test the abilities of our current models to reproduce the temperatures observed with the Cassini CIRS instrument around equinox in August 2009. A simple semi-analytic model which includes mutual shadowing effects can mostly explain the radial profile of the equinox ring temperatures, except the model predicts lower temperatures than those observed for the A ring. The temperature variation at a given saturnocentric radius is primarily caused by observational geometry variations relative to Saturn. The observed temperature increases with decreasing Saturn-ring-observer angle. In addition, we found evidence that the leading hemispheres of particles are warmer than the trailing hemispheres at least for the C ring and probably for the A and B rings as well. This is explained if some fraction of particles has spin rates lower than the synchronous rotation rate as predicted by N-body simulations. The spin model for a monolayer ring (Ferrari, C., Leyrat, C., 2006, Astron. Astrophys. 447, 745-760) can fit the temperature variations with spacecraft longitude observed in the C ring with currently known thermal properties and a mixing of slow and fast rotators. The multilayer model (Morishima, R., Salo, H., Ohtsuki, K., 2009, Icarus 201, 634-654) can reproduce the temperatures of the B and C rings but gives A ring temperatures that are significantly lower than those observed as does the simple semi-analytic model. More advanced models which take into account self-gravity wakes may explain the A ring temperature behavior.

  1. Parameter Scan for the CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Papaphilippou, Y; Korostelev, M

    2008-01-01

    Triggered by the RF frequency reduction of the CLIC main linac cavities, the damping ring parameters had to be reevaluated and the rings performance adapted to the new luminosity requirements. In view of a staged approach for reaching the ultimate energy of the collider, the dependence of the rings output emittances under the influence of Intrabeam Scattering is evaluated with respect to different beam characteristics such as bunch population, beam energy, coupling and longitudinal beam characteristics.

  2. Design of Piston Ring Friction Tester Apparatus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klit, Peder

    2006-01-01

    One of the major prerequisites for calculating piston ring friction is a good description of the tribological situation. Piston rings operate in three different lubrication regimes and the theoretical models should be capable to describe this. A very important condition for describing the frictio......One of the major prerequisites for calculating piston ring friction is a good description of the tribological situation. Piston rings operate in three different lubrication regimes and the theoretical models should be capable to describe this. A very important condition for describing...... the frictional behavior of a piston ring correctly is knowledge about the amount of lubricant present. For piston rings the external load may be established by measuring the pressure distribution, i.e. the pressure drop in the piston ring package. Speed and temperature may also be established. The amount...... available is reflected in the friction absorbed in the bearing. The following properties will be measured: Oil fillm thickness - along liner (axial variation), oil film thickness - along piston ring (circumferential variation), piston tilt, temperature of piston rings and liner, pressure at piston lands...

  3. Forandringslæring med autismediagnoser?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafson, Kari Ingrid; Mørck, Line Lerche

    2013-01-01

    Rasmus’ ændringer i læring, selvforståelse og tilhørsforhold perspektiveres med andre ASF-diagnostiseredes læring udforsket bl.a. gennem gruppeinterviews i regi af Asperger-foreningen. Artiklen byder således på et alternativ i form af at forstå forandringslæring som overskridende læring, med langt større...... hvor fx Asperger-foreningen, lærere og skolebørns- og unges-fællesskaber, samt forældrene er vigtige aktører i overskridelsen af marginalisering....

  4. Corneal iron ring after hyperopic photorefractive keratectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgihan, K; Akata, F; Gürelik, G; Adigüzel, U; Akpinar, M; Hasanreisoğlu, B

    1999-05-01

    To report the incidence and course of corneal iron deposition after hyperopic photorefractive keratectomy (PRK). Gazi University, Medical School, Department of Ophthalmology, Ankara, Turkey. Between January 1995 and December 1997, 62 eyes had PRK to correct hyperopia. Nine eyes developed corneal iron ring 5 to 8 months (mean 6.25 months +/- 1.3 [SD]) after PRK for hyperopia. The rings persisted during the mean follow-up of 19 +/- 11.09 months. The ring-shaped iron deposition after PRK for hyperopia must be differentiated from the Fleischer ring. Our results suggest that the slitlamp findings of peripheral corneal iron deposition in hyperopic PRK patients correlate with achieved correction.

  5. Multiplication modules over non-commutative rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuganbaev, A A

    2003-01-01

    It is proved that each submodule of a multiplication module over a regular ring is a multiplicative module. If A is a ring with commutative multiplication of right ideals, then each projective right ideal is a multiplicative module, and a finitely generated A-module M is a multiplicative module if and only if all its localizations with respect to maximal right ideals of A are cyclic modules over the corresponding localizations of A. In addition, several known results on multiplication modules over commutative rings are extended to modules over not necessarily commutative rings

  6. Status of the SLC damping rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, A.M.; Davies-White, W.A.; Delahaye, J.P.

    1985-06-01

    Electron beams of full design energy 1.21 GeV and nearly full design intensity 4 x 10 10 particles/pulse (design 5 x 10 10 ) have been extracted from the Stanford Linac and successfully stored in the electron damping ring. Beams of less intensity have been extracted from the ring and reinjected into the Linac. The present intensity limits are not thought to be fundamental. The operating experience with the electron ring and the status of the construction of the positron ring will be discussed. 11 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  7. The Conversion of Wiswesser Line Notations to Ring Codes. I. The Conversion of Ring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granito, Charles E.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    The computerized conversion of Wiswesser Line Notations to Ring Codes, using a two-part approach, and the set of computer programs generated for the conversion of ring systems are described. (9 references) (Author)

  8. Mechanical support of a ceramic gas turbine vane ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jun; Green, Kevin E.; Mosher, Daniel A.; Holowczak, John E.; Reinhardt, Gregory E.

    2010-07-27

    An assembly for mounting a ceramic turbine vane ring onto a turbine support casing comprises a first metal clamping ring and a second metal clamping ring. The first metal clamping ring is configured to engage with a first side of a tab member of the ceramic turbine vane ring. The second metal clamping ring is configured to engage with a second side of the tab member such that the tab member is disposed between the first and second metal clamping rings.

  9. Ring opening metathesis polymerization catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grubbs, R.H.; Johnson, L.K.; Novak, B.M.; Hillmyer, M.; Benedicto, A.; France, M.; Nguyen, S.T. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Over the past eight years, a number of new catalysts for the ring opening metathesis polymerization of cyclic olefins have been developed. These catalysts are simple organometallic complexes containing metal carbon multiple bonds that in most cases polymerize olefins by a living process. These catalysts have been used to prepare a family of near monodispersed and structurally homogeneous polymers, a series of telechelic polymers with controlled molecular weight and functionality and triblock polymers with segments with potentially interesting electronic properties. A series of new group VIII catalysts are being developed that allow a wide range of functionality to be incorporated into the polymer side chains. The same catalysts can also be used in the synthesis of fine chemicals.

  10. Main ring transition crossing simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kourbanis, I.; Ng, King-Yuen.

    1990-10-01

    We used ESME to simulate transition crossing in the Main Ring (MR). For the simulations, we followed the MR 29 cycle used currently for bar p production with a flat top of 120 GeV. In Sect. II, some inputs are discussed. In Sect. III, we present simulations with space charge turned off so that the effect of nonlinearity can be studied independently. When space charge is turned on in Sect. IV, we are faced with the problem of statistical errors due to binning, an analysis of which is given in the Appendices. Finally in Sects. V and VI, the results of simulations with space charge are presented and compared with the experimental measurements. 7 refs., 6 figs

  11. Low-emittance Storage Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Wolski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The effects of synchrotron radiation on particle motion in storage rings are discussed. In the absence of radiation, particle motion is symplectic, and the beam emittances are conserved. The inclusion of radiation effects in a classical approximation leads to emittance damping: expressions for the damping times are derived. Then, it is shown that quantum radiation effects lead to excitation of the beam emittances. General expressions for the equilibrium longitudinal and horizontal (natural) emittances are derived. The impact of lattice design on the natural emittance is discussed, with particular attention to the special cases of FODO-, achromat- and theoretical-minimum-emittance-style lattices. Finally, the effects of betatron coupling and vertical dispersion (generated by magnet alignment and lattice tuning errors) on the vertical emittance are considered.

  12. What confines the rings of Saturn?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajeddine, Radwan; Nicholson, Philip D.; El Moutamid, Maryame; Longaretti, Pierre-Yves; Burns, Joseph A.

    2017-10-01

    The viscous spreading of planetary rings is believed to be counteracted by satellite torques, either through an individual resonance or through overlapping resonances (when the satellite is close to the ring edge). For the A ring of Saturn, it has been commonly believed that the satellite Janus alone can prevent the ring from spreading via its 7:6 Lindblad resonance. We discuss this common misconception and show that, in reality, the A ring is confined by the contributions from the group of satellites Pan, Atlas, Prometheus, Pandora, Janus, Epimetheus, and Mimas, whose resonances gradually decrease the angular momentum flux transported outward through the ring via density and bending waves. We further argue that this decrease in angular momentum flux occurs through the mechanism of ‘flux reversal’.We find that the Janus 7:6 torque is relatively feeble, as is the comparable torque of the nearby small satellite Atlas, each amounting to less than one-tenth of the angular momentum transport carried by the A ring. But the cumulative torques of the many other satellite resonances in the A ring sufficiently reduce the angular momentum flux through the rings so that the torques due to Janus and Atlas are effective in confining the outer edge of the ring.Furthermore, we use the magnitude of the satellites’ resonance torques to estimate the effective viscosity profile across the A ring, showing that it decreases from ~50 cm2 s-1 at the inner edge to less than ~11 cm2 s-1 at the outer edge. The gradual estimated decrease of the angular momentum flux and effective viscosity are roughly consistent with results obtained by balancing the shepherding torques from Pan and Daphnis with the viscous torque at the edges of the Encke and Keeler gaps, as well as the edge of the A ring.On the other hand, the Mimas 2:1 Lindblad resonance alone seems to be capable of confining the edge of the B ring, and contrary to the situation in the A ring, we show that the effective viscosity

  13. VUV optical ring resonator for Duke storage ring free electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S.H.; Litvinenko, V.N.; Madey, J.M.J. [Duke Univ., Durham, NC (United States)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    The conceptual design of the multifaceted-mirror ring resonator for Duke storage ring VUV FEL is presented. The expected performance of the OK-4 FEL with ring resonator is described. We discuss in this paper our plans to study reflectivity of VUV mirrors and their resistivity to soft X-ray spontaneous radiation from OK-4 undulator.

  14. Electron beam cooling at a magnetic storage ring, TARN II, and an electrostatic storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Tetsumi

    2006-01-01

    At the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), a magnetic storage ring, TARN II, with an electron cooler was operated from 1989 to 1999, while an electrostatic storage ring with a small electron cooler has been operational since 2000. In this paper, the electron cooling at TARN II and the electrostatic storage ring is described. (author)

  15. Effects of Saffron (Crocus sativus L.) Stigma Extract and its Active Constituent Crocin on Neuropathic Pain Responses in a Rat Model of Chronic Constriction Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Safakhah, Hossein Ali; Taghavi, Tahereh; Rashidy-Pour, Ali; Vafaei, Abbas Ali; Sokhanvar, Mina; Mohebbi, Narges; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the therapeutic effects of saffron (Crocus sativus L.) and its main constituent crocin on neuropathic pain behavioral responses induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI) in rats. Adult male Wistar rats (200 to 250 g) were randomly assigned into 5 groups: Sham + saline, CCI + saline, CCI+ saffron (30 mg/kg), CCI + crocin (15 mg/kg) and CCI + crocin (30 mg/kg). CCI was induced by applying 4 loose ligatures around the sciatic nerve. Two weeks after nerve...

  16. Two cases of halo scalp ring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douri, Thaer Hasan

    2016-11-15

    Halo scalp ring (HSR) is a rare form of non-scarring annular alopecia that is attributed to caput succedaneum. It arises perinatally because of prolonged pressure on the scalp by the cervix during or before the delivery. We report two new cases of halo scalp ring in full term pregnancy - newborns.

  17. Two cases of halo scalp ring

    OpenAIRE

    Douri, Thaer Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Halo scalp ring (HSR) is a rare form of non-scarring annular alopecia that is attributed to caput succedaneum. It arises perinatally because of prolonged pressure on the scalp by the cervix during or before the delivery. We report two new cases of halo scalp ring in full term pregnancy - newborns.

  18. Local duality for 2-dimensional local ring

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We prove a local duality for some schemes associated to a 2-dimensional complete local ring whose residue field is an -dimensional local field in the sense of Kato–Parshin. Our results generalize the Saito works in the case =0 and are applied to study the Bloch–Ogus complex for such rings in various cases.

  19. Hawking radiation of black rings from anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Bin; He Wei

    2008-01-01

    We derive Hawking radiation of five-dimensional black rings from gauge and gravitational anomalies using the method proposed by Robinson and Wilczek. We find, as in the black hole case, that the problem could reduce to a (1+1)-dimensional field theory and the anomalies result in correct Hawking temperature for neutral, dipole and charged black rings

  20. Local duality for 2-dimensional local ring

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dimensional complete local ring whose residue field is an n-dimensional local field in the sense of. Kato–Parshin. Our results generalize the Saito works in the case n = 0 and are applied to study the Bloch–Ogus complex for such rings in various cases.

  1. Counteracting ring formation in rotary kilns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisaroni, M.; Sadi, R.; Lahaye, D.

    Avoiding the formation of rings in rotary kilns is an issue of primary concern to the cement production industry. We developed a numerical combustion model that revealed that in our case study rings are typically formed in zones of maximal radiative heat transfer. This local overheating causes the

  2. The King's Ring: A Matter of Trust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sterrett, Joseph William

    2018-01-01

    This essay examines the material and social effects of an exchange of trust between a king, Henry VIII, and his counsellor, Thomas Cranmer in Shakespeare and Fletcher’s All is True. The ring that the King gives Cranmer is both nothing and everything: nothing in that it could be anything, any ring...

  3. Familial transmission of a ring chromosome 21

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael

    1987-01-01

    A ring chromosome 21 was found in a phenotypically normal mother and her son. The clinical findings in the son were bilateral retention of the testes and a slightly delayed puberty onset. Consequences of a ring formation of a chromosome 21 in phenotypically normal patients are presented...

  4. Coefficient rings of formal group laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchstaber, V M; Ustinov, A V

    2015-01-01

    We describe the coefficient rings of universal formal group laws which arise in algebraic geometry, algebraic topology and their application to mathematical physics. We also describe the homomorphisms of these coefficient rings coming from reductions of one formal group law to another. The proofs are based on the number-theoretic properties of binomial coefficients. Bibliography: 37 titles

  5. Ring chromosome 13 and ambiguous genitalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozsu, Elif; Yeşiltepe Mutlu, Gül; Ipekçi, Belkıs

    2014-01-01

    Ambiguous genitalia, known to be associated with sex chromosome disorders, may also be seen with autosomal chromosome anomalies. Herein, we report a case with ambiguous genitalia and ring chromosome 13. Ring chromosome 13 is a rare genetic anomaly in which the loss of genetic material determines the clinical spectrum.

  6. Ring Chromosome 13 and Ambiguous Genitalia

    OpenAIRE

    Özsu, Elif; Yeşiltepe Mutlu, Gül; İpekçi, Belkıs

    2014-01-01

    Ambiguous genitalia, known to be associated with sex chromosome disorders, may also be seen with autosomal chromosome anomalies. Herein, we report a case with ambiguous genitalia and ring chromosome 13. Ring chromosome 13 is a rare genetic anomaly in which the loss of genetic material determines the clinical spectrum.

  7. On P-coherent endomorphism rings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A ring is called right -coherent if every principal right ideal is finitely presented. Let M R be a right -module. We study the -coherence of the endomorphism ring of M R . It is shown ... Author Affiliations. Li-Xin Mao1. Institute of Mathematics, Nanjing Institute of Technology, Nanjing 211167, People's Republic of China ...

  8. The Fine Structure of Herman Rings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagella, Nuria; Henriksen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    We study the geometric structure of the boundary of Herman rings in a model family of Blaschke products of degree 3 (up to quasiconformal deformation). Shishikura’s quasiconformal surgery relates the Herman ring to the Siegel disk of a quadratic polynomial. By studying the regularity properties...

  9. On the nonlinear modeling of ring oscillators

    KAUST Repository

    Elwakil, Ahmed S.

    2009-06-01

    We develop higher-order nonlinear models of three-stage and five-stage ring oscillators based on a novel inverter model. The oscillation condition and oscillation frequency are derived and compared to classical linear model analysis. Two important special cases for five-stage ring oscillators are also studied. Numerical simulations are shown. © 2009 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  10. Piecewise catenarian and going between rings.

    OpenAIRE

    Brodmann, M.

    1980-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to prove the following theorem. Let R be a noetherian ring and n a nonnegative integer. Then R[X1, ••• ,Xn] is a going-between ring (=GB) iff R is GB and is (n+l)-piecewise catenarian.

  11. Cooling rings for TeV colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, R.B.

    1985-02-01

    Consideration is given to quantum fluctuations, intra beam scattering, cooling rates, and ring acceptance in order to see if one can obtain a normalized emittance of 10 -8 in any plausible cooling ring. It is concluded that only a small gain is obtained by varying the partition functions, but a very significant gain is made by using higher bending fields. The ring is found to get bigger if the magnet apertures are increased. The ring diameter is found to increase if the momentum spread of the beam is reduced. It is shown that the power can be reduced by allowing a high beamstrahlung energy loss resulting in higher current in the cooling ring. Parameters are also given for a 10 -7 m radian emittance case

  12. Monlithic nonplanar ring oscillator and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Alan C. (Inventor); Byer, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A monolithic nonplanar ring oscillator having an optically isotropic solid-state laser body for propagating laser radiation about a nonplanar ring path internal to the laser body is disclosed. The monolithic laser body is configured to produce a 2N reflection nonplanar ring light path, where N is an integer greater than or equal to 2, comprising 2N-1 total internal reflections and one reflection at a coupler in a single round trip. Undirectional traveling wave oscillation of the laser is induced by the geometry of the nonplanar ring path together with the effect of an applied magnetic field and partial polarizer characteristics of the oblique reflection from the coupler. The 6-reflection nonplanar ring oscillator makes possible otpimal unidirectional oscillation (low loss for the oscillating direction of propagation and, simultaneously high loss for the nonoscillating direction of propagation) in monolithic NPROs using materials with index of refraction smaller than the square root of 3, for example, laser glass.

  13. Observation of "fairy rings" in the lowlands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Sadowska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigations on the formation of fairy rings by Agaricales were performed in the year·s 1971-1974 in forest meadows and reserves in Dziekanów Leśny and on agricultural mowed ones in Kazuń near Warsaw. During 240 observations 378 maps were made. In forest meadows 15 species formed rings and on agricultural mowed meadows 22 species. Many species formed rings considerably affecting the growth of vascular plants. This caused the formation of distinct zone.s parallel to the lines of fructifications. Many more species formed rings without affecting the growth and species composition of vascular plants. The appearance of fairy rings and the analysis of the reasons for their occurrence may facilitate in a certain sense the investigation of the speed and way of growth of mycelium in the soil.

  14. Vaginal rings for delivery of HIV microbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCoy CF

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available R Karl Malcolm, Susan M Fetherston, Clare F McCoy, Peter Boyd, Ian MajorSchool of Pharmacy, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, UKAbstract: Following the successful development of long-acting steroid-releasing vaginal ring devices for the treatment of menopausal symptoms and contraception, there is now considerable interest in applying similar devices to the controlled release of microbicides against HIV. In this review article, the vaginal ring concept is first considered within the wider context of the early advances in controlled-release technology, before describing the various types of ring device available today. The remainder of the article highlights the key developments in HIV microbicide-releasing vaginal rings, with a particular focus on the dapivirine ring that is presently in late-stage clinical testing.Keywords: controlled release, sustained release, antiretroviral, dapivirine, SILCS diaphragm, silicone elastomer, thermoplastic

  15. An evolving view of Saturn's dynamic rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, J N; Burns, J A; Charnoz, S; Clark, R N; Colwell, J E; Dones, L; Esposito, L W; Filacchione, G; French, R G; Hedman, M M; Kempf, S; Marouf, E A; Murray, C D; Nicholson, P D; Porco, C C; Schmidt, J; Showalter, M R; Spilker, L J; Spitale, J N; Srama, R; Sremcević, M; Tiscareno, M S; Weiss, J

    2010-03-19

    We review our understanding of Saturn's rings after nearly 6 years of observations by the Cassini spacecraft. Saturn's rings are composed mostly of water ice but also contain an undetermined reddish contaminant. The rings exhibit a range of structure across many spatial scales; some of this involves the interplay of the fluid nature and the self-gravity of innumerable orbiting centimeter- to meter-sized particles, and the effects of several peripheral and embedded moonlets, but much remains unexplained. A few aspects of ring structure change on time scales as short as days. It remains unclear whether the vigorous evolutionary processes to which the rings are subject imply a much younger age than that of the solar system. Processes on view at Saturn have parallels in circumstellar disks.

  16. Semi-algebraic function rings and reflectors of partially ordered rings

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Niels

    1999-01-01

    The book lays algebraic foundations for real geometry through a systematic investigation of partially ordered rings of semi-algebraic functions. Real spectra serve as primary geometric objects, the maps between them are determined by rings of functions associated with the spectra. The many different possible choices for these rings of functions are studied via reflections of partially ordered rings. Readers should feel comfortable using basic algebraic and categorical concepts. As motivational background some familiarity with real geometry will be helpful. The book aims at researchers and graduate students with an interest in real algebra and geometry, ordered algebraic structures, topology and rings of continuous functions.

  17. Electro-optical hybrid slip ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, En

    2005-11-01

    The slip ring is a rotary electrical interface, collector, swivel or rotary joint. It is a physical system that can perform continuous data transfer and data exchange between a stationary and a rotating structure. A slip ring is generally used to transfer data or power from an unrestrained, continuously rotating electro-mechanical system in real-time, thereby simplifying operations and eliminating damage-prone wires dangling from moving joints. Slip rings are widely used for testing, evaluating, developing and improving various technical equipment and facilities with rotating parts. They are widely used in industry, especially in manufacturing industries employing turbo machinery, as in aviation, shipbuilding, aerospace, defense, and in precise facilities having rotating parts such as medical Computerized Tomography (CT) and MRI scanners and so forth. Therefore, any improvement in slip ring technology can impact large markets. Research and development in this field will have broad prospects long into the future. The goal in developing the current slip ring technology is to improve and increase the reliability, stability, anti-interference, and high data fidelity between rotating and stationary structures. Up to now, there have been numerous approaches used for signal and data transfer utilizing a slip ring such as metal contacts, wires, radio transmission, and even liquid media. However, all suffer from drawbacks such as data transfer speed limitations, reliability, stability, electro-magnetic interference and durability. The purpose of the current research is to break through these basic limitations using an optical solution, thereby improving performance in current slip ring applications. This dissertation introduces a novel Electro-Optical Hybrid Slip Ring technology, which makes "through the air" digital-optical communication between stationary and rotating systems a reality with high data transfer speed, better reliability and low interference susceptibility

  18. Galactic rings revisited - I. CVRHS classifications of 3962 ringed galaxies from the Galaxy Zoo 2 Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buta, Ronald J.

    2017-11-01

    Rings are important and characteristic features of disc-shaped galaxies. This paper is the first in a series that re-visits galactic rings with the goals of further understanding the nature of the features and for examining their role in the secular evolution of galaxy structure. The series begins with a new sample of 3962 galaxies drawn from the Galaxy Zoo 2 citizen science data base, selected because zoo volunteers recognized a ring-shaped pattern in the morphology as seen in Sloan Digital Sky Survey colour images. The galaxies are classified within the framework of the Comprehensive de Vaucouleurs revised Hubble-Sandage system. It is found that zoo volunteers cued on the same kinds of ring-like features that were recognized in the 1995 Catalogue of Southern Ringed Galaxies. This paper presents the full catalogue of morphological classifications, comparisons with other sources of classifications and some histograms designed mainly to highlight the content of the catalogue. The advantages of the sample are its large size and the generally good quality of the images; the main disadvantage is the low physical resolution that limits the detectability of linearly small rings such as nuclear rings. The catalogue includes mainly inner and outer disc rings and lenses. Cataclysmic (`encounter-driven') rings (such as ring and polar ring galaxies) are recognized in less than 1 per cent of the sample.

  19. Wear Analysis of Top Piston Ring to Reduce Top Ring Reversal Bore Wear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ilanthirayan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The piston rings are the most important part in engine which controls the lubricating oil consumption and blowby of the gases. The lubricating film of oil is provided to seal of gases towards crankcase and also to give smooth friction free translatory motion between rings and liner. Of the three rings present top ring is more crucial as it does the main work of restricting gases downwards the crankcase. Boundary lubrication is present at the Top dead centre (TDC and Bottom dead centre (BDC of the liner surface. In addition to this, top ring is exposed to high temperature gases which makes the oil present near the top ring to get evaporated and decreasing its viscosity, making metal-metal contact most of the time. Due to this at TDC, excess wear happens on the liner which is termed as Top ring reversal bore wear. The wear rate depends upon many parameters such as lubrication condition, viscosity index, contact type, normal forces acting on ring, geometry of ring face, surface roughness, material property. The present work explores the wear depth for different geometries of barrel ring using Finite Element model with the help of Archard wear law and the same is validated through experimentation. The study reveals that Asymmetric barrel rings have less contact pressure which in turn reduces the wear at Top dead centre.

  20. Hyperautofluorescent ring in eyes with macular holes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sato T

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tatsuhiko Sato, Kazuyuki Emi, Yui Osawa, Hajime Bando Osaka Rosai Hospital Clinical Research Center for Occupational Sensory Organ Disability, Sakai, Japan Background: Fundus autofluorescence studies in eyes with macular holes (MHs have shown a hyperautofluorescent spot corresponding to the hole and a hypoautofluorescent ring corresponding to the fluid cuff surrounding the hole. The purpose of this report is to present three cases of MH with a different fundus autofluorescence pattern. Case reports: Case 1 was a 62-year-old woman who did not know the duration of the MH in her left eye. Her decimal best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA was 0.08. The left eye had a one-half disc diameter MH with a depigmented ring surrounding the area of the fluid cuff. Fundus autofluorescence showed a hyperautofluorescent ring corresponding to the depigmented ring. After vitrectomy, fundus autofluorescence showed the same size hyperautofluorescent ring despite the decreased size of the opened MH. Case 2 was a 69-year-old woman who had been diagnosed with MH in the right eye 13 years earlier. Her decimal BCVA was 0.1. The right eye had a one-half disc diameter MH with a depigmented ring surrounding the area of the fluid cuff. Fundus autofluorescence showed a hyperautofluorescent ring corresponding to the depigmented ring. Postoperative fundus autofluorescence showed the same size hyperautofluorescent ring despite the hole being closed. The decimal BCVA was 0.2 in her right eye 6 months after vitrectomy. Case 3 was a 71-year-old woman who had been diagnosed with MH in the right eye 15 years earlier. Her decimal BCVA was 0.1. The right eye had a one-half disc diameter MH with a depigmented ring which corresponded with a hyperautofluorescent ring. Postoperative fundus autofluorescence showed the same size hyperautofluorescent ring despite the hole being closed. The decimal BCVA was 0.2 in her right eye 6 months after vitrectomy. Conclusion: Our findings suggest that a

  1. Wedding ring shaped excitation coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Tsai, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency.

  2. Common pass decentered annular ring resonator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, D. A.; Waite, T. R.

    1985-04-30

    An optical resonator having an annular cylindrical gain region for use in a chemical laser or the like in which two ring-shaped mirrors having substantially conical reflecting surfaces are spaced apart along a common axis of revolution of the respective conical surfaces. A central conical mirror reflects incident light directed along said axis radially outwardly to the reflecting surface of a first one of the ring-shaped mirrors. The radial light rays are reflected by the first ring mirror to the second ring mirror within an annular cylindrical volume concentric with said common axis and forming a gain region. Light rays impinging on the second ring mirror are reflected to diametrically opposite points on the same conical mirror surfaces and back to the first ring mirror through the same annular cylindrical volume. The return rays are then reflected by the conical mirror surface of the first ring mirror back to the central conical mirror. The mirror surfaces are angled such that the return rays are reflected back along the common axis by the central mirror in a concentric annular cylindrical volume. A scraper mirror having a central opening centered on said axis and an offset opening reflects all but the rays passing through the two openings in an output beam. The rays passing through the second opening are reflected back through the first opening to provide feedback.

  3. Nilradicals of skew Hurwitz series of rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morteza Ahmadi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available ‎For a ring endomorphism α of a ring R, ‎Krempa called α a rigid endomorphism if aα(a=0 implies a = 0 for a in R. ‎A ring R is called rigid if there exists a rigid endomorphism of R. ‎In this paper‎, ‎we extend the α-rigid property of a ring R to the upper nilradical N_r(R of R. ‎For an endomorphism α and the upper nilradical N_r(R of a ring R, ‎we introduce the condition (*: ‎N_r(R is a α-ideal of R and aα(a in N_r(R implies a in N_r(R for a in R. ‎We study characterizations of a ring R with an endomorphism α satisfying the condition (*, ‎and we investigate their related properties‎. ‎The connections between the upper nilradical of R and the upper nilradical of the skew Hurwitz series ring (HR,α of R are also investigated‎.

  4. Ring enhancement in contrast enhancement computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inatsuki, Shinichi; Hayashi, Kuniaki; Miyake, Hidetoshi

    1979-01-01

    Ring enhancement was examined in 11 lesions, 61 patients, we experienced. The frequency of ring enhancement observed in cerebral abscesses and tumors and the characteristics and the differential points of each disease were obtained. The frequency of ring enhancement was 54% in metastatic cerebral tumor, 56% in glioblastoma and astrocytoma (grade III) and 100% in cerebral abscess. Glioblastoma and astrocytoma (grade III) differed from other diseases in having distorted rings with poor uniform thickness. Although there was a great similarity between the computed tomographic picture of metastatic cerebral tumor and that of cerebral abscess, the ring in cerebral abscess was clearer, thin and uniform, and the peripheral edema in cerebral abscess was weak in general. In cerebral infarct, peripheral edema and mass effect of the ring were not observed or slightly observed, if any. Considering only the characteristics of the rings, there are differences between each diseases, and differentiation seems to be possibly performed. In practice, however, it is not necessarily easy to make a differential diagnosis. Clinical results should be carefully managed. (Kumagai, M.)

  5. Dynamics of the Uranian Gamma Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.; Rimlinger, Thomas; Hahn, Joseph M.

    2017-10-01

    The planet Uranus is surrounded by a unique ring system consisting of ten narrow ringlets as well as several broad sheets of dust. The brightest of these rings is bracketed by a pair of satellites, Cordelia and Ophelia, that may serve to help confine the ring radially. Searches for smaller satellites near the other narrow rings, however, have been unsuccessful. Hamilton et. al. 2016 and Rimlinger et al. 2016 have argued that the eccentric and/or inclined uranian ringlets self confine radially by a combination of ringlet gravity and viscous forces. Importantly, no shepherd satellites are required in this model.We apply these ideas to the uranian gamma ring, a particularly strange ringlet which has, in addition to the standard elliptical shape, a superposed m=0 breathing mode (French et. al. 1988). In a pure m=0 mode, the particles in an elliptical ring all reach pericenter at the same times giving the ring a circular appearance. The particles remain synced in phase and all move outward reaching apocenter simultaneously. Thus the ring appears circular at any given time, but the radius of the circle seems to increase and decrease - it breathes. We investigate first the dynamics of the pure m=0 mode and show that the equilibrium is stable against small perturbations. We are currently moving toward a more sophisticated stability analysis for the real gamma ring with its unusual combination of normal modes. We will detail our results to date and will report on our progress toward an origin scenario for this obscure but interesting ringlet.

  6. Migration of Star Clusters and Nuclear Rings

    OpenAIRE

    van de Ven, Glenn; Chang, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Star clusters that form in nuclear rings appear to be at slightly larger radii than the gas. We argue that the star clusters move out from the gas in which they are formed because of satellite-disk tidal interactions. In calculating the dynamics of this star cluster and gas ring system, we include the effects of dynamical friction of the background stars in the host galaxy on the star cluster, and inflowing gas along the bar onto the nuclear ring at the two contact points. We show that the fi...

  7. Beam dynamics in Compton ring gamma sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Bulyak

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Electron storage rings of GeV energy with laser pulse stacking cavities are promising intense sources of polarized hard photons which, via pair production, can be used to generate polarized positron beams. In this paper, the dynamics of electron bunches circulating in a storage ring and interacting with high-power laser pulses is studied both analytically and by simulation. Both the common features and the differences in the behavior of bunches interacting with an extremely high power laser pulse and with a moderate pulse are discussed. Also considerations on particular lattice designs for Compton gamma rings are presented.

  8. Wind turbine ring/shroud drive system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakemore, Ralph W.

    2005-10-04

    A wind turbine capable of driving multiple electric generators having a ring or shroud structure for reducing blade root bending moments, hub loads, blade fastener loads and pitch bearing loads. The shroud may further incorporate a ring gear for driving an electric generator. In one embodiment, the electric generator may be cantilevered from the nacelle such that the gear on the generator drive shaft is contacted by the ring gear of the shroud. The shroud also provides protection for the gearing and aids in preventing gear lubricant contamination.

  9. Injection envelope matching in storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minty, M.G.; Spence, W.L.

    1995-05-01

    The shape and size of the transverse phase space injected into a storage ring can be deduced from turn-by-turn measurements of the transient behavior of the beam envelope in the ring. Envelope oscillations at 2 x the β-tron frequency indicate the presence of a β-mismatch, while envelope oscillations at the β-tron frequency are the signature of a dispersion function mismatch. Experiments in injection optimization using synchrotron radiation imaging of the beam and a fast-gated camera at the SLC damping rings are reported

  10. Nitrile O-ring Cracking: A Case of Vacuum Flange O-ring Failures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dees, Craig

    2016-07-01

    A review of recent nitrile O-ring failures in ISO-KF vacuum flange connections in glovebox applications is presented. An investigation of a single “isolated” o-ring failure leads to the discovery of cracked nitrile o-rings in a glovebox atmospheric control unit. The initial cause of the o-ring failure is attributed to ozone degradation. However, additional investigation reveals nitrile o-ring cracking on multiple gloveboxes and general purpose piping, roughly 85% of the nitrile o-rings removed for inspection show evidence of visible cracking after being in service for 18 months or less. The results of material testing and ambient air testing is presented, elevated ozone levels are not found. The contributing factors of o-ring failure, including nitrile air sensitivity, inadequate storage practices, and poor installation techniques, are discussed. A discussion of nitrile o-ring material properties, the benefits and limitations, and alternate materials are discussed. Considerations for o-ring material selection, purchasing, storage, and installation are presented in the context of lessons learned from the nitrile o-ring cracking investigation. This paper can be presented in 20 minutes and does not require special accommodations or special audio visual devices.

  11. Dark matter axions and caustic rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sikivie, P.

    1997-01-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: the strong CP problem; dark matter axions; the cavity detector of galactic halo axions; and caustic rings in the density distribution of cold dark matter halos

  12. Proton storage ring: man/machine interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lander, R.F.; Clout, P.N.

    1985-01-01

    The human interface of the Proton Storage Ring Control System at Los Alamos is described in some detail, together with the software environment in which operator interaction programs are written. Some examples of operator interaction programs are given

  13. Sapphire Ring Resonator For Microwave Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, G. John; Saunders, Jon

    1991-01-01

    Sapphire dielectric ring resonator operating in "whispering-gallery" mode helps to stabilize frequency and phase of microwave oscillator. Reduces phase noise appreciably at room temperature and promises unprecedented stability of phase at cryogenic temperatures.

  14. Polarized gas targets for storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holt, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    It is widely recognized that polarized gas targets in electron storage rings represent a new opportunity for precision nuclear physics studies. New developments in polarized target technology specific to internal applications will be discussed. In particular, polarized gas targets have been used in the VEPP-3 electron ring in Novosibirsk. A simple storage cell was used to increase the total target thickness by a factor of 15 over the simple gas jet target from an atomic beam source. Results from the initial phase of this project will be reported. In addition, the plans for increasing the luminosity by an additional order or magnitude will be presented. The application of this work to polarized hydrogen and deuterium targets for the HERA ring will be noted. The influence of beam-induced depolarization, a phenomena encountered in short-pulse electron storage rings, will be discussed. Finally, the performance tests of laser-driven sources will be presented. 8 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  15. A non-Abelian black ring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomás Ortín

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We construct a supersymmetric black ring solution of SU(2 N=1, d=5 Super-Einstein–Yang–Mills (SEYM theory by adding a distorted BPST instanton to an Abelian black ring solution of the same theory. The change cannot be observed from spatial infinity: neither the mass, nor the angular momenta or the values of the scalars at infinity differ from those of the Abelian ring. The entropy is, however, sensitive to the presence of the non-Abelian instanton, and it is smaller than that of the Abelian ring, in analogy to what happens in the supersymmetric colored black holes recently constructed in the same theory and in N=2, d=4 SEYM. By taking the limit in which the two angular momenta become equal we derive a non-Abelian generalization of the BMPV rotating black-hole solution.

  16. National synchrotron light source VUV storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumberg, L.; Bittner, J.; Galayda, J.; Heese, R.; Krinsky, S.; Schuchman, J.; van Steenbergen, A.

    1979-01-01

    A 700 MeV electron storage ring designed for synchrotron radiation applications is described. Lattice and stability calculations are presented and the vacuum, correction and injection systems are discussed

  17. Collins' bypass for the main ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuma, S.

    1982-01-01

    Design of the bypass for the main ring at Fermilab is discussed. Specific design features discussed include space, path length, geometric closure, matching of betatron functions, and external dispersion. Bypass parameters are given

  18. On Learning Ring-Sum-Expansions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Paul; Simon, H. -U.

    1992-01-01

    The problem of learning ring-sum-expansions from examples is studied. Ring-sum-expansions (RSE) are representations of Boolean functions over the base {#123;small infinum, (+), 1}#125;, which reflect arithmetic operations in GF(2). k-RSE is the class of ring-sum-expansions containing only monomials...... of length at most k:. term-RSE is the class of ring-sum-expansions having at most I: monomials. It is shown that k-RSE, k>or=1, is learnable while k-term-RSE, k>2, is not learnable if RPnot=NP. Without using a complexity-theoretical hypothesis, it is proven that k-RSE, k>or=1, and k-term-RSE, k>or=2 cannot...

  19. Ethinyl Estradiol and Etonogestrel Vaginal Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or stand with one leg up on a chair, step, or other object. Choose the position that ... contraceptive ring.if you are having surgery, including dental surgery, tell the doctor or dentist that you ...

  20. A dynamic, rotating ring current around Saturn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krimigis, S M; Sergis, N; Mitchell, D G; Hamilton, D C; Krupp, N

    2007-12-13

    The concept of an electrical current encircling the Earth at high altitudes was first proposed in 1917 to explain the depression of the horizontal component of the Earth's magnetic field during geomagnetic storms. In situ measurements of the extent and composition of this current were made some 50 years later and an image was obtained in 2001 (ref. 6). Ring currents of a different nature were observed at Jupiter and their presence inferred at Saturn. Here we report images of the ring current at Saturn, together with a day-night pressure asymmetry and tilt of the planet's plasma sheet, based on measurements using the magnetospheric imaging instrument (MIMI) on board Cassini. The ring current can be highly variable with strong longitudinal asymmetries that corotate nearly rigidly with the planet. This contrasts with the Earth's ring current, where there is no rotational modulation and initial asymmetries are organized by local time effects.

  1. From coffee ring to spherulites ring of poly(ethylene oxide) film from drying droplet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yinchun; Zhang, Xuerong; Qiu, Maibo; Wei, Yan; Zhou, Qiong; Huang, Di

    2018-03-01

    We discuss how the "spherulites ring" morphology and "coffee ring" profile of PEO film formed by the drying droplet at glass substrate with different heating rate. Upon increasing the heating rate of substrate, it is found that deposited PEO film from drying droplet shows the unusually observed "coffee ring" profile and "spherulites ring" morphology. The main mechanism for this phenomenon is proposed to be an enhanced Marangoni convection which is induced by the increased solute concentration gradient and reduced viscous force above 70 °C. A simple formation mechanism of the unusually observed "coffee ring" profile and "spherulites ring" morphology is proposed. These findings can be exploited to trace the center of Marangoni convection, with potential applications in designing the spherulite patterns of crystalline polymer films in ink-jet printing and self-assembly fields.

  2. Vaginal rings for menopausal symptom relief.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballagh, Susan A

    2004-01-01

    The vagina is an alternative delivery site of sex steroids for menopausal women. New ring technology provides continuous and consistent delivery of steroids for up to 3 months. Rings rest on the pelvic floor muscles in a nearly horizontal position and are usually imperceptible. Steroid is delivered directly into the systemic circulation which may result in less alteration of coagulation/fibrinolysis pathways as seen with transdermal hormone therapy. Fewer adverse effects are noted when progesterone is applied vaginally, possibly due to lower serum levels of metabolites such as alloprenanolone. Women often switch to a ring for the longer dosing interval but also appreciate the reduced messiness. Over 5700 healthy US women who evaluated an unmedicated ring as a drug delivery platform found it very acceptable independent of age or prior use of barrier contraceptives. Marketed rings in the US include: (i) a ring for systemic and vaginal menopausal therapy that provides average serum estradiol levels of 40.6 pg/mL for the 0.05 mg and 76 pg/mL for the 0.1 mg dose; (ii) a ring for urogenital menopausal symptoms only that minimally elevates serum estradiol, usually within the menopausal range, treating atrophic vaginitis and urethritis; and (iii) a ring labelled for contraception that provides ethinyl estradiol 15 microg and etonogestrel 120 microg appropriate for nonsmoking perimenopausal women. A ring for combination hormone therapy and another releasing progesterone for contraception in lactating women have been reported in the literature, but are not yet available commercially. These may offer future options for hormone therapy. Women with a uterus receiving estrogen, even in low doses, should be given progestogen to prevent endometrial hyperplasia or carcinoma. Even women who have had an endometrial ablation are likely to have some endometrial tissue remaining since long-term amenorrhoea is uncommon. Since no marketed combination ring product is available, other forms

  3. Nonexistence of extremal de Sitter black rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khuri, Marcus; Woolgar, Eric

    2017-11-01

    We show that near-horizon geometries in the presence of a positive cosmological constant cannot exist with ring topology. In particular, de Sitter black rings with vanishing surface gravity do not exist. Our result relies on a known mathematical theorem which is a straightforward consequence of a type of energy condition for a modified Ricci tensor, similar to the curvature-dimension conditions for the m-Bakry-Émery-Ricci tensor.

  4. A Review of Piston Compression Ring Tribology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.C. Mishra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents studies related to piston compression ring tribology and the theoretical and experimental works developed to analyze ring-liner contact friction. The literatures revealed that the simulation and experimental work are more independently investigated. The correlation of modeling output with experimental output is presented in limited number of research works. The experimental work to capture data from a running engine is also in basic level.

  5. Prometheus Induced Vorticity in Saturn's F Ring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Phil J.; Kusmartsev, Feo V.

    2016-11-01

    Saturn's rings are known to show remarkable real time variability in their structure. Many of which can be associated to interactions with nearby moons and moonlets. Possibly the most interesting and dynamic place in the rings, probably in the whole Solar System, is the F ring. A highly disrupted ring with large asymmetries both radially and azimuthally. Numerically non-zero components to the curl of the velocity vector field (vorticity) in the perturbed area of the F ring post encounter are witnessed, significantly above the background vorticity. Within the perturbed area rich distributions of local rotations is seen located in and around the channel edges. The gravitational scattering of ring particles during the encounter causes a significant elevated curl of the vector field above the background F ring vorticity for the first 1-3 orbital periods post encounter. After 3 orbital periods vorticity reverts quite quickly to near background levels. This new found dynamical vortex life of the ring will be of great interest to planet and planetesimals in proto-planetary disks where vortices and turbulence are suspected of having a significant role in their formation and migrations. Additionally, it is found that the immediate channel edges created by the close passage of Prometheus actually show high radial dispersions in the order 20-50 cm/s, up to a maximum of 1 m/s. This is much greater than the value required by Toomre for a disk to be unstable to the growth of axisymmetric oscillations. However, an area a few hundred km away from the edge shows a more promising location for the growth of coherent objects.

  6. Ring oscillator switching noise under NBTI wearout

    OpenAIRE

    Fernández García, Raúl; Gil Galí, Ignacio; Ruiz, José María; Morata Cariñena, Marta

    2011-01-01

    In this paper the switching noise of a CMOS ring oscillator has been analysed when their pFETs are subjected to negative bias temperature instability (NBTI). The impact of pFET under NBTI has been experimentally quantified whereas CMOS ring oscillator frequency and the switching noise has been analysed by means of electrical full-model simulation. The results show that the impact on the electromagnetic compatibility behaviour increases with NBTI wearout. Peer Reviewed

  7. Collective Effects in the CLIC Damping Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Zimmermann, Frank; Korostelev, Maxim S; Schulte, Daniel; Yokoya, Kaoru

    2005-01-01

    The small emittance, short bunch length, and high current in the CLIC damping ring could give rise to collective effects which degrade the quality of the extracted beam. In this paper, we survey a number of possible instabilities and estimate their impact on the ring performance. The effects considered include fast beam-ion instability, coherent synchrotron radiation, Touschek scattering, intrabeam scattering, resistive-wall wake fields, and electron cloud.

  8. Eelgrass fairy rings: sulfide as inhibiting agent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borum, Jens; Raun, Ane-Marie Løvendahl; Hasler-Sheetal, Harald

    2014-01-01

    specifically, for the apparent die- off of eelgrass shoots on the inner side of the rings. The fairy rings were up to 15 m in diameter consisting of 0.3- to 1-m-wide zones of sea grass shoots at densities of up to 1,200 shoots m−2 and rooted in an up to 10-cm-thick sediment layer. On the outer side, shoots...

  9. Power cocentralizing generalized derivations on prime rings

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ring it follows that [R,R] ⊆ L. This follows from pp. 4–5 in [6], Lemma 2 and Proposition 1 in [4] and Theorem 4 in [8]. 2. The case of inner generalized derivations on prime rings. We dedicate this section to prove the theorem in case both the generalized derivations. H and G are inner, that is there exist b, c, p, q ∈ U such that ...

  10. Integral Ring Carbon-Carbon Piston

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved structure for a reciprocating internal combustion engine or compressor piston fabricate from carbon-carbon composite materials is disclosed. An integral ring carbon-carbon composite piston, disclosed herein, reduces the need for piston rings and for small clearances by providing a small flexible, integral component around the piston that allows for variation in clearance due to manufacturing tolerances, distortion due to pressure and thermal loads, and variations in thermal expansion differences between the piston and cylinder liner.

  11. Characteristics of an Integrated Optics Ring Resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-08-01

    water before polishing. A 3/4 inch pitch polishing lap is prepared using 50% soft optical pitch. The pitch is melted and poured onto a flat metal lap. To...working on the devel- Typical lae powers for laser writing range from 8 pW to OPawnt Of a ring interferometer in glass, consisting Of a ring 0.5 mW

  12. Computerspil og læring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lasse Juel

    2015-01-01

    Game-based learning og gamification er ord, der ofte optræder i forbindelse med computerspil og læring. Denne artikel vil analytisk undersøge, hvordan computerspil og læring går i forbindelse med hinanden. Artikel tager afsæt i Gregory Batesons læringsteori og læser denne igennem det kommercielle...

  13. Inelastic neutron scattering from superconducting rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agafonov, A.I.

    2010-01-01

    For the first time the differential cross section for the inelastic magnetic neutron scattering by superconducting rings is derived taking account of the interaction of the neutron magnetic moment with the magnetic field generated by the superconducting current. Calculations of the scattering cross section are carried out for cold neutrons and thin film rings from type-II superconductors with the magnetic fields not exceeding the first critical field.

  14. Latest on polarization in electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chao, A.W.

    1983-01-01

    The field of beam polarization in electron storage rings is making rapid progress in recent several years. This report is an attempt to summarize some of these developments concerning how to produce and maintain a high level of beam polarization. Emphasized will be the ideas and current thoughts people have on what should and could be done on electron rings being designed at present such as HERA, LEP and TRISTAN. 23 references

  15. Tannakian duality over Dedekind rings and applications

    OpenAIRE

    Duong, Nguyen Dai; Hai, Phùng Hô

    2013-01-01

    We establish a duality between flat affine group schemes and rigid tensor categories equipped with a neutral fiber functor (called Tannakian lattice), both defined over a Dedekind ring. We use this duality and the known Tannakian duality due to Saavedra to study morphisms between flat affine group schemes. Next, we apply our new duality to the category of stratified sheaves on a smooth scheme over a Dedekind ring R to define the relative differential fundamental group scheme of the given sche...

  16. Ring Avulsion Injuries: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamba, Ravinder; Malhotra, Gautam; Bueno, Reuben A; Thayer, Wesley P; Shack, R Bruce

    2018-01-01

    Ring avulsion injuries can range from soft tissue injury to complete amputation. Grading systems have been developed to guide treatment, but there is controversy with high-grade injuries. Traditionally, advanced ring injuries have been treated with completion amputation, but there is evidence that severe ring injuries can be salvaged. The purpose of this systematic review was to pool the current published data on ring injuries. A systematic review of the English literature published from 1980 to 2015 in PubMed and MEDLINE databases was conducted to identify patients who underwent treatment for ring avulsion injuries. Twenty studies of ring avulsion injuries met the inclusion criteria. There were a total of 572 patients reported with ring avulsion injuries. The Urbaniak class breakdown was class I (54 patients), class II (204 patients), and class III (314 patients). The average total arc of motion (TAM) for patients with a class I injury was 201.25 (n = 40). The average 2-point discrimination was 5.6 (n = 10). The average TAM for patients with a class II injury undergoing microsurgical revascularization was 187.0 (n = 114), and the average 2-point discrimination was 8.3 (n = 40). The average TAM for patients with a class III injury undergoing microsurgical revascularization was 168.2 (n = 170), and the average 2-point discrimination was 10.5 (n = 97). Ring avulsion injuries are commonly classified with the Urbaniak class system. Outcomes are superior for class I and II injuries, and there are select class III injuries that can be treated with replantation. Shared decision making with patients is imperative to determine whether replantation is appropriate.

  17. SNS RING STUDY AT THE AGS BOOSTER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ZHANG, S.Y.; AHRENS, L.; BEEBE-WANG, J.; BLASKIEWICZ, M.; FEDOTOV, A.; GARDNER, C.; LEE, Y.Y.; LUCCIO, A.; MALITSKY, N.; ROSER, T.; WENG, W.T.; WEI, J.; ZENO, K.; REECE, K.; WANG, J.G.

    2000-01-01

    During the g-2 run at the BNL AGS in early 2000, a 200 MeV storage-ring-like magnetic cycle has been set-up and tuned at the Booster in preparing for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring study. In this article, we report the progress of the machine set-up, tuning, some preliminary studies, and the future plan

  18. Control of ring lasers by means of coupled cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchhave, Preben; Abitan, Haim; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Variable phase coupling to an external ring is used to control a unidirectional ring laser. The observed behavior of the coupled rings is explained theoretically. We have found experimentally that by quickly changing the phase of the feedback from the external ring it is possible to Q-switch the ......-switch the ring laser. Also, at certain values of the phase of the feedback in the external ring, instabilities in the total system occur and oscillations arise in the ring laser.......Variable phase coupling to an external ring is used to control a unidirectional ring laser. The observed behavior of the coupled rings is explained theoretically. We have found experimentally that by quickly changing the phase of the feedback from the external ring it is possible to Q...

  19. Achieving Translationally Invariant Trapped Ion Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Erik; Li, Hao-Kun; Noel, Crystal; Hemmerling, Boerge; Zhang, Xiang; Haeffner, Hartmut

    2017-04-01

    We present the design and implementation of a novel surface ion trap design in a ring configuration. By eliminating the need for wire bonds through the use of electrical vias and using a rotationally invariant electrode configuration, we have realized a trap that is able to trap up to 20 ions in a ring geometry 45um in diameter, 400um above the trap surface. This large trapping height to ring diameter ratio allows for global addressing of the ring with both lasers and electric fields in the chamber, thereby increasing our ability to control the ring as a whole. Applying compensating electric fields, we measure very low tangential trap frequencies (less than 20kHz) corresponding to rotational barriers down to 4mK. This measurement is currently limited by the temperature of the ions but extrapolation indicates the barrier can be reduced much further with more advanced cooling techniques. Finally, we show that we are able to reduce this energy barrier sufficiently such that the ions are able to overcome it either through thermal motion or rotational motion and delocalize over the full extent of the ring. This work was funded by the Keck Foundation and the NSF.

  20. INJECTION EFFICIENCY IN COMPTON RING NESTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. I. Gladkikh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available NESTOR is the hard X-ray source that is under commissioning at NSC KIPT. NESTOR based on the Compton scattering of laser photons on relativistic electrons. The structure of the facility can be represented as the following components: a linear accelerator, a transport channel, a storage ring, and a laser-optical system. Electrons are stored in the storage ring for energy of 40-200 MeV. Inevitable alignment errors of magnetic elements are strongly effect on the beam dynamics in the storage ring. These errors lead to a shift of the equilibrium orbit relative to the ideal one. Significant shift of the equilibrium orbit could lead to loss of the beam on physical apertures. Transverse sizes of electron and laser beams are only few tens of microns at the interaction point. The shift of electron beam at the interaction point could greatly complicate the operation adjustment of storage ring without sufficient beam position diagnostic system. This article presents the simulation results of the efficiency of electron beam accumulation in the NESTOR storage ring. Also, this article is devoted to electron beam dynamics due to alignment errors of magnetic element in the ring.

  1. Hitchhikers’ guide to analysing bird ringing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harnos Andrea

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bird ringing datasets constitute possibly the largest source of temporal and spatial information on vertebrate taxa available on the globe. Initially, the method was invented to understand avian migration patterns. However, data deriving from bird ringing has been used in an array of other disciplines including population monitoring, changes in demography, conservation management and to study the effects of climate change to name a few. Despite the widespread usage and importance, there are no guidelines available specifically describing the practice of data management, preparation and analyses of ringing datasets. Here, we present the first of a series of comprehensive tutorials that may help fill this gap. We describe in detail and through a real-life example the intricacies of data cleaning and how to create a data table ready for analyses from raw ringing data in the R software environment. Moreover, we created and present here the R package; ringR, designed to carry out various specific tasks and plots related to bird ringing data. Most methods described here can also be applied to a wide range of capture-recapture type data based on individual marking, regardless to taxa or research question.

  2. Rings of non-spherical, axisymmetric bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Akash; Nadkarni-Ghosh, Sharvari; Sharma, Ishan

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the dynamical behavior of rings around bodies whose shapes depart considerably from that of a sphere. To this end, we have developed a new self-gravitating discrete element N-body code, and employed a local simulation method to simulate a patch of the ring. The central body is modeled as a symmetric (oblate or prolate) ellipsoid, or defined through the characteristic frequencies (circular, vertical, epicyclic) that represent its gravitational field. Through our simulations we explore how a ring's behavior - characterized by dynamical properties like impact frequency, granular temperature, number density, vertical thickness and radial width - varies with the changing gravitational potential of the central body. We also contrast properties of rings about large central bodies (e.g. Saturn) with those of smaller ones (e.g. Chariklo). Finally, we investigate how the characteristic frequencies of a central body, restricted to being a solid of revolution with an equatorial plane of symmetry, affect the ring dynamics. The latter process may be employed to qualitatively understand the dynamics of rings about any symmetric solid of revolution.

  3. Phase behaviour of polyethylene knotted ring chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wen Xiao-Hui; Xia A-Gen; Chen Hong-Ping; Zhang Lin-Xi

    2011-01-01

    The phase behaviour of polyethylene knotted ring chains is investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations. In this paper, we focus on the collapse of the polyethylene knotted ring chain, and also present the results of linear and ring chains for comparison. At high temperatures, a fully extensive knot structure is observed. The mean-square radius of gyration per bond (S 2 )/(Nb 2 ) and the shape factor (δ*) depend on not only the chain length but also the knot type. With temperature decreasing, chain collapse is observed, and the collapse temperature decreases with the chain length increasing. The actual collapse transition can be determined by the specific heat capacity C v , and the knotted ring chain undergoes gas—liquid—solid-like transition directly. The phase transition of a knotted ring chain is only one-stage collapse, which is different from the polyethylene linear and ring chains. This investigation can provide some insights into the statistical properties of knotted polymer chains. (condensed matter: structural, mechanical, and thermal properties)

  4. Systematic Search for Rings around Kepler Planet Candidates: Constraints on Ring Size and Occurrence Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizawa, Masataka; Masuda, Kento; Kawahara, Hajime; Suto, Yasushi

    2018-05-01

    We perform a systematic search for rings around 168 Kepler planet candidates with sufficient signal-to-noise ratios that are selected from all of the short-cadence data. We fit ringed and ringless models to their light curves and compare the fitting results to search for the signatures of planetary rings. First, we identify 29 tentative systems, for which the ringed models exhibit statistically significant improvement over the ringless models. The light curves of those systems are individually examined, but we are not able to identify any candidate that indicates evidence for rings. In turn, we find several mechanisms of false positives that would produce ringlike signals, and the null detection enables us to place upper limits on the size of the rings. Furthermore, assuming the tidal alignment between axes of the planetary rings and orbits, we conclude that the occurrence rate of rings larger than twice the planetary radius is less than 15%. Even though the majority of our targets are short-period planets, our null detection provides statistical and quantitative constraints on largely uncertain theoretical models of the origin, formation, and evolution of planetary rings.

  5. Mechanical improvement of metal reinforcement rings for a finite ring-shaped superconducting bulk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen-Guang; Zhou, You-He

    2018-03-01

    As a key technique, reinforcement of type-II superconducting bulks with metal rings can efficiently improve their mechanical properties to enhance the maximum trapped field. In this paper, we study the magnetostrictive and fracture behaviors of a finite superconducting ring bulk reinforced by three typical reinforcing structures composed of metal rings during the magnetizing process by means of the minimization of magnetic energy and the finite element method. After a field-dependent critical current density is adopted, the magnetostriction, pinning-induced stress, and crack tip stress intensity factor are calculated considering the demagnetization effects. The results show that the mechanical properties of the ring bulk are strongly dependent on the reinforcing structure and the material and geometrical parameters of the metal rings. Introducing the metal ring can significantly reduce the hoop stress, and the reduction effect by internal reinforcement is much improved relative to external reinforcement. By comparison, bilateral reinforcement seems to be the best candidate structure. Only when the metal rings have particular Young's modulus and radial thickness will they contribute to improve the mechanical properties the most. In addition, if an edge crack is pre-existing in the ring bulk, the presence of metal rings can effectively avoid crack propagation since it reduces the crack tip stress intensity factor by nearly one order of magnitude.

  6. Surface roughness of Saturn's rings and ring particles inferred from thermal phase curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishima, Ryuji; Turner, Neal; Spilker, Linda

    2017-10-01

    We analyze thermal phase curves of all the main rings of Saturn (the A, B, C rings, and the Cassini division) measured by both the far-IR and mid-IR detectors of the Cassini Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS). All the rings show temperature increases toward zero phase angle, known as an opposition effect or thermal beaming. For the C ring and Cassini division, which have low optical depths, intra-particle shadowing is considered the dominant mechanism causing the effect. On the other hand, the phase curves of the optically thick B and A rings steepen significantly with decreasing absolute solar elevation angle from 21° to 14°, suggesting inter-particle shadowing plays an important role in these rings. We employ an analytic roughness model to estimate the degrees of surface roughness of the rings or ring particles. For optically thin rings, an isolated particle covered by spherical segment craters is employed while for the thick rings we approximate a packed particle layer as a slab covered by craters. The particles in the thin rings are found to have generally rough surfaces, except in the middle C ring. Across the C ring, the optical depth correlates with the degree of surface roughness. This may indicate that surface roughness comes mainly from particle clumping, while individual particles have rather smooth surfaces. For the optically thick rings, the surface roughness of the particle layer is found to be moderate. The modeled phase curves of optically thick rings are shallow if the phase angle change is primarily due to change of observer azimuthal angle. On the other hand, the phase curves are steep if the phase angle change is due to change of observer elevation angle, as inter-particle shadows become visible at higher observer elevation. In addition, the area of shadowed facets increases with decreasing solar elevation angle. These combined effects explain the large seasonal change of the phase curve steepness observed for the thick rings. The degrees

  7. Mechanical improvement of metal reinforcement rings for a finite ring-shaped superconducting bulk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Guang Huang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available As a key technique, reinforcement of type-II superconducting bulks with metal rings can efficiently improve their mechanical properties to enhance the maximum trapped field. In this paper, we study the magnetostrictive and fracture behaviors of a finite superconducting ring bulk reinforced by three typical reinforcing structures composed of metal rings during the magnetizing process by means of the minimization of magnetic energy and the finite element method. After a field-dependent critical current density is adopted, the magnetostriction, pinning-induced stress, and crack tip stress intensity factor are calculated considering the demagnetization effects. The results show that the mechanical properties of the ring bulk are strongly dependent on the reinforcing structure and the material and geometrical parameters of the metal rings. Introducing the metal ring can significantly reduce the hoop stress, and the reduction effect by internal reinforcement is much improved relative to external reinforcement. By comparison, bilateral reinforcement seems to be the best candidate structure. Only when the metal rings have particular Young’s modulus and radial thickness will they contribute to improve the mechanical properties the most. In addition, if an edge crack is pre-existing in the ring bulk, the presence of metal rings can effectively avoid crack propagation since it reduces the crack tip stress intensity factor by nearly one order of magnitude.

  8. Novel manifestations of the Aharonov-Bohm effect in quantum rings and Moebius rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fomin, Vladimir M.

    2013-01-01

    - An overview is given on the recent experimental and theoretical advancements in studies of novel manifestations of the Aharonov-Bohm quantum-interference effect for excitons confined to self assembled quantum rings and other semiconductor nanostructures with ring-like states of charge carriers as well as for electrons in Moebius rings at the micro- and nanoscale. The exciton Aharonov-Bohm effect can be effectively controlled by an out-of-plane magnetic field, a vertical electric field, a spin disorder. A 'delocalization-to-localization' transition for the electron ground state occurs in a Moebius ring as it is made more inhomogeneous. (authors)

  9. Particle sizes in Saturn's rings from UVIS stellar occultations 1. Variations with ring region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, J. E.; Esposito, L. W.; Cooney, J. H.

    2018-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft's Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) includes a high speed photometer (HSP) that has observed stellar occultations by Saturn's rings with a radial resolution of ∼10 m. In the absence of intervening ring material, the time series of measurements by the HSP is described by Poisson statistics in which the variance equals the mean. The finite sizes of the ring particles occulting the star lead to a variance that is larger than the mean due to correlations in the blocking of photons due to finite particle size and due to random variations in the number of individual particles in each measurement area. This effect was first exploited by Showalter and Nicholson (1990) with the stellar occultation observed by Voyager 2. At a given optical depth, a larger excess variance corresponds to larger particles or clumps that results in greater variation of the signal from measurement to measurement. Here we present analysis of the excess variance in occultations observed by Cassini UVIS. We observe differences in the best-fitting particle size in different ring regions. The C ring plateaus show a distinctly smaller effective particle size, R, than the background C ring, while the background C ring itself shows a positive correlation between R and optical depth. The innermost 700 km of the B ring has a distribution of excess variance with optical depth that is consistent with the C ring ramp and C ring but not with the remainder of the B1 region. The Cassini Division, while similar to the C ring in spectral and structural properties, has different trends in effective particle size with optical depth. There are discrete jumps in R on either side of the Cassini Division ramp, while the C ring ramp shows a smooth transition in R from the C ring to the B ring. The A ring is dominated by self-gravity wakes whose shadow size depends on the occultation geometry. The spectral ;halo; regions around the strongest density waves in the A ring correspond to

  10. Stable CSR in Storage Rings: A Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannibale, F.

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive historical view of the work done on coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in storage rings is given in reference [1]. Here we want just to point out that even if the issue of CSR in storage rings was already discussed over 50 years ago, it is only recently that a considerable number of observations have been reported. In fact, intense bursts of coherent synchrotron radiation with a stochastic character were measured in the terahertz frequency range, at several synchrotron light source storage rings [2-8]. It has been shown [8-11], that this bursting emission of CSR is associated with a single bunch instability, usually referred as microbunching instability (MBI), driven by the fields of the synchrotron radiation emitted by the bunch itself. Of remarkably different characteristics was the CSR emission observed at BESSY II in Berlin, when the storage ring was tuned into a special low momentum compaction mode [12, 13]. In fact, the emitted radiation was not the quasi-random bursting observed in the other machines, but a powerful and stable flux of broadband CSR in the terahertz range. This was an important result, because it experimentally demonstrated the concrete possibility of constructing a stable broadband source with extremely high power in the terahertz region. Since the publication of the first successful experiment using the ring as a CSR source [14], BESSY II has regular scheduled user's shifts dedicated to CSR experiments. At the present time, several other laboratories are investigating the possibility of a CSR mode of operation [15-17] and a design for a new ring optimized for CSR is at an advanced stage [18]. In what follows, we describe a model that first accounts for the BESSY II observations and then indicates that the special case of BESSY II is actually quite general and typical when relativistic electron storage rings are tuned for short bunches. The model provides a scheme for predicting and optimizing the performance of ring

  11. Stable CSR in storage rings: A model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sannibale, Fernando; Byrd, John M.; Loftsdottir, Agusta; Venturini, Marco; Abo-Bakr, Michael; Feikes, Jorge; Holldack, Karsten; Kuske, Peter; Wustefeld, Godehart; Hubers, Heinz-Willerm; Warnock, Robert

    2005-01-01

    A comprehensive historical view of the work done on coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in storage rings is given in reference [1]. Here we want just to point out that even if the issue of CSR in storage rings was already discussed over 50 years ago, it is only recently that a considerable number of observations have been reported. In fact, intense bursts of coherent synchrotron radiation with a stochastic character were measured in the terahertz frequency range, at several synchrotron light source storage rings [2-8]. It has been shown [8-11], that this bursting emission of CSR is associated with a single bunch instability, usually referred as microbunching instability (MBI), driven by the fields of the synchrotron radiation emitted by the bunch itself. Of remarkably different characteristics was the CSR emission observed at BESSY II in Berlin, when the storage ring was tuned into a special low momentum compaction mode [12, 13]. In fact, the emitted radiation was not the quasi-random bursting observed in the other machines, but a powerful and stable flux of broadband CSR in the terahertz range. This was an important result, because it experimentally demonstrated the concrete possibility of constructing a stable broadband source with extremely high power in the terahertz region. Since the publication of the first successful experiment using the ring as a CSR source [14], BESSY II has regular scheduled user s shifts dedicated to CSR experiments. At the present time, several other laboratories are investigating the possibility of a CSR mode of operation [15-17] and a design for a new ring optimized for CSR is at an advanced stage [18]. In what follows, we describe a model that first accounts for the BESSY II observations and then indicates that the special case of BESSY II is actually quite general and typical when relativistic electron storage rings are tuned for short bunches. The model provides a scheme for predicting and optimizing the performance of ring

  12. Effects of chronic constriction injury and spared nerve injury, two models of neuropathic pain, on the numbers of neurons and glia in the rostral ventromedial medulla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Mai Lan; Speltz, Rebecca; Wessendorf, Martin

    2016-03-23

    In previous studies we have reported that spinal nerve ligation (SNL), a model of neuropathic pain, results in the loss of over 20% of neurons in the rostral portion of the ventromedial medulla (RVM) in rats, 10 days after SNL. The RVM is involved in pain modulation and we have proposed that loss of pain inhibition from the RVM, including loss of RVM serotonin neurons, contributes to the increased hypersensitivity observed after SNL. In the present study we examined whether RVM neuronal loss occurs in two other models of neuropathic pain, chronic constriction injury (CCI) and spared nerve injury (SNI). We found no evidence for neuronal loss 10 days after either nerve injury, a time when robust tactile hypersensitivity is present in both CCI and SNI. We conclude that loss of RVM neurons appears not to be required for expression of tactile hypersensitivity in these models of neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. α-Skew π-McCoy Rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Areej M. Abduldaim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available As a generalization of α-skew McCoy rings, we introduce the concept of α-skew π-McCoy rings, and we study the relationships with another two new generalizations, α-skew π1-McCoy rings and α-skew π2-McCoy rings, observing the relations with α-skew McCoy rings, π-McCoy rings, α-skew Armendariz rings, π-regular rings, and other kinds of rings. Also, we investigate conditions such that α-skew π1-McCoy rings imply α-skew π-McCoy rings and α-skew π2-McCoy rings. We show that in the case where R is a nonreduced ring, if R is 2-primal, then R is an α-skew π-McCoy ring. And, let R be a weak (α,δ-compatible ring; if R is an α-skew π1-McCoy ring, then R is α-skew π2-McCoy.

  14. On rings generating supernilpotent and special atoms | France ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We study prime rings which generate supernilpotent (respectively special) atoms, that is, atoms of the lattice of all supernilpotent (respectively special) radicals. A prime ring A is called a **-ring if the smallest special class containing A is closed under semiprime homomorphic images of A. A semiprime ring A whose every ...

  15. Rings Related to Special Atoms | France-Jackson | Quaestiones ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract unavailable at this time... Mathematics Subject Classification (1991): 16A21, 16A12 Keywords: ring, special atoms, atoms, *k-ring, prime ring, *-ring, Jacobson, artinia, essential extension, homomorphic image, ideals. Quaestiones Mathematicae 24(1) 2001, 105–109 ...

  16. Temperature histories from tree rings and corals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, E.R. [Tree-Ring Lab., Palisades, NY (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Recent temperature trends in long tree-ring and coral proxy temperature histories are evaluated and compared in an effort to objectively determine how anomalous twentieth century temperature changes have been. These histories mostly reflect regional variations in summer warmth from the tree rings and annual warmth from the corals. In the Northern Hemisphere. the North American tree-ring temperature histories and those from the north Polar Urals, covering the past 1000 or more years, indicate that the twentieth century has been anomalously warm relative to the past. In contrast, the tree-ring history from northern Fennoscandia indicates that summer temperatures during the {open_quote}Medieval Warm Period{close_quote} were probably warmer on average than those than during this century. In the Southern Hemisphere, the tree-ring temperature histories from South America show no indication of recent warming, which is in accordance with local instrumental records. In contrast, the tree-ring, records from Tasmania and New Zealand indicate that the twentieth century has been unusually warm particularly since 1960. The coral temperature histories from the Galapagos Islands and the Great Barrier Reef are in broad agreement with the tree-ring temperature histories in those sectors, with the former showing recent cooling and the latter showing recent warming that may be unprecedented. Overall, the regional temperature histories evaluated here broadly support the larger-scale evidence for anomalous twentieth century warming based on instrumental records. However, this warming cannot be confirmed as an unprecedented event in all regions. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. A note on derivations in semiprime rings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joso Vukman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available We prove in this note the following result. Let n>1 be an integer and let R be an n!-torsion-free semiprime ring with identity element. Suppose that there exists an additive mapping D:R→R such that D(xn=∑j=1nxn−jD(xxj−1 is fulfilled for all x∈R. In this case, D is a derivation. This research is motivated by the work of Bridges and Bergen (1984. Throughout, R will represent an associative ring with center Z(R. Given an integer n>1, a ring R is said to be n-torsion-free if for x∈R, nx=0 implies that x=0. Recall that a ring R is prime if for a,b∈R, aRb=(0 implies that either a=0 or b=0, and is semiprime in case aRa=(0 implies that a=0. An additive mapping D:R→R is called a derivation if D(xy=D(xy+xD(y holds for all pairs x,y∈R and is called a Jordan derivation in case D(x2=D(xx+xD(x is fulfilled for all x∈R. Every derivation is a Jordan derivation. The converse is in general not true. A classical result of Herstein (1957 asserts that any Jordan derivation on a prime ring with characteristic different from two is a derivation. A brief proof of Herstein's result can be found in 1988 by Brešar and Vukman. Cusack (1975 generalized Herstein's result to 2-torsion-free semiprime rings (see also Brešar (1988 for an alternative proof. For some other results concerning derivations on prime and semiprime rings, we refer to Brešar (1989, Vukman (2005, Vukman and Kosi-Ulbl (2005.

  18. Behavioral and anatomical characterization of the bilateral sciatic nerve chronic constriction (bCCI) injury: correlation of anatomic changes and responses to cold stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sukdeb; Chatterjee, Koel; Kline, Robert H; Wiley, Ronald G

    2010-01-27

    Unilateral constrictive sciatic nerve injury (uCCI) is a common neuropathic pain model. However, the bilateral constrictive injury (bCCI) model is less well studied, and shows unique characteristics. In the present study, we sought to correlate effects of bCCI on nocifensive responses to cold and mechanical stimuli with selected dorsal horn anatomic markers. bCCI or sham ligation of both rat sciatic nerves were followed up to 90 days of behavioural testing. Additional rats sacrificed at 15, 30 and 90 days were used for anatomic analyses. Behavioural tests included hindpaw withdrawal responses to topical acetone, cold plate testing, an operant thermal preference task and hindpaw withdrawal thresholds to mechanical probing. All nocifensive responses to cold increased and remained enhanced for >45 days. Mechanical withdrawal thresholds decreased for 25 days only. Densitometric analyses of immunoperoxidase staining in the superficial dorsal horn at L4-5 revealed decreased cholecystokinin (CCK) staining at all times after bCCI, decreased mu opiate receptor (MOR) staining, maximal at 15 days, increased neuropeptide Y (NPY) staining only at days 15 and 30, and increased neurokinin-1 receptor (NK-1R) staining at all time points, maximal at 15 days. Correlation analyses at 45 days post-bCCI, were significant for individual rat nocifensive responses in each cold test and CCK and NK-1R, but not for MOR or NPY. These results confirm the usefulness of cold testing in bCCI rats, a new approach using CCI to model neuropathic pain, and suggest a potential value of studying the roles of dorsal horn CCK and substance P in chronic neuropathic pain. Compared to human subjects with neuropathic pain, responses to cold stimuli in rats with bCCI may be a useful model of neuropathic pain.

  19. Analysis list: RING1 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available RING1 Breast,Epidermis,Prostate + hg19 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/h...g19/target/RING1.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/RING1.5.tsv http://dbarchive.bioscience...dbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/RING1.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/RING1....Breast.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/RING1.Epidermis....tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/RING1.Prostate.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.j

  20. Quality Assurance Project Plan for Verification of Sediment Ecotoxicity Assessment Ring(SEA Ring)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of the verification is to test the efficacy and ability of the Sediment Ecotoxicity Assessment Ring (SEA Ring) to evaluate the toxicity of contaminants in the sediment, at the sediment-water interface, and WC to organisms that live in those respective environments.