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Sample records for activity-dependent vmat-mediated depletion

  1. Ly6G-mediated depletion of neutrophils is dependent on macrophages.

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    Bruhn, Kevin W; Dekitani, Ken; Nielsen, Travis B; Pantapalangkoor, Paul; Spellberg, Brad

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated depletion of neutrophils is commonly used to study neutropenia. However, the mechanisms by which antibodies deplete neutrophils have not been well defined. We noticed that mice deficient in complement and macrophages had blunted neutrophil depletion in response to anti-Ly6G monoclonal antibody (MAb) treatment. In vitro, exposure of murine neutrophils to anti-Ly6G MAb in the presence of plasma did not result in significant depletion of cells, either in the presence or absence of complement. In vivo, anti-Ly6G-mediated neutrophil depletion was abrogated following macrophage depletion, but not complement depletion, indicating a requirement for macrophages to induce neutropenia by this method. These results inform the use and limitations of anti-Ly6G antibody as an experimental tool for depleting neutrophils in various immunological settings.

  2. Time dependent pre-treatment EPID dosimetry for standard and FFF VMAT.

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    Podesta, Mark; Nijsten, Sebastiaan M J J G; Persoon, Lucas C G G; Scheib, Stefan G; Baltes, Christof; Verhaegen, Frank

    2014-08-21

    Methods to calibrate Megavoltage electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) for dosimetry have been previously documented for dynamic treatments such as intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using flattened beams and typically using integrated fields. While these methods verify the accumulated field shape and dose, the dose rate and differential fields remain unverified. The aim of this work is to provide an accurate calibration model for time dependent pre-treatment dose verification using amorphous silicon (a-Si) EPIDs in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for both flattened and flattening filter free (FFF) beams. A general calibration model was created using a Varian TrueBeam accelerator, equipped with an aS1000 EPID, for each photon spectrum 6 MV, 10 MV, 6 MV-FFF, 10 MV-FFF. As planned VMAT treatments use control points (CPs) for optimization, measured images are separated into corresponding time intervals for direct comparison with predictions. The accuracy of the calibration model was determined for a range of treatment conditions. Measured and predicted CP dose images were compared using a time dependent gamma evaluation using criteria (3%, 3 mm, 0.5 sec). Time dependent pre-treatment dose verification is possible without an additional measurement device or phantom, using the on-board EPID. Sufficient data is present in trajectory log files and EPID frame headers to reliably synchronize and resample portal images. For the VMAT plans tested, significantly more deviation is observed when analysed in a time dependent manner for FFF and non-FFF plans than when analysed using only the integrated field. We show EPID-based pre-treatment dose verification can be performed on a CP basis for VMAT plans. This model can measure pre-treatment doses for both flattened and unflattened beams in a time dependent manner which highlights deviations that are missed in integrated field verifications.

  3. Depletion of Mediator Kinase Module Subunits Represses Superenhancer-Associated Genes in Colon Cancer Cells.

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    Kuuluvainen, Emilia; Domènech-Moreno, Eva; Niemelä, Elina H; Mäkelä, Tomi P

    2018-06-01

    In cancer, oncogene activation is partly mediated by acquired superenhancers, which therefore represent potential targets for inhibition. Superenhancers are enriched for BRD4 and Mediator, and both BRD4 and the Mediator MED12 subunit are disproportionally required for expression of superenhancer-associated genes in stem cells. Here we show that depletion of Mediator kinase module subunit MED12 or MED13 together with MED13L can be used to reduce expression of cancer-acquired superenhancer genes, such as the MYC gene, in colon cancer cells, with a concomitant decrease in proliferation. Whereas depletion of MED12 or MED13/MED13L caused a disproportional decrease of superenhancer gene expression, this was not seen with depletion of the kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK8) and CDK19. MED12-MED13/MED13L-dependent superenhancer genes were coregulated by β-catenin, which has previously been shown to associate with MED12. Importantly, β-catenin depletion caused reduced binding of MED12 at the MYC superenhancer. The effect of MED12 or MED13/MED13L depletion on cancer-acquired superenhancer gene expression was more specific than and partially distinct from that of BRD4 depletion, with the most efficient inhibition seen with combined targeting. These results identify a requirement of MED12 and MED13/MED13L for expression of acquired superenhancer genes in colon cancer, implicating these Mediator subunits as potential therapeutic targets for colon cancer, alone or together with BRD4. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Heme-Mediated Induction of CXCL10 and Depletion of CD34+ Progenitor Cells Is Toll-Like Receptor 4 Dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen M Dickinson-Copeland

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum infection can cause microvascular dysfunction, cerebral encephalopathy and death if untreated. We have previously shown that high concentrations of free heme, and C-X-C motif chemokine 10 (CXCL10 in sera of malaria patients induce apoptosis in microvascular endothelial and neuronal cells contributing to vascular dysfunction, blood-brain barrier (BBB damage and mortality. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPC are microvascular endothelial cell precursors partly responsible for repair and regeneration of damaged BBB endothelium. Studies have shown that EPC's are depleted in severe malaria patients, but the mechanisms mediating this phenomenon are unknown. Toll-like receptors recognize a wide variety of pathogen-associated molecular patterns generated by pathogens such as bacteria and parasites. We tested the hypothesis that EPC depletion during malaria pathogenesis is a function of heme-induced apoptosis mediated by CXCL10 induction and toll-like receptor (TLR activation. Heme and CXCL10 concentrations in plasma obtained from malaria patients were elevated compared with non-malaria subjects. EPC numbers were significantly decreased in malaria patients (P < 0.02 and TLR4 expression was significantly elevated in vivo. These findings were confirmed in EPC precursors in vitro; where it was determined that heme-induced apoptosis and CXCL10 expression was TLR4-mediated. We conclude that increased serum heme mediates depletion of EPC during malaria pathogenesis.

  5. Menadione induces the formation of reactive oxygen species and depletion of GSH-mediated apoptosis and inhibits the FAK-mediated cell invasion.

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    Kim, Yun Jeong; Shin, Yong Kyoo; Sohn, Dong Suep; Lee, Chung Soo

    2014-09-01

    Menadione induces apoptosis in tumor cells. However, the mechanism of apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells exposed to menadione is not clear. In addition, it is unclear whether menadione-induced apoptosis is mediated by the depletion of glutathione (GSH) contents that is associated with the formation of reactive oxygen species. Furthermore, the effect of menadione on the invasion and migration of human epithelial ovarian cancer cells has not been studied. Therefore, we investigated the effects of menadione exposure on apoptosis, cell adhesion, and cell migration using the human epithelial ovarian carcinoma cell lines OVCAR-3 and SK-OV-3. The results suggest that menadione may induce apoptotic cell death in ovarian carcinoma cell lines by activating the mitochondrial pathway and the caspase-8- and Bid-dependent pathways. The apoptotic effect of menadione appears to be mediated by the formation of reactive oxygen species and the depletion of GSH. Menadione inhibited fetal-bovine-serum-induced cell adhesion and migration of OVCAR-3 cells, possibly through the suppression the focal adhesion kinase (FAK)-dependent activation of cytoskeletal-associated components. Therefore, menadione might be beneficial in the treatment of epithelial ovarian adenocarcinoma and combination therapy.

  6. VMAT optimization with dynamic collimator rotation.

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    Lyu, Qihui; O'Connor, Daniel; Ruan, Dan; Yu, Victoria; Nguyen, Dan; Sheng, Ke

    2018-04-16

    Although collimator rotation is an optimization variable that can be exploited for dosimetric advantages, existing Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) optimization uses a fixed collimator angle in each arc and only rotates the collimator between arcs. In this study, we develop a novel integrated optimization method for VMAT, accounting for dynamic collimator angles during the arc motion. Direct Aperture Optimization (DAO) for Dynamic Collimator in VMAT (DC-VMAT) was achieved by adding to the existing dose fidelity objective an anisotropic total variation term for regulating the fluence smoothness, a binary variable for forming simple apertures, and a group sparsity term for controlling collimator rotation. The optimal collimator angle for each beam angle was selected using the Dijkstra's algorithm, where the node costs depend on the estimated fluence map at the current iteration and the edge costs account for the mechanical constraints of multi-leaf collimator (MLC). An alternating optimization strategy was implemented to solve the DAO and collimator angle selection (CAS). Feasibility of DC-VMAT using one full-arc with dynamic collimator rotation was tested on a phantom with two small spherical targets, a brain, a lung and a prostate cancer patient. The plan was compared against a static collimator VMAT (SC-VMAT) plan using three full arcs with 60 degrees of collimator angle separation in patient studies. With the same target coverage, DC-VMAT achieved 20.3% reduction of R50 in the phantom study, and reduced the average max and mean OAR dose by 4.49% and 2.53% of the prescription dose in patient studies, as compared with SC-VMAT. The collimator rotation co-ordinated with the gantry rotation in DC-VMAT plans for deliverability. There were 13 beam angles in the single-arc DC-VMAT plan in patient studies that requires slower gantry rotation to accommodate multiple collimator angles. The novel DC-VMAT approach utilizes the dynamic collimator rotation during arc

  7. Sci-Thur PM: YIS - 03: Comparing 4D-VMAT, Gated-VMAT and 3D-VMAT in SBRT treatment of lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, E; Loewen, S; Nichol, A; Otto, K

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the treatment plan qualities of 4D-VMAT, gated-VMAT and 3D-VMAT in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). 4D-VMAT is a motion compensation strategy that aims to exploit relative target and OAR motion to increase OAR sparing over 3D-VMAT without the long treatment times associated with gated-VMAT. The 4D-VMAT algorithm incorporates the entire patient respiratory cycle and 4D-CT in the optimization process. Resulting treatment plans synchronize the delivery of each MLC aperture to a specific phase of the target motion. Using software developed in Matlab™, SBRT treatment plans for 4D-VMAT, gated-VMAT and 3D-VMAT were generated on 3 patients with NSCLC. Tumour motion ranged from 1.4-3.4 cm. The fractionation scheme was 48Gy in 4 fractions with the GTV receiving 100% of the prescribed dose. For gated-VMAT, the treatment window constrained residual tumour motion to 3 mm or less corresponding to duty cycles of 40-60%. In 3D-VMAT, the ITV was generated by merging the GTV from all phases. A b-spline transformation model was used to register the 4D-CT images and DVHs were calculated from total dose accumulated on the max expiration phase. For the majority of OARs, gated-VMAT provided the greatest radiation sparing but significantly extended treatment times (25-35 gantry interruptions/arc). For 3D-VMAT, only 2 patients had clinically acceptable plans that met all the strict dose limits. OAR sparing in 4D-VMAT was comparable to gated-VMAT but with significantly improved delivery efficiency. © 2012 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  8. Depletion of NADP(H) due to CD38 activation triggers endothelial dysfunction in the postischemic heart.

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    Reyes, Levy A; Boslett, James; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; De Pascali, Francesco; Hemann, Craig; Druhan, Lawrence J; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; El-Mahdy, Mohamed; Zweier, Jay L

    2015-09-15

    In the postischemic heart, coronary vasodilation is impaired due to loss of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) function. Although the eNOS cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) is depleted, its repletion only partially restores eNOS-mediated coronary vasodilation, indicating that other critical factors trigger endothelial dysfunction. Therefore, studies were performed to characterize the unidentified factor(s) that trigger endothelial dysfunction in the postischemic heart. We observed that depletion of the eNOS substrate NADPH occurs in the postischemic heart with near total depletion from the endothelium, triggering impaired eNOS function and limiting BH4 rescue through NADPH-dependent salvage pathways. In isolated rat hearts subjected to 30 min of ischemia and reperfusion (I/R), depletion of the NADP(H) pool occurred and was most marked in the endothelium, with >85% depletion. Repletion of NADPH after I/R increased NOS-dependent coronary flow well above that with BH4 alone. With combined NADPH and BH4 repletion, full restoration of NOS-dependent coronary flow occurred. Profound endothelial NADPH depletion was identified to be due to marked activation of the NAD(P)ase-activity of CD38 and could be prevented by inhibition or specific knockdown of this protein. Depletion of the NADPH precursor, NADP(+), coincided with formation of 2'-phospho-ADP ribose, a CD38-derived signaling molecule. Inhibition of CD38 prevented NADP(H) depletion and preserved endothelium-dependent relaxation and NO generation with increased recovery of contractile function and decreased infarction in the postischemic heart. Thus, CD38 activation is an important cause of postischemic endothelial dysfunction and presents a novel therapeutic target for prevention of this dysfunction in unstable coronary syndromes.

  9. Activating RNAs associate with Mediator to enhance chromatin architecture and transcription.

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    Lai, Fan; Orom, Ulf A; Cesaroni, Matteo; Beringer, Malte; Taatjes, Dylan J; Blobel, Gerd A; Shiekhattar, Ramin

    2013-02-28

    Recent advances in genomic research have revealed the existence of a large number of transcripts devoid of protein-coding potential in multiple organisms. Although the functional role for long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) has been best defined in epigenetic phenomena such as X-chromosome inactivation and imprinting, different classes of lncRNAs may have varied biological functions. We and others have identified a class of lncRNAs, termed ncRNA-activating (ncRNA-a), that function to activate their neighbouring genes using a cis-mediated mechanism. To define the precise mode by which such enhancer-like RNAs function, we depleted factors with known roles in transcriptional activation and assessed their role in RNA-dependent activation. Here we report that depletion of the components of the co-activator complex, Mediator, specifically and potently diminished the ncRNA-induced activation of transcription in a heterologous reporter assay using human HEK293 cells. In vivo, Mediator is recruited to ncRNA-a target genes and regulates their expression. We show that ncRNA-a interact with Mediator to regulate its chromatin localization and kinase activity towards histone H3 serine 10. The Mediator complex harbouring disease- displays diminished ability to associate with activating ncRNAs. Chromosome conformation capture confirmed the presence of DNA looping between the ncRNA-a loci and its targets. Importantly, depletion of Mediator subunits or ncRNA-a reduced the chromatin looping between the two loci. Our results identify the human Mediator complex as the transducer of activating ncRNAs and highlight the importance of Mediator and activating ncRNA association in human disease.

  10. Towards real-time VMAT verification using a prototype, high-speed CMOS active pixel sensor.

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    Zin, Hafiz M; Harris, Emma J; Osmond, John P F; Allinson, Nigel M; Evans, Philip M

    2013-05-21

    This work investigates the feasibility of using a prototype complementary metal oxide semiconductor active pixel sensor (CMOS APS) for real-time verification of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment. The prototype CMOS APS used region of interest read out on the chip to allow fast imaging of up to 403.6 frames per second (f/s). The sensor was made larger (5.4 cm × 5.4 cm) using recent advances in photolithographic technique but retains fast imaging speed with the sensor's regional read out. There is a paradigm shift in radiotherapy treatment verification with the advent of advanced treatment techniques such as VMAT. This work has demonstrated that the APS can track multi leaf collimator (MLC) leaves moving at 18 mm s(-1) with an automatic edge tracking algorithm at accuracy better than 1.0 mm even at the fastest imaging speed. Evaluation of the measured fluence distribution for an example VMAT delivery sampled at 50.4 f/s was shown to agree well with the planned fluence distribution, with an average gamma pass rate of 96% at 3%/3 mm. The MLC leaves motion and linac pulse rate variation delivered throughout the VMAT treatment can also be measured. The results demonstrate the potential of CMOS APS technology as a real-time radiotherapy dosimeter for delivery of complex treatments such as VMAT.

  11. MPTP-meditated hippocampal dopamine deprivation modulates synaptic transmission and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Guoqi; Chen Ying; Huang Yuying; Li Qinglin; Behnisch, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD)-like symptoms including learning deficits are inducible by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Therefore, it is possible that MPTP may disturb hippocampal memory processing by modulation of dopamine (DA)- and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. We demonstrate here that intraperitoneal (i.p.) MPTP injection reduces the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) within 7 days. Subsequently, the TH expression level in SN and hippocampus and the amount of DA and its metabolite DOPAC in striatum and hippocampus decrease. DA depletion does not alter basal synaptic transmission and changes pair-pulse facilitation (PPF) of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) only at the 30 ms inter-pulse interval. In addition, the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) is impaired whereas the duration of long-term depression (LTD) becomes prolonged. Since both LTP and LTD depend critically on activation of NMDA and DA receptors, we also tested the effect of DA depletion on NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission. Seven days after MPTP injection, the NMDA receptor-mediated fEPSPs are decreased by about 23%. Blocking the NMDA receptor-mediated fEPSP does not mimic the MPTP-LTP. Only co-application of D1/D5 and NMDA receptor antagonists during tetanization resembled the time course of fEPSP potentiation as observed 7 days after i.p. MPTP injection. Together, our data demonstrate that MPTP-induced degeneration of DA neurons and the subsequent hippocampal DA depletion alter NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. - Highlights: → I.p. MPTP-injection mediates death of dopaminergic neurons. → I.p. MPTP-injection depletes DA and DOPAC in striatum and hippocampus. → I.p. MPTP-injection does not alter basal synaptic transmission. → Reduction of LTP and enhancement of LTD after i.p. MPTP-injection. → Attenuation of NMDA-receptors mediated

  12. SU-F-BRB-04: Comparison of Coplanar VMAT, Non-Coplanar VMAT, and 4π Treatment Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, K; Nguyen, D; Tran, A; Yu, V; Cao, M; Sheng, K

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The 4π non-coplanar radiotherapy delivery technique has demonstrated significantly better normal tissue sparing and dose conformality than the clinically used volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). It is unclear whether this is a fundamental limitation of VMAT delivery or the coplanar nature of its typical clinical plans. The non-coplanar basis of 4π is incorporated into VMAT treatment planning to compare its effect on plan quality. Methods: Clinical stereotactic body radiation therapy plans for 9 liver patients treated with 30–60 Gy using coplanar VMAT (cVMAT) were re-planned using non-coplanar VMAT (nVMAT) with 3 arcs and 4 π with 20 intensity-modulated non-coplanar fields. All plans were optimized to deliver 100% of the prescribed dose to 95% of the planning target volume (PTV), and nVMAT and 4π plans were tailored to match the maximum and mean PTV dose from the clinical plan. The conformality index (CI), 50% dose spillage volume (R50), normal liver volume receiving >15 Gy (VL>15), and doses to organs at risk (OARs) were compared for all three treatment plans. Results: Compared to cVMAT, the nVMAT and 4π plans reduced VL>15 by an average of 30.6 cm3 and 96.3 cm3, respectively. The average CI was also reduced from 1.22 (cVMAT) to 1.17 (nVMAT) and 1.14 (4π), indicating higher conformality in the same order. Similarly, R50 was reduced from 3.87 (cVMAT) to 3.58 (nVMAT) and 2.74 (4π). With the exception of the mean right kidney dose, which increased by an average of only 0.6 Gy for nVMAT, the dose differences to OARs were not statistically significant between the two VMAT plans. 4π plans either significantly decreased or maintained OAR doses. Conclusion: While the manual selection of intuitive non-coplanar arcs does show some improvement over coplanar VMAT, the automated beam selection for 4π still results in superior plan quality. This project is supported in part by Varian Medical Systems and NIH R43 CA183390

  13. Polycystin-1 promotes PKCα-mediated NF-κB activation in kidney cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banzi, Manuela; Aguiari, Gianluca; Trimi, Viky; Mangolini, Alessandra; Pinton, Paolo; Witzgall, Ralph; Rizzuto, Rosario; Senno, Laura del

    2006-01-01

    Polycystin-1 (PC1), the PKD1 gene product, is a membrane receptor which regulates many cell functions, including cell proliferation and apoptosis, both typically increased in cyst lining cells in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease. Here we show that PC1 upregulates the NF-κB signalling pathway in kidney cells to prevent cell death. Human embryonic kidney cell lines (HEK293 CTT ), stably expressing a PC1 cytoplasmic terminal tail (CTT), presented increased NF-κB nuclear levels and NF-κB-mediated luciferase promoter activity. This, consistently, was reduced in HEK293 cells in which the endogenous PC1 was depleted by RNA interference. CTT-dependent NF-κB promoter activation was mediated by PKCα because it was blocked by its specific inhibitor Ro-320432. Furthermore, it was observed that apoptosis, which was increased in PC1-depleted cells, was reduced in HEK293 CTT cells and in porcine kidney LtTA cells expressing a doxycycline-regulated CTT. Staurosporine, a PKC inhibitor, and parthenolide, a NF-κB inhibitor, significantly reduced the CTT-dependent antiapoptotic effect. These data reveal, therefore, a novel pathway by which polycystin-1 activates a PKCα-mediated NF-κB signalling and cell survival

  14. Multicriteria VMAT optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craft, David; McQuaid, Dualta; Wala, Jeremiah; Chen, Wei; Salari, Ehsan; Bortfeld, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To make the planning of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) faster and to explore the tradeoffs between planning objectives and delivery efficiency. Methods: A convex multicriteria dose optimization problem is solved for an angular grid of 180 equi-spaced beams. This allows the planner to navigate the ideal dose distribution Pareto surface and select a plan of desired target coverage versus organ at risk sparing. The selected plan is then made VMAT deliverable by a fluence map merging and sequencing algorithm, which combines neighboring fluence maps based on a similarity score and then delivers the merged maps together, simplifying delivery. Successive merges are made as long as the dose distribution quality is maintained. The complete algorithm is called VMERGE. Results: VMERGE is applied to three cases: a prostate, a pancreas, and a brain. In each case, the selected Pareto-optimal plan is matched almost exactly with the VMAT merging routine, resulting in a high quality plan delivered with a single arc in less than 5 min on average. Conclusions: VMERGE offers significant improvements over existing VMAT algorithms. The first is the multicriteria planning aspect, which greatly speeds up planning time and allows the user to select the plan, which represents the most desirable compromise between target coverage and organ at risk sparing. The second is the user-chosen epsilon-optimality guarantee of the final VMAT plan. Finally, the user can explore the tradeoff between delivery time and plan quality, which is a fundamental aspect of VMAT that cannot be easily investigated with current commercial planning systems.

  15. Noncoplanar VMAT for nasopharyngeal tumors: Plan quality versus treatment time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wild, Esther, E-mail: e.wild@dkfz.de; Bangert, Mark [Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Nill, Simeon [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG (United Kingdom); Oelfke, Uwe [Joint Department of Physics at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London SM2 5NG, United Kingdom and Department of Medical Physics in Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The authors investigated the potential of optimized noncoplanar irradiation trajectories for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatments of nasopharyngeal patients and studied the trade-off between treatment plan quality and delivery time in radiation therapy. Methods: For three nasopharyngeal patients, the authors generated treatment plans for nine different delivery scenarios using dedicated optimization methods. They compared these scenarios according to dose characteristics, number of beam directions, and estimated delivery times. In particular, the authors generated the following treatment plans: (1) a 4π plan, which is a not sequenced, fluence optimized plan that uses beam directions from approximately 1400 noncoplanar directions and marks a theoretical upper limit of the treatment plan quality, (2) a coplanar 2π plan with 72 coplanar beam directions as pendant to the noncoplanar 4π plan, (3) a coplanar VMAT plan, (4) a coplanar step and shoot (SnS) plan, (5) a beam angle optimized (BAO) coplanar SnS IMRT plan, (6) a noncoplanar BAO SnS plan, (7) a VMAT plan with rotated treatment couch, (8) a noncoplanar VMAT plan with an optimized great circle around the patient, and (9) a noncoplanar BAO VMAT plan with an arbitrary trajectory around the patient. Results: VMAT using optimized noncoplanar irradiation trajectories reduced the mean and maximum doses in organs at risk compared to coplanar VMAT plans by 19% on average while the target coverage remains constant. A coplanar BAO SnS plan was superior to coplanar SnS or VMAT; however, noncoplanar plans like a noncoplanar BAO SnS plan or noncoplanar VMAT yielded a better plan quality than the best coplanar 2π plan. The treatment plan quality of VMAT plans depended on the length of the trajectory. The delivery times of noncoplanar VMAT plans were estimated to be 6.5 min in average; 1.6 min longer than a coplanar plan but on average 2.8 min faster than a noncoplanar SnS plan with comparable

  16. Noncoplanar VMAT for nasopharyngeal tumors: Plan quality versus treatment time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wild, Esther; Bangert, Mark; Nill, Simeon; Oelfke, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The authors investigated the potential of optimized noncoplanar irradiation trajectories for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatments of nasopharyngeal patients and studied the trade-off between treatment plan quality and delivery time in radiation therapy. Methods: For three nasopharyngeal patients, the authors generated treatment plans for nine different delivery scenarios using dedicated optimization methods. They compared these scenarios according to dose characteristics, number of beam directions, and estimated delivery times. In particular, the authors generated the following treatment plans: (1) a 4π plan, which is a not sequenced, fluence optimized plan that uses beam directions from approximately 1400 noncoplanar directions and marks a theoretical upper limit of the treatment plan quality, (2) a coplanar 2π plan with 72 coplanar beam directions as pendant to the noncoplanar 4π plan, (3) a coplanar VMAT plan, (4) a coplanar step and shoot (SnS) plan, (5) a beam angle optimized (BAO) coplanar SnS IMRT plan, (6) a noncoplanar BAO SnS plan, (7) a VMAT plan with rotated treatment couch, (8) a noncoplanar VMAT plan with an optimized great circle around the patient, and (9) a noncoplanar BAO VMAT plan with an arbitrary trajectory around the patient. Results: VMAT using optimized noncoplanar irradiation trajectories reduced the mean and maximum doses in organs at risk compared to coplanar VMAT plans by 19% on average while the target coverage remains constant. A coplanar BAO SnS plan was superior to coplanar SnS or VMAT; however, noncoplanar plans like a noncoplanar BAO SnS plan or noncoplanar VMAT yielded a better plan quality than the best coplanar 2π plan. The treatment plan quality of VMAT plans depended on the length of the trajectory. The delivery times of noncoplanar VMAT plans were estimated to be 6.5 min in average; 1.6 min longer than a coplanar plan but on average 2.8 min faster than a noncoplanar SnS plan with comparable

  17. Non-coplanar volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for craniopharyngiomas reduces radiation doses to the bilateral hippocampus: a planning study comparing dynamic conformal arc therapy, coplanar VMAT, and non-coplanar VMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uto, Megumi; Mizowaki, Takashi; Ogura, Kengo; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that radiation-induced injuries to the hippocampus play important roles in compromising neurocognitive functioning for patients with brain tumors and it could be important to spare the hippocampus using modern planning methods for patients with craniopharyngiomas. As bilateral hippocampus are located on the same level as the planning target volume (PTV) in patients with craniopharyngioma, it seems possible to reduce doses to hippocampus using non-coplanar beams. While the use of non-coplanar beams in volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) of malignant intracranial tumors has recently been reported, no dosimetric comparison has yet been made between VMAT using non-coplanar arcs (ncVMAT) and VMAT employing only coplanar arcs (coVMAT) among patients with craniopharyngiomas. We performed a planning study comparing dose distributions to the PTV, hippocampus, and other organs at risk (OAR) of dynamic conformal arc therapy (DCAT), coVMAT, and ncVMAT. DCAT, coVMAT, and ncVMAT plans were created for 10 patients with craniopharyngiomas. The prescription dose was 52.2 Gy in 29 fractions, and 99 % of each PTV was covered by 90 % of the prescribed dose. The maximum dose was held below 107 % of the prescribed dose. CoVMAT and ncVMAT plans were formulated to satisfy the following criteria: the doses to the hippocampus were minimized, and the doses to the OAR were similar to or lower than those of DCAT. The mean equivalent doses in 2-Gy fractions to 40 % of the volumes of the bilateral hippocampus [EQD 2 (40% hippos )] were 15.4/10.8/6.5 Gy for DCAT/coVMAT/ncVMAT, respectively. The EQD 2 (40% hippos ) for ncVMAT were <7.3 Gy, which is the threshold predicting cognitive impairment, as defined by Gondi et al.. The mean doses to normal brain tissue and the conformity indices were similar for the three plans, and the homogeneity indices were significantly better for coVMAT and ncVMAT compared with DCAT. NcVMAT is more appropriate than DCAT and coVMAT for

  18. Adaptor Protein Complex-2 (AP-2) and Epsin-1 Mediate Protease-activated Receptor-1 Internalization via Phosphorylation- and Ubiquitination-dependent Sorting Signals*

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    Chen, Buxin; Dores, Michael R.; Grimsey, Neil; Canto, Isabel; Barker, Breann L.; Trejo, JoAnn

    2011-01-01

    Signaling by protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1), a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) for thrombin, is regulated by desensitization and internalization. PAR1 desensitization is mediated by β-arrestins, like most classic GPCRs. In contrast, internalization of PAR1 occurs through a clathrin- and dynamin-dependent pathway independent of β-arrestins. PAR1 displays two modes of internalization. Constitutive internalization of unactivated PAR1 is mediated by the clathrin adaptor protein complex-2 (AP-2), where the μ2-adaptin subunit binds directly to a tyrosine-based motif localized within the receptor C-tail domain. However, AP-2 depletion only partially inhibits agonist-induced internalization of PAR1, suggesting a function for other clathrin adaptors in this process. Here, we now report that AP-2 and epsin-1 are both critical mediators of agonist-stimulated PAR1 internalization. We show that ubiquitination of PAR1 and the ubiquitin-interacting motifs of epsin-1 are required for epsin-1-dependent internalization of activated PAR1. In addition, activation of PAR1 promotes epsin-1 de-ubiquitination, which may increase its endocytic adaptor activity to facilitate receptor internalization. AP-2 also regulates activated PAR1 internalization via recognition of distal C-tail phosphorylation sites rather than the canonical tyrosine-based motif. Thus, AP-2 and epsin-1 are both required to promote efficient internalization of activated PAR1 and recognize discrete receptor sorting signals. This study defines a new pathway for internalization of mammalian GPCRs. PMID:21965661

  19. Multicriteria optimization informed VMAT planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Huixiao; Craft, David L.; Gierga, David P., E-mail: dgierga@partners.org

    2014-04-01

    We developed a patient-specific volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) optimization procedure using dose-volume histogram (DVH) information from multicriteria optimization (MCO) of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans. The study included 10 patients with prostate cancer undergoing standard fractionation treatment, 10 patients with prostate cancer undergoing hypofractionation treatment, and 5 patients with head/neck cancer. MCO-IMRT plans using 20 and 7 treatment fields were generated for each patient on the RayStation treatment planning system (clinical version 2.5, RaySearch Laboratories, Stockholm, Sweden). The resulting DVH of the 20-field MCO-IMRT plan for each patient was used as the reference DVH, and the extracted point values of the resulting DVH of the MCO-IMRT plan were used as objectives and constraints for VMAT optimization. Weights of objectives or constraints of VMAT optimization or both were further tuned to generate the best match with the reference DVH of the MCO-IMRT plan. The final optimal VMAT plan quality was evaluated by comparison with MCO-IMRT plans based on homogeneity index, conformity number of planning target volume, and organ at risk sparing. The influence of gantry spacing, arc number, and delivery time on VMAT plan quality for different tumor sites was also evaluated. The resulting VMAT plan quality essentially matched the 20-field MCO-IMRT plan but with a shorter delivery time and less monitor units. VMAT plan quality of head/neck cancer cases improved using dual arcs whereas prostate cases did not. VMAT plan quality was improved by fine gantry spacing of 2 for the head/neck cancer cases and the hypofractionation-treated prostate cancer cases but not for the standard fractionation–treated prostate cancer cases. MCO-informed VMAT optimization is a useful and valuable way to generate patient-specific optimal VMAT plans, though modification of the weights of objectives or constraints extracted from resulting DVH of MCO

  20. Transient Treg depletion enhances therapeutic anti‐cancer vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aston, Wayne J.; Chee, Jonathan; Khong, Andrea; Cleaver, Amanda L.; Solin, Jessica N.; Ma, Shaokang; Lesterhuis, W. Joost; Dick, Ian; Holt, Robert A.; Creaney, Jenette; Boon, Louis; Robinson, Bruce; Lake, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Regulatory T cells (Treg) play an important role in suppressing anti‐ immunity and their depletion has been linked to improved outcomes. To better understand the role of Treg in limiting the efficacy of anti‐cancer immunity, we used a Diphtheria toxin (DTX) transgenic mouse model to specifically target and deplete Treg. Methods Tumor bearing BALB/c FoxP3.dtr transgenic mice were subjected to different treatment protocols, with or without Treg depletion and tumor growth and survival monitored. Results DTX specifically depleted Treg in a transient, dose‐dependent manner. Treg depletion correlated with delayed tumor growth, increased effector T cell (Teff) activation, and enhanced survival in a range of solid tumors. Tumor regression was dependent on Teffs as depletion of both CD4 and CD8 T cells completely abrogated any survival benefit. Severe morbidity following Treg depletion was only observed, when consecutive doses of DTX were given during peak CD8 T cell activation, demonstrating that Treg can be depleted on multiple occasions, but only when CD8 T cell activation has returned to base line levels. Finally, we show that even minimal Treg depletion is sufficient to significantly improve the efficacy of tumor‐peptide vaccination. Conclusions BALB/c.FoxP3.dtr mice are an ideal model to investigate the full therapeutic potential of Treg depletion to boost anti‐tumor immunity. DTX‐mediated Treg depletion is transient, dose‐dependent, and leads to strong anti‐tumor immunity and complete tumor regression at high doses, while enhancing the efficacy of tumor‐specific vaccination at low doses. Together this data highlight the importance of Treg manipulation as a useful strategy for enhancing current and future cancer immunotherapies. PMID:28250921

  1. Multi-institutional comparison of simulated treatment delivery errors in ssIMRT, manually planned VMAT and autoplan-VMAT plans for nasopharyngeal radiotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pogson, Elise M; Aruguman, Sankar; Hansen, Christian R

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To quantify the impact of simulated errors for nasopharynx radiotherapy across multiple institutions and planning techniques (auto-plan generated Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (ap-VMAT), manually planned VMAT (mp-VMAT) and manually planned step and shoot Intensity Modulated Radiation...... Therapy (mp-ssIMRT)). METHODS: Ten patients were retrospectively planned with VMAT according to three institution's protocols. Within one institution two further treatment plans were generated using differing treatment planning techniques. This resulted in mp-ssIMRT, mp-VMAT, and ap-VMAT plans. Introduced...

  2. Comparison of VMAT and IMRT strategies for cervical cancer patients using automated planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharfo, Abdul Wahab M; Voet, Peter W J; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Mens, Jan Willem M; Hoogeman, Mischa S; Heijmen, Ben J M

    2015-03-01

    In a published study on cervical cancer, 5-beam IMRT was inferior to single arc VMAT. Here we compare 9, 12, and 20 beam IMRT with single and dual arc VMAT. For each of 10 patients, automated plan generation with the in-house Erasmus-iCycle optimizer was used to assist an expert planner in generating the five plans with the clinical TPS. For each patient, all plans were clinically acceptable with a high and similar PTV coverage. OAR sparing increased when going from 9 to 12 to 20 IMRT beams, and from single to dual arc VMAT. For all patients, 12 and 20 beam IMRT were superior to single and dual arc VMAT, with substantial variations in gain among the study patients. As expected, delivery of VMAT plans was significantly faster than delivery of IMRT plans. Often reported increased plan quality for VMAT compared to IMRT has not been observed for cervical cancer. Twenty and 12 beam IMRT plans had a higher quality than single and dual arc VMAT. For individual patients, the optimal delivery technique depends on a complex trade-off between plan quality and treatment time that may change with introduction of faster delivery systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of VMAT and IMRT strategies for cervical cancer patients using automated planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharfo, Abdul Wahab M.; Voet, Peter W.J.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Mens, Jan Willem M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose: In a published study on cervical cancer, 5-beam IMRT was inferior to single arc VMAT. Here we compare 9, 12, and 20 beam IMRT with single and dual arc VMAT. Material and methods: For each of 10 patients, automated plan generation with the in-house Erasmus-iCycle optimizer was used to assist an expert planner in generating the five plans with the clinical TPS. Results: For each patient, all plans were clinically acceptable with a high and similar PTV coverage. OAR sparing increased when going from 9 to 12 to 20 IMRT beams, and from single to dual arc VMAT. For all patients, 12 and 20 beam IMRT were superior to single and dual arc VMAT, with substantial variations in gain among the study patients. As expected, delivery of VMAT plans was significantly faster than delivery of IMRT plans. Conclusions: Often reported increased plan quality for VMAT compared to IMRT has not been observed for cervical cancer. Twenty and 12 beam IMRT plans had a higher quality than single and dual arc VMAT. For individual patients, the optimal delivery technique depends on a complex trade-off between plan quality and treatment time that may change with introduction of faster delivery systems

  4. Evidence for a role of transporter-mediated currents in the depletion of brain serotonin induced by serotonin transporter substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Michael H; Bulling, Simon; Benaderet, Tova S; Saha, Kusumika; Ayestas, Mario A; Partilla, John S; Ali, Syed F; Stockner, Thomas; Rothman, Richard B; Sandtner, Walter; Sitte, Harald H

    2014-05-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) transporter (SERT) substrates like fenfluramine and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine cause long-term depletion of brain 5-HT, while certain other substrates do not. The 5-HT deficits produced by SERT substrates are dependent upon transporter proteins, but the exact mechanisms responsible are unclear. Here, we compared the pharmacology of several SERT substrates: fenfluramine, d-fenfluramine, 1-(m-chlorophenyl)piperazine (mCPP) and 1-(m-trifluoromethylphenyl)piperainze (TFMPP), to establish relationships between acute drug mechanisms and the propensity for long-term 5-HT depletions. In vivo microdialysis was carried out in rat nucleus accumbens to examine acute 5-HT release and long-term depletion in the same subjects. In vitro assays were performed to measure efflux of [(3)H]5-HT in rat brain synaptosomes and transporter-mediated ionic currents in SERT-expressing Xenopus oocytes. When administered repeatedly to rats (6 mg/kg, i.p., four doses), all drugs produce large sustained elevations in extracellular 5-HT (>5-fold) with minimal effects on dopamine. Importantly, 2 weeks after dosing, only rats exposed to fenfluramine and d-fenfluramine display depletion of brain 5-HT. All test drugs evoke fluoxetine-sensitive efflux of [(3)H]5-HT from synaptosomes, but d-fenfluramine and its bioactive metabolite d-norfenfluramine induce significantly greater SERT-mediated currents than phenylpiperazines. Our data confirm that drug-induced 5-HT release probably does not mediate 5-HT depletion. However, the magnitude of transporter-mediated inward current may be a critical factor in the cascade of events leading to 5-HT deficits. This hypothesis warrants further study, especially given the growing popularity of designer drugs that target SERT.

  5. Fully automated VMAT treatment planning for advanced-stage NSCLC patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Della Gala, Giuseppe [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Universita di Bologna, Scuola di Scienze, Alma Mater Studiorum, Bologna (Italy); Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Hoekstra, Nienke; Fransen, Dennie; Pol, Marjan van de; Heijmen, Ben J.M. [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Lanconelli, Nico [Universita di Bologna, Scuola di Scienze, Alma Mater Studiorum, Bologna (Italy); Petit, Steven F. [Erasmus MC Cancer Institute, Department of Radiation Oncology, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Massachusetts General Hospital - Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-05-15

    To develop a fully automated procedure for multicriterial volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning (autoVMAT) for stage III/IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with curative intent. After configuring the developed autoVMAT system for NSCLC, autoVMAT plans were compared with manually generated clinically delivered intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for 41 patients. AutoVMAT plans were also compared to manually generated VMAT plans in the absence of time pressure. For 16 patients with reduced planning target volume (PTV) dose prescription in the clinical IMRT plan (to avoid violation of organs at risk tolerances), the potential for dose escalation with autoVMAT was explored. Two physicians evaluated 35/41 autoVMAT plans (85%) as clinically acceptable. Compared to the manually generated IMRT plans, autoVMAT plans showed statistically significant improved PTV coverage (V{sub 95%} increased by 1.1% ± 1.1%), higher dose conformity (R{sub 50} reduced by 12.2% ± 12.7%), and reduced mean lung, heart, and esophagus doses (reductions of 0.9 Gy ± 1.0 Gy, 1.5 Gy ± 1.8 Gy, 3.6 Gy ± 2.8 Gy, respectively, all p < 0.001). To render the six remaining autoVMAT plans clinically acceptable, a dosimetrist needed less than 10 min hands-on time for fine-tuning. AutoVMAT plans were also considered equivalent or better than manually optimized VMAT plans. For 6/16 patients, autoVMAT allowed tumor dose escalation of 5-10 Gy. Clinically deliverable, high-quality autoVMAT plans can be generated fully automatically for the vast majority of advanced-stage NSCLC patients. For a subset of patients, autoVMAT allowed for tumor dose escalation. (orig.) [German] Entwicklung einer vollautomatisierten, auf multiplen Kriterien basierenden volumenmodulierten Arc-Therapie-(VMAT-)Behandlungsplanung (autoVMAT) fuer kurativ behandelte Patienten mit nicht-kleinzelligem Bronchialkarzinom (NSCLC) im Stadium III/IV. Nach Konfiguration unseres autoVMAT

  6. Regulation of death induction and chemosensitizing action of 3-bromopyruvate in myeloid leukemia cells: energy depletion, oxidative stress, and protein kinase activity modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calviño, Eva; Estañ, María Cristina; Sánchez-Martín, Carlos; Brea, Rocío; de Blas, Elena; Boyano-Adánez, María del Carmen; Rial, Eduardo; Aller, Patricio

    2014-02-01

    3-Bromopyruvate (3-BrP) is an alkylating, energy-depleting drug that is of interest in antitumor therapies, although the mechanisms underlying its cytotoxicity are ill-defined. We show here that 3-BrP causes concentration-dependent cell death of HL60 and other human myeloid leukemia cells, inducing both apoptosis and necrosis at 20-30 μM and a pure necrotic response at 60 μM. Low concentrations of 3-BrP (10-20 μM) brought about a rapid inhibition of glycolysis, which at higher concentrations was followed by the inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. The combination of these effects causes concentration-dependent ATP depletion, although this cannot explain the lethality at intermediate 3-BrP concentrations (20-30 μM). The oxidative stress caused by exposure to 3-BrP was evident as a moderate overproduction of reactive oxygen species and a concentration-dependent depletion of glutathione, which was an important determinant of 3-BrP toxicity. In addition, 3-BrP caused glutathione-dependent stimulation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), mitogen-induced extracellular kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and protein kinase B (Akt)/mammalian target of rapamycin/p70S6K phosphorylation or activation, as well as rapid LKB-1/AMP kinase (AMPK) activation, which was later followed by Akt-mediated inactivation. Experiments with pharmacological inhibitors revealed that p38 MAPK activation enhances 3-BrP toxicity, which is conversely restrained by ERK and Akt activity. Finally, 3-BrP was seen to cooperate with antitumor agents like arsenic trioxide and curcumin in causing cell death, a response apparently mediated by both the generation of oxidative stress induced by 3-BrP and the attenuation of Akt and ERK activation by curcumin. In summary, 3-BrP cytotoxicity is the result of several combined regulatory mechanisms that might represent important targets to improve therapeutic efficacy.

  7. Protective actions of the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) in monoaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillot, Thomas S; Miller, Gary W

    2009-04-01

    Vesicular monoamine transporters (VMATs) are responsible for the packaging of neurotransmitters such as dopamine, serotonin, norepinephrine, and epinephrine into synaptic vesicles. These proteins evolved from precursors in the major facilitator superfamily of transporters and are among the members of the toxin extruding antiporter family. While the primary function of VMATs is to sequester neurotransmitters within vesicles, they can also translocate toxicants away from cytosolic sites of action. In the case of dopamine, this dual role of VMAT2 is combined-dopamine is more readily oxidized in the cytosol where it can cause oxidative stress so packaging into vesicles serves two purposes: neurotransmission and neuroprotection. Furthermore, the deleterious effects of exogenous toxicants on dopamine neurons, such as MPTP, can be attenuated by VMAT2 activity. The active metabolite of MPTP can be kept within vesicles and prevented from disrupting mitochondrial function thereby sparing the dopamine neuron. The highly addictive drug methamphetamine is also neurotoxic to dopamine neurons by using dopamine itself to destroy the axon terminals. Methamphetamine interferes with vesicular sequestration and increases the production of dopamine, escalating the amount in the cytosol and leading to oxidative damage of terminal components. Vesicular transport seems to resist this process by sequestering much of the excess dopamine, which is illustrated by the enhanced methamphetamine neurotoxicity in VMAT2-deficient mice. It is increasingly evident that VMAT2 provides neuroprotection from both endogenous and exogenous toxicants and that while VMAT2 has been adapted by eukaryotes for synaptic transmission, it is derived from phylogenetically ancient proteins that originally evolved for the purpose of cellular protection.

  8. Clumping factor A-mediated virulence during Staphylococcus aureus infection is retained despite fibrinogen depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmqvist, Niklas; Josefsson, Elisabet; Tarkowski, Andrzej

    2004-02-01

    Clumping factor A (ClfA), a fibrinogen-binding protein expressed on the Staphylococcus aureus cell surface, has previously been shown to act as a virulence factor in experimental septic arthritis. Although the interaction between ClfA and fibrinogen is assumed to be of importance for the virulence of S. aureus, this has not been demonstrated in any in vivo model of infection. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the contribution of this interaction to ClfA-mediated virulence in murine S. aureus-induced arthritis. Ancrod, a serine protease with thrombin-like activity, was used to induce in vivo depletion of fibrinogen in mice. Ancrod treatment significantly aggravated septic arthritis following inoculation with a ClfA-expressing strain (Newman) compared to control treatment. Also, ancrod treatment tended to enhance the arthritis induced by a clfA mutant strain (DU5876), indicating that fibrinogen depletion exacerbates septic arthritis in a ClfA-independent manner. Most importantly, the ClfA-expressing strain was much more arthritogenic than the isogenic clfA mutant, following inoculation of fibrinogen-depleted mice. This finding indicates that the interaction between ClfA and free fibrinogen is not required for ClfA-mediated functions contributing to S. aureus virulence. It is conceivable that ClfA contributes to the virulence of S. aureus through interactions with other host ligands than fibrinogen.

  9. Fully automated VMAT treatment planning for advanced-stage NSCLC patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Della Gala, Giuseppe; Dirkx, Maarten L.P.; Hoekstra, Nienke; Fransen, Dennie; Pol, Marjan van de; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Lanconelli, Nico; Petit, Steven F.

    2017-01-01

    To develop a fully automated procedure for multicriterial volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning (autoVMAT) for stage III/IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with curative intent. After configuring the developed autoVMAT system for NSCLC, autoVMAT plans were compared with manually generated clinically delivered intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans for 41 patients. AutoVMAT plans were also compared to manually generated VMAT plans in the absence of time pressure. For 16 patients with reduced planning target volume (PTV) dose prescription in the clinical IMRT plan (to avoid violation of organs at risk tolerances), the potential for dose escalation with autoVMAT was explored. Two physicians evaluated 35/41 autoVMAT plans (85%) as clinically acceptable. Compared to the manually generated IMRT plans, autoVMAT plans showed statistically significant improved PTV coverage (V_9_5_% increased by 1.1% ± 1.1%), higher dose conformity (R_5_0 reduced by 12.2% ± 12.7%), and reduced mean lung, heart, and esophagus doses (reductions of 0.9 Gy ± 1.0 Gy, 1.5 Gy ± 1.8 Gy, 3.6 Gy ± 2.8 Gy, respectively, all p [de

  10. SU-E-T-43: A Methodology for Quality Control of IMPT Treatment Plan Based On VMAT Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, S; Yang, Y; Liao, L; Wang, X; Li, H; Zhu, X; Zhang, X

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: IMPT plan design is highly dependent on planner’s experiences. VMAT plan design is relatively mature and can even be automated. The quality of IMPT plan designed by in-experienced planner could be inferior to that of VMAT plan designed by experienced planner or automatic planning software. Here we introduce a method for designing IMPT plan based on VMAT plan to ensure the IMPT plan be superior to IMRT/VMAT plan for majority clinical scenario. Methods: To design a new IMPT plan, a VMAT plan is first generated either by experienced planner or by in-house developed automatic planning system. An in-house developed tool is used to generate the dose volume constrains for the IMPT plan as plan template to Eclipse TPS. The beam angles for IMPT plan are selected based on the preferred angles in the VMAT plan. IMPT plan is designed by importing the plan objectives generated from VMAT plan. Majority thoracic IMPT plans are designed using this plan approach in our center. In this work, a thoracic IMPT plan under RTOG 1308 protocol is selected to demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of this approach. The dosimetric indices of IMPT are compared with VMAT plan. Results: The PTV D95, lung V20, MLD, mean heart dose, esophagus D1, cord D1 are 70Gy, 31%, 17.8Gy, 25.5Gy, 73Gy, 45Gy for IMPT plan and 65.3Gy, 34%, 21.6Gy, 35Gy, 74Gy, 48Gy for VMAT plan. For majority cases, the high dose region of the normal tissue which is in proximity of PTV is comparable between IMPT and VMAT plan. The low dose region of the IMPT plan is significantly better than VMAT plan. Conclusion: Using the knowledge gained in VMAT plan design can help efficiently and effectively design high quality IMPT plan. The quality of IMPT plan can be controlled to ensure the superiority of IMPT plan compared to VMAT/IMRT plan

  11. SU-E-T-43: A Methodology for Quality Control of IMPT Treatment Plan Based On VMAT Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, S [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital (China); Yang, Y [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States); Tianjin First Center Hospital (China); Liao, L; Wang, X; Li, H; Zhu, X; Zhang, X [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: IMPT plan design is highly dependent on planner’s experiences. VMAT plan design is relatively mature and can even be automated. The quality of IMPT plan designed by in-experienced planner could be inferior to that of VMAT plan designed by experienced planner or automatic planning software. Here we introduce a method for designing IMPT plan based on VMAT plan to ensure the IMPT plan be superior to IMRT/VMAT plan for majority clinical scenario. Methods: To design a new IMPT plan, a VMAT plan is first generated either by experienced planner or by in-house developed automatic planning system. An in-house developed tool is used to generate the dose volume constrains for the IMPT plan as plan template to Eclipse TPS. The beam angles for IMPT plan are selected based on the preferred angles in the VMAT plan. IMPT plan is designed by importing the plan objectives generated from VMAT plan. Majority thoracic IMPT plans are designed using this plan approach in our center. In this work, a thoracic IMPT plan under RTOG 1308 protocol is selected to demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of this approach. The dosimetric indices of IMPT are compared with VMAT plan. Results: The PTV D95, lung V20, MLD, mean heart dose, esophagus D1, cord D1 are 70Gy, 31%, 17.8Gy, 25.5Gy, 73Gy, 45Gy for IMPT plan and 65.3Gy, 34%, 21.6Gy, 35Gy, 74Gy, 48Gy for VMAT plan. For majority cases, the high dose region of the normal tissue which is in proximity of PTV is comparable between IMPT and VMAT plan. The low dose region of the IMPT plan is significantly better than VMAT plan. Conclusion: Using the knowledge gained in VMAT plan design can help efficiently and effectively design high quality IMPT plan. The quality of IMPT plan can be controlled to ensure the superiority of IMPT plan compared to VMAT/IMRT plan.

  12. Automated VMAT planning for postoperative adjuvant treatment of advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharfo, Abdul Wahab M; Stieler, Florian; Kupfer, Oskar; Heijmen, Ben J M; Dirkx, Maarten L P; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Wenz, Frederik; Lohr, Frank; Boda-Heggemann, Judit; Buergy, Daniel

    2018-04-23

    Postoperative/adjuvant radiotherapy of advanced gastric cancer involves a large planning target volume (PTV) with multi-concave shapes which presents a challenge for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning. This study investigates the advantages of automated VMAT planning for this site compared to manual VMAT planning by expert planners. For 20 gastric cancer patients in the postoperative/adjuvant setting, dual-arc VMAT plans were generated using fully automated multi-criterial treatment planning (autoVMAT), and compared to manually generated VMAT plans (manVMAT). Both automated and manual plans were created to deliver a median dose of 45 Gy to the PTV using identical planning and segmentation parameters. Plans were evaluated by two expert radiation oncologists for clinical acceptability. AutoVMAT and manVMAT plans were also compared based on dose-volume histogram (DVH) and predicted normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) analysis. Both manVMAT and autoVMAT plans were considered clinically acceptable. Target coverage was similar (manVMAT: 96.6 ± 1.6%, autoVMAT: 97.4 ± 1.0%, p = 0.085). With autoVMAT, median kidney dose was reduced on average by > 25%; (for left kidney from 11.3 ± 2.1 Gy to 8.9 ± 3.5 Gy (p = 0.002); for right kidney from 9.2 ± 2.2 Gy to 6.1 ± 1.3 Gy (p plans (4.2% and 9.1%, respectively; p plans compared to manVMAT plans, the predicted NTCPs for the left and right kidney and the liver-PTV were significantly reduced by 11.3%, 12.8%, 7%, respectively (p ≤ 0.001). Delivery time and total number of monitor units were increased in autoVMAT plans (from 168 ± 19 s to 207 ± 26 s, p = 0.006) and (from 781 ± 168 MU to 1001 ± 134 MU, p = 0.003), respectively. For postoperative/adjuvant radiotherapy of advanced gastric cancer, involving a complex target shape, automated VMAT planning is feasible and can substantially reduce the dose to the kidneys and the liver

  13. The impact of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 depletion on poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity and responses to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolin, Celeste; Boudra, Mohammed-Tayyib; Fernet, Marie; Vaslin, Laurence; Pennaneach, Vincent; Zaremba, Tomasz; Favaudon, Vincent; Megnin-Chanet, Frederique; Hall, Janet; Biard, Denis; Cordelieres, Fabrice P.

    2012-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) has been identified as a determinant of sensitivity to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors. Here, the consequences of its depletion on cell survival, PARP activity, the recruitment of base excision repair (BER) proteins to DNA damage sites, and overall DNA single-strand break (SSB) repair were investigated using isogenic HeLa stably depleted (KD) and Control cell lines. Synthetic lethality achieved by disrupting PARP activity in Cdk5-deficient cells was confirmed, and the Cdk5KD cells were also found to be sensitive to the killing effects of ionizing radiation (IR) but not methyl methanesulfonate or neocarzinostatin. The recruitment profiles of GFP-PARP-1 and XRCC1-YFP to sites of micro irradiated Cdk5KD cells were slower and reached lower maximum values, while the profile of GFP-PCNA recruitment was faster and attained higher maximum values compared to Control cells. Higher basal, IR, and hydrogen peroxide-induced polymer levels were observed in Cdk5KD compared to Control cells. Recruitment of GFP-PARP-1 in which serines 782, 785, and 786, potential Cdk5 phosphorylation targets, were mutated to alanines in micro-irradiated Control cells was also reduced. We hypothesize that Cdk5- dependent PARP-1 phosphorylation on one or more of these serines results in an attenuation of its ribosylating activity facilitating persistence at DNA damage sites. Despite these deficiencies, Cdk5KD cells are able to effectively repair SSBs probably via the long patch BER pathway, suggesting that the enhanced radiation sensitivity of Cdk5KD cells is due to a role of Cdk5 in other pathways or the altered polymer levels. (authors)

  14. Quasi-VMAT in high-grade glioma radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fadda, G.; Massazza, G.; Zucca, S.; Durzu, S.; Meleddu, G.; Possanzini, M.; Farace, P. [Regional Oncological Hospital, Cagliari (Italy). Dept. of Radio-Oncology

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: To compare a quasi-volumetric modulated arc therapy (qVMAT) with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of high-grade gliomas. The qVMAT technique is a fast method of radiation therapy in which multiple equispaced beams analogous to those in rotation therapy are radiated in succession. Patients and methods: This study included 12 patients with a planning target volume (PTV) that overlapped at least one organ at risk (OAR). 3D-CRT was planned using 2-3 non-coplanar beams, whereby the field-in-field technique (FIF) was used to divide each field into 1-3 subfields to shield the OAR. The qVMAT strategy was planned with 15 equispaced beams and IMRT was planned using 9 beams with a total of 80 segments. Inverse planning for qVMAT and IMRT was performed by direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO) to deliver a homogenous dose distribution of 60 Gy within the PTV and simultaneously limit the dose received by the OARs to the recommended values. Finally, the effect of introducing a maximum dose objective (max. dose < 54 Gy) for a virtual OAR in the form of a 0.5 cm ring around the PTV was investigated. Results: The qVMAT method gave rise to significantly improved PTV{sub 95%} and conformity index (CI) values in comparison to 3D-CRT (PTV{sub 95%} = 90.7 % vs. 82.0 %; CI = 0.79 vs. 0.74, respectively). A further improvement was achieved by IMRT (PTV{sub 95%} = 94.4 %, CI = 0.78). In qVMAT and IMRT, the addition of a 0.5 cm ring around the PTV produced a significant increase in CI (0.87 and 0.88, respectively), but dosage homogeneity within the PTV was considerably reduced (PTV{sub 95%} = 88.5 % and 92.3 %, respectively). The time required for qVMAT dose delivery was similar to that required using 3D-CRT. Conclusion: These findings suggest that qVMAT should be preferred to 3D-CRT for the treatment of high-grade gliomas. The qVMAT method could be applied in hospitals, for example

  15. Quasi-VMAT in high-grade glioma radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fadda, G.; Massazza, G.; Zucca, S.; Durzu, S.; Meleddu, G.; Possanzini, M.; Farace, P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To compare a quasi-volumetric modulated arc therapy (qVMAT) with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of high-grade gliomas. The qVMAT technique is a fast method of radiation therapy in which multiple equispaced beams analogous to those in rotation therapy are radiated in succession. Patients and methods: This study included 12 patients with a planning target volume (PTV) that overlapped at least one organ at risk (OAR). 3D-CRT was planned using 2-3 non-coplanar beams, whereby the field-in-field technique (FIF) was used to divide each field into 1-3 subfields to shield the OAR. The qVMAT strategy was planned with 15 equispaced beams and IMRT was planned using 9 beams with a total of 80 segments. Inverse planning for qVMAT and IMRT was performed by direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO) to deliver a homogenous dose distribution of 60 Gy within the PTV and simultaneously limit the dose received by the OARs to the recommended values. Finally, the effect of introducing a maximum dose objective (max. dose 95% and conformity index (CI) values in comparison to 3D-CRT (PTV 95% = 90.7 % vs. 82.0 %; CI = 0.79 vs. 0.74, respectively). A further improvement was achieved by IMRT (PTV 95% = 94.4 %, CI = 0.78). In qVMAT and IMRT, the addition of a 0.5 cm ring around the PTV produced a significant increase in CI (0.87 and 0.88, respectively), but dosage homogeneity within the PTV was considerably reduced (PTV 95% = 88.5 % and 92.3 %, respectively). The time required for qVMAT dose delivery was similar to that required using 3D-CRT. Conclusion: These findings suggest that qVMAT should be preferred to 3D-CRT for the treatment of high-grade gliomas. The qVMAT method could be applied in hospitals, for example, which have limited departmental resources and are not equipped with systems capable of VMAT delivery. (orig.)

  16. Online adaptation and verification of VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crijns, Wouter, E-mail: wouter.crijns@uzleuven.be [KU Leuven Department of Oncology, Laboratory of Experimental Radiotherapy, Herestraat 49, Leuven 3000, Belgium and KU Leuven Medical Imaging Research Center, Herestraat 49, Leuven 3000 (Belgium); Defraene, Gilles; Depuydt, Tom; Haustermans, Karin [KU Leuven Department of Oncology, Laboratory of Experimental Radiotherapy, Herestraat 49, Leuven 3000 (Belgium); Van Herck, Hans [KU Leuven Medical Imaging Research Center, Herestraat 49, Leuven 3000, Belgium and KU Leuven Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT), PSI, Center for Processing Speech and Images, Leuven 3000 (Belgium); Maes, Frederik [KU Leuven Department of Electrical Engineering (ESAT), PSI, Center for Processing Speech and Images, Leuven 3000, Belgium and KU Leuven iMinds - Medical IT Department, Leuven 3000 (Belgium); Van den Heuvel, Frank [Department of Oncology, MRC-CR-UK Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    practice. Results: The proposed adaptation of a two-arc VMAT plan resulted in the intended CTV{sub mean} (Δ ≤ 3%) and TCP (ΔTCP ≤ 0.001). Moreover, the method assures the intended CI{sub 95%} (Δ ≤ 11%) resulting in lowered rectal NTCP for all cases. Compared to replanning, their adaptation is faster (13 s vs 10 min) and more intuitive. Compared to the current clinical practice, it has a better protection of the healthy tissue. Compared to IMRT, VMAT is more robust to anatomical variations, but it is also less sensitive to the different correction steps. The observed variations of the plan parameters in their database included a linear dependence on the date of treatment planning and on the target radius. The MCS is not retained as QA metric due to a contrasting behavior of its components (LSV and AAV). If three out of four plan parameters (MU, EqFS, AAV, and LSV) need to lie inside a 50% prediction interval (3/4—50%PI), all adapted plans will be accepted. In contrast, all replanned plans do not meet this loose criterion, mainly because they have no connection to the initially optimized and verified plan. Conclusions: A direct (forward) VMAT adaptation performs equally well as (inverse) replanning but is faster and can be extended to real-time adaptation. The prediction intervals for the machine parameters are equivalent to the tolerance tables for couch shifts in the current clinical practice. A 3/4—50%PI QA criterion accepts all the adapted plans but rejects all the replanned plans.

  17. Online adaptation and verification of VMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crijns, Wouter; Defraene, Gilles; Depuydt, Tom; Haustermans, Karin; Van Herck, Hans; Maes, Frederik; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2015-01-01

    . Results: The proposed adaptation of a two-arc VMAT plan resulted in the intended CTV mean (Δ ≤ 3%) and TCP (ΔTCP ≤ 0.001). Moreover, the method assures the intended CI 95% (Δ ≤ 11%) resulting in lowered rectal NTCP for all cases. Compared to replanning, their adaptation is faster (13 s vs 10 min) and more intuitive. Compared to the current clinical practice, it has a better protection of the healthy tissue. Compared to IMRT, VMAT is more robust to anatomical variations, but it is also less sensitive to the different correction steps. The observed variations of the plan parameters in their database included a linear dependence on the date of treatment planning and on the target radius. The MCS is not retained as QA metric due to a contrasting behavior of its components (LSV and AAV). If three out of four plan parameters (MU, EqFS, AAV, and LSV) need to lie inside a 50% prediction interval (3/4—50%PI), all adapted plans will be accepted. In contrast, all replanned plans do not meet this loose criterion, mainly because they have no connection to the initially optimized and verified plan. Conclusions: A direct (forward) VMAT adaptation performs equally well as (inverse) replanning but is faster and can be extended to real-time adaptation. The prediction intervals for the machine parameters are equivalent to the tolerance tables for couch shifts in the current clinical practice. A 3/4—50%PI QA criterion accepts all the adapted plans but rejects all the replanned plans

  18. The depletion of ATM inhibits colon cancer proliferation and migration via B56γ2-mediated Chk1/p53/CD44 cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Tang, Jiajia; Ding, Chaodong; Liang, Weicheng; Zhang, Li; Chen, Tianke; Xiong, Yan; Dai, Xiaowei; Li, Wenfeng; Xu, Yunsheng; Hu, Jin; Lu, Liting; Liao, Wanqin; Lu, Xincheng

    2017-04-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) protein kinase is a major guardian of genomic stability, and its well-established function in cancer is tumor suppression. Here, we report an oncogenic role of ATM. Using two isogenic sets of human colon cancer cell lines that differed only in their ATM status, we demonstrated that ATM deficiency significantly inhibits cancer cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. The tumor-suppressive function of ATM depletion is not modulated by the compensatory activation of ATR, but it is associated with B56γ2-mediated Chk1/p53/CD44 signaling pathways. Under normal growth conditions, the depletion of ATM prevents B56γ2 ubiquitination and degradation, which activates PP2A-mediated Chk1/p53/p21 signaling pathways, leading to senescence and cell cycle arrest. CD44 was validated as a novel ATM target based on its ability to rescue cell migration and invasion defects in ATM-depleted cells. The activation of p53 induced by ATM depletion suppresses CD44 transcription, thus resulting in epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cell migration suppression. Our study suggests that ATM has tumorigenic potential in post-formed colon neoplasia, and it supports ATM as an appealing target for improving cancer therapy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Statistical process control analysis for patient-specific IMRT and VMAT QA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanghangthum, Taweap; Suriyapee, Sivalee; Srisatit, Somyot; Pawlicki, Todd

    2013-05-01

    This work applied statistical process control to establish the control limits of the % gamma pass of patient-specific intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) quality assurance (QA), and to evaluate the efficiency of the QA process by using the process capability index (Cpml). A total of 278 IMRT QA plans in nasopharyngeal carcinoma were measured with MapCHECK, while 159 VMAT QA plans were undertaken with ArcCHECK. Six megavolts with nine fields were used for the IMRT plan and 2.5 arcs were used to generate the VMAT plans. The gamma (3%/3 mm) criteria were used to evaluate the QA plans. The % gamma passes were plotted on a control chart. The first 50 data points were employed to calculate the control limits. The Cpml was calculated to evaluate the capability of the IMRT/VMAT QA process. The results showed higher systematic errors in IMRT QA than VMAT QA due to the more complicated setup used in IMRT QA. The variation of random errors was also larger in IMRT QA than VMAT QA because the VMAT plan has more continuity of dose distribution. The average % gamma pass was 93.7% ± 3.7% for IMRT and 96.7% ± 2.2% for VMAT. The Cpml value of IMRT QA was 1.60 and VMAT QA was 1.99, which implied that the VMAT QA process was more accurate than the IMRT QA process. Our lower control limit for % gamma pass of IMRT is 85.0%, while the limit for VMAT is 90%. Both the IMRT and VMAT QA processes are good quality because Cpml values are higher than 1.0.

  20. Quasi-VMAT in high-grade glioma radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadda, G; Massazza, G; Zucca, S; Durzu, S; Meleddu, G; Possanzini, M; Farace, P

    2013-05-01

    To compare a quasi-volumetric modulated arc therapy (qVMAT) with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of high-grade gliomas. The qVMAT technique is a fast method of radiation therapy in which multiple equispaced beams analogous to those in rotation therapy are radiated in succession. This study included 12 patients with a planning target volume (PTV) that overlapped at least one organ at risk (OAR). 3D-CRT was planned using 2-3 non-coplanar beams, whereby the field-in-field technique (FIF) was used to divide each field into 1-3 subfields to shield the OAR. The qVMAT strategy was planned with 15 equispaced beams and IMRT was planned using 9 beams with a total of 80 segments. Inverse planning for qVMAT and IMRT was performed by direct machine parameter optimization (DMPO) to deliver a homogenous dose distribution of 60 Gy within the PTV and simultaneously limit the dose received by the OARs to the recommended values. Finally, the effect of introducing a maximum dose objective (max. dose < 54 Gy) for a virtual OAR in the form of a 0.5 cm ring around the PTV was investigated. The qVMAT method gave rise to significantly improved PTV95% and conformity index (CI) values in comparison to 3D-CRT (PTV95% = 90.7 % vs. 82.0 %; CI = 0.79 vs. 0.74, respectively). A further improvement was achieved by IMRT (PTV95% = 94.4 %, CI = 0.78). In qVMAT and IMRT, the addition of a 0.5 cm ring around the PTV produced a significant increase in CI (0.87 and 0.88, respectively), but dosage homogeneity within the PTV was considerably reduced (PTV95% = 88.5 % and 92.3 %, respectively). The time required for qVMAT dose delivery was similar to that required using 3D-CRT. These findings suggest that qVMAT should be preferred to 3D-CRT for the treatment of high-grade gliomas. The qVMAT method could be applied in hospitals, for example, which have limited departmental

  1. SU-F-T-384: Step and Shoot IMRT, VMAT and Autoplan VMAT Nasopharnyx Plan Robustness to Linear Accelerator Delivery Errors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogson, EM; Hansen, C; Blake, S; Thwaites, D; Arumugam, S; Holloway, L

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To identify the robustness of different treatment techniques in respect to simulated linac errors on the dose distribution to the target volume and organs at risk for step and shoot IMRT (ssIMRT), VMAT and Autoplan generated VMAT nasopharynx plans. Methods: A nasopharynx patient dataset was retrospectively replanned with three different techniques: 7 beam ssIMRT, one arc manual generated VMAT and one arc automatically generated VMAT. Treatment simulated uncertainties: gantry, collimator, MLC field size and MLC shifts, were introduced into these plans at increments of 5,2,1,−1,−2 and −5 (degrees or mm) and recalculated in Pinnacle. The mean and maximum doses were calculated for the high dose PTV, parotids, brainstem, and spinal cord and then compared to the original baseline plan. Results: Simulated gantry angle errors have <1% effect on the PTV, ssIMRT is most sensitive. The small collimator errors (±1 and ±2 degrees) impacted the mean PTV dose by <2% for all techniques, however for the ±5 degree errors mean target varied by up to 7% for the Autoplan VMAT and 10% for the max dose to the spinal cord and brain stem, seen in all techniques. The simulated MLC shifts introduced the largest errors for the Autoplan VMAT, with the larger MLC modulation presumably being the cause. The most critical error observed, was the MLC field size error, where even small errors of 1 mm, caused significant changes to both the PTV and the OAR. The ssIMRT is the least sensitive and the Autoplan the most sensitive, with target errors of up to 20% over and under dosages observed. Conclusion: For a nasopharynx patient the plan robustness observed is highest for the ssIMRT plan and lowest for the Autoplan generated VMAT plan. This could be caused by the more complex MLC modulation seen for the VMAT plans. This project is supported by a grant from NSW Cancer Council.

  2. SU-F-T-384: Step and Shoot IMRT, VMAT and Autoplan VMAT Nasopharnyx Plan Robustness to Linear Accelerator Delivery Errors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogson, EM [Institute of Medical Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, NSW (United Kingdom); Ingham Institute for Applied Medical Research, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Hansen, C [Laboratory of Radiation Physics, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); Institute of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Blake, S; Thwaites, D [Institute of Medical Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Arumugam, S [Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, NSW (United Kingdom); Holloway, L [Institute of Medical Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Liverpool and Macarthur Cancer Therapy Centres, Liverpool, NSW (United Kingdom); Laboratory of Radiation Physics, Odense University Hospital, Odense (Denmark); South Western Sydney Clinical School, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To identify the robustness of different treatment techniques in respect to simulated linac errors on the dose distribution to the target volume and organs at risk for step and shoot IMRT (ssIMRT), VMAT and Autoplan generated VMAT nasopharynx plans. Methods: A nasopharynx patient dataset was retrospectively replanned with three different techniques: 7 beam ssIMRT, one arc manual generated VMAT and one arc automatically generated VMAT. Treatment simulated uncertainties: gantry, collimator, MLC field size and MLC shifts, were introduced into these plans at increments of 5,2,1,−1,−2 and −5 (degrees or mm) and recalculated in Pinnacle. The mean and maximum doses were calculated for the high dose PTV, parotids, brainstem, and spinal cord and then compared to the original baseline plan. Results: Simulated gantry angle errors have <1% effect on the PTV, ssIMRT is most sensitive. The small collimator errors (±1 and ±2 degrees) impacted the mean PTV dose by <2% for all techniques, however for the ±5 degree errors mean target varied by up to 7% for the Autoplan VMAT and 10% for the max dose to the spinal cord and brain stem, seen in all techniques. The simulated MLC shifts introduced the largest errors for the Autoplan VMAT, with the larger MLC modulation presumably being the cause. The most critical error observed, was the MLC field size error, where even small errors of 1 mm, caused significant changes to both the PTV and the OAR. The ssIMRT is the least sensitive and the Autoplan the most sensitive, with target errors of up to 20% over and under dosages observed. Conclusion: For a nasopharynx patient the plan robustness observed is highest for the ssIMRT plan and lowest for the Autoplan generated VMAT plan. This could be caused by the more complex MLC modulation seen for the VMAT plans. This project is supported by a grant from NSW Cancer Council.

  3. VMAT techniques for lymph node-positive left sided breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasler, Marlies; Lutterbach, Johannes; Bjoernsgard, Mari; Reichmann, Ursula; Bartelt, Susanne; Georg, Dietmar; Medical Univ. Vienna

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the plan quality of two different volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) techniques for lymph node-positive left-sided breast cancer. Two VMAT plans were generated for 10 lymph node-positive left-sided breast cancer patients: one plan using one single segment of a full rotation, typically an arc segment of 230 (1s-VMAT); and a second plan consisting of 2 small tangential arc segments of about 50 (2s-VMAT). For plan comparison, various dose and dose volume metrics (D mean , D 98% , D 2% for target volumes, D 2% , D mean and V x% for organs at risk (OAR)) were evaluated. Both techniques fulfilled both clinical target dose and OAR goals. 1s-VMAT achieved a slightly better homogeneity and better target coverage (D 2% = 54.2 ± 0.7 Gy, D 98% = 30.3 ± 1.8 Gy) compared to 2s-VMAT (D 2% = 55.0 ± 1.1 Gy, D 98% = 29.9 ± 1.7 Gy). For geometrical reasons, OAR sparing was noticeable but not significant better using 2s-VMAT, particularly heart and contralateral breast. The heart received a mean dose of 4.4 ± 0.8 Gy using 1s-VMAT and 3.3 ± 1.0 Gy using 2s-VMAT; the contralateral breast received 1.5 ± 0.3 Gy and 0.9 ± 0.3 Gy, respectively. A VMAT technique based on two small tangential arc segments enables improved OAR sparing; the differences between the two techniques in target coverage and homogeneity are minor. Patient age and -anatomy must be considered for each individual case when deciding which technique to be used.

  4. Studies on ADCC (antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity) using sheep red blood cells as target cells, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichikawa, Yukinobu; Takaya, Masatoshi; Arimori, Shigeru

    1979-01-01

    A non-specific cytotoxic mediator from effector cells (human peripheral blood leukocytes) was investigated in the ADCC (antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity) system using antibody-coated sheep red blood cells (SRBC) as target cells. 51 Cr-labelled homologous (sheep) or heterologous (human) red blood cells were used as adjacent cells. Either crude lymphocyte fraction, phagocyte depleted fraction or granulocyte rich fraction separated from human peripheral leukocytes showed moderate cytotoxic effect on homologous adjacent cells, however no cytotoxic activity on heterologous adjacent cells was demonstrated in any leukocyte fraction. This suggests that the cytotoxic effects on homologous adjacent cells were resulted from the translocation of antibody molecules to adjacent cells from antibody-coated target cells. We concluded that the cytotoxic mechanism in this ADCC system was not mediated by non-specific soluble factors released from either human peripheral lymphocytes, monocytes or granulocytes. (author)

  5. Mediator Undergoes a Compositional Change during Transcriptional Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, Natalia; Jin, Yi; Wong, Koon Ho; Struhl, Kevin

    2016-11-03

    Mediator is a transcriptional co-activator recruited to enhancers by DNA-binding activators, and it also interacts with RNA polymerase (Pol) II as part of the preinitiation complex (PIC). We demonstrate that a single Mediator complex associates with the enhancer and core promoter in vivo, indicating that it can physically bridge these transcriptional elements. However, the Mediator kinase module associates strongly with the enhancer, but not with the core promoter, and it dissociates from the enhancer upon depletion of the TFIIH kinase. Severing the kinase module from Mediator by removing the connecting subunit Med13 does not affect Mediator association at the core promoter but increases occupancy at enhancers. Thus, Mediator undergoes a compositional change in which the kinase module, recruited via Mediator to the enhancer, dissociates from Mediator to permit association with Pol II and the PIC. As such, Mediator acts as a dynamic bridge between the enhancer and core promoter. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Caspase-dependant activation of chymotrypsin-like proteases mediates nuclear events during Jurkat T cell apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, A.R.; Lee, B.W.; Stenson-Cox, C.

    2006-01-01

    Apoptosis involves a cascade of biochemical and morphological changes resulting in the systematic disintegration of the cell. Caspases are central mediators of this process. Supporting and primary roles for serine proteases as pro-apoptotic mediators have also been highlighted. Evidence for such roles comes largely from the use of pharmacological inhibitors; as a consequence information regarding their apoptotic function and biochemical properties has been limited. Here, we circumvented limitations associated with traditional serine protease inhibitors through use of a fluorescently labelled inhibitor of serine proteases (FLISP) that allowed for analysis of the specificity, regulation and positioning of apoptotic serine proteases within a classical apoptotic cascade. We demonstrate that staurosporine triggers a caspase-dependant induction of chymotrypsin-like activity in the nucleus of apoptotic Jurkat T cells. We show that serine protease activity is required for the generation of late stage nuclear events including condensation, fragmentation and DNA degradation. Furthermore, we reveal caspase-dependant activation of two chymotrypsin-like protein species that we hypothesize mediate cell death-associated nuclear events

  7. VMAT techniques for lymph node-positive left sided breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasler, Marlies; Lutterbach, Johannes; Bjoernsgard, Mari; Reichmann, Ursula; Bartelt, Susanne [Lake Constance Radiation Oncology Center Singen, Friedrichshafen (Germany); Georg, Dietmar [Medical Univ. Vienna/AKH Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiooncology; Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria). Christian Doppler Lab. for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the plan quality of two different volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) techniques for lymph node-positive left-sided breast cancer. Two VMAT plans were generated for 10 lymph node-positive left-sided breast cancer patients: one plan using one single segment of a full rotation, typically an arc segment of 230 (1s-VMAT); and a second plan consisting of 2 small tangential arc segments of about 50 (2s-VMAT). For plan comparison, various dose and dose volume metrics (D{sub mean}, D{sub 98%}, D{sub 2%} for target volumes, D{sub 2%}, D{sub mean} and V{sub x%} for organs at risk (OAR)) were evaluated. Both techniques fulfilled both clinical target dose and OAR goals. 1s-VMAT achieved a slightly better homogeneity and better target coverage (D{sub 2%} = 54.2 ± 0.7 Gy, D{sub 98%} = 30.3 ± 1.8 Gy) compared to 2s-VMAT (D{sub 2%} = 55.0 ± 1.1 Gy, D{sub 98%} = 29.9 ± 1.7 Gy). For geometrical reasons, OAR sparing was noticeable but not significant better using 2s-VMAT, particularly heart and contralateral breast. The heart received a mean dose of 4.4 ± 0.8 Gy using 1s-VMAT and 3.3 ± 1.0 Gy using 2s-VMAT; the contralateral breast received 1.5 ± 0.3 Gy and 0.9 ± 0.3 Gy, respectively. A VMAT technique based on two small tangential arc segments enables improved OAR sparing; the differences between the two techniques in target coverage and homogeneity are minor. Patient age and -anatomy must be considered for each individual case when deciding which technique to be used.

  8. SU-E-T-550: Modulation Index for VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J; Park, S; Kim, J; Kim, J [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, H [Yonsei University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Carlson, J; Ye, S [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To present modulation indices (MIs) for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: A total of 40 VMAT plans were retrospectively selected. To investigate the delivery accuracy of each VMAT plan, gamma passing rates, differences in modulating parameters between plans and log files, and differences between the original plans and the plans reconstructed with the log files were acquired. A modulation index (MIt) was designed by multiplications of the weighted quantifications of MLC speeds, MLC accelerations, gantry accelerations and dose-rate variations. Textural features including angular second moment, inverse difference moment, contrast, variance, correlation and entropy were calculated from the fluences of each VMAT plan. To test the performance of suggested MIs, Spearman’s rank correlation coefficients (r) with the plan delivery accuracy were calculated. Conventional modulation indices for VMAT including the modulation complexity score for VMAT (MCSv), leaf travel modulation complexity score (LTMCS) and MI by Li & Xing were calculated, and their correlations were also analyzed in the same way. Results: The r values of contrast (particular displacement distance, d = 1), variance (d = 1), MIt, MCSv, LTMCS and MI by Li&Xing to the local gamma passing rates with 2%/2 mm were 0.547 (p < 0.001), 0.519 (p < 0.001), −0.658 (p < 0.001), 0.186 (p = 0.251), 0.312 (p = 0.05) and −0.455 (p = 0.003), respectively. The r values of those to the MLC errors were −0.863, −0.828, 0.917, −0.635, − 0.857 and 0.795, respectively (p < 0.001). For dose-volumetric parameters, MIt showed higher statistically significant correlations than did the conventional modulation indices. Conclusion: The MIt, contrast (d = 1) and variance (d = 1) showed good performance to predict the VMAT delivery accuracy showing higher correlations to the results of various types of verification methods for VMAT. This work was in part supported by the National Research Foundation of

  9. Depletion of ribosomal protein L37 occurs in response to DNA damage and activates p53 through the L11/MDM2 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llanos, Susana; Serrano, Manuel

    2010-10-01

    Perturbation of ribosomal biogenesis has recently emerged as a relevant p53-activating pathway. This pathway can be initiated by depletion of certain ribosomal proteins, which is followed by the binding and inhibition of MDM2 by a different subset of ribosomal proteins that includes L11. Here, we report that depletion of L37 leads to cell cycle arrest in a L11- and p53-dependent manner. DNA damage can initiate ribosomal stress, although little is known about the mechanisms involved. We have found that some genotoxic insults, namely, UV light and cisplatin, lead to proteasomal degradation of L37 in the nucleoplasm and to the ensuing L11-dependent stabilization of p53. Moreover, ectopic L37 overexpression can attenuate the DNA damage response mediated by p53. These results support the concept that DNA damage-induced proteasomal degradation of L37 constitutes a mechanistic link between DNA damage and the ribosomal stress pathway, and is a relevant contributing signaling pathway for the activation of p53 in response to DNA damage.

  10. GTP depletion synergizes the anti-proliferative activity of chemotherapeutic agents in a cell type-dependent manner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Tao; Meng, Lingjun; Tsai, Robert Y.L.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Strong synergy between mycophenolic acid (MPA) and 5-FU in MDA-MB-231 cells. → Cell type-dependent synergy between MPA and anti-proliferative agents. → The synergy of MPA on 5-FU is recapitulated by RNA polymerase-I inhibition. → The synergy of MPA on 5-FU requires the expression of nucleostemin. -- Abstract: Mycophenolic acid (MPA) depletes intracellular GTP by blocking de novo guanine nucleotide synthesis. GTP is used ubiquitously for DNA/RNA synthesis and as a signaling molecule. Here, we made a surprising discovery that the anti-proliferative activity of MPA acts synergistically with specific chemotherapeutic agents in a cell type-dependent manner. In MDA-MB-231 cells, MPA shows an extremely potent synergy with 5-FU but not with doxorubicin or etoposide. The synergy between 5-FU and MPA works most effectively against the highly tumorigenic mammary tumor cells compared to the less tumorigenic ones, and does not work in the non-breast cancer cell types that we tested, with the exception of PC3 cells. On the contrary, MPA shows the highest synergy with paclitaxel but not with 5-FU in SCC-25 cells, derived from oral squamous cell carcinomas. Mechanistically, the synergistic effect of MPA on 5-FU in MDA-MB-231 cells can be recapitulated by inhibiting the RNA polymerase-I activity and requires the expression of nucleostemin. This work reveals that the synergy between MPA and anti-proliferative agents is determined by cell type-dependent factors.

  11. SU-F-T-378: Evaluation of Dose-Volume Variability and Parameters Between Prostate IMRT and VMAT Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chow, J [Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, ON (Canada); Jiang, R [Grand River Regional Cancer Centre, Kitchener, ON (Canada); Kiciak, A [University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study compared the rectal dose-volume consistency, equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) in prostate intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: For forty prostate IMRT and fifty VMAT patients treated using the same dose prescription (78 Gy/39 fraction) and dose-volume criteria in inverse planning optimization, the rectal EUD and NTCP were calculated for each patient. The rectal dose-volume consistency, showing the variability of dose-volume histogram (DVH) among patients, was defined and calculated based on the deviation between the mean and corresponding rectal DVH. Results: From both the prostate IMRT and VMAT plans, the rectal EUD and NTCP were found decreasing with the rectal volume. The decrease rates for the IMRT plans (EUD = 0.47 × 10{sup −3} Gy cm{sup −3} and NTCP = 3.94 × 10{sup −2} % cm{sup −3}) were higher than those for the VMAT (EUD = 0.28 × 10{sup −3} Gy cm{sup −3} and NTCP = 2.61 × 10{sup −2} % cm{sup −3}). In addition, the dependences of the rectal EUD and NTCP on the dose-volume consistency were found very similar between the prostate IMRT and VMAT plans. This shows that both delivery techniques have similar variations of the rectal EUD and NTCP on the dose-volume consistency. Conclusion: Dependences of the dose-volume consistency on the rectal EUD and NTCP were compared between the prostate IMRT and VMAT plans. It is concluded that both rectal EUD and NTCP decreased with an increase of the rectal volume. The variation rates of the rectal EUD and NTCP on the rectal volume were higher for the IMRT plans than VMAT. However, variations of the rectal dose-volume consistency on the rectal EUD and NTCP were found not significant for both delivery techniques.

  12. Channel-mediated and carrier-mediated uptake of K+ into cultured ovine oligodendrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertz, L.; Soliven, B.; Hertz, E.; Szuchet, S.; Nelson, D.J. (Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada))

    1990-01-01

    Uptake of radioactive K+ by mature ovine oligodendrocytes (OLGs) maintained in primary culture was measured under steady-state conditions, i.e., in cells maintained in a normal tissue culture medium (5.4 mM K+), and in cells after depletion of intracellular K+ to less than 15% of its normal value by pre-incubation in K(+)-free medium. The latter value is dominated by an active, carrier-mediated uptake (although it may include some diffusional uptake), whereas the former, in addition to active uptake, also reflects passive K+ diffusion through ion selective channels and possible self-exchange between extracellular and intracellular K+, which may be carrier-mediated. The total uptake rate was 144 +/- 10 nmol/min/mg protein, and the uptake after K+ depletion was 60 +/- 2 nmol/min/mg protein, much lower rates than previously observed in astrocytes. The uptake into K(+)-depleted cells was inhibited by about 80% in the presence of ouabain (1 mM) and about 30% in the presence of furosemide (2 mM). Activators of protein kinase C (phorbol esters) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (forskolin) have been shown to alter the myelinogenic metabolism as well as outward K+ current in cultured OLGs. The present study demonstrates that K+ homeostasis in OLGs is modulated through similar second messenger pathways. Active uptake was inhibited by about 60% in the presence of active phorbol esters (100 nM) but was not affected by forskolin (100 nM). Forskolin likewise had no effect on total uptake, whereas phorbol esters caused a much larger inhibition than expected from their effect on carrier-mediated uptake alone, suggesting that channel-mediated uptake was also reduced.

  13. Evaluating efficiency of coaxial MLC VMAT plan for spine SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Sang Jun; Mun, Jun Ki; Kim, Dae Ho; Yoo, Suk Hyun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate the efficiency of Coaxial MLC VMAT plan (Using 273° and 350° collimator angle) That the leaf motion direction aligned with axis of OAR (Organ at risk, It means spinal cord or cauda equine in this study.) compare to Universal MLC VMAT plan (using 30° and 330 ° collimator angle) for spine SBRT. The 10 cases of spine SBRT that treated with VMAT planned by Coaxial MLC and Varian TBX were enrolled. Those cases were planned by Eclipse (Ver. 10.0.42, Varian, USA), PRO3 (Progressive Resolution Optimizer 10.0.28) and AAA (Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm Ver. 10.0.28) with coplanar 260 ° arcs and 10MV FFF (Flattening filter free). Each arc has 273° and 350 ° collimator angle, respectively. The Universal MLC VMAT plans are based on existing treatment plans. Those plans have the same parameters of existing treatment plans but collimator angle. To minimize the dose difference that shows up randomly on optimizing, all plans were optimized and calculated twice respectively. The calculation grid is 0.2 cm and all plans were normalized to the target V100%=90%. The indexes of evaluation are V10Gy, D0.03cc, Dmean of OAR (Organ at risk, It means spinal cord or cauda equine in this study.), H.I (Homogeneity index) of the target and total MU. All Coaxial VMAT plans were verified by gamma test with Mapcheck2 (Sun Nuclear Co., USA), Mapphan (Sun Nuclear Co., USA) and SNC patient (Sun Nuclear Co., USA Ver 6.1.2.18513). The difference between the coaxial and the universal VMAT plans are follow. The coaxial VMAT plan is better in the V10Gy of OAR, Up to 4.1%, at least 0.4%, the average difference was 1.9% and In the D0.03cc of OAR, Up to 83.6 cGy, at least 2.2 cGy, the average difference was 33.3 cGy. In Dmean, Up to 34.8 cGy, at least -13.0 cGy, the average difference was 9.6 cGy that say the coaxial VMAT plans are better except few cases. H.I difference Up to 0.04, at least 0.01, the average difference was 0.02 and the difference of average

  14. Nuclear DAMP complex-mediated RAGE-dependent macrophage cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ruochan [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Infectious Diseases and State Key Lab of Viral Hepatitis, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Fu, Sha; Fan, Xue-Gong [Department of Infectious Diseases and State Key Lab of Viral Hepatitis, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410008 (China); Lotze, Michael T.; Zeh, Herbert J. [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Tang, Daolin, E-mail: tangd2@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Kang, Rui, E-mail: kangr@upmc.edu [Department of Surgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2015-03-13

    High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), histone, and DNA are essential nuclear components involved in the regulation of chromosome structure and function. In addition to their nuclear function, these molecules act as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) alone or together when released extracellularly. The synergistic effect of these nuclear DNA-HMGB1-histone complexes as DAMP complexes (nDCs) on immune cells remains largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that nDCs limit survival of macrophages (e.g., RAW264.7 and peritoneal macrophages) but not cancer cells (e.g., HCT116, HepG2 and Hepa1-6). nDCs promote production of inflammatory tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) release, triggering reactive oxygen species-dependent apoptosis and necrosis. Moreover, the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), but not toll-like receptor (TLR)-4 and TLR-2, was required for Akt-dependent TNFα release and subsequent cell death following treatment with nDCs. Genetic depletion of RAGE by RNAi, antioxidant N-Acetyl-L-cysteine, and TNFα neutralizing antibody significantly attenuated nDC-induced cell death. These findings provide evidence supporting novel signaling mechanisms linking nDCs and inflammation in macrophage cell death. - Highlights: • Nuclear DAMP complexes (nDCs) selectively induce cell death in macrophages, but not cancer cells. • TNFα-mediated oxidative stress is required for nDC-induced death. • RAGE-mediated Akt activation is required for nDC-induced TNFα release. • Blocking RAGE and TNFα inhibits nDC-induced macrophage cell death.

  15. Serotonin depletion results in a decrease of the neuronal activation caused by rivastigmine in the rat hippocampus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kornum, Birgitte R; Weikop, Pia; Moller, Arne

    2006-01-01

    nicotinic receptors located at nerve terminals. The aim of the present study was to determine in which areas and to what extent 5-HT mediates the neuronal response to ACh release. For this purpose, neuronal activity was measured in rats with rivastigmine-induced elevated ACh levels after a 95% 5-HT...... depletion obtained by dosing p-chlorophenylalanine followed by D,L-fenfluramine. Neuronal activation was quantified by stereological measurements of c-Fos immunoreactivity. The brain areas examined were medial prefrontal cortex, septum, dorsal hippocampus, and dorsal raphe nucleus. Rivastigmine...... brain areas examined. It is concluded that 5-HT mediates part of the ACh-induced hippocampal neuronal activation, possibly mediated via locally released 5-HT....

  16. Clinical experience transitioning from IMRT to VMAT for head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studenski, Matthew T., E-mail: matthew.studenski@jeffersonhospital.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bar-Ad, Voichita; Siglin, Joshua [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Cognetti, David; Curry, Joseph [Department of Otolaryngology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Tuluc, Madalina [Department of Pathology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Harrison, Amy S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2013-07-01

    To quantify clinical differences for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) versus intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in terms of dosimetric endpoints and planning and delivery time, twenty head and neck cancer patients have been considered for VMAT using Nucletron Oncentra MasterPlan delivered via an Elekta linear accelerator. Differences in planning time between IMRT and VMAT were estimated accounting for both optimization and calculation. The average delivery time per patient was obtained retrospectively using the record and verify software. For the dosimetric comparison, all contoured organs at risk (OARs) and planning target volumes (PTVs) were evaluated. Of the 20 cases considered, 14 had VMAT plans approved. Six VMAT plans were rejected due to unacceptable dose to OARs. In terms of optimization time, there was minimal difference between the two modalities. The dose calculation time was significantly longer for VMAT, 4 minutes per 358 degree arc versus 2 minutes for an entire IMRT plan. The overall delivery time was reduced by 9.2 ± 3.9 minutes for VMAT (51.4 ± 15.6%). For the dosimetric comparison of the 14 clinically acceptable plans, there was almost no statistical difference between the VMAT and IMRT. There was also a reduction in monitor units of approximately 32% from IMRT to VMAT with both modalities demonstrating comparable quality assurance results. VMAT provides comparable coverage of target volumes while sparing OARs for the majority of head and neck cases. In cases where high dose modulation was required for OARs, a clinically acceptable plan was only achievable with IMRT. Due to the long calculation times, VMAT plans can cause delays during planning but marked improvements in delivery time reduce patient treatment times and the risk of intra-fraction motion.

  17. Development of a software of VMAT delivery using EPID

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arumugam, Sankar; Xing, Aitang; Jameson, Michael; Holloway, Lois; Goozee, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Full text: Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) is more complex than standard IMRT, requiring new methodology to evaluate delivery accuracy. Here, we present the development of methodology and a software tool to perform control point based verification of VMAT delivery using an EPID. Individual segment dose comparison allows the verification of VMAT deli very accuracy for individual control-points. An in-house software tool was developed to predict the individual segment dose as measured by EPID for Pinnacle (Philips) generated VMAT plans. The VMAT plans were delivered using an Elekta-synergy accelerator and the segment doses were measured using EPID. A normalised dose comparison of measured and predicted doses was performed using gamma analysis with 3% dose tolerance and 3 mm DTA. The sensitivity of the proposed methodology in detecting delivery errors was studied by delivering a standard intensity pattern with a preset dose error of 4 and 5% in two of its eight control-points. Four clinical plans were also tested using this methodology. The developed software accurately predicts the EPID dose by considering all possible leaf trajectories in VMAT delivery. The mean gamma value and percentage of pixels exceeding the gamma tolerance for a segment with and without delivery errors are shown in Table. From the tabulated values it is evident that the proposed methodology is sensitive in detecting delivery errors above 3% tolerance level. The clinical plans were successfully validated showing a maximum 2.5% of pixels exceeding gamma tolerance. Methodology and a software were successfully developed to perform control-point validation of VMAT delivery using an EPID. Set error in Delivery (%) Mean gamma value% of pixels exceeding Gamma tolerance 0 0.40 1.240.5417.050.6221.8.

  18. Using an EPID for patient-specific VMAT quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakhtiari, M.; Kumaraswamy, L.; Bailey, D. W.; Boer, S. de; Malhotra, H. K.; Podgorsak, M. B.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: A patient-specific quality assurance (QA) method was developed to verify gantry-specific individual multileaf collimator (MLC) apertures (control points) in volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans using an electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Methods: VMAT treatment plans were generated in an Eclipse treatment planning system (TPS). DICOM images from a Varian EPID (aS1000) acquired in continuous acquisition mode were used for pretreatment QA. Each cine image file contains the grayscale image of the MLC aperture related to its specific control point and the corresponding gantry angle information. The TPS MLC file of this RapidArc plan contains the leaf positions for all 177 control points (gantry angles). In-house software was developed that interpolates the measured images based on the gantry angle and overlays them with the MLC pattern for all control points. The 38% isointensity line was used to define the edge of the MLC leaves on the portal images. The software generates graphs and tables that provide analysis for the number of mismatched leaf positions for a chosen distance to agreement at each control point and the frequency in which each particular leaf mismatches for the entire arc. Results: Seven patients plans were analyzed using this method. The leaves with the highest mismatched rate were found to be treatment plan dependent. Conclusions: This in-house software can be used to automatically verify the MLC leaf positions for all control points of VMAT plans using cine images acquired by an EPID.

  19. Comparison of 3DCRT,VMAT and IMRT techniques in metastatic vertebra radiotherapy: A phantom Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gedik Sonay

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertebra metastases can be seen during the prognosis of cancer patients. Treatment ways of the metastasis are radiotherapy, chemotherapy and surgery. Three-dimensional conformal therapy (3D-CRT is widely used in the treatment of vertebra metastases. Also, Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT and Volumetric Arc Therapy (VMAT are used too. The aim of this study is to examine the advantages and disadvantages of the different radiotherapy techniques. In the aspect of this goal, it is studied with a randophantom in Uludag University Medicine Faculty, Radiation Oncology Department. By using a computerized tomography image of the phantom, one 3DCRT plan, two VMAT and three IMRT plans for servical vertebra and three different 3DCRT plans, two VMAT and two IMRT plans for lomber vertebra are calculated. To calculate 3DCRT plans, CMS XiO Treatment System is used and to calculate VMAT and IMRT plans Monaco Treatment Planning System is used in the department. The study concludes with the dosimetric comparison of the treatment plans in the spect of critical organ doses, homogeneity and conformity index. As a result of this study, all critical organ doses are suitable for QUANTEC Dose Limit Report and critical organ doses depend on the techniques which used in radiotherapy. According to homogeneity and conformity indices, VMAT and IMRT plans are better than one in 3DCRT plans in servical and lomber vertebra radiotherapy plans.

  20. Novel time-dependent vascular actions of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, Saoirse E.; Tarling, Elizabeth J.; Bennett, Andrew J.; Kendall, David A.; Randall, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    Cannabinoids have widespread effects on the cardiovascular system, only some of which are mediated via G-protein-coupled cell surface receptors. The active ingredient of cannabis, Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), causes acute vasorelaxation in various arteries. Here we show for the first time that THC also causes slowly developing vasorelaxation through activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma (PPARγ). In vitro, THC (10 μM) caused time-dependent vasorelaxation of rat isolated arteries. Time-dependent vasorelaxation to THC was similar to that produced by the PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone and was inhibited by the PPARγ antagonist GW9662 (1 μM), but not the cannabinoid CB 1 receptor antagonist AM251 (1 μM). Time-dependent vasorelaxation to THC requires an intact endothelium, nitric oxide, production of hydrogen peroxide, and de novo protein synthesis. In transactivation assays in cultured HEK293 cells, THC-activated PPARγ, transiently expressed in combination with retinoid X receptor α and a luciferase reporter gene, in a concentration-dependent manner (100 nM-10 μM). In vitro incubation with THC (1 or 10 μM, 8 days) stimulated adipocyte differentiation in cultured 3T3L1 cells, a well-accepted property of PPARγ ligands. The present results provide strong evidence that THC is a PPARγ ligand, stimulation of which causes time-dependent vasorelaxation, implying some of the pleiotropic effects of cannabis may be mediated by nuclear receptors

  1. SU-E-T-16: A Hybrid VMAT/IMRT Technique for the Treatment of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, N; Yang, R; Wang, J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate a Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique which combines volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: 2 full arcs VMAT, 9-field IMRT and Hybrid VMAT/IMRT plans were created for 10 patients with NPC. The Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique consisted of 1 full VMAT arc and 7 IMRT fields. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) for Hybrid VMAT/IMRT was compared with IMRT and VMAT. The monitor units (MUs) were also evaluated. Results: The Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique significantly improved target dose homogeneity compared with IMRT and VMAT for PTV70 and PTV54. For PTV70 and PTV60, the Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique significantly improved target dose conformity compared with IMRT (0.62 vs 0.47; p<0.05 and 0.64 vs 0.58; p<0.05, respectively) and VMAT (0.62 vs 0.43; p<0.05 and 0.64 vs 0.6; p<0.05, respectively). The near maximum dose (D2%) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ), temporal lobe and mandible for Hybrid plans were 5.5%, 7.9% and 5.2% lower than IMRT plans (p<0.05). The mean dose of TMJ, temporal lobe, mandible and unspecified tissue for Hybrid plans were 12.8%, 11.4%, 4.2% and 4.1% lower than IMRT plans (p<0.05). The mean dose of right parotid, mandible and unspecified tissue for Hybrid plans were 3.3%, 2.4% and 3.1% lower than VMAT plans (p<0.05). The mean MUs needed for IMRT, VMAT and Hybrid plans were 2256, 507 and 1394, respectively. Conclusion: Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique significantly improved the target dose homogeneity and conformity compared with IMRT and VMAT and reduced the dose of OARs and unspecified tissue compared with IMRT with fewer MUs. Compared with VMAT, Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique can better protect parotid gland, mandible and unspecified tissue. Ruijie Yang was funded by the grant project: National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 81071237). Other authors have no competing interest for this work

  2. SU-E-T-16: A Hybrid VMAT/IMRT Technique for the Treatment of Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, N; Yang, R; Wang, J [Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, Beijing (China)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate a Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique which combines volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods: 2 full arcs VMAT, 9-field IMRT and Hybrid VMAT/IMRT plans were created for 10 patients with NPC. The Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique consisted of 1 full VMAT arc and 7 IMRT fields. The dose distribution of planning target volume (PTV) and organs at risk (OARs) for Hybrid VMAT/IMRT was compared with IMRT and VMAT. The monitor units (MUs) were also evaluated. Results: The Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique significantly improved target dose homogeneity compared with IMRT and VMAT for PTV70 and PTV54. For PTV70 and PTV60, the Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique significantly improved target dose conformity compared with IMRT (0.62 vs 0.47; p<0.05 and 0.64 vs 0.58; p<0.05, respectively) and VMAT (0.62 vs 0.43; p<0.05 and 0.64 vs 0.6; p<0.05, respectively). The near maximum dose (D2%) of temporomandibular joint (TMJ), temporal lobe and mandible for Hybrid plans were 5.5%, 7.9% and 5.2% lower than IMRT plans (p<0.05). The mean dose of TMJ, temporal lobe, mandible and unspecified tissue for Hybrid plans were 12.8%, 11.4%, 4.2% and 4.1% lower than IMRT plans (p<0.05). The mean dose of right parotid, mandible and unspecified tissue for Hybrid plans were 3.3%, 2.4% and 3.1% lower than VMAT plans (p<0.05). The mean MUs needed for IMRT, VMAT and Hybrid plans were 2256, 507 and 1394, respectively. Conclusion: Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique significantly improved the target dose homogeneity and conformity compared with IMRT and VMAT and reduced the dose of OARs and unspecified tissue compared with IMRT with fewer MUs. Compared with VMAT, Hybrid VMAT/IMRT technique can better protect parotid gland, mandible and unspecified tissue. Ruijie Yang was funded by the grant project: National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 81071237). Other authors have no competing interest for this work.

  3. Imaging TCR-Dependent NFAT-Mediated T-Cell Activation with Positron Emission Tomography In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Ponomarev

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A noninvasive method for molecular imaging of T-cell activity in vivo would be of considerable value. It would aid in understanding the role of specific genes and signal transduction pathways in the course of normal and pathologic immune responses, could elucidate temporal dynamics and immune regulation at different stages of disease and following therapy. We developed and assessed a novel method for monitoring the T-cell receptor (TCR -dependent nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT -mediated activation of T cells by optical fluorescence imaging (OFI and positron emission tomography (PET. The herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase/green fluorescent protein [HSV1-tk/GFP (TKGFP ] dual reporter gene was used to monitor NFAT-mediated transcriptional activation in human Jurkat cells. A recombinant retrovirus bearing the NFAT-TKGFP reporter system was constructed in which the TKGFP reporter gene was placed under control of an artificial cis-acting NFAT-specific enhancer. Transduced Jurkat cells were used to establish subcutaneous infiltrates in nude rats. We demonstrated that noninvasive OR and nuclear imaging of T-cell activation is feasible using the NFAT-TKGFP reporter system. PET imaging with [124]FIAU using the NFAT-TKGFP reporter system is sufficiently sensitive to detect T-cell activation in vivo. PET images were confirmed by independent measurements of T-cell activation (e.g., CD69 and induction of GFP fluorescence. PET imaging of TCR-induced NFAT-dependent transcriptional activity may be useful in the assessment of T cell responses, T-cell-based adoptive therapies, vaccination strategies and immunosuppressive drugs.

  4. SU-E-T-31: Alternative VMAT Technique Reduces Total Monitor Units for Lung SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Happersett, L; Mechalakos, J; Kuo, L; Zhang, P; Rimner, A [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, NY, NY (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate an alternative approach to VMAT optimization for hypofractionation lung treatment which increases average aperture opening and results in lower total Monitor Units (MU) without significantly sacrificing plan quality. Methods: Benchmark Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (bVMAT) plans were generated for 10 lung Stereotactic Body radiotherapy (SBRT) cases using Eclipse Version 11.0.42 (Varian Medical Systems) without a maximum MU constraint. Prescriptions ranged from 40 to 54Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. AAA dose calculation and PRO fluence based optimization was utilized. Two comparison VMAT plans were generated for each case, one that forced an initial “open” mlc aperture conformal to the tumor as a starting condition (oVMAT) with similar optimization parameters and arc geometries, and one that repeated the bVMAT optimization but added a maximum MU constraint (muVMAT). All plans used two arcs with lengths between 168 to 230 degrees. PTV D 95% and Dmean, lung V20 Gy, chest wall V30 Gy, average aperture opening and MU's were compared. Statistical significance was evaluated using Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: Average PTV D(95), PTV mean and lung V20Gy over all plans was 99.2 ± 1.7%, 103.3 ± 0.6% and 7.8 ± 2.4% respectively. The average chest wall V30Gy was 61 ± 61 cc and ranged between 0 to 166 cc. There were no significant differences between the three techniques for the dosimetric quantities. MUs were reduced by 11 ±11% (p<0.01) and 25 ± 5% (p<0.01) and the average aperture size was increased by 13.7 ± 14% (p=0.02) and 35.8 ± 10% (p<0.01) with muVMAT and oVMAT, respectively, compared to bVMAT. Conclusion: oVMAT and muVMAT techniques were both able to increase average aperture size and reduce total MU compared to the benchmark VMAT plan, but the magnitude of the changes observed for oVMAT was larger.

  5. Cr(VI) induces mitochondrial-mediated and caspase-dependent apoptosis through reactive oxygen species-mediated p53 activation in JB6 Cl41 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Young-Ok; Hitron, J. Andrew; Wang Xin; Chang Qingshan; Pan Jingju; Zhang Zhuo; Liu Jiankang; Wang Shuxia; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Shi Xianglin

    2010-01-01

    Cr(VI) compounds are known to cause serious toxic and carcinogenic effects. Cr(VI) exposure can lead to a severe damage to the skin, but the mechanisms involved in the Cr(VI)-mediated toxicity in the skin are unclear. The present study examined whether Cr(VI) induces cell death by apoptosis or necrosis using mouse skin epidermal cell line, JB6 Cl41 cells. We also investigated the cellular mechanisms of Cr(VI)-induced cell death. This study showed that Cr(VI) induced apoptotic cell death in a dose-dependent manner, as demonstrated by the appearance of cell shrinkage, the migration of cells into the sub-G1 phase, the increase of Annexin V positively stained cells, and the formation of nuclear DNA ladders. Cr(VI) treatment resulted in the increases of mitochondrial membrane depolarization and caspases activation. Electron spin resonance (ESR) and fluorescence analysis revealed that Cr(VI) increased intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion radical in dose-dependent manner. Blockage of p53 by si-RNA transfection suppressed mitochondrial changes of Bcl-2 family composition, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, caspase activation and PARP cleavage, leading to the inhibition of Cr(VI)-induced apoptosis. Further, catalase treatment prevented p53 phosphorylation stimulated by Cr(VI) with the concomitant inhibition of caspase activation. These results suggest that Cr(VI) induced a mitochondrial-mediated and caspase-dependent apoptosis in skin epidermal cells through activation of p53, which are mainly mediated by reactive oxidants generated by the chemical.

  6. Regulation of Serine-Threonine Kinase Akt Activation by NAD+-Dependent Deacetylase SIRT7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The Akt pathway is a central regulator that promotes cell survival in response to extracellular signals. Depletion of SIRT7, an NAD+-dependent deacetylase that is the least-studied sirtuin, is known to significantly increase Akt activity in mice through unknown mechanisms. In this study, we demonstrate that SIRT7 depletion in breast cancer cells results in Akt hyper-phosphorylation and increases cell survival following genotoxic stress. Mechanistically, SIRT7 specifically interacts with and deacetylates FKBP51 at residue lysines 28 and 155 (K28 and K155, resulting in enhanced interactions among FKBP51, Akt, and PHLPP, as well as Akt dephosphorylation. Mutating both lysines to arginines abolishes the effect of SIRT7 on Akt activity through FKBP51 deacetylation. Finally, energy stress strengthens SIRT7-mediated effects on Akt dephosphorylation through FKBP51 and thus sensitizes cancer cells to cytotoxic agents. These results reveal a direct role of SIRT7 in Akt regulation and raise the possibility of using the glucose analog 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2DG as a chemo-sensitizing agent.

  7. Treg depletion inhibits efficacy of cancer immunotherapy: implications for clinical trials.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James F Curtin

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Regulatory T lymphocytes (Treg infiltrate human glioblastoma (GBM; are involved in tumor progression and correlate with tumor grade. Transient elimination of Tregs using CD25 depleting antibodies (PC61 has been found to mediate GBM regression in preclinical models of brain tumors. Clinical trials that combine Treg depletion with tumor vaccination are underway to determine whether transient Treg depletion can enhance anti-tumor immune responses and improve long term survival in cancer patients.Using a syngeneic intracrabial glioblastoma (GBM mouse model we show that systemic depletion of Tregs 15 days after tumor implantation using PC61 resulted in a decrease in Tregs present in tumors, draining lymph nodes and spleen and improved long-term survival (50% of mice survived >150 days. No improvement in survival was observed when Tregs were depleted 24 days after tumor implantation, suggesting that tumor burden is an important factor for determining efficacy of Treg depletion in clinical trials. In a T cell dependent model of brain tumor regression elicited by intratumoral delivery of adenoviral vectors (Ad expressing Fms-like Tyrosine Kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L and Herpes Simplex Type 1-Thymidine Kinase (TK with ganciclovir (GCV, we demonstrate that administration of PC61 24 days after tumor implantation (7 days after treatment inhibited T cell dependent tumor regression and long term survival. Further, depletion with PC61 completely inhibited clonal expansion of tumor antigen-specific T lymphocytes in response to the treatment.Our data demonstrate for the first time, that although Treg depletion inhibits the progression/eliminates GBM tumors, its efficacy is dependent on tumor burden. We conclude that this approach will be useful in a setting of minimal residual disease. Further, we also demonstrate that Treg depletion, using PC61 in combination with immunotherapy, inhibits clonal expansion of tumor antigen-specific T cells, suggesting that new, more

  8. Novel time-dependent vascular actions of {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol mediated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Sullivan, Saoirse E [School of Biomedical Sciences, E Floor, Queen' s Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2UH (United Kingdom); Tarling, Elizabeth J [School of Biomedical Sciences, E Floor, Queen' s Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2UH (United Kingdom); Bennett, Andrew J [School of Biomedical Sciences, E Floor, Queen' s Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2UH (United Kingdom); Kendall, David A [School of Biomedical Sciences, E Floor, Queen' s Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2UH (United Kingdom); Randall, Michael D [School of Biomedical Sciences, E Floor, Queen' s Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2UH (United Kingdom)

    2005-11-25

    Cannabinoids have widespread effects on the cardiovascular system, only some of which are mediated via G-protein-coupled cell surface receptors. The active ingredient of cannabis, {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), causes acute vasorelaxation in various arteries. Here we show for the first time that THC also causes slowly developing vasorelaxation through activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors gamma (PPAR{gamma}). In vitro, THC (10 {mu}M) caused time-dependent vasorelaxation of rat isolated arteries. Time-dependent vasorelaxation to THC was similar to that produced by the PPAR{gamma} agonist rosiglitazone and was inhibited by the PPAR{gamma} antagonist GW9662 (1 {mu}M), but not the cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist AM251 (1 {mu}M). Time-dependent vasorelaxation to THC requires an intact endothelium, nitric oxide, production of hydrogen peroxide, and de novo protein synthesis. In transactivation assays in cultured HEK293 cells, THC-activated PPAR{gamma}, transiently expressed in combination with retinoid X receptor {alpha} and a luciferase reporter gene, in a concentration-dependent manner (100 nM-10 {mu}M). In vitro incubation with THC (1 or 10 {mu}M, 8 days) stimulated adipocyte differentiation in cultured 3T3L1 cells, a well-accepted property of PPAR{gamma} ligands. The present results provide strong evidence that THC is a PPAR{gamma} ligand, stimulation of which causes time-dependent vasorelaxation, implying some of the pleiotropic effects of cannabis may be mediated by nuclear receptors.

  9. SU-F-T-392: Superior Brainstem and Cochlea Sparing with VMAT for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briere, TM; McAleer, MF; Levy, LB; Yang, JN; Anderson, MD [Cancer Ctr., Houston, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Volumetric arc therapy (VMAT) can provide similar target coverage and normal tissue sparing as IMRT but with shorter treatment times. At our institution VMAT was adopted for the treatment glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) after a small number of test plans demonstrated its non-inferiority. In this study, we compare actual clinical treatment plans for a larger cohort of patients treated with either VMAT or IMRT. Methods: 90 GBM patients were included in this study, 45 treated with IMRT and 45 with VMAT. All planning target volumes (PTVs) were prescribed a dose of 50 Gy, with a simultaneous integrated boost to 60 Gy. Most IMRT plans used 5 non-coplanar beams, while most VMAT plans used 2 coplanar beams. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher’s exact test or the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney rank sum test. Included in the analysis were patient and treatment characteristics as well as the doses to the target volumes and organs at risk. Results: Treatment times for the VMAT plans were reduced by 5 minutes compared with IMRT. The PTV coverage was similar, with at least 95% covered for all plans, while the median boost PTV dose differed by 0.1 Gy between the IMRT and VMAT cohorts. The doses to the brain, optic chiasm, optic nerves and eyes were not significantly different. The mean dose to the brainstem, however, was 9.4 Gy less with VMAT (p<0.001). The dose to the ipsilateral and contralateral cochleae were respectively 19.7 and 9.5 Gy less (p<0.001). Conclusion: Comparison of clinical treatment plans for separate IMRT and VMAT cohorts demonstrates that VMAT can save substantial treatment time while providing similar target coverage and superior sparing of the brainstem and cochleae. To our knowledge this is the first study to demonstrate this benefit of VMAT in the management of GBM.

  10. SU-E-T-426: Feasibility of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) Treatment of Pancreatic Cancer Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with Active Breathing Control (ABC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y; Jackson, J; Davies, G; Herman, J; Forbang, R Teboh [John Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: SBRT shows excellent tumor control and toxicity rates for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (PCA). Herein, we evaluate the feasibility of using VMAT with ABC for PCA SBRT. Methods: Nine PCA patients previously treated via SBRT utilizing 11-beam step-and-shoot IMRT technique in our center were retrospectively identified, among whom eight patients received 3300cGy in 5 fractions while one received 3000cGy in 5 fractions. A VMAT plan was generated on each patient’s planning CT in Pinnacle v9.8 on Elekta Synergy following the same PCA SBRT clinical protocol. Three partial arcs (182°–300°, 300°-60°, and 60°-180°) with 2°/4° control-point spacing were used. The dosimetric difference between the VMAT and the original IMRT plans was analyzed. IMRT QA was performed for the VMAT plans using MapCheck2 in MapPHAN and the total delivery time was recorded. To mimic the treatment situation with ABC, where patients hold their breath for 20–30 seconds, the delivery was intentionally interrupted every 20–30 seconds. For each plan, the QA was performed with and without beam interruption. Gamma analysis (2%/2mm) was used to compare the planned and measured doses. Results: All VMAT plans with 2mm dose grid passed the clinic protocol with similar PTV coverage and OARs sparing, where PTV V-RxDose was 92.7±2.1% (VMAT) vs. 92.1±2.6% (IMRT), and proximal stomach V15Gy was 3.60±2.69 cc (VMAT) vs. 4.80±3.13 cc (IMRT). The mean total MU and delivery time of the VMAT plans were 2453.8±531.1 MU and 282.1±56.0 seconds. The gamma passing rates of absolute dose were 94.9±3.4% and 94.5±4.0% for delivery without and with interruption respectively, suggesting the dosimetry of VMAT delivery with ABC for SBRT won’t be compromised. Conclusion: This study suggests that PCA SBRT using VMAT with ABC is a feasible technique without compromising plan dosimetry. The combination of VMAT with ABC will potentially reduce the SBRT treatment time.

  11. Kidney in potassium depletion. I. Na+-K+-ATPase activity and [3H]ouabain binding in MCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, M.; Katz, A.I.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of potassium depletion on renal Na + K + -ATPase was studied in rats. K depletion produced a striking, time-dependent increase in Na + -K + -ATPase activity of the outer medullary collecting tubules (inner stripe; MCT/sub is/). After 3 wk on the K-free diet, when the urine was almost potassium-free, Na + -K + -ATPase activity in MCT/sub is/ was over fourfold higher than in control animals. Repletion of potassium restored enzyme activity to base line within 7 days which corresponds to the catabolic rate of the renal enzyme, suggesting the cessation of enhanced synthesis that took place during K deprivation. Changes in Na + -K + -ATPase activity and aldosterone levels during both K depletion and repletion occurred in opposite directions and were therefore independent of each other. [ 3 H]Ouabain binding to intact MCT/sub is/, reflecting the number of pump sites on the basolateral membrane, was similar in K-depleted and control animals; in contrast, tubule permeabilization that exposes additional pump units to the ligand, unmasked a nearly fourfold increase in [ 3 H]ouabain binding in K-depleted rats, comparable to the increment in Na + -K + -ATPase activity. These results show that K depletion leads to a marked increase in Na + -K + -ATPase activity of MCT/sub is/, and suggest that the new enzyme units are located at a ouabain-inaccessible site in the intact tubule, i.e., either in an intracellular compartment or at the luminal membrane, where they may be involved in potassium reabsorption

  12. B cell depletion reduces T cell activation in pancreatic islets in a murine autoimmune diabetes model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Rosa, Larissa C; Boldison, Joanne; De Leenheer, Evy; Davies, Joanne; Wen, Li; Wong, F Susan

    2018-06-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease characterised by the destruction of beta cells in the islets of Langerhans, resulting in deficient insulin production. B cell depletion therapy has proved successful in preventing diabetes and restoring euglycaemia in animal models of diabetes, as well as in preserving beta cell function in clinical trials in the short term. We aimed to report a full characterisation of B cell kinetics post B cell depletion, with a focus on pancreatic islets. Transgenic NOD mice with a human CD20 transgene expressed on B cells were injected with an anti-CD20 depleting antibody. B cells were analysed using multivariable flow cytometry. There was a 10 week delay in the onset of diabetes when comparing control and experimental groups, although the final difference in the diabetes incidence, following prolonged observation, was not statistically significant (p = 0.07). The co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 were reduced on stimulation of B cells during B cell depletion and repopulation. IL-10-producing regulatory B cells were not induced in repopulated B cells in the periphery, post anti-CD20 depletion. However, the early depletion of B cells had a marked effect on T cells in the local islet infiltrate. We demonstrated a lack of T cell activation, specifically with reduced CD44 expression and effector function, including IFN-γ production from both CD4 + and CD8 + T cells. These CD8 + T cells remained altered in the pancreatic islets long after B cell depletion and repopulation. Our findings suggest that B cell depletion can have an impact on T cell regulation, inducing a durable effect that is present long after repopulation. We suggest that this local effect of reducing autoimmune T cell activity contributes to delay in the onset of autoimmune diabetes.

  13. AMP-activated protein kinase couples 3-bromopyruvate-induced energy depletion to apoptosis via activation of FoxO3a and upregulation of proapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodur, Cagri; Karakas, Bahriye; Timucin, Ahmet Can; Tezil, Tugsan; Basaga, Huveyda

    2016-11-01

    Most tumors primarily rely on glycolysis rather than mitochondrial respiration for ATP production. This phenomenon, also known as Warburg effect, renders tumors more sensitive to glycolytic disturbances compared to normal cells. 3-bromopyruvate is a potent inhibitor of glycolysis that shows promise as an anticancer drug candidate. Although investigations revealed that 3-BP triggers apoptosis through ATP depletion and subsequent AMPK activation, the underlying molecular mechanisms coupling AMPK to apoptosis are poorly understood. We showed that 3-BP leads to a rapid ATP depletion which was followed by growth inhibition and Bax-dependent apoptosis in HCT116 cells. Apoptosis was accompanied with activation of caspase-9 and -3 while pretreatment with a general caspase inhibitor attenuated cell death. AMPK, p38, JNK, and Akt were phosphorylated immediately upon treatment. Pharmacological inhibition and silencing of AMPK largely inhibited 3-BP-induced apoptosis and reversed phosphorylation of JNK. Transcriptional activity of FoxO3a was dramatically increased subsequent to AMPK-mediated phosphorylation of FoxO3a at Ser413. Cell death analysis of cells transiently transfected with wt or AMPK-phosphorylation-deficient FoxO3 expression plasmids verified the contributory role of AMPK-FoxO3a axis in 3-BP-induced apoptosis. In addition, expression of proapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins Bim and Bax were upregulated in an AMPK-dependent manner. Bim was transcriptionally activated in association with FoxO3a activity, while Bax upregulation was abolished in p53-null cells. Together, these data suggest that AMPK couples 3-BP-induced metabolic disruption to intrinsic apoptosis via modulation of FoxO3a-Bim axis and Bax expression. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Nucleolus-derived mediators in oncogenic stress response and activation of p53-dependent pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stępiński, Dariusz

    2016-08-01

    Rapid growth and division of cells, including tumor ones, is correlated with intensive protein biosynthesis. The output of nucleoli, organelles where translational machineries are formed, depends on a rate of particular stages of ribosome production and on accessibility of elements crucial for their effective functioning, including substrates, enzymes as well as energy resources. Different factors that induce cellular stress also often lead to nucleolar dysfunction which results in ribosome biogenesis impairment. Such nucleolar disorders, called nucleolar or ribosomal stress, usually affect cellular functioning which in fact is a result of p53-dependent pathway activation, elicited as a response to stress. These pathways direct cells to new destinations such as cell cycle arrest, damage repair, differentiation, autophagy, programmed cell death or aging. In the case of impaired nucleolar functioning, nucleolar and ribosomal proteins mediate activation of the p53 pathways. They are also triggered as a response to oncogenic factor overexpression to protect tissues and organs against extensive proliferation of abnormal cells. Intentional impairment of any step of ribosome biosynthesis which would direct the cells to these destinations could be a strategy used in anticancer therapy. This review presents current knowledge on a nucleolus, mainly in relation to cancer biology, which is an important and extremely sensitive element of the mechanism participating in cellular stress reaction mediating activation of the p53 pathways in order to counteract stress effects, especially cancer development.

  15. TH-E-BRE-04: An Online Replanning Algorithm for VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahunbay, E; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Moreau, M [Elekta, Inc, Verona, WI (Italy)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a fast replanning algorithm based on segment aperture morphing (SAM) for online replanning of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with flattening filtered (FF) and flattening filter free (FFF) beams. Methods: A software tool was developed to interface with a VMAT planning system ((Monaco, Elekta), enabling the output of detailed beam/machine parameters of original VMAT plans generated based on planning CTs for FF or FFF beams. A SAM algorithm, previously developed for fixed-beam IMRT, was modified to allow the algorithm to correct for interfractional variations (e.g., setup error, organ motion and deformation) by morphing apertures based on the geometric relationship between the beam's eye view of the anatomy from the planning CT and that from the daily CT for each control point. The algorithm was tested using daily CTs acquired using an in-room CT during daily IGRT for representative prostate cancer cases along with their planning CTs. The algorithm allows for restricted MLC leaf travel distance between control points of the VMAT delivery to prevent SAM from increasing leaf travel, and therefore treatment delivery time. Results: The VMAT plans adapted to the daily CT by SAM were found to improve the dosimetry relative to the IGRT repositioning plans for both FF and FFF beams. For the adaptive plans, the changes in leaf travel distance between control points were < 1cm for 80% of the control points with no restriction. When restricted to the original plans' maximum travel distance, the dosimetric effect was minimal. The adaptive plans were delivered successfully with similar delivery times as the original plans. The execution of the SAM algorithm was < 10 seconds. Conclusion: The SAM algorithm can quickly generate deliverable online-adaptive VMAT plans based on the anatomy of the day for both FF and FFF beams.

  16. TH-E-BRE-04: An Online Replanning Algorithm for VMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahunbay, E; Li, X; Moreau, M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a fast replanning algorithm based on segment aperture morphing (SAM) for online replanning of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with flattening filtered (FF) and flattening filter free (FFF) beams. Methods: A software tool was developed to interface with a VMAT planning system ((Monaco, Elekta), enabling the output of detailed beam/machine parameters of original VMAT plans generated based on planning CTs for FF or FFF beams. A SAM algorithm, previously developed for fixed-beam IMRT, was modified to allow the algorithm to correct for interfractional variations (e.g., setup error, organ motion and deformation) by morphing apertures based on the geometric relationship between the beam's eye view of the anatomy from the planning CT and that from the daily CT for each control point. The algorithm was tested using daily CTs acquired using an in-room CT during daily IGRT for representative prostate cancer cases along with their planning CTs. The algorithm allows for restricted MLC leaf travel distance between control points of the VMAT delivery to prevent SAM from increasing leaf travel, and therefore treatment delivery time. Results: The VMAT plans adapted to the daily CT by SAM were found to improve the dosimetry relative to the IGRT repositioning plans for both FF and FFF beams. For the adaptive plans, the changes in leaf travel distance between control points were < 1cm for 80% of the control points with no restriction. When restricted to the original plans' maximum travel distance, the dosimetric effect was minimal. The adaptive plans were delivered successfully with similar delivery times as the original plans. The execution of the SAM algorithm was < 10 seconds. Conclusion: The SAM algorithm can quickly generate deliverable online-adaptive VMAT plans based on the anatomy of the day for both FF and FFF beams

  17. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated macrophage activation: the role of calcium in the generation of tumoricidal activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drysdale, B.E.; Shin, H.S.

    1986-01-01

    As the authors reported, calcium ionophore, A23187, activates macrophages (M theta) for tumor cell killing and the activated M theta produce a soluble cytotoxic factor (M theta-CF) that is similar if not identical to tumor necrosis factor. Based on these observations they have investigated whether calcium is involved in the activation mediated by another potent M theta activator, LPS. The authors have shown that A23187 caused uptake of extracellular 45 Ca ++ but LPS did not. They have examined the effect of depleting extracellular calcium by using medium containing no added calcium containing 1.0 mM EGTA. In no case did depletion result in decreased M theta-CF production by the M theta activated with LPS. Measurements using the fluorescent, intracellular calcium indicator, Quin 2 have also been performed. While ionomycin, caused a rapid change in the Quin-2 signal, LPS at a concentration even in excess of that required to activate the M theta caused no change in the signal. When high doses of Quin 2 or another intracellular chelator, 8-(diethylaminol-octyl-3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoate, were used to treat M theta, M theta-CF production decreased and cytotoxic activity was impaired. These data indicate that one or more of the processes involved in M theta-CF production does require calcium, but that activation mediated by LPS occurs without the influx of extracellular calcium or redistribution of intracellular calcium

  18. Comparison of whole-field simultaneous integrated boost VMAT and IMRT in the treatment of nasopharyngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Xiance; Yi, Jinling; Zhou, Yongqiang; Yan, Huawei; Han, Ce; Xie, Congying, E-mail: billy07@wzhospital.cn

    2013-01-01

    To study the feasibility of using volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to deliver whole-field simultaneous integrated boost (WF-SIB) to treat patients with nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC). WF-SIB intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans, one-arc WF-SIB VMAT plans, and two-arc WF-SIB VMAT plans were generated with identical objective functions for 8 patients with NPC of various stages. Isodose distributions and dose-volume histograms were evaluated. Dosimetric and biological quality indices of clinical target volume (CTV) and organs at risk (OARs) were calculated to study the optimization capability of these 3 modalities in the treatment of patients with NPC. The optimization time, delivery time, required monitor units (MUs), and delivery accuracy were also compared to investigate the feasibility of these 3 modalities. There was no significant difference (p = 0.92) in target coverage (TC) between WF-SIB IMRT (99.00 ± 0.79) and two-arc WF-SIB VMAT (97.98 ± 1.29). However, both had higher TC than one-arc VMAT plans (89.92 ± 6.32, p < 0.01). IMRT demonstrated the best protection of the spinal cord, whereas two-arc VMAT showed the minimum D{sub max} to OARs. No other significant differences were observed among these 3 modalities on CTV coverage and OAR sparing. The delivery and MU efficiency of one-arc and two-arc WF-SIB VMAT were greatly improved compared with WF-SIB IMRT. The optimization time of one-arc and two-arc WF-SIB VMAT plans were 5 and 10 times greater than that of WF-SIB IMRT, respectively. The delivery accuracy of WF-SIB VMAT was not affected by the increased freedom. For patients with NPC, one-arc WF-SIB VMAT might not be able to achieve sufficient TC, whereas two-arc WF-SIB VMAT was able to achieve reasonable TC. No significant advantage on OAR protection was demonstrated by VMAT compared with IMRT. WF-SIB VMAT has significantly shorter delivery times, but WF-SIB IMRT may still be the first treatment choice for patients with NPC.

  19. A Monte Carlo tool for evaluating VMAT and DIMRT treatment deliveries including planar detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asuni, G; Van Beek, T A; Venkataraman, S; McCurdy, B M C; Popescu, I A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to describe and validate a new general research tool that performs Monte Carlo (MC) simulations for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and dynamic intensity modulated radiation therapy (DIMRT), simultaneously tracking dose deposition in both the patient CT geometry and an arbitrary planar detector system. The tool is generalized to handle either entrance or exit detectors and provides the simulated dose for the individual control-points of the time-dependent VMAT and DIMRT deliveries. The MC simulation tool was developed with the EGSnrc radiation transport. For the individual control point simulation, we rotate the patient/phantom volume only (i.e. independent of the gantry and planar detector geometries) using the gantry angle in the treatment planning system (TPS) DICOM RP file such that each control point has its own unique phantom file. After MC simulation, we obtained the total dose to the phantom by summing dose contributions for all control points. Scored dose to the sensitive layer of the planar detector is available for each control point. To validate the tool, three clinical treatment plans were used including VMAT plans for a prostate case and a head-and-neck case, and a DIMRT plan for a head-and-neck case. An electronic portal imaging device operated in ‘movie’ mode was used with the VMAT plans delivered to cylindrical and anthropomorphic phantoms to validate the code using an exit detector. The DIMRT plan was delivered to a novel transmission detector, to validate the code using an entrance detector. The total MC 3D absolute doses in patient/phantom were compared with the TPS doses, while 2D MC doses were compared with planar detector doses for all individual control points, using the gamma evaluation test with 3%/3 mm criteria. The MC 3D absolute doses demonstrated excellent agreement with the TPS doses for all the tested plans, with about 95% of voxels having γ 90% of percentage pixels with γ <1. We found that over

  20. Evaluating efficiency of split VMAT plan for prostate cancer radiotherapy involving pelvic lymph nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mun, Jun Ki; Son, Sang Jun; Kim, Dae Ho; Seo, Seok Jin [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficiency of Split VMAT planning(Contouring rectum divided into an upper and a lower for reduce rectum dose) compare to Conventional VMAT planning(Contouring whole rectum) for prostate cancer radiotherapy involving pelvic lymph nodes. A total of 9 cases were enrolled. Each case received radiotherapy with Split VMAT planning to the prostate involving pelvic lymph nodes. Treatment was delivered using TrueBeam STX(Varian Medical Systems, USA) and planned on Eclipse(Ver. 10.0.42, Varian, USA), PRO3(Progressive Resolution Optimizer 10.0.28), AAA(Anisotropic Analytic Algorithm Ver. 10.0.28). Lower rectum contour was defined as starting 1 cm superior and ending 1 cm inferior to the prostate PTV, upper rectum is a part, except lower rectum from the whole rectum. Split VMAT plan parameters consisted of 10 MV coplanar 360° arcs. Each arc had 30° and 30° collimator angle, respectively. An SIB(Simultaneous Integrated Boost) treatment prescription was employed delivering 50.4 Gy to pelvic lymph nodes and 63- 70 Gy to the prostate in 28 fractions. D{sub mean} of whole rectum on Split VMAT plan was applied for DVC(Dose Volume Constraint) of the whole rectum for Conventional VMAT plan. In addition, all parameters were set to be the same of existing treatment plans. To minimize the dose difference that shows up randomly on optimizing, all plans were optimized and calculated twice respectively using a 0.2 cm grid. All plans were normalized to the prostate PTV{sub 100%} = 90% or 95%. A comparison of D{sub mean} of whole rectum, upperr ectum, lower rectum, and bladder, V{sub 50%} of upper rectum, total MU and H.I.(Homogeneity Index) and C.I.(Conformity Index) of the PTV was used for technique evaluation. All Split VMAT plans were verified by gamma test with portal dosimetry using EPID. Using DVH analysis, a difference between the Conventional and the Split VMAT plans was demonstrated. The Split VMAT plan demonstrated better in the D

  1. SU-F-T-613: Multi-Lesion Cranial SRS VMAT Plan Quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballangrud, A; Kuo, L; Happersett, L; Lim, S; Li, X; Beal, K; Yamada, Y; LoSasso, T; Mechalakos, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Cranial SRS VMAT plans must have steep dose gradient around each target to reduce dose to normal brain. This study reports on the correlation between gradient index (GI=V50%/V100%), target size and target dose heterogeneity index (HI=PTV Dmax/prescription dose) for multi-lesion cranial SRS VMAT plans. Methods: VMAT plans for 10 cranial cases with 3 to 6 lesions (total 39 lesions) generated in Varian Eclipse V11.0.47 with a fine-tuned AAA beam model and 0.125 cm dose grid were analyzed. One or two iso centers were used depending on the spatial distribution of lesions. Two to nine coplanar and non-coplanar arcs were used per isocenter. Conformity index (CI= V100%/VPTV), HI, and GI were determined for each lesion. Dose to critical structures were recorded. Results: Lesion size ranged from 0.05–11.00 cm3. HI ranged from 1.2–1.4, CI ranged from 1.0–2.8 and GI from 3.1–8.4. Maximum dose to brainstem, chiasm, lenses, optic nerves and eyes ranged from 120–1946 cGy, 47–463 cGy, 9–121 cGy, 14–512 cGy, and 17–294 cGy, respectively. Brain minus PTV (Brain-PTV) V7Gy was in the range 1.1–6.5%, and Brain-PTV Dmean was in the range 94–324 cGy. Conclusion: This work shows that a GI 0.4cc. For smaller lesions, GI increases rapidly. GI is lower when HI is increased. Based on this study, recommend HI is 1.4, and recommended GI is for volumes 1.0cc GI<4. CI is < 1.3 for all lesions except for targets < 0.1cc. Cranial SRS VMAT plans must be optimized to lower the GI to reduce the dose to normal brain tissue.

  2. Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Loss of Synaptic Akt1 Signaling Leads to Deficient Activity-Dependent Protein Translation Early in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faraz; Singh, Kunal; Das, Debajyoti; Gowaikar, Ruturaj; Shaw, Eisha; Ramachandran, Arathy; Rupanagudi, Khader Valli; Kommaddi, Reddy Peera; Bennett, David A; Ravindranath, Vijayalakshmi

    2017-12-01

    Synaptic deficits are known to underlie the cognitive dysfunction seen in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by β-amyloid has also been implicated in AD pathogenesis. However, it is unclear whether ROS contributes to synaptic dysfunction seen in AD pathogenesis and, therefore, we examined whether altered redox signaling could contribute to synaptic deficits in AD. Activity dependent but not basal translation was impaired in synaptoneurosomes from 1-month old presymptomatic APP Swe /PS1ΔE9 (APP/PS1) mice, and this deficit was sustained till middle age (MA, 9-10 months). ROS generation leads to oxidative modification of Akt1 in the synapse and consequent reduction in Akt1-mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, leading to deficiency in activity-dependent protein translation. Moreover, we found a similar loss of activity-dependent protein translation in synaptoneurosomes from postmortem AD brains. Loss of activity-dependent protein translation occurs presymptomatically early in the pathogenesis of AD. This is caused by ROS-mediated loss of pAkt1, leading to reduced synaptic Akt1-mTOR signaling and is rescued by overexpression of Akt1. ROS-mediated damage is restricted to the synaptosomes, indicating selectivity. We demonstrate that ROS-mediated oxidative modification of Akt1 contributes to synaptic dysfunction in AD, seen as loss of activity-dependent protein translation that is essential for synaptic plasticity and maintenance. Therapeutic strategies promoting Akt1-mTOR signaling at synapses may provide novel target(s) for disease-modifying therapy in AD. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 1269-1280.

  3. Dissecting Bacterial Cell Wall Entry and Signaling in Eukaryotic Cells: an Actin-Dependent Pathway Parallels Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor-Mediated Endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Lip Nam; Gao, Geli; Tuomanen, Elaine I

    2017-01-03

    The Gram-positive bacterial cell wall (CW) peptidoglycan-teichoic acid complex is released into the host environment during bacterial metabolism or death. It is a highly inflammatory Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) ligand, and previous in vivo studies have demonstrated its ability to recapitulate pathological features of pneumonia and meningitis. We report that an actin-dependent pathway is involved in the internalization of the CW by epithelial and endothelial cells, in addition to the previously described platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr)-dependent uptake pathway. Unlike the PAFr-dependent pathway, which is mediated by clathrin and dynamin and does not lead to signaling, the alternative pathway is sensitive to 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA) and engenders Rac1, Cdc42, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Upon internalization by this macropinocytosis-like pathway, CW is trafficked to lysosomes. Intracellular CW trafficking is more complex than previously recognized and suggests multiple points of interaction with and without innate immune signaling. Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major human pathogen infecting the respiratory tract and brain. It is an established model organism for understanding how infection injures the host. During infection or bacterial growth, bacteria shed their cell wall (CW) into the host environment and trigger inflammation. A previous study has shown that CW enters and crosses cell barriers by interacting with a receptor on the surfaces of host cells, termed platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFr). In the present study, by using cells that are depleted of PAFr, we identified a second pathway with features of macropinocytosis, which is a receptor-independent fluid uptake mechanism by cells. Each pathway contributes approximately the same amount of cell wall trafficking, but the PAFr pathway is silent, while the new pathway appears to contribute to the host inflammatory response to CW insult. Copyright © 2017

  4. A Comprehensive Comparison of IMRT and VMAT Plan Quality for Prostate Cancer Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quan, Enzhuo M.; Li Xiaoqiang; Li Yupeng; Wang Xiaochun; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Johnson, Jennifer L.; Kuban, Deborah A.; Lee, Andrew K.; Zhang Xiaodong

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: We performed a comprehensive comparative study of the plan quality between volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: Eleven patients with prostate cancer treated at our institution were randomly selected for this study. For each patient, a VMAT plan and a series of IMRT plans using an increasing number of beams (8, 12, 16, 20, and 24 beams) were examined. All plans were generated using our in-house–developed automatic inverse planning (AIP) algorithm. An existing eight-beam clinical IMRT plan, which was used to treat the patient, was used as the reference plan. For each patient, all AIP-generated plans were optimized to achieve the same level of planning target volume (PTV) coverage as the reference plan. Plan quality was evaluated by measuring mean dose to and dose–volume statistics of the organs at risk, especially the rectum, from each type of plan. Results: For the same PTV coverage, the AIP-generated VMAT plans had significantly better plan quality in terms of rectum sparing than the eight-beam clinical and AIP-generated IMRT plans (p < 0.0001). However, the differences between the IMRT and VMAT plans in all the dosimetric indices decreased as the number of beams used in IMRT increased. IMRT plan quality was similar or superior to that of VMAT when the number of beams in IMRT was increased to a certain number, which ranged from 12 to 24 for the set of patients studied. The superior VMAT plan quality resulted in approximately 30% more monitor units than the eight-beam IMRT plans, but the delivery time was still less than 3 min. Conclusions: Considering the superior plan quality as well as the delivery efficiency of VMAT compared with that of IMRT, VMAT may be the preferred modality for treating prostate cancer.

  5. Cross-validation of two commercial methods for volumetric high-resolution dose reconstruction on a phantom for non-coplanar VMAT beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feygelman, Vladimir; Stambaugh, Cassandra; Opp, Daniel; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo G.; Nelms, Benjamin E.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: Delta 4 (ScandiDos AB, Uppsala, Sweden) and ArcCHECK with 3DVH software (Sun Nuclear Corp., Melbourne, FL, USA) are commercial quasi-three-dimensional diode dosimetry arrays capable of volumetric measurement-guided dose reconstruction. A method to reconstruct dose for non-coplanar VMAT beams with 3DVH is described. The Delta 4 3D dose reconstruction on its own phantom for VMAT delivery has not been thoroughly evaluated previously, and we do so by comparison with 3DVH. Materials and methods: Reconstructed volumetric doses for VMAT plans delivered with different table angles were compared between the Delta 4 and 3DVH using gamma analysis. Results: The average γ (2% local dose-error normalization/2mm) passing rate comparing the directly measured Delta 4 diode dose with 3DVH was 98.2 ± 1.6% (1SD). The average passing rate for the full volumetric comparison of the reconstructed doses on a homogeneous cylindrical phantom was 95.6 ± 1.5%. No dependence on the table angle was observed. Conclusions: Modified 3DVH algorithm is capable of 3D VMAT dose reconstruction on an arbitrary volume for the full range of table angles. Our comparison results between different dosimeters make a compelling case for the use of electronic arrays with high-resolution 3D dose reconstruction as primary means of evaluating spatial dose distributions during IMRT/VMAT verification

  6. Amphetamine activates Rho GTPase signaling to mediate dopamine transporter internalization and acute behavioral effects of amphetamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, David S.; Underhill, Suzanne M.; Stolz, Donna B.; Murdoch, Geoffrey H.; Thiels, Edda; Romero, Guillermo; Amara, Susan G.

    2015-01-01

    Acute amphetamine (AMPH) exposure elevates extracellular dopamine through a variety of mechanisms that include inhibition of dopamine reuptake, depletion of vesicular stores, and facilitation of dopamine efflux across the plasma membrane. Recent work has shown that the DAT substrate AMPH, unlike cocaine and other nontransported blockers, can also stimulate endocytosis of the plasma membrane dopamine transporter (DAT). Here, we show that when AMPH enters the cytoplasm it rapidly stimulates DAT internalization through a dynamin-dependent, clathrin-independent process. This effect, which can be observed in transfected cells, cultured dopamine neurons, and midbrain slices, is mediated by activation of the small GTPase RhoA. Inhibition of RhoA activity with C3 exotoxin or a dominant-negative RhoA blocks AMPH-induced DAT internalization. These actions depend on AMPH entry into the cell and are blocked by the DAT inhibitor cocaine. AMPH also stimulates cAMP accumulation and PKA-dependent inactivation of RhoA, thus providing a mechanism whereby PKA- and RhoA-dependent signaling pathways can interact to regulate the timing and robustness of AMPH’s effects on DAT internalization. Consistent with this model, the activation of D1/D5 receptors that couple to PKA in dopamine neurons antagonizes RhoA activation, DAT internalization, and hyperlocomotion observed in mice after AMPH treatment. These observations support the existence of an unanticipated intracellular target that mediates the effects of AMPH on RhoA and cAMP signaling and suggest new pathways to target to disrupt AMPH action. PMID:26553986

  7. SU-E-T-417: The Impact of Normal Tissue Constraints On PTV Dose Homogeneity for Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT), Volume Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and Tomotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, J; McDonald, D; Ashenafi, M; Ellis, A; Vanek, K [Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Complex intensity modulated arc therapy tends to spread low dose to normal tissue(NT)regions to obtain improved target conformity and homogeneity and OAR sparing.This work evaluates the trade-offs between PTV homogeneity and reduction of the maximum dose(Dmax)spread to NT while planning of IMRT,VMAT and Tomotherapy. Methods: Ten prostate patients,previously planned with step-and-shoot IMRT,were selected.To fairly evaluate how PTV homogeneity was affected by NT Dmax constraints,original IMRT DVH objectives for PTV and OARs(femoral heads,and rectal and bladder wall)applied to 2 VMAT plans in Pinnacle(V9.0), and Tomotherapy(V4.2).The only constraint difference was the NT which was defined as body contours excluding targets,OARs and dose rings.NT Dmax constraint for 1st VMAT was set to the prescription dose(Dp).For 2nd VMAT(VMAT-NT)and Tomotherapy,it was set to the Dmax achieved in IMRT(~70-80% of Dp).All NT constraints were set to the lowest priority.Three common homogeneity indices(HI),RTOG-HI=Dmax/Dp,moderated-HI=D95%/D5% and complex-HI=(D2%-D98%)/Dp*100 were calculated. Results: All modalities with similar dosimetric endpoints for PTV and OARs.The complex-HI shows the most variability of indices,with average values of 5.9,4.9,9.3 and 6.1 for IMRT,VMAT,VMAT-NT and Tomotherapy,respectively.VMAT provided the best PTV homogeneity without compromising any OAR/NT sparing.Both VMAT-NT and Tomotherapy,planned with more restrictive NT constraints,showed reduced homogeneity,with VMAT-NT showing the worst homogeneity(P<0.0001)for all HI.Tomotherapy gave the lowest NT Dmax,with slightly decreased homogeneity compared to VMAT. Finally, there was no significant difference in NT Dmax or Dmean between VMAT and VMAT-NT. Conclusion: PTV HI is highly dependent on permitted NT constraints. Results demonstrated that VMAT-NT with more restrictive NT constraints does not reduce Dmax NT,but significantly receives higher Dmax and worse target homogeneity.Therefore, it is critical

  8. Shape-dependent bactericidal activity of copper oxide nanoparticle mediated by DNA and membrane damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laha, Dipranjan; Pramanik, Arindam; Laskar, Aparna; Jana, Madhurya; Pramanik, Panchanan; Karmakar, Parimal

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles were synthesized. • Physical characterizations of these nanoparticles were done by TEM, DLS, XRD, FTIR. • They showed shape dependent antibacterial activity on different bacterial strain. • They induced both membrane damage and ROS mediated DNA damage in bacteria. - Abstract: In this work, we synthesized spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles and their physical characterizations were done by the X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The antibacterial activity of these nanoparticles was determined on both gram positive and gram negative bacterial. Spherical shaped copper oxide nanoparticles showed more antibacterial property on gram positive bacteria where as sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles are more active on gram negative bacteria. We also demonstrated that copper oxide nanoparticles produced reactive oxygen species in both gram negative and gram positive bacteria. Furthermore, they induced membrane damage as determined by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Thus production of and membrane damage are major mechanisms of the bactericidal activity of these copper oxide nanoparticles. Finally it was concluded that antibacterial activity of nanoparticles depend on physicochemical properties of copper oxide nanoparticles and bacterial strain

  9. Shape-dependent bactericidal activity of copper oxide nanoparticle mediated by DNA and membrane damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laha, Dipranjan; Pramanik, Arindam [Department of Life Science and Biotechnology, Jadavpur University, 188, Raja S C Mallick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Laskar, Aparna [CSIR-Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata 700032 (India); Jana, Madhurya [Department of Life Science and Biotechnology, Jadavpur University, 188, Raja S C Mallick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India); Pramanik, Panchanan [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Karmakar, Parimal, E-mail: pkarmakar_28@yahoo.co.in [Department of Life Science and Biotechnology, Jadavpur University, 188, Raja S C Mallick Road, Kolkata 700032 (India)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles were synthesized. • Physical characterizations of these nanoparticles were done by TEM, DLS, XRD, FTIR. • They showed shape dependent antibacterial activity on different bacterial strain. • They induced both membrane damage and ROS mediated DNA damage in bacteria. - Abstract: In this work, we synthesized spherical and sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles and their physical characterizations were done by the X-ray diffraction, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. The antibacterial activity of these nanoparticles was determined on both gram positive and gram negative bacterial. Spherical shaped copper oxide nanoparticles showed more antibacterial property on gram positive bacteria where as sheet shaped copper oxide nanoparticles are more active on gram negative bacteria. We also demonstrated that copper oxide nanoparticles produced reactive oxygen species in both gram negative and gram positive bacteria. Furthermore, they induced membrane damage as determined by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Thus production of and membrane damage are major mechanisms of the bactericidal activity of these copper oxide nanoparticles. Finally it was concluded that antibacterial activity of nanoparticles depend on physicochemical properties of copper oxide nanoparticles and bacterial strain.

  10. Activity-dependent astrocyte swelling is mediated by pH-regulating mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Brian Roland; MacAulay, Nanna

    2017-10-01

    During neuronal activity in the mammalian brain, the K + released into the synaptic space is initially buffered by the astrocytic compartment. In parallel, the extracellular space (ECS) shrinks, presumably due to astrocytic cell swelling. With the Na + /K + /2Cl - cotransporter and the Kir4.1/AQP4 complex not required for the astrocytic cell swelling in the hippocampus, the molecular mechanisms underlying the activity-dependent ECS shrinkage have remained unresolved. To identify these molecular mechanisms, we employed ion-sensitive microelectrodes to measure changes in ECS, [K + ] o and [H + ] o /pH o during electrical stimulation of rat hippocampal slices. Transporters and receptors responding directly to the K + and glutamate released into the extracellular space (the K + /Cl - cotransporter, KCC, glutamate transporters and G protein-coupled receptors) did not modulate the extracellular space dynamics. The HCO3--transporting mechanism, which in astrocytes mainly constitutes the electrogenic Na + / HCO3- cotransporter 1 (NBCe1), is activated by the K + -mediated depolarization of the astrocytic membrane. Inhibition of this transporter reduced the ECS shrinkage by ∼25% without affecting the K + transients, pointing to NBCe1 as a key contributor to the stimulus-induced astrocytic cell swelling. Inhibition of the monocarboxylate cotransporters (MCT), like-wise, reduced the ECS shrinkage by ∼25% without compromising the K + transients. Isosmotic reduction of extracellular Cl - revealed a requirement for this ion in parts of the ECS shrinkage. Taken together, the stimulus-evoked astrocytic cell swelling does not appear to occur as a direct effect of the K + clearance, as earlier proposed, but partly via the pH-regulating transport mechanisms activated by the K + -induced astrocytic depolarization and the activity-dependent metabolism. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Persistent polar depletion of stratospheric ozone and emergent mechanisms of ultraviolet radiation-mediated health dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugo, Mark A; Han, Fengxiang; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2012-01-01

    Year 2011 noted the first definable ozone "hole" in the Arctic region, serving as an indicator to the continued threat of dangerous ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure caused by the deterioration of stratospheric ozone in the northern hemisphere. Despite mandates of the Montreal Protocol to phase out the production of ozone-depleting chemicals (ODCs), the relative stability of ODCs validates popular notions of persistent stratospheric ozone for several decades. Moreover, increased UVR exposure through stratospheric ozone depletion is occurring within a larger context of physiologic stress and climate change across the biosphere. In this review, we provide commentaries on stratospheric ozone depletion with relative comparisons between the well-known Antarctic ozone hole and the newly defined ozone hole in the Arctic. Compared with the Antarctic region, the increased UVR exposure in the Northern Hemisphere poses a threat to denser human populations across North America, Europe, and Asia. In this context, we discuss emerging targets of UVR exposure that can potentially offset normal biologic rhythms in terms of taxonomically conserved photoperiod-dependent seasonal signaling and entrainment of circadian clocks. Consequences of seasonal shifts during critical life history stages can alter fitness and condition, whereas circadian disruption is increasingly becoming associated as a causal link to increased carcinogenesis. We further review the significance of genomic alterations via UVR-induced modulations of phase I and II transcription factors located in skin cells, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), and the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-related factor 2 (Nrf2), with emphasis on mechanism that can lead to metabolic shifts and cancer. Although concern for adverse health consequences due to increased UVR exposure are longstanding, recent advances in biochemical research suggest that AhR and Nrf2 transcriptional regulators are likely targets for UVR-mediated

  12. VMATc: VMAT with constant gantry speed and dose rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Fei; Romeijn, H Edwin; Epelman, Marina A; Jiang, Steve B

    2015-01-01

    This article considers the treatment plan optimization problem for Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) with constant gantry speed and dose rate (VMATc). In particular, we consider the simultaneous optimization of multi-leaf collimator leaf positions and a constant gantry speed and dose rate. We propose a heuristic framework for (approximately) solving this optimization problem that is based on hierarchical decomposition. Specifically, an iterative algorithm is used to heuristically optimize dose rate and gantry speed selection, where at every iteration a leaf position optimization subproblem is solved, also heuristically, to find a high-quality plan corresponding to a given dose rate and gantry speed. We apply our framework to clinical patient cases, and compare the resulting VMATc plans to idealized IMRT, as well as full VMAT plans. Our results suggest that VMATc is capable of producing treatment plans of comparable quality to VMAT, albeit at the expense of long computation time and generally higher total monitor units. (paper)

  13. A role for host cell exocytosis in InlB-mediated internalisation of Listeria monocytogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Ngo, Hoan; Bhalla, Manmeet; Chen, Da-Yuan; Ireton, Keith

    2017-11-01

    The bacterial surface protein InlB mediates internalisation of Listeria monocytogenes into human cells through interaction with the host receptor tyrosine kinase, Met. InlB-mediated entry requires localised polymerisation of the host actin cytoskeleton. Apart from actin polymerisation, roles for other host processes in Listeria entry are unknown. Here, we demonstrate that exocytosis in the human cell promotes InlB-dependent internalisation. Using a probe consisting of VAMP3 with an exofacial green fluorescent protein tag, focal exocytosis was detected during InlB-mediated entry. Exocytosis was dependent on Met tyrosine kinase activity and the GTPase RalA. Depletion of SNARE proteins by small interfering RNA demonstrated an important role for exocytosis in Listeria internalisation. Depletion of SNARE proteins failed to affect actin filaments during internalisation, suggesting that actin polymerisation and exocytosis are separable host responses. SNARE proteins were required for delivery of the human GTPase Dynamin 2, which promotes InlB-mediated entry. Our results identify exocytosis as a novel host process exploited by Listeria for infection. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Independent mediation of unconditioned motor behavior by striatal D1 and D2 receptors in rats depleted of dopamine as neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, J P; Byrnes, E M; Johnson, B J

    1995-11-01

    The effects of systemic administration of DA receptor antagonists suggest that unconditioned motor behavior in rats depleted of DA as neonates continues to be dependent upon dopaminergic transmission, yet the specific contribution of D1 and D2 receptors to these behaviors has been altered. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether these depletion-induced receptor changes are occurring at the level of striatal DA terminals and their targets. The ability of bilateral intrastriatal injections (0.5 microliter) of DA receptor antagonists to induce motoric deficits was determined in adult rats treated with vehicle or 6-OHDA (100 micrograms, intraventricular) on postnatal day 3. Administration of the D1-like antagonist SCH 23390 (0.5-2.0 micrograms) or the D2-like antagonist clebopride (1.0-4.0 micrograms) induced dose-dependent akinesia, catalepsy, and somatosensory neglect in vehicle-treated controls. In contrast, neither antagonist produced deficits in rats depleted of forebrain DA as neonates. However, combined administration of SCH 23390 + clebopride induced similar akinesia, catalepsy, and somatosensory neglect in both controls and DA depleted animals. Animals depleted of DA were more sensitive than controls to the low doses of this combined D1 + D2 antagonism. These results demonstrate that activation of striatal DA receptors remains necessary for unconditioned motor behavior in rats depleted of DA as neonates. However, the specific contributions of D1- and D2-like receptors to these behaviors differ between intact animals and those depleted of DA as neonates. The ability of endogenous DA acting at either D1 or D2 receptors to support spontaneous motor behavior in rats depleted of DA as neonates may contribute to their relative sparing from parkinsonian deficits.

  15. Malaria-induced NLRP12/NLRP3-dependent caspase-1 activation mediates inflammation and hypersensitivity to bacterial superinfection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco A Ataide

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic paroxysm and high fever are hallmarks of malaria and are associated with high levels of pyrogenic cytokines, including IL-1β. In this report, we describe a signature for the expression of inflammasome-related genes and caspase-1 activation in malaria. Indeed, when we infected mice, Plasmodium infection was sufficient to promote MyD88-mediated caspase-1 activation, dependent on IFN-γ-priming and the expression of inflammasome components ASC, P2X7R, NLRP3 and/or NLRP12. Pro-IL-1β expression required a second stimulation with LPS and was also dependent on IFN-γ-priming and functional TNFR1. As a consequence of Plasmodium-induced caspase-1 activation, mice produced extremely high levels of IL-1β upon a second microbial stimulus, and became hypersensitive to septic shock. Therapeutic intervention with IL-1 receptor antagonist prevented bacterial-induced lethality in rodents. Similar to mice, we observed a significantly increased frequency of circulating CD14(+CD16(-Caspase-1(+ and CD14(dimCD16(+Caspase-1(+ monocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from febrile malaria patients. These cells readily produced large amounts of IL-1β after stimulation with LPS. Furthermore, we observed the presence of inflammasome complexes in monocytes from malaria patients containing either NLRP3 or NLRP12 pyroptosomes. We conclude that NLRP12/NLRP3-dependent activation of caspase-1 is likely to be a key event in mediating systemic production of IL-1β and hypersensitivity to secondary bacterial infection during malaria.

  16. SU-E-T-451: Hybrid-VMAT: A Novel Technique Combining VMAT and 3D in Planning Whole Breast Radiotherapy with a Simultaneously-Integrated Boost (WBRT+SIB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guida, K; Qamar, K; Thompson, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The RTOG 1005 trial offered a hypofractionated arm in delivering WBRT+SIB. Traditionally, treatments were planned at our institution using field-in-field (FiF) tangents with a concurrent 3D conformal boost. With the availability of VMAT, it is possible that a hybrid VMAT-3D planning technique could provide another avenue in treating WBRT+SIB. Methods: A retrospective study of nine patients previously treated using RTOG 1005 guidelines was performed to compare FiF+3D plans with the hybrid technique. A combination of static tangents and partial VMAT arcs were used in base-dose optimization. The hybrid plans were optimized to deliver 4005cGy to the breast PTVeval and 4800cGy to the lumpectomy PTVeval over 15 fractions. Plans were optimized to meet the planning goals dictated by RTOG 1005. Results: Hybrid plans yielded similar coverage of breast and lumpectomy PTVs (average D95 of 4013cGy compared to 3990cGy for conventional), while reducing the volume of high dose within the breast; the average D30 and D50 for the hybrid technique were 4517cGy and 4288cGy, compared to 4704cGy and 4377cGy for conventional planning. Hybrid plans increased conformity as well, yielding CI95% values of 1.22 and 1.54 for breast and lumpectomy PTVeval volumes; in contrast, conventional plans averaged 1.49 and 2.27, respectively. The nearby organs at risk (OARs) received more low dose with the hybrid plans due to low dose spray from the partial arcs, but all hybrid plans did meet the acceptable constraints, at a minimum, from the protocol. Treatment planning time was also reduced, as plans were inversely optimized (VMAT) rather than forward optimized. Conclusion: Hybrid-VMAT could be a solution in delivering WB+SIB, as plans yield very conformal treatment plans and maintain clinical standards in OAR sparing. For treating breast cancer patients with a simultaneously-integrated boost, Hybrid-VMAT offers superiority in dosimetric conformity and planning time as compared to FIF

  17. SU-E-T-451: Hybrid-VMAT: A Novel Technique Combining VMAT and 3D in Planning Whole Breast Radiotherapy with a Simultaneously-Integrated Boost (WBRT+SIB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guida, K; Qamar, K; Thompson, M [University of Kansas Hospital, Kansas City, MO (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The RTOG 1005 trial offered a hypofractionated arm in delivering WBRT+SIB. Traditionally, treatments were planned at our institution using field-in-field (FiF) tangents with a concurrent 3D conformal boost. With the availability of VMAT, it is possible that a hybrid VMAT-3D planning technique could provide another avenue in treating WBRT+SIB. Methods: A retrospective study of nine patients previously treated using RTOG 1005 guidelines was performed to compare FiF+3D plans with the hybrid technique. A combination of static tangents and partial VMAT arcs were used in base-dose optimization. The hybrid plans were optimized to deliver 4005cGy to the breast PTVeval and 4800cGy to the lumpectomy PTVeval over 15 fractions. Plans were optimized to meet the planning goals dictated by RTOG 1005. Results: Hybrid plans yielded similar coverage of breast and lumpectomy PTVs (average D95 of 4013cGy compared to 3990cGy for conventional), while reducing the volume of high dose within the breast; the average D30 and D50 for the hybrid technique were 4517cGy and 4288cGy, compared to 4704cGy and 4377cGy for conventional planning. Hybrid plans increased conformity as well, yielding CI95% values of 1.22 and 1.54 for breast and lumpectomy PTVeval volumes; in contrast, conventional plans averaged 1.49 and 2.27, respectively. The nearby organs at risk (OARs) received more low dose with the hybrid plans due to low dose spray from the partial arcs, but all hybrid plans did meet the acceptable constraints, at a minimum, from the protocol. Treatment planning time was also reduced, as plans were inversely optimized (VMAT) rather than forward optimized. Conclusion: Hybrid-VMAT could be a solution in delivering WB+SIB, as plans yield very conformal treatment plans and maintain clinical standards in OAR sparing. For treating breast cancer patients with a simultaneously-integrated boost, Hybrid-VMAT offers superiority in dosimetric conformity and planning time as compared to FIF

  18. Revisiting Antarctic Ozone Depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Tritscher, Ines; Müller, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Antarctic ozone depletion is known for almost three decades and it has been well settled that it is caused by chlorine catalysed ozone depletion inside the polar vortex. However, there are still some details, which need to be clarified. In particular, there is a current debate on the relative importance of liquid aerosol and crystalline NAT and ice particles for chlorine activation. Particles have a threefold impact on polar chlorine chemistry, temporary removal of HNO3 from the gas-phase (uptake), permanent removal of HNO3 from the atmosphere (denitrification), and chlorine activation through heterogeneous reactions. We have performed simulations with the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS) employing a recently developed algorithm for saturation-dependent NAT nucleation for the Antarctic winters 2011 and 2012. The simulation results are compared with different satellite observations. With the help of these simulations, we investigate the role of the different processes responsible for chlorine activation and ozone depletion. Especially the sensitivity with respect to the particle type has been investigated. If temperatures are artificially forced to only allow cold binary liquid aerosol, the simulation still shows significant chlorine activation and ozone depletion. The results of the 3-D Chemical Transport Model CLaMS simulations differ from purely Lagrangian longtime trajectory box model simulations which indicates the importance of mixing processes.

  19. Efficacy of robust optimization plan with partial-arc VMAT for photon volumetric-modulated arc therapy: A phantom study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Hideharu; Ozawa, Shuichi; Nagata, Yasushi

    2017-09-01

    This study investigated position dependence in planning target volume (PTV)-based and robust optimization plans using full-arc and partial-arc volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The gantry angles at the periphery, intermediate, and center CTV positions were 181°-180° (full-arc VMAT) and 181°-360° (partial-arc VMAT). A PTV-based optimization plan was defined by 5 mm margin expansion of the CTV to a PTV volume, on which the dose constraints were applied. The robust optimization plan consisted of a directly optimized dose to the CTV under a maximum-uncertainties setup of 5 mm. The prescription dose was normalized to the CTV D 99% (the minimum relative dose that covers 99% of the volume of the CTV) as an original plan. The isocenter was rigidly shifted at 1 mm intervals in the anterior-posterior (A-P), superior-inferior (S-I), and right-left (R-L) directions from the original position to the maximum-uncertainties setup of 5 mm in the original plan, yielding recalculated dose distributions. It was found that for the intermediate and center positions, the uncertainties in the D 99% doses to the CTV for all directions did not significantly differ when comparing the PTV-based and robust optimization plans (P > 0.05). For the periphery position, uncertainties in the D 99% doses to the CTV in the R-L direction for the robust optimization plan were found to be lower than those in the PTV-based optimization plan (P plan's efficacy using partial-arc VMAT depends on the periphery CTV position. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  20. Feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein mediates apoptosis in activated PBMC by a mechanism dependent on gp41 function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, Himanshu; Joshi, Anjali; Tompkins, Wayne A.

    2004-01-01

    Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) is a lentivirus that causes immunodeficiency in cats, which parallels HIV-1-induced immunodeficiency in humans. It has been established that HIV envelope (Env) glycoprotein mediates T cell loss via a mechanism that requires CXCR4 binding. The Env glycoprotein of FIV, similar to HIV, requires CXCR4 binding for viral entry, as well as inducing membrane fusion leading to syncytia formation. However, the role of FIV Env in T cell loss and the molecular mechanisms governing this process have not been elucidated. We studied the role of Env glycoprotein in FIV-mediated T cell apoptosis in an in vitro model. Our studies demonstrate that membrane-expressed FIV Env induces apoptosis in activated feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by a mechanism that requires CXCR4 binding, as the process was inhibited by CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100 in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, studies regarding the role of CD134, the recently identified primary receptor of FIV, suggest that binding to CD134 may not be important for induction of apoptosis in PBMC. However, inhibiting Env-mediated fusion post CXCR4 binding by FIV gp41-specific fusion inhibitor also inhibited apoptosis. Under similar conditions, a fusion-defective gp41 mutant was unable to induce apoptosis in activated PBMC. Our findings are the first report suggesting the potential of FIV Env to mediate apoptosis in bystander cells by a process that is dependent on gp41 function

  1. SU-F-T-613: Multi-Lesion Cranial SRS VMAT Plan Quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballangrud, A; Kuo, L; Happersett, L; Lim, S; Li, X; Beal, K; Yamada, Y; LoSasso, T; Mechalakos, J [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Cranial SRS VMAT plans must have steep dose gradient around each target to reduce dose to normal brain. This study reports on the correlation between gradient index (GI=V50%/V100%), target size and target dose heterogeneity index (HI=PTV Dmax/prescription dose) for multi-lesion cranial SRS VMAT plans. Methods: VMAT plans for 10 cranial cases with 3 to 6 lesions (total 39 lesions) generated in Varian Eclipse V11.0.47 with a fine-tuned AAA beam model and 0.125 cm dose grid were analyzed. One or two iso centers were used depending on the spatial distribution of lesions. Two to nine coplanar and non-coplanar arcs were used per isocenter. Conformity index (CI= V100%/VPTV), HI, and GI were determined for each lesion. Dose to critical structures were recorded. Results: Lesion size ranged from 0.05–11.00 cm3. HI ranged from 1.2–1.4, CI ranged from 1.0–2.8 and GI from 3.1–8.4. Maximum dose to brainstem, chiasm, lenses, optic nerves and eyes ranged from 120–1946 cGy, 47–463 cGy, 9–121 cGy, 14–512 cGy, and 17–294 cGy, respectively. Brain minus PTV (Brain-PTV) V7Gy was in the range 1.1–6.5%, and Brain-PTV Dmean was in the range 94–324 cGy. Conclusion: This work shows that a GI < 5 can be achieved for lesions > 0.4cc. For smaller lesions, GI increases rapidly. GI is lower when HI is increased. Based on this study, recommend HI is 1.4, and recommended GI is for volumes <0.1cc GI<9, 0.1–0.4cc GI<6, 0.4–0.1.0cc GI<5, and for volumes >1.0cc GI<4. CI is < 1.3 for all lesions except for targets < 0.1cc. Cranial SRS VMAT plans must be optimized to lower the GI to reduce the dose to normal brain tissue.

  2. CYP2S1 depletion enhances colorectal cell proliferation is associated with PGE2-mediated activation of β-catenin signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Chao; Li, Changyuan; Li, Minle; Tong, Xuemei; Hu, Xiaowen; Yang, Xuhan; Yan, Xiaomei; He, Lin; Wan, Chunling

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal epithelial cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world and its 5-year survival rate is still relatively low. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in epithelial cells lining the alimentary tract play an important role in the oxidative metabolism of a wide range of xenobiotics, including (pro-)carcinogens and endogenous compounds. Although CYP2S1, a member of CYP family, strongly expressed in many extrahepatic tissues, the role of CYP2S1 in cancer remains unclear. To investigate whether CYP2S1 involves in colorectal carcinogenesis, cell proliferation was analyzed in HCT116 cells depleted of CYP2S1 using small hairpin interfering RNA. Our data show that CYP2S1 knockdown promotes cell proliferation through increasing the level of endogenous prostaglandin E2(PGE2). PGE2, in turn, reduces phosphorylation of β-catenin and activates β-catenin signaling, which contributes to the cell proliferation. Furthermore, CYP2S1 knockdown increase tumor growth in xenograft mouse model. In brief, these results demonstrate that CYP2S1 regulates colorectal cancer growth through associated with PGE2-mediated activation of β-catenin signaling. - Highlights: • Knockdown of CYP2S1 expression improve HCT116 cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. • Elevate PGE2 production in CYP2S1 knockdown cell is associated with its proliferation. • Elevate PGE2 level in CYP2S1 knockdown cells enhance β-catenin accumulation. • β-catenin activate TCF/LEF and target gene expression thus promote cell proliferation

  3. CYP2S1 depletion enhances colorectal cell proliferation is associated with PGE2-mediated activation of β-catenin signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Chao [Bio-X Institutes, Key Laboratory for the Genetics of Developmental and Neuropsychiatric Disorders (Ministry of Education), Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); College of Life Science, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000, Anhui (China); Li, Changyuan [College of Life Science, Anhui Normal University, Wuhu 241000, Anhui (China); Li, Minle; Tong, Xuemei [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Cell Biology, Shanghai Key Laboratory for Tumor Microenvironment and Inflammation, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025 (China); Hu, Xiaowen; Yang, Xuhan [Bio-X Institutes, Key Laboratory for the Genetics of Developmental and Neuropsychiatric Disorders (Ministry of Education), Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Yan, Xiaomei [School of Life Sciences & Biotechnology, Shanghai JiaoTong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); He, Lin, E-mail: helinhelin@gmail.com [Bio-X Institutes, Key Laboratory for the Genetics of Developmental and Neuropsychiatric Disorders (Ministry of Education), Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China); Wan, Chunling, E-mail: clwan@sjtu.edu.cn [Bio-X Institutes, Key Laboratory for the Genetics of Developmental and Neuropsychiatric Disorders (Ministry of Education), Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2015-02-15

    Colorectal epithelial cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world and its 5-year survival rate is still relatively low. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in epithelial cells lining the alimentary tract play an important role in the oxidative metabolism of a wide range of xenobiotics, including (pro-)carcinogens and endogenous compounds. Although CYP2S1, a member of CYP family, strongly expressed in many extrahepatic tissues, the role of CYP2S1 in cancer remains unclear. To investigate whether CYP2S1 involves in colorectal carcinogenesis, cell proliferation was analyzed in HCT116 cells depleted of CYP2S1 using small hairpin interfering RNA. Our data show that CYP2S1 knockdown promotes cell proliferation through increasing the level of endogenous prostaglandin E2(PGE2). PGE2, in turn, reduces phosphorylation of β-catenin and activates β-catenin signaling, which contributes to the cell proliferation. Furthermore, CYP2S1 knockdown increase tumor growth in xenograft mouse model. In brief, these results demonstrate that CYP2S1 regulates colorectal cancer growth through associated with PGE2-mediated activation of β-catenin signaling. - Highlights: • Knockdown of CYP2S1 expression improve HCT116 cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. • Elevate PGE2 production in CYP2S1 knockdown cell is associated with its proliferation. • Elevate PGE2 level in CYP2S1 knockdown cells enhance β-catenin accumulation. • β-catenin activate TCF/LEF and target gene expression thus promote cell proliferation.

  4. Validation of Fully Automated VMAT Plan Generation for Library-Based Plan-of-the-Day Cervical Cancer Radiotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Sharfo, Abdul Wahab M.; Breedveld, Sebastiaan; Voet, Peter W. J.; Heijkoop, Sabrina T.; Mens, Jan-Willem M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.; Heijmen, Ben J. M.

    2016-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: To develop and validate fully automated generation of VMAT plan-libraries for plan-of-the-day adaptive radiotherapy in locally-advanced cervical cancer. Material and Methods: Our framework for fully automated treatment plan generation (Erasmus-iCycle) was adapted to create dual-arc VMAT treatment plan libraries for cervical cancer patients. For each of 34 patients, automatically generated VMAT plans (autoVMAT) were compared to manually generated, clinically delivered 9-be...

  5. Linac-based total body irradiation (TBI) with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tas, B.; Durmus, I. F.; Okumus, A.; Uzel, O. E.

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate dose distribution of Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) planning tecnique using Versa HD® lineer accelerator to deliver Total Body Irradiation (TBI) on the coach. Eight TBI patient's Treatment Planning System (TPS) were performed with dual arc VMAT for each patient. The VMAT-TBI consisted of three isocentres and three dual overlapping arcs. The prescribed dose was 12 Gy. Mean dose to lung and kidney were restricted less than 10 Gy and max. dose to lens were restricted less than 6 Gy. The plans were verified using 2D array and ion chamber. The comparison between calculation and measurement were made by γ-index analysis and absolute dose. An average total delivery time was determined 923±34 seconds and an average MU was determined 2614±228 MUs for dual arc VMAT. Mean dose to lungs was 9.7±0.2 Gy, mean dose to kidneys was 8.8±0.3 Gy, max. dose to lens was 5.5±0.3 Gy and max. dose was 14.6±0.3 Gy, HI of PTV was 1.13±0.2, mean dose to PTV was 12.6±1.5 Gy and mean γ-index pass rate was %97.1±1.9. The results show that the tecnique for TBI using VMAT on the treatment coach is feasible.

  6. Kidney in potassium depletion. I. Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase activity and (/sup 3/H)ouabain binding in MCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayashi, M.; Katz, A.I.

    1987-03-01

    The effect of potassium depletion on renal Na/sup +/K/sup +/-ATPase was studied in rats. K depletion produced a striking, time-dependent increase in Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase activity of the outer medullary collecting tubules (inner stripe; MCT/sub is/). After 3 wk on the K-free diet, when the urine was almost potassium-free, Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase activity in MCT/sub is/ was over fourfold higher than in control animals. Repletion of potassium restored enzyme activity to base line within 7 days which corresponds to the catabolic rate of the renal enzyme, suggesting the cessation of enhanced synthesis that took place during K deprivation. Changes in Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase activity and aldosterone levels during both K depletion and repletion occurred in opposite directions and were therefore independent of each other. (/sup 3/H)Ouabain binding to intact MCT/sub is/, reflecting the number of pump sites on the basolateral membrane, was similar in K-depleted and control animals; in contrast, tubule permeabilization that exposes additional pump units to the ligand, unmasked a nearly fourfold increase in (/sup 3/H)ouabain binding in K-depleted rats, comparable to the increment in Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase activity. These results show that K depletion leads to a marked increase in Na/sup +/-K/sup +/-ATPase activity of MCT/sub is/, and suggest that the new enzyme units are located at a ouabain-inaccessible site in the intact tubule, i.e., either in an intracellular compartment or at the luminal membrane, where they may be involved in potassium reabsorption.

  7. Comparative dosimetric analysis of IMRT and VMAT (RapidArc in brain, head and neck, breast and prostate malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirza Athar Ali

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT in the recent past has established itself as a gold standard for organs at risk (OAR sparing, target coverage and dose conformity. With the advent of a rotational treatment technology such as volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT, an inter-comparison is warranted to address the advantages and disadvantages of each technique. Methods: Twenty patients were selected retrospectively from our patient database. Sites included were brain, head and neck, chest wall, and prostate, with five patients for each site. For all the selected patients, both the IMRT and VMAT treatment plans were generated. Plan comparison was done in terms of OAR dose, dose homogeneity index (HI, dose conformity index (CI, target coverage, low isodose volumes, monitor units (MUs, and treatment time.Results: The VMAT showed better sparing of “parotids minus planning target volume (PTV”, spinal cord and head of femur as compared to the IMRT. The lung V40 for VMAT was lower, whereas the lung V10, contralateral lung mean dose, contralateral breast mean dose and mean body dose were lower with IMRT for chest wall cases. Both the VMAT and IMRT achieved comparable HI except for the brain site, where IMRT scored over VMAT. The CI achieved by the IMRT and VMAT were similar except for chest wall cases, whereas the VMAT achieved better dose conformity. The target coverage was comparable with both the plans. The VMAT clearly scored over IMRT in terms of average MUs (486 versus 812 respectively and average treatment time (2.54 minutes versus 5.54 minutes per treatment session. Conclusion: The VMAT (RapidArc has a potential to generate treatment plans for various anatomical sites which are comparable with the corresponding IMRT plans in terms of OAR sparing and plan quality parameters. The VMAT significantly reduces treatment time as compared to the IMRT, thus VMAT can increase the throughput of a busy radiotherapy department.

  8. Dosimetric comparison of treatment techniques IMRT and VMAT for breast cancer; Comparacion dosimetrica de las tecnicas de tratamiento IMRT y VMAT para cancer en mama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbina, G. L. [Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Maestria en Fisica Medica, Av. Tupac Amaru s/n, Rimac, Lima 25 (Peru); Garcia, B. G., E-mail: gerlup@hotmail.com [Red AUNA, Clinica Delgado, Av. Angamos Cdra. 4 esquina Gral. Borgono, Miraflores, Lima (Peru)

    2015-10-15

    In this study the dosimetric distribution was compared in the different treatment techniques such as Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in female patients with breast cancer with stage II-B and III-A, 6 cases (both calculated on VMAT and IMRT) were studied, comparison parameter that are taken into account are: compliance rate, homogeneity index, monitor units, volume dose 50 Gy (D-50%) and 5 Gy (D-5%) volume dose. Comparisons are made in primary tumor volume to optimize treatment in patients with breast cancer, with IMRT using Step, Shoot and VMAT Monte Carlo algorithm, in addition to the organs at risk; the concern to make this work is due to technological advances in radiotherapy and the application of new treatment techniques, that increase the accuracy allowing treatment dose climbing delivering a higher dose to the patient. (Author)

  9. Impact of gantry rotation time on plan quality and dosimetric verification. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) vs. intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasler, Marlies; Wirtz, Holger; Lutterbach, Johannes [Gemeinschaftspraxis fuer Strahlentherapie Singen-Friedrichshafen, Singen (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    To compare plan quality criteria and dosimetric accuracy of step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (ss-IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) using two different gantry rotation times. This retrospective planning study based on 20 patients was comprised of 10 prostate cancer (PC) and 10 head and neck (HN) cancer cases. Each plan contained two target volumes: a primary planning target volume (PTV) and a boost volume. For each patient, one ss-IMRT plan and two VMAT plans at 90 s (VMAT90) and 120 s (VMAT120) per arc were generated with the Pinnacle {sup copyright} planning system. Two arcs were provided for the PTV plans and a single arc for boost volumes. Dosimetric verification of the plans was performed using a 2D ionization chamber array placed in a full scatter phantom. VMAT reduced delivery time and monitor units for both treatment sites compared to IMRT. VMAT120 vs. VMAT90 increased delivery time and monitor units in PC plans without improving plan quality. For HN cases, VMAT120 provided comparable organs at risk sparing and better target coverage and conformity than VMAT90. In the VMAT plan verification, an average of 97.1% of the detector points passed the 3 mm, 3% {gamma} criterion, while in IMRT verification it was 98.8%. VMAT90, VMAT120, and IMRT achieved comparable treatment plans. Slower gantry movement in VMAT120 plans only improves dosimetric quality for highly complex targets.

  10. Impact of gantry rotation time on plan quality and dosimetric verification. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) vs. intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasler, Marlies; Wirtz, Holger; Lutterbach, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    To compare plan quality criteria and dosimetric accuracy of step-and-shoot intensity-modulated radiotherapy (ss-IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (VMAT) using two different gantry rotation times. This retrospective planning study based on 20 patients was comprised of 10 prostate cancer (PC) and 10 head and neck (HN) cancer cases. Each plan contained two target volumes: a primary planning target volume (PTV) and a boost volume. For each patient, one ss-IMRT plan and two VMAT plans at 90 s (VMAT90) and 120 s (VMAT120) per arc were generated with the Pinnacle copyright planning system. Two arcs were provided for the PTV plans and a single arc for boost volumes. Dosimetric verification of the plans was performed using a 2D ionization chamber array placed in a full scatter phantom. VMAT reduced delivery time and monitor units for both treatment sites compared to IMRT. VMAT120 vs. VMAT90 increased delivery time and monitor units in PC plans without improving plan quality. For HN cases, VMAT120 provided comparable organs at risk sparing and better target coverage and conformity than VMAT90. In the VMAT plan verification, an average of 97.1% of the detector points passed the 3 mm, 3% γ criterion, while in IMRT verification it was 98.8%. VMAT90, VMAT120, and IMRT achieved comparable treatment plans. Slower gantry movement in VMAT120 plans only improves dosimetric quality for highly complex targets.

  11. Time-Dependent Vascular Effects of Endocannabinoids Mediated by Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma (PPAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saoirse E. O'Sullivan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to examine whether endocannabinoids cause PPAR-mediated vascular actions. Functional vascular studies were carried out in rat aortae. Anandamide and N-arachidonoyl-dopamine (NADA, but not palmitoylethanolamide, caused significant vasorelaxation over time (2 hours. Vasorelaxation to NADA, but not anandamide, was inhibited by CB1 receptor antagonism (AM251, 1 M, and vasorelaxation to both anandamide and NADA was inhibited by PPAR antagonism (GW9662, 1 M. Pharmacological inhibition of de novo protein synthesis, nitric oxide synthase, and super oxide dismutase abolished the responses to anandamide and NADA. Removal of the endothelium partly inhibited the vasorelaxant responses to anandamide and NADA. Inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (URB597, 1 M inhibited the vasorelaxant response to NADA, but not anandamide. These data indicate that endocannabinoids cause time-dependent, PPAR-mediated vasorelaxation. Activation of PPAR in the vasculature may represent a novel mechanism by which endocannabinoids are involved in vascular regulation.

  12. Role of Flightless-I (Drosophila) homolog in the transcription activation of type I collagen gene mediated by transforming growth factor beta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Mi-Sun; Jeong, Kwang Won, E-mail: kwjeong@gachon.ac.kr

    2014-11-21

    Highlights: • FLII activates TGFβ-mediated expression of COL1A2 gene. • TGFβ induces the association of FLII with SMAD3 and BRG1 in A549 cells. • FLII is required for the recruitment of SWI/SNF complex and chromatin accessibility to COL1A2 promoter. - Abstract: Flightless-I (Drosophila) homolog (FLII) is a nuclear receptor coactivator that is known to interact with other transcriptional regulators such as the SWI/SNF complex, an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex, at the promoter or enhancer region of estrogen receptor (ER)-α target genes. However, little is known about the role of FLII during transcription initiation in the transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ)/SMAD-dependent signaling pathway. Here, we demonstrate that FLII functions as a coactivator in the expression of type I collagen gene induced by TGFβ in A549 cells. FLII activates the reporter gene driven by COL1A2 promoter in a dose-dependent manner. Co-expression of GRIP1, CARM1, or p300 did not show any synergistic activation of transcription. Furthermore, the level of COL1A2 expression correlated with the endogenous level of FLII mRNA level. Depletion of FLII resulted in a reduction of TGFβ-induced expression of COL1A2 gene. In contrast, over-expression of FLII caused an increase in the endogenous expression of COL1A2. We also showed that FLII is associated with Brahma-related gene 1 (BRG1) as well as SMAD in A549 cells. Notably, the recruitment of BRG1 to the COL1A2 promoter region was decreased in FLII-depleted A549 cells, suggesting that FLII is required for TGFβ-induced chromatin remodeling, which is carried out by the SWI/SNF complex. Furthermore, formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements (FAIRE)-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) experiments revealed that depletion of FLII caused a reduction in chromatin accessibility at the COL1A2 promoter. These results suggest that FLII plays a critical role in TGFβ/SMAD-mediated transcription of the COL1A2 gene

  13. SU-E-T-309: Dosimetric Comparison of Simultaneous Integrated Boost Treatment Plan Between Intensity Modulated Radiotherapies (IMRTs), Dual Arc Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (DA-VMAT) and Single Arc Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (SA-VMAT) for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (NPC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivakumar, R; Janardhan, N; Bhavani, P; Surendran, J; Saranganathan, B; Ibrahim, S; Jhonson, B; Madhuri, B; Anuradha, C

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the plan quality and performance of Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB) Treatment plan between Seven field (7F) and Nine field(9F) Intensity Modulated Radiotherapies and Single Arc (SA) and Dual Arc (DA) Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy( VMAT). Methods: Retrospective planning study of 16 patients treated in Elekta Synergy Platform (mlci2) by 9F-IMRT were replanned with 7F-IMRT, Single Arc VMAT and Dual Arc VMAT using CMS, Monaco Treatment Planning System (TPS) with Monte Carlo simulation. Target delineation done as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Protocols (RTOG 0225&0615). Dose Prescribed as 70Gy to Planning Target Volumes (PTV70) and 61Gy to PTV61 in 33 fraction as a SIB technique. Conformity Index(CI), Homogeneity Index(HI) were used as analysis parameter for Target Volumes as well as Mean dose and Max dose for Organ at Risk(OAR,s).Treatment Delivery Time(min), Monitor unit per fraction (MU/fraction), Patient specific quality assurance were also analysed. Results: A Poor dose coverage and Conformity index (CI) was observed in PTV70 by 7F-IMRT among other techniques. SA-VMAT achieved poor dose coverage in PTV61. No statistical significance difference observed in OAR,s except Spinal cord (P= 0.03) and Right optic nerve (P=0.03). DA-VMAT achieved superior target coverage, higher CI (P =0.02) and Better HI (P=0.03) for PTV70 other techniques (7F-IMRT/9F-IMRT/SA-VMAT). A better dose spare for Parotid glands and spinal cord were seen in DA-VMAT. The average treatment delivery time were 5.82mins, 6.72mins, 3.24mins, 4.3mins for 7F-IMRT, 9F-IMRT, SA-VMAT and DA-VMAT respectively. Significance difference Observed in MU/fr (P <0.001) and Patient quality assurance pass rate were >95% (Gamma analysis (Γ3mm, 3%). Conclusion: DA-VAMT showed better target dose coverage and achieved better or equal performance in sparing OARs among other techniques. SA-VMAT offered least Treatment Time than other techniques but achieved poor target coverage. DA-VMAT offered

  14. SU-E-T-309: Dosimetric Comparison of Simultaneous Integrated Boost Treatment Plan Between Intensity Modulated Radiotherapies (IMRTs), Dual Arc Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (DA-VMAT) and Single Arc Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (SA-VMAT) for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (NPC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivakumar, R; Janardhan, N; Bhavani, P; Surendran, J; Saranganathan, B; Ibrahim, S; Jhonson, B; Madhuri, B [Omega Hospitals, Hyderabad, Telangana (India); Anuradha, C [Vit University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare the plan quality and performance of Simultaneous Integrated Boost (SIB) Treatment plan between Seven field (7F) and Nine field(9F) Intensity Modulated Radiotherapies and Single Arc (SA) and Dual Arc (DA) Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy( VMAT). Methods: Retrospective planning study of 16 patients treated in Elekta Synergy Platform (mlci2) by 9F-IMRT were replanned with 7F-IMRT, Single Arc VMAT and Dual Arc VMAT using CMS, Monaco Treatment Planning System (TPS) with Monte Carlo simulation. Target delineation done as per Radiation Therapy Oncology Protocols (RTOG 0225&0615). Dose Prescribed as 70Gy to Planning Target Volumes (PTV70) and 61Gy to PTV61 in 33 fraction as a SIB technique. Conformity Index(CI), Homogeneity Index(HI) were used as analysis parameter for Target Volumes as well as Mean dose and Max dose for Organ at Risk(OAR,s).Treatment Delivery Time(min), Monitor unit per fraction (MU/fraction), Patient specific quality assurance were also analysed. Results: A Poor dose coverage and Conformity index (CI) was observed in PTV70 by 7F-IMRT among other techniques. SA-VMAT achieved poor dose coverage in PTV61. No statistical significance difference observed in OAR,s except Spinal cord (P= 0.03) and Right optic nerve (P=0.03). DA-VMAT achieved superior target coverage, higher CI (P =0.02) and Better HI (P=0.03) for PTV70 other techniques (7F-IMRT/9F-IMRT/SA-VMAT). A better dose spare for Parotid glands and spinal cord were seen in DA-VMAT. The average treatment delivery time were 5.82mins, 6.72mins, 3.24mins, 4.3mins for 7F-IMRT, 9F-IMRT, SA-VMAT and DA-VMAT respectively. Significance difference Observed in MU/fr (P <0.001) and Patient quality assurance pass rate were >95% (Gamma analysis (Γ3mm, 3%). Conclusion: DA-VAMT showed better target dose coverage and achieved better or equal performance in sparing OARs among other techniques. SA-VMAT offered least Treatment Time than other techniques but achieved poor target coverage. DA-VMAT offered

  15. Textural feature calculated from segmental fluences as a modulation index for VMAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So-Yeon; Park, Jong Min; Kim, Jung-In; Kim, Hyoungnyoun; Kim, Il Han; Ye, Sung-Joon

    2015-12-01

    Textural features calculated from various segmental fluences of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plans were optimized to enhance its performance to predict plan delivery accuracy. Twenty prostate and twenty head and neck VMAT plans were selected retrospectively. Fluences were generated for each VMAT plan by summations of segments at sequential groups of control points. The numbers of summed segments were 5, 10, 20, 45, 90, 178 and 356. For each fluence, we investigated 6 textural features: angular second moment, inverse difference moment, contrast, variance, correlation and entropy (particular displacement distances, d = 1, 5 and 10). Spearman's rank correlation coefficients (rs) were calculated between each textural feature and several different measures of VMAT delivery accuracy. The values of rs of contrast (d = 10) with 10 segments to both global and local gamma passing rates with 2%/2 mm were 0.666 (p <0.001) and 0.573 (p <0.001), respectively. It showed rs values of -0.895 (p <0.001) and 0.727 (p <0.001) to multi-leaf collimator positional errors and gantry angle errors during delivery, respectively. The number of statistically significant rs values (p <0.05) to the changes in dose-volumetric parameters during delivery was 14 among a total of 35 tested parameters. Contrast (d = 10) with 10 segments showed higher correlations to the VMAT delivery accuracy than did the conventional modulation indices. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Antigen-specific and nonspecific mediators of T cell/B cell cooperation. III. Characterization of the nonspecific mediator(s) from different sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harwell, L; Kappler, J W; Marrack, P

    1976-05-01

    T cell-containing lymphoid populations produce a nonantigen-specific mediator(s) (NSM) which can replace T cell helper function in vitro in the response of B cells to sheep red blood cells (SRBC), but not to the hapten-protein conjugate, trinitrophenyl-keyhole limpet hemocyanin, (TNP-KLH). NSM produced under three conditions: 1) stimulation of KLH-primed cells with KLH; 2) allogeneic stimulation of normal spleen cells; and 3) stimulation of normal spleen cells with Con A (but not PHA) are indistinguishable on the basis of their biologic activity and m.w., estimated as 30 to 40,000 daltons by G-200 chromatography. Production of NSM is dependent on the presence of T cells. The action of NSM on B cells responding to SRBC in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol is unaffected by severe macrophage depletion. Extensive absorption of NSM with SRBC failed to remove its activity, confirming its nonantigen-specific nature.

  17. ARTD1/PARP1 Negatively Regulates Glycolysis by Inhibiting Hexokinase 1 Independent of NAD+ Depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Fouquerel

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available ARTD1 (PARP1 is a key enzyme involved in DNA repair through the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose (PAR in response to strand breaks, and it plays an important role in cell death following excessive DNA damage. ARTD1-induced cell death is associated with NAD+ depletion and ATP loss; however, the molecular mechanism of ARTD1-mediated energy collapse remains elusive. Using real-time metabolic measurements, we compared the effects of ARTD1 activation and direct NAD+ depletion. We found that ARTD1-mediated PAR synthesis, but not direct NAD+ depletion, resulted in a block to glycolysis and ATP loss. We then established a proteomics-based PAR interactome after DNA damage and identified hexokinase 1 (HK1 as a PAR binding protein. HK1 activity is suppressed following nuclear ARTD1 activation and binding by PAR. These findings help explain how prolonged activation of ARTD1 triggers energy collapse and cell death, revealing insight into the importance of nucleus-to-mitochondria communication via ARTD1 activation.

  18. Haematopoietic depletion in vaccine-induced neonatal pancytopenia depends on both the titre and specificity of alloantibody and levels of MHC I expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Charlotte R; MacHugh, Niall D; Connelley, Timothy K; Degnan, Kathryn; Morrison, W Ivan

    2015-07-09

    Bovine Neonatal Pancytopenia (BNP) is a disease of calves characterised by haematopoietic depletion, mediated by ingestion of alloantibodies in colostrum. It has been linked epidemiologically to vaccination of the dams of affected calves with a particular vaccine (Pregsure) containing a novel adjuvant. Evidence suggests that BNP-alloantibodies are directed against MHC I molecules, induced by contaminant bovine cellular material from Madin-Darby Bovine Kidney (MDBK) cells used in the vaccine's production. We aimed to investigate the specificity of BNP-alloantibody for bovine MHC I alleles, particularly those expressed by MDBK cells, and whether depletion of particular cell types is due to differential MHC I expression levels. A complement-mediated cytotoxicity assay was used to assess functional serum alloantibody titres in BNP-dams, Pregsure-vaccinated dams with healthy calves, cows vaccinated with an alternative product and unvaccinated controls. Alloantibody specificity was investigated using transfected mouse lines expressing the individual MHC I alleles identified from MDBK cells and MHC I-defined bovine leukocyte lines. All BNP-dams and 50% of Pregsure-vaccinated cows were shown to have MDBK-MHC I specific alloantibodies, which cross-reacted to varying degrees with other MHC I genotypes. MHC I expression levels on different blood cell types, assessed by flow cytometry, were found to correlate with levels of alloantibody-mediated damage in vitro and in vivo. Alloantibody-killed bone marrow cells were shown to express higher levels of MHC I than undamaged cells. The results provide evidence that MHC I-specific alloantibodies play a dominant role in the pathogenesis of BNP. Haematopoietic depletion was shown to be dependent on the titre and specificity of alloantibody produced by individual cows and the density of surface MHC I expression by different cell types. Collectively, the results support the hypothesis that MHC I molecules originating from MDBK cells

  19. Syk-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of 3BP2 is required for optimal FcRγ-mediated phagocytosis and chemokine expression in U937 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chihara, Kazuyasu; Kato, Yuji; Yoshiki, Hatsumi; Takeuchi, Kenji; Fujieda, Shigeharu; Sada, Kiyonao

    2017-09-13

    The adaptor protein c-Abl SH3 domain binding protein-2 (3BP2) is tyrosine phosphorylated by Syk in response to cross-linking of antigen receptors, which in turn activates various immune responses. Recently, a study using the mouse model of cherubism, a dominant inherited disorder caused by mutations in the gene encoding 3BP2, showed that 3BP2 is involved in the regulation of phagocytosis mediated by Fc receptor for IgG (FcγR) in macrophages. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying 3BP2-mediated regulation of phagocytosis and the physiological relevance of 3BP2 tyrosine phosphorylation remains elusive. In this study, we established various gene knockout U937 cell lines using the CRISPR/Cas9 system and found that 3BP2 is rapidly tyrosine phosphorylated by Syk in response to cross-linking of FcγRI. Depletion of 3BP2 caused significant reduction in the Fc receptor γ chain (FcRγ)-mediated phagocytosis in addition to the FcγRI-mediated induction of chemokine mRNA for IL-8, CCL3L3 and CCL4L2. Syk-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of 3BP2 was required for overcoming these defects. Finally, we found that the PH and SH2 domains play important roles on FcγRI-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation of 3BP2 in HL-60 cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Syk-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of 3BP2 is required for optimal FcRγ-mediated phagocytosis and chemokine expression.

  20. Apoptosis and T cell depletion during feline infectious peritonitis

    OpenAIRE

    Horzinek, M.C.; Haagmans, B.L.; Egberink, H.F.

    1996-01-01

    Cats that have succumbed to feline infectious peritonitis, an immune- mediated disease caused by variants of feline coronaviruses, show apoptosis and T-cell depletion in their lymphoid organs. The ascitic fluid that develops in the course of the condition causes apoptosis in vitro but only in activated T cells. Since feline infectious peritonitis virus does not infect T cells, and viral proteins did not inhibit T-cell proliferation, we postulate that soluble mediators released during the infe...

  1. Implementation of dosimetric quality control on IMRT and VMAT treatments in radiotherapy using diodes; Implementacion de control de calidad dosimetrico en tratamientos de IMRT y VMAT en radioterapia usando diodos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzales, A.; Garcia, B.; Ramirez, J.; Marquina, J., E-mail: andres.gonzales@aliada.com.pe [ALIADA, Oncologia Integral, Av. Jose Galvez Barrenechea 1044, San Isidro, Lima 27 (Peru)

    2014-08-15

    To implement quality control of IMRT and VMAT treatments Rapid Arc radiotherapy using diode array. Were tested 90 patients with IMRT and VMAT Rapid Arc, comparing the planned dose to the dose administered, used the Map-Check-2 and Arc-Check of Sun Nuclear, they using the gamma factor for calculating and using comparison parameters 3% / 3m m. The statistic shows that the quality controls of the 90 patients analyzed, presented a percentage of diodes that pass the test between 96,7% and 100,0% of the irradiated diodes. Implemented in Clinical ALIADA Oncologia Integral, the method for quality control of IMRT and VMAT treatments Rapid Arc radiotherapy using diode array. (Author)

  2. Plasma depletion layer: its dependence on solar wind conditions and the Earth dipole tilt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. L. Wang

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The plasma depletion layer (PDL is a layer on the sunward side of the magnetopause with lower plasma density and higher magnetic field compared to their corresponding upstream magnetosheath values. It is believed that the PDL is controlled jointly by conditions in the solar wind plasma and the (IMF. In this study, we extend our former model PDL studies by systematically investigating the dependence of the PDL and the slow mode front on solar wind conditions using global MHD simulations. We first point out the difficulties for the depletion factor method and the plasma β method for defining the outer boundary of the plasma depletion layer. We propose to use the N/B ratio to define the PDL outer boundary, which can give the best description of flux tube depletion. We find a strong dependence of the magnetosheath environment on the solar wind magnetosonic Mach number. A difference between the stagnation point and the magnetopause derived from the open-closed magnetic field boundary is found. We also find a strong and complex dependence of the PDL and the slow mode front on the IMF Bz. A density structure right inside the subsolar magnetopause for higher IMF Bz;might be responsible for some of this dependence. Both the IMF tilt and clock angles are found to have little influence on the magnetosheath and the PDL structures. However, the IMF geometry has a much stronger influence on the slow mode fronts in the magnetosheath. Finally, the Earth dipole tilt is found to play a minor role for the magnetosheath geometry and the PDL along the Sun-Earth line. A complex slow mode front geometry is found for cases with different Earth dipole tilts. Comparisons between our results with those from some former studies are conducted, and consistencies and inconsistencies are found.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetosheath, solar wind-magnetosphere interactions – Space plasma physics (numerical

  3. Multi-GPU implementation of a VMAT treatment plan optimization algorithm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Zhen; Folkerts, Michael; Tan, Jun; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.; Peng, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) optimization is a computationally challenging problem due to its large data size, high degrees of freedom, and many hardware constraints. High-performance graphics processing units (GPUs) have been used to speed up the computations. However, GPU’s relatively small memory size cannot handle cases with a large dose-deposition coefficient (DDC) matrix in cases of, e.g., those with a large target size, multiple targets, multiple arcs, and/or small beamlet size. The main purpose of this paper is to report an implementation of a column-generation-based VMAT algorithm, previously developed in the authors’ group, on a multi-GPU platform to solve the memory limitation problem. While the column-generation-based VMAT algorithm has been previously developed, the GPU implementation details have not been reported. Hence, another purpose is to present detailed techniques employed for GPU implementation. The authors also would like to utilize this particular problem as an example problem to study the feasibility of using a multi-GPU platform to solve large-scale problems in medical physics. Methods: The column-generation approach generates VMAT apertures sequentially by solving a pricing problem (PP) and a master problem (MP) iteratively. In the authors’ method, the sparse DDC matrix is first stored on a CPU in coordinate list format (COO). On the GPU side, this matrix is split into four submatrices according to beam angles, which are stored on four GPUs in compressed sparse row format. Computation of beamlet price, the first step in PP, is accomplished using multi-GPUs. A fast inter-GPU data transfer scheme is accomplished using peer-to-peer access. The remaining steps of PP and MP problems are implemented on CPU or a single GPU due to their modest problem scale and computational loads. Barzilai and Borwein algorithm with a subspace step scheme is adopted here to solve the MP problem. A head and neck (H and N) cancer case is

  4. Multi-GPU implementation of a VMAT treatment plan optimization algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Zhen, E-mail: Zhen.Tian@UTSouthwestern.edu, E-mail: Xun.Jia@UTSouthwestern.edu, E-mail: Steve.Jiang@UTSouthwestern.edu; Folkerts, Michael; Tan, Jun; Jia, Xun, E-mail: Zhen.Tian@UTSouthwestern.edu, E-mail: Xun.Jia@UTSouthwestern.edu, E-mail: Steve.Jiang@UTSouthwestern.edu; Jiang, Steve B., E-mail: Zhen.Tian@UTSouthwestern.edu, E-mail: Xun.Jia@UTSouthwestern.edu, E-mail: Steve.Jiang@UTSouthwestern.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390 (United States); Peng, Fei [Computer Science Department, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) optimization is a computationally challenging problem due to its large data size, high degrees of freedom, and many hardware constraints. High-performance graphics processing units (GPUs) have been used to speed up the computations. However, GPU’s relatively small memory size cannot handle cases with a large dose-deposition coefficient (DDC) matrix in cases of, e.g., those with a large target size, multiple targets, multiple arcs, and/or small beamlet size. The main purpose of this paper is to report an implementation of a column-generation-based VMAT algorithm, previously developed in the authors’ group, on a multi-GPU platform to solve the memory limitation problem. While the column-generation-based VMAT algorithm has been previously developed, the GPU implementation details have not been reported. Hence, another purpose is to present detailed techniques employed for GPU implementation. The authors also would like to utilize this particular problem as an example problem to study the feasibility of using a multi-GPU platform to solve large-scale problems in medical physics. Methods: The column-generation approach generates VMAT apertures sequentially by solving a pricing problem (PP) and a master problem (MP) iteratively. In the authors’ method, the sparse DDC matrix is first stored on a CPU in coordinate list format (COO). On the GPU side, this matrix is split into four submatrices according to beam angles, which are stored on four GPUs in compressed sparse row format. Computation of beamlet price, the first step in PP, is accomplished using multi-GPUs. A fast inter-GPU data transfer scheme is accomplished using peer-to-peer access. The remaining steps of PP and MP problems are implemented on CPU or a single GPU due to their modest problem scale and computational loads. Barzilai and Borwein algorithm with a subspace step scheme is adopted here to solve the MP problem. A head and neck (H and N) cancer case is

  5. Interleukin-10 overexpression promotes Fas-ligand-dependent chronic macrophage-mediated demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dru S Dace

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Demyelinating polyneuropathy is a debilitating, poorly understood disease that can exist in acute (Guillain-Barré syndrome or chronic forms. Interleukin-10 (IL-10, although traditionally considered an anti-inflammatory cytokine, has also been implicated in promoting abnormal angiogenesis in the eye and in the pathobiology of autoimmune diseases such as lupus and encephalomyelitis. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Overexpression of IL-10 in a transgenic mouse model leads to macrophage-mediated demyelinating polyneuropathy. IL-10 upregulates ICAM-1 within neural tissues, promoting massive macrophage influx, inflammation-induced demyelination, and subsequent loss of neural tissue resulting in muscle weakness and paralysis. The primary insult is to perineural myelin followed by secondary axonal loss. Infiltrating macrophages within the peripheral nerves demonstrate a highly pro-inflammatory signature. Macrophages are central players in the pathophysiology, as in vivo depletion of macrophages using clodronate liposomes reverses the phenotype, including progressive nerve loss and paralysis. Macrophage-mediate demyelination is dependent on Fas-ligand (FasL-mediated Schwann cell death. SIGNIFICANCE: These findings mimic the human disease chronic idiopathic demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP and may also promote further understanding of the pathobiology of related conditions such as acute idiopathic demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP or Guillain-Barré syndrome.

  6. Fibroblast growth factor receptor mediates fibroblast-dependent growth in EMMPRIN-depleted head and neck cancer tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyong; Hartman, Yolanda E; Warram, Jason M; Knowles, Joseph A; Sweeny, Larissa; Zhou, Tong; Rosenthal, Eben L

    2011-08-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumors (HNSCC) contain a dense fibrous stroma which is known to promote tumor growth, although the mechanism of stroma-mediated growth remains unclear. As dysplastic mucosal epithelium progresses to cancer, there is incremental overexpression of extracellular matrix metalloprotease inducer (EMMPRIN) which is associated with tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we present evidence that gain of EMMPRIN expression allows tumor growth to be less dependent on fibroblasts by modulating fibroblast growth factor receptor-2 (FGFR2) signaling. We show that silencing EMMPRIN in FaDu and SCC-5 HNSCC cell lines inhibits cell growth, but when EMMPRIN-silenced tumor cells were cocultured with fibroblasts or inoculated with fibroblasts into severe combined immunodeficient mice, the growth inhibition by silencing EMMPRIN was blunted by the presence of fibroblasts. Coculture experiments showed fibroblast-dependent tumor cell growth occurred via a paracrine signaling. Analysis of tumor gene expression revealed expression of FGFR2 was inversely related to EMMPRIN expression. To determine the role of FGFR2 signaling in EMMPRIN-silenced tumor cells, ligands and inhibitors of FGFR2 were assessed. Both FGF1 and FGF2 enhanced tumor growth in EMMPRIN-silenced cells compared with control vector-transfected cells, whereas inhibition of FGFR2 with blocking antibody or with a synthetic inhibitor (PD173074) inhibited tumor cell growth in fibroblast coculture, suggesting the importance of FGFR2 signaling in fibroblast-mediated tumor growth. Analysis of xenografted tumors revealed that EMMPRIN-silenced tumors had a larger stromal compartment compared with control. Taken together, these results suggest that EMMPRIN acquired during tumor progression promotes fibroblast-independent tumor growth.

  7. Fibroblast growth factor receptor mediates fibroblast-dependent growth in EMMPRIN depleted head and neck cancer tumor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiyong; Hartman, Yolanda E.; Warram, Jason M.; Knowles, Joseph A.; Sweeny, Larrisa; Zhou, Tong; Rosenthal, Eben L.

    2011-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma tumors (HNSCC) contain a dense fibrous stroma which is known to promote tumor growth, although the mechanism of stroma mediated growth remains unclear. As dysplastic mucosal epithelium progresses to cancer there is incremental overexpression of extracellular matrix metalloprotease inducer (EMMPRIN) which is associated with tumor growth and metastasis. Here we present evidence that gain of EMMPRIN expression allows tumor growth to be less dependent on fibroblasts by modulating fibroblast growth factor receptor-2 (FGFR2) signaling. We show that silencing EMMPRIN in FaDu and SCC-5 HNSCC cell lines inhibits cell growth, but when EMMPRIN-silenced tumor cells were co-cultured with fibroblasts or inoculated with fibroblasts into SCID mice, the growth inhibition by silencing EMMPRIN was blunted by the presence of fibroblasts. Co-culture experiments demonstrated fibroblast-dependent tumor cell growth occurred via a paracrine signaling. Analysis of tumor gene expression revealed expression of FGFR2 was inversely related to EMMPRIN expression. To determine the role of FGFR2 signaling in EMMPRIN silenced tumor cells, ligands and inhibitors of FGFR2 were assessed. Both FGF1 and FGF2 enhanced tumor growth in EMMPRIN silenced cells compared to control vector transfected cells, while inhibition of FGFR2 with blocking antibody or with a synthetic inhibitor (PD173074) inhibited tumor cell growth in fibroblast co-culture, suggesting the importance of FGFR2 signaling in fibroblast mediated tumor growth. Analysis of xenografted tumors revealed EMMPRIN silenced tumors had a larger stromal compartment compared to control. Taken together, these results suggest that EMMPRIN acquired during tumor progression promotes fibroblast independent tumor growth. PMID:21665938

  8. Dosimetric comparison of treatment techniques IMRT and VMAT for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbina, G. L.; Garcia, B. G.

    2015-10-01

    In this study the dosimetric distribution was compared in the different treatment techniques such as Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) in female patients with breast cancer with stage II-B and III-A, 6 cases (both calculated on VMAT and IMRT) were studied, comparison parameter that are taken into account are: compliance rate, homogeneity index, monitor units, volume dose 50 Gy (D-50%) and 5 Gy (D-5%) volume dose. Comparisons are made in primary tumor volume to optimize treatment in patients with breast cancer, with IMRT using Step, Shoot and VMAT Monte Carlo algorithm, in addition to the organs at risk; the concern to make this work is due to technological advances in radiotherapy and the application of new treatment techniques, that increase the accuracy allowing treatment dose climbing delivering a higher dose to the patient. (Author)

  9. SU-F-T-396: Impact of Shoulder Deformation for Head and Neck VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, Y; Tachibana, H [National Cancer Center, Kashiwa, Chiba (Japan)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: For head and neck VMAT (HN-VMAT), variations of position and deformation of patient’s shoulders is a concern to affect inaccuracy of dose distribution. It has been reported that the setup error of the shoulders was variable from 5 mm – 1 cm. The beams of the HN-VMAT pass through the shoulders. We assessed the impact of shoulder deformation to dose distribution for HN-VMAT. Methods: One HN-VMAT plan was generated using a patient’s CT. The patient’s CT was deformed using ImSimQA (Oncology Systems Limited, Shrewsbury, Shropshire, UK) to generate several patterns of the shoulders’ deformations when the right and left humeral heads were shifted with 3, 6, and 15 mm in the superior and inferior directions (SI), 3, 5, and 15 mm in the anterior and posterior directions (AP), and 5 and 15 mm in the right or left direction (LR). DVH comparison was performed in the different deformation patterns. The dosimetric parameters of D95% for CTV70Gy, CTV60Gy and CTV54Gy and dmax for Spinal cord were also measured. Gamma index evaluation (Criteria: 3%/2mm) was performed to exhibit clinically tolerable area in the comparison. Results: DVH comparison shows similar for all structures. As the comparison for the dosimetric parameters, the variations of D95% in the LR and AP were within 1%. There were larger variations in the SI than those in the other directions, however were within 1.5%. In gamma index evaluation, the small spots with higher gamma index values were appeared when the shift was 6 mm, however the pass ratio was 99.13%. Conclusion: HN-VMAT should be robust for shoulder deformation and geometric accuracy within 6 mm from patient’s setup and image-guided radiotherapy may be clinically acceptable for target dose coverage or normal tissue dose sparing.

  10. SU-E-T-522: A Multi-Isocenter VMAT Technique for Cranio-Spinal Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aristophanous, M; Chi, P; Tung, S; Pinnix, C; Dabaja, B [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Develop a matching VMAT field technique and investigate planning feasibility for treating the entire central nervous system (CNS) using Cranio-Spinal Irradiation (CSI) . Methods: Two patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presented with CNS involvement, received CSI, and were included in this study. The patients were treated with the traditional CSI technique: prone position, opposing lateral brain fields, two posterior fields (upper and lower spine), and 5mm junction shifts to improve dose uniformity. The patients were retrospectively re-planned using volumetric arc therapy (VMAT). The spine and brain were contoured to create the clinical target volume (CTV) as well as normal tissues including kidneys, lung and heart for optimization. Three isocenters were used for planning: brain, upper and lower spine. The beams were allowed to overlap by approximately 10cm. Entire 360 degree rotations were used for the brain fields and posterior 120 degree arcs were used for the spine fields. The dosimetric coverage of the target between the VMAT and traditional plans was compared, as well as the dose to normal tissues. Results: Both VMAT plans achieved improved dose uniformity in the CTV (standard deviation < 2%), and reduced hot spots (<110%). Dose to the heart was reduced, with the V10 being 12.7% and 28.2%, compared to 44.6% and 50.2%, respectively, for the traditional plan. Dose to the total lung V5 increased for the VMAT plans for both patients (21.6% and 27.8% compared to 12% and 13% respectively). The results for the kidneys were mixed with the mean dose increasing for one patient and decreasing for the other . Conclusion: The efficacy of planning CSI treatments using a matching VMAT technique was demonstrated. The developed technique has the potential to improve dose uniformity to the target while at the same time reduce the risk of under or over dosing the spine.

  11. Plan averaging for multicriteria navigation of sliding window IMRT and VMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craft, David; Papp, Dávid; Unkelbach, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a method for combining sliding window plans [intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)] for use in treatment plan averaging, which is needed for Pareto surface navigation based multicriteria treatment planning. Methods: The authors show that by taking an appropriately defined average of leaf trajectories of sliding window plans, the authors obtain a sliding window plan whose fluence map is the exact average of the fluence maps corresponding to the initial plans. In the case of static-beam IMRT, this also implies that the dose distribution of the averaged plan is the exact dosimetric average of the initial plans. In VMAT delivery, the dose distribution of the averaged plan is a close approximation of the dosimetric average of the initial plans. Results: The authors demonstrate the method on three Pareto optimal VMAT plans created for a demanding paraspinal case, where the tumor surrounds the spinal cord. The results show that the leaf averaged plans yield dose distributions that approximate the dosimetric averages of the precomputed Pareto optimal plans well. Conclusions: The proposed method enables the navigation of deliverable Pareto optimal plans directly, i.e., interactive multicriteria exploration of deliverable sliding window IMRT and VMAT plans, eliminating the need for a sequencing step after navigation and hence the dose degradation that is caused by such a sequencing step

  12. Plan averaging for multicriteria navigation of sliding window IMRT and VMAT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craft, David; Papp, Dávid; Unkelbach, Jan

    2014-02-01

    To describe a method for combining sliding window plans [intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)] for use in treatment plan averaging, which is needed for Pareto surface navigation based multicriteria treatment planning. The authors show that by taking an appropriately defined average of leaf trajectories of sliding window plans, the authors obtain a sliding window plan whose fluence map is the exact average of the fluence maps corresponding to the initial plans. In the case of static-beam IMRT, this also implies that the dose distribution of the averaged plan is the exact dosimetric average of the initial plans. In VMAT delivery, the dose distribution of the averaged plan is a close approximation of the dosimetric average of the initial plans. The authors demonstrate the method on three Pareto optimal VMAT plans created for a demanding paraspinal case, where the tumor surrounds the spinal cord. The results show that the leaf averaged plans yield dose distributions that approximate the dosimetric averages of the precomputed Pareto optimal plans well. The proposed method enables the navigation of deliverable Pareto optimal plans directly, i.e., interactive multicriteria exploration of deliverable sliding window IMRT and VMAT plans, eliminating the need for a sequencing step after navigation and hence the dose degradation that is caused by such a sequencing step.

  13. Plan averaging for multicriteria navigation of sliding window IMRT and VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craft, David, E-mail: dcraft@partners.org; Papp, Dávid; Unkelbach, Jan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To describe a method for combining sliding window plans [intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)] for use in treatment plan averaging, which is needed for Pareto surface navigation based multicriteria treatment planning. Methods: The authors show that by taking an appropriately defined average of leaf trajectories of sliding window plans, the authors obtain a sliding window plan whose fluence map is the exact average of the fluence maps corresponding to the initial plans. In the case of static-beam IMRT, this also implies that the dose distribution of the averaged plan is the exact dosimetric average of the initial plans. In VMAT delivery, the dose distribution of the averaged plan is a close approximation of the dosimetric average of the initial plans. Results: The authors demonstrate the method on three Pareto optimal VMAT plans created for a demanding paraspinal case, where the tumor surrounds the spinal cord. The results show that the leaf averaged plans yield dose distributions that approximate the dosimetric averages of the precomputed Pareto optimal plans well. Conclusions: The proposed method enables the navigation of deliverable Pareto optimal plans directly, i.e., interactive multicriteria exploration of deliverable sliding window IMRT and VMAT plans, eliminating the need for a sequencing step after navigation and hence the dose degradation that is caused by such a sequencing step.

  14. Development of a VMAT quality assurance program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Ricardo Goulart da

    2013-01-01

    Modern radiation therapy keeps evolving and the technological changes include new imaging modalities, new patient immobilization devices and new treatment delivery systems. These advances have made it possible to reduce the dose to normal tissue structures and consequently minimize the risk of toxicity and morbidity, while allowing for dose escalation to the tumor volumes, potentially leading to improved locoregional control. Traditional IMRT techniques offer all of these features but the treatment session time is usually long, mainly for the head and neck cases. Currently, the VMAT technique is a reality in reference centers around the world. This technology has improved delivery efficiency over IMRT, decreasing the treatment application time, as this modality introduces extra degrees of freedom in the optimization process. The modulation of the radiation beams is achieved by simultaneous variation of dynamic parameters such as dose rate, gantry speed and leaves speed. The high level of complexity associated to the new treatment trends, inevitably, requires more accuracy and more rigorous quality assurance programs. The commissioning methods reported for the Varian RapidArc system were extended to an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator, using custom files built in the iComCAT software. Specific tests for the machine quality assurance are presented and also the dosimetric validation process applied to the Monaco treatment planning system. The MLC parameters, modeled by the Monte Carlo algorithm, were analyzed and the TG 119 tests were adapted for VMAT planning. In the end, a specific program developed for the VMAT technology for Elekta accelerators is presented. (author)

  15. In Premature Newborns Intraventricular Hemorrhage Causes Cerebral Vasospasm and Associated Neurodisability via Heme-Induced Inflammasome-Mediated Interleukin-1 Production and Nitric Oxide Depletion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Eisenhut

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundIntraventricular hemorrhage (IVH occurs in 60–70% of neonates weighing 500–750 g and 10–20% of those weighing 1,000–1,500 g. All forms of IVH have been associated with neurocognitive deficits. Both subarachnoid and IVHs have been associated with delayed vasospasm leading to neurological deficits. Pathways linking hemoglobin release from blood clots to vasospasm include heme-induced activation of inflammasomes releasing interleukin-1 (IL-1 that can cause calcium dependent and independent vasospasm. Free hemoglobin is a potent scavenger of nitric oxide (NO. Depletion of NO, a potent endogenous vasodilator, has been associated with features of vasospasm.HypothesisIn premature newborns, IVH causes cerebral vasospasm and associated neurodisability via heme-induced increased inflammasome-mediated IL-1 production and NO depletion.Confirmation of hypothesis and implicationsThis hypothesis could be confirmed in the IVH animal model with visualization of any associated vasospasm by angiography and in newborns with IVH by transcranial Doppler ultrasonography and correlation with cerebrospinal fluid IL-1 and NO metabolite levels. Confirmation of the role of heme in activation of inflammasomes causing IL-1 production and NO binding could be achieved by measuring the effect of heme scavenging interventions on IL-1 levels and levels of NO metabolites. In addition to removal of the accumulated blood of an IVH by drainage, irrigation, and fibrinolytic therapy intrathecal application of vasodilators and heme scavenging agents like haptoglobin and haemopexin and systemic treatment with inhibitors of inflammasomes like telmisartan could be used to prevent and treat cerebral vasospasm, and thus reduce the risk of associated brain injury in premature neonates.

  16. Node-positive left-sided breast cancer. Does VMAT improve treatment plan quality with respect to IMRT?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasler, M.; Bartelt, S.; Lutterbach, J. [Lake Constance Radiation Oncology Center Singen, Friedrichshafen (Germany); Georg, D. [Medical University Vienna/AKH Wien, Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiooncology; Medical University Vienna (Austria). Christian Doppler Laboratory for Medical Radiation Research for Radiation Oncology

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: The aim of the present work was to explore plan quality and dosimetric accuracy of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for lymph node-positive left-sided breast cancer. Methods: VMAT and IMRT plans were generated with the Pinnacle{sup 3} V9.0 treatment planning system for 10 lymph node-positive left-sided breast cancer patients. VMAT plans were created using a single arc and IMRT was performed with 4 beams using 6, 10, and 15 MV photon energy, respectively. Plans were evaluated both manually and automatically using ArtiView trademark. Dosimetric plan verification was performed with a 2D ionization chamber array placed in a full scatter phantom. Results: Photon energy had no significant influence on plan quality for both VMAT and IMRT. Large variability in low doses to the heart was found due to patient anatomy (range V{sub 5} {sub Gy} 26.5-95 %). Slightly more normal tissue dose was found for VMAT (e.g., V{sub Tissue30%} = 22 %) than in IMRT (V{sub Tissue30%} = 18 %). The manual and ArtiView trademark plan evaluation coincided very accurately for most dose metrics (difference < 1 %). In VMAT, 96.7 % of detector points passed the 3 %/3 mm gamma criterion; marginally better accuracy was found in IMRT (98.3 %). Conclusion: VMAT for node-positive left-sided breast cancer retains target homogeneity and coverage when compared to IMRT and allows maximum doses to organs at risk to be reduced. ArtiView trademark enables fast and accurate plan evaluation. (orig.)

  17. SU-F-T-446: Improving Craniospinal Irradiation Technique Using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) Planning and Its Dosimetric Verification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X; Tejani, M; Jiang, X; Elder, E; Dhabaan, A [Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment planning technique for supine craniospinal irradiation (CSI). Evaluate the suitability of VMAT for CSI with dosimetric measurements and compare it to 3D conformal planning using specific plan metrics such as dose conformity, homogeneity, and dose of organs at risk (OAR). Methods: Ten CSI patients treated with conventional 3D technique were re-planned with VMAT. The PTV was contoured to include the whole contents of the brain and spinal canal with a uniform margin of 5 mm. VMAT plans were generated with two partial arcs covering the brain, two partial arcs for the superior portion of the spinal cord and two partial arcs covering the remaining inferior portion of the spinal cord. Conformity index (CI), heterogeneity indexes (HI) and max and mean doses of OAR were compared to 3D plans. VMAT plans were delivered onto an anthropomorphic phantom loaded with Gafchromic films and OSLDs placed at specific positions to evaluate the plan dose at the junctions and as well as the plan dose distributions. Results: This VMAT technique was validated with a clinical study of 10 patients. The average CI was 1.03±0.02 for VMAT plans and 1.96±0.32 for conformal plans. And the average HI was 1.15±0.01 for VMAT plans and 1.51±0.21 for conformal plans. The mean and max doses to the all OARs for VMAT plans were significantly lower than conformal plans. The measured dose in phantom for VAMT plans was comparable to the calculated dose in Eclipse and the doses at junctions were verified. Conclusion: VMAT CSI was able to achieve better dose conformity and heterogeneity as well as significantly reducing the dose to Heart, esophagus and larynx. VMAT CSI appears to be a dosimterically advantageous, faster delivery, has better reproducibility CSI treatment.

  18. Comparison of dosimetric parameters and toxicity in esophageal cancer patients undergoing 3D conformal radiotherapy or VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muench, Stefan; Aichmeier, Sylvia; Duma, Marciana-Nona; Oechsner, Markus; Habermehl, Daniel [TU Muenchen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Hapfelmeier, Alexander [TU Muenchen, Institute of Medical Statistics and Epidemiology (IMSE), Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Feith, Marcus [TU Muenchen, Department of Visceral Surgery, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E. [TU Muenchen, Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Muenchen (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute of Innovative Radiotherapy (iRT), Oberschleissheim (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) achieves high conformity to the planned target volume (PTV) and good sparing of organs at risk (OAR). This study compares dosimetric parameters and toxicity in esophageal cancer (EC) patients treated with VMAT and 3D conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT). Between 2007 and 2014, 17 SC patients received neoadjuvant chemoradiation (CRT) with VMAT. Dose-volume histograms and toxicity were compared between these patients and 20 treated with 3D-CRT. All patients were irradiated with a total dose of 45 Gy. All VMAT patients received simultaneous chemotherapy with cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in treatment weeks 1 and 5. Of 20 patients treated with 3D-CRT, 13 (65 %) also received CRT with cisplatin and 5-FU, whereas 6 patients (30 %) received CRT with weekly oxaliplatin and cetuximab, and a continuous infusion of 5-FU (OE-7). There were no differences in baseline characteristics between the treatment groups. For the lungs, VMAT was associated with a higher V{sub 5} (median 90.1 % vs. 79.7 %; p = 0.013) and V{sub 10} (68.2 % vs. 56.6 %; p = 0.014), but with a lower V{sub 30} (median 6.6 % vs. 11.0 %; p = 0.030). Regarding heart parameters, VMAT was associated with a higher V{sub 5} (median 100.0 % vs. 91.0 %; p = 0.043), V{sub 10} (92.0 % vs. 79.2 %; p = 0.047), and D{sub max} (47.5 Gy vs. 46.3 Gy; p = 0.003), but with a lower median dose (18.7 Gy vs. 30.0 Gy; p = 0.026) and V{sub 30} (17.7 % vs. 50.4 %; p = 0.015). Complete resection was achieved in 16 VMAT and 19 3D-CRT patients. Due to systemic progression, 2 patients did not undergo surgery. The most frequent postoperative complication was anastomosis insufficiency, occurring in 1 VMAT (6.7 %) and 5 3D-CRT patients (27.8 %; p = 0.180). Postoperative pneumonia was seen in 2 patients of each group (p = 1.000). There was no significant difference in 3-year overall (65 % VMAT vs. 45 % 3D-CRT; p = 0.493) or 3-year progression-free survival (53 % VMAT vs. 35 % 3D-CRT; p = 0

  19. Suppression of Mediator is regulated by Cdk8-dependent Grr1 turnover of the Med3 coactivator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Deyarina; Hamidi, Nurul; Del Sol, Ricardo; Benschop, Joris J; Nancy, Thomas; Li, Chao; Francis, Lewis; Tzouros, Manuel; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Holstege, Frank C P; Conlan, R Steven

    2014-02-18

    Mediator, an evolutionary conserved large multisubunit protein complex with a central role in regulating RNA polymerase II-transcribed genes, serves as a molecular switchboard at the interface between DNA binding transcription factors and the general transcription machinery. Mediator subunits include the Cdk8 module, which has both positive and negative effects on activator-dependent transcription through the activity of the cyclin-dependent kinase Cdk8, and the tail module, which is required for positive and negative regulation of transcription, correct preinitiation complex formation in basal and activated transcription, and Mediator recruitment. Currently, the molecular mechanisms governing Mediator function remain largely undefined. Here we demonstrate an autoregulatory mechanism used by Mediator to repress transcription through the activity of distinct components of different modules. We show that the function of the tail module component Med3, which is required for transcription activation, is suppressed by the kinase activity of the Cdk8 module. Med3 interacts with, and is phosphorylated by, Cdk8; site-specific phosphorylation triggers interaction with and degradation by the Grr1 ubiquitin ligase, thereby preventing transcription activation. This active repression mechanism involving Grr1-dependent ubiquitination of Med3 offers a rationale for the substoichiometric levels of the tail module that are found in purified Mediator and the corresponding increase in tail components seen in cdk8 mutants.

  20. Are there any dosimetric advantages in using VMAT for treatment of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousseau, D.; Krhili, S.; Yossi, S.; Cellier, P.; Paumier, A.; Autret, D.; Dupas, A.; Edouard, M.; Mahe, M.A.; Giraud, P.; Le Pechoux, C.; Denis, F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. - To analyse the dosimetric differences between the conventional conformal radiation therapy (CR) and the volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for non-small-cell locally advanced lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and methods. - Two plans (CR and VMAT) were calculated for ten NSCLC patients. Dose to PTV, organs at risk and external contours (body), conformity index (PTV volume/volume of the 95% reference isodose) and homogeneity index ([maximal dose - minimal dose]/dose prescription) were compared. Results. - Doses delivered to PTV (homogeneity index, maximal, minimal and mean dose) are similar with both techniques but conformity index is improved by 60% with VMAT: from 0.55 ± 0.07 with CR to 0.89 ± 0.07 with VMAT (P = 0.002). Pulmonary protection is improved with VMAT: with CR and VMAT, respectively, the mean lung dose is 14.1 ± 5.2 Gy and 12.2 ± 4.5 Gy, the lung volume which receives at least 30 Gy (V30) is 20 ± 8% and 14 ± 5%, and the V20 is 24 ± 11% and 20 ± 10% (P = 0.002). The mean dose received by the body is also 9% lower (P = 0.004) and V5 is 13% higher (P = 0.004) with VMAT. V10 and V15 were similar with both modalities. From 20 Gy and higher, irradiated body volume is larger with CR than with VMAT. The relative difference increases with the dose: from 10% for 20 Gy (P = 0.014) up to 39% for 62.7 Gy (P = 0.002). Conclusion. - Compared to CR, VMAT greatly improves conformity and reduces mean dose and dose delivered from 20 Gy and higher to the lungs and the body. (authors)

  1. Report on use of a methodology for commissioning and quality assurance of a VMAT system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Mayo

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Results of use of methodology for VMAT commissioning and quality assurance, utilizing both control point tests and dosimetric measurements are presented. METHODS AND MATERIALS: A generalizable, phantom measurement approach is used to characterize the accuracy of the measurement system. Correction for angular response of the measurement system and inclusion of couch structures are used to characterize the full range gantry angles desirable for clinical plans. A dose based daily QA measurement approach is defined. RESULTS: Agreement in the static vs. VMAT picket fence control point test was better than 0.5 mm. Control point tests varying gantry rotation speed, leaf speed and dose rate, demonstrated agreement with predicted values better than 1%. Angular dependence of the MatriXX array, varied over a range of 0.94-1.06, with respect to the calibration condition. Phantom measurements demonstrated central axis dose accuracy for un-modulated four field box plans was ≥2.5% vs. 1% with and without angular correction respectively with better results for VMAT (0.4% vs. IMRT (1.6% plans. Daily QA results demonstrated average agreement all three chambers within 0.4% over 9 month period with no false positives at a 3% threshold. DISCUSSION: The methodology described is simple in design and characterizes both the inherit limitations of the measurement system as well at the dose based measurements that may be directly related to patient plan QA.

  2. Puerarin activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase through estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and calcium-dependent AMP-activated protein kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Hien, Tran Thi; Jeong, Myung Ho; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2011-01-01

    The cardioprotective properties of puerarin, a natural product, have been attributed to the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated production of nitric oxide (NO) in EA.hy926 endothelial cells. However, the mechanism by which puerarin activates eNOS remains unclear. In this study, we sought to identify the intracellular pathways underlying eNOS activation by puerarin. Puerarin induced the activating phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser1177 and the production of NO in EA.hy926 cells. Puerarin-induced eNOS phosphorylation required estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling and was reversed by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibition. Importantly, puerarin inhibited the adhesion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-stimulated monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF-α induced expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1. Puerarin also inhibited the TNF-α-induced nuclear factor-κB activation, which was attenuated by pretreatment with N G -nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a NOS inhibitor. These results indicate that puerarin stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production via activation of an estrogen receptor-mediated PI3K/Akt- and CaMKII/AMPK-dependent pathway. Puerarin may be useful for the treatment or prevention of endothelial dysfunction associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: ► Puerarin induced the phosphorylation of eNOS and the production of NO. ► Puerarin activated eNOS through ER-dependent PI3-kinase and Ca 2+ -dependent AMPK. ► Puerarin-induced NO was involved in the inhibition of NF-kB activation. ► Puerarin may help for prevention of vascular dysfunction and diabetes.

  3. Hierarchy of protein tyrosine kinases in interleukin-2 (IL-2) signaling: activation of syk depends on Jak3; however, neither Syk nor Lck is required for IL-2-mediated STAT activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y J; Magnuson, K S; Cheng, T P; Gadina, M; Frucht, D M; Galon, J; Candotti, F; Geahlen, R L; Changelian, P S; O'Shea, J J

    2000-06-01

    Interleukin-2 (IL-2) activates several different families of tyrosine kinases, but precisely how these kinases interact is not completely understood. We therefore investigated the functional relationships among Jak3, Lck, and Syk in IL-2 signaling. We first observed that in the absence of Jak3, both Lck and Syk had the capacity to phosphorylate Stat3 and Stat5a. However, neither supported IL-2-induced STAT activation, nor did dominant negative alleles of these kinases inhibit. Moreover, pharmacological abrogation of Lck activity did not inhibit IL-2-mediated phosphorylation of Jak3 and Stat5a. Importantly, ligand-dependent Syk activation was dependent on the presence of catalytically active Jak3, whereas Lck activation was not. Interestingly, Syk functioned as a direct substrate of Jak1 but not Jak3. Additionally, Jak3 phosphorylated Jak1, whereas the reverse was not the case. Taken together, our data support a model in which Lck functions in parallel with Jak3, while Syk functions as a downstream element of Jaks in IL-2 signaling. Jak3 may regulate Syk catalytic activity indirectly via Jak1. However, IL-2-mediated Jak3/Stat activation is not dependent on Lck or Syk. While the essential roles of Jak1 and Jak3 in signaling by gammac-utilizing cytokines are clear, it will be important to dissect the exact contributions of Lck and Syk in mediating the effects of IL-2 and related cytokines.

  4. BID-dependent release of mitochondrial SMAC dampens XIAP-mediated immunity against Shigella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andree, Maria; Seeger, Jens M; Schüll, Stephan; Coutelle, Oliver; Wagner-Stippich, Diana; Wiegmann, Katja; Wunderlich, Claudia M; Brinkmann, Kerstin; Broxtermann, Pia; Witt, Axel; Fritsch, Melanie; Martinelli, Paola; Bielig, Harald; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Rugarli, Elena I; Kaufmann, Thomas; Sterner-Kock, Anja; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Villunger, Andreas; Martins, L Miguel; Krönke, Martin; Kufer, Thomas A; Utermöhlen, Olaf; Kashkar, Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) is a potent caspase inhibitor, best known for its anti-apoptotic function in cancer. During apoptosis, XIAP is antagonized by SMAC, which is released from the mitochondria upon caspase-mediated activation of BID. Recent studies suggest that XIAP is involved in immune signaling. Here, we explore XIAP as an important mediator of an immune response against the enteroinvasive bacterium Shigella flexneri, both in vitro and in vivo. Our data demonstrate for the first time that Shigella evades the XIAP-mediated immune response by inducing the BID-dependent release of SMAC from the mitochondria. Unlike apoptotic stimuli, Shigella activates the calpain-dependent cleavage of BID to trigger the release of SMAC, which antagonizes the inflammatory action of XIAP without inducing apoptosis. Our results demonstrate how the cellular death machinery can be subverted by an invasive pathogen to ensure bacterial colonization. PMID:25056906

  5. Activation of PKA and Epac proteins by cyclic AMP depletes intracellular calcium stores and reduces calcium availability for vasoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuíñas, Andrea; García-Morales, Verónica; Viña, Dolores; Gil-Longo, José; Campos-Toimil, Manuel

    2016-06-15

    We investigated the implication of PKA and Epac proteins in the endothelium-independent vasorelaxant effects of cyclic AMP (cAMP). Cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]c) was measured by fura-2 imaging in rat aortic smooth muscle cells (RASMC). Contraction-relaxation experiments were performed in rat aortic rings deprived of endothelium. In extracellular Ca(2+)-free solution, cAMP-elevating agents induced an increase in [Ca(2+)]c in RASMC that was reproduced by PKA and Epac activation and reduced after depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) reservoirs. Arginine-vasopressin (AVP)-evoked increase of [Ca(2+)]c and store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) were inhibited by cAMP-elevating agents, PKA or Epac activation in these cells. In aortic rings, the contractions induced by phenylephrine in absence of extracellular Ca(2+) were inhibited by cAMP-elevating agents, PKA or Epac activation. In these conditions, reintroduction of Ca(2+) induced a contraction that was inhibited by cAMP-elevating agents, an effect reduced by PKA inhibition and reproduced by PKA or Epac activators. Our results suggest that increased cAMP depletes intracellular, thapsigargin-sensitive Ca(2+) stores through activation of PKA and Epac in RASMC, thus reducing the amount of Ca(2+) released by IP3-generating agonists during the contraction of rat aorta. cAMP rise also inhibits the contraction induced by depletion of intracellular Ca(2+), an effect mediated by reduction of SOCE after PKA or Epac activation. Both effects participate in the cAMP-induced endothelium-independent vasorelaxation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. CD4 down regulation and raft dissociation by the non-depleting YTS177 antibody hinder murine T helper cell activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Cheng-Jang [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Division of Biological Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093 (United States); Lu, Chun-Hao [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Chen, Li-Chen [Division of Allergy, Asthma, and Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Nguyen, Duc T. [Division of Biological Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 92093 (United States); Huang, Yi-Shu [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, Hsi-Hsien [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Chang Gung Immunology Consortium, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Anatomic Pathology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Lin, Chun-Yen [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Chang Gung Immunology Consortium, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Hepatogastroenterology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Kuo, Ming-Ling, E-mail: mingling@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, College of Medicine, Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Division of Allergy, Asthma, and Rheumatology, Department of Pediatrics, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China); Chang Gung Immunology Consortium, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital and Chang Gung University, Tao-Yuan, Taiwan (China)

    2016-05-13

    Non-depleting YTS177 anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody (MoAb) has been reported to lead to antigen-specific immunotolerance in allograft transplantation and autoimmune diabetes, as well as possibly to inhibition of allergic inflammation in mice. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying hyporesponsive T cell responses induced by YTS177 MoAb remain elusive. Herein, we demonstrate that the YTS177 MoAb increases the levels of anergy factors p27{sup kip1} and Cbl-b, inhibits IL-2 production, and impairs calcium mobilization in activated T cells in vitro. YTS177 MoAb suppresses OVA-driven proliferation of DO11.10 CD4{sup +} T cells in vivo as well. Mechanistically, YTS177 MoAb induces tolerance by causing CD4 down-regulation through clathrin-dependent and raft dissociation. The results obtained in this study lead us to propose novel protective or curative approaches to CD4 T cell-mediated diseases.

  7. CD4 down regulation and raft dissociation by the non-depleting YTS177 antibody hinder murine T helper cell activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Cheng-Jang; Lu, Chun-Hao; Chen, Li-Chen; Nguyen, Duc T.; Huang, Yi-Shu; Lin, Hsi-Hsien; Lin, Chun-Yen; Kuo, Ming-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Non-depleting YTS177 anti-CD4 monoclonal antibody (MoAb) has been reported to lead to antigen-specific immunotolerance in allograft transplantation and autoimmune diabetes, as well as possibly to inhibition of allergic inflammation in mice. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying hyporesponsive T cell responses induced by YTS177 MoAb remain elusive. Herein, we demonstrate that the YTS177 MoAb increases the levels of anergy factors p27"k"i"p"1 and Cbl-b, inhibits IL-2 production, and impairs calcium mobilization in activated T cells in vitro. YTS177 MoAb suppresses OVA-driven proliferation of DO11.10 CD4"+ T cells in vivo as well. Mechanistically, YTS177 MoAb induces tolerance by causing CD4 down-regulation through clathrin-dependent and raft dissociation. The results obtained in this study lead us to propose novel protective or curative approaches to CD4 T cell-mediated diseases.

  8. Activation of TRPV1 channels inhibits mechanosensitive Piezo channel activity by depleting membrane phosphoinositides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borbiro, Istvan; Badheka, Doreen; Rohacs, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Capsaicin is an activator of the heat-sensitive TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1) ion channels and has been used as a local analgesic. We found that activation of TRPV1 channels with capsaicin either in dorsal root ganglion neurons or in a heterologous expression system inhibited the mechanosensitive Piezo1 and Piezo2 channels by depleting phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and its precursor PI(4)P from the plasma membrane through Ca2+-induced phospholipase Cδ (PLCδ) activation. Experiments with chemically inducible phosphoinositide phosphatases and receptor-induced activation of PLCβ indicated that inhibition of Piezo channels required depletion of both PI(4)P and PI(4,5)P2. The mechanically activated current amplitudes decreased substantially in the excised inside-out configuration, where the membrane patch containing Piezo1 channels is removed from the cell. PI(4,5)P2 and PI(4)P applied to these excised patches inhibited this decrease. Thus, we concluded that Piezo channel activity requires the presence of phosphoinositides, and the combined depletion of PI(4,5)P2 or PI(4)P reduces channel activity. In addition to revealing a role for distinct membrane lipids in mechanosensitive ion channel regulation, these data suggest that inhibition of Piezo2 channels may contribute to the analgesic effect of capsaicin. PMID:25670203

  9. Optimal partial-arcs in VMAT treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wala, Jeremiah; Salari, Ehsan; Chen Wei; Craft, David

    2012-01-01

    We present a method for improving the delivery efficiency of VMAT by extending the recently published VMAT treatment planning algorithm vmerge to automatically generate optimal partial-arc plans. A high-quality initial plan is created by solving a convex multicriteria optimization problem using 180 equi-spaced beams. This initial plan is used to form a set of dose constraints, and a set of partial-arc plans is created by searching the space of all possible partial-arc plans that satisfy these constraints. For each partial-arc, an iterative fluence map merging and sequencing algorithm (vmerge) is used to improve the delivery efficiency. Merging continues as long as the dose quality is maintained above a user-defined threshold. The final plan is selected as the partial-arc with the lowest treatment time. The complete algorithm is called pmerge. Partial-arc plans are created using pmerge for a lung, liver and prostate case, with final treatment times of 127, 245 and 147 s. Treatment times using full arcs with vmerge are 211, 357 and 178 s. The mean doses to the critical structures for the vmerge and pmerge plans are kept within 5% of those in the initial plan, and the target volume covered by the prescription isodose is maintained above 98% for the pmerge and vmerge plans. Additionally, we find that the angular distribution of fluence in the initial plans is predictive of the start and end angles of the optimal partial-arc. We conclude that VMAT delivery efficiency can be improved by employing partial-arcs without compromising dose quality, and that partial-arcs are most applicable to cases with non-centralized targets. (paper)

  10. Extracellular adenosine-induced Rac1 activation in pulmonary endothelium: Molecular mechanisms and barrier-protective role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs-Kasa, Anita; Kim, Kyung Mi; Cherian-Shaw, Mary; Black, Stephen M; Fulton, David J; Verin, Alexander D

    2018-08-01

    We have previously shown that Gs-coupled adenosine receptors (A2a) are primarily involved in adenosine-induced human pulmonary artery endothelial cell (HPAEC) barrier enhancement. However, the downstream events that mediate the strengthening of the endothelial cell (EC) barrier via adenosine signaling are largely unknown. In the current study, we tested the overall hypothesis that adenosine-induced Rac1 activation and EC barrier enhancement is mediated by Gs-dependent stimulation of cAMP-dependent Epac1-mediated signaling cascades. Adenoviral transduction of HPAEC with constitutively-active (C/A) Rac1 (V12Rac1) significantly increases transendothelial electrical resistance (TER) reflecting an enhancement of the EC barrier. Conversely, expression of an inactive Rac1 mutant (N17Rac1) decreases TER reflecting a compromised EC barrier. The adenosine-induced increase in TER was accompanied by activation of Rac1, decrease in contractility (MLC dephosphorylation), but not Rho inhibition. Conversely, inhibition of Rac1 activity attenuates adenosine-induced increase in TER. We next examined the role of cAMP-activated Epac1 and its putative downstream targets Rac1, Vav2, Rap1, and Tiam1. Depletion of Epac1 attenuated the adenosine-induced Rac1 activation and the increase in TER. Furthermore, silencing of Rac1 specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), Vav2 and Rap1a expression significantly attenuated adenosine-induced increases in TER and activation of Rac1. Depletion of Rap1b only modestly impacted adenosine-induced increases in TER and Tiam1 depletion had no effect on adenosine-induced Rac1 activation and TER. Together these data strongly suggest that Rac1 activity is required for adenosine-induced EC barrier enhancement and that the activation of Rac1 and ability to strengthen the EC barrier depends, at least in part, on cAMP-dependent Epac1/Vav2/Rap1-mediated signaling. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Exacerbation of spontaneous autoimmune nephritis following regulatory T cell depletion in B cell lymphoma 2-interacting mediator knock-out mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y M; Zhang, G Y; Wang, Y; Hu, M; Zhou, J J; Sawyer, A; Cao, Q; Wang, Y; Zheng, G; Lee, V W S; Harris, D C H; Alexander, S I

    2017-05-01

    Regulatory T cells (T regs ) have been recognized as central mediators for maintaining peripheral tolerance and limiting autoimmune diseases. The loss of T regs or their function has been associated with exacerbation of autoimmune disease. However, the temporary loss of T regs in the chronic spontaneous disease model has not been investigated. In this study, we evaluated the role of T regs in a novel chronic spontaneous glomerulonephritis model of B cell lymphoma 2-interacting mediator (Bim) knock-out mice by transient depleting T regs . Bim is a pro-apoptotic member of the B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) family. Bim knock-out (Bim -/- ) mice fail to delete autoreactive T cells in thymus, leading to chronic spontaneous autoimmune kidney disease. We found that T reg depletion in Bim -/- mice exacerbated the kidney injury with increased proteinuria, impaired kidney function, weight loss and greater histological injury compared with wild-type mice. There was a significant increase in interstitial infiltrate of inflammatory cells, antibody deposition and tubular damage. Furthermore, the serum levels of cytokines interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17α, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α were increased significantly after T reg depletion in Bim -/- mice. This study demonstrates that transient depletion of T regs leads to enhanced self-reactive T effector cell function followed by exacerbation of kidney disease in the chronic spontaneous kidney disease model of Bim-deficient mice. © 2017 British Society for Immunology.

  12. Effect of interfractional shoulder motion on low neck nodal targets for patients treated using volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Casey

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric impact of interfractional shoulder motion on targets in the low neck for head and neck patients treated with volume modulated arc therapy (VMAT.Methods: Three patients with head and neck cancer were selected. All three required treatment to nodal regions in the low neck in addition to the primary tumor site. The patients were immobilized during simulation and treatment with a custom thermoplastic mask covering the head and shoulders. One VMAT plan was created for each patient utilizing two full 360° arcs and a second plan was created consisting of two superior VMAT arcs matched to an inferior static AP supraclavicular field. A CT-on-rails alignment verification was performed weekly during each patient’s treatment course. The weekly CT images were registered to the simulation CT and the target contours were deformed and applied to the weekly CT. The two VMAT plans were copied to the weekly CT datasets and recalculated to obtain the dose to the deformed low neck contours.Results: The average observed shoulder position shift in any single dimension relative to simulation was 2.5 mm. The maximum shoulder shift observed in a single dimension was 25.7 mm. Low neck target mean doses, normalized to simulation and averaged across all weekly recalculations were 0.996, 0.991, and 1.033 (Full VMAT plan and 0.986, 0.995, and 0.990 (Half-Beam VMAT plan for the three patients, respectively. The maximum observed deviation in target mean dose for any individual weekly recalculation was 6.5%, occurring with the Full VMAT plan for Patient 3.Conclusion: Interfractional variation in dose to low neck nodal regions was quantified for three head and neck patients treated with VMAT. Mean dose was 3.3% higher than planned for one patient using a Full VMAT plan. A Half-Beam technique is likely a safer choice when treating the supraclavicular region with VMAT.-------------------------------------------Cite this article as: Casey K

  13. Evaluations of secondary cancer risk in spine radiotherapy using 3DCRT, IMRT, and VMAT: A phantom study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, Jalil ur, E-mail: jalil_khanphy@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur (Pakistan); Department of Radiation Physics, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Tailor, Ramesh C. [Department of Radiation Physics, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Isa, Muhammad [Department of Physics, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur (Pakistan); Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Afzal, Muhammad [Department of Physics, The Islamia University of Bahawalpur, Bahawalpur (Pakistan); Chow, James [Princess Margaret Cancer Center, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ibbott, Geoffrey S. [Department of Radiation Physics, UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This study evaluated the secondary cancer risk from volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for spine radiotherapy compared with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT). Computed tomography images of an Radiological Physics Center spine anthropomorphic phantom were exported to a treatment planning system (Pinnacle{sup 3}, version 9.4). Radiation treatment plans for spine were prepared using VMAT (dual-arc), 7-field IMRT (beam angles: 110°, 130°, 150°, 180°, 210°, 230°, and 250°), and 4-field 3DCRT technique. The mean and maximum doses, dose-volume histograms, and volumes receiving more than 2 and 4 Gy to organs at risk (OARs) were calculated and compared. The lifetime risk for secondary cancers was estimated according to the National Cancer Registry Programme Report 116. VMAT delivered the lowest maximum dose to the esophagus (4.03 Gy), bone (8.11 Gy), heart (2.11 Gy), spinal cord (6.45 Gy), and whole lung (5.66 Gy) as compared with other techniques (IMRT and 3DCRT). The volumes of OAR (esophagus) receiving more than 4 Gy were 0% for VMAT, 27.06% for IMRT, and up to 32.35% for 3DCRT. The estimated risk for secondary cancer in the respective OAR is considerably lower in VMAT compared with other techniques. The results of maximum doses and volumes of OARs suggest that the risk of secondary cancer induction for the spine in VMAT is lower than IMRT and 3DCRT, whereas VMAT has the best target coverage compared with the other techniques.

  14. Implementation of dosimetric quality control on IMRT and VMAT treatments in radiotherapy using diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzales, A.; Garcia, B.; Ramirez, J.; Marquina, J.

    2014-08-01

    To implement quality control of IMRT and VMAT treatments Rapid Arc radiotherapy using diode array. Were tested 90 patients with IMRT and VMAT Rapid Arc, comparing the planned dose to the dose administered, used the Map-Check-2 and Arc-Check of Sun Nuclear, they using the gamma factor for calculating and using comparison parameters 3% / 3m m. The statistic shows that the quality controls of the 90 patients analyzed, presented a percentage of diodes that pass the test between 96,7% and 100,0% of the irradiated diodes. Implemented in Clinical ALIADA Oncologia Integral, the method for quality control of IMRT and VMAT treatments Rapid Arc radiotherapy using diode array. (Author)

  15. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Mediates ICAM-1-Dependent Monocyte Adhesion through p38 MAPK and p42/p44 MAPK-Dependent Akt Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Chung; Lee, I-Ta; Hsu, Chun-Hao; Hsu, Chih-Kai; Chi, Pei-Ling; Hsiao, Li-Der; Yang, Chuen-Mao

    2015-01-01

    Up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is frequently implicated in lung inflammation. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) has been shown to play a key role in inflammation via adhesion molecules induction, and then causes lung injury. However, the mechanisms underlying S1P-induced ICAM-1 expression in human pulmonary alveolar epithelial cells (HPAEpiCs) remain unclear. The effect of S1P on ICAM-1 expression was determined by Western blot and real-time PCR. The involvement of signaling pathways in these responses was investigated by using the selective pharmacological inhibitors and transfection with siRNAs. S1P markedly induced ICAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion which were attenuated by pretreatment with the inhibitor of S1PR1 (W123), S1PR3 (CAY10444), c-Src (PP1), EGFR (AG1478), PDGFR (AG1296), MEK1/2 (U0126), p38 MAPK (SB202190), JNK1/2 (SP600125), PI3K (LY294002), or AP-1 (Tanshinone IIA) and transfection with siRNA of S1PR1, S1PR3, c-Src, EGFR, PDGFR, p38, p42, JNK1, c-Jun, or c-Fos. We observed that S1P-stimulated p42/p44 MAPK and p38 MAPK activation was mediated via a c-Src/EGFR and PDGFR-dependent pathway. S1P caused the c-Src/EGFR/PDGFR complex formation. On the other hand, we demonstrated that S1P induced p42/p44 MAPK and p38 MAPK-dependent Akt activation. In addition, S1P-stimulated JNK1/2 phosphorylation was attenuated by SP600125 or PP1. Finally, S1P enhanced c-Fos mRNA levels and c-Jun phosphorylation. S1P-induced c-Jun activation was reduced by PP1, AG1478, AG1296, U0126, SP600125, SB202190, or LY294002. These results demonstrated that S1P-induced ICAM-1 expression and monocyte adhesion were mediated through S1PR1/3/c-Src/EGFR, PDGFR/p38 MAPK, p42/p44 MAPK/Akt-dependent AP-1 activation. PMID:25734900

  16. Puerarin activates endothelial nitric oxide synthase through estrogen receptor-dependent PI3-kinase and calcium-dependent AMP-activated protein kinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Kim, Hyung Gyun [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hien, Tran Thi [College of Pharmacy, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Myung Ho [Heart Research Center, Chonnam National University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Tae Cheon, E-mail: taecheon@ynu.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy, Yeungnam University, Gyungsan (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Hye Gwang, E-mail: hgjeong@cnu.ac.kr [Department of Toxicology, College of Pharmacy, Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    The cardioprotective properties of puerarin, a natural product, have been attributed to the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS)-mediated production of nitric oxide (NO) in EA.hy926 endothelial cells. However, the mechanism by which puerarin activates eNOS remains unclear. In this study, we sought to identify the intracellular pathways underlying eNOS activation by puerarin. Puerarin induced the activating phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser1177 and the production of NO in EA.hy926 cells. Puerarin-induced eNOS phosphorylation required estrogen receptor (ER)-mediated phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling and was reversed by AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII) inhibition. Importantly, puerarin inhibited the adhesion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-{alpha}-stimulated monocytes to endothelial cells and suppressed the TNF-{alpha} induced expression of intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1. Puerarin also inhibited the TNF-{alpha}-induced nuclear factor-{kappa}B activation, which was attenuated by pretreatment with N{sup G}-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester, a NOS inhibitor. These results indicate that puerarin stimulates eNOS phosphorylation and NO production via activation of an estrogen receptor-mediated PI3K/Akt- and CaMKII/AMPK-dependent pathway. Puerarin may be useful for the treatment or prevention of endothelial dysfunction associated with diabetes and cardiovascular disease. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin induced the phosphorylation of eNOS and the production of NO. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin activated eNOS through ER-dependent PI3-kinase and Ca{sup 2+}-dependent AMPK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin-induced NO was involved in the inhibition of NF-kB activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Puerarin may help for prevention of vascular dysfunction and diabetes.

  17. PI3-kinase γ promotes Rap1a-mediated activation of myeloid cell integrin α4β1, leading to tumor inflammation and growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C Schmid

    Full Text Available Tumor inflammation, the recruitment of myeloid lineage cells into the tumor microenvironment, promotes angiogenesis, immunosuppression and metastasis. CD11b+Gr1lo monocytic lineage cells and CD11b+Gr1hi granulocytic lineage cells are recruited from the circulation by tumor-derived chemoattractants, which stimulate PI3-kinase γ (PI3Kγ-mediated integrin α4 activation and extravasation. We show here that PI3Kγ activates PLCγ, leading to RasGrp/CalDAG-GEF-I&II mediated, Rap1a-dependent activation of integrin α4β1, extravasation of monocytes and granulocytes, and inflammation-associated tumor progression. Genetic depletion of PLCγ, CalDAG-GEFI or II, Rap1a, or the Rap1 effector RIAM was sufficient to prevent integrin α4 activation by chemoattractants or activated PI3Kγ (p110γCAAX, while activated Rap (RapV12 promoted constitutive integrin activation and cell adhesion that could only be blocked by inhibition of RIAM or integrin α4β1. Similar to blockade of PI3Kγ or integrin α4β1, blockade of Rap1a suppressed both the recruitment of monocytes and granulocytes to tumors and tumor progression. These results demonstrate critical roles for a PI3Kγ-Rap1a-dependent pathway in integrin activation during tumor inflammation and suggest novel avenues for cancer therapy.

  18. Development of uncoupling between D1- and D2-mediated motor behavior in rats depleted of dopamine as neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, E M; Bruno, J P

    1994-09-01

    The D1- and D2-mediation of stimulated motor behavior was studied in pups (Days 10-11) and weanlings (Days 20-21) that had been depleted of dopamine (DA) on postnatal Day 3. Administration of the D1-like agonist SKF 38393 (30.0 mg/kg) or the D2-like agonist quinpirole (3.0 mg/kg) increased the incidence of sniffing and locomotion in intact and DA-depleted animals tested at either age. However, the ability of selective DA antagonists to reduce these stimulated responses interacted with both the depletion and the age at the time of testing. When tested as pups, both the D1 antagonist SCH 23390 (0.2 or 0.4 mg/kg) and the D2 antagonist clebopride (10.0 mg/kg) suppressed the behaviors induced by either class of DA agonist. When tested as weanlings, intact animals exhibited the profile of pups (i.e., either antagonist blocked each agonist). In DA-depleted weanlings, however, only the D1 antagonist blocked the D1 agonist-induced responses and only the D2 antagonist blocked the D2 agonist-induced responses. These data demonstrate that the interactions between D1 and D2 receptors in the expression of stimulated motor behaviors are altered following DA depletions in neonates. Moreover, this change in receptor function occurs sometime between 7 and 13 days after the DA depletion.

  19. SU-F-T-686: Considerations About Dose Protraction Factor in TCP Calculations for Prostate VMAT Treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemente, F; Perez-Vara, C; Clavo, M [Herranz Hospital Central de la Defensa “Gomez Ulla”, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Dose protraction factor should be considered in order to model the TCP calculations. Nevertheless, this study describes a brief discussion showing that the lack of its inclusion should not invalidate these calculations for prostate VMAT treatments. Methods: Dose protraction factor (G) modifies the quadratic term of the linear-quadratic expression in order to take into account the sublethal damage repair of protracting the dose delivery. If the delivery takes a short time (instantaneous), G = 1. For any other dose delivery pattern, G < 1. The Lea-Catcheside dose protraction factor for external beam radiotherapy contains terms depending of on the tissue specific repair parameter (λ) and the irradiation time (T). Expanding the exponential term using a Taylor’s series and neglecting terms of order (λT){sup 3}, the approximation leads to G = 1. The described situation occurs for 3DCRT techniques, where treatment times are about few minutes. For IMRT techniques, fraction times are prolonged compared to 3DCRT times. Wang et al. (2003) and Fowler et al. (2004) investigated the protraction effect with respect to IMRT treatments, reporting clinically significant loss in biological effect associated with IMRT delivery times. Results: Treatment times are noticeably reduced for prostate treatments using VMAT techniques. These times are comparable to 3DCRT times, leading to consider the previous approximation. Conclusion: Dose protraction factor can be approximated by G = 1 in TCP calculations for prostate treatments using VMAT techniques.

  20. Neurotrophin release by neurotrophins: Implications for activity-dependent neuronal plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Canossa, Marco; Griesbeck, Oliver; Berninger, Benedikt; Campana, Gabriele; Kolbeck, Roland; Thoenen, Hans

    1997-01-01

    Neurotrophins, secreted in an activity-dependent manner, are thought to be involved in the activity-dependent refinement of synaptic connections. Here we demonstrate that in hippocampal neurons and the rat pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 application of exogenous neurotrophins induces secretion of neurotrophins, an effect that is mediated by the activation of tyrosine kinase neurotrophin receptors (Trks). Like activity-dependent secretion of neurotrophins, neurotrophin-induced neurotrophin sec...

  1. The functionalized amino acid (S-Lacosamide subverts CRMP2-mediated tubulin polymerization to prevent constitutive and activity-dependent increase in neurite outgrowth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M Wilson

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Activity-dependent neurite outgrowth is a highly complex, regulated process with important implications for neuronal circuit remodeling in development as well as in seizure-induced sprouting in epilepsy. Recent work has linked outgrowth to collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP2, an intracellular phosphoprotein originally identified as axon guidance and growth cone collapse protein. The neurite outgrowth promoting function of CRMP2 is regulated by its phosphorylation state. In this study, depolarization (potassium chloride-driven activity increased the level of active CRMP2 by decreasing its phosphorylation by GSK3β via a reduction in priming by Cdk5. To determine the contribution of CRMP2 in activity-driven neurite outgrowth, we screened a limited set of compounds for their ability to reduce neurite outgrowth but not modify voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC biophysical properties. This led to the identification of (S-lacosamide ((S-LCM, a stereoisomer of the clinically used antiepileptic drug (R-LCM (Vimpat®, as a novel tool for preferentially targeting CRMP2-mediated neurite outgrowth. Whereas (S-LCM was ineffective in targeting VGSCs, the presumptive pharmacological targets of (R-LCM, (S-LCM was more efficient than (R-LCM in subverting neurite outgrowth. Biomolecular interaction analyses revealed that (S-LCM bound to wildtype CRMP2 with low micromolar affinity, similar to (R-LCM. Through the use of this novel tool, the activity-dependent increase in neurite outgrowth observed following depolarization was characterized to be reliant on CRMP2 function. Knockdown of CRMP2 by siRNA in cortical neurons resulted in reduced CRMP2-dependent neurite outgrowth; incubation with (S-LCM phenocopied this effect. Other CRMP2-mediated processes were unaffected. (S-LCM subverted neurite outgrowth not by affecting the canonical CRMP2-tubulin association but rather by impairing the ability of CRMP2 to promote tubulin polymerization, events that are

  2. Poster - 22: Retrospective analysis of portal dosimetry based QA of Prostate VMAT Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badu, Shyam; Darko, Johnson; Fleck, Andre; Osei, Ernest [Grand River Regional Cancer Centre , Kitchener , ON Canada (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to retrospectively analyze the portal dosimetry based quality assurance of prostate VMAT plans. Methods: Our standard quality assurance of VMAT treatment plans are performed using EPID installed on Varian TrueBeam Linac. In our current study we analyzed 84 prostate pretreatment VMAT plans. All plans consisted of two arcs, 7800cGy in 39 fractions with a 6MV beam. For each of these VMAT plans, the measured fluence for each arc is compared with the reference fluence using gamma index analysis. Results: We have compared the gamma passing rates for three criteria; 3%/3mm, 2%/2mm and 1%/1mm. Out of 168 arcs measured, the number below the gamma passing rate 95% using the area, Field+1cm, are 0, 2, and 124 for 3%/3mm, 2%/2mm and 1%/1mm criteria respectively. Corresponding numbers for MLC CIAO are 0, 2, and 139 respectively. The average gamma passing rate for all arcs measured using Field+1cm are 99.9±0.4, 99.6±1.2, and 90.9±6.5 for 3%/3mm, 2%/2mm and 1%/1mm respectively. Similarly if the MLC CIAO area is analyzed, a passing rate of 99.9±0.2, 99.2±1.2 and 87.2±8.5 respectively was observed. The average of the maximum gamma was also found to increase with tighter criteria. Conclusion: Analysis of prostate VMAT quality assurance plans indicate that the gamma passing rate is sensitive to the criteria and the area analyzed.

  3. Cyclophilin B induces integrin-mediated cell adhesion by a mechanism involving CD98-dependent activation of protein kinase C-delta and p44/42 mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, Aurélie; Denys, Agnès; Deligny, Audrey; Mazurier, Joël; Allain, Fabrice

    2008-02-01

    Initially identified as a cyclosporin-A binding protein, cyclophilin B (CyPB) is an inflammatory mediator that induces adhesion of T lymphocytes to fibronectin, by a mechanism dependent on CD147 and alpha 4 beta 1 integrins. Recent findings have suggested that another cell membrane protein, CD98, may cooperate with CD147 to regulate beta1 integrin functions. Based on these functional relationships, we examined the contribution of CD98 in the pro-adhesive activity of CyPB, by utilizing the responsive promonocyte cell line THP-1. We demonstrated that cross-linking CD98 with CD98-AHN-18 antibody mimicked the responses induced by CyPB, i.e. homotypic aggregation, integrin-mediated adhesion to fibronectin and activation of p44/42 MAPK. Consistent with previous data, immunoprecipitation confirmed the existence of a heterocomplex wherein CD147, CD98 and beta1 integrins were associated. We then demonstrated that CyPB-induced cell adhesion and p44/42 MAPK activation were dependent on the participation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase and subsequent activation of protein kinase C-delta. Finally, silencing the expression of CD98 by RNA interference potently reduced CyPB-induced cell responses, thus confirming the role of CD98 in the pro-adhesive activity of CyPB. Altogether, our results support a model whereby CyPB induces integrin-mediated adhesion via interaction with a multimolecular unit formed by the association between CD147, CD98 and beta1 integrins.

  4. Ultrafast treatment plan optimization for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Chunhua; Romeijn, H Edwin; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B

    2010-11-01

    To develop a novel aperture-based algorithm for volumetric modulated are therapy (VMAT) treatment plan optimization with high quality and high efficiency. The VMAT optimization problem is formulated as a large-scale convex programming problem solved by a column generation approach. The authors consider a cost function consisting two terms, the first enforcing a desired dose distribution and the second guaranteeing a smooth dose rate variation between successive gantry angles. A gantry rotation is discretized into 180 beam angles and for each beam angle, only one MLC aperture is allowed. The apertures are generated one by one in a sequential way. At each iteration of the column generation method, a deliverable MLC aperture is generated for one of the unoccupied beam angles by solving a subproblem with the consideration of MLC mechanic constraints. A subsequent master problem is then solved to determine the dose rate at all currently generated apertures by minimizing the cost function. When all 180 beam angles are occupied, the optimization completes, yielding a set of deliverable apertures and associated dose rates that produce a high quality plan. The algorithm was preliminarily tested on five prostate and five head-and-neck clinical cases, each with one full gantry rotation without any couch/collimator rotations. High quality VMAT plans have been generated for all ten cases with extremely high efficiency. It takes only 5-8 min on CPU (MATLAB code on an Intel Xeon 2.27 GHz CPU) and 18-31 s on GPU (CUDA code on an NVIDIA Tesla C1060 GPU card) to generate such plans. The authors have developed an aperture-based VMAT optimization algorithm which can generate clinically deliverable high quality treatment plans at very high efficiency.

  5. Domestic comparison of radiation treatment techniques for breast cancer: 3D-CRT, IMRT and VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Bo Ram; Yoon, Myong Geun [Dept. of Bio-convergence Engineering, College of Health Science, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sun Young [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Yusung Sun Medical Center, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-15

    The purpose of this study is to compare method in the treatment of breast cancer using dose index. And, it is to find the optimized treatment technique to the patient. The phantom filled with tissue-equivalent material were used simulation and treatment as techniques of 3D-CRT, IMRT, VMAT was planned using Eclipse v10. By using HI(homogeneity index), CI(Conformity index), OE (Organ equivalent dose), EAR(Excess Absolute Risk), were assessed for each treatment plans. HI and CI of 3D-CRT, IMRT, VMAT were calculated 16.89, 11.21, 9.55 and 0.59, 0.61, 0.83. The organ average doses of Lt lung, Rt lung, liver, heart, esophagus, cord, Lt breast, trachea and stomach were 0.01 ∼ 2.02 Gy, 0.36 ∼ 5.01 Gy, 0.25 ∼ 2.49 Gy, 0.14 ∼ 6.92 Gy, 0.03 ∼ 2.02 Gy, 0.01 ∼ 1.06 Gy, 0.25 ∼ 6.08 Gy, 0.08 ∼ 0.59 Gy, 0.01 ∼ 1.34 Gy, respectively. The OED, EAR of the IMRT and VMAT show higher than 3D-CRT. As the result of this study, we could confirm being higher dose index(HI, CI) in IMRT and VMAT than 3D-CRT, but doses of around normal organs was higher IMRT, VMAT than 3D-CRT.

  6. Acceptance for clinical use of a treatment planning system with IMRT and VMAT techniques; Aceptacion para uso clinico de un sistema de planificacion de tratamientos con tecnicas de IMRT y VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serna, A.; Puchades, V.; Mata, F.

    2011-07-01

    Purpose: In this work the set of measurements and results to test the reliability of the calculated absorbed dose by our treatment planning system (Tps) for intensity modulated radiation therapy (Imr) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (Vat) is reported. Method: A set of measures was performed, both point and planar absorbed dose, selecting a set of conventional and Imr and Vat treatment fields. A gamma criteria 3 mm distance to agreement and 3% dose difference (referred to the maximum dose) was used for the planar distribution analysis, using a 10% of maximum dose as threshold. Based on this set of measures the confidence limits were calculated for the Imr and VMAT plans, and compared with the reference values given in AAPM TG119 document. Results: The average percentage deviation of point dose measures was lower than 0.5% for conventional fields and lower than 1% for IMRT and VMAT fields. Calculated confidence limits were 3.6% and 4.6% for point dose and almost zero for planar dose distributions, for IMRT and VMAT respectively. Conclusions: Our confidence levels improve significantly the AAPM TG119 reference levels both for point and planar doses, thus ensuring the reliability of the TPS performing IMRT and VMAT dose calculations. (Author) 17 refs.

  7. Temperature dependent simulation of diamond depleted Schottky PIN diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hathwar, Raghuraj; Dutta, Maitreya; Chowdhury, Srabanti; Goodnick, Stephen M.; Koeck, Franz A. M.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Diamond is considered as an ideal material for high field and high power devices due to its high breakdown field, high lightly doped carrier mobility, and high thermal conductivity. The modeling and simulation of diamond devices are therefore important to predict the performances of diamond based devices. In this context, we use Silvaco ® Atlas, a drift-diffusion based commercial software, to model diamond based power devices. The models used in Atlas were modified to account for both variable range and nearest neighbor hopping transport in the impurity bands associated with high activation energies for boron doped and phosphorus doped diamond. The models were fit to experimentally reported resistivity data over a wide range of doping concentrations and temperatures. We compare to recent data on depleted diamond Schottky PIN diodes demonstrating low turn-on voltages and high reverse breakdown voltages, which could be useful for high power rectifying applications due to the low turn-on voltage enabling high forward current densities. Three dimensional simulations of the depleted Schottky PIN diamond devices were performed and the results are verified with experimental data at different operating temperatures

  8. Temperature dependent simulation of diamond depleted Schottky PIN diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathwar, Raghuraj; Dutta, Maitreya; Koeck, Franz A. M.; Nemanich, Robert J.; Chowdhury, Srabanti; Goodnick, Stephen M.

    2016-06-01

    Diamond is considered as an ideal material for high field and high power devices due to its high breakdown field, high lightly doped carrier mobility, and high thermal conductivity. The modeling and simulation of diamond devices are therefore important to predict the performances of diamond based devices. In this context, we use Silvaco® Atlas, a drift-diffusion based commercial software, to model diamond based power devices. The models used in Atlas were modified to account for both variable range and nearest neighbor hopping transport in the impurity bands associated with high activation energies for boron doped and phosphorus doped diamond. The models were fit to experimentally reported resistivity data over a wide range of doping concentrations and temperatures. We compare to recent data on depleted diamond Schottky PIN diodes demonstrating low turn-on voltages and high reverse breakdown voltages, which could be useful for high power rectifying applications due to the low turn-on voltage enabling high forward current densities. Three dimensional simulations of the depleted Schottky PIN diamond devices were performed and the results are verified with experimental data at different operating temperatures

  9. Temperature dependent simulation of diamond depleted Schottky PIN diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathwar, Raghuraj; Dutta, Maitreya; Chowdhury, Srabanti; Goodnick, Stephen M. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-8806 (United States); Koeck, Franz A. M.; Nemanich, Robert J. [Department of Physics, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-8806 (United States)

    2016-06-14

    Diamond is considered as an ideal material for high field and high power devices due to its high breakdown field, high lightly doped carrier mobility, and high thermal conductivity. The modeling and simulation of diamond devices are therefore important to predict the performances of diamond based devices. In this context, we use Silvaco{sup ®} Atlas, a drift-diffusion based commercial software, to model diamond based power devices. The models used in Atlas were modified to account for both variable range and nearest neighbor hopping transport in the impurity bands associated with high activation energies for boron doped and phosphorus doped diamond. The models were fit to experimentally reported resistivity data over a wide range of doping concentrations and temperatures. We compare to recent data on depleted diamond Schottky PIN diodes demonstrating low turn-on voltages and high reverse breakdown voltages, which could be useful for high power rectifying applications due to the low turn-on voltage enabling high forward current densities. Three dimensional simulations of the depleted Schottky PIN diamond devices were performed and the results are verified with experimental data at different operating temperatures.

  10. ATP depletion during mitotic arrest induces mitotic slippage and APC/CCdh1-dependent cyclin B1 degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yun Yeon; Ahn, Ju-Hyun; Cho, Min-Guk; Lee, Jae-Ho

    2018-04-27

    ATP depletion inhibits cell cycle progression, especially during the G1 phase and the G2 to M transition. However, the effect of ATP depletion on mitotic progression remains unclear. We observed that the reduction of ATP after prometaphase by simultaneous treatment with 2-deoxyglucose and NaN 3 did not arrest mitotic progression. Interestingly, ATP depletion during nocodazole-induced prometaphase arrest resulted in mitotic slippage, as indicated by a reduction in mitotic cells, APC/C-dependent degradation of cyclin B1, increased cell attachment, and increased nuclear membrane reassembly. Additionally, cells successfully progressed through the cell cycle after mitotic slippage, as indicated by EdU incorporation and time-lapse imaging. Although degradation of cyclin B during normal mitotic progression is primarily regulated by APC/C Cdc20 , we observed an unexpected decrease in Cdc20 prior to degradation of cyclin B during mitotic slippage. This decrease in Cdc20 was followed by a change in the binding partner preference of APC/C from Cdc20 to Cdh1; consequently, APC/C Cdh1 , but not APC/C Cdc20 , facilitated cyclin B degradation following ATP depletion. Pulse-chase analysis revealed that ATP depletion significantly abrogated global translation, including the translation of Cdc20 and Cdh1. Additionally, the half-life of Cdh1 was much longer than that of Cdc20. These data suggest that ATP depletion during mitotic arrest induces mitotic slippage facilitated by APC/C Cdh1 -dependent cyclin B degradation, which follows a decrease in Cdc20 resulting from reduced global translation and the differences in the half-lives of the Cdc20 and Cdh1 proteins.

  11. Frame average optimization of cine-mode EPID images used for routine clinical in vivo patient dose verification of VMAT deliveries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCowan, P. M., E-mail: pmccowan@cancercare.mb.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2, Canada and Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); McCurdy, B. M. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, 820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3A 1R9 (Canada)

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: The in vivo 3D dose delivered to a patient during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery can be calculated using electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images. These images must be acquired in cine-mode (i.e., “movie” mode) in order to capture the time-dependent delivery information. The angle subtended by each cine-mode EPID image during an arc can be changed via the frame averaging number selected within the image acquisition software. A large frame average number will decrease the EPID’s angular resolution and will result in a decrease in the accuracy of the dose information contained within each image. Alternatively, less EPID images acquired per delivery will decrease the overall 3D patient dose calculation time, which is appealing for large-scale clinical implementation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the optimal frame average value per EPID image, defined as the highest frame averaging that can be used without an appreciable loss in 3D dose reconstruction accuracy for VMAT treatments. Methods: Six different VMAT plans and six different SBRT-VMAT plans were delivered to an anthropomorphic phantom. Delivery was carried out on a Varian 2300ix model linear accelerator (Linac) equipped with an aS1000 EPID running at a frame acquisition rate of 7.5 Hz. An additional PC was set up at the Linac console area, equipped with specialized frame-grabber hardware and software packages allowing continuous acquisition of all EPID frames during delivery. Frames were averaged into “frame-averaged” EPID images using MATLAB. Each frame-averaged data set was used to calculate the in vivo dose to the patient and then compared to the single EPID frame in vivo dose calculation (the single frame calculation represents the highest possible angular resolution per EPID image). A mean percentage dose difference of low dose (<20% prescription dose) and high dose regions (>80% prescription dose) was calculated for each frame averaged

  12. Frame average optimization of cine-mode EPID images used for routine clinical in vivo patient dose verification of VMAT deliveries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCowan, P. M.; McCurdy, B. M. C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The in vivo 3D dose delivered to a patient during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery can be calculated using electronic portal imaging device (EPID) images. These images must be acquired in cine-mode (i.e., “movie” mode) in order to capture the time-dependent delivery information. The angle subtended by each cine-mode EPID image during an arc can be changed via the frame averaging number selected within the image acquisition software. A large frame average number will decrease the EPID’s angular resolution and will result in a decrease in the accuracy of the dose information contained within each image. Alternatively, less EPID images acquired per delivery will decrease the overall 3D patient dose calculation time, which is appealing for large-scale clinical implementation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the optimal frame average value per EPID image, defined as the highest frame averaging that can be used without an appreciable loss in 3D dose reconstruction accuracy for VMAT treatments. Methods: Six different VMAT plans and six different SBRT-VMAT plans were delivered to an anthropomorphic phantom. Delivery was carried out on a Varian 2300ix model linear accelerator (Linac) equipped with an aS1000 EPID running at a frame acquisition rate of 7.5 Hz. An additional PC was set up at the Linac console area, equipped with specialized frame-grabber hardware and software packages allowing continuous acquisition of all EPID frames during delivery. Frames were averaged into “frame-averaged” EPID images using MATLAB. Each frame-averaged data set was used to calculate the in vivo dose to the patient and then compared to the single EPID frame in vivo dose calculation (the single frame calculation represents the highest possible angular resolution per EPID image). A mean percentage dose difference of low dose ( 80% prescription dose) was calculated for each frame averaged scenario for each plan. The authors defined their

  13. Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein Regulates Activity-Dependent Membrane Trafficking and Trans-Synaptic Signaling Mediating Synaptic Remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sears, James C.; Broadie, Kendal

    2018-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the leading monogenic cause of autism and intellectual disability. The disease arises through loss of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), which normally exhibits peak expression levels in early-use critical periods, and is required for activity-dependent synaptic remodeling during this transient developmental window. FMRP canonically binds mRNA to repress protein translation, with targets that regulate cytoskeleton dynamics, membrane trafficking, and trans-synaptic signaling. We focus here on recent advances emerging in these three areas from the Drosophila disease model. In the well-characterized central brain mushroom body (MB) olfactory learning/memory circuit, FMRP is required for activity-dependent synaptic remodeling of projection neurons innervating the MB calyx, with function tightly restricted to an early-use critical period. FMRP loss is phenocopied by conditional removal of FMRP only during this critical period, and rescued by FMRP conditional expression only during this critical period. Consistent with FXS hyperexcitation, FMRP loss defects are phenocopied by heightened sensory experience and targeted optogenetic hyperexcitation during this critical period. FMRP binds mRNA encoding Drosophila ESCRTIII core component Shrub (human CHMP4 homolog) to restrict Shrub translation in an activity-dependent mechanism only during this same critical period. Shrub mediates endosomal membrane trafficking, and perturbing Shrub expression is known to interfere with neuronal process pruning. Consistently, FMRP loss and Shrub overexpression targeted to projection neurons similarly causes endosomal membrane trafficking defects within synaptic boutons, and genetic reduction of Shrub strikingly rescues Drosophila FXS model defects. In parallel work on the well-characterized giant fiber (GF) circuit, FMRP limits iontophoretic dye loading into central interneurons, demonstrating an FMRP role controlling core neuronal properties through the

  14. Oval cell response is attenuated by depletion of liver resident macrophages in the 2-AAF/partial hepatectomy rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Xiang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: Macrophages are known to play an important role in hepatocyte mediated liver regeneration by secreting inflammatory mediators. However, there is little information available on the role of resident macrophages in oval cell mediated liver regeneration. In the present study we aimed to investigate the role of macrophages in oval cell expansion induced by 2-acetylaminofluorene/partial hepatectomy (2-AAF/PH in rats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We depleted macrophages in the liver of 2-AAF/PH treated rats by injecting liposome encapsulated clodronate 48 hours before PH. Regeneration of remnant liver mass, as well as proliferation and differentiation of oval cells were measured. We found that macrophage-depleted rats suffered higher mortality and liver transaminase levels. We also showed that depletion of macrophages yielded a significant decrease of EPCAM and PCK positive oval cells in immunohistochemical stained liver sections 9 days after PH. Meanwhile, oval cell differentiation was also attenuated as a result of macrophage depletion, as large foci of small basophilic hepatocytes were observed by day 9 following hepatectomy in control rats whereas they were almost absent in macrophage depleted rats. Accordingly, real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed lower expression of albumin mRNA in macrophage depleted livers. Then we assessed whether macrophage depletion may affect hepatic production of stimulating cytokines for liver regeneration. We showed that macrophage-depletion significantly inhibited hepatic expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6, along with a lack of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation during the early period following hepatectomy. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that macrophages play an important role in oval cell mediated liver regeneration in the 2-AAF/PH model.

  15. Targeted impairment of thymidine kinase 2 expression in cells induces mitochondrial DNA depletion and reveals molecular mechanisms of compensation of mitochondrial respiratory activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villarroya, Joan; Lara, Mari-Carmen; Dorado, Beatriz; Garrido, Marta; Garcia-Arumi, Elena; Meseguer, Anna; Hirano, Michio; Vila, Maya R.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We impaired TK2 expression in Ost TK1 - cells via siRNA-mediated interference (TK2 - ). → TK2 impairment caused severe mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion in quiescent cells. → Despite mtDNA depletion, TK2 - cells show high cytochrome oxidase activity. → Depletion of mtDNA occurs without imbalance in the mitochondrial dNTP pool. → Nuclear-encoded ENT1, DNA-pol γ, TFAM and TP gene expression is lowered in TK2 - cells. -- Abstract: The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome comprises a clinically heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by reductions of the mtDNA abundance, without associated point mutations or rearrangements. We have developed the first in vitro model to study of mtDNA depletion due to reduced mitochondrial thymidine kinase 2 gene (TK2) expression in order to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in mtDNA depletion syndrome due to TK2 mutations. Small interfering RNA targeting TK2 mRNA was used to decrease TK2 expression in Ost TK1 - cells, a cell line devoid of endogenous thymidine kinase 1 (TK1). Stable TK2-deficient cell lines showed a reduction of TK2 levels close to 80%. In quiescent conditions, TK2-deficient cells showed severe mtDNA depletion, also close to 80% the control levels. However, TK2-deficient clones showed increased cytochrome c oxidase activity, higher cytochrome c oxidase subunit I transcript levels and higher subunit II protein expression respect to control cells. No alterations of the deoxynucleotide pools were found, whereas a reduction in the expression of genes involved in nucleoside/nucleotide homeostasis (human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1, thymidine phosphorylase) and mtDNA maintenance (DNA-polymerase γ, mitochondrial transcription factor A) was observed. Our findings highlight the importance of cellular compensatory mechanisms that enhance the expression of respiratory components to ensure respiratory activity despite profound depletion in mtDNA levels.

  16. Technical Note: A fast online adaptive replanning method for VMAT using flattening filter free beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ates, Ozgur; Ahunbay, Ergun E.; Li, X. Allen, E-mail: ali@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53226 (United States); Moreau, Michel [Elekta, Inc., Maryland Heights, Missouri 63043 (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a fast replanning algorithm based on segment aperture morphing (SAM) for online replanning of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with flattening filter free (FFF) beams. Methods: A software tool was developed to interface with a VMAT research planning system, which enables the input and output of beam and machine parameters of VMAT plans. The SAM algorithm was used to modify multileaf collimator positions for each segment aperture based on the changes of the target from the planning (CT/MR) to daily image [CT/CBCT/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)]. The leaf travel distance was controlled for large shifts to prevent the increase of VMAT delivery time. The SAM algorithm was tested for 11 patient cases including prostate, pancreatic, and lung cancers. For each daily image set, three types of VMAT plans, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) repositioning, SAM adaptive, and full-scope reoptimization plans, were generated and compared. Results: The SAM adaptive plans were found to have improved the plan quality in target and/or critical organs when compared to the IGRT repositioning plans and were comparable to the reoptimization plans based on the data of planning target volume (PTV)-V100 (volume covered by 100% of prescription dose). For the cases studied, the average PTV-V100 was 98.85% ± 1.13%, 97.61% ± 1.45%, and 92.84% ± 1.61% with FFF beams for the reoptimization, SAM adaptive, and repositioning plans, respectively. The execution of the SAM algorithm takes less than 10 s using 16-CPU (2.6 GHz dual core) hardware. Conclusions: The SAM algorithm can generate adaptive VMAT plans using FFF beams with comparable plan qualities as those from the full-scope reoptimization plans based on daily CT/CBCT/MRI and can be used for online replanning to address interfractional variations.

  17. TU-CD-304-08: Feasibility of a VMAT-Based Spatially Fractionated Grid Therapy Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, B; Liu, M; Huang, Y; Kim, J; Brown, S; Siddiqui, F; Chetty, I; Wen, N [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Jin, J [Georgia Regents University, Augusta, GA (Georgia)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Grid therapy (GT) uses spatially modulated radiation doses to treat large tumors without significant toxicities. Incorporating 3D conformal-RT or IMRT improved single-field GT by reducing dose to normal tissues spatially through the use of multiple fields. The feasibility of a MLC-based, inverse-planned multi-field GT technique has been demonstrated. Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) provides conformal dose distributions with the additional potential advantage of reduced treatment times. In this study, we characterize a new VMAT-based GT (VMAT-GT) technique with respect to its deliverability and dosimetric accuracy. Methods: A lattice of 5mm-diameter spheres was created as the boost volume within a large treatment target. A simultaneous boost VMAT (RapidArc) plan with 8Gy to the target and 20Gy to the boost volume was generated using the Eclipse treatment planning system (AAA-v11). The linac utilized HD120 MLC and 6MV flattening-filter free beam. Four non-coplanar arcs, with couch angles at 0, 45, 90 and 317° were used. Collimator angles were at 45 and 315°. The plan was mapped to a phantom. Calibrated Gafchromic EBT3 films were used to measure the delivered dose. Results: The VMAT plan generated a highly spatially modulated dose distribution in the target. D95%, D50%, D5% for the spheres and the targets in Gy were 18.9, 20.6, 23 and 8.0, 9.6, 14.8, respectively. D50% for a 1cm ring 1cm outside the target was 3.0Gy. The peak-to-valley ratio of this technique is comparable to previously proposed techniques, but the MUs were reduced by almost 50%. Film dosimetry showed good agreement between calculated and delivered dose, with an overall gamma passing rate of >98% (3% and 1mm). The point dose differences at sphere centers varied from 2–8%. Conclusion: The deliverability and dose calculation accuracy of the proposed VMAT-GT technique demonstrates that ablative radiation doses are deliverable to large tumors safely and efficiently.

  18. SU-F-T-437: 3 Field VMAT Technique for Irradiation of Large Pelvic Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stakhursky, V [Radiation Oncology, Norwalk Hospital, Norwalk, CT (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: VMAT treatment planning for large pelvic volume irradiation could be suboptimal due to inability of Varian linac to split MLC carriage during VMAT delivery for fields larger than 14.5cm in X direction (direction of leaf motion). We compare the dosimetry between 3 VMAT planning techniques, two 2-arc field techniques and a 3-arc field technique: a) two small in X direction (less than 14.5cm) arc fields, complementing each other to cover the whole lateral extent of target during gantry rotation, b) two large arc fields, each covering the targets completely during the rotation, c) a 3 field technique with 2 small in X direction arcs and 1 large field covering whole target. Methods: 5 GYN cancer patients were selected to evaluate the 3 VMAT planning techniques. Treatment plans were generated using Varian Eclipse (ver. 11) TPS. Dose painting technique was used to deliver 5300 cGy to primary target and 4500 cGy to pelvic/abdominal node target. All the plans were normalized so that the prescription dose of 5300 cGy covered 95% of primary target volume. PTV and critical structures DVH curves were compared to evaluate all 3 planning techniques. Results: The dosimetric differences between the two 2-arc techniques were minor. The small field 2-arc technique showed a colder hot spot (0.4% averaged), while variations in maximum doses to critical structures were statistically nonsignificant (under 1.3%). In comparison, the 3-field technique demonstrated a colder hot spot (1.1% less, 105.8% averaged), and better sparing of critical structures. The maximum doses to larger bowel, small bowel and gluteal fold were 3% less, cord/cauda sparing was 4.2% better, and bladder maximum dose was 4.6% less. The differences in maximum doses to stomach and rectum were statistically nonsignificant. Conclusion: 3-arc VMAT technique for large field irradiation of pelvis demonstrates dosimetric advantages compared to 2-arc VMAT techniques.

  19. Dosimetric Verification Using 2D Planar Diode Arrays and 3D Cylindrical Diode Arrays in IMRT and VMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utitsarn, K.; Suriyapee, S.; Oonsiri, S.; Oonsiri, P.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Dosimetric verification of intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) before treatment is necessary due to the complexity of delivery beams. This work aims to evaluate the performance of 2D planar and 3D cylindrical diode arrays for patient specific QA in IMRT and VMAT. Methods: MapCHECK and ArcCHECK were studied for their properties before clinical use. The clinical performance was demonstrated with IMRT and VMAT plans, the measured results were compared with the calculation from Eclipse treatment planning. The gamma index of 3% /3mm with 10% threshold dose were the criteria of agreement between measured and calculated. Results: MapCHECK and ArcCHECK showed linearly dose response and demonstrated a short term and long term reproducibility within ± 0.2 and ± 2%, the repeatability rate effect was within ± 0.1 and ± 0.25 %, respectively. The dose rate response was within ± 1% for both detectors. The field size dependence was the same as ionization chamber response. The variation in energy response was within ± 4.5% for MapCHECK and ± 2% for ArcCHECK. The measured beam profile of open and 30° of hard and enhance dynamic wedge showed good agreement with calculated dose. Both detectors showed the excellent percentage passing for all 15 IMRT and VMAT plans. For IMRT, The average of the % pass of MapCHECK was 97.31 with the mean gamma of 0.45. The average number of detector was 344.80, while the average of the % pass of ArcCHECK was 97.21 with the mean gamma of 0.46. The average number of detector was 1049.31. For VMAT, The average of the % pass of MapCHECK was 98.55 with the mean gamma of 0.37. The average number of detector was 410, while the average of the % pass of ArcCHECK was 97.04 with the mean γ of 0.43. The average number of detector was 1054. Discussion: The more detectors of ArcCHECK than MapCHECK make more dose measurement points that increase the chance of dose difference. In addition, Map

  20. Curcumin attenuates oxidative stress induced NFκB mediated inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum dependent apoptosis of splenocytes in diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Kahkashan; Chowdhury, Sayantani; Ghosh, Sumit; Sil, Parames C

    2017-11-01

    The present study was aimed to determine the curative role of curcumin against diabetes induced oxidative stress and its associated splenic complications. Diabetes was induced in the experimental rats via the intraperitoneal administration of a single dose of STZ (65mgkg -1 body weight). Increased blood glucose and intracellular ROS levels along with decreased body weight, the activity of cellular antioxidant enzymes and GSH/GSSG ratio were observed in the diabetic animals. Histological assessment showed white pulp depletion and damaged spleen anatomy in these animals. Oral administration of curcumin at a dose of 100mgkg -1 body weight daily for 8weeks, however, restored these alterations. Investigation of the mechanism of hyperglycemia induced oxidative stress mediated inflammation showed upregulation of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, adhesion molecules and increased translocation of NFκB into the nucleus. Moreover, ER stress dependent cell death showed induction of eIF2α and CHOP mediated signalling pathways as well as increment in the expression of GRP78, Caspase-12, Calpain-1, phospho JNK, phospho p38 and phospho p53 in the diabetic group. Alteration of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio; disruption of mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome-C from mitochondria and upregulation of caspase 3 along with the formation of characteristic DNA ladder in the diabetic animals suggest the involvement of mitochondria dependent apoptotic pathway in the splenic cells. Treatment with curcumin could, however, protect cells from inflammatory damage and ER as well as mitochondrial apoptotic death by restoring the alterations of these parameters. Our results suggest that curcumin has the potential to act as an anti-diabetic, anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic therapeutic against diabetes mediated splenic damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Reversed synaptic effects of hypocretin and NPY mediated by excitatory GABA-dependent synaptic activity in developing MCH neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Xu, Youfen; van den Pol, Anthony N

    2013-03-01

    In mature neurons, GABA is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter. In contrast, in developing neurons, GABA exerts excitatory actions, and in some neurons GABA-mediated excitatory synaptic activity is more prevalent than glutamate-mediated excitation. Hypothalamic neuropeptides that modulate cognitive arousal and energy homeostasis, hypocretin/orexin and neuropeptide Y (NPY), evoked reversed effects on synaptic actions that were dependent on presynaptic GABA release onto melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) neurons. MCH neurons were identified by selective green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in transgenic mice. In adults, hypocretin increased GABA release leading to reduced excitation. In contrast, in the developing brain as studied here with analysis of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents, paired-pulse ratios, and evoked potentials, hypocretin acted presynaptically to enhance the excitatory actions of GABA. The ability of hypocretin to enhance GABA release increases inhibition in adult neurons but paradoxically enhances excitation in developing MCH neurons. In contrast, NPY attenuation of GABA release reduced inhibition in mature neurons but enhanced inhibition during development by attenuating GABA excitation. Both hypocretin and NPY also evoked direct actions on developing MCH neurons. Hypocretin excited MCH cells by activating a sodium-calcium exchanger and by reducing potassium currents; NPY reduced activity by increasing an inwardly rectifying potassium current. These data for the first time show that both hypocretin and NPY receptors are functional presynaptically during early postnatal hypothalamic development and that both neuropeptides modulate GABA actions during development with a valence of enhanced excitation or inhibition opposite to that of the adult state, potentially allowing neuropeptide modulation of use-dependent synapse stabilization.

  2. Troxerutin protects against 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47)-induced liver inflammation by attenuating oxidative stress-mediated NAD⁺-depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zi-Feng; Zhang, Yan-Qiu; Fan, Shao-Hua; Zhuang, Juan; Zheng, Yuan-Lin; Lu, Jun; Wu, Dong-Mei; Shan, Qun; Hu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates that 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) induces liver injury through enhanced ROS production and lymphocytic infiltration, which may promote a liver inflammatory response. Antioxidants have been reported to attenuate the cellular toxicity associated with polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). In this study, we investigated the effect of troxerutin, a trihydroxyethylated derivative of the natural bioflavonoid rutin, on BDE-47-induced liver inflammation and explored the potential mechanisms underlying this effect. Our results showed that NAD(+)-depletion was involved in the oxidative stress-mediated liver injury in a BDE-47 treated mouse model, which was confirmed by Vitamin E treatment. Furthermore, our data revealed that troxerutin effectively alleviated liver inflammation by mitigating oxidative stress-mediated NAD(+)-depletion in BDE-47 treated mice. Consequently, troxerutin remarkably restored SirT1 protein expression and activity in the livers of BDE-47-treated mice. Mechanistically, troxerutin dramatically repressed the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and the acetylation of NF-κB p65 (Lys 310) and Histone H3 (Lys9) to abate the transcription of inflammatory genes in BDE-47-treated mouse livers. These inhibitory effects of troxerutin were markedly blunted by EX527 (SirT1 inhibitor) treatment. This study provides novel mechanistic insights into the toxicity of BDE-47 and indicates that troxerutin might be used in the prevention and therapy of BDE-47-induced hepatotoxicity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Depletion of the Third Complement Component Ameliorates Age-Dependent Oxidative Stress and Positively Modulates Autophagic Activity in Aged Retinas in a Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Rogińska

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of complement component C3 global depletion on the biological structure and function of the aged retina. In vivo morphology (OCT, electrophysiological function (ERG, and the expression of selected oxidative stress-, apoptosis-, and autophagy-related proteins were assessed in retinas of 12-month-old C3-deficient and WT mice. Moreover, global gene expression in retinas was analyzed by RNA arrays. We found that the absence of active C3 was associated with (1 alleviation of the age-dependent decrease in retinal thickness and gradual deterioration of retinal bioelectrical function, (2 significantly higher levels of antioxidant enzymes (catalase and glutathione reductase and the antiapoptotic survivin and Mcl-1/Bak dimer, (3 lower expression of the cellular oxidative stress marker—4HNE—and decreased activity of proapoptotic caspase-3, (4 ameliorated retinal autophagic activity with localization of ubiquitinated protein conjugates commonly along the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE layer, and (5 significantly increased expression of several gene sets associated with maintenance of the physiological functions of the neural retina. Our findings shed light on mechanisms of age-related retinal alterations by identifying C3 as a potential therapeutic target for retinal aging.

  4. Troxerutin protects against 2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47)-induced liver inflammation by attenuating oxidative stress-mediated NAD+-depletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Zi-Feng; Zhang, Yan-qiu; Fan, Shao-Hua; Zhuang, Juan; Zheng, Yuan-Lin; Lu, Jun; Wu, Dong-Mei; Shan, Qun; Hu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • BDE-47 promotes liver inflammation by triggering oxidative stress-induced NAD + depletion. • Troxerutin inhibits BDE-47-induced liver inflammation via its antioxidant properties. • Troxerutin restores NAD + level and consequently abates SirT1 loss. • Troxerutin represses acetylation of NF-κB p65 (K310) and H3K9. • Troxerutin is a candidate for prevention and therapy of BDE-47-induced hepatotoxicity. - Abstract: Emerging evidence indicates that 2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) induces liver injury through enhanced ROS production and lymphocytic infiltration, which may promote a liver inflammatory response. Antioxidants have been reported to attenuate the cellular toxicity associated with polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). In this study, we investigated the effect of troxerutin, a trihydroxyethylated derivative of the natural bioflavonoid rutin, on BDE-47-induced liver inflammation and explored the potential mechanisms underlying this effect. Our results showed that NAD + -depletion was involved in the oxidative stress-mediated liver injury in a BDE-47 treated mouse model, which was confirmed by Vitamin E treatment. Furthermore, our data revealed that troxerutin effectively alleviated liver inflammation by mitigating oxidative stress-mediated NAD + -depletion in BDE-47 treated mice. Consequently, troxerutin remarkably restored SirT1 protein expression and activity in the livers of BDE-47-treated mice. Mechanistically, troxerutin dramatically repressed the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and the acetylation of NF-κB p65 (Lys 310) and Histone H3 (Lys9) to abate the transcription of inflammatory genes in BDE-47-treated mouse livers. These inhibitory effects of troxerutin were markedly blunted by EX527 (SirT1 inhibitor) treatment. This study provides novel mechanistic insights into the toxicity of BDE-47 and indicates that troxerutin might be used in the prevention and therapy of BDE-47-induced hepatotoxicity

  5. Evidence for Multiple Mediator Complexes in Yeast Independently Recruited by Activated Heat Shock Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandhakumar, Jayamani; Moustafa, Yara W; Chowdhary, Surabhi; Kainth, Amoldeep S; Gross, David S

    2016-07-15

    Mediator is an evolutionarily conserved coactivator complex essential for RNA polymerase II transcription. Although it has been generally assumed that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Mediator is a stable trimodular complex, its structural state in vivo remains unclear. Using the "anchor away" (AA) technique to conditionally deplete select subunits within Mediator and its reversibly associated Cdk8 kinase module (CKM), we provide evidence that Mediator's tail module is highly dynamic and that a subcomplex consisting of Med2, Med3, and Med15 can be independently recruited to the regulatory regions of heat shock factor 1 (Hsf1)-activated genes. Fluorescence microscopy of a scaffold subunit (Med14)-anchored strain confirmed parallel cytoplasmic sequestration of core subunits located outside the tail triad. In addition, and contrary to current models, we provide evidence that Hsf1 can recruit the CKM independently of core Mediator and that core Mediator has a role in regulating postinitiation events. Collectively, our results suggest that yeast Mediator is not monolithic but potentially has a dynamic complexity heretofore unappreciated. Multiple species, including CKM-Mediator, the 21-subunit core complex, the Med2-Med3-Med15 tail triad, and the four-subunit CKM, can be independently recruited by activated Hsf1 to its target genes in AA strains. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. An in vivo dose verification method for SBRT–VMAT delivery using the EPID

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCowan, P. M., E-mail: peter.mccowan@cancercare.mb.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Van Uytven, E.; Van Beek, T.; Asuni, G. [Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); McCurdy, B. M. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Medical Physics Department, CancerCare Manitoba, 675 McDermot Avenue, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3E 0V9 (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, 820 Sherbrook Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3A 1R9 (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Radiation treatments have become increasingly more complex with the development of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and the use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). SBRT involves the delivery of substantially larger doses over fewer fractions than conventional therapy. SBRT–VMAT treatments will strongly benefit from in vivo patient dose verification, as any errors in delivery can be more detrimental to the radiobiology of the patient as compared to conventional therapy. Electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are available on most commercial linear accelerators (Linacs) and their documented use for dosimetry makes them valuable tools for patient dose verification. In this work, the authors customize and validate a physics-based model which utilizes on-treatment EPID images to reconstruct the 3D dose delivered to the patient during SBRT–VMAT delivery. Methods: The SBRT Linac head, including jaws, multileaf collimators, and flattening filter, were modeled using Monte Carlo methods and verified with measured data. The simulation provides energy spectrum data that are used by their “forward” model to then accurately predict fluence generated by a SBRT beam at a plane above the patient. This fluence is then transported through the patient and then the dose to the phosphor layer in the EPID is calculated. Their “inverse” model back-projects the EPID measured focal fluence to a plane upstream of the patient and recombines it with the extra-focal fluence predicted by the forward model. This estimate of total delivered fluence is then forward projected onto the patient’s density matrix and a collapsed cone convolution algorithm calculates the dose delivered to the patient. The model was tested by reconstructing the dose for two prostate, three lung, and two spine SBRT–VMAT treatment fractions delivered to an anthropomorphic phantom. It was further validated against actual patient data for a lung and spine SBRT–VMAT plan. The

  7. Auxin-dependent compositional change in Mediator in ARF7- and ARF19-mediated transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Jun; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Onoda, Makoto; Li, Lin; Li, Chuanyou; Tasaka, Masao; Furutani, Masahiko

    2016-06-07

    Mediator is a multiprotein complex that integrates the signals from transcription factors binding to the promoter and transmits them to achieve gene transcription. The subunits of Mediator complex reside in four modules: the head, middle, tail, and dissociable CDK8 kinase module (CKM). The head, middle, and tail modules form the core Mediator complex, and the association of CKM can modify the function of Mediator in transcription. Here, we show genetic and biochemical evidence that CKM-associated Mediator transmits auxin-dependent transcriptional repression in lateral root (LR) formation. The AUXIN/INDOLE 3-ACETIC ACID 14 (Aux/IAA14) transcriptional repressor inhibits the transcriptional activity of its binding partners AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 7 (ARF7) and ARF19 by making a complex with the CKM-associated Mediator. In addition, TOPLESS (TPL), a transcriptional corepressor, forms a bridge between IAA14 and the CKM component MED13 through the physical interaction. ChIP assays show that auxin induces the dissociation of MED13 but not the tail module component MED25 from the ARF7 binding region upstream of its target gene. These findings indicate that auxin-induced degradation of IAA14 changes the module composition of Mediator interacting with ARF7 and ARF19 in the upstream region of their target genes involved in LR formation. We suggest that this regulation leads to a quick switch of signal transmission from ARFs to target gene expression in response to auxin.

  8. Acute antibody-mediated rejection of skin grafts without involvement of granulocytes or complement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogman, M.J.; Cornelissen, I.M.; Koene, R.A.

    1984-01-01

    In immunosuppressed mice that carry rat skin xeno-grafts, acute antibody-mediated graft rejection (AAR) can be induced by intravenous administration of mouse anti-rat globulin. Dependent on the amount of antibody injected and on the complement status of the recipient, an Arthus-like or a Shwartzman-like pattern of vasculitis occurs. The role of polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMNs) in either type of vasculitis was tested by inducing AAR in recipients depleted of PMNs by total body irradiation. Despite the absence of PMNs in the graft vessels, AAR occurred both in the Arthus-like and in the Shwartzman-like type. Moreover, AAR could be elicited in PMN-depleted recipients that were complement-depleted by cobra venom factor treatment or were congenitally C5-deficient. We conclude that neither the PMN nor complement is an essential mediator the PMN nor complement is an essential mediator in this form of antibody-mediated vasculitis

  9. Epidermal growth factor receptor mediated proliferation depends on increased lipid droplet density regulated via a negative regulatory loop with FOXO3/Sirtuin6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penrose, Harrison; Heller, Sandra; Cable, Chloe [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Tulane University School of Medicine, 1430 Tulane Ave SL-79, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Makboul, Rania [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Tulane University School of Medicine, 1430 Tulane Ave SL-79, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Pathology Department, Assiut University, Assiut (Egypt); Chadalawada, Gita; Chen, Ying [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Tulane University School of Medicine, 1430 Tulane Ave SL-79, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Crawford, Susan E. [Department of Pathology, Saint Louis University School of Medicine, 1402 South Grand Blvd, Saint Louis, MO 63104 (United States); Savkovic, Suzana D., E-mail: ssavkovi@tulane.edu [Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Tulane University School of Medicine, 1430 Tulane Ave SL-79, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    The proliferation of colon cancer cells is mediated in part by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and requires sustained levels of cellular energy to meet its high metabolic needs. Intracellular lipid droplets (LDs) are a source of energy used for various cellular functions and they are elevated in density in human cancer, yet their regulation and function are not well understood. Here, in human colon cancer cells, EGF stimulates increases in LD density, which depends on EGFR expression and activation as well as the individual cellular capacity for lipid synthesis. Increases in LDs are blockaded by inhibition of PI3K/mTOR and PGE2 synthesis, supporting their dependency on select upstream pathways. In colon cancer cells, silencing of the FOXO3 transcription factor leads to down regulation of SIRT6, a negative regulator of lipid synthesis, and consequent increases in the LD coat protein PLIN2, revealing that increases in LDs depend on loss of FOXO3/SIRT6. Moreover, EGF stimulates loss of FOXO3/SIRT6, which is blockaded by the inhibition of upstream pathways as well as lipid synthesis, revealing existence of a negative regulatory loop between LDs and FOXO3/SIRT6. Elevated LDs are utilized by EGF treatment and their depletion through the inhibition of lipid synthesis or silencing of PLIN2 significantly attenuates proliferation. This novel mechanism of proliferative EGFR signaling leading to elevated LD density in colon cancer cells could potentially be therapeutically targeted for the treatment of tumor progression. - Highlights: • In colon cancer cells, EGFR activation leads to increases in LD density. • EGFR signaling includes PI3K/mTOR and PGE2 leading to lipid synthesis. • Increases in LDs are controlled by a negative regulatory loop with FOXO3/SIRT6. • EGFR mediated colon cancer cell proliferation depends on increased LD density.

  10. Epidermal growth factor receptor mediated proliferation depends on increased lipid droplet density regulated via a negative regulatory loop with FOXO3/Sirtuin6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penrose, Harrison; Heller, Sandra; Cable, Chloe; Makboul, Rania; Chadalawada, Gita; Chen, Ying; Crawford, Susan E.; Savkovic, Suzana D.

    2016-01-01

    The proliferation of colon cancer cells is mediated in part by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and requires sustained levels of cellular energy to meet its high metabolic needs. Intracellular lipid droplets (LDs) are a source of energy used for various cellular functions and they are elevated in density in human cancer, yet their regulation and function are not well understood. Here, in human colon cancer cells, EGF stimulates increases in LD density, which depends on EGFR expression and activation as well as the individual cellular capacity for lipid synthesis. Increases in LDs are blockaded by inhibition of PI3K/mTOR and PGE2 synthesis, supporting their dependency on select upstream pathways. In colon cancer cells, silencing of the FOXO3 transcription factor leads to down regulation of SIRT6, a negative regulator of lipid synthesis, and consequent increases in the LD coat protein PLIN2, revealing that increases in LDs depend on loss of FOXO3/SIRT6. Moreover, EGF stimulates loss of FOXO3/SIRT6, which is blockaded by the inhibition of upstream pathways as well as lipid synthesis, revealing existence of a negative regulatory loop between LDs and FOXO3/SIRT6. Elevated LDs are utilized by EGF treatment and their depletion through the inhibition of lipid synthesis or silencing of PLIN2 significantly attenuates proliferation. This novel mechanism of proliferative EGFR signaling leading to elevated LD density in colon cancer cells could potentially be therapeutically targeted for the treatment of tumor progression. - Highlights: • In colon cancer cells, EGFR activation leads to increases in LD density. • EGFR signaling includes PI3K/mTOR and PGE2 leading to lipid synthesis. • Increases in LDs are controlled by a negative regulatory loop with FOXO3/SIRT6. • EGFR mediated colon cancer cell proliferation depends on increased LD density.

  11. Strain- and Substrate-Dependent Redox Mediator and Electricity Production by Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosire, Erick M; Blank, Lars M; Rosenbaum, Miriam A

    2016-08-15

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an important, thriving member of microbial communities of microbial bioelectrochemical systems (BES) through the production of versatile phenazine redox mediators. Pure culture experiments with a model strain revealed synergistic interactions of P. aeruginosa with fermenting microorganisms whereby the synergism was mediated through the shared fermentation product 2,3-butanediol. Our work here shows that the behavior and efficiency of P. aeruginosa in mediated current production is strongly dependent on the strain of P. aeruginosa We compared levels of phenazine production by the previously investigated model strain P. aeruginosa PA14, the alternative model strain P. aeruginosa PAO1, and the BES isolate Pseudomonas sp. strain KRP1 with glucose and the fermentation products 2,3-butanediol and ethanol as carbon substrates. We found significant differences in substrate-dependent phenazine production and resulting anodic current generation for the three strains, with the BES isolate KRP1 being overall the best current producer and showing the highest electrochemical activity with glucose as a substrate (19 μA cm(-2) with ∼150 μg ml(-1) phenazine carboxylic acid as a redox mediator). Surprisingly, P. aeruginosa PAO1 showed very low phenazine production and electrochemical activity under all tested conditions. Microbial fuel cells and other microbial bioelectrochemical systems hold great promise for environmental technologies such as wastewater treatment and bioremediation. While there is much emphasis on the development of materials and devices to realize such systems, the investigation and a deeper understanding of the underlying microbiology and ecology are lagging behind. Physiological investigations focus on microorganisms exhibiting direct electron transfer in pure culture systems. Meanwhile, mediated electron transfer with natural redox compounds produced by, for example, Pseudomonas aeruginosa might enable an entire microbial

  12. DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation mediates low-dose X-ray irradiation (LDI)-induced Akt activation and osteoblast differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yong; Fang, Shi-ji [The Department of Orthopedics, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215000 (China); Zhu, Li-juan [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Translational Research and Therapy for Neuro-Psycho-Diseases and Institute of Neuroscience, Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215021 (China); Zhu, Lun-qing, E-mail: xiaodongwangsz@163.com [The Center of Diagnosis and Treatment for Children’s Bone Diseases, The Children’s Hospital Affiliated to Soochow University, Suzhou, Jiangsu 215000 (China); Zhou, Xiao-zhong, E-mail: zhouxz@suda.edu.cn [The Department of Orthopedics, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215000 (China)

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • LDI increases ALP activity, promotes type I collagen (Col I)/Runx2 mRNA expression. • LDI induces DNA–PKcs activation, which is required for osteoblast differentiation. • Akt activation mediates LDI-induced ALP activity and Col I/Runx2 mRNA increase. • DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation mediates LDI-induced Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation. • DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation is important for osteoblast differentiation. - Abstract: Low-dose irradiation (LDI) induces osteoblast differentiation, however the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. In this study, we explored the potential role of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA–PKcs)–Akt signaling in LDI-induced osteoblast differentiation. We confirmed that LDI promoted mouse calvarial osteoblast differentiation, which was detected by increased alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity as well as mRNA expression of type I collagen (Col I) and runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2). In mouse osteoblasts, LDI (1 Gy) induced phosphorylation of DNA–PKcs and Akt (mainly at Ser-473). The kinase inhibitors against DNA–PKcs (NU-7026 and NU-7441) or Akt (LY294002, perifosine and MK-2206), as well as partial depletion of DNA–PKcs or Akt1 by targeted-shRNA, dramatically inhibited LDI-induced Akt activation and mouse osteoblast differentiation. Further, siRNA-knockdown of SIN1, a key component of mTOR complex 2 (mTORC2), also inhibited LDI-induced Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation as well as ALP activity increase and Col I/Runx2 expression in mouse osteoblasts. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) assay results demonstrated that LDI-induced DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation, which was inhibited by NU-7441 or SIN1 siRNA-knockdown in mouse osteoblasts. In summary, our data suggest that DNA–PKcs–SIN1 complexation-mediated Akt activation (Ser-473 phosphorylation) is required for mouse osteoblast differentiation.

  13. SU-F-E-03: PET/CT Guided Dose Boost to Hypoxic Sub-Volume in Nasopharyngeal Carcinomas Using Self-Optimizing Non-Uniform VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, J; Zheng, X; Liu, H; Chen, B; Zhuo, W [FuDan University HuaDong Hospital, Institute of Radiation Medicine Fudan University Shanghai, Shanghai (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This study is to evaluate the feasibility of simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) to hypoxic subvolume (HTV) in nasopharyngeal carcinomas under the guidance of 18F-Fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) PET/CT using a novel non-uniform volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT)technique. Methods: Eight nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients treated with conventional uniform VMAT were retrospectively analyzed. For each treatment, actual conventional uniform VMAT plan with two or more arcs (2–2.5 arcs, totally rotating angle < 1000o) was designed with dose boost to hopxic subvolume (total dose, 84Gy) in the gross tumor volme (GTV) under the guidance of 18F- FMISO PET/CT. Based on the same dataset, experimental single arc non-uniform VAMT plans were generated with the same dose prescription using customized software tools. Dosimetric parameters, quality assurance and the efficiency of the treatment delivery were compared between the uniform and non-uniform VMAT plans. Results: To develop the non-uniform VMAT technique, a specific optimization model was successfully established. Both techniques generate high-quality plans with pass rate (>98%) with the 3mm, 3% criterion. HTV received dose of 84.1±0.75Gy and 84.1±1.2Gy from uniform and non-uniform VMAT plans, respectively. In terms of target coverage and dose homogeneity, there was no significant statistical difference between actual and experimental plans for each case. However, for critical organs at risk (OAR), including the parotids, oral cavity and larynx, dosimetric difference was significant with better dose sparing form experimental plans. Regarding plan implementation efficiency, the average machine time was 3.5 minutes for the actual VMAT plans and 3.7 minutes for the experimental nonuniform VMAT plans (p>0.050). Conclusion: Compared to conventional VMAT technique, the proposed non-uniform VMAT technique has the potential to produce efficient and safe treatment plans, especially in cases with complicated anatomical

  14. Radiotherapy-induced secondary cancer risk for breast cancer: 3D conformal therapy versus IMRT versus VMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Boram; Sung, Jiwon; Yoon, Myonggeun; Lee, Sunyoung

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the secondary cancer risk to various organs due to radiation treatment for breast cancer. Organ doses to an anthropomorphic phantom were measured using a photoluminescent dosimeter (PLD) for breast cancer treatment with 3D conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Cancer risk based on the measured dose was calculated using the BEIR (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation) VII models. The secondary dose per treatment dose (50.4 Gy) to various organs ranged from 0.02 to 0.36 Gy for 3D-CRT, but from 0.07 to 8.48 Gy for IMRT and VMAT, indicating that the latter methods are associated with higher secondary radiation doses than 3D-CRT. The result of the homogeneity index in the breast target shows that the dose homogeneity of 3D-CRT was worse than those of IMRT and VMAT. The organ specific lifetime attributable risks (LARs) to the thyroid, contralateral breast and ipsilateral lung per 100 000 population were 0.02, 19.71, and 0.76 respectively for 3D-CRT, much lower than the 0.11, 463.56, and 10.59 respectively for IMRT and the 0.12, 290.32, and 12.28 respectively for VMAT. The overall estimation of LAR indicated that the radiation-induced cancer risk due to breast radiation therapy was lower with 3D-CRT than with IMRT or VMAT. (paper)

  15. SU-E-T-184: Clinical VMAT QA Practice Using LINAC Delivery Log Files

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnston, H; Jacobson, T; Gu, X; Jiang, S; Stojadinovic, S

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment delivery dose clouds by comparing linac log data to doses measured using an ionization chamber and film. Methods: A commercial IMRT quality assurance (QA) process utilizing a DICOM-RT framework was tested for clinical practice using 30 prostate and 30 head and neck VMAT plans. Delivered 3D VMAT dose distributions were independently checked using a PinPoint ionization chamber and radiographic film in a solid water phantom. DICOM RT coordinates were used to extract the corresponding point and planar doses from 3D log file dose distributions. Point doses were evaluated by computing the percent error between log file and chamber measured values. A planar dose evaluation was performed for each plan using a 2D gamma analysis with 3% global dose difference and 3 mm isodose point distance criteria. The same analysis was performed to compare treatment planning system (TPS) doses to measured values to establish a baseline assessment of agreement. Results: The mean percent error between log file and ionization chamber dose was 1.0%±2.1% for prostate VMAT plans and −0.2%±1.4% for head and neck plans. The corresponding TPS calculated and measured ionization chamber values agree within 1.7%±1.6%. The average 2D gamma passing rates for the log file comparison to film are 98.8%±1.0% and 96.2%±4.2% for the prostate and head and neck plans, respectively. The corresponding passing rates for the TPS comparison to film are 99.4%±0.5% and 93.9%±5.1%. Overall, the point dose and film data indicate that log file determined doses are in excellent agreement with measured values. Conclusion: Clinical VMAT QA practice using LINAC treatment log files is a fast and reliable method for patient-specific plan evaluation

  16. The cyclin-dependent kinase 8 module sterically blocks Mediator interactions with RNA polymerase II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmlund, Hans; Baraznenok, Vera; Lindahl, Martin

    2006-01-01

    CDK8 (cyclin-dependent kinase 8), along with CycC, Med12, and Med13, form a repressive module (the Cdk8 module) that prevents RNA polymerase II (pol II) interactions with Mediator. Here, we report that the ability of the Cdk8 module to prevent pol II interactions is independent of the Cdk8......-dependent kinase activity. We use electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction to demonstrate that the Cdk8 module forms a distinct structural entity that binds to the head and middle region of Mediator, thereby sterically blocking interactions with pol II....

  17. Anti-CD20 B-cell depletion enhances monocyte reactivity in neuroimmunological disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hohlfeld Reinhard

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical trials evaluating anti-CD20-mediated B-cell depletion in multiple sclerosis (MS and neuromyelitis optica (NMO generated encouraging results. Our recent studies in the MS model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE attributed clinical benefit to extinction of activated B-cells, but cautioned that depletion of naïve B-cells may be undesirable. We elucidated the regulatory role of un-activated B-cells in EAE and investigated whether anti-CD20 may collaterally diminish regulatory B-cell properties in treatment of neuroimmunological disorders. Methods Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG peptide-immunized C57Bl/6 mice were depleted of B-cells. Functional consequences for regulatory T-cells (Treg and cytokine production of CD11b+ antigen presenting cells (APC were assessed. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 22 patients receiving anti-CD20 and 23 untreated neuroimmunological patients were evaluated for frequencies of B-cells, T-cells and monocytes; monocytic reactivity was determined by TNF-production and expression of signalling lymphocytic activation molecule (SLAM. Results We observed that EAE-exacerbation upon depletion of un-activated B-cells closely correlated with an enhanced production of pro-inflammatory TNF by CD11b+ APC. Paralleling this pre-clinical finding, anti-CD20 treatment of human neuroimmunological disorders increased the relative frequency of monocytes and accentuated pro-inflammatory monocyte function; when reactivated ex vivo, a higher frequency of monocytes from B-cell depleted patients produced TNF and expressed the activation marker SLAM. Conclusions These data suggest that in neuroimmunological disorders, pro-inflammatory APC activity is controlled by a subset of B-cells which is eliminated concomitantly upon anti-CD20 treatment. While this observation does not conflict with the general concept of B-cell depletion in human autoimmunity, it implies that its safety and

  18. Replication Protein A (RPA) deficiency activates the Fanconi anemia DNA repair pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Seok-Won; Jung, Jin Ki; Kim, Jung Min

    2016-09-01

    The Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway regulates DNA inter-strand crosslink (ICL) repair. Despite our greater understanding of the role of FA in ICL repair, its function in the preventing spontaneous genome instability is not well understood. Here, we show that depletion of replication protein A (RPA) activates the FA pathway. RPA1 deficiency increases chromatin recruitment of FA core complex, leading to FANCD2 monoubiquitination (FANCD2-Ub) and foci formation in the absence of DNA damaging agents. Importantly, ATR depletion, but not ATM, abolished RPA1 depletion-induced FANCD2-Ub, suggesting that ATR activation mediated FANCD2-Ub. Interestingly, we found that depletion of hSSB1/2-INTS3, a single-stranded DNA-binding protein complex, induces FANCD2-Ub, like RPA1 depletion. More interestingly, depletion of either RPA1 or INTS3 caused increased accumulation of DNA damage in FA pathway deficient cell lines. Taken together, these results indicate that RPA deficiency induces activation of the FA pathway in an ATR-dependent manner, which may play a role in the genome maintenance.

  19. Dosimetric impact of interplay effect in lung IMRT and VMAT treatment using in-house dynamic thorax phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukhlisin; Pawiro, S A

    2016-01-01

    Tumor motion due to patient's respiratory is a significant problem in radiotherapy treatment of lung cancer. The purpose of this project is to study the interplay effect through dosimetry verification between the calculated and delivered dose, as well as the dosimetric impact of leaf interplay with breathing-induced tumor motion in IMRT and VMAT treatment. In this study, a dynamic thorax phantom was designed and constructed for dosimetry measurement. The phantom had a linear sinusoidal tumor motion toward superior-inferior direction with variation of amplitudes and periods. TLD-100 LiF:Mg,Ti and Gafchromic EBT2 film were used to measure dose in the midpoint target and the spinal cord. The IMRT and VMAT treatment had prescription dose of 200 cGy per fraction. The dosimetric impact due to interplay effect during IMRT and VMAT treatment were resulted in the range of 0.5% to -6.6% and 0.9% to -5.3% of target dose reduction, respectively. Meanwhile, mean dose deviation of spinal cord in IMRT and VMAT treatment were around 1.0% to -6.9% and 0.9% to -6.3%, respectively. The results showed that if respiratory management technique were not implemented, the presence of lung tumor motion during dose delivery in IMRT and VMAT treatment causes dose discrepancies inside tumor volume. (paper)

  20. Depletion of GGA1 and GGA3 mediates postinjury elevation of BACE1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kendall R; Kang, Eugene L; Whalen, Michael J; Shen, Yong; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2012-07-25

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the most robust environmental risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Compelling evidence is accumulating that a single event of TBI is associated with increased levels of Aβ. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. We report here that the BACE1 interacting protein, GGA3, is depleted while BACE1 levels increase in the acute phase after injury (48 h) in a mouse model of TBI. We further demonstrated the role of GGA3 in the regulation of BACE1 in vivo by showing that BACE1 levels are increased in the brain of GGA3-null mice. We next found that head trauma potentiates BACE1 elevation in GGA3-null mice in the acute phase after TBI, and discovered that GGA1, a GGA3 homolog, is a novel caspase-3 substrate depleted at 48 h after TBI. Moreover, GGA1 silencing potentiates BACE1 elevation induced by GGA3 deletion in neurons in vitro, indicating that GGA1 and GGA3 synergistically regulate BACE1. Accordingly, we found that levels of both GGA1 and GGA3 are depleted while BACE1 levels are increased in a series of postmortem AD brains. Finally, we show that GGA3 haploinsufficiency results in sustained elevation of BACE1 and Aβ levels while GGA1 levels are restored in the subacute phase (7 d) after injury. In conclusion, our data indicate that depletion of GGA1 and GGA3 engender a rapid and robust elevation of BACE1 in the acute phase after injury. However, the efficient disposal of the acutely accumulated BACE1 solely depends on GGA3 levels in the subacute phase of injury.

  1. Troxerutin protects against 2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47)-induced liver inflammation by attenuating oxidative stress-mediated NAD{sup +}-depletion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Zi-Feng [School of Environment Science and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008, Jiangsu Province (China); Key Laboratory for Biotechnology on Medicinal Plants of Jiangsu Province, School of Life Science, Jiangsu Normal University, 101 Shanghai Road, Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhang, Yan-qiu [School of Environment Science and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008, Jiangsu Province (China); Fan, Shao-Hua [Key Laboratory for Biotechnology on Medicinal Plants of Jiangsu Province, School of Life Science, Jiangsu Normal University, 101 Shanghai Road, Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhuang, Juan [School of Environment Science and Spatial Informatics, China University of Mining and Technology, Xuzhou 221008, Jiangsu Province (China); Zheng, Yuan-Lin, E-mail: ylzheng@jsnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Biotechnology on Medicinal Plants of Jiangsu Province, School of Life Science, Jiangsu Normal University, 101 Shanghai Road, Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu Province (China); Lu, Jun; Wu, Dong-Mei; Shan, Qun; Hu, Bin [Key Laboratory for Biotechnology on Medicinal Plants of Jiangsu Province, School of Life Science, Jiangsu Normal University, 101 Shanghai Road, Xuzhou 221116, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • BDE-47 promotes liver inflammation by triggering oxidative stress-induced NAD{sup +} depletion. • Troxerutin inhibits BDE-47-induced liver inflammation via its antioxidant properties. • Troxerutin restores NAD{sup +} level and consequently abates SirT1 loss. • Troxerutin represses acetylation of NF-κB p65 (K310) and H3K9. • Troxerutin is a candidate for prevention and therapy of BDE-47-induced hepatotoxicity. - Abstract: Emerging evidence indicates that 2,2′,4,4′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) induces liver injury through enhanced ROS production and lymphocytic infiltration, which may promote a liver inflammatory response. Antioxidants have been reported to attenuate the cellular toxicity associated with polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). In this study, we investigated the effect of troxerutin, a trihydroxyethylated derivative of the natural bioflavonoid rutin, on BDE-47-induced liver inflammation and explored the potential mechanisms underlying this effect. Our results showed that NAD{sup +}-depletion was involved in the oxidative stress-mediated liver injury in a BDE-47 treated mouse model, which was confirmed by Vitamin E treatment. Furthermore, our data revealed that troxerutin effectively alleviated liver inflammation by mitigating oxidative stress-mediated NAD{sup +}-depletion in BDE-47 treated mice. Consequently, troxerutin remarkably restored SirT1 protein expression and activity in the livers of BDE-47-treated mice. Mechanistically, troxerutin dramatically repressed the nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65 and the acetylation of NF-κB p65 (Lys 310) and Histone H3 (Lys9) to abate the transcription of inflammatory genes in BDE-47-treated mouse livers. These inhibitory effects of troxerutin were markedly blunted by EX527 (SirT1 inhibitor) treatment. This study provides novel mechanistic insights into the toxicity of BDE-47 and indicates that troxerutin might be used in the prevention and therapy of BDE-47-induced

  2. Cardiac dose-sparing effects of deep-inspiration breath-hold in left breast irradiation. Is IMRT more beneficial than VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakka, Mazen; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G. [Coburg Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Coburg (Germany); Friedrich-Alexander University of Erlangen-Nuernberg, Faculty of Medicine, Erlangen (Germany); Kunzelmann, Leonie; Metzger, Martin [Coburg Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Coburg (Germany)

    2017-10-15

    Given the reduction in death from breast cancer, as well as improvements in overall survival, adjuvant radiotherapy is considered the standard treatment for breast cancer. However, left-sided breast irradiation was associated with an increased rate of fatal cardiovascular events due to incidental irradiation of the heart. Recently, considerable efforts have been made to minimize cardiac toxicity of left-sided breast irradiation by new treatment methods such as deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and new radiation techniques, particularly intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of DIBH irradiation on cardiac dose compared with free-breathing (FB) irradiation, while the secondary objective was to compare the advantages of IMRT versus VMAT plans in both the FB and the DIBH position for left-sided breast cancer. In all, 25 consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients underwent CT simulation in the FB and DIBH position. Five patients were excluded with no cardiac displacement following DIBH-CT simulation. The other 20 patients were irradiated in the DIBH position using respiratory gating. Four different treatment plans were generated for each patient, an IMRT and a VMAT plan in the DIBH and in the FB position, respectively. The following parameters were used for plan comparison: dose to the heart, left anterior descending coronary artery (mean dose, maximum dose, D25% and D45%), ipsilateral, contralateral lung (mean dose, D20%, D30%) and contralateral breast (mean dose). The percentage in dose reduction for organs at risk achieved by DIBH for both IMRT and VMAT plans was calculated and compared for each patient by each treatment plan. DIBH irradiation significantly reduced mean dose to the heart and left anterior descending coronary artery (LADCA) using both IMRT (heart -20%; p = 0.0002, LADCA -9%; p = 0.001) and VMAT (heart -23%; p = 0.00003, LADCA -16%; p = 0

  3. Chitin-induced T6SS in Vibrio cholerae is dependent on ChiS activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chourashi, Rhishita; Das, Suman; Dhar, Debarpan; Okamoto, Keinosuke; Mukhopadhyay, Asish K; Chatterjee, Nabendu Sekhar

    2018-05-01

    Vibrio cholerae regularly colonizes the chitinous exoskeleton of crustacean shells in the aquatic region. The type 6 secretion system (T6SS) in V. cholerae is an interbacterial killing device. This system is thought to provide a competitive advantage to V. cholerae in a polymicrobial community of the aquatic region under nutrient-poor conditions. V. cholerae chitin sensing is known to be initiated by the activation of a two-component sensor histidine kinase ChiS in the presence of GlcNAc2 (N,N'-diacetylchitobiose) residues generated by the action of chitinases on chitin. It is known that T6SS in V. cholerae is generally induced by chitin. However, the effect of ChiS activation on T6SS is unknown. Here, we found that ChiS inactivation resulted in impaired bacterial killing and reduced expression of T6SS genes. Active ChiS positively affected T6SS-mediated natural transformation in V. cholerae. ChiS depletion or inactivation also resulted in reduced colonization on insoluble chitin surfaces. Therefore, we have shown that V. cholerae colonization on chitinous surfaces activates ChiS, which promotes T6SS-dependent bacterial killing and horizontal gene transfer. We also highlight the importance of chitinases in T6SS upregulation.

  4. Functional genetic variants in the vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1) modulate emotion processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohoff, Falk W.; Hodge, Rachel; Narasimhan, Sneha; Nall, Aleksandra; Ferraro, Thomas N.; Mickey, Brian J.; Heitzeg, Mary M.; Langenecker, Scott A.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar; Bogdan, Ryan; Nikolova, Yuliya S.; Drabant, Emily; Hariri, Ahmad R.; Bevilacqua, Laura; Goldman, David; Doyle, Glenn A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Emotional behavior is in part heritable and often disrupted in psychopathology. Identification of specific genetic variants that drive this heritability may provide important new insight into molecular and neurobiological mechanisms involved in emotionality. Our results demonstrate that the presynaptic vesicular monoamine transporter 1 (VMAT1) Thr136Ile (rs1390938) polymorphism is functional in vitro, with the Ile allele leading to increased monoamine transport into presynaptic vesicles. Moreover, we show that the Thr136Ile variant predicts differential responses in emotional brain circuits consistent with its effects in vitro. Lastly, deep sequencing of bipolar disorder (BPD) patients and controls identified several rare novel VMAT1 variants. The variant Phe84Ser was only present in individuals with BPD and leads to marked increase monoamine transport in vitro. Taken together, our data show that VMAT1 polymorphisms influence monoamine signaling, the functional response of emotional brain circuits, and risk for psychopathology. PMID:23337945

  5. Dosimetric comparison of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in total scalp irradiation: a single institutional experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ostheimer, Christian; Huebsch, Patrick; Janich, Martin; Gerlach, Reinhard; Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Total scalp irradiation (TSI) is a rare but challenging indication. We previously reported that non-coplanar intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was superior to coplanar IMRT in organ-at-risk (OAR) protection and target dose distribution. This consecutive treatment planning study compared IMRT with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). A retrospective treatment plan databank search was performed and 5 patient cases were randomly selected. Cranial imaging was restored from the initial planning computed tomography (CT) and target volumes and OAR were redelineated. For each patients, three treatment plans were calculated (coplanar/non-coplanar IMRT, VMAT; prescribed dose 50 Gy, single dose 2 Gy). Conformity, homogeneity and dose volume histograms were used for plan. VMAT featured the lowest monitor units and the sharpest dose gradient (1.6 Gy/mm). Planning target volume (PTV) coverage and homogeneity was better in VMAT (coverage, 0.95; homogeneity index [HI], 0.118) compared to IMRT (coverage, 0.94; HI, 0.119) but coplanar IMRT produced the most conformal plans (conformity index [CI], 0.43). Minimum PTV dose range was 66.8% –88.4% in coplanar, 77.5%–88.2% in non-coplanar IMRT and 82.8%–90.3% in VMAT. Mean dose to the brain, brain stem, optic system (maximum dose) and lenses were 18.6, 13.2, 9.1, and 5.2 Gy for VMAT, 21.9, 13.4, 14.5, and 6.3 Gy for non-coplanar and 22.8, 16.5, 11.5, and 5.9 Gy for coplanar IMRT. Maximum optic chiasm dose was 7.7, 8.4, and 11.1 Gy (non-coplanar IMRT, VMAT, and coplanar IMRT). Target coverage, homogeneity and OAR protection, was slightly superior in VMAT plans which also produced the sharpest dose gradient towards healthy tissue

  6. Dosimetric comparison of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in total scalp irradiation: a single institutional experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostheimer, Christian; Huebsch, Patrick; Janich, Martin; Gerlach, Reinhard; Vordermark, Dirk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Halle (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Total scalp irradiation (TSI) is a rare but challenging indication. We previously reported that non-coplanar intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) was superior to coplanar IMRT in organ-at-risk (OAR) protection and target dose distribution. This consecutive treatment planning study compared IMRT with volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT). A retrospective treatment plan databank search was performed and 5 patient cases were randomly selected. Cranial imaging was restored from the initial planning computed tomography (CT) and target volumes and OAR were redelineated. For each patients, three treatment plans were calculated (coplanar/non-coplanar IMRT, VMAT; prescribed dose 50 Gy, single dose 2 Gy). Conformity, homogeneity and dose volume histograms were used for plan. VMAT featured the lowest monitor units and the sharpest dose gradient (1.6 Gy/mm). Planning target volume (PTV) coverage and homogeneity was better in VMAT (coverage, 0.95; homogeneity index [HI], 0.118) compared to IMRT (coverage, 0.94; HI, 0.119) but coplanar IMRT produced the most conformal plans (conformity index [CI], 0.43). Minimum PTV dose range was 66.8% –88.4% in coplanar, 77.5%–88.2% in non-coplanar IMRT and 82.8%–90.3% in VMAT. Mean dose to the brain, brain stem, optic system (maximum dose) and lenses were 18.6, 13.2, 9.1, and 5.2 Gy for VMAT, 21.9, 13.4, 14.5, and 6.3 Gy for non-coplanar and 22.8, 16.5, 11.5, and 5.9 Gy for coplanar IMRT. Maximum optic chiasm dose was 7.7, 8.4, and 11.1 Gy (non-coplanar IMRT, VMAT, and coplanar IMRT). Target coverage, homogeneity and OAR protection, was slightly superior in VMAT plans which also produced the sharpest dose gradient towards healthy tissue.

  7. Nanotoxicity of pure silica mediated through oxidant generation rather than glutathione depletion in human lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Mohd Javed; Ahamed, Maqusood; Kumar, Sudhir; Siddiqui, Huma; Patil, Govil; Ashquin, Mohd; Ahmad, Iqbal

    2010-10-09

    Though, oxidative stress has been implicated in silica nanoparticles induced toxicity both in vitro and in vivo, but no similarities exist regarding dose-response relationship. This discrepancy may, partly, be due to associated impurities of trace metals that may present in varying amounts. Here, cytotoxicity and oxidative stress parameters of two sizes (10 nm and 80 nm) of pure silica nanoparticles was determined in human lung epithelial cells (A549 cells). Both sizes of silica nanoparticles induced dose-dependent cytotoxicity as measured by MTT [3-(4,5-dimethyl thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide] and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assays. Silica nanoparticles were also found to induce oxidative stress in dose-dependent manner indicated by induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, and membrane lipid peroxidation (LPO). However, both sizes of silica nanoparticles had little effect on intracellular glutathione (GSH) level and the activities of glutathione metabolizing enzymes; glutathione reductase (GR) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx). Buthionine-[S,R]-sulfoximine (BSO) plus silica nanoparticles did not result in significant GSH depletion than that caused by BSO alone nor N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) afforded significant protection from ROS and LPO induced by silica nanoparticles. The rather unaltered level of GSH is also supported by finding no appreciable alteration in the level of GR and GPx. Our data suggest that the silica nanoparticles exert toxicity in A549 cells through the oxidant generation (ROS and LPO) rather than the depletion of GSH. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Mycotoxin zearalenone induces AIF- and ROS-mediated cell death through p53- and MAPK-dependent signaling pathways in RAW264.7 macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ji-Yeon; Zheng, Zhong-Hua; Son, Young-Ok; Shi, Xianglin; Jang, Young-Oh; Lee, Jeong-Chae

    2011-12-01

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is commonly found in many food commodities and is known to cause reproductive disorders and genotoxic effects. However, the mode of ZEN-induced cell death of macrophages and the mechanisms by which ZEN causes cytotoxicity remain unclear. The present study shows that ZEN treatment reduces viability of RAW264.7 cells in a dose-dependent manner. ZEN causes predominantly necrotic and late apoptotic cell death. ZEN treatment also results in the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), mitochondrial changes in Bcl-2 and Bax proteins, and cytoplasmic release of cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF). Pre-treatment of the cells with either z-VAD-fmk or z-IETD-fmk does not attenuate ZEN-mediated cell death, whereas catalase suppresses the ZEN-induced decrease in viability in RAW264.7 cells. Treating the cells with c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), or p53 inhibitor prevented ZEN-mediated changes, such as MMP loss, cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) increase, and cell death. JNK or p38 MAPK inhibitor inhibited mitochondrial alterations of Bcl-2 and Bax proteins with attendant decreases in cellular ROS levels. Knockdown of AIF via siRNA transfection also diminished ZEN-induced cell death. Further, adenosine triphosphate was markedly depleted in the ZEN-exposed cells. Collectively, these results suggest that ZEN induces cytotoxicity in RAW264.7 cells via AIF- and ROS-mediated signaling, in which the activations of p53 and JNK/p38 play a key role. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. RACK1-mediated translation control promotes liver fibrogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Min; Peng, Peike; Wang, Jiajun [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Wang, Lan; Duan, Fangfang [Institute of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Jia, Dongwei, E-mail: jiadongwei@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Ruan, Yuanyuan, E-mail: yuanyuanruan@fudan.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Gu, Jianxin [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Institute of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2015-07-31

    Activation of quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is the central event of liver fibrosis. The translational machinery is an optimized molecular network that affects cellular homoeostasis and diseases, whereas the role of protein translation in HSCs activation and liver fibrosis is little defined. Our previous report suggests that up-regulation of receptor for activated C-kinase 1(RACK1) in HSCs is critical for liver fibrogenesis. In this study, we found that RACK1 promoted macrophage conditioned medium (MCM)-induced assembly of eIF4F and phosphorylation of eIF4E in primary HSCs. RACK1 enhanced the translation and expression of pro-fibrogenic factors collagen 1α1, snail and cyclin E1 induced by MCM. Administration of PP242 or knock-down of eIF4E suppressed RACK1-stimulated collagen 1α1 production, proliferation and migration in primary HSCs. In addition, depletion of eIF4E attenuated thioacetamide (TAA)-induced liver fibrosis in vivo. Our data suggest that RACK1-mediated stimulation of cap-dependent translation plays crucial roles in HSCs activation and liver fibrogenesis, and targeting translation initiation could be a promising strategy for the treatment of liver fibrosis. - Highlights: • RACK1 induces the assembly of eIF4F and phosphorylation of eIF4E in primary HSCs. • RACK1 stimulates the translation of collagen 1α1, snail and cyclin E1 in HSCs. • RACK1 promotes HSCs activation via cap-mediated translation. • Depletion of eIF4E suppresses liver fibrogenesis in vivo.

  10. RACK1-mediated translation control promotes liver fibrogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Min; Peng, Peike; Wang, Jiajun; Wang, Lan; Duan, Fangfang; Jia, Dongwei; Ruan, Yuanyuan; Gu, Jianxin

    2015-01-01

    Activation of quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) is the central event of liver fibrosis. The translational machinery is an optimized molecular network that affects cellular homoeostasis and diseases, whereas the role of protein translation in HSCs activation and liver fibrosis is little defined. Our previous report suggests that up-regulation of receptor for activated C-kinase 1(RACK1) in HSCs is critical for liver fibrogenesis. In this study, we found that RACK1 promoted macrophage conditioned medium (MCM)-induced assembly of eIF4F and phosphorylation of eIF4E in primary HSCs. RACK1 enhanced the translation and expression of pro-fibrogenic factors collagen 1α1, snail and cyclin E1 induced by MCM. Administration of PP242 or knock-down of eIF4E suppressed RACK1-stimulated collagen 1α1 production, proliferation and migration in primary HSCs. In addition, depletion of eIF4E attenuated thioacetamide (TAA)-induced liver fibrosis in vivo. Our data suggest that RACK1-mediated stimulation of cap-dependent translation plays crucial roles in HSCs activation and liver fibrogenesis, and targeting translation initiation could be a promising strategy for the treatment of liver fibrosis. - Highlights: • RACK1 induces the assembly of eIF4F and phosphorylation of eIF4E in primary HSCs. • RACK1 stimulates the translation of collagen 1α1, snail and cyclin E1 in HSCs. • RACK1 promotes HSCs activation via cap-mediated translation. • Depletion of eIF4E suppresses liver fibrogenesis in vivo

  11. SU-E-T-395: Multi-GPU-Based VMAT Treatment Plan Optimization Using a Column-Generation Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Z; Shi, F; Jia, X; Jiang, S; Peng, F

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: GPU has been employed to speed up VMAT optimizations from hours to minutes. However, its limited memory capacity makes it difficult to handle cases with a huge dose-deposition-coefficient (DDC) matrix, e.g. those with a large target size, multiple arcs, small beam angle intervals and/or small beamlet size. We propose multi-GPU-based VMAT optimization to solve this memory issue to make GPU-based VMAT more practical for clinical use. Methods: Our column-generation-based method generates apertures sequentially by iteratively searching for an optimal feasible aperture (referred as pricing problem, PP) and optimizing aperture intensities (referred as master problem, MP). The PP requires access to the large DDC matrix, which is implemented on a multi-GPU system. Each GPU stores a DDC sub-matrix corresponding to one fraction of beam angles and is only responsible for calculation related to those angles. Broadcast and parallel reduction schemes are adopted for inter-GPU data transfer. MP is a relatively small-scale problem and is implemented on one GPU. One headand- neck cancer case was used for test. Three different strategies for VMAT optimization on single GPU were also implemented for comparison: (S1) truncating DDC matrix to ignore its small value entries for optimization; (S2) transferring DDC matrix part by part to GPU during optimizations whenever needed; (S3) moving DDC matrix related calculation onto CPU. Results: Our multi-GPU-based implementation reaches a good plan within 1 minute. Although S1 was 10 seconds faster than our method, the obtained plan quality is worse. Both S2 and S3 handle the full DDC matrix and hence yield the same plan as in our method. However, the computation time is longer, namely 4 minutes and 30 minutes, respectively. Conclusion: Our multi-GPU-based VMAT optimization can effectively solve the limited memory issue with good plan quality and high efficiency, making GPUbased ultra-fast VMAT planning practical for real clinical use

  12. SU-E-T-395: Multi-GPU-Based VMAT Treatment Plan Optimization Using a Column-Generation Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tian, Z; Shi, F; Jia, X; Jiang, S [UT Southwestern Medical Ctr at Dallas, Dallas, TX (United States); Peng, F [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: GPU has been employed to speed up VMAT optimizations from hours to minutes. However, its limited memory capacity makes it difficult to handle cases with a huge dose-deposition-coefficient (DDC) matrix, e.g. those with a large target size, multiple arcs, small beam angle intervals and/or small beamlet size. We propose multi-GPU-based VMAT optimization to solve this memory issue to make GPU-based VMAT more practical for clinical use. Methods: Our column-generation-based method generates apertures sequentially by iteratively searching for an optimal feasible aperture (referred as pricing problem, PP) and optimizing aperture intensities (referred as master problem, MP). The PP requires access to the large DDC matrix, which is implemented on a multi-GPU system. Each GPU stores a DDC sub-matrix corresponding to one fraction of beam angles and is only responsible for calculation related to those angles. Broadcast and parallel reduction schemes are adopted for inter-GPU data transfer. MP is a relatively small-scale problem and is implemented on one GPU. One headand- neck cancer case was used for test. Three different strategies for VMAT optimization on single GPU were also implemented for comparison: (S1) truncating DDC matrix to ignore its small value entries for optimization; (S2) transferring DDC matrix part by part to GPU during optimizations whenever needed; (S3) moving DDC matrix related calculation onto CPU. Results: Our multi-GPU-based implementation reaches a good plan within 1 minute. Although S1 was 10 seconds faster than our method, the obtained plan quality is worse. Both S2 and S3 handle the full DDC matrix and hence yield the same plan as in our method. However, the computation time is longer, namely 4 minutes and 30 minutes, respectively. Conclusion: Our multi-GPU-based VMAT optimization can effectively solve the limited memory issue with good plan quality and high efficiency, making GPUbased ultra-fast VMAT planning practical for real clinical use.

  13. A retrospective planning analysis comparing intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) using two optimization algorithms for the treatment of early-stage prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elith, Craig A; Dempsey, Shane E; Warren-Forward, Helen M

    2013-01-01

    The primary aim of this study is to compare intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) to volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for the radical treatment of prostate cancer using version 10.0 (v10.0) of Varian Medical Systems, RapidArc radiation oncology system. Particular focus was placed on plan quality and the implications on departmental resources. The secondary objective was to compare the results in v10.0 to the preceding version 8.6 (v8.6). Twenty prostate cancer cases were retrospectively planned using v10.0 of Varian's Eclipse and RapidArc software. Three planning techniques were performed: a 5-field IMRT, VMAT using one arc (VMAT-1A), and VMAT with two arcs (VMAT-2A). Plan quality was assessed by examining homogeneity, conformity, the number of monitor units (MUs) utilized, and dose to the organs at risk (OAR). Resource implications were assessed by examining planning and treatment times. The results obtained using v10.0 were also compared to those previously reported by our group for v8.6. In v10.0, each technique was able to produce a dose distribution that achieved the departmental planning guidelines. The IMRT plans were produced faster than VMAT plans and displayed improved homogeneity. The VMAT plans provided better conformity to the target volume, improved dose to the OAR, and required fewer MUs. Treatments using VMAT-1A were significantly faster than both IMRT and VMAT-2A. Comparison between versions 8.6 and 10.0 revealed that in the newer version, VMAT planning was significantly faster and the quality of the VMAT dose distributions produced were of a better quality. VMAT (v10.0) using one or two arcs provides an acceptable alternative to IMRT for the treatment of prostate cancer. VMAT-1A has the greatest impact on reducing treatment time

  14. Fenofibrate activates Nrf2 through p62-dependent Keap1 degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jeong Su; Kang, Dong Hoon; Lee, Da Hyun; Bae, Soo Han

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) activates the β-oxidation of fatty acids in the liver. Fenofibrate is a potent agonist of PPARα and is used in the treatment of hyperlipidemia. Fenofibrate treatment often induces the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to cell death. The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) pathway is an essential component of the defense mechanism against oxidative stress. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway in fenofibrate-induced cell death is not known. In this study, we demonstrated that fenofibrate induces Keap1 degradation and Nrf2 activation. This fenofibrate-mediated Keap1 degradation is partly dependent on autophagy. Furthermore, fenofibrate-induced Keap1 degradation followed by Nrf2 activation is mainly mediated by p62, which functions as an adaptor protein in the autophagic pathway. Consistent with these findings, ablation of p62 increased fenofibrate-mediated apoptotic cell death associated with ROS accumulation. These results strongly suggest that p62 plays a crucial role in preventing fenofibrate-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Fenofibrate induces cell death by increasing ROS production. • The underlying defense mechanism against this effect is unknown. • Fenofibrate induces autophagy-dependent Keap1 degradation and Nrf2 activation. • This process is p62-dependent; lack of p62 enhanced fenofibrate-mediated apoptosis. • p62 plays a crucial role in preventing fenofibrate-induced cell death

  15. Fenofibrate activates Nrf2 through p62-dependent Keap1 degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jeong Su [Severance Biomedical Science Institute (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei Biomedical Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Dong Hoon [Department of Life Science and Ewha Research Center for Systems Biology (Korea, Republic of); The Research Center for Cell Homeostasis, Ewha Womans University, Seoul 127-750 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Da Hyun [Severance Biomedical Science Institute (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei Biomedical Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Soo Han, E-mail: soohanbae@yuhs.ac [Severance Biomedical Science Institute (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei Biomedical Research Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, 50 Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-752 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-25

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) activates the β-oxidation of fatty acids in the liver. Fenofibrate is a potent agonist of PPARα and is used in the treatment of hyperlipidemia. Fenofibrate treatment often induces the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), leading to cell death. The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) pathway is an essential component of the defense mechanism against oxidative stress. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway in fenofibrate-induced cell death is not known. In this study, we demonstrated that fenofibrate induces Keap1 degradation and Nrf2 activation. This fenofibrate-mediated Keap1 degradation is partly dependent on autophagy. Furthermore, fenofibrate-induced Keap1 degradation followed by Nrf2 activation is mainly mediated by p62, which functions as an adaptor protein in the autophagic pathway. Consistent with these findings, ablation of p62 increased fenofibrate-mediated apoptotic cell death associated with ROS accumulation. These results strongly suggest that p62 plays a crucial role in preventing fenofibrate-induced cell death. - Highlights: • Fenofibrate induces cell death by increasing ROS production. • The underlying defense mechanism against this effect is unknown. • Fenofibrate induces autophagy-dependent Keap1 degradation and Nrf2 activation. • This process is p62-dependent; lack of p62 enhanced fenofibrate-mediated apoptosis. • p62 plays a crucial role in preventing fenofibrate-induced cell death.

  16. SU-F-J-124: Reduction in Dosimetric Impact of Motion Using VMAT Compared to IMRT in Hypofractionated Prostate Cancer Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravindranath, B; Xiong, J; Happersett, L; Mageras, G; Zhang, P; Hunt, M [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify and compare the dosimetric impact of motion management correction strategies during VMAT and IMRT for hypofractionated prostate treatment. Methods: Two arc VMAT and 9 field IMRT plans were generated for two prostate cancer patients undergoing hypofractionated radiotherapy (7.5Gy × 5 and 8Gy × 5). 212 motion traces were retrospectively extracted from treatment records of prostate cancer patients with implanted Calypso beacons. Dose to the CTV and normal tissues was reconstructed for each trace and plan taking into account the actual treatment delivery time. Following motion correction scenarios were simulated: (1) VMAT plan – (a) No correction, (b) correction between arcs, (c) correction every 20 degrees of gantry rotation and (2) IMRT plan - (a) No correction,(b) correction between fields. Two mm action threshold for position correction was assumed. The 5–95% confidence interval (CI) range was extracted from the family of DVHs for each correction scenario. Results: Treatment duration for 8Gy plan (VMAT vs IMRT) was 3 vs 12 mins and for 7.5Gy plan was 3 vs 9 mins. In the absence of correction, the VMAT 5–−95% CI dose spread was, on average, less than the IMRT dose spread by 2% for CTVD95, 9% for rectalwall (RW) D1cc and 9% for bladderwall (BW) D53. Further, VMAT b/w arcs correction strategy reduced the spread about the planned value compared to IMRT b/w fields correction by: 1% for CTVD95, 2.6% for RW1cc and 2% for BWD53. VMAT 20 degree strategy led to greater reduction in dose spread compared to IMRT by: 2% for CTVD95, 4.5% for RW1cc and 6.7% for BWD53. Conclusion: In the absence of a correction strategy, the limited motion during VMAT’s shorter delivery times translates into less motion-induced dosimetric degradation than IMRT. Performing limited periodic motion correction during VMAT can yield excellent conformity to planned values that is superior to IMRT. This work was partially supported by Varian Medical Systems.

  17. SU-F-T-388: Comparison of Biophysical Indices in Hippocampal-Avoidance Whole Brain VMAT and IMRT Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kendall, E; Ahmad, S; Algan, O; Higby, C; Hossain, S

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare biophysical indices of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for whole brain radiation therapy following the NRG-CC001 protocol. Methods: In this retrospective study, a total of fifteen patients were planned with Varian Eclipse Treatment Planning System using VMAT (RapidArc) and IMRT techniques. The planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the whole brain volume excluding a uniform three-dimensional 5mm expansion of the hippocampus volume. Prescribed doses in all plans were 30 Gy delivered over 10 fractions normalized to a minimum of 95% of the target volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose. The NRG Oncology protocol guidelines were followed for contouring and dose-volume constraints. A single radiation oncologist evaluated all treatment plans. Calculations of statistical significance were performed using Student’s paired t-test. Results: All VMAT and IMRT plans met the NRG-CC001 protocol dose-volume criteria. The average equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for the PTV for VMAT vs. IMRT was respectively (19.05±0.33 Gy vs. 19.38±0.47 Gy) for α/β of 2 Gy and (19.47±0.30 Gy vs. 19.84±0.42 Gy) for α/β of 10 Gy. For the PTV, the average mean and maximum doses were 2% and 5% lower in VMAT plans than in IMRT plans, respectively. The average EUD and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for the hippocampus in VMAT vs. IMRT plans were (15.28±1.35 Gy vs. 15.65±0.99 Gy, p=0.18) and (0.305±0.012 Gy vs. 0.308±0.008 Gy, p=0.192), respectively. The average EUD and NTCP for the optic chiasm were both 2% higher in VMAT than in IMRT plans. Conclusion: Though statistically insignificant, VMAT plans indicate a lower hippocampus EUD than IMRT plans. Also, a small variation in NTCP was found between plans.

  18. SU-F-T-395: Evaluation of Best Dosimetry Achievable with VMAT and IMRT Treatment Techniques Targeting Borderline Resectable Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harpool, K; Schnell, E; Herman, T; Ahmad, S; De La Fuente Herman, T [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To determine from retrospective study the most appropriate technique for targeting small borderline operable pancreatic cancer surrounding blood vessels by evaluating the dosimetry and normal tissue sparing achievable using Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT). Methods: Treatment plans from ten patients who have undergone treatment with a prescribed dose of 4950 cGy, at 275 cGy per fraction, were analyzed. All plans were replanned using Eclipse TPS (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) with complementary VMAT or IMRT techniques to obtain paired data sets for comparison. The coverage to at least 95% of the planned target volume (PTV) was normalized to receive 100% of the prescription dose. The normal tissue constraints followed the quantitative analysis of normal tissue effects in the clinic (QUANTEC) guidelines and the organs at risks (OARs) were liver, kidneys, spinal cord and bowel. The plan evaluation was based on conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), uniformity index (UI), DVH parameters, and student’s-t statistics (2 tails). Results: The VMAT technique delivered less maximum dose to the right kidney, left kidney, total kidney, liver, spinal cord, and bowel by 9.3%, 5.9%, 6.7%, 3.9%, 15.1%, 3.9%, and 4.3%, respectively. The averaged V15 for the total kidney was 10.21% for IMRT and 7.29% for VMAT. The averaged V20 for the bowel was 19.89% for IMRT and 14.06% for VMAT. On average, the CI for IMRT was 1.20 and 1.16 for VMAT (p = 0.20). The HI was 0.08 for both techniques (p = 0.91) and UI was 1.05 and 1.06 for IMRT and VMAT respectively (p = 0.59). Conclusion: Both techniques achieve adequate PTV coverage. Although VMAT techniques show better normal tissue sparing from excessive dose, no significant differences were observed. Slight discrepancies may rise from different versions of calculation algorithms.

  19. SU-F-T-388: Comparison of Biophysical Indices in Hippocampal-Avoidance Whole Brain VMAT and IMRT Radiation Therapy Treatment Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kendall, E; Ahmad, S; Algan, O; Higby, C; Hossain, S [University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare biophysical indices of Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) treatment plans for whole brain radiation therapy following the NRG-CC001 protocol. Methods: In this retrospective study, a total of fifteen patients were planned with Varian Eclipse Treatment Planning System using VMAT (RapidArc) and IMRT techniques. The planning target volume (PTV) was defined as the whole brain volume excluding a uniform three-dimensional 5mm expansion of the hippocampus volume. Prescribed doses in all plans were 30 Gy delivered over 10 fractions normalized to a minimum of 95% of the target volume receiving 100% of the prescribed dose. The NRG Oncology protocol guidelines were followed for contouring and dose-volume constraints. A single radiation oncologist evaluated all treatment plans. Calculations of statistical significance were performed using Student’s paired t-test. Results: All VMAT and IMRT plans met the NRG-CC001 protocol dose-volume criteria. The average equivalent uniform dose (EUD) for the PTV for VMAT vs. IMRT was respectively (19.05±0.33 Gy vs. 19.38±0.47 Gy) for α/β of 2 Gy and (19.47±0.30 Gy vs. 19.84±0.42 Gy) for α/β of 10 Gy. For the PTV, the average mean and maximum doses were 2% and 5% lower in VMAT plans than in IMRT plans, respectively. The average EUD and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for the hippocampus in VMAT vs. IMRT plans were (15.28±1.35 Gy vs. 15.65±0.99 Gy, p=0.18) and (0.305±0.012 Gy vs. 0.308±0.008 Gy, p=0.192), respectively. The average EUD and NTCP for the optic chiasm were both 2% higher in VMAT than in IMRT plans. Conclusion: Though statistically insignificant, VMAT plans indicate a lower hippocampus EUD than IMRT plans. Also, a small variation in NTCP was found between plans.

  20. Antispasmodic activity of Symplocos paniculata is mediated through opening of ATP-dependent K+ channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalid Hussain Janbaz

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Symplocos paniculata is a medicinal plant used by native healers to manage gastrointestinal ailments. The crude methanolic extract of S. paniculata was screened pharmacologically both in vitro and in vivo for the validation of its therapeutic potential. It suppressed the spontaneous activity of isolated rabbit jejunum preparations and also caused inhibition of the low K+ (20 mM- induced spastic contractions in isolated rabbit jejunum preparations in a manner comparable to cromakalim. The relaxant effect was found to be blocked following glibenclamide exposure of the isolated tissue preparations similar to cromakalim, suggesting that observed response was likely to be mediated through opening of ATP dependent K+ channels. Following oral administration to mice provided protection against castor oil-induced diarrhea in a manner similar to loperamide. The plant material was found safe in toxicity study up to oral dose of 8 g/kg in mice. Hence, present study provides a scientific basis for the vernacular use of S. paniculata in gastro-intestinal system.

  1. Evaluation of the Delta4 phantom for IMRT and VMAT verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bedford, James L; Lee, Young K; Wai, Philip; South, Christopher P; Warrington, Alan P

    2009-01-01

    The Delta 4 diode array phantom (Scandidos, Uppsala, Sweden) was evaluated for verification of segmental intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) on an Elekta linear accelerator (Crawley UK). The device was tested for angular sensitivity by irradiating it from 36 different gantry angles, and the responses of the device to various step-and-shoot segment doses and dose rates were evaluated using an ionization chamber as a comparison. The phantom was then compared with ionization chamber and film results for two prostate and pelvic nodes IMRT plans, two head and neck IMRT plans and two lung VMAT plans. These plans were calculated using Pinnacle 3 (Philips Radiation Oncology Systems, Madison, WI). The uniformity of angular response was better than 0.5% over the range of gantry angles. The uniformity of response of the Delta 4 to different segment monitor units and dose rates was better than 0.5%. The assessment of the IMRT and VMAT plans showed that the Delta 4 measured a dose within 2.5% of the ionization chamber, and compared to film recorded a slightly larger region (range -2% to +7%) agreeing with the planned dose to within 3% and 3 mm. The Delta 4 is a complex device and requires careful benchmarking, but following the successful completion of these measurements, the Delta 4 has been introduced into clinical use. (note)

  2. Ibuprofen administration attenuates serum TNF-α levels, hepatic glutathione depletion, hepatic apoptosis and mouse mortality after Fas stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cazanave, Sophie; Vadrot, Nathalie; Tinel, Marina; Berson, Alain; Letteron, Philippe; Larosche, Isabelle; Descatoire, Veronique; Feldmann, Gerard; Robin, Marie-Anne; Pessayre, Dominique

    2008-01-01

    Fas stimulation recruits neutrophils and activates macrophages that secrete tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), which aggravates Fas-mediated liver injury. To determine whether nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs modify these processes, we challenged 24-hour-fasted mice with the agonistic Jo2 anti-Fas antibody (4 μg/mouse), and treated the animals 1 h later with saline or ibuprofen (250 mg/kg), a dual cyclooxygenase (COX)-1 and COX-2 inhibitor. Ibuprofen attenuated the Jo2-mediated recruitment/activation of myeloperoxidase-secreting neutrophils/macrophages in the liver, and attenuated the surge in serum TNF-α. Ibuprofen also minimized hepatic glutathione depletion, Bid truncation, caspase activation, outer mitochondrial membrane rupture, hepatocyte apoptosis and the increase in serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) activity 5 h after Jo2 administration, to finally decrease mouse mortality at later times. The concomitant administration of pentoxifylline (decreasing TNF-α secretion) and infliximab (trapping TNF-α) likewise attenuated the Jo2-mediated increase in TNF-α, the decrease in hepatic glutathione, and the increase in serum ALT activity 5 h after Jo2 administration. The concomitant administration of the COX-1 inhibitor, SC-560 (10 mg/kg) and the COX-2 inhibitor, celecoxib (40 mg/kg) 1 h after Jo2 administration, also decreased liver injury 5 h after Jo2 administration. In contrast, SC-560 (10 mg/kg) or celecoxib (40 or 160 mg/kg) given alone had no significant protective effects. In conclusion, secondary TNF-α secretion plays an important role in Jo2-mediated glutathione depletion and liver injury. The combined inhibition of COX-1 and COX-2 by ibuprofen attenuates TNF-α secretion, glutathione depletion, mitochondrial alterations, hepatic apoptosis and mortality in Jo2-treated fasted mice

  3. Quality assurance for the clinical implementation of kilovoltage intrafraction monitoring for prostate cancer VMAT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ng, J. A.; Booth, J. T.; O'Brien, R. T.

    2014-01-01

    is being piloted in a clinical trial for prostate cancer patients treated with VMAT (NCT01742403). The purpose of this work was to develop clinical process and quality assurance (QA) practices for the clinical implementation of KIM. Methods: Informed by and adapting existing guideline documents from other...... real-time monitoring systems, KIM-specific QA practices were developed. The following five KIM-specific QA tests were included: (1) static localization accuracy, (2) dynamic localization accuracy, (3) treatment interruption accuracy, (4) latency measurement, and (5) clinical conditions accuracy. Tests...... developed and implemented for prostate cancer VMAT....

  4. Mediating role of activity level in the depressive realism effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Fernando; Matute, Helena; A Vadillo, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Several classic studies have concluded that the accuracy of identifying uncontrollable situations depends heavily on depressive mood. Nondepressed participants tend to exhibit an optimistic illusion of control, whereas depressed participants tend to better detect a lack of control. Recently, we suggested that the different activity levels (measured as the probability of responding during a contingency learning task) exhibited by depressed and nondepressed individuals is partly responsible for this effect. The two studies presented in this paper provide further support for this mediational hypothesis, in which mood is the distal cause of the illusion of control operating through activity level, the proximal cause. In Study 1, the probability of responding, P(R), was found to be a mediator variable between the depressive symptoms and the judgments of control. In Study 2, we intervened directly on the mediator variable: The P(R) for both depressed and nondepressed participants was manipulated through instructions. Our results confirm that P(R) manipulation produced differences in the participants' perceptions of uncontrollability. Importantly, the intervention on the mediator variable cancelled the effect of the distal cause; the participants' judgments of control were no longer mood dependent when the P(R) was manipulated. This result supports the hypothesis that the so-called depressive realism effect is actually mediated by the probability of responding.

  5. Deuterium-depleted water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, Ion; Steflea, Dumitru; Saros-Rogobete, Irina; Titescu, Gheorghe; Tamaian, Radu

    2001-01-01

    Deuterium-depleted water represents water that has an isotopic content smaller than 145 ppm D/(D+H) which is the natural isotopic content of water. Deuterium depleted water is produced by vacuum distillation in columns equipped with structured packing made from phosphor bronze or stainless steel. Deuterium-depleted water, the production technique and structured packing are patents of National Institute of Research - Development for Cryogenics and Isotopic Technologies at Rm. Valcea. Researches made in the last few years showed the deuterium-depleted water is a biological active product that could have many applications in medicine and agriculture. (authors)

  6. Grb2 mediates semaphorin-4D-dependent RhoA inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianliang; Krishnan, Rameshkumar; Swiercz, Jakub M

    2012-08-01

    Signaling through the semaphorin 4D (Sema4D) receptor plexin-B1 is modulated by its interaction with tyrosine kinases ErbB-2 and Met. In cells expressing the plexin-B1-ErbB-2 receptor complex, ligand stimulation results in the activation of small GTPase RhoA and stimulation of cellular migration. By contrast, in cells expressing plexin-B1 and Met, ligand stimulation results in an association with the RhoGTPase-activating protein p190 RhoGAP and subsequent RhoA inactivation--a process that involves the tyrosine phosphorylation of plexin-B1 by Met. Inactivation of RhoA is necessary for Sema4D-mediated inhibition of cellular migration. It is, however, unknown how plexin-B1 phosphorylation regulates RhoGAP interaction and activity. Here we show that the activation of plexin-B1 by Sema4D and its subsequent tyrosine phosphorylation by Met creates a docking site for the SH2 domain of growth factor receptor bound-2 (Grb2). Grb2 is thereby recruited into the plexin-B1 receptor complex and, through its SH3 domain, interacts with p190 RhoGAP and mediates RhoA deactivation. Phosphorylation of plexin-B1 by Met and the recruitment of Grb2 have no effect on the R-RasGAP activity of plexin-B1, but are required for Sema4D-induced, RhoA-dependent antimigratory effects of Sema4D on breast cancer cells. These data show Grb2 as a direct link between plexin and p190-RhoGAP-mediated downstream signaling.

  7. Activity-Dependent Bidirectional Regulation of GAD Expression in a Homeostatic Fashion Is Mediated by BDNF-Dependent and Independent Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanno-Iijima, Yoko; Tanaka, Masami; Iijima, Takatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Homeostatic synaptic plasticity, or synaptic scaling, is a mechanism that tunes neuronal transmission to compensate for prolonged, excessive changes in neuronal activity. Both excitatory and inhibitory neurons undergo homeostatic changes based on synaptic transmission strength, which could effectively contribute to a fine-tuning of circuit activity. However, gene regulation that underlies homeostatic synaptic plasticity in GABAergic (GABA, gamma aminobutyric) neurons is still poorly understood. The present study demonstrated activity-dependent dynamic scaling in which NMDA-R (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor) activity regulated the expression of GABA synthetic enzymes: glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and 67 (GAD65 and GAD67). Results revealed that activity-regulated BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) release is necessary, but not sufficient, for activity-dependent up-scaling of these GAD isoforms. Bidirectional forms of activity-dependent GAD expression require both BDNF-dependent and BDNF-independent pathways, both triggered by NMDA-R activity. Additional results indicated that these two GAD genes differ in their responsiveness to chronic changes in neuronal activity, which could be partially caused by differential dependence on BDNF. In parallel to activity-dependent bidirectional scaling in GAD expression, the present study further observed that a chronic change in neuronal activity leads to an alteration in neurotransmitter release from GABAergic neurons in a homeostatic, bidirectional fashion. Therefore, the differential expression of GAD65 and 67 during prolonged changes in neuronal activity may be implicated in some aspects of bidirectional homeostatic plasticity within mature GABAergic presynapses. PMID:26241953

  8. Mulberry Leaf Extract Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Mediated Testosterone Depletion in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetic Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Hajizadeh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been proposed that oxidative stress may contribute to the development of testicular abnormalities in diabetes. Morus alba leaf extract (MAE has hypoglycemic and antioxidant properties. We, therefore, explored the impact of the administration of MAE on steroidogenesis in diabetic rats. Methods: To address this hypothesis, we measured the serum level of glucose, insulin, and free testosterone (Ts as well as oxidative stress parameters (including glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, total antioxidant capacity, and malondialdehyde in the testis of control, untreated and MAE-treated (1 g/day/kg diabetic rats. In order to determine the likely mechanism of MAE action on Ts levels, we analyzed the quantitative mRNA expression level of the two key steroidogenic proteins, namely steroid acute regulatory protein (StAR and P450 cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc, by real-time PCR. Results: The MAE-treated diabetic rats had significantly decreased glucose levels and on the other hand increased insulin and free Ts levels than the untreated diabetic rats. In addition, the administration of MAE to the diabetic rats restored the oxidative stress parameters toward control. Induction of diabetes decreased testicular StAR mRNA expression by 66% and MAE treatment enhanced mRNA expression to the same level of the control group. However, the expression of P540scc was not significantly decreased in the diabetic group as compared to the control group. Conclusion: Our findings indicated that MAE significantly increased Ts production in the diabetic rats, probably through the induction of StAR mRNA expression levels. Administration of MAE to experimental models of diabetes can effectively attenuate oxidative stress-mediated testosterone depletion. Please cite this article as: Hajizadeh MR, Eftekhar E, Zal F, Jaffarian A, Mostafavi-Pour Z. Mulberry Leaf Extract Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Mediated Testosterone Depletion in

  9. CERT depletion predicts chemotherapy benefit and mediates cytotoxic and polyploid‐specific cancer cell death through autophagy induction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Alvin J. X.; Roylance, Rebecca; Sander, Jil

    2012-01-01

    cell microscopy analysis revealed that CERT depletion induces LAMP2‐dependent death of polyploid cells following exit from mitosis in the presence of paclitaxel. We find that CERT is relatively over‐expressed in HER2+ breast cancer and CERT protein expression acts as an independent prognostic variable...

  10. Three-dimensional verification of prostate cancer patients treated with VMAT by Matrixx detector and COMPASS software IBA; Verificacion tridimensional de pacientes con cancer de prostata tratados con VMAT mediante el detector Matrixx y software COMPASS de IBA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mateos, J. C.; Luis, F. J.; Cabrera, P.; Carrasco, M.; Sanchez, G.; Herrador, M.

    2011-07-01

    Described in this paper the verification of prostate cancer patients treated with VMAT planned in our hospital, with a prescribed dose of 76 Gy. The ability to simultaneously analyze the patient by any plane COMPASS software (IBA, Germany), together with the detector array Matrixx-Evolution, this system gives a particularly interesting feature. The aim of this paper is to describe the operation of this equipment and validated for patient dosimetry in IMRT and VMAT treatments.

  11. Cytosolic calcium mediates RIP1/RIP3 complex-dependent necroptosis through JNK activation and mitochondrial ROS production in human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wen; Wu, Xiaxia; Gao, Hongwei; Yu, Jie; Zhao, Wenwen; Lu, Jin-Jian; Wang, Jinhua; Du, Guanhua; Chen, Xiuping

    2017-07-01

    Necroptosis is a form of programmed necrosis mediated by signaling complexes with receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) and RIP3 kinases as the main mediators. However, the underlying execution pathways of this phenomenon have yet to be elucidated in detail. In this study, a RIP1/RIP3 complex was formed in 2-methoxy-6-acetyl-7-methyljuglone (MAM)-treated HCT116 and HT29 colon cancer cells. With this formation, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels increased, mitochondrial depolarization occurred, and ATP concentrations decreased. This process was identified as necroptosis. This finding was confirmed by experiments showing that MAM-induced cell death was attenuated by the pharmacological or genetic blockage of necroptosis signaling, including RIP1 inhibitor necrostatin-1s (Nec-1s) and siRNA-mediated gene silencing of RIP1 and RIP3, but was unaffected by caspase inhibitor z-vad-fmk or necrosis inhibitor 2-(1H-Indol-3-yl)-3-pentylamino-maleimide (IM54). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis further revealed the ultrastructural features of MAM-induced necroptosis. MAM-induced RIP1/RIP3 complex triggered necroptosis through cytosolic calcium (Ca 2+ ) accumulation and sustained c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. Both calcium chelator BAPTA-AM and JNK inhibitor SP600125 could attenuate necroptotic features, including mitochondrial ROS elevation, mitochondrial depolarization, and ATP depletion. 2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTFA), which is a mitochondrial complex II inhibitor, was found to effectively reverse both MAM induced mitochondrial ROS generation and cell death, indicating the complex II was the ROS-producing site. The essential role of mitochondrial ROS was confirmed by the protective effect of overexpression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). MAM-induced necroptosis was independent of TNFα, p53, MLKL, and lysosomal membrane permeabilization. In summary, our study demonstrated that RIP1/RIP3 complex-triggered cytosolic calcium

  12. Overexpression of PLK3 Mediates the Degradation of Abnormal Prion Proteins Dependent on Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Tian, Chan; Sun, Jing; Chen, Li-Na; Lv, Yan; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xiao, Kang; Wang, Jing; Chen, Cao; Shi, Qi; Shao, Qi-Xiang; Dong, Xiao-Ping

    2017-08-01

    Polo-like kinase 3 (PLK3) is the main cause of cell cycle reentry-related neuronal apoptosis which has been implicated in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. Previous work also showed the regulatory activity of exogenous PLK3 on the degradation of PrP (prion protein) mutants and pathogenic PrP Sc ; however, the precise mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we identified that the overexpression of PLK3-mediated degradation of PrP mutant and PrP Sc was repressed by lysosome rather than by proteasomal and macroautophagy inhibitors. Core components of chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) effectors, lysosome-associated membrane protein type 2A (LAMP2a), and heat shock cognate protein 70 (Hsc70) are markedly decreased in the HEK293T cells expressing PrP mutant and scrapie-infected cell line SMB-S15. Meanwhile, PrP mutant showed ability to interact with LAMP2a and Hsc70. Overexpression of PLK3 sufficiently increased the cellular levels of LAMP2a and Hsc70, accompanying with declining the accumulations of PrP mutant and PrP Sc . The kinase domain (KD) of PLK3 was responsible for elevating LAMP2a and Hsc70. Knockdown of endogenous PLK3 enhanced the activity of macroautophagy in the cultured cells. Moreover, time-dependent reductions of LAMP2a and Hsc70 were also observed in the brain tissues of hamster-adapted scrapie agent 263K-infected hamsters, indicating an impairment of CMA during prion infection. Those data indicate that the overexpression of PLK3-mediated degradation of abnormal PrP is largely dependent on CMA pathway.

  13. Cardiac dose-sparing effects of deep-inspiration breath-hold in left breast irradiation : Is IMRT more beneficial than VMAT?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Mazen; Kunzelmann, Leonie; Metzger, Martin; Grabenbauer, Gerhard G

    2017-10-01

    Given the reduction in death from breast cancer, as well as improvements in overall survival, adjuvant radiotherapy is considered the standard treatment for breast cancer. However, left-sided breast irradiation was associated with an increased rate of fatal cardiovascular events due to incidental irradiation of the heart. Recently, considerable efforts have been made to minimize cardiac toxicity of left-sided breast irradiation by new treatment methods such as deep-inspiration breath-hold (DIBH) and new radiation techniques, particularly intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of DIBH irradiation on cardiac dose compared with free-breathing (FB) irradiation, while the secondary objective was to compare the advantages of IMRT versus VMAT plans in both the FB and the DIBH position for left-sided breast cancer. In all, 25 consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients underwent CT simulation in the FB and DIBH position. Five patients were excluded with no cardiac displacement following DIBH-CT simulation. The other 20 patients were irradiated in the DIBH position using respiratory gating. Four different treatment plans were generated for each patient, an IMRT and a VMAT plan in the DIBH and in the FB position, respectively. The following parameters were used for plan comparison: dose to the heart, left anterior descending coronary artery (mean dose, maximum dose, D25% and D45%), ipsilateral, contralateral lung (mean dose, D20%, D30%) and contralateral breast (mean dose). The percentage in dose reduction for organs at risk achieved by DIBH for both IMRT and VMAT plans was calculated and compared for each patient by each treatment plan. DIBH irradiation significantly reduced mean dose to the heart and left anterior descending coronary artery (LADCA) using both IMRT (heart -20%; p = 0.0002, LADCA -9%; p = 0.001) and VMAT (heart -23%; p = 0.00003, LADCA -16%; p = 0

  14. A novel method for sub-arc VMAT dose delivery verification based on portal dosimetry with an EPID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cools, Ruud A M; Dirkx, Maarten L P; Heijmen, Ben J M

    2017-11-01

    The EPID-based sub-arc verification of VMAT dose delivery requires synchronization of the acquired electronic portal images (EPIs) with the VMAT delivery, that is, establishment of the start- and stop-MU of the acquired images. To realize this, published synchronization methods propose the use of logging features of the linac or dedicated hardware solutions. In this study, we developed a novel, software-based synchronization method that only uses information inherently available in the acquired images. The EPIs are continuously acquired during pretreatment VMAT delivery and converted into Portal Dose Images (PDIs). Sub-arcs of approximately 10 MU are then defined by combining groups of sequentially acquired PDIs. The start- and stop-MUs of measured sub-arcs are established in a synchronization procedure, using only dosimetric information in measured and predicted PDIs. Sub-arc verification of a VMAT dose delivery is based on comparison of measured sub-arc PDIs with synchronized, predicted sub-arc PDIs, using γ-analyses. To assess the accuracy of this new method, measured and predicted PDIs were compared for 20 clinically applied VMAT prostate cancer plans. The sensitivity of the method for detection of delivery errors was investigated using VMAT deliveries with intentionally inserted, small perturbations (25 error scenarios; leaf gap deviations ≤ 1.5 mm, leaf motion stops during ≤ 15 MU, linac output error ≤ 2%). For the 20 plans, the average failed pixel rates (FPR) for full-arc and sub-arc dose QA were 0.36% ± 0.26% (1 SD) and 0.64% ± 0.88%, based on 2%/2 mm and 3%/3 mm γ-analyses, respectively. Small systematic perturbations of up to 1% output error and 1 mm leaf offset were detected using full-arc QA. Sub-arc QA was able to detect positioning errors in three leaves only during approximately 20 MU and small dose delivery errors during approximately 40 MU. In an ROC analysis, the area under the curve (AUC) for the combined full-arc/sub-arc approach was

  15. Depletion of GGA1 and GGA3 mediates post-injury elevation of BACE1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kendall R.; Kang, Eugene L.; Whalen, Michael J.; Shen, Yong; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2012-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the most robust environmental risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Compelling evidence is accumulating that a single event of TBI is associated with increased levels of Aβ. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. We report here that the BACE1 interacting protein, GGA3, is depleted while BACE1 levels increase in the acute phase post-injury (48hrs) in a mouse model of TBI. We further demonstrated the role of GGA3 in the regulation of BACE1 in vivo by showing that BACE1 levels are increased in the brain of GGA3 null mice. We next found that head trauma potentiates BACE1 elevation in GGA3 null mice in the acute phase post-TBI and discovered that GGA1, a GGA3 homologue, is a novel caspase-3 substrate depleted at 48 hrs post-TBI. Moreover, GGA1 silencing potentiates BACE1 elevation induced by GGA3 deletion in neurons in vitro indicating that GGA1 and GGA3 synergistically regulate BACE1. Accordingly, we found that levels of both GGA1 and GGA3 are depleted while BACE1 levels are increased in a series of post-mortem AD brains. Finally, we show that GGA3 haploinsufficiency results in sustained elevation of BACE1 and Aβ levels while GGA1 levels are restored in the subacute phase (7 days) post-injury. In conclusion, our data indicate that depletion of GGA1 and GGA3 engender a rapid and robust elevation of BACE1 in the acute phase post-injury. However, the efficient disposal of the acutely accumulated BACE1 solely depends on GGA3 levels in the sub-acute phase of injury. PMID:22836275

  16. SU-F-T-590: Modeling PTV Dose Fall-Off for Cervical Cancer SBRT Treatment Planning Using VMAT and Step-And-Shoot IMRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado, A Brito; Cohen, D; Eng, T; Gutierrez, A [University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Due to the high dose per fraction in SBRT, dose conformity and dose fall-off are critical. In patients with cervical cancer, rapid dose fall-off is particularly important to limit dose to the nearby rectum, small bowel, and bladder. This study compares the target volume dose fall-off for two radiation delivery techniques, fixed-field IMRT & VMAT, using non-coplanar beam geometries. Further comparisons are made between 6 and 10MV photon beam energies. Methods: Eleven (n=11) patients were planned in Pinnacle3 v9.10 with a NovalisTx (HD120 MLC) machine model using 6 and 10 MV photons. The following three techniques were used: (1) IMRT (10 non-coplanar beams) (2) Dual, coplanar 360° VMAT arcs (4° spacing), and (3) Triple, non-coplanar VMAT arcs (1 full arc and dual partial arcs). All plans were normalized such that 98% of the PTV received at least 28Gy/4Fx. Dose was calculated using a 2.0mm isotropic dose grid. To assess dose fall-off, twenty concentric 2mm thick rings were created around the PTV. The maximum dose in each ring was recorded and the data was fitted to model dose fall-off. A separate analysis was performed by separating target volumes into small (0–50cc), medium (51–80cc), and large (81–110cc). Results: Triple, non-coplanar VMAT arcs showed the best dose fall-off for all patients evaluated. All fitted regressions had an R{sup 2}≥0.99. At 10mm from the PTV edge, 10 MV VMAT3-arc had an absolute improvement in dose fall-off of 3.8% and 6.9% over IMRT and VMAT2-arc, respectively. At 30mm, 10 MV VMAT3-arc had an absolute improvement of 12.0% and 7.0% over IMRT and VMAT2-arc, respectively. Faster dose fall-off was observed for small volumes as opposed to medium and large ones—9.6% at 20mm. Conclusion: Triple, non-coplanar VMAT arcs offer the sharpest dose fall-off for cervical SBRT plans. This improvement is most pronounced when treating smaller target volumes.

  17. p53-dependent control of cell death by nicastrin: lack of requirement for presenilin-dependent gamma-secretase complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardossi-Piquard, Raphaëlle; Dunys, Julie; Giaime, Emilie; Guillot-Sestier, Marie-Victoire; St George-Hyslop, Peter; Checler, Frédéric; Alves da Costa, Cristine

    2009-04-01

    Nicastrin (NCT) is a component of the presenilin (PS)-dependent gamma-secretase complexes that liberate amyloid beta-peptides from the beta-Amyloid Precursor Protein. Several lines of evidence indicate that the members of these complexes could also contribute to the control of cell death. Here we show that over-expression of NCT increases the viability of human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells and decreases staurosporine (STS)- and thapsigargin (TPS)-induced caspase-3 activation in various cell lines from human and neuronal origins by Akt-dependent pathway. NCT lowers p53 expression, transcriptional activity and promoter transactivation and reduces p53 phosphorylation. NCT-associated protection against STS-stimulated cell death was completely abolished by p53 deficiency. Conversely, the depletion of NCT drastically enhances STS-induced caspase-3 activation and p53 pathway and favored p53 nuclear translocation. We examined whether NCT protective function depends on PS-dependent gamma-secretase activity. First, a 29-amino acid deletion known to reduce NCT-dependent amyloid beta-peptide production did not affect NCT-associated protective phenotype. Second, NCT still reduces STS-induced caspase-3 activation in fibroblasts lacking PS1 and PS2. Third, the gamma-secretase inhibitor DFK167 did not affect NCT-mediated reduction of p53 activity. Altogether, our study indicates that NCT controls cell death via phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt and p53-dependent pathways and that this function remains independent of the activity and molecular integrity of the gamma-secretase complexes.

  18. Management of depleted uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Large stocks of depleted uranium have arisen as a result of enrichment operations, especially in the United States and the Russian Federation. Countries with depleted uranium stocks are interested in assessing strategies for the use and management of depleted uranium. The choice of strategy depends on several factors, including government and business policy, alternative uses available, the economic value of the material, regulatory aspects and disposal options, and international market developments in the nuclear fuel cycle. This report presents the results of a depleted uranium study conducted by an expert group organised jointly by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency. It contains information on current inventories of depleted uranium, potential future arisings, long term management alternatives, peaceful use options and country programmes. In addition, it explores ideas for international collaboration and identifies key issues for governments and policy makers to consider. (authors)

  19. New perspectives on mannan-binding lectin-mediated complement activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Degn, Søren Egedal; Thiel, Steffen; Jensenius, Jens Christian

    2007-01-01

    The complement system is an important part of the innate immune system, mediating several major effector functions and modulating adaptive immune responses. Three complement activation pathways exist: the classical pathway (CP), the alternative pathway (AP), and the lectin pathway (LP). The LP......, allowing C3 activation in the absence of components otherwise believed critical. The classical bypass pathways are dependent on C1 and components of the AP. A recent study has shown the existence also of a lectin bypass pathway dependent on mannan-binding lectin (MBL) and AP components. The emerging...

  20. Mitochondrial-mediated apoptosis in lymphoma cells by the diterpenoid lactone Andrographolide, the active component of Andrographis paniculata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuo; Evens, Andrew M.; Prachand, Sheila; Singh, Amareshwar T.K; Bhalla, Savita; David, Kevin; Gordon, Leo I.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Andrographolide is a diterpenoid lactone isolated from Andrographis paniculata (King of Bitters), an herbal medicine used in Asia. It has been reported to have anti-inflammatory, antihypertensive, anti-viral and immune-stimulant properties. Furthermore, it has been shown to inhibit cancer cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in leukemia and solid tumor cell lines. Experimental Design We studied the Burkitt p53 mutated Ramos cell line, the mantle-cell lymphoma (MCL) line Granta, the follicular lymphoma (FL) cell line HF-1 and the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) cell line SUDHL4, as well as primary cells from patients with FL, DLBCL, and MCL. Results We found that andrographolide resulted in dose- and time-dependent cell death as measured by MTT. Andrographolide significantly increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in all cell lines. To determine mechanism of cell death, we measured apoptosis by Annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI) in the presence and absence of the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), the glutathione-depleting agent buthionine sulfoxamine (BSO), or caspase inhibitors. We found that apoptosis was greatly enhanced by BSO, blocked by NAC, and accompanied by PARP cleavage and activation of caspases 3, 8 and 9. We measured BAX conformational change, and mitochondrial membrane potential, and using mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) Bax/Bak double knockouts (MEFBax−/−/Bak−/−), we found that apoptosis was mediated through mitochondrial pathways, but dependent on caspases in both cell lines and in patient samples. Conclusions Andrographolide caused ROS-dependent apoptosis in lymphoma cell lines and in primary tumor samples, which was enhanced by depletion of GSH and inhibited by NAC or the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. Further studies of diterpenoid lactones in lymphoma are warranted. PMID:20798229

  1. MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Teng; Ji, Jiang; Guo, Yong-li

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Curcumin activates MST1 in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced apoptosis of melanoma cells. •ROS production is involved in curcumin-induced MST1 activation. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced JNK activation in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced Foxo3a nuclear translocation and Bim expression. -- Abstract: Different groups including ours have shown that curcumin induces melanoma cell apoptosis, here we focused the role of mammalian Sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) in it. We observed that curcumin activated MST1-dependent apoptosis in cultured melanoma cells. MST1 silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) suppressed curcumin-induced cell apoptosis, while MST1 over-expressing increased curcumin sensitivity. Meanwhile, curcumin induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in melanoma cells, and the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), almost blocked MST1 activation to suggest that ROS might be required for MST1 activation by curcumin. c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation by curcumin was dependent on MST1, since MST1 inhibition by RNAi or NAC largely inhibited curcumin-induced JNK activation. Further, curcumin induced Foxo3 nuclear translocation and Bim-1 (Foxo3 target gene) expression in melanoma cells, such an effect by curcumin was inhibited by MST1 RNAi. In conclusion, we suggested that MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells

  2. MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Teng, E-mail: tengyu33@yahoo.com [Department of Dermatology, Shandong Ji-ning No. 1 People’s Hospital, Shandong Province 272011 (China); Ji, Jiang [Department of Dermatology, The Second Hospital Affiliated of Soochow University, SuZhou, Jiangsu Province 215000 (China); Guo, Yong-li [Department of Oncology, Shandong Ji-ning No. 1 People’s Hospital, Shandong Province 272011 (China)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Curcumin activates MST1 in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced apoptosis of melanoma cells. •ROS production is involved in curcumin-induced MST1 activation. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced JNK activation in melanoma cells. •MST1 mediates curcumin-induced Foxo3a nuclear translocation and Bim expression. -- Abstract: Different groups including ours have shown that curcumin induces melanoma cell apoptosis, here we focused the role of mammalian Sterile 20-like kinase 1 (MST1) in it. We observed that curcumin activated MST1-dependent apoptosis in cultured melanoma cells. MST1 silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) suppressed curcumin-induced cell apoptosis, while MST1 over-expressing increased curcumin sensitivity. Meanwhile, curcumin induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in melanoma cells, and the ROS scavenger, N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC), almost blocked MST1 activation to suggest that ROS might be required for MST1 activation by curcumin. c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation by curcumin was dependent on MST1, since MST1 inhibition by RNAi or NAC largely inhibited curcumin-induced JNK activation. Further, curcumin induced Foxo3 nuclear translocation and Bim-1 (Foxo3 target gene) expression in melanoma cells, such an effect by curcumin was inhibited by MST1 RNAi. In conclusion, we suggested that MST1 activation by curcumin mediates JNK activation, Foxo3a nuclear translocation and apoptosis in melanoma cells.

  3. Chlorpromazine-induced hepatotoxicity during inflammation is mediated by TIRAP-dependent signaling pathway in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandhi, Adarsh; Guo, Tao; Shah, Pranav; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Ghose, Romi

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation is a major component of idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions (IADRs). To understand the molecular mechanism of inflammation-mediated IADRs, we determined the role of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway in idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity of the anti-psychotic drug, chlorpromazine (CPZ). Activation of TLRs recruits the first adaptor protein, Toll-interleukin 1 receptor domain containing adaptor protein (TIRAP) to the TIR domain of TLRs leading to the activation of the downstream kinase, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK). Prolonged activation of JNK leads to cell-death. We hypothesized that activation of TLR2 by lipoteichoic acid (LTA) or TLR4 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) will augment the hepatotoxicity of CPZ by TIRAP-dependent mechanism involving prolonged activation of JNK. Adult male C57BL/6, TIRAP +/+ and TIRAP −/− mice were pretreated with saline, LPS (2 mg/kg) or LTA (6 mg/kg) for 30 min or 16 h followed by CPZ (5 mg/kg) or saline (vehicle) up to 24 h. We found that treatment of mice with CPZ in presence of LPS or LTA leads to ∼ 3–4 fold increase in serum ALT levels, a marked reduction in hepatic glycogen content, significant induction of serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α and prolonged JNK activation, compared to LPS or LTA alone. Similar results were observed in TIRAP +/+ mice, whereas the effects of LPS or LTA on CPZ-induced hepatotoxicity were attenuated in TIRAP −/− mice. For the first time, we show that inflammation-mediated hepatotoxicity of CPZ is dependent on TIRAP, and involves prolonged JNK activation in vivo. Thus, TIRAP-dependent pathways may be targeted to predict and prevent inflammation-mediated IADRs. -- Highlights: ► Inflammation augments the toxicity of an idiosyncratic hepatotoxin chlorpromazine. ► Activation of Toll-like receptors by LPS or LTA induces chlorpromazine toxicity. ► Sustained stress kinase (JNK) activation is associated with chlorpromazine toxicity. ► These studies provide novel mechanistic

  4. Chlorpromazine-induced hepatotoxicity during inflammation is mediated by TIRAP-dependent signaling pathway in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandhi, Adarsh, E-mail: adarsh.gandhi@nih.gov [University of Houston, Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, 1441 Moursund Street, Room 517, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Guo, Tao, E-mail: tguo4@jhu.edu [University of Houston, Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, 1441 Moursund Street, Room 517, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Shah, Pranav [University of Houston, Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, 1441 Moursund Street, Room 517, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Moorthy, Bhagavatula [Baylor College of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, 1102 Bates Avenue, Suite 530, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Ghose, Romi, E-mail: rghose@uh.edu [University of Houston, Department of Pharmacological and Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, 1441 Moursund Street, Room 517, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2013-02-01

    Inflammation is a major component of idiosyncratic adverse drug reactions (IADRs). To understand the molecular mechanism of inflammation-mediated IADRs, we determined the role of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathway in idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity of the anti-psychotic drug, chlorpromazine (CPZ). Activation of TLRs recruits the first adaptor protein, Toll-interleukin 1 receptor domain containing adaptor protein (TIRAP) to the TIR domain of TLRs leading to the activation of the downstream kinase, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK). Prolonged activation of JNK leads to cell-death. We hypothesized that activation of TLR2 by lipoteichoic acid (LTA) or TLR4 by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) will augment the hepatotoxicity of CPZ by TIRAP-dependent mechanism involving prolonged activation of JNK. Adult male C57BL/6, TIRAP{sup +/+} and TIRAP{sup −/−} mice were pretreated with saline, LPS (2 mg/kg) or LTA (6 mg/kg) for 30 min or 16 h followed by CPZ (5 mg/kg) or saline (vehicle) up to 24 h. We found that treatment of mice with CPZ in presence of LPS or LTA leads to ∼ 3–4 fold increase in serum ALT levels, a marked reduction in hepatic glycogen content, significant induction of serum tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α and prolonged JNK activation, compared to LPS or LTA alone. Similar results were observed in TIRAP{sup +/+} mice, whereas the effects of LPS or LTA on CPZ-induced hepatotoxicity were attenuated in TIRAP{sup −/−} mice. For the first time, we show that inflammation-mediated hepatotoxicity of CPZ is dependent on TIRAP, and involves prolonged JNK activation in vivo. Thus, TIRAP-dependent pathways may be targeted to predict and prevent inflammation-mediated IADRs. -- Highlights: ► Inflammation augments the toxicity of an idiosyncratic hepatotoxin chlorpromazine. ► Activation of Toll-like receptors by LPS or LTA induces chlorpromazine toxicity. ► Sustained stress kinase (JNK) activation is associated with chlorpromazine toxicity. ► These studies

  5. SU-F-T-356: DosimetricComparison of VMAT Vs Step and Shoot IMRT Plans for Stage III Lung CancerPatients with Mediastinal Involvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pearson, D; Bogue, J [University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: For Stage III lung cancers that entail treatment of some or all of the mediastinum, anterior-posterior focused Step and Shoot IMRT (SS-IMRT) and VMAT plans have been clinically used to deliver the prescribed dose while working to minimize lung dose and avoid other critical structures. A comparison between the two planning methods was completed to see which treatment method is superior and minimizes dose to healthy lung tissue. Methods: Ten patients who were recently treated with SS-IMRT or VMAT plans for Stage III lung cancer with mediastinal involvement were selected. All patients received a simulation CT for treatment planning, as well as a 4D CT and PET/CT fusion for target delineation. Plans were prescribed 6250 cGy in 25 fractions and normalized such that 100% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the PTV. Clinically approved SS-IMRT or VMAT plans were then copied and planned using the alternative modality with identical optimization criteria. SS-IMRT plans utilized seven to nine beams distributed around the patient while the VMAT plans consisted of two full 360 degree arcs. Plans were compared for the lung volume receiving 20 Gy (V20). Results: Both SS-IMRT and VMAT can be used to achieve clinical treatment plans for patients with Stage III Lung cancer with targets encompassing the mediastinum. VMAT plans produced an average V20 of 23.0+/−8.3% and SS-IMRT produced an average of 24.2+/−10.0%. Conclusion: Results indicate that either method can achieve comparable dose distributions, however, VMAT can allow the optimizer to distribute dose over paths of minimal lung tissue and reduce the V20. Therefore, creating a VMAT with constraints identical to an SS-IMRT plan could help to reduce the V20 in clinical treatment plans.

  6. SU-F-T-356: DosimetricComparison of VMAT Vs Step and Shoot IMRT Plans for Stage III Lung CancerPatients with Mediastinal Involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, D; Bogue, J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: For Stage III lung cancers that entail treatment of some or all of the mediastinum, anterior-posterior focused Step and Shoot IMRT (SS-IMRT) and VMAT plans have been clinically used to deliver the prescribed dose while working to minimize lung dose and avoid other critical structures. A comparison between the two planning methods was completed to see which treatment method is superior and minimizes dose to healthy lung tissue. Methods: Ten patients who were recently treated with SS-IMRT or VMAT plans for Stage III lung cancer with mediastinal involvement were selected. All patients received a simulation CT for treatment planning, as well as a 4D CT and PET/CT fusion for target delineation. Plans were prescribed 6250 cGy in 25 fractions and normalized such that 100% of the prescription dose covered 95% of the PTV. Clinically approved SS-IMRT or VMAT plans were then copied and planned using the alternative modality with identical optimization criteria. SS-IMRT plans utilized seven to nine beams distributed around the patient while the VMAT plans consisted of two full 360 degree arcs. Plans were compared for the lung volume receiving 20 Gy (V20). Results: Both SS-IMRT and VMAT can be used to achieve clinical treatment plans for patients with Stage III Lung cancer with targets encompassing the mediastinum. VMAT plans produced an average V20 of 23.0+/−8.3% and SS-IMRT produced an average of 24.2+/−10.0%. Conclusion: Results indicate that either method can achieve comparable dose distributions, however, VMAT can allow the optimizer to distribute dose over paths of minimal lung tissue and reduce the V20. Therefore, creating a VMAT with constraints identical to an SS-IMRT plan could help to reduce the V20 in clinical treatment plans.

  7. Altered neuronal activity in the primary motor cortex and globus pallidus after dopamine depletion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min; Li, Min; Geng, Xiwen; Song, Zhimin; Albers, H Elliott; Yang, Maoquan; Zhang, Xiao; Xie, Jinlu; Qu, Qingyang; He, Tingting

    2015-01-15

    The involvement of dopamine (DA) neuron loss in the etiology of Parkinson's disease has been well documented. The neural mechanisms underlying the effects of DA loss and the resultant motor dysfunction remain unknown. To gain insights into how loss of DA disrupts the electrical processes in the cortico-subcortical network, the present study explores the effects of DA neuron depletion on electrical activity in the primary motor cortex (M1), on the external and the internal segment of the globus pallidus (GPe and GPi respectively), and on their temporal relationships. Comparison of local field potentials (LFPs) in these brain regions from unilateral hemispheric DA neuron depleted rats and neurologically intact rats revealed that the spectrum power of LFPs in 12-70Hz (for M1, and GPe) and in 25-40Hz (for GPi) was significantly greater in the DA depleted rats than that in the control group. These changes were associated with a shortening of latency in LFP activities between M1 and GPe, from several hundred milliseconds in the intact animals to close to zero in the DA depleted animals. LFP oscillations in M1 were significantly more synchronized with those in GPe in the DA depleted rats compared with those in the control rats. By contrast, the synchronization of oscillation in LFP activities between M1 and GPi did not differ between the DA depleted and intact rats. Not surprisingly, rats that had DA neuron depletion spent more time along the ladder compared with the control rats. These data suggest that enhanced oscillatory activity and increased synchronization of LFPs may contribute to movement impairment in the rat model of Parkinson's disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Mediating role of activity level in the depressive realism effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Blanco

    Full Text Available Several classic studies have concluded that the accuracy of identifying uncontrollable situations depends heavily on depressive mood. Nondepressed participants tend to exhibit an optimistic illusion of control, whereas depressed participants tend to better detect a lack of control. Recently, we suggested that the different activity levels (measured as the probability of responding during a contingency learning task exhibited by depressed and nondepressed individuals is partly responsible for this effect. The two studies presented in this paper provide further support for this mediational hypothesis, in which mood is the distal cause of the illusion of control operating through activity level, the proximal cause. In Study 1, the probability of responding, P(R, was found to be a mediator variable between the depressive symptoms and the judgments of control. In Study 2, we intervened directly on the mediator variable: The P(R for both depressed and nondepressed participants was manipulated through instructions. Our results confirm that P(R manipulation produced differences in the participants' perceptions of uncontrollability. Importantly, the intervention on the mediator variable cancelled the effect of the distal cause; the participants' judgments of control were no longer mood dependent when the P(R was manipulated. This result supports the hypothesis that the so-called depressive realism effect is actually mediated by the probability of responding.

  9. Mediating Role of Activity Level in the Depressive Realism Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Fernando; Matute, Helena; A. Vadillo, Miguel

    2012-01-01

    Several classic studies have concluded that the accuracy of identifying uncontrollable situations depends heavily on depressive mood. Nondepressed participants tend to exhibit an optimistic illusion of control, whereas depressed participants tend to better detect a lack of control. Recently, we suggested that the different activity levels (measured as the probability of responding during a contingency learning task) exhibited by depressed and nondepressed individuals is partly responsible for this effect. The two studies presented in this paper provide further support for this mediational hypothesis, in which mood is the distal cause of the illusion of control operating through activity level, the proximal cause. In Study 1, the probability of responding, P(R), was found to be a mediator variable between the depressive symptoms and the judgments of control. In Study 2, we intervened directly on the mediator variable: The P(R) for both depressed and nondepressed participants was manipulated through instructions. Our results confirm that P(R) manipulation produced differences in the participants’ perceptions of uncontrollability. Importantly, the intervention on the mediator variable cancelled the effect of the distal cause; the participants’ judgments of control were no longer mood dependent when the P(R) was manipulated. This result supports the hypothesis that the so-called depressive realism effect is actually mediated by the probability of responding. PMID:23029435

  10. MO-FG-CAMPUS-TeP2-02: First Experiences and Perspectives in Using Direct Multicriteria Optimization (MCO) On Volumetric-Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT) for Head and Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edgington, Samantha; Cotter, Christopher; Busse, Paul; Crawford, Bruce; Wang, Yi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To report the first experiences and perspectives in using direct multicriteria optimization (MCO) on volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) for head and neck (H&N) cancer. Methods: Ten prior patients with tumors in representative H&N regions were selected to evaluate direct MCO-VMAT in RayStation v5.0 beta. The patients were previously treated by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with MCO on an Elekta linear accelerator with Agility multileaf collimator. To avoid radiating eyes and shoulders, MCO-VMAT required one to three partial-arc groups, with each group consisting of single or dual arcs. All MCO-VMAT plans were approved by a radiation oncologist. The MCO-VMAT and MCO-IMRT plans were compared using V{sub 100}, D{sub 5}, homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI) for planning target volume (PTV), D{sub mean} and D{sub 50} for six parallel organs and D{sub max} for five serial organs. Patient-specific quality assurance (QA) was performed using ArcCHECK for MCO-VMAT and Matrixx for MCO-IMRT with results analyzed using gamma criteria of 3%/3mm. Results: MCO-VMAT provided better V{sub 100} (+0.8%) lower D{sub 5}(− 0.3 Gy), lower HI (−0.27) and comparable CI (+0.05). MCO-VMAT decreased D{sub mean} and D{sub 50} for multiple parallel organs in seven of the ten patients. On average the reduction ranged from 2.1 (larynx) to 7.6 Gy (esophagus). For the nasal cavity and nasopharynx plans significant reduction in D{sub max} was observed for optics (up to 11 Gy) brainstem (6.4 Gy), cord (2.1 Gy) and mandible (6.7 Gy). All MCO-VMAT and -IMRT plans passed clinical QA. MCO-VMAT required slightly longer planning time due to the more complex VMAT optimization. The net beam-on time for the MCO-VMAT plans ranged from 80 to 242 seconds, up to 9 minutes shorter than MCO-IMRT. Conclusion: With similar target coverage, reduced organ dose, comparable planning time, and significantly faster treatment, MCO-VMAT is very likely to become the modality of

  11. LIF Mediates Proinvasive Activation of Stromal Fibroblasts in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Albrengues

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Signaling crosstalk between tumor cells and fibroblasts confers proinvasive properties to the tumor microenvironment. Here, we identify leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF as a tumor promoter that mediates proinvasive activation of stromal fibroblasts independent of alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA expression. We demonstrate that a pulse of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β establishes stable proinvasive fibroblast activation by inducing LIF production in both fibroblasts and tumor cells. In fibroblasts, LIF mediates TGF-β-dependent actomyosin contractility and extracellular matrix remodeling, which results in collective carcinoma cell invasion in vitro and in vivo. Accordingly, carcinomas from multiple origins and melanomas display strong LIF upregulation, which correlates with dense collagen fiber organization, cancer cell collective invasion, and poor clinical outcome. Blockade of JAK activity by Ruxolitinib (JAK inhibitor counteracts fibroblast-dependent carcinoma cell invasion in vitro and in vivo. These findings establish LIF as a proinvasive fibroblast producer independent of α-SMA and may open novel therapeutic perspectives for patients with aggressive primary tumors.

  12. Exercisers' identities and exercise dependence: the mediating effect of exercise commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Frank Jing-Horng; Hsu, Eva Ya-Wen; Wang, Junn-Ming; Huang, Mei-Yao; Chang, Jo-Ning; Wang, Chien-Hsin

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the associations of exercise identity, exercise commitment, exercise dependence, and, particularly, the mediating effects of exercise commitment on the relationship between exercise identity and exercise dependence. 253 Taiwanese regular exercisers completed measures, including the Exercise Dependence Scale-Revised, the Exercise Identity Scale, the Exercise Commitment Scale, and the Godin Leisure Time Exercise Questionnaire. Results showed that exercise identity, exercise dependence, and two types of exercise commitment were moderately to highly correlated. Furthermore, structural equation modelling indicated that a "have to" commitment partially mediated the relationship between exercise identity and exercise dependence. Based on the mediating role of a "have to" commitment, the findings are particularly informative to exercise instructors and for exercise program managers.

  13. SU-F-T-272: Patient Specific Quality Assurance of Prostate VMAT Plans with Portal Dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darko, J; Osei, E [Grand River Cancer Centre @ Grand River Hospital, Kitchener, ON (Canada); University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Kiciak, A [University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada); Badu, S; Grigorov, G; Fleck, A [Grand River Cancer Centre @ Grand River Hospital, Kitchener, ON (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of using the Portal Dosimetry (PD) method for patient specific quality assurance of prostate VMAT plans. Methods: As per institutional protocol all VMAT plans were measured using the Varian Portal Dosimetry (PD) method. A gamma evaluation criterion of 3%-3mm with a minimum area gamma pass rate (gamma <1) of 95% is used clinically for all plans. We retrospectively evaluated the portal dosimetry results for 170 prostate patients treated with VMAT technique. Three sets of criterions were adopted for re-evaluating the measurements; 3%-3mm, 2%-2mm and 1%-1mm. For all criterions two areas, Field+1cm and MLC-CIAO were analysed.To ascertain the effectiveness of the portal dosimetry technique in determining the delivery accuracy of prostate VMAT plans, 10 patients previously measured with portal dosimetry, were randomly selected and their measurements repeated using the ArcCHECK method. The same criterion used in the analysis of PD was used for the ArcCHECK measurements. Results: All patient plans reviewed met the institutional criteria for Area Gamma pass rate. Overall, the gamma pass rate (gamma <1) decreases for 3%-3mm, 2%-2mm and 1%-1mm criterion. For each criterion the pass rate was significantly reduced when the MLC-CIAO was used instead of FIELD+1cm. There was noticeable change in sensitivity for MLC-CIAO with 2%-2mm criteria and much more significant reduction at 1%-1mm. Comparable results were obtained for the ArcCHECK measurements. Although differences were observed between the clockwise verses the counter clockwise plans in both the PD and ArcCHECK measurements, this was not deemed to be statistically significant. Conclusion: This work demonstrates that Portal Dosimetry technique can be effectively used for quality assurance of VMAT plans. Results obtained show similar sensitivity compared to ArcCheck. To reveal certain delivery inaccuracies, the use of a combination of criterions may provide an effective way in improving

  14. A novel approach to EPID-based 3D volumetric dosimetry for IMRT and VMAT QA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhazmi, Abdulaziz; Gianoli, Chiara; Neppl, Sebastian; Martins, Juliana; Veloza, Stella; Podesta, Mark; Verhaegen, Frank; Reiner, Michael; Belka, Claus; Parodi, Katia

    2018-06-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) are relatively complex treatment delivery techniques and require quality assurance (QA) procedures. Pre-treatment dosimetric verification represents a fundamental QA procedure in daily clinical routine in radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to develop an EPID-based approach to reconstruct a 3D dose distribution as imparted to a virtual cylindrical water phantom to be used for plan-specific pre-treatment dosimetric verification for IMRT and VMAT plans. For each depth, the planar 2D dose distributions acquired in air were back-projected and convolved by depth-specific scatter and attenuation kernels. The kernels were obtained by making use of scatter and attenuation models to iteratively estimate the parameters from a set of reference measurements. The derived parameters served as a look-up table for reconstruction of arbitrary measurements. The summation of the reconstructed 3D dose distributions resulted in the integrated 3D dose distribution of the treatment delivery. The accuracy of the proposed approach was validated in clinical IMRT and VMAT plans by means of gamma evaluation, comparing the reconstructed 3D dose distributions with Octavius measurement. The comparison was carried out using (3%, 3 mm) criteria scoring 99% and 96% passing rates for IMRT and VMAT, respectively. An accuracy comparable to the one of the commercial device for 3D volumetric dosimetry was demonstrated. In addition, five IMRT and five VMAT were validated against the 3D dose calculation performed by the TPS in a water phantom using the same passing rate criteria. The median passing rates within the ten treatment plans was 97.3%, whereas the lowest was 95%. Besides, the reconstructed 3D distribution is obtained without predictions relying on forward dose calculation and without external phantom or dosimetric devices. Thus, the approach provides a fully automated, fast and easy QA

  15. Recombinant mouse PAP has pH-dependent ectonucleotidase activity and acts through A(1-adenosine receptors to mediate antinociception.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel A Sowa

    Full Text Available Prostatic acid phosphatase (PAP is expressed in nociceptive neurons and functions as an ectonucleotidase. When injected intraspinally, the secretory isoforms of human and bovine PAP protein have potent and long-lasting antinociceptive effects that are dependent on A(1-adenosine receptor (A(1R activation. In this study, we purified the secretory isoform of mouse (mPAP using the baculovirus expression system to determine if recombinant mPAP also had antinociceptive properties. We found that mPAP dephosphorylated AMP, and to a much lesser extent, ADP at neutral pH (pH 7.0. In contrast, mPAP dephosphorylated all purine nucleotides (AMP, ADP, ATP at an acidic pH (pH 5.6. The transmembrane isoform of mPAP had similar pH-dependent ectonucleotidase activity. A single intraspinal injection of mPAP protein had long-lasting (three day antinociceptive properties, including antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects in the Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA inflammatory pain model. These antinociceptive effects were transiently blocked by the A(1R antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1, 3-dipropylxanthine (CPX, suggesting mPAP dephosphorylates nucleotides to adenosine to mediate antinociception just like human and bovine PAP. Our studies indicate that PAP has species-conserved antinociceptive effects and has pH-dependent ectonucleotidase activity. The ability to metabolize nucleotides in a pH-dependent manner could be relevant to conditions like inflammation where tissue acidosis and nucleotide release occur. Lastly, our studies demonstrate that recombinant PAP protein can be used to treat chronic pain in animal models.

  16. Depletion of pro-oncogenic RUNX2 enhances gemcitabine (GEM) sensitivity of p53-mutated pancreatic cancer Panc-1 cells through the induction of pro-apoptotic TAp63.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Toshinori; Nakamura, Mizuyo; Ogata, Takehiro; Sang, Meijie; Yoda, Hiroyuki; Hiraoka, Kiriko; Sang, Meixiang; Shimozato, Osamu

    2016-11-01

    Recently, we have described that siRNA-mediated silencing of runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) improves anti-cancer drug gemcitabine (GEM) sensitivity of p53-deficient human pancreatic cancer AsPC-1 cells through the augmentation of p53 family TAp63-dependent cell death pathway. In this manuscript, we have extended our study to p53-mutated human pancreatic cancer Panc-1 cells. According to our present results, knockdown of mutant p53 alone had a marginal effect on GEM-mediated cell death of Panc-1 cells. We then sought to deplete RUNX2 using siRNA in Panc-1 cells and examined its effect on GEM sensitivity. Under our experimental conditions, RUNX2 knockdown caused a significant enhancement of GEM sensitivity of Panc-1 cells. Notably, GEM-mediated induction of TAp63 but not of TAp73 was further stimulated in RUNX2-depleted Panc-1 cells, indicating that, like AsPC-1 cells, TAp63 might play a pivotal role in the regulation of GEM sensitivity of Panc-1 cells. Consistent with this notion, forced expression of TAp63α in Panc-1 cells promoted cell cycle arrest and/or cell death, and massively increased luciferase activities driven by TAp63-target gene promoters such as p21WAF1 and NOXA. In addition, immunoprecipitation experiments indicated that RUNX2 forms a complex with TAp63 in Panc-1 cells. Taken together, our current observations strongly suggest that depletion of RUNX2 enhances the cytotoxic effect of GEM on p53-mutated Panc-1 cells through the stimulation of TAp63-dependent cell death pathway even in the presence of a large amount of pro-oncogenic mutant p53, and might provide an attractive strategy to treat pancreatic cancer patients with p53 mutations.

  17. Effect of photon-beam energy on VMAT and IMRT treatment plan quality and dosimetric accuracy for advanced prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pasler, Marlies; Wirtz, Holger; Lutterbach, Johannes [Lake Constance Radiation Oncology Center Singen-Friedrichshafen, Singen (Germany); Georg, Dietmar [Medical Univ. Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2011-12-15

    The goal of the research was to evaluate treatment plan quality and dosimetric accuracy of volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) plans using 6, 10, and 15 MV photon beams for prostate cancer including lymph nodes. In this retrospective study, VMAT and IMRT plans were generated with the Pinnacle {sup copyright} treatment planning system (TPS) (V9.0) for 10 prostate cancer cases. Each plan consisted of two target volumes: PTV{sub B} included the prostate bed, PTV{sub PC+LN} contained PTV{sub B} and lymph nodes. For plan evaluation statistics, the homogeneity index, conformity index, mean doses, and near-max doses to organs at risk (OAR) were analyzed. Treatment time and number of monitor units were assessed to compare delivery efficiency. Dosimetric plan verification was performed with a 2D ionization chamber array placed in a full scatter phantom. Results: No differences were found for target and OAR parameters in low and high energy photon beam plans for both VMAT and IMRT. A slightly higher low dose volume was detected for 6 MV VMAT plans (normal tissue: D{sub mean} = 16.47 Gy) compared to 10 and 15 MV VMAT plans (D{sub mean} = 15.90 Gy and 15.74 Gy, respectively), similar to the findings in IMRT. In VMAT, > 96% of detector points passed the 3%/ 3 mm {gamma} criterion; marginally better accuracy was found in IMRT (> 97%). Conclusion: For static and rotational IMRT, 15 MV photons did not show advantages over 6 and 10 MV high energy photon beams in large volume pelvic plans. For the investigated TPS and linac combination, 10 MV photon beams can be used as the general purpose energy for intensity modulation.

  18. Incorporation of copper ions into crystals of T2 copper-depleted laccase from Botrytis aclada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osipov, E. M.; Polyakov, K. M.; Tikhonova, T. V.; Kittl, R.; Dorovatovskii, P.V.; Shleev, S. V.; Popov, V. O.; Ludwig, R.

    2015-01-01

    The restoration of the native form of laccase from B. aclada from the type 2 copper-depleted form of the enzyme was investigated. Copper ions were found to be incorporated into the active site after soaking the depleted enzyme in a Cu + -containing solution. Laccases belong to the class of multicopper oxidases catalyzing the oxidation of phenols accompanied by the reduction of molecular oxygen to water without the formation of hydrogen peroxide. The activity of laccases depends on the number of Cu atoms per enzyme molecule. The structure of type 2 copper-depleted laccase from Botrytis aclada has been solved previously. With the aim of obtaining the structure of the native form of the enzyme, crystals of the depleted laccase were soaked in Cu + - and Cu 2+ -containing solutions. Copper ions were found to be incorporated into the active site only when Cu + was used. A comparative analysis of the native and depleted forms of the enzymes was performed

  19. CD83 Antibody Inhibits Human B Cell Responses to Antigen as well as Dendritic Cell-Mediated CD4 T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kuan Y; Baron, Rebecca; Seldon, Therese A; Jones, Martina L; Rice, Alison M; Munster, David J

    2018-05-15

    Anti-CD83 Ab capable of Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity can deplete activated CD83 + human dendritic cells, thereby inhibiting CD4 T cell-mediated acute graft-versus-host disease. As CD83 is also expressed on the surface of activated B lymphocytes, we hypothesized that anti-CD83 would also inhibit B cell responses to stimulation. We found that anti-CD83 inhibited total IgM and IgG production in vitro by allostimulated human PBMC. Also, Ag-specific Ab responses to immunization of SCID mice xenografted with human PBMC were inhibited by anti-CD83 treatment. This inhibition occurred without depletion of all human B cells because anti-CD83 lysed activated CD83 + B cells by Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and spared resting (CD83 - ) B cells. In cultured human PBMC, anti-CD83 inhibited tetanus toxoid-stimulated B cell proliferation and concomitant dendritic cell-mediated CD4 T cell proliferation and expression of IFN-γ and IL-17A, with minimal losses of B cells (80% of B cells but had no effect on CD4 T cell proliferation and cytokine expression. By virtue of the ability of anti-CD83 to selectively deplete activated, but not resting, B cells and dendritic cells, with the latter reducing CD4 T cell responses, anti-CD83 may be clinically useful in autoimmunity and transplantation. Advantages might include inhibited expansion of autoantigen- or alloantigen-specific B cells and CD4 T cells, thus preventing further production of pathogenic Abs and inflammatory cytokines while preserving protective memory and regulatory cells. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. GFAP-Cre-mediated transgenic activation of Bmi1 results in pituitary tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart A Westerman

    Full Text Available Bmi1 is a member of the polycomb repressive complex 1 and plays different roles during embryonic development, depending on the developmental context. Bmi1 over expression is observed in many types of cancer, including tumors of astroglial and neural origin. Although genetic depletion of Bmi1 has been described to result in tumor inhibitory effects partly through INK4A/Arf mediated senescence and apoptosis and also through INK4A/Arf independent effects, it has not been proven that Bmi1 can be causally involved in the formation of these tumors. To see whether this is the case, we developed two conditional Bmi1 transgenic models that were crossed with GFAP-Cre mice to activate transgenic expression in neural and glial lineages. We show here that these mice generate intermediate and anterior lobe pituitary tumors that are positive for ACTH and beta-endorphin. Combined transgenic expression of Bmi1 together with conditional loss of Rb resulted in pituitary tumors but was insufficient to induce medulloblastoma therefore indicating that the oncogenic function of Bmi1 depends on regulation of p16(INK4A/Rb rather than on regulation of p19(ARF/p53. Human pituitary adenomas show Bmi1 overexpression in over 50% of the cases, which indicates that Bmi1 could be causally involved in formation of these tumors similarly as in our mouse model.

  1. SU-E-T-422: Correlation Between 2D Passing Rates and 3D Dose Differences for Pretreatment VMAT QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, X; Xie, C

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) quality assurance (QA) is typically using QA methods and action levels taken from fixedbeam intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) QA methods. However, recent studies demonstrated that there is no correlation between the percent gamma passing rate (%GP) and the magnitude of dose discrepancy between the planned dose and the actual delivered dose for IMRT. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether %GP is correlated with clinical dosimetric difference for VMAT. Methods: Twenty nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) patients treated with dual-arc simultaneous integrated boost VMAT and 20 esophageal cancer patients treated with one-arc VMAT were enrolled in this study. Pretreatment VMAT QA was performed by a 3D diode array ArcCheck. Acceptance criteria of 2%/2mm, 3%/3mm, and 4%/4mm were applied for 2D %GP. Dose values below 10% of the per-measured normalization maximum dose were ignored.Mean DVH values obtained from 3DVH software and TPS were calculated and percentage dose differences were calculated. Statistical correlation between %GP and percent dose difference was studied by using Pearson correlation. Results: The %GP for criteria 2%/2mm, 3%/3mm, and 4%/4mm were 82.33±4.45, 93.47±2.31, 97.13±2.41, respectively. Dose differences calculated from 3DVH and TPS for beam isocenter, mean dose of PTV, maximum dose of PTV, D2 of PTV and D98 of PTV were -1.04±3.24, -0.74±1.71, 2.92±3.62, 0.89±3.29, -1.46±1.97, respectively. No correction were found between %GP and dose differences. Conclusion: There are weak correlations between the 2D %GP and dose differences calculated from 3DVH. The %GP acceptance criteria of 3%/3mm usually applied for pretreatment QA of IMRT and VMAT is not indicating strong clinical correlation with 3D dose difference. 3D dose reconstructions on patient anatomy may be necessary for physicist to predict the accuracy of delivered dose for VMAT QA

  2. Potential involvement of oxygen intermediates and glutathione depletion in UV-induced epidermal cell injury in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, G.C.; Acosta, D.

    1991-01-01

    Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depletion of glutathione (GSH) are suggested as the cytotoxic mechanisms for UVB-induced cellular damage. Primary monolayer cultures of epidermal keratinocytes (KCs) prepared from the skin of neonatal rats were irradiated with UVB at levels of 0.25-3.0 J/cm 2 . Cytotoxicity was measured at 3, 6, and 12 hr after UVB radiation. Exposure of KCs to UVB resulted in time- and dose-related toxic responses as determined by plasma membrane integrity, lysosomal function and mitochondrial metabolic activity. Irradiated KCs generated superoxide in a dose-dependent manner when compared to sham-irradiated cells. Superoxide formation, which occurred before and concomitant with cell injury, was decreased by superoxide dismutase (SOD). Cell injury was also significantly prevented by ROS scavengers, SOD and catalase. Pretreatment of cells with endocytosis inhibitors, cytochalasin B and methylamine, suppressed the ability of SOD and catalase to protect keratinocytes from UVB-induced toxicity. Irradiation of cells with UVB caused rapid depletion of GSH to about 30% of unirradiated levels within 15 min. UVB-irradiation led to a rapid transient increase in GSH peroxidase activity, concomitant with a marked decrease in the GSH/GSSG ratio. After 1 hr., while the GSH/GSSG ratio remained low, the GSH peroxidase activity declined below the control levels in UVB-treated epidermal cells. Following extensive GSH depletion in cells preincubated with 0.1 mM buthiomine sulfoximine, KCs became strongly sensitized to the cytotoxic action of UVB. These results indicate that UVB-induced cell injury in cultured KCs may be mediated by ROs and that endogenous GSH may play an important protective role against the cytotoxic action of UVB

  3. Glutathione-mediated detoxification of halobenzoquinone drinking water disinfection byproducts in T24 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinhua; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hongquan; Le, X Chris; Li, Xing-Fang

    2014-10-01

    Halobenzoquinones (HBQs) are a new class of drinking water disinfection byproducts (DBPs) and are capable of producing reactive oxygen species and causing oxidative damage to proteins and DNA in T24 human bladder carcinoma cells. However, the exact mechanism of the cytotoxicity of HBQs is unknown. Here, we investigated the role of glutathione (GSH) and GSH-related enzymes including glutathione S-transferase (GST) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in defense against HBQ-induced cytotoxicity in T24 cells. The HBQs are 2,6-dichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (DCBQ), 2,6-dichloro-3-methyl-1,4-benzoquinone (DCMBQ), 2,3,6-trichloro-1,4-benzoquinone (TriCBQ), and 2,6-dibromobenzoquinone (DBBQ). We found that depletion of cellular GSH could sensitize cells to HBQs and extracellular GSH supplementation could attenuate HBQ-induced cytotoxicity. HBQs caused significant cellular GSH depletion and increased cellular GST activities in a concentration-dependent manner. Our mass spectrometry study confirms that HBQs can conjugate with GSH, explaining in part the mechanism of GSH depletion by HBQs. The effects of HBQs on GPx activity are compound dependent; DCMBQ and DBBQ decrease cellular GPx activities, whereas DCBQ and TriCBQ have no significant effects. Pearson correlation analysis shows that the cellular GSH level is inversely correlated with ROS production and cellular GST activity in HBQ-treated cells. These results support a GSH and GSH-related enzyme-mediated detoxification mechanism of HBQs in T24 cells. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Treatment planning for radiotherapy with very high-energy electron beams and comparison of VHEE and VMAT plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Qu, Bradley; Palma, Bianey; Jensen, Christopher; Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Hårdemark, Björn; Hynning, Elin

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this work was to develop a treatment planning workflow for rapid radiotherapy delivered with very high-energy electron (VHEE) scanning pencil beams of 60–120 MeV and to study VHEE plans as a function of VHEE treatment parameters. Additionally, VHEE plans were compared to clinical state-of-the-art volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) photon plans for three cases. Methods: VHEE radiotherapy treatment planning was performed by linking EGSnrc Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculations with inverse treatment planning in a research version of RayStation. In order to study the effect of VHEE treatment parameters on VHEE dose distributions, a MATLAB graphical user interface (GUI) for calculation of VHEE MC pencil beam doses was developed. Through the GUI, pediatric case MC simulations were run for a number of beam energies (60, 80, 100, and 120 MeV), number of beams (13, 17, and 36), pencil beam spot (0.1, 1.0, and 3.0 mm) and grid (2.0, 2.5, and 3.5 mm) sizes, and source-to-axis distance, SAD (40 and 50 cm). VHEE plans for the pediatric case calculated with the different treatment parameters were optimized and compared. Furthermore, 100 MeV VHEE plans for the pediatric case, a lung, and a prostate case were calculated and compared to the clinically delivered VMAT plans. All plans were normalized such that the 100% isodose line covered 95% of the target volume. Results: VHEE beam energy had the largest effect on the quality of dose distributions of the pediatric case. For the same target dose, the mean doses to organs at risk (OARs) decreased by 5%–16% when planned with 100 MeV compared to 60 MeV, but there was no further improvement in the 120 MeV plan. VHEE plans calculated with 36 beams outperformed plans calculated with 13 and 17 beams, but to a more modest degree (<8%). While pencil beam spacing and SAD had a small effect on VHEE dose distributions, 0.1–3 mm pencil beam sizes resulted in identical dose distributions. For the 100 MeV VHEE pediatric

  5. Regret causes ego-depletion and finding benefits in the regrettable events alleviates ego-depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongmei; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Fang; Xu, Yan; Hong, Ying-Yi; Jiang, Jiang

    2014-01-01

    This study tested the hypotheses that experiencing regret would result in ego-depletion, while finding benefits (i.e., "silver linings") in the regret-eliciting events counteracted the ego-depletion effect. Using a modified gambling paradigm (Experiments 1, 2, and 4) and a retrospective method (Experiments 3 and 5), five experiments were conducted to induce regret. Results revealed that experiencing regret undermined performance on subsequent tasks, including a paper-and-pencil calculation task (Experiment 1), a Stroop task (Experiment 2), and a mental arithmetic task (Experiment 3). Furthermore, finding benefits in the regret-eliciting events improved subsequent performance (Experiments 4 and 5), and this improvement was mediated by participants' perceived vitality (Experiment 4). This study extended the depletion model of self-regulation by considering emotions with self-conscious components (in our case, regret). Moreover, it provided a comprehensive understanding of how people felt and performed after experiencing regret and after finding benefits in the events that caused the regret.

  6. The effect of adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists on hydroxyl radical, dopamine, and glutamate in the striatum of rats with altered function of VMAT2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołembiowska, Krystyna; Dziubina, Anna

    2012-08-01

    It has been shown that a decreased vesicular monoamine transporter (VMAT2) function and the disruption of dopamine (DA) storage is an early contributor to oxidative damage of dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). In our previous study, we demonstrated that adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists suppressed oxidative stress in 6-hydroxydopamine-treated rats suggesting that this effect may account for neuroprotective properties of drugs. In the present study, rats were injected with reserpine (10 mg/kg sc) and 18 h later the effect of the adenosine A(2A) receptor antagonists 8-(3-chlorostyryl)caffeine (CSC) and 4-(2-[7-amino-2-(2-furyl)[1,2,4]triazolo[2,3-a][1,3,5]triazin-5-ylamino]ethyl)phenol (ZM 241385) on extracellular DA, glutamate and hydroxyl radical formation was studied in the rat striatum using in vivo microdialysis. By disrupting VMAT2 function, reserpine depleted DA stores, and increased glutamate and hydroxyl radical levels in the rat striatum. CSC (1 mg/kg) but not ZM 241385 (3 mg/kg) increased extracellular DA level and production of hydroxyl radical in reserpinised rats. Both antagonists decreased the reserpine-induced increase in extracellular glutamate. L-3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA) (25 mg/kg) significantly enhanced extracellular DA, had no effect on reserpine-induced hydroxyl radical production and decreased extracellular glutamate concentration. CSC but not ZM 241385 given jointly with L-DOPA increased the effect of L-DOPA on extracellular DA and augmented the reserpine-induced hydroxyl radical production. CSC and ZM 241385 did not influence extracellular glutamate level, which was decreased by L-DOPA. It seems that by decreasing the MAO-dependent DA metabolism rate, CSC raised cytosolic DA and by DA autoxidation, it induced hydroxyl radical overproduction. Thus, the methylxanthine A(2A) receptor antagonists bearing properties of MAO-B inhibitor, like CSC, may cause a risk of oxidative stress resulting from dysfunctional DA storage

  7. p18(Hamlet) mediates different p53-dependent responses to DNA-damage inducing agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafarga, Vanesa; Cuadrado, Ana; Nebreda, Angel R

    2007-10-01

    Cells organize appropriate responses to environmental cues by activating specific signaling networks. Two proteins that play key roles in coordinating stress responses are the kinase p38alpha (MAPK14) and the transcription factor p53 (TP53). Depending on the nature and the extent of the stress-induced damage, cells may respond by arresting the cell cycle or by undergoing cell death, and these responses are usually associated with the phosphorylation of particular substrates by p38alpha as well as the activation of specific target genes by p53. We recently characterized a new p38alpha substrate, named p18(Hamlet) (ZNHIT1), which mediates p53-dependent responses to different genotoxic stresses. Thus, cisplatin or UV light induce stabilization of the p18(Hamlet) protein, which then enhances the ability of p53 to bind to and activate the promoters of pro-apoptotic genes such as NOXA and PUMA leading to apoptosis induction. In a similar way, we report here that p18(Hamlet) can also mediate the cell cycle arrest induced in response to gamma-irradiation, by participating in the p53-dependent upregulation of the cell cycle inhibitor p21(Cip1) (CDKN1A).

  8. Very high-energy electron (VHEE) beams in radiation therapy; Treatment plan comparison between VHEE, VMAT, and PPBS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schüler, Emil; Eriksson, Kjell; Hynning, Elin; Hancock, Steven L; Hiniker, Susan M; Bazalova-Carter, Magdalena; Wong, Tony; Le, Quynh-Thu; Loo, Billy W; Maxim, Peter G

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of very high-energy electron beams (VHEE) in comparison to clinically derived treatment plans generated with volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and proton pencil beam scanning (PPBS) technology. We developed a custom optimization script that could be applied automatically across modalities to eliminate operator bias during IMRT optimization. Four clinical cases were selected (prostate cancer, lung cancer, pediatric brain tumor, and head and neck cancer (HNC)). The VHEE beams were calculated in the EGSnrc/DOSXYZnrc Monte Carlo code for 100 and 200 MeV beams. Treatment plans with VHEE, VMAT, and PPBS were optimized in a research version of RayStation using an in-house developed script to minimize operator bias between the different techniques. The in-house developed script generated similar or superior plans to the clinically used plans. In the comparisons between the modalities, the integral dose was lowest for the PPBS-generated plans in all cases. For the prostate case, the 200 MeV VHEE plan showed reduced integral dose and reduced organ at risk (OAR) dose compared to the VMAT plan. For all other cases, both the 100 and the 200 MeV VHEE plans were superior to the VMAT plans, and the VHEE plans showed better conformity and lower spinal cord dose in the pediatric brain case and lower brain stem dose in the HNC case when compared to the PPBS plan. The automated optimization developed in this study generated similar or superior plans as compared to the clinically used plan and represents an unbiased approach to compare treatment plans generated for different modalities. In the present study, we also show that VHEE plans are similar or superior to VMAT plans with reduced mean OAR dose and increased target conformity for a variety of clinical cases, and VHEE plans can even achieve reductions in OAR doses compared to PPBS plans for shallow targets. With increased VHEE energy, better conformity and even higher

  9. Dose distribution assessment (comparison) in the target volume treated with VMAT given by the planning system and evaluated by TL dosimeters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bravim, A.; Sakuraba, R.K.; Campos, L.L., E-mail: ambravim@hotmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Gerencia de Metrologia das Radiacoes

    2015-07-01

    Volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is a relatively new therapy technique in which treatment is delivered using a cone beam that rotates around the patient. The radiation is delivered in a continuous gantry rotation while the cone beam is modulated by the intertwining of dynamic multileaf collimators (MLCs). Studies of VMAT plans have shown reduction in the treatment delivery time and monitor units (MU) comparable to IMRT plans improving major comfort to the patient and reducing uncertainties associated with patient movement during treatment. The treatment using VMAT minimizes the biological effects of radiation to critical structures near to the target volumes and produces excellent dose distributions. The dosimetry of ionizing radiation is essential for the radiological protection programs for quality assurance and licensing of equipment. For radiation oncology a quality assurance program is essentially to maintain the quality of patient care. As the VMAT is a new technique of radiation therapy it is important to optimize quality assurance mechanisms to ensure that tests are performed in order to preserve the patient and the equipment. This paper aims to determinate the dose distribution in the target volume (tumor to be treated) and the scattered dose distribution in the risk organs for VMAT technique comparing data given by the planning system and thermoluminescent (TL) response. (author)

  10. Local confidence limits for IMRT and VMAT techniques: a study based on TG119 test suite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, M.; Chandroth, M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to generate a local confidence limit (CL) for intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) techniques used at Waikato Regional Cancer Centre. This work was carried out based on the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group (TG) 119 report. The AAPM TG 119 report recommends CLs as a bench mark for IMRT commissioning and delivery based on its multiple institutions planning and dosimetry comparisons. In this study the locally obtained CLs were compared to TG119 benchmarks. Furthermore, the same bench mark was used to test the capabilities and quality of the VMAT technique in our clinic. The TG 119 test suite consists of two primary and four clinical tests for evaluating the accuracy of IMRT planning and dose delivery systems. Pre defined structure sets contoured on computed tomography images were downloaded from AAPM website and were transferred to a locally designed phantom. For each test case two plans were generated using IMRT and VMAT optimisation. Dose prescriptions and planning objectives recommended by TG119 report were followed to generate the test plans in Eclipse Treatment Planning System. For each plan the point dose measurements were done using an ion chamber at high dose and low dose regions. The planar dose distribution was analysed for percentage of points passing the gamma criteria of 3 %/3 mm, for both the composite plan and individual fields of each plan. The CLs were generated based on the results from the gamma analysis and point dose measurements. For IMRT plans, the CLs obtained were (1) from point dose measurements: 2.49 % at high dose region and 2.95 % for the low dose region (2) from gamma analysis: 2.12 % for individual fields and 5.9 % for the composite plan. For VMAT plans, the CLs obtained were (1) from point dose measurements: 2.56 % at high dose region and 2.6 % for the low dose region (2) from gamma analysis: 1.46 % for individual fields and 0

  11. ER-mediated stress induces mitochondrial-dependent caspases activation in NT2 neuron-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arduino, Daniela M; Esteves, A Raquel; Domingues, A Filipa; Pereira, Claudia M F; Cardoso, Sandra M; Oliveira, Catarina R

    2009-11-30

    Recent studies have revealed that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) disturbance is involved in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative disorders, contributing to the activation of the ER stress-mediated apoptotic pathway. Therefore, we investigated here the molecular mechanisms underlying the ER-mitochondria axis, focusing on calcium as a potential mediator of cell death signals. Using NT2 cells treated with brefeldin A or tunicamycin, we observed that ER stress induces changes in the mitochondrial function, impairing mitochondrial membrane potential and distressing mitochondrial respiratory chain complex Moreover, stress stimuli at ER level evoked calcium fluxes between ER and mitochondria. Under these conditions, ER stress activated the unfolded protein response by an overexpression of GRP78, and also caspase-4 and-2, both involved upstream of caspase-9. Our findings show that ER and mitochondria interconnection plays a prominent role in the induction of neuronal cell death under particular stress circumstances.

  12. Analysis of intra-fraction prostate motion and derivation of duration-dependent margins for radiotherapy using real-time 4D ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Pei Ping Pang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: During radiotherapy, prostate motion changes over time. Quantifying and accounting for this motion is essential. This study aimed to assess intra-fraction prostate motion and derive duration-dependent planning margins for two treatment techniques. Material and methods: A four-dimension (4D transperineal ultrasound Clarity® system was used to track prostate motion. We analysed 1913 fractions from 60 patients undergoing volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT to the prostate. The mean VMAT treatment duration was 3.4 min. Extended monitoring was conducted weekly to simulate motion during intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT treatment (an additional seven minutes. A motion-time trend analysis was conducted and the mean intra-fraction motion between VMAT and IMRT treatments compared. Duration-dependent margins were calculated and anisotropic margins for VMAT and IMRT treatments were derived. Results: There were statistically significant differences in the mean intra-fraction motion between VMAT and the simulated IMRT duration in the inferior (0.1 mm versus 0.3 mm and posterior (−0.2 versus −0.4 mm directions respectively (p ≪ 0.01. An intra-fraction motion trend inferiorly and posteriorly was observed. The recommended minimum anisotropic margins are 1.7 mm/2.7 mm (superior/inferior; 0.8 mm (left/right, 1.7 mm/2.9 mm (anterior/posterior for VMAT treatments and 2.9 mm/4.3 mm (superior/inferior, 1.5 mm (left/right, 2.8 mm/4.8 mm (anterior/posterior for IMRT treatments. Smaller anisotropic margins were required for VMAT compared to IMRT (differences ranging from 1.2 to 1.6 mm superiorly/inferiorly, 0.7 mm laterally and 1.1–1.9 mm anteriorly/posteriorly. Conclusions: VMAT treatment is preferred over IMRT as prostate motion increases with time. Larger margins should be employed in the inferior and posterior directions for both treatment durations. Duration-dependent margins should

  13. Determination of the optimal tolerance for MLC positioning in sliding window and VMAT techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, V.; Abella, R.; Calvo, J. F.; Jurado-Bruggemann, D.; Sancho, I.; Carrasco, P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Several authors have recommended a 2 mm tolerance for multileaf collimator (MLC) positioning in sliding window treatments. In volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatments, however, the optimal tolerance for MLC positioning remains unknown. In this paper, the authors present the results of a multicenter study to determine the optimal tolerance for both techniques. Methods: The procedure used is based on dynalog file analysis. The study was carried out using seven Varian linear accelerators from five different centers. Dynalogs were collected from over 100 000 clinical treatments and in-house software was used to compute the number of tolerance faults as a function of the user-defined tolerance. Thus, the optimal value for this tolerance, defined as the lowest achievable value, was investigated. Results: Dynalog files accurately predict the number of tolerance faults as a function of the tolerance value, especially for low fault incidences. All MLCs behaved similarly and the Millennium120 and the HD120 models yielded comparable results. In sliding window techniques, the number of beams with an incidence of hold-offs >1% rapidly decreases for a tolerance of 1.5 mm. In VMAT techniques, the number of tolerance faults sharply drops for tolerances around 2 mm. For a tolerance of 2.5 mm, less than 0.1% of the VMAT arcs presented tolerance faults. Conclusions: Dynalog analysis provides a feasible method for investigating the optimal tolerance for MLC positioning in dynamic fields. In sliding window treatments, the tolerance of 2 mm was found to be adequate, although it can be reduced to 1.5 mm. In VMAT treatments, the typically used 5 mm tolerance is excessively high. Instead, a tolerance of 2.5 mm is recommended

  14. β-Arrestin-2-Dependent Signaling Promotes CCR4-mediated Chemotaxis of Murine T-Helper Type 2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Rui; Choi, Yeon Ho; Zidar, David A; Walker, Julia K L

    2018-06-01

    Allergic asthma is a complex inflammatory disease that leads to significant healthcare costs and reduction in quality of life. Although many cell types are implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma, CD4 + T-helper cell type 2 (Th2) cells are centrally involved. We previously reported that the asthma phenotype is virtually absent in ovalbumin-sensitized and -challenged mice that lack global expression of β-arrestin (β-arr)-2 and that CD4 + T cells from these mice displayed significantly reduced CCL22-mediated chemotaxis. Because CCL22-mediated activation of CCR4 plays a role in Th2 cell regulation in asthmatic inflammation, we hypothesized that CCR4-mediated migration of CD4 + Th2 cells to the lung in asthma may use β-arr-dependent signaling. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the effect of various signaling inhibitors on CCL22-induced chemotaxis using in vitro-polarized primary CD4 + Th2 cells from β-arr2-knockout and wild-type mice. Our results show, for the first time, that CCL22-induced, CCR4-mediated Th2 cell chemotaxis is dependent, in part, on a β-arr2-dependent signaling pathway. In addition, we show that this chemotactic signaling mechanism involves activation of P-p38 and Rho-associated protein kinase. These findings point to a proinflammatory role for β-arr2-dependent signaling and support β-arr2 as a novel therapeutic target in asthma.

  15. Calcium-mediated signaling and calmodulin-dependent kinase regulate hepatocyte-inducible nitric oxide synthase expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baochun; Crankshaw, Will; Nesemeier, Ryan; Patel, Jay; Nweze, Ikenna; Lakshmanan, Jaganathan; Harbrecht, Brian G

    2015-02-01

    Induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) is induced in hepatocytes by shock and inflammatory stimuli. Excessive NO from iNOS mediates shock-induced hepatic injury and death, so understanding the regulation of iNOS will help elucidate the pathophysiology of septic shock. In vitro, cytokines induce iNOS expression through activation of signaling pathways including mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor κB. Cytokines also induce calcium (Ca(2+)) mobilization and activate calcium-mediated intracellular signaling pathways, typically through activation of calmodulin-dependent kinases (CaMK). Calcium regulates NO production in macrophages but the role of calcium and calcium-mediated signaling in hepatocyte iNOS expression has not been defined. Primary rat hepatocytes were isolated, cultured, and induced to produce NO with proinflammatory cytokines. Calcium mobilization and Ca(2+)-mediated signaling were altered with ionophore, Ca(2+) channel blockers, and inhibitors of CaMK. The Ca(2+) ionophore A23187 suppressed cytokine-stimulated NO production, whereas Ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid and nifedipine increased NO production, iNOS messenger RNA, and iNOS protein expression. Inhibition of CaMK with KN93 and CBD increased NO production but the calcineurin inhibitor FK 506 decreased iNOS expression. These data demonstrate that calcium-mediated signaling regulates hepatocyte iNOS expression and does so through a mechanism independent of calcineurin. Changes in intracellular calcium levels may regulate iNOS expression during hepatic inflammation induced by proinflammatory cytokines. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Activation of Nrf2 Reduces UVA-Mediated MMP-1 Upregulation via MAPK/AP-1 Signaling Cascades: The Photoprotective Effects of Sulforaphane and Hispidulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaiprasongsuk, Anyamanee; Lohakul, Jinaphat; Soontrapa, Kitipong; Sampattavanich, Somponnat; Akarasereenont, Pravit

    2017-01-01

    UVA irradiation plays a role in premature aging of the skin through triggering oxidative stress-associated stimulation of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) responsible for collagen degradation, a hallmark of photoaged skin. Compounds that can activate nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2), a transcription factor regulating antioxidant gene expression, should therefore serve as effective antiphotoaging agents. We investigated whether genetic silencing of Nrf2 could relieve UVA-mediated MMP-1 upregulation via activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/activator protein 1 (AP-1) signaling using human keratinocyte cell line (HaCaT). Antiphotoaging effects of hispidulin (HPD) and sulforaphane (SFN) were assessed on their abilities to activate Nrf2 in controlling MMP-1 and collagen expressions in association with phosphorylation of MAPKs (extracellular signal-regulated kinase, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38), c-Jun, and c-Fos, using the skin of BALB/c mice subjected to repetitive UVA irradiation. Our findings suggested that depletion of Nrf2 promoted both mRNA expression and activity of MMP-1 in the UVA-irradiated HaCaT cells. Treatment of Nrf2 knocked-down HaCaT cells with MAPK inhibitors significantly suppressed UVA-induced MMP-1 and AP-1 activities. Moreover, pretreatment of the mouse skin with HPD and SFN, which could activate Nrf2, provided protective effects against UVA-mediated MMP-1 induction and collagen depletion in correlation with the decreased levels of phosphorylated MAPKs, c-Jun, and c-Fos in the mouse skin. In conclusion, Nrf2 could influence UVA-mediated MMP-1 upregulation through the MAPK/AP-1 signaling cascades. HPD and SFN may therefore represent promising antiphotoaging candidates. PMID:28011874

  17. Tyrosine kinase inhibitors as modulators of trastuzumab-mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in breast cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Denis M; Gately, Kathy; Hughes, Clare; Edwards, Connla; Davies, Anthony; Madden, Stephen F; O'Byrne, Kenneth J; O'Donovan, Norma; Crown, John

    2017-09-01

    Trastuzumab is an anti-HER2 monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapy capable of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and used in the treatment of HER2+ breast cancer. Through interactions with FcƴR+ immune cell subsets, trastuzumab functions as a passive immunotherapy. The EGFR/HER2-targeting tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) lapatinib and the next generation TKIs afatinib and neratinib, can alter HER2 levels, potentially modulating the ADCC response to trastuzumab. Using LDH-release assays, we investigated the impact of antigen modulation, assay duration and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) activity on trastuzumab-mediated ADCC in breast cancer models of maximal (SKBR3) and minimal (MCF-7) target antigen expression to determine if modulating the ADCC response to trastuzumab using TKIs may be a viable approach for enhancing tumor immune reactivity. HER2 levels were determined in lapatinib, afatinib and neratinib-treated SKBR3 and MCF-7 using high content analysis (HCA). Trastuzumab-mediated ADCC was assessed following treatment with TKIs utilising a colorimetric LDH release-based protocol at 4 and 12h timepoints. PBMC activity was assessed against non-MHC-restricted K562 cells. A flow cytometry-based method (CFSE/7-AAD) was also used to measure trastuzumab-mediated ADCC in medium-treated SKBR3 and MCF-7. HER2 antigen levels were significantly altered by the three TKIs in both cell line models. The TKIs significantly reduced LDH levels directly in SKBR3 cells but not MCF-7. Lapatinib and neratinib augment trastuzumab-related ADCC in SKBR3 but the effect was not consistent with antigen expression levels and was dependent on volunteer PBMC activity (vs. K562). A 12h assay timepoint produced more consistent results. Trastuzumab-mediated ADCC (PBMC:target cell ratio of 10:1) was measured at 7.6±4.7% (T12) by LDH assay and 19±3.2 % (T12) using the flow cytometry-based method in the antigen-low model MCF-7. In the presence of effector cells with high

  18. SU-E-T-490: Independent Three-Dimensional (3D) Dose Verification of VMAT/SBRT Using EPID and Cloud Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, A; Han, B; Bush, K; Wang, L; Xing, L [Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dosimetric verification of VMAT/SBRT is currently performed on one or two planes in a phantom with either film or array detectors. A robust and easy-to-use 3D dosimetric tool has been sought since the advent of conformal radiation therapy. Here we present such a strategy for independent 3D VMAT/SBRT plan verification system by a combined use of EPID and cloud-based Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation. Methods: The 3D dosimetric verification proceeds in two steps. First, the plan was delivered with a high resolution portable EPID mounted on the gantry, and the EPID-captured gantry-angle-resolved VMAT/SBRT field images were converted into fluence by using the EPID pixel response function derived from MC simulations. The fluence was resampled and used as the input for an in-house developed Amazon cloud-based MC software to reconstruct the 3D dose distribution. The accuracy of the developed 3D dosimetric tool was assessed using a Delta4 phantom with various field sizes (square, circular, rectangular, and irregular MLC fields) and different patient cases. The method was applied to validate VMAT/SBRT plans using WFF and FFF photon beams (Varian TrueBeam STX). Results: It was found that the proposed method yielded results consistent with the Delta4 measurements. For points on the two detector planes, a good agreement within 1.5% were found for all the testing fields. Patient VMAT/SBRT plan studies revealed similar level of accuracy: an average γ-index passing rate of 99.2± 0.6% (3mm/3%), 97.4± 2.4% (2mm/2%), and 72.6± 8.4 % ( 1mm/1%). Conclusion: A valuable 3D dosimetric verification strategy has been developed for VMAT/SBRT plan validation. The technique provides a viable solution for a number of intractable dosimetry problems, such as small fields and plans with high dose gradient.

  19. SU-E-T-490: Independent Three-Dimensional (3D) Dose Verification of VMAT/SBRT Using EPID and Cloud Computing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, A; Han, B; Bush, K; Wang, L; Xing, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric verification of VMAT/SBRT is currently performed on one or two planes in a phantom with either film or array detectors. A robust and easy-to-use 3D dosimetric tool has been sought since the advent of conformal radiation therapy. Here we present such a strategy for independent 3D VMAT/SBRT plan verification system by a combined use of EPID and cloud-based Monte Carlo (MC) dose calculation. Methods: The 3D dosimetric verification proceeds in two steps. First, the plan was delivered with a high resolution portable EPID mounted on the gantry, and the EPID-captured gantry-angle-resolved VMAT/SBRT field images were converted into fluence by using the EPID pixel response function derived from MC simulations. The fluence was resampled and used as the input for an in-house developed Amazon cloud-based MC software to reconstruct the 3D dose distribution. The accuracy of the developed 3D dosimetric tool was assessed using a Delta4 phantom with various field sizes (square, circular, rectangular, and irregular MLC fields) and different patient cases. The method was applied to validate VMAT/SBRT plans using WFF and FFF photon beams (Varian TrueBeam STX). Results: It was found that the proposed method yielded results consistent with the Delta4 measurements. For points on the two detector planes, a good agreement within 1.5% were found for all the testing fields. Patient VMAT/SBRT plan studies revealed similar level of accuracy: an average γ-index passing rate of 99.2± 0.6% (3mm/3%), 97.4± 2.4% (2mm/2%), and 72.6± 8.4 % ( 1mm/1%). Conclusion: A valuable 3D dosimetric verification strategy has been developed for VMAT/SBRT plan validation. The technique provides a viable solution for a number of intractable dosimetry problems, such as small fields and plans with high dose gradient

  20. SU-E-T-325: The New Evaluation Method of the VMAT Plan Delivery Using Varian DynaLog Files and Modulation Complexity Score (MCS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tateoka, K [Proton Treatment Center, Radiation Therapy Research Institute, Social Medical Corporation Teishinkai, Sapporo (Japan); Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo, JP (Japan); Fujimomo, K; Hareyama, M [Proton Treatment Center, Radiation Therapy Research Institute, Social Medical Corporation Teishinkai, Sapporo (Japan); Saitou, Y; Nakazawa, T; Abe, T; Nakata, A; Yano, M [Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo, JP (Japan)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of the study is to evaluate the use of Varian DynaLog files to verify VMAT plans delivery and modulation complexity score (MCS) of VMAT. Methods: Delivery accuracy of machine performance was quantified by multileaf collimator (MLC) position errors, gantry angle errors and fluence delivery accuracy for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). The relationship between machine performance and plan complexity were also investigated using the modulation complexity score (MCS). Plan and Actual MLC positions, gantry angles and delivered fraction of monitor units were extracted from Varian DynaLog files. These factors were taken from the record and verify system of MLC control file. Planned and delivered beam data were compared to determine leaf position errors and gantry angle errors. Analysis was also performed on planned and actual fluence maps reconstructed from those of the DynaLog files. This analysis was performed for all treatment fractions of 5 prostate VMAT plans. The analysis of DynaLog files have been carried out by in-house programming in Visual C++. Results: The root mean square of leaf position and gantry angle errors were about 0.12 and 0.15, respectively. The Gamma of planned and actual fluence maps at 3%/3 mm criterion was about 99.21. The gamma of the leaf position errors were not directly related to plan complexity as determined by the MCS. Therefore, the gamma of the gantry angle errors were directly related to plan complexity as determined by the MCS. Conclusion: This study shows Varian dynalog files for VMAT plan can be diagnosed delivery errors not possible with phantom based quality assurance. Furthermore, the MCS of VMAT plan can evaluate delivery accuracy for patients receiving of VMAT. Machine performance was found to be directly related to plan complexity but this is not the dominant determinant of delivery accuracy.

  1. Temperature dependence of the radiation induced change of depletion voltage in silicon PIN detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziock, H.J.; Holzscheiter, K.; Morgan, A.; Palounek, A.P.T.; Ellison, J.; Heinson, A.P.; Mason, M.; Wimpenny, S.J.; Barberis, E.; Cartiglia, N.; Grillo, A.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Rahn, J.; Rinaldi, P.; Rowe, W.A.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E.; Webster, A.; Wichmann, R.; Wilder, M.; Coupal, D.; Pal, T.

    1993-01-01

    The silicon microstrip detectors that will be used in the SDC experiment at the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) will be exposed to very large fluences of charged particles, neutrons, and gammas. The authors present a study of how temperature affects the change in the depletion voltage of silicon PIN detectors damaged by radiation. They study the initial radiation damage and the short-term and long-term annealing of that damage as a function of temperature in the range from -10 degrees C to +50 degrees C, and as a function of 800 MeV proton fluence up to 1.5 x 10 14 p/cm 2 . They express the pronounced temperature dependencies in a simple model in terms of two annealing time constants which depend exponentially on the temperature

  2. Density dependence of electron mobility in the accumulation mode for fully depleted SOI films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumova, O. V., E-mail: naumova@isp.nsc.ru; Zaitseva, E. G.; Fomin, B. I.; Ilnitsky, M. A.; Popov, V. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2015-10-15

    The electron mobility µ{sub eff} in the accumulation mode is investigated for undepleted and fully depleted double-gate n{sup +}–n–n{sup +} silicon-on-insulator (SOI) metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET). To determine the range of possible values of the mobility and the dominant scattering mechanisms in thin-film structures, it is proposed that the field dependence of the mobility µ{sub eff} be replaced with the dependence on the density N{sub e} of induced charge carriers. It is shown that the dependences µ{sub eff}(N{sub e}) can be approximated by the power functions µ{sub eff}(N{sub e}) ∝ N{sub e}{sup -n}, where the exponent n is determined by the chargecarrier scattering mechanism as in the mobility field dependence. The values of the exponent n in the dependences µ{sub eff}(N{sub e}) are determined when the SOI-film mode near one of its surfaces varies from inversion to accumulation. The obtained results are explained from the viewpoint of the electron-density redistribution over the SOI-film thickness and changes in the scattering mechanisms.

  3. Poster - 56: Preliminary comparison of FF- and FFF-VMAT for prostate plans with higher rectal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Baochang; Darko, Johnson; Osei, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A recent retrospective study found 53 patients previously treated to 78Gy/39 using flattened filtered (FF) 6X-VMAT at GRRCC had rectal DVH more than one standard deviation higher than the average. This study was to investigate if using 6FFFor10FFF beams could reduce these DVHs without compromising target coverage. Methods: Twenty patients’ plans were re-planed with 2-arc 6X-VMAT, 6FFF-VMAT and 10FFF-VMAT using the Eclipse TPS following departmental protocol. All plans had the same optimization and normalization, and were evaluated against the acceptance criteria from the QUANTEC and Emami. Statistical differences in the mean dose to OARs (D m ) and PTV homogeneity index (HI) between energies were tested using the paired sample Wilcoxon signed rank statistical method (p<0.05). Beam delivery accuracy was checked on five patients using portal dosimetry (PD). Results: The PTV HI for the 10FFF shows no statistical difference from the 6X. All the OARs, except left femoral head with 6FFF, have significantly lower Dm using 6FFF and 10FFF .There is no difference in the maximum doses to rectum and bladder and are limited by the prescribed doses. Measurements show good agreements in the gamma evaluation (3%/3mm) for all energies. Conclusion: This preliminary study shows that doses to the OARs are reduced using 10FFF for the same target coverage. The plans using 6FFF result in lower doses to some OARs, and statistically different PTV HI. All plans showed very good agreement with measurements.

  4. Poster - 56: Preliminary comparison of FF- and FFF-VMAT for prostate plans with higher rectal dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Baochang; Darko, Johnson; Osei, Ernest [Grand River Regional Cancer Centre, Kitchener, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-08-15

    Purpose: A recent retrospective study found 53 patients previously treated to 78Gy/39 using flattened filtered (FF) 6X-VMAT at GRRCC had rectal DVH more than one standard deviation higher than the average. This study was to investigate if using 6FFFor10FFF beams could reduce these DVHs without compromising target coverage. Methods: Twenty patients’ plans were re-planed with 2-arc 6X-VMAT, 6FFF-VMAT and 10FFF-VMAT using the Eclipse TPS following departmental protocol. All plans had the same optimization and normalization, and were evaluated against the acceptance criteria from the QUANTEC and Emami. Statistical differences in the mean dose to OARs (D{sub m}) and PTV homogeneity index (HI) between energies were tested using the paired sample Wilcoxon signed rank statistical method (p<0.05). Beam delivery accuracy was checked on five patients using portal dosimetry (PD). Results: The PTV HI for the 10FFF shows no statistical difference from the 6X. All the OARs, except left femoral head with 6FFF, have significantly lower Dm using 6FFF and 10FFF .There is no difference in the maximum doses to rectum and bladder and are limited by the prescribed doses. Measurements show good agreements in the gamma evaluation (3%/3mm) for all energies. Conclusion: This preliminary study shows that doses to the OARs are reduced using 10FFF for the same target coverage. The plans using 6FFF result in lower doses to some OARs, and statistically different PTV HI. All plans showed very good agreement with measurements.

  5. C/EBPβ Mediates Growth Hormone-Regulated Expression of Multiple Target Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Tracy X.; Lin, Grace; LaPensee, Christopher R.; Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Rathore, Maanjot; Streeter, Cale; Piwien-Pilipuk, Graciela; Lanning, Nathan; Jin, Hui; Carter-Su, Christin; Qin, Zhaohui S.

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of c-Fos transcription by GH is mediated by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ). This study examines the role of C/EBPβ in mediating GH activation of other early response genes, including Cyr61, Btg2, Socs3, Zfp36, and Socs1. C/EBPβ depletion using short hairpin RNA impaired responsiveness of these genes to GH, as seen for c-Fos. Rescue with wild-type C/EBPβ led to GH-dependent recruitment of the coactivator p300 to the c-Fos promoter. In contrast, rescue with C/EBPβ mutated at the ERK phosphorylation site at T188 failed to induce GH-dependent recruitment of p300, indicating that ERK-mediated phosphorylation of C/EBPβ at T188 is required for GH-induced recruitment of p300 to c-Fos. GH also induced the occupancy of phosphorylated C/EBPβ and p300 on Cyr61, Btg2, and Socs3 at predicted C/EBP-cAMP response element-binding protein motifs in their promoters. Consistent with a role for ERKs in GH-induced expression of these genes, treatment with U0126 to block ERK phosphorylation inhibited their GH-induced expression. In contrast, GH-dependent expression of Zfp36 and Socs1 was not inhibited by U0126. Thus, induction of multiple early response genes by GH in 3T3-F442A cells is mediated by C/EBPβ. A subset of these genes is regulated similarly to c-Fos, through a mechanism involving GH-stimulated ERK 1/2 activation, phosphorylation of C/EBPβ, and recruitment of p300. Overall, these studies suggest that C/EBPβ, like the signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins, regulates multiple genes in response to GH. PMID:21292824

  6. Bacteria and viruses modulate FcεRI-dependent mast cell activity 

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Słodka

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Undoubtedly, mast cells play a central role in allergic processes. Specific allergen cross-linking of IgE bound to the high affinity receptors (FcεRI on the mast cell surface leads to the release of preformed mediators and newly synthesized mediators, i.e. metabolites of arachidonic acid and cytokines. More and more data indicate that bacteria and viruses can influence FcεRI-dependent mast cell activation. Some bacterial and viral components can reduce the surface expression of FcεRI. There are also findings that ligation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs by bacterial or viral antigens can affect IgE-dependent mast cell degranulation and preformed mediator release as well as eicosanoid production. The synergistic interaction of TLR ligands and allergen can also modify cytokine synthesis by mast cells stimulated via FcεRI. Moreover, data suggest that specific IgE for bacterial or viral antigens can influence mast cell activity. What is more, some bacterial and viral components or some endogenous proteins produced during viral infection can act as superantigens by interacting with the VH3 domain of IgE. All these observations indicate that bacterial and viral infections modify the course of allergic diseases by affecting FcεRI-dependent mast cell activation

  7. Experimentally studied dynamic dose interplay does not meaningfully affect target dose in VMAT SBRT lung treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambaugh, Cassandra; Nelms, Benjamin E; Dilling, Thomas; Stevens, Craig; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir

    2013-09-01

    The effects of respiratory motion on the tumor dose can be divided into the gradient and interplay effects. While the interplay effect is likely to average out over a large number of fractions, it may play a role in hypofractionated [stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT)] treatments. This subject has been extensively studied for intensity modulated radiation therapy but less so for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), particularly in application to hypofractionated regimens. Also, no experimental study has provided full four-dimensional (4D) dose reconstruction in this scenario. The authors demonstrate how a recently described motion perturbation method, with full 4D dose reconstruction, is applied to describe the gradient and interplay effects during VMAT lung SBRT treatments. VMAT dose delivered to a moving target in a patient can be reconstructed by applying perturbations to the treatment planning system-calculated static 3D dose. Ten SBRT patients treated with 6 MV VMAT beams in five fractions were selected. The target motion (motion kernel) was approximated by 3D rigid body translation, with the tumor centroids defined on the ten phases of the 4DCT. The motion was assumed to be periodic, with the period T being an average from the empirical 4DCT respiratory trace. The real observed tumor motion (total displacement ≤ 8 mm) was evaluated first. Then, the motion range was artificially increased to 2 or 3 cm. Finally, T was increased to 60 s. While not realistic, making T comparable to the delivery time elucidates if the interplay effect can be observed. For a single fraction, the authors quantified the interplay effect as the maximum difference in the target dosimetric indices, most importantly the near-minimum dose (D99%), between all possible starting phases. For the three- and five-fractions, statistical simulations were performed when substantial interplay was found. For the motion amplitudes and periods obtained from the 4DCT, the interplay effect

  8. Experimentally studied dynamic dose interplay does not meaningfully affect target dose in VMAT SBRT lung treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stambaugh, Cassandra; Nelms, Benjamin E.; Dilling, Thomas; Stevens, Craig; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The effects of respiratory motion on the tumor dose can be divided into the gradient and interplay effects. While the interplay effect is likely to average out over a large number of fractions, it may play a role in hypofractionated [stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT)] treatments. This subject has been extensively studied for intensity modulated radiation therapy but less so for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), particularly in application to hypofractionated regimens. Also, no experimental study has provided full four-dimensional (4D) dose reconstruction in this scenario. The authors demonstrate how a recently described motion perturbation method, with full 4D dose reconstruction, is applied to describe the gradient and interplay effects during VMAT lung SBRT treatments.Methods: VMAT dose delivered to a moving target in a patient can be reconstructed by applying perturbations to the treatment planning system-calculated static 3D dose. Ten SBRT patients treated with 6 MV VMAT beams in five fractions were selected. The target motion (motion kernel) was approximated by 3D rigid body translation, with the tumor centroids defined on the ten phases of the 4DCT. The motion was assumed to be periodic, with the period T being an average from the empirical 4DCT respiratory trace. The real observed tumor motion (total displacement ≤8 mm) was evaluated first. Then, the motion range was artificially increased to 2 or 3 cm. Finally, T was increased to 60 s. While not realistic, making T comparable to the delivery time elucidates if the interplay effect can be observed. For a single fraction, the authors quantified the interplay effect as the maximum difference in the target dosimetric indices, most importantly the near-minimum dose (D 99% ), between all possible starting phases. For the three- and five-fractions, statistical simulations were performed when substantial interplay was found.Results: For the motion amplitudes and periods obtained from the

  9. Sarcolemmal cholesterol and caveolin-3 dependence of cardiac function, ischemic tolerance, and opioidergic cardioprotection

    Science.gov (United States)

    See Hoe, Louise E.; Schilling, Jan M.; Tarbit, Emiri; Kiessling, Can J.; Busija, Anna R.; Niesman, Ingrid R.; Du Toit, Eugene; Ashton, Kevin J.; Roth, David M.; Headrick, John P.; Patel, Hemal H.

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol-rich caveolar microdomains and associated caveolins influence sarcolemmal ion channel and receptor function and protective stress signaling. However, the importance of membrane cholesterol content to cardiovascular function and myocardial responses to ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) and cardioprotective stimuli are unclear. We assessed the effects of graded cholesterol depletion with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD) and lifelong knockout (KO) or overexpression (OE) of caveolin-3 (Cav-3) on cardiac function, I/R tolerance, and opioid receptor (OR)-mediated protection. Langendorff-perfused hearts from young male C57Bl/6 mice were untreated or treated with 0.02–1.0 mM MβCD for 25 min to deplete membrane cholesterol and disrupt caveolae. Hearts were subjected to 25-min ischemia/45-min reperfusion, and the cardioprotective effects of morphine applied either acutely or chronically [sustained ligand-activated preconditioning (SLP)] were assessed. MβCD concentration dependently reduced normoxic contractile function and postischemic outcomes in association with graded (10–30%) reductions in sarcolemmal cholesterol. Cardioprotection with acute morphine was abolished with ≥20 μM MβCD, whereas SLP was more robust and only inhibited with ≥200 μM MβCD. Deletion of Cav-3 also reduced, whereas Cav-3 OE improved, myocardial I/R tolerance. Protection via SLP remained equally effective in Cav-3 KO mice and was additive with innate protection arising with Cav-3 OE. These data reveal the membrane cholesterol dependence of normoxic myocardial and coronary function, I/R tolerance, and OR-mediated cardioprotection in murine hearts (all declining with cholesterol depletion). In contrast, baseline function appears insensitive to Cav-3, whereas cardiac I/R tolerance parallels Cav-3 expression. Novel SLP appears unique, being less sensitive to cholesterol depletion than acute OR protection and arising independently of Cav-3 expression. PMID:25063791

  10. Melanopsin mediates light-dependent relaxation in blood vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikka, Gautam; Hussmann, G Patrick; Pandey, Deepesh; Cao, Suyi; Hori, Daijiro; Park, Jong Taek; Steppan, Jochen; Kim, Jae Hyung; Barodka, Viachaslau; Myers, Allen C; Santhanam, Lakshmi; Nyhan, Daniel; Halushka, Marc K; Koehler, Raymond C; Snyder, Solomon H; Shimoda, Larissa A; Berkowitz, Dan E

    2014-12-16

    Melanopsin (opsin4; Opn4), a non-image-forming opsin, has been linked to a number of behavioral responses to light, including circadian photo-entrainment, light suppression of activity in nocturnal animals, and alertness in diurnal animals. We report a physiological role for Opn4 in regulating blood vessel function, particularly in the context of photorelaxation. Using PCR, we demonstrate that Opn4 (a classic G protein-coupled receptor) is expressed in blood vessels. Force-tension myography demonstrates that vessels from Opn4(-/-) mice fail to display photorelaxation, which is also inhibited by an Opn4-specific small-molecule inhibitor. The vasorelaxation is wavelength-specific, with a maximal response at ∼430-460 nm. Photorelaxation does not involve endothelial-, nitric oxide-, carbon monoxide-, or cytochrome p450-derived vasoactive prostanoid signaling but is associated with vascular hyperpolarization, as shown by intracellular membrane potential measurements. Signaling is both soluble guanylyl cyclase- and phosphodiesterase 6-dependent but protein kinase G-independent. β-Adrenergic receptor kinase 1 (βARK 1 or GRK2) mediates desensitization of photorelaxation, which is greatly reduced by GRK2 inhibitors. Blue light (455 nM) regulates tail artery vasoreactivity ex vivo and tail blood blood flow in vivo, supporting a potential physiological role for this signaling system. This endogenous opsin-mediated, light-activated molecular switch for vasorelaxation might be harnessed for therapy in diseases in which altered vasoreactivity is a significant pathophysiologic contributor.

  11. Comparative Analysis of VERA Depletion Problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jinsu; Kim, Wonkyeong; Choi, Sooyoung; Lee, Hyunsuk; Lee, Deokjung

    2016-01-01

    Each code has its own solver for depletion, which can produce different depletion calculation results. In order to produce reference solutions for depletion calculation comparison, sensitivity studies should be preceded for each depletion solver. The sensitivity tests for burnup interval, number of depletion zones, and recoverable energy per fission (Q-value) were performed in this paper. For the comparison of depletion calculation results, usually the multiplication factors are compared as a function of burnup. In this study, new comparison methods have been introduced by using the number density of isotope or element, and a cumulative flux instead of burnup. In this paper, optimum depletion calculation options are determined through the sensitivity study of the burnup intervals and the number of depletion intrazones. Because the depletion using CRAM solver performs well for large burnup intervals, smaller number of burnup steps can be used to produce converged solutions. It was noted that the depletion intra-zone sensitivity is only pin-type dependent. The 1 and 10 depletion intra-zones for the normal UO2 pin and gadolinia rod, respectively, are required to obtain the reference solutions. When the optimized depletion calculation options are used, the differences of Q-values are found to be a main cause of the differences of solutions. In this paper, new comparison methods were introduced for consistent code-to-code comparisons even when different kappa libraries were used in the depletion calculations

  12. Toxicity of isoproturon on Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing in mineral medium depends on glutathione-mediated antioxidant capacity.

    OpenAIRE

    Candeias, M; Alves-Pereira, I; Ferreira, Rui

    2011-01-01

    The results revealed an increase of viable cells, after 72 h of culture and an increase of antioxidant power mediated by GSH and GR activity in S. cerevisiae UE-ME3. The adaptive response of UE-ME3 strain to isoproturon, determined in MB, was clearly higher than observed in IGC-3507 strain. So, we presume that the extent of the toxic effect of isoproturon in both yeast strains depends on glutathione-mediated antioxidant capacity.

  13. Adenovirus DNA binding protein inhibits SrCap-activated CBP and CREB-mediated transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xiequn; Tarakanova, Vera; Chrivia, John; Yaciuk, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The SNF2-related CBP activator protein (SrCap) is a potent activator of transcription mediated by CBP and CREB. We have previously demonstrated that the Adenovirus 2 DNA Binding Protein (DBP) binds to SrCap and inhibits the transcription mediated by the carboxyl-terminal region of SrCap (amino acids 1275-2971). We report here that DBP inhibits the ability of full-length SrCap (1-2971) to activate transcription mediated by Gal-CREB and Gal-CBP. In addition, DBP also inhibits the ability of SrCap to enhance Protein Kinase A (PKA) activated transcription of the enkaphalin promoter. DBP was found to dramatically inhibit transcription of a mammalian two-hybrid system that was dependent on the interaction of SrCap and CBP binding domains. We also found that DBP has no effect on transcription mediated by a transcriptional activator that is not related to SrCap, indicating that our reported transcriptional inhibition is specific for SrCap and not due to nonspecific effects of DBP's DNA binding activity on the CAT reporter plasmid. Taken together, these results suggest a model in which DBP inhibits cellular transcription mediated by the interaction between SrCap and CBP

  14. SU-E-J-127: Implementation of An Online Replanning Tool for VMAT Using Flattening Filter-Free Beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ates, O; Ahunbay, E; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This is to report the implementation of an online replanning tool based on segment aperture morphing (SAM) for VMAT with flattening filter free (FFF) beams. Methods: Previously reported SAM algorithm modified to accommodate VMAT with FFF beams was implemented in a tool that was interfaced with a treatment planning system (Monaco, Elekta). The tool allows (1) to output the beam parameters of the original VMAT plan from Monaco, and (2) to input the apertures generated from the SAM algorithm into Monaco for the dose calculation on daily CT/CBCT/MRI in the following steps:(1) Quickly generating target contour based on the image of the day, using an auto-segmentation tool (ADMIRE, Elekta) with manual editing if necessary; (2) Morphing apertures based on the SAM in the original VMAT plan to account for the interfractional change of the target from the planning to the daily images; (3) Calculating dose distribution for new apertures with the same numbers of MU as in the original plan; (4) Transferring the new plan into a record & verify system (MOSAIQ, Elekta); (5) Performing a pre-delivery QA based on software; (6) Delivering the adaptive plan for the fraction.This workflow was implemented on a 16-CPU (2.6 GHz dual-core) hardware with GPU and was tested for sample cases of prostate, pancreas and lung tumors. Results: The online replanning process can be completed within 10 minutes. The adaptive plans generally have improved the plan quality when compared to the IGRT repositioning plans. The adaptive plans with FFF beams have better normal tissue sparing as compared with those of FF beams. Conclusion: The online replanning tool based on SAM can quickly generate adaptive VMAT plans using FFF beams with improved plan quality than those from the IGRT repositioning plans based on daily CT/CBCT/MRI and can be used clinically. This research was supported by Elekta Inc. (Crawley, UK)

  15. SU-E-J-127: Implementation of An Online Replanning Tool for VMAT Using Flattening Filter-Free Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ates, O; Ahunbay, E; Li, X

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This is to report the implementation of an online replanning tool based on segment aperture morphing (SAM) for VMAT with flattening filter free (FFF) beams. Methods: Previously reported SAM algorithm modified to accommodate VMAT with FFF beams was implemented in a tool that was interfaced with a treatment planning system (Monaco, Elekta). The tool allows (1) to output the beam parameters of the original VMAT plan from Monaco, and (2) to input the apertures generated from the SAM algorithm into Monaco for the dose calculation on daily CT/CBCT/MRI in the following steps:(1) Quickly generating target contour based on the image of the day, using an auto-segmentation tool (ADMIRE, Elekta) with manual editing if necessary; (2) Morphing apertures based on the SAM in the original VMAT plan to account for the interfractional change of the target from the planning to the daily images; (3) Calculating dose distribution for new apertures with the same numbers of MU as in the original plan; (4) Transferring the new plan into a record & verify system (MOSAIQ, Elekta); (5) Performing a pre-delivery QA based on software; (6) Delivering the adaptive plan for the fraction.This workflow was implemented on a 16-CPU (2.6 GHz dual-core) hardware with GPU and was tested for sample cases of prostate, pancreas and lung tumors. Results: The online replanning process can be completed within 10 minutes. The adaptive plans generally have improved the plan quality when compared to the IGRT repositioning plans. The adaptive plans with FFF beams have better normal tissue sparing as compared with those of FF beams. Conclusion: The online replanning tool based on SAM can quickly generate adaptive VMAT plans using FFF beams with improved plan quality than those from the IGRT repositioning plans based on daily CT/CBCT/MRI and can be used clinically. This research was supported by Elekta Inc. (Crawley, UK)

  16. WE-AB-209-10: Optimizing the Delivery of Sequential Fluence Maps for Efficient VMAT Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Craft, D [Massachusetts General Hospital, Cambridge, MA (United States); Balvert, M [Tilburg University, Tilburg (Netherlands)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To develop an optimization model and solution approach for computing MLC leaf trajectories and dose rates for high quality matching of a set of optimized fluence maps to be delivered sequentially around a patient in a VMAT treatment. Methods: We formulate the fluence map matching problem as a nonlinear optimization problem where time is discretized but dose rates and leaf positions are continuous variables. For a given allotted time, which is allocated across the fluence maps based on the complexity of each fluence map, the optimization problem searches for the best leaf trajectories and dose rates such that the original fluence maps are closely recreated. Constraints include maximum leaf speed, maximum dose rate, and leaf collision avoidance, as well as the constraint that the ending leaf positions for one map are the starting leaf positions for the next map. The resulting model is non-convex but smooth, and therefore we solve it by local searches from a variety of starting positions. We improve solution time by a custom decomposition approach which allows us to decouple the rows of the fluence maps and solve each leaf pair individually. This decomposition also makes the problem easily parallelized. Results: We demonstrate method on a prostate case and a head-and-neck case and show that one can recreate fluence maps to high degree of fidelity in modest total delivery time (minutes). Conclusion: We present a VMAT sequencing method that reproduces optimal fluence maps by searching over a vast number of possible leaf trajectories. By varying the total allotted time given, this approach is the first of its kind to allow users to produce VMAT solutions that span the range of wide-field coarse VMAT deliveries to narrow-field high-MU sliding window-like approaches.

  17. Pathogenic lysosomal depletion in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehay, Benjamin; Bové, Jordi; Rodríguez-Muela, Natalia; Perier, Celine; Recasens, Ariadna; Boya, Patricia; Vila, Miquel

    2010-09-15

    Mounting evidence suggests a role for autophagy dysregulation in Parkinson's disease (PD). The bulk degradation of cytoplasmic proteins (including α-synuclein) and organelles (such as mitochondria) is mediated by macroautophagy, which involves the sequestration of cytosolic components into autophagosomes (AP) and its delivery to lysosomes. Accumulation of AP occurs in postmortem brain samples from PD patients, which has been widely attributed to an induction of autophagy. However, the cause and pathogenic significance of these changes remain unknown. Here we found in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine mouse model of PD that AP accumulation and dopaminergic cell death are preceded by a marked decrease in the amount of lysosomes within dopaminergic neurons. Lysosomal depletion was secondary to the abnormal permeabilization of lysosomal membranes induced by increased mitochondrial-derived reactive oxygen species. Lysosomal permeabilization resulted in a defective clearance and subsequent accumulation of undegraded AP and contributed directly to neurodegeneration by the ectopic release of lysosomal proteases into the cytosol. Lysosomal breakdown and AP accumulation also occurred in PD brain samples, where Lewy bodies were strongly immunoreactive for AP markers. Induction of lysosomal biogenesis by genetic or pharmacological activation of lysosomal transcription factor EB restored lysosomal levels, increased AP clearance and attenuated 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium-induced cell death. Similarly, the autophagy-enhancer compound rapamycin attenuated PD-related dopaminergic neurodegeneration, both in vitro and in vivo, by restoring lysosomal levels. Our results indicate that AP accumulation in PD results from defective lysosomal-mediated AP clearance secondary to lysosomal depletion. Restoration of lysosomal levels and function may thus represent a novel neuroprotective strategy in PD.

  18. SU-C-201-02: Dosimetric Verification of SBRT with FFF-VMAT Using a 3-D Radiochromic/Optical-CT Dosimetry System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Y; Black, P; Wuu, C [Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Adamovics, J [Department of Chemistry and Biology, Rider University, Skillman, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: With an increasing use of small field size and high dose rate irradiation in the advances of radiotherapy techniques, such as stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), an in-depth quality assurance (QA) system is required. The purpose of this study is to investigate a high resolution optical CT-based 3D radiochromic dosimetry system for SBRT with intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and flattening filter free (FFF) volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). Methods: Cylindrical PRESAGE radiochromic dosimeters of 10cm height and 11cm diameter were used to validate SBRT. Four external landmarks were placed on the surface of each dosimeter to define the isocenter of target. SBRT plans were delivered using a Varian TrueBeam™ linear accelerator (LINAC). Three validation plans, SBRT with IMRT (6MV 600MU/min), FFF-VMAT (10MV 2400MU/min), and mixed FFF-VMAT (6MV 1400MU/min, 10MV 2400MU/min), were delivered to the PRESAGE dosimeters. Each irradiated PRESAGE dosimeter was scanned using a single laser beam optical CT scanner and reconstructed with a 1mm × 1mm high spatial resolution. The comparison of measured dose distributions of irradiated PRESAGE dosimeters to those calculated by Pinnacle{sup 3} treatment planning system (TPS) were performed with a 10% dose threshold, 3% dose difference (DD), and 3mm distance-to-agreement (DTA) Gamma criteria. Results: The average pass rates for the gamma comparisons between PRESAGE and Pinnacle{sup 3} in the transverse, sagittal, coronal planes were 94.6%, 95.9%, and 96.4% for SBRT with IMRT, FFF-VMAT, and mixed FFF-VMAT plans, respectively. A good agreement of the isodose distributions of those comparisons were shown at the isodose lines 50%, 70%, 80%, 90% and 98%. Conclusion: This study demonstrates the feasibility of the high resolution optical CT-based 3D radiochromic dosimetry system for validation of SBRT with IMRT and FFF-VMAT. This dosimetry system offers higher precision QA with 3D

  19. Spillover-mediated feedforward-inhibition functionally segregates interneuron activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coddington, Luke T.; Rudolph, Stephanie; Lune, Patrick Vande; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda; Wadiche, Jacques I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Neurotransmitter spillover represents a form of neural transmission not restricted to morphologically defined synaptic connections. Communication between climbing fibers (CFs) and molecular layer interneurons (MLIs) in the cerebellum is mediated exclusively by glutamate spillover. Here, we show how CF stimulation functionally segregates MLIs based on their location relative to glutamate release. Excitation of MLIs that reside within the domain of spillover diffusion coordinates inhibition of MLIs outside the diffusion limit. CF excitation of MLIs is dependent on extrasynaptic NMDA receptors that enhance the spatial and temporal spread of CF signaling. Activity mediated by functionally segregated MLIs converges onto neighboring Purkinje cells (PCs) to generate a long-lasting biphasic change in inhibition. These data demonstrate how glutamate release from single CFs modulates excitability of neighboring PCs, thus expanding the influence of CFs on cerebellar cortical activity in a manner not predicted by anatomical connectivity. PMID:23707614

  20. Comparison of testicular dose delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients with prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Jeffrey M.; Handorf, Elizabeth A.; Price, Robert A.; Cherian, George; Buyyounouski, Mark K.; Chen, David Y.; Kutikov, Alexander; Johnson, Matthew E.; Ma, Chung-Ming Charlie; Horwitz, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    A small decrease in testosterone level has been documented after prostate irradiation, possibly owing to the incidental dose to the testes. Testicular doses from prostate external beam radiation plans with either intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were calculated to investigate any difference. Testicles were contoured for 16 patients being treated for localized prostate cancer. For each patient, 2 plans were created: 1 with IMRT and 1 with VMAT. No specific attempt was made to reduce testicular dose. Minimum, maximum, and mean doses to the testicles were recorded for each plan. Of the 16 patients, 4 received a total dose of 7800 cGy to the prostate alone, 7 received 8000 cGy to the prostate alone, and 5 received 8000 cGy to the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. The mean (range) of testicular dose with an IMRT plan was 54.7 cGy (21.1 to 91.9) and 59.0 cGy (25.1 to 93.4) with a VMAT plan. In 12 cases, the mean VMAT dose was higher than the mean IMRT dose, with a mean difference of 4.3 cGy (p = 0.019). There was a small but statistically significant increase in mean testicular dose delivered by VMAT compared with IMRT. Despite this, it unlikely that there is a clinically meaningful difference in testicular doses from either modality

  1. Comparison of testicular dose delivered by intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in patients with prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Jeffrey M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Handorf, Elizabeth A. [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Price, Robert A.; Cherian, George [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Chen, David Y.; Kutikov, Alexander [Department of Urologic Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Johnson, Matthew E.; Ma, Chung-Ming Charlie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M., E-mail: eric.horwitz@fccc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-10-01

    A small decrease in testosterone level has been documented after prostate irradiation, possibly owing to the incidental dose to the testes. Testicular doses from prostate external beam radiation plans with either intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) or volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) were calculated to investigate any difference. Testicles were contoured for 16 patients being treated for localized prostate cancer. For each patient, 2 plans were created: 1 with IMRT and 1 with VMAT. No specific attempt was made to reduce testicular dose. Minimum, maximum, and mean doses to the testicles were recorded for each plan. Of the 16 patients, 4 received a total dose of 7800 cGy to the prostate alone, 7 received 8000 cGy to the prostate alone, and 5 received 8000 cGy to the prostate and pelvic lymph nodes. The mean (range) of testicular dose with an IMRT plan was 54.7 cGy (21.1 to 91.9) and 59.0 cGy (25.1 to 93.4) with a VMAT plan. In 12 cases, the mean VMAT dose was higher than the mean IMRT dose, with a mean difference of 4.3 cGy (p = 0.019). There was a small but statistically significant increase in mean testicular dose delivered by VMAT compared with IMRT. Despite this, it unlikely that there is a clinically meaningful difference in testicular doses from either modality.

  2. Ghrelin protects against depleted uranium-induced apoptosis of MC3T3-E1 cells through oxidative stress-mediated p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, Yuhui; Liu, Cong; Huang, Jiawei; Gu, Ying; Li, Hong; Yang, Zhangyou; Liu, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burns and Combined Injury, Institute of Combined Injury, Chongqing Engineering Research Center for Nanomedicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, No. 30 Gaotanyan Street, Shapingba District, Chongqing 400038 (China); Wang, Weidong, E-mail: wwdwyl@sina.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University Affiliated Sixth People Hospital, Shanghai 200233 (China); Li, Rong, E-mail: yuhui_hao@126.com [State Key Laboratory of Trauma, Burns and Combined Injury, Institute of Combined Injury, Chongqing Engineering Research Center for Nanomedicine, College of Preventive Medicine, Third Military Medical University, No. 30 Gaotanyan Street, Shapingba District, Chongqing 400038 (China)

    2016-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) mainly accumulates in the bone over the long term. Osteoblast cells are responsible for the formation of bone, and they are sensitive to DU damage. However, studies investigating methods of reducing DU damage in osteoblasts are rarely reported. Ghrelin is a stomach hormone that stimulates growth hormones released from the hypothalamic–pituitary axis, and it is believed to play an important physiological role in bone metabolism. This study evaluates the impact of ghrelin on DU-induced apoptosis of the osteoblast MC3T3-E1 and investigates its underlying mechanisms. The results show that ghrelin relieved the intracellular oxidative stress induced by DU, eliminated reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reduced lipid peroxidation by increasing intracellular GSH levels; in addition, ghrelin effectively suppressed apoptosis, enhanced mitochondrial membrane potential, and inhibited cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation after DU exposure. Moreover, ghrelin significantly reduced the expression of DU-induced phosphorylated p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). A specific inhibitor (SB203580) or specific siRNA of p38-MAPK could significantly suppress DU-induced apoptosis and related signals, whereas ROS production was not affected. In addition, ghrelin receptor inhibition could reduce the anti-apoptosis effect of ghrelin on DU and reverse the effect of ghrelin on intracellular ROS and p38-MAPK after DU exposure. These results suggest that ghrelin can suppress DU-induced apoptosis of MC3T3-E1 cells, reduce DU-induced oxidative stress by interacting with its receptor, and inhibit downstream p38-MAPK activation, thereby suppressing the mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis pathway. - Highlights: • Ghrelin suppressed DU-induced apoptosis of MC3T3-E1 cells. • Ghrelin inhibited DU-induced oxidative stress and further p38-MAPK activation. • Ghrelin further suppressed mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis pathway. • The anti-oxidation effect of

  3. SU-E-T-315: Dosimetric Effects of Couch Top Shift On VMAT Delivery in Absence of Indexing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, M; Jin, H; Ferguson, S; Ahmad, S [Oklahoma Univ. Health Science Ctr., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate dosimetric effects of couch top shift for volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in absence of indexing of immobilization devices. Methods: A total of twelve VMAT treatment plans were selected from three regions (lung, abdomen, and pelvis) to account for the variation of the patient position relative to the couch top. The treatment plans were generated using the Varian Eclipse system. A pinpoint ionization chamber (PTW TN31014) was placed at the center of 16-cm solid water phantom and the dose was delivered using the Varian TrueBeam STx with BrainLAB ExacTrac couch top. To simulate the day-to-day variation of the patient position relative to couch top, the couch top was laterally shifted up to 50 mm, with an increment of 5 mm from 0 to 20 mm; and of 10 mm afterwards, and the phantom was moved back to 0 cm shift for measurement. The dose was also delivered using a Varian tennis racket grid insert at 0 cm shift to simulate the absence of couch top. The treatment plans were delivered with 6, 10, and 15 MV photons using the same leaf sequencing to investigate the energy dependence of couch top shift. The dose difference was normalized to 0 cm shift for the regular couch top for comparison. Results: The percent difference of dose was found to increase with lateral shift for all energies; however, the average differences were close to 0% and the maximum difference was within 1% along the lateral shifts. The differences with the absence of couch top were 2.2±0.5% (6MV), 1.7±0.3% (10MV), and 1.6±0.2% (15MV), respectively. Conclusion: The inclusion of couch top is recommended in treatment planning to minimize the dosimetric uncertainty between calculated and delivered dose even in absence of indexing of immobilization devices in VMAT delivery.

  4. SU-E-T-365: Dosimetric Impact of Dental Amalgam CT Image Artifacts On IMRT and VMAT Head and Neck Plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, N; Young, L; Parvathaneni, U; Liao, J; Richard, P; Ford, E; Sandison, G [University of Washington, Department of Radiation Oncology, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The presence of high density dental amalgam in patient CT image data sets causes dose calculation errors for head and neck (HN) treatment planning. This study assesses and compares dosimetric variations in IMRT and VMAT treatment plans due to dental artifacts. Methods: Sixteen HN patients with similar treatment sites (oropharynx), tumor volume and extensive dental artifacts were divided into two groups: IMRT (n=8, 6 to 9 beams) and VMAT (n=8, 2 arcs with 352° rotation). All cases were planned with the Pinnacle 9.2 treatment planning software using the collapsed cone convolution superposition algorithm and a range of prescription dose from 60 to 72Gy. Two different treatment plans were produced, each based on one of two image sets: (a)uncorrected; (b)dental artifacts density overridden (set to 1.0g/cm{sup 3}). Differences between the two treatment plans for each of the IMRT and VMAT techniques were quantified by the following dosimetric parameters: maximum point dose, maximum spinal cord and brainstem dose, mean left and right parotid dose, and PTV coverage (V95%Rx). Average differences generated for these dosimetric parameters were compared between IMRT and VMAT plans. Results: The average absolute dose differences (plan a minus plan b) for the VMAT and IMRT techniques, respectively, caused by dental artifacts were: 2.2±3.3cGy vs. 37.6±57.5cGy (maximum point dose, P=0.15); 1.2±0.9cGy vs. 7.9±6.7cGy (maximum spinal cord dose, P=0.026); 2.2±2.4cGy vs. 12.1±13.0cGy (maximum brainstem dose, P=0.077); 0.9±1.1cGy vs. 4.1±3.5cGy (mean left parotid dose, P=0.038); 0.9±0.8cGy vs. 7.8±11.9cGy (mean right parotid dose, P=0.136); 0.021%±0.014% vs. 0.803%±1.44% (PTV coverage, P=0.17). Conclusion: For the HN plans studied, dental artifacts demonstrated a greater dose calculation error for IMRT plans compared to VMAT plans. Rotational arcs appear on the average to compensate dose calculation errors induced by dental artifacts. Thus, compared to VMAT, density

  5. Acrolein-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling is mediated by alkylation of thioredoxin reductase and thioredoxin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Matthew J; Spiess, Page C; Hristova, Milena; Hondal, Robert J; van der Vliet, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smoking remains a major health concern worldwide, and many of the adverse effects of cigarette smoke (CS) can be attributed to its abundant electrophilic aldehydes, such as acrolein (2-propenal). Previous studies indicate that acrolein readily reacts with thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1), a critical enzyme involved in regulation of thioredoxin (Trx)-mediated redox signaling, by alkylation at its selenocysteine (Sec) residue. Because alkylation of Sec within TrxR1 has significant implications for its enzymatic function, we explored the potential importance of TrxR1 alkylation in acrolein-induced activation or injury of bronchial epithelial cells. Exposure of human bronchial epithelial HBE1 cells to acrolein (1-30 μM) resulted in dose-dependent loss of TrxR thioredoxin reductase activity, which coincided with its alkylation, as determined by biotin hydrazide labeling, and was independent of initial GSH status. To test the involvement of TrxR1 in acrolein responses in HBE1 cells, we suppressed TrxR1 using siRNA silencing or augmented TrxR1 by cell supplementation with sodium selenite. Acrolein exposure of HBE1 cells induced dose-dependent activation of the MAP kinases, extracellular regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38, and activation of JNK was markedly enhanced after selenite-mediated induction of TrxR1, and was associated with increased alkylation of TrxR1. Conversely, siRNA silencing of TrxR1 significantly suppressed the ability of acrolein to activate JNK, and also appeared to attenuate acrolein-dependent activation of ERK and p38. Alteration of initial TrxR1 levels by siRNA or selenite supplementation also affected initial Trx1 redox status and acrolein-mediated alkylation of Trx1, but did not significantly affect acrolein-mediated activation of HO-1 or cytotoxicity. Collectively, our findings indicate that alkylation of TrxR1 and/or Trx1 may contribute directly to acrolein-mediated activation of MAP kinases such as JNK, and

  6. Acrolein-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling is mediated by alkylation of thioredoxin reductase and thioredoxin 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Randall

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cigarette smoking remains a major health concern worldwide, and many of the adverse effects of cigarette smoke (CS can be attributed to its abundant electrophilic aldehydes, such as acrolein (2-propenal. Previous studies indicate that acrolein readily reacts with thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1, a critical enzyme involved in regulation of thioredoxin (Trx-mediated redox signaling, by alkylation at its selenocysteine (Sec residue. Because alkylation of Sec within TrxR1 has significant implications for its enzymatic function, we explored the potential importance of TrxR1 alkylation in acrolein-induced activation or injury of bronchial epithelial cells. Exposure of human bronchial epithelial HBE1 cells to acrolein (1–30 μM resulted in dose-dependent loss of TrxR thioredoxin reductase activity, which coincided with its alkylation, as determined by biotin hydrazide labeling, and was independent of initial GSH status. To test the involvement of TrxR1 in acrolein responses in HBE1 cells, we suppressed TrxR1 using siRNA silencing or augmented TrxR1 by cell supplementation with sodium selenite. Acrolein exposure of HBE1 cells induced dose-dependent activation of the MAP kinases, extracellular regulated kinase (ERK, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, and p38, and activation of JNK was markedly enhanced after selenite-mediated induction of TrxR1, and was associated with increased alkylation of TrxR1. Conversely, siRNA silencing of TrxR1 significantly suppressed the ability of acrolein to activate JNK, and also appeared to attenuate acrolein-dependent activation of ERK and p38. Alteration of initial TrxR1 levels by siRNA or selenite supplementation also affected initial Trx1 redox status and acrolein-mediated alkylation of Trx1, but did not significantly affect acrolein-mediated activation of HO-1 or cytotoxicity. Collectively, our findings indicate that alkylation of TrxR1 and/or Trx1 may contribute directly to acrolein-mediated activation of MAP kinases

  7. Adaptive and innate immune reactions regulating mast cell activation: from receptor-mediated signaling to responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tkaczyk, Christine; Jensen, Bettina M; Iwaki, Shoko

    2006-01-01

    differentially activate multiple signaling pathways within the mast cells required for the generation and/or release of inflammatory mediators. Thus, the composition of the suite of mediators released and the physiologic ramifications of these responses are dependent on the stimuli and the microenvironment...

  8. Rosmarinic acid counteracts activation of hepatic stellate cells via inhibiting the ROS-dependent MMP-2 activity: Involvement of Nrf2 antioxidant system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Changfang; Zou, Yu; Liu, Yuzhang; Niu, Yingcai, E-mail: nyc1968@126.com

    2017-03-01

    Recently, oxidative stress is involved in hepatofibrogenesis. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is required for activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in response to reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study was designed to explore the hypothesis that the inhibitory effect of rosmarinic acid (RA) on HSCs activation might mainly result from its antioxidant capability by increasing the synthesis of glutathione (GSH) involved in nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-dependent inhibition of MMP-2 activity. Here, we demonstrate that RA reverses activated HSCs to quiescent cells. Concomitantly, RA inhibits MMP-2 activity. RNA interference-imposed knockdown of NF-κB abolished down-regulation of MMP-2 by RA. RA-mediated inactivation of NF-κB could be blocked by the diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI; a ROS inhibitor). Conversely, transfection of dominant-negative (DN) mutant of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 2 (ERK2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1), or p38α kinase had no such effect. Simultaneously, RA suppresses ROS generation and lipid peroxidation (LPO) whereas increases cellular GSH in HSC-T6 cells. Furthermore, RA significantly increased antioxidant response element (ARE)-mediated luciferase activity, nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and catalytic subunits from glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLc) expression, but not modulatory subunits from GCL (GCLm). RA-mediated up-regulation of GClc is inhibited by the shRNA-induced Nrf2 knockdown. The knocking down of Nrf2 or buthionine sulfoximine (a GCL inhibitor) abolished RA-mediated inhibition of ROS. Collectively, these results provide novel insights into the mechanisms of RA as an antifibrogenic candidate in the prevention and treatment of liver fibrosis. - Highlights: • RA reverses activated HSCs to quiescent cells. • RA suppresses MMP-2 activity through a NF-κB-dependent pathway. • Inhibition of oxidative stress by RA is dependent on nuclear translocation of Nrf2

  9. Rosmarinic acid counteracts activation of hepatic stellate cells via inhibiting the ROS-dependent MMP-2 activity: Involvement of Nrf2 antioxidant system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Changfang; Zou, Yu; Liu, Yuzhang; Niu, Yingcai

    2017-01-01

    Recently, oxidative stress is involved in hepatofibrogenesis. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) is required for activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) in response to reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study was designed to explore the hypothesis that the inhibitory effect of rosmarinic acid (RA) on HSCs activation might mainly result from its antioxidant capability by increasing the synthesis of glutathione (GSH) involved in nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB)-dependent inhibition of MMP-2 activity. Here, we demonstrate that RA reverses activated HSCs to quiescent cells. Concomitantly, RA inhibits MMP-2 activity. RNA interference-imposed knockdown of NF-κB abolished down-regulation of MMP-2 by RA. RA-mediated inactivation of NF-κB could be blocked by the diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI; a ROS inhibitor). Conversely, transfection of dominant-negative (DN) mutant of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 2 (ERK2), c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 (JNK1), or p38α kinase had no such effect. Simultaneously, RA suppresses ROS generation and lipid peroxidation (LPO) whereas increases cellular GSH in HSC-T6 cells. Furthermore, RA significantly increased antioxidant response element (ARE)-mediated luciferase activity, nuclear translocation of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and catalytic subunits from glutamate cysteine ligase (GCLc) expression, but not modulatory subunits from GCL (GCLm). RA-mediated up-regulation of GClc is inhibited by the shRNA-induced Nrf2 knockdown. The knocking down of Nrf2 or buthionine sulfoximine (a GCL inhibitor) abolished RA-mediated inhibition of ROS. Collectively, these results provide novel insights into the mechanisms of RA as an antifibrogenic candidate in the prevention and treatment of liver fibrosis. - Highlights: • RA reverses activated HSCs to quiescent cells. • RA suppresses MMP-2 activity through a NF-κB-dependent pathway. • Inhibition of oxidative stress by RA is dependent on nuclear translocation of Nrf2

  10. In vivo T cell depletion regulates resistance and morbidity in murine schistosomiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, S.M.; Linette, G.P.; Doughty, B.L.; Byram, J.E.; Von Lichtenberg, F.

    1987-01-01

    These studies assessed the roles of subpopulations of T lymphocytes in inducing and modulating resistance to schistosomiasis and thereby influencing subsequent morbidity. C57BL/6 mice were depleted in vivo of Lyt-1+, Lyt-2+, and L3T4+ cells by the daily administration of monoclonal antibodies. The development of protective immunity, induced by exposure to irradiated Schistosoma mansoni cercariae as expressed in depleted animals, was compared to that demonstrated in undepleted, normal, and congenitally athymic C57BL/6 mice. The development of morbidity was determined by spleen weight, portal pressure and reticuloendothelial system activity. The results indicated that depletion of specific subpopulations of T lymphocytes minimally affected the primary development of parasites; however, depletion strongly influenced the development of resistance to the parasite and subsequent morbidity due to infection. Depletion of T lymphocytes by anti-Lyt-1+ or anti-L3T4+ antibody decreased the development of resistance, antibody and delayed-type hypersensitivity directed against schistosome antigens. Morbidity due to disease was increased. Depletion of Lyt-2+ cells produced opposite changes with augmented resistance and reduced morbidity. Congenitally athymic mice developed minimal resistance and morbidity. Moreover, resistance was inversely related to the morbidity shown by a given animal. These studies indicate that the development of protective immunity to S. mansoni cercariae is regulated by discrete subpopulations of T lymphocytes. The feasibility of decreasing morbidity by increasing specific immunologically mediated resistance is suggested

  11. Reactive oxygen species mediate Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through PI3K/AKT-dependent activation of GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Young-Ok; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xin; Fan, Jia; Kim, Dong-Hern; Lee, Ju-Yeon; Zhang, Zhuo; Lee, Jeong-Chae; Shi, Xianglin

    2013-01-01

    Cr(VI) compounds are known human carcinogens that primarily target the lungs. Cr(VI) produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the exact effects of ROS on the signaling molecules involved in Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis have not been extensively studied. Chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells to Cr(VI) at nanomolar concentrations (10–100 nM) for 3 months not only induced cell transformation, but also increased the potential of these cells to invade and migrate. Injection of Cr(VI)-stimulated cells into nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) increased levels of intracellular ROS and antiapoptotic proteins. Transfection with catalase or superoxide dismutase (SOD) prevented Cr(VI)-mediated increases in colony formation, cell invasion, migration, and xenograft tumors. While chronic Cr(VI) exposure led to activation of signaling cascades involving PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin and PI3K/AKT/mTOR, transfection with catalase or SOD markedly inhibited Cr(VI)-mediated activation of these signaling proteins. Inhibitors specific for AKT or β-catenin almost completely suppressed the Cr(VI)-mediated increase in total and active β-catenin proteins and colony formation. In particular, Cr(VI) suppressed autophagy of epithelial cells under nutrition deprivation. Furthermore, there was a marked induction of AKT, GSK-3β, β-catenin, mTOR, and carcinogenic markers in tumor tissues formed in mice after injection with Cr(VI)-stimulated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that ROS is a key mediator of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through the activation of PI3K/AKT-dependent GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling and the promotion of cell survival mechanisms via the inhibition of apoptosis and autophagy. - Highlights: • Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) induces carcinogenic properties in BEAS-2B cells. • ROS play an important role in Cr(VI)-induced tumorigenicity of BEAS-2B cells. • PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling involved in Cr

  12. Reactive oxygen species mediate Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through PI3K/AKT-dependent activation of GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Young-Ok; Pratheeshkumar, Poyil; Wang, Lei; Wang, Xin; Fan, Jia; Kim, Dong-Hern; Lee, Ju-Yeon; Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); Lee, Jeong-Chae [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States); School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biosciences, Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@email.uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536-0305 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Cr(VI) compounds are known human carcinogens that primarily target the lungs. Cr(VI) produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), but the exact effects of ROS on the signaling molecules involved in Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis have not been extensively studied. Chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial cells to Cr(VI) at nanomolar concentrations (10–100 nM) for 3 months not only induced cell transformation, but also increased the potential of these cells to invade and migrate. Injection of Cr(VI)-stimulated cells into nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors. Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) increased levels of intracellular ROS and antiapoptotic proteins. Transfection with catalase or superoxide dismutase (SOD) prevented Cr(VI)-mediated increases in colony formation, cell invasion, migration, and xenograft tumors. While chronic Cr(VI) exposure led to activation of signaling cascades involving PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin and PI3K/AKT/mTOR, transfection with catalase or SOD markedly inhibited Cr(VI)-mediated activation of these signaling proteins. Inhibitors specific for AKT or β-catenin almost completely suppressed the Cr(VI)-mediated increase in total and active β-catenin proteins and colony formation. In particular, Cr(VI) suppressed autophagy of epithelial cells under nutrition deprivation. Furthermore, there was a marked induction of AKT, GSK-3β, β-catenin, mTOR, and carcinogenic markers in tumor tissues formed in mice after injection with Cr(VI)-stimulated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that ROS is a key mediator of Cr(VI)-induced carcinogenesis through the activation of PI3K/AKT-dependent GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling and the promotion of cell survival mechanisms via the inhibition of apoptosis and autophagy. - Highlights: • Chronic exposure to Cr(VI) induces carcinogenic properties in BEAS-2B cells. • ROS play an important role in Cr(VI)-induced tumorigenicity of BEAS-2B cells. • PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling involved in Cr

  13. Single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT) as adjuvant treatment for gastric cancer: Dosimetric comparisons with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xin; Li, Guangjun; Zhang, Yingjie; Bai, Sen; Xu, Feng; Wei, Yuquan; Gong, Youling

    2013-01-01

    To compare the dosimetric differences between the single-arc volumetric-modulated arc therapy (sVMAT), 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) techniques in treatment planning for gastric cancer as adjuvant radiotherapy. Twelve patients were retrospectively analyzed. In each patient's case, the parameters were compared based on the dose-volume histogram (DVH) of the sVMAT, 3D-CRT, and IMRT plans, respectively. Three techniques showed similar target dose coverage. The maximum and mean doses of the target were significantly higher in the sVMAT plans than that in 3D-CRT plans and in the 3D-CRT/IMRT plans, respectively, but these differences were clinically acceptable. The IMRT and sVMAT plans successfully achieved better target dose conformity, reduced the V 20/30 , and mean dose of the left kidney, as well as the V 20/30 of the liver, compared with the 3D-CRT plans. And the sVMAT technique reduced the V 20 of the liver much significantly. Although the maximum dose of the spinal cord were much higher in the IMRT and sVMAT plans, respectively (mean 36.4 vs 39.5 and 40.6 Gy), these data were still under the constraints. Not much difference was found in the analysis of the parameters of the right kidney, intestine, and heart. The IMRT and sVMAT plans achieved similar dose distribution to the target, but superior to the 3D-CRT plans, in adjuvant radiotherapy for gastric cancer. The sVMAT technique improved the dose sparings of the left kidney and liver, compared with the 3D-CRT technique, but showed few dosimetric advantages over the IMRT technique. Studies are warranted to evaluate the clinical benefits of the VMAT treatment for patients with gastric cancer after surgery in the future

  14. Tryptophan depletion affects compulsive behaviour in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merchán, A; Navarro, S V; Klein, A B

    2017-01-01

    investigated whether 5-HT manipulation, through a tryptophan (TRP) depletion by diet in Wistar and Lister Hooded rats, modulates compulsive drinking in schedule-induced polydipsia (SIP) and locomotor activity in the open-field test. The levels of dopamine, noradrenaline, serotonin and its metabolite were......-depleted HD Wistar rats, while the LD Wistar and the Lister Hooded rats did not exhibit differences in SIP. In contrast, the TRP-depleted Lister Hooded rats increased locomotor activity compared to the non-depleted rats, while no differences were found in the Wistar rats. Serotonin 2A receptor binding...

  15. Mediator Recruitment to Heat Shock Genes Requires Dual Hsf1 Activation Domains and Mediator Tail Subunits Med15 and Med16*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sunyoung; Gross, David S.

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved Mediator complex is central to the regulation of gene transcription in eukaryotes because it serves as a physical and functional interface between upstream regulators and the Pol II transcriptional machinery. Nonetheless, its role appears to be context-dependent, and the detailed mechanism by which it governs the expression of most genes remains unknown. Here we investigate Mediator involvement in HSP (heat shock protein) gene regulation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We find that in response to thermal upshift, subunits representative of each of the four Mediator modules (Head, Middle, Tail, and Kinase) are rapidly, robustly, and selectively recruited to the promoter regions of HSP genes. Their residence is transient, returning to near-background levels within 90 min. Hsf1 (heat shock factor 1) plays a central role in recruiting Mediator, as indicated by the fact that truncation of either its N- or C-terminal activation domain significantly reduces Mediator occupancy, whereas removal of both activation domains abolishes it. Likewise, ablation of either of two Mediator Tail subunits, Med15 or Med16, reduces Mediator recruitment to HSP promoters, whereas deletion of both abolishes it. Accompanying the loss of Mediator, recruitment of RNA polymerase II is substantially diminished. Interestingly, Mediator antagonizes Hsf1 occupancy of non-induced promoters yet facilitates enhanced Hsf1 association with activated ones. Collectively, our observations indicate that Hsf1, via its dual activation domains, recruits holo-Mediator to HSP promoters in response to acute heat stress through cooperative physical and/or functional interactions with the Tail module. PMID:23447536

  16. Mediator, TATA-binding Protein, and RNA Polymerase II Contribute to Low Histone Occupancy at Active Gene Promoters in Yeast*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Suraiya A.; Paul, Emily; Sommer, Sebastian; Lieleg, Corinna; He, Qiye; Daly, Alexandre Z.; Rode, Kara A.; Barber, Wesley T.; Ellis, Laura C.; LaPorta, Erika; Orzechowski, Amanda M.; Taylor, Emily; Reeb, Tanner; Wong, Jason; Korber, Philipp; Morse, Randall H.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in eukaryotes requires the Mediator complex, and often involves chromatin remodeling and histone eviction at active promoters. Here we address the role of Mediator in recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex and its role, along with components of the preinitiation complex (PIC), in histone eviction at inducible and constitutively active promoters in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex to the induced CHA1 promoter, as well as its association with several constitutively active promoters, depends on the Mediator complex but is independent of Mediator at the induced MET2 and MET6 genes. Although transcriptional activation and histone eviction at CHA1 depends on Swi/Snf, Swi/Snf recruitment is not sufficient for histone eviction at the induced CHA1 promoter. Loss of Swi/Snf activity does not affect histone occupancy of several constitutively active promoters; in contrast, higher histone occupancy is seen at these promoters in Mediator and PIC component mutants. We propose that an initial activator-dependent, nucleosome remodeling step allows PIC components to outcompete histones for occupancy of promoter sequences. We also observe reduced promoter association of Mediator and TATA-binding protein in a Pol II (rpb1-1) mutant, indicating mutually cooperative binding of these components of the transcription machinery and indicating that it is the PIC as a whole whose binding results in stable histone eviction. PMID:24727477

  17. SU-F-T-273: Using a Diode Array to Explore the Weakness of TPS DoseCalculation Algorithm for VMAT and Sliding Window Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J; Lu, B; Yan, G; Park, J; Li, F; Li, J; Liu, C [University of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To identify the weakness of dose calculation algorithm in a treatment planning system for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and sliding window (SW) techniques using a two-dimensional diode array. Methods: The VMAT quality assurance(QA) was implemented with a diode array using multiple partial arcs that divided from a VMAT plan; each partial arc has the same segments and the original monitor units. Arc angles were less than ± 30°. Multiple arcs delivered through consecutive and repetitive gantry operating clockwise and counterclockwise. The source-toaxis distance setup with the effective depths of 10 and 20 cm were used for a diode array. To figure out dose errors caused in delivery of VMAT fields, the numerous fields having the same segments with the VMAT field irradiated using different delivery techniques of static and step-and-shoot. The dose distributions of the SW technique were evaluated by creating split fields having fine moving steps of multi-leaf collimator leaves. Calculated doses using the adaptive convolution algorithm were analyzed with measured ones with distance-to-agreement and dose difference of 3 mm and 3%.. Results: While the beam delivery through static and step-and-shoot techniques showed the passing rate of 97 ± 2%, partial arc delivery of the VMAT fields brought out passing rate of 85%. However, when leaf motion was restricted less than 4.6 mm/°, passing rate was improved up to 95 ± 2%. Similar passing rate were obtained for both 10 and 20 cm effective depth setup. The calculated doses using the SW technique showed the dose difference over 7% at the final arrival point of moving leaves. Conclusion: Error components in dynamic delivery of modulated beams were distinguished by using the suggested QA method. This partial arc method can be used for routine VMAT QA. Improved SW calculation algorithm is required to provide accurate estimated doses.

  18. GGA3 mediates TrkA endocytic recycling to promote sustained Akt phosphorylation and cell survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuezhi; Lavigne, Pierre; Lavoie, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Although TrkA postendocytic sorting significantly influences neuronal cell survival and differentiation, the molecular mechanism underlying TrkA receptor sorting in the recycling or degradation pathways remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that Golgi-localized, γ adaptin-ear–containing ADP ribosylation factor-binding protein 3 (GGA3) interacts directly with the TrkA cytoplasmic tail through an internal DXXLL motif and mediates the functional recycling of TrkA to the plasma membrane. We find that GGA3 depletion by siRNA delays TrkA recycling, accelerates TrkA degradation, attenuates sustained NGF-induced Akt activation, and reduces cell survival. We also show that GGA3’s effect on TrkA recycling is dependent on the activation of Arf6. This work identifies GGA3 as a key player in a novel DXXLL-mediated endosomal sorting machinery that targets TrkA to the plasma membrane, where it prolongs the activation of Akt signaling and survival responses. PMID:26446845

  19. SU-F-T-522: Dosimetric Study of Junction Dose in Double Isocenter Flatten and Flatten Filter Free IMRT and VMAT Plan Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samuvel, K; Yadav, G; Bhushan, M; Tamilarasu, S; Kumar, L; Suhail, M [Rajiv Gandhi Cancer Institute and Research Centre, New Delhi, Delhi (India)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To quantify the dosimetric accuracy of junction dose in double isocenter flattened and flatten filter free(FFF) intensity modulated radiation therapy(IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy(VMAT) plan delivery using pelvis phantom. Methods: Five large field pelvis patients were selected for this study. Double isocenter IMRT and VMAT treatment plans were generated in Eclipse Treatment planning System (V.11.0) using 6MV FB and FFF beams. For all the plans same distance 17.0cm was kept between one isocenter to another isocenter. IMRT Plans were made with 7 coplanar fields and VMAT plans were made with full double arcs. Dose calculation was performed using AAA algorithms with dose grid size of 0.25 cm. Verification plans were calculated on Scanditronix Wellhofer pelvis slab phantom. Measurement point was selected and calculated, where two isocenter plan fields are overlapping, this measurement point was kept at distance 8.5cm from both isocenter. The plans were delivered using Varian TrueBeamTM machine on pelvis slab phantom. Point dose measurements was carried out using CC13 ion chamber volume of 0.13cm3. Results: The measured junction point dose are compared with TPS calculated dose. The mean difference observed was 4.5%, 6.0%, 4.0% and 7.0% for IMRT-FB,IMRT-FFF, VMAT-FB and VMAT-FFF respectively. The measured dose results shows closer agreement with calculated dose in Flatten beam planning in both IMRT and VMAT, whereas in FFF beam plan dose difference are more compared with flatten beam plan. Conclusion: Dosimetry accuracy of Large Field junction dose difference was found less in Flatten beam compared with FFF beam plan delivery. Even though more dosimetric studies are required to analyse junction dose for FFF beam planning using multiple point dose measurements and fluence map verification in field junction area.

  20. Under-reported dosimetry errors due to interplay effects during VMAT dose delivery in extreme hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauer, Tobias; Sothmann, Thilo; Blanck, Oliver; Petersen, Cordula; Werner, René

    2018-06-01

    Radiotherapy of extracranial metastases changed from normofractioned 3D CRT to extreme hypofractionated stereotactic treatment using VMAT beam techniques. Random interaction between tumour motion and dynamically changing beam parameters might result in underdosage of the CTV even for an appropriately dimensioned ITV (interplay effect). This study presents a clinical scenario of extreme hypofractionated stereotactic treatment and analyses the impact of interplay effects on CTV dose coverage. For a thoracic/abdominal phantom with an integrated high-resolution detector array placed on a 4D motion platform, dual-arc treatment plans with homogenous target coverage were created using a common VMAT technique and delivered in a single fraction. CTV underdosage through interplay effects was investigated by comparing dose measurements with and without tumour motion during plan delivery. Our study agrees with previous works that pointed out insignificant interplay effects on target coverage for very regular tumour motion patterns like simple sinusoidal motion. However, we identified and illustrated scenarios that are likely to result in a clinically relevant CTV underdosage. For tumour motion with abnormal variability, target coverage quantified by the CTV area receiving more than 98% of the prescribed dose decreased to 78% compared to 100% at static dose measurement. This study is further proof of considerable influence of interplay effects on VMAT dose delivery in stereotactic radiotherapy. For selected conditions of an exemplary scenario, interplay effects and related motion-induced target underdosage primarily occurred in tumour motion pattern with increased motion variability and VMAT plan delivery using complex MLC dose modulation.

  1. Effect of acrolein and glutathione depleting agents on thioredoxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xianmei; Wu Xuli; Choi, Young Eun; Kern, Julie C.; Kehrer, James P.

    2004-01-01

    Acrolein is a widespread environmental pollutant that reacts rapidly with nucleophiles, especially cellular thiols. In addition to glutathione (GSH), thioredoxin (Trx) and thioredoxin reductase (TR) contain thiol groups and may react with electrophiles. In the present study, A549 cells treated with 5-25 μM acrolein for 30 min lost cellular Trx activity in a dose-dependent fashion. Over 90% of Trx activity was lost at concentrations of 25 μM or greater. In contrast, Trx protein content, as assessed by western blotting, was not altered immediately after the 30 min acrolein treatment. Both Trx activity and protein levels increased 4 h after the acrolein treatment. However, Trx activity remained below control levels at 24 h. A similar dose-response relationship was seen with TR in A549 cells exposed to acrolein. There was, however, a rapid recovery of TR activity such that it attained normal levels by 4 h after doses ≤75 μM acrolein. Diethyl maleate (DEM), a common but not highly specific, agent used to deplete GSH, also inactivated Trx. A 2 h exposure of A549 cells to 1 mM DEM depleted cellular GSH by ∼50% and diminished Trx activity by over 67%. Lower DEM doses (0.125 mM and 0.25 mM) for 1 h had no significant effect on GSH but significantly decreased Trx activity 12 and 23%, respectively. Similar to immediately after acrolein exposure, DEM did not affect Trx protein levels. A Trx-1-GFP fusion protein was transfected into A549 cells. While the fusion protein was expressed, the Trx component was inactive by the insulin reducing assay. In summary, Trx and TR are inactivated by acrolein. In addition, the GSH depleting agent DEM inactivates Trx somewhat more effectively than it depletes GSH. The Trx-1-GFP fusion protein, while readily expressed, appears to have little or no activity, perhaps because the small size of Trx-1 (12 kDa) is affected by the larger GFP

  2. Cyclin-dependent kinase suppression by WEE1 kinase protects the genome through control of replication initiation and nucleotide consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Halfdan; Nähse-Kumpf, Viola; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo

    2012-01-01

    Activation of oncogenes or inhibition of WEE1 kinase deregulates Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) activity and leads to replication stress, however, the underlying mechanism is not understood. We now show that elevation of CDK activity by inhibiting WEE1 kinase rapidly increases initiation of replic......Activation of oncogenes or inhibition of WEE1 kinase deregulates Cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) activity and leads to replication stress, however, the underlying mechanism is not understood. We now show that elevation of CDK activity by inhibiting WEE1 kinase rapidly increases initiation...... of replication. This leads to nucleotide shortage and reduces replication fork speed, which is followed by SLX4/MUS81-mediated DNA double-strand breakage. Fork speed is normalized and DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation is suppressed when CDT1, a key factor for replication initiation, is depleted...

  3. The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Briner

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Depleted uranium (DU is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a clear and defined set of symptoms. Chronic low-dose, or subacute, exposure to depleted uranium alters the appearance of milestones in developing organisms. Adult animals that were exposed to depleted uranium during development display persistent alterations in behavior, even after cessation of depleted uranium exposure. Adult animals exposed to depleted uranium demonstrate altered behaviors and a variety of alterations to brain chemistry. Despite its reduced level of radioactivity evidence continues to accumulate that depleted uranium, if ingested, may pose a radiologic hazard. The current state of knowledge concerning DU is discussed.

  4. SU-F-T-296: Modulated Therapy Down Under: A Survey of IMRT & VMAT Physics Practice in Australia and New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, J; Vial, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: A comprehensive survey of Australasian radiation oncology physics departments was undertaken to capture a snapshot of current usage, commissioning and QA practices for intensity-modulated therapies. Methods: An online survey was developed and advertised to Australian and New Zealand radiation oncology physicists through the local college (ACPSEM) in April 2015. The survey consisted of 147 questions in total, covering IMRT, VMAT and Tomotherapy, and details specific to different treatment planning systems. Questions captured detailed information on equipment, policies and procedures for the commissioning and QA of each treatment technique. Results: 41 partial or complete responses were collected, representing 59 departments out of the 78 departments operational. 137 and 84 linacs from these departments were using IMRT and VMAT respectively, from a total 150 linacs. 100% and 78% of respondents were treating with IMRT and VMAT respectively. There are at least 8 different treatment planning systems being used for IMRT or VMAT, and large variations in all aspects of QA policies and procedures. 29 responses indicated 72 methods routinely used for pre-treatment QA, when breaking down by device and analysis type. Similar numbers of departments use field-by-field analysis compared to composite analysis (56% to 44%) while a majority use true gantry angle delivery compared to fixed gantry at 0° (72% to 28%). 19 different implementations of gamma index analysis parameters were reported from 33 responses. A follow-up one-day workshop to highlight the results, discuss the role of QA and share equipment-specific knowledge across users was conducted in November 2015. Conclusion: While IMRT and VMAT are almost universally available in Australasia, large variations in practice indicate a need for national or consensus guidelines.

  5. Toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction-dependent fluorescent strategy for sensitive detection of uracil-DNA glycosylase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yushu; Wang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2017-03-15

    Sensitive detection of uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) activity is beneficial for evaluating the repairing process of DNA lesions. Here, toehold-mediated strand displacement reaction (TSDR)-dependent fluorescent strategy was constructed for sensitive detection of UDG activity. A single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe with two uracil bases and a trigger sequence were designed. A hairpin probe with toehold domain was designed, and a reporter probe was also designed. Under the action of UDG, two uracil bases were removed from ssDNA probe, generating apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites. Then, the AP sites could inhibit the TSDR between ssDNA probe and hairpin probe, leaving the trigger sequence in ssDNA probe still free. Subsequently, the trigger sequence was annealed with the reporter probe, initiating the polymerization and nicking amplification reaction. As a result, numerous G-quadruplex (G4) structures were formed, which could bind with N-methyl-mesoporphyrin IX (NMM) to generate enhanced fluorescent signal. In the absence of UDG, the ssDNA probe could hybridize with the toehold domain of the hairpin probe to initiate TSDR, blocking the trigger sequence, and then the subsequent amplification reaction would not occur. The proposed strategy was successfully implemented for detecting UDG activity with a detection limit of 2.7×10 -5 U/mL. Moreover, the strategy could distinguish UDG well from other interference enzymes. Furthermore, the strategy was also applied for detecting UDG activity in HeLa cells lysate with low effect of cellular components. These results indicated that the proposed strategy offered a promising tool for sensitive quantification of UDG activity in UDG-related function study and disease prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The Toxicity of Depleted Uranium

    OpenAIRE

    Briner, Wayne

    2010-01-01

    Depleted uranium (DU) is an emerging environmental pollutant that is introduced into the environment primarily by military activity. While depleted uranium is less radioactive than natural uranium, it still retains all the chemical toxicity associated with the original element. In large doses the kidney is the target organ for the acute chemical toxicity of this metal, producing potentially lethal tubular necrosis. In contrast, chronic low dose exposure to depleted uranium may not produce a c...

  7. Experimentally studied dynamic dose interplay does not meaningfully affect target dose in VMAT SBRT lung treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stambaugh, Cassandra [Department of Physics, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States); Nelms, Benjamin E. [Canis Lupus LLC, Merrimac, Wisconsin 53561 (United States); Dilling, Thomas; Stevens, Craig; Latifi, Kujtim; Zhang, Geoffrey; Moros, Eduardo; Feygelman, Vladimir [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida 33612 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: The effects of respiratory motion on the tumor dose can be divided into the gradient and interplay effects. While the interplay effect is likely to average out over a large number of fractions, it may play a role in hypofractionated [stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT)] treatments. This subject has been extensively studied for intensity modulated radiation therapy but less so for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT), particularly in application to hypofractionated regimens. Also, no experimental study has provided full four-dimensional (4D) dose reconstruction in this scenario. The authors demonstrate how a recently described motion perturbation method, with full 4D dose reconstruction, is applied to describe the gradient and interplay effects during VMAT lung SBRT treatments.Methods: VMAT dose delivered to a moving target in a patient can be reconstructed by applying perturbations to the treatment planning system-calculated static 3D dose. Ten SBRT patients treated with 6 MV VMAT beams in five fractions were selected. The target motion (motion kernel) was approximated by 3D rigid body translation, with the tumor centroids defined on the ten phases of the 4DCT. The motion was assumed to be periodic, with the period T being an average from the empirical 4DCT respiratory trace. The real observed tumor motion (total displacement ≤8 mm) was evaluated first. Then, the motion range was artificially increased to 2 or 3 cm. Finally, T was increased to 60 s. While not realistic, making T comparable to the delivery time elucidates if the interplay effect can be observed. For a single fraction, the authors quantified the interplay effect as the maximum difference in the target dosimetric indices, most importantly the near-minimum dose (D{sub 99%}), between all possible starting phases. For the three- and five-fractions, statistical simulations were performed when substantial interplay was found.Results: For the motion amplitudes and periods obtained from

  8. Dosimetric effects of immobilization devices on SABR for lung cancer using VMAT technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong In; Ye, Sung-Joon; Kim, Hak Jae; Park, Jong Min

    2015-01-08

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the dosimetric effects of immobilization devices on the dose distributions of stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung cancer using volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) technique. A total of 30 patients who underwent SABR for lung cancer were selected retrospectively. Every patient was immobilized using Body Pro-Lok with a vacuum bag customized for each patient body shape. Structure sets were generated to include the patient body inside the body structure with and without the immobilization device. Dose distributions, with and without the immobilization device, were calculated using identical VMAT plans for each patient. Correlations between the change in dose-volumetric parameters and the MU fraction of photon beams penetrating through the immobilization device were analyzed with Pearson correlation coefficients (r). The maximum change in D95%, D100%, and the minimum, maximum and mean dose to the planning target volume (PTV) due to the immobilization device were 5%, 7%, 4%, 5%, and 5%, respectively. The maximum changes in the maximum dose to the spinal cord, esophagus, heart, and trachea were 1.3 Gy, 0.9 Gy, 1 Gy, and 1.7 Gy, respectively. Strong correlations were observed between the changes in PTV D95%, the minimum, the maximum, and the mean dose to the PTV, the maximum dose to the esophagus and heart, and the MU fractions, showing values of r higher than 0.7. The decrease in dose to the target volume was considerable for lung SABR using VMAT technique, especially when MU fraction was large.

  9. Tissue depletion of taurine accelerates skeletal muscle senescence and leads to early death in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Ito

    Full Text Available Taurine (2-aminoethanesulfonic acid is found in milimolar concentrations in mammalian tissues. One of its main functions is osmoregulation; however, it also exhibits cytoprotective activity by diminishing injury caused by stress and disease. Taurine depletion is associated with several defects, many of which are found in the aging animal, suggesting that taurine might exert anti-aging actions. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the hypothesis that taurine depletion accelerates aging by reducing longevity and accelerating aging-associated tissue damage. Tissue taurine depletion in taurine transporter knockout (TauTKO mouse was found to shorten lifespan and accelerate skeletal muscle histological and functional defects, including an increase in central nuclei containing myotubes, a reduction in mitochondrial complex 1 activity and an induction in an aging biomarker, Cyclin-dependent kinase 4 inhibitor A (p16INK4a. Tissue taurine depletion also enhances unfolded protein response (UPR, which may be associated with an improvement in protein folding by taurine. Our data reveal that tissue taurine depletion affects longevity and cellular senescence; an effect possibly linked to a disturbance in protein folding.

  10. Concurrent inhibition of kit- and FcepsilonRI-mediated signaling: coordinated suppression of mast cell activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bettina M; Beaven, Michael A; Iwaki, Shoko

    2008-01-01

    Although primarily required for the growth, differentiation, and survival of mast cells, Kit ligand (stem cell factor) is also required for optimal antigen-mediated mast cell activation. Therefore, concurrent inhibition of Kit- and FcepsilonRI-mediated signaling would be an attractive approach...... characterized Kit inhibitor imatinib mesylate (imatinib). In contrast to imatinib, however, hypothemycin also effectively inhibited FcepsilonRI-mediated degranulation and cytokine production in addition to the potentiation of these responses via Kit. The effect of hypothemycin on Kit-mediated responses could...... be explained by its inhibition of Kit kinase activity, whereas the inhibitory effects on FcepsilonRI-dependent signaling were at the level of Btk activation. Because hypothemycin also significantly reduced the mouse passive cutaneous anaphylaxis response in vivo, these data provide proof of principle...

  11. Quality of tri-Co-60 MR-IGRT treatment plans in comparison with VMAT treatment plans for spine SABR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chang Heon; Park, So-Yeon; Kim, Jung-In; Kim, Jin Ho; Kim, Kyubo; Carlson, Joel; Park, Jong Min

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the plan quality of tri-Co-60 intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for spine stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR). A total of 20 patients with spine metastasis were retrospectively selected. For each patient, a tri-Co-60 IMRT plan and a volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) plan were generated. The spinal cords were defined based on MR images for the tri-Co-60 IMRT, while isotropic 1-mm margins were added to the spinal cords for the VMAT plans. The VMAT plans were generated with 10-MV flattening filter-free photon beams of TrueBeam STx ™ (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA), while the tri-Co-60 IMRT plans were generated with the ViewRay ™ system (ViewRay inc., Cleveland, OH). The initial prescription dose was 18 Gy (1 fraction). If the tolerance dose of the spinal cord was not met, the prescription dose was reduced until the spinal cord tolerance dose was satisfied. The mean dose to the target volumes, conformity index and homogeneity index of the VMAT and tri-Co-60 IMRT were 17.8 ± 0.8 vs 13.7 ± 3.9 Gy, 0.85 ± 0.20 vs 1.58 ± 1.29 and 0.09 ± 0.04 vs 0.24 ± 0.19, respectively. The integral doses and beam-on times were 16,570 ± 1768 vs 22,087 ± 2.986 Gy cm 3 and 3.95 ± 1.13 vs 48.82 ± 10.44 min, respectively. The tri-Co-60 IMRT seems inappropriate for spine SABR compared with VMAT. Advances in knowledge: For spine SABR, the tri-Co-60 IMRT is inappropriate owing to the large penumbra, large leaf width and low dose rate of the ViewRay system.

  12. Glutamate transporter activity promotes enhanced Na+/K+-ATPase -mediated extracellular K+ management during neuronal activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Brian R; Holm, Rikke; Vilsen, Bente

    2016-01-01

    , in addition, Na+ /K+ -ATPase-mediated K+ clearance could be governed by astrocytic [Na+ ]i . During most neuronal activity, glutamate is released in the synaptic cleft and is re-absorbed by astrocytic Na+ -coupled glutamate transporters, thereby elevating [Na+ ]i . It thus remains unresolved whether...... the different Na+ /K+ -ATPase isoforms are controlled by [K+ ]o or [Na+ ]i during neuronal activity. Hippocampal slice recordings of stimulus-induced [K+ ]o transients with ion-sensitive microelectrodes revealed reduced Na+ /K+ -ATPase-mediated K+ management upon parallel inhibition of the glutamate transporter......+ affinity to the α1 and α2 isoforms than the β2 isoform. In summary, enhanced astrocytic Na+ /K+ -ATPase-dependent K+ clearance was obtained with parallel glutamate transport activity. The astrocytic Na+ /K+ -ATPase isoform constellation α2β1 appeared to be specifically geared to respond to the [Na+ ]i...

  13. Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-mediated stimulation of adipocyte differentiation requires the synergistic action of Epac- and cAMP-dependent protein kinase-dependent processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Rasmus Koefoed; Madsen, Lise; Pedersen, Lone Møller

    2008-01-01

    AMP-dependent stimulation of adipocyte differentiation. Epac, working via Rap, acted synergistically with cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A [PKA]) to promote adipogenesis. The major role of PKA was to down-regulate Rho and Rho-kinase activity, rather than to enhance CREB phosphorylation. Suppression of Rho......-kinase impaired proadipogenic insulin/insulin-like growth factor 1 signaling, which was restored by activation of Epac. This interplay between PKA and Epac-mediated processes not only provides novel insight into the initiation and tuning of adipocyte differentiation, but also demonstrates a new mechanism of c......AMP signaling whereby cAMP uses both PKA and Epac to achieve an appropriate cellular response....

  14. CDK-mediated activation of the SCFFBXO28 ubiquitin ligase promotes MYC-driven transcription and tumourigenesis and predicts poor survival in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cepeda, Diana; Ng, Hwee-Fang; Sharifi, Hamid Reza; Mahmoudi, Salah; Cerrato, Vanessa Soto; Fredlund, Erik; Magnusson, Kristina; Nilsson, Helén; Malyukova, Alena; Rantala, Juha; Klevebring, Daniel; Viñals, Francesc; Bhaskaran, Nimesh; Zakaria, Siti Mariam; Rahmanto, Aldwin Suryo; Grotegut, Stefan; Nielsen, Michael Lund; Szigyarto, Cristina Al-Khalili; Sun, Dahui; Lerner, Mikael; Navani, Sanjay; Widschwendter, Martin; Uhlén, Mathias; Jirström, Karin; Pontén, Fredrik; Wohlschlegel, James; Grandér, Dan; Spruck, Charles; Larsson, Lars-Gunnar; Sangfelt, Olle

    2013-01-01

    SCF (Skp1/Cul1/F-box) ubiquitin ligases act as master regulators of cellular homeostasis by targeting key proteins for ubiquitylation. Here, we identified a hitherto uncharacterized F-box protein, FBXO28 that controls MYC-dependent transcription by non-proteolytic ubiquitylation. SCFFBXO28 activity and stability are regulated during the cell cycle by CDK1/2-mediated phosphorylation of FBXO28, which is required for its efficient ubiquitylation of MYC and downsteam enhancement of the MYC pathway. Depletion of FBXO28 or overexpression of an F-box mutant unable to support MYC ubiquitylation results in an impairment of MYC-driven transcription, transformation and tumourigenesis. Finally, in human breast cancer, high FBXO28 expression and phosphorylation are strong and independent predictors of poor outcome. In conclusion, our data suggest that SCFFBXO28 plays an important role in transmitting CDK activity to MYC function during the cell cycle, emphasizing the CDK-FBXO28-MYC axis as a potential molecular drug target in MYC-driven cancers, including breast cancer. PMID:23776131

  15. Dose- and time-dependence of the host-mediated response to paclitaxel therapy: a mathematical modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benguigui, Madeleine; Alishekevitz, Dror; Timaner, Michael; Shechter, Dvir; Raviv, Ziv; Benzekry, Sebastien; Shaked, Yuval

    2018-01-05

    It has recently been suggested that pro-tumorigenic host-mediated processes induced in response to chemotherapy counteract the anti-tumor activity of therapy, and thereby decrease net therapeutic outcome. Here we use experimental data to formulate a mathematical model describing the host response to different doses of paclitaxel (PTX) chemotherapy as well as the duration of the response. Three previously described host-mediated effects are used as readouts for the host response to therapy. These include the levels of circulating endothelial progenitor cells in peripheral blood and the effect of plasma derived from PTX-treated mice on migratory and invasive properties of tumor cells in vitro . A first set of mathematical models, based on basic principles of pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics, did not appropriately describe the dose-dependence and duration of the host response regarding the effects on invasion. We therefore provide an alternative mathematical model with a dose-dependent threshold, instead of a concentration-dependent one, that describes better the data. This model is integrated into a global model defining all three host-mediated effects. It not only precisely describes the data, but also correctly predicts host-mediated effects at different doses as well as the duration of the host response. This mathematical model may serve as a tool to predict the host response to chemotherapy in cancer patients, and therefore may be used to design chemotherapy regimens with improved therapeutic outcome by minimizing host mediated effects.

  16. Mediator, TATA-binding protein, and RNA polymerase II contribute to low histone occupancy at active gene promoters in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansari, Suraiya A; Paul, Emily; Sommer, Sebastian; Lieleg, Corinna; He, Qiye; Daly, Alexandre Z; Rode, Kara A; Barber, Wesley T; Ellis, Laura C; LaPorta, Erika; Orzechowski, Amanda M; Taylor, Emily; Reeb, Tanner; Wong, Jason; Korber, Philipp; Morse, Randall H

    2014-05-23

    Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) in eukaryotes requires the Mediator complex, and often involves chromatin remodeling and histone eviction at active promoters. Here we address the role of Mediator in recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex and its role, along with components of the preinitiation complex (PIC), in histone eviction at inducible and constitutively active promoters in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that recruitment of the Swi/Snf chromatin remodeling complex to the induced CHA1 promoter, as well as its association with several constitutively active promoters, depends on the Mediator complex but is independent of Mediator at the induced MET2 and MET6 genes. Although transcriptional activation and histone eviction at CHA1 depends on Swi/Snf, Swi/Snf recruitment is not sufficient for histone eviction at the induced CHA1 promoter. Loss of Swi/Snf activity does not affect histone occupancy of several constitutively active promoters; in contrast, higher histone occupancy is seen at these promoters in Mediator and PIC component mutants. We propose that an initial activator-dependent, nucleosome remodeling step allows PIC components to outcompete histones for occupancy of promoter sequences. We also observe reduced promoter association of Mediator and TATA-binding protein in a Pol II (rpb1-1) mutant, indicating mutually cooperative binding of these components of the transcription machinery and indicating that it is the PIC as a whole whose binding results in stable histone eviction. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Active volume studies with depleted and enriched BEGe detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sturm, Katharina von [Eberhard Karls Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany); Universita degli Studi di Padova, Padua (Italy); Collaboration: GERDA-Collaboration

    2013-07-01

    The Gerda experiment is currently taking data for the search of the 0νββ decay in {sup 76}Ge. In 2013, 30 newly manufactured Broad Energy Germanium (BEGe) diodes will be deployed which will double the active mass within Gerda. These detectors were fabricated from high-purity germanium enriched in {sup 76}Ge and tested in the HADES underground laboratory, owned by SCK.CEN, in Mol, Belgium. As the BEGes are source and detector at the same time, one crucial parameter is their active volume which directly enters into the evaluation of the half-life. This talk illustrates the dead layer and active volume determination of prototype detectors from depleted germanium as well as the newly produced detectors from enriched material, using gamma spectroscopy methods and comparing experimental results to Monte-Carlo simulations. Recent measurements and their results are presented, and systematic effects are discussed.

  18. Mediator, SWI/SNF and SAGA complexes regulate Yap8-dependent transcriptional activation of ACR2 in response to arsenate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Regina Andrade; Pimentel, Catarina; Silva, Ana Rita Courelas; Amaral, Catarina; Merhej, Jawad; Devaux, Frédéric; Rodrigues-Pousada, Claudina

    2017-04-01

    Response to arsenic stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is orchestrated by the regulatory protein Yap8, which mediates transcriptional activation of ACR2 and ACR3. This study contributes to the state of art knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying yeast stress response to arsenate as it provides the genetic and biochemical evidences that Yap8, through cysteine residues 132, 137, and 274, is the sensor of presence of arsenate in the cytosol. Moreover, it is here reported for the first time the essential role of the Mediator complex in the transcriptional activation of ACR2 by Yap8. Based on our data, we propose an order-of-function map to recapitulate the sequence of events taking place in cells injured with arsenate. Modification of the sulfhydryl state of these cysteines converts Yap8 in its activated form, triggering the recruitment of the Mediator complex to the ACR2/ACR3 promoter, through the interaction with the tail subunit Med2. The Mediator complex then transfers the regulatory signals conveyed by Yap8 to the core transcriptional machinery, which culminates with TBP occupancy, ACR2 upregulation and cell adaptation to arsenate stress. Additional co-factors are required for the transcriptional activation of ACR2 by Yap8, particularly the nucleosome remodeling activity of SWI/SNF and SAGA complexes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. The influence of plan modulation on the interplay effect in VMAT liver SBRT treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubley, Emily; Pierce, Greg

    2017-08-01

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) uses multileaf collimator (MLC) leaves, gantry speed, and dose rate to modulate beam fluence, producing the highly conformal doses required for liver radiotherapy. When targets that move with respiration are treated with a dynamic fluence, there exists the possibility for interplay between the target and leaf motions. This study employs a novel motion simulation technique to determine if VMAT liver SBRT plans with an increase in MLC leaf modulation are more susceptible to dosimetric differences in the GTV due to interplay effects. For ten liver SBRT patients, two VMAT plans with different amounts of MLC leaf modulation were created. Motion was simulated using a random starting point in the respiratory cycle for each fraction. To isolate the interplay effect, motion was also simulated using four specific starting points in the respiratory cycle. The dosimetric differences caused by different starting points were examined by subtracting resultant dose distributions from each other. When motion was simulated using random starting points for each fraction, or with specific starting points, there were significantly more dose differences in the GTV (maximum 100cGy) for more highly modulated plans, but the overall plan quality was not adversely affected. Plans with more MLC leaf modulation are more susceptible to interplay effects, but dose differences in the GTV are clinically negligible in magnitude. Copyright © 2017 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The head module of Mediator directs activation of preloaded RNAPII in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sarah K; Chen, Xu; Huang, Liangqun; Stargell, Laurie A

    2013-12-01

    The successful synthesis of a transcript by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) is a multistage process with distinct rate-limiting steps that can vary depending on the particular gene. A growing number of genes in a variety of organisms are regulated at steps after the recruitment of RNAPII. The best-characterized Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene regulated in this manner is CYC1. This gene has high occupancy of RNAPII under non-inducing conditions, defining it as a poised gene. Here, we find that subunits of the head module of Mediator, Med18 and Med20, and Med19 are required for activation of transcription at the CYC1 promoter in response to environmental cues. These subunits of Mediator are required at the preloaded promoter for normal levels of recruitment and activity of the general transcription factor TFIIH. Strikingly, these Mediator components are dispensable for activation by the same activator at a different gene, which lacks a preloaded polymerase in the promoter region. Based on these results and other studies, we speculate that Mediator plays an essential role in triggering an inactive polymerase at CYC1 into a productively elongating form.

  1. L-alanine detector characterization for dosimetry of small fields in SBRT with VMAT techniques; Caracterizacao do detector de L-alanina para dosimetria de campos pequenos em SBRT com a tecnica de VMAT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazaro, Sarah J.; Peres, Leonardo [Instituto Nacional de Cancer (INCA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Baffa, Oswaldo, E-mail: sarahmazaro@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciencias e Letras. Departamento de Fisica

    2016-07-01

    New radiotherapy treatment techniques have some problems such as: the dosimetric and geometric of the beam and small fields. Determination of the prescribed dose on the target volume in small fields is hampered due to lack of lateral electronic equilibrium and steep dose gradient along the edges of fields. The choice of radiation better detector becomes important in the dosimetry of small fields. Alanine detector has been shown to be a good choice for measurements of high doses of radiation in small fields. This study aims to characterize the L-alanine detector through the dosimetric tests for SBRT in VMAT techniques. L-alanine response showed a strong linear correlation with the dose (R ² = 0.9865), with significant angles and dose rate dependencies (14%) and (15%) respectively, and minor with the small field size (maximum 4% deviation). (author)

  2. Halo Star Lithium Depletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinsonneault, M. H.; Walker, T. P.; Steigman, G.; Narayanan, Vijay K.

    1999-01-01

    The depletion of lithium during the pre-main-sequence and main-sequence phases of stellar evolution plays a crucial role in the comparison of the predictions of big bang nucleosynthesis with the abundances observed in halo stars. Previous work has indicated a wide range of possible depletion factors, ranging from minimal in standard (nonrotating) stellar models to as much as an order of magnitude in models that include rotational mixing. Recent progress in the study of the angular momentum evolution of low-mass stars permits the construction of theoretical models capable of reproducing the angular momentum evolution of low-mass open cluster stars. The distribution of initial angular momenta can be inferred from stellar rotation data in young open clusters. In this paper we report on the application of these models to the study of lithium depletion in main-sequence halo stars. A range of initial angular momenta produces a range of lithium depletion factors on the main sequence. Using the distribution of initial conditions inferred from young open clusters leads to a well-defined halo lithium plateau with modest scatter and a small population of outliers. The mass-dependent angular momentum loss law inferred from open cluster studies produces a nearly flat plateau, unlike previous models that exhibited a downward curvature for hotter temperatures in the 7Li-Teff plane. The overall depletion factor for the plateau stars is sensitive primarily to the solar initial angular momentum used in the calibration for the mixing diffusion coefficients. Uncertainties remain in the treatment of the internal angular momentum transport in the models, and the potential impact of these uncertainties on our results is discussed. The 6Li/7Li depletion ratio is also examined. We find that the dispersion in the plateau and the 6Li/7Li depletion ratio scale with the absolute 7Li depletion in the plateau, and we use observational data to set bounds on the 7Li depletion in main-sequence halo

  3. Tau-mediated nuclear depletion and cytoplasmic accumulation of SFPQ in Alzheimer's and Pick's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazi D Ke

    Full Text Available Tau dysfunction characterizes neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD. Here, we performed an unbiased SAGE (serial analysis of gene expression of differentially expressed mRNAs in the amygdala of transgenic pR5 mice that express human tau carrying the P301L mutation previously identified in familial cases of FTLD. SAGE identified 29 deregulated transcripts including Sfpq that encodes a nuclear factor implicated in the splicing and regulation of gene expression. To assess the relevance for human disease we analyzed brains from AD, Pick's disease (PiD, a form of FTLD, and control cases. Strikingly, in AD and PiD, both dementias with a tau pathology, affected brain areas showed a virtually complete nuclear depletion of SFPQ in both neurons and astrocytes, along with cytoplasmic accumulation. Accordingly, neurons harboring either AD tangles or Pick bodies were also depleted of SFPQ. Immunoblot analysis of human entorhinal cortex samples revealed reduced SFPQ levels with advanced Braak stages suggesting that the SFPQ pathology may progress together with the tau pathology in AD. To determine a causal role for tau, we stably expressed both wild-type and P301L human tau in human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells, an established cell culture model of tau pathology. The cells were differentiated by two independent methods, mitomycin C-mediated cell cycle arrest or neuronal differentiation with retinoic acid. Confocal microscopy revealed that SFPQ was confined to nuclei in non-transfected wild-type cells, whereas in wild-type and P301L tau over-expressing cells, irrespective of the differentiation method, it formed aggregates in the cytoplasm, suggesting that pathogenic tau drives SFPQ pathology in post-mitotic cells. Our findings add SFPQ to a growing list of transcription factors with an altered nucleo-cytoplasmic distribution under neurodegenerative conditions.

  4. Voltage Dependence of a Neuromodulator-Activated Ionic Current123

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The neuromodulatory inward current (IMI) generated by crab Cancer borealis stomatogastric ganglion neurons is an inward current whose voltage dependence has been shown to be crucial in the activation of oscillatory activity of the pyloric network of this system. It has been previously shown that IMI loses its voltage dependence in conditions of low extracellular calcium, but that this effect appears to be regulated by intracellular calmodulin. Voltage dependence is only rarely regulated by intracellular signaling mechanisms. Here we address the hypothesis that the voltage dependence of IMI is mediated by intracellular signaling pathways activated by extracellular calcium. We demonstrate that calmodulin inhibitors and a ryanodine antagonist can reduce IMI voltage dependence in normal Ca2+, but that, in conditions of low Ca2+, calmodulin activators do not restore IMI voltage dependence. Further, we show evidence that CaMKII alters IMI voltage dependence. These results suggest that calmodulin is necessary but not sufficient for IMI voltage dependence. We therefore hypothesize that the Ca2+/calmodulin requirement for IMI voltage dependence is due to an active sensing of extracellular calcium by a GPCR family calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) and that the reduction in IMI voltage dependence by a calmodulin inhibitor is due to CaSR endocytosis. Supporting this, preincubation with an endocytosis inhibitor prevented W7 (N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide hydrochloride)-induced loss of IMI voltage dependence, and a CaSR antagonist reduced IMI voltage dependence. Additionally, myosin light chain kinase, which is known to act downstream of the CaSR, seems to play a role in regulating IMI voltage dependence. Finally, a Gβγ-subunit inhibitor also affects IMI voltage dependence, in support of the hypothesis that this process is regulated by a G-protein-coupled CaSR. PMID:27257619

  5. Dosimetric comparison between VMAT and RC3D techniques: case of prostate treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemingui, Fatima Zohra; Benrachi, Fatima; Bali, Mohamed Saleh; Ladjal, Hamid

    2017-09-01

    Considered as the second men cancer in Algeria, prostate cancer is treated in 70% by radiation. That's why radiation therapy is therapeutic weapon for prostate cancer. Conformational Radiotherapy in 3D is the most common technique [1-5]. The use of conventionally optimized treatment plans was compared at case scenario of optimized treatment plans VMAT for prostate cancer. The evaluation of the two optimizations strategies focused on the resulting plans ability to retain dose objectives under the influence of patient set up. Dose Volume Histogram in the Planning Target Volume and dose in the Organs At Risks were used to calculate the conformity index, and evaluation ratio of irradiated volume which represent the main tool of comparison [6,7]. The situation was analysed systematically. The 14% dose increase in the target leads to a decrease in the dose in adjacent organs with 39% in the bladder. Therefore, the criterion for better efficacy and less toxicity reveal that VMAT is the best choice.

  6. Dosimetric comparison between VMAT and RC3D techniques: case of prostate treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chemingui Fatima Zohra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Considered as the second men cancer in Algeria, prostate cancer is treated in 70% by radiation. That's why radiation therapy is therapeutic weapon for prostate cancer. Conformational Radiotherapy in 3D is the most common technique [1−5]. The use of conventionally optimized treatment plans was compared at case scenario of optimized treatment plans VMAT for prostate cancer. The evaluation of the two optimizations strategies focused on the resulting plans ability to retain dose objectives under the influence of patient set up. Dose Volume Histogram in the Planning Target Volume and dose in the Organs At Risks were used to calculate the conformity index, and evaluation ratio of irradiated volume which represent the main tool of comparison [6,7]. The situation was analysed systematically. The 14% dose increase in the target leads to a decrease in the dose in adjacent organs with 39% in the bladder. Therefore, the criterion for better efficacy and less toxicity reveal that VMAT is the best choice.

  7. Discoidin Domain Receptor 1 Mediates Myosin-Dependent Collagen Contraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno M. Coelho

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1 is a tyrosine kinase collagen adhesion receptor that mediates cell migration through association with non-muscle myosin IIA (NMIIA. Because DDR1 is implicated in cancer fibrosis, we hypothesized that DDR1 interacts with NMIIA to enable collagen compaction by traction forces. Mechanical splinting of rat dermal wounds increased DDR1 expression and collagen alignment. In periodontal ligament of DDR1 knockout mice, collagen mechanical reorganization was reduced >30%. Similarly, cultured cells with DDR1 knockdown or expressing kinase-deficient DDR1d showed 50% reduction of aligned collagen. Tractional remodeling of collagen was dependent on DDR1 clustering, activation, and interaction of the DDR1 C-terminal kinase domain with NMIIA filaments. Collagen remodeling by traction forces, DDR1 tyrosine phosphorylation, and myosin light chain phosphorylation were increased on stiff versus soft substrates. Thus, DDR1 clustering, activation, and interaction with NMIIA filaments enhance the collagen tractional remodeling that is important for collagen compaction in fibrosis.

  8. VMAT2 identified as a regulator of late-stage β-cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakano, Daisuke; Shiraki, Nobuaki; Kikawa, Kazuhide; Yamazoe, Taiji; Kataoka, Masateru; Umeda, Kahoko; Araki, Kimi; Mao, Di; Matsumoto, Shirou; Nakagata, Naomi; Andersson, Olov; Stainier, Didier; Endo, Fumio; Kume, Kazuhiko; Uesugi, Motonari; Kume, Shoen

    2014-02-01

    Cell replacement therapy for diabetes mellitus requires cost-effective generation of high-quality, insulin-producing, pancreatic β cells from pluripotent stem cells. Development of this technique has been hampered by a lack of knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying β-cell differentiation. The present study identified reserpine and tetrabenazine (TBZ), both vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) inhibitors, as promoters of late-stage differentiation of Pdx1-positive pancreatic progenitor cells into Neurog3 (referred to henceforth as Ngn3)-positive endocrine precursors. VMAT2-controlled monoamines, such as dopamine, histamine and serotonin, negatively regulated β-cell differentiation. Reserpine or TBZ acted additively with dibutyryl adenosine 3',5'-cyclic AMP, a cell-permeable cAMP analog, to potentiate differentiation of embryonic stem (ES) cells into β cells that exhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. When ES cell-derived β cells were transplanted into AKITA diabetic mice, the cells reversed hyperglycemia. Our protocol provides a basis for the understanding of β-cell differentiation and its application to a cost-effective production of functional β cells for cell therapy.

  9. Ursolic acid mediates photosensitization by initiating mitochondrial-dependent apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yuan-Hao; Wang, Exing; Kumar, Neeru; Glickman, Randolph D.

    2013-02-01

    The signaling pathways PI3K/Akt and MAPK play key roles in transcription, translation and carcinogenesis, and may be activated by light exposure. These pathways may be modulated or inhibited by naturally-occurring compounds, such as the triterpenoid, ursolic acid (UA). Previously, the transcription factors p53 and NF-kB, which transactivate mitochondrial apoptosis-related genes, were shown to be differentially modulated by UA. Our current work indicates that UA causes these effects via the mTOR and insulin-mediated pathways. UA-modulated apoptosis, following exposure to UV radiation, is observed to correspond to differential levels of oxidative stress in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) and skin melanoma (SM) cells. Flow cytometry analysis, DHE (dihydroethidium) staining and membrane permeability assay showed that UA pretreatment potentiated cell cycle arrest and radiation-induced apoptosis selectively on SM cells while DNA photo-oxidative damage (i.e. strand breakage) was reduced, presumably by some antioxidant activity of UA in RPE cells. The UA-mediated NF-κB activation in SM cells was reduced by rapamycin pretreatment, which indicates that these agents exert inter-antagonistic effects in the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway. In contrast, the antagonistic effect of UA on the PI3K/Akt pathway was reversed by insulin leading to greater NF-κB and p53 activation in RPE cells. MitoTracker, a mitochondrial functional assay, indicated that mitochondria in RPE cells experienced reduced oxidative stress while those in SM cells exhibited increased oxidative stress upon UA pretreatment. When rapamycin administration was followed by UA, mitochondrial oxidative stress was increased in RPE cells but decreased in SM cells. These results indicate that UA modulates p53 and NF-κB, initiating a mitogenic response to radiation that triggers mitochondria-dependent apoptosis.

  10. Application of cultured human mast cells (CHMC) for the design and structure-activity relationship of IgE-mediated mast cell activation inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argade, Ankush; Bhamidipati, Somasekhar; Li, Hui; Carroll, David; Clough, Jeffrey; Keim, Holger; Sylvain, Catherine; Rossi, Alexander B; Coquilla, Christina; Issakani, Sarkiz D; Masuda, Esteban S; Payan, Donald G; Singh, Rajinder

    2015-01-01

    Here we report the optimization of small molecule inhibitors of human mast cell degranulation via anti-IgE-mediated tryptase release following cross-linking and activation of IgE-loaded FcεR1 receptors. The compounds are selective upstream inhibitors of FcεR1-dependent human mast cell degranulation and proved to be devoid of activity in downstream ionomycin mediated degranulation. Structure-activity relationship (SAR) leading to compound 26 is outlined. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Isotopic depletion with Monte Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, W.R.; Rathkopf, J.A.

    1996-06-01

    This work considers a method to deplete isotopes during a time- dependent Monte Carlo simulation of an evolving system. The method is based on explicitly combining a conventional estimator for the scalar flux with the analytical solutions to the isotopic depletion equations. There are no auxiliary calculations; the method is an integral part of the Monte Carlo calculation. The method eliminates negative densities and reduces the variance in the estimates for the isotope densities, compared to existing methods. Moreover, existing methods are shown to be special cases of the general method described in this work, as they can be derived by combining a high variance estimator for the scalar flux with a low-order approximation to the analytical solution to the depletion equation

  12. Vivo-morpholinos induced transient knockdown of physical activity related proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Ferguson

    Full Text Available Physical activity is associated with disease prevention and overall wellbeing. Additionally there has been evidence that physical activity level is a result of genetic influence. However, there has not been a reliable method to silence candidate genes in vivo to determine causal mechanisms of physical activity regulation. Vivo-morpholinos are a potential method to transiently silence specific genes. Thus, the aim of this study was to validate the use of Vivo-morpholinos in a mouse model for voluntary physical activity with several sub-objectives. We observed that Vivo-morpholinos achieved between 60-97% knockdown of Drd1-, Vmat2-, and Glut4-protein in skeletal muscle, the delivery moiety of Vivo-morpholinos (scramble did not influence physical activity and that a cocktail of multiple Vivo-morpholinos can be given in a single treatment to achieve protein knockdown of two different targeted proteins in skeletal muscle simultaneously. Knocking down Drd1, Vmat2, or Glut4 protein in skeletal muscle did not affect physical activity. Vivo-morpholinos injected intravenously alone did not significantly knockdown Vmat2-protein expression in the brain (p = 0.28. However, the use of a bradykinin analog to increase blood-brain-barrier permeability in conjunction with the Vivo-morpholinos significantly (p = 0.0001 decreased Vmat2-protein in the brain with a corresponding later over-expression of Vmat2 coincident with a significant (p = 0.0016 increase in physical activity. We conclude that Vivo-morpholinos can be a valuable tool in determining causal gene-phenotype relationships in whole animal models.

  13. Transforming growth factor beta-activated kinase 1 (TAK1)-dependent checkpoint in the survival of dendritic cells promotes immune homeostasis and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanyan; Huang, Gonghua; Vogel, Peter; Neale, Geoffrey; Reizis, Boris; Chi, Hongbo

    2012-02-07

    Homeostatic control of dendritic cell (DC) survival is crucial for adaptive immunity, but the molecular mechanism is not well defined. Moreover, how DCs influence immune homeostasis under steady state remains unclear. Combining DC-specific and -inducible deletion systems, we report that transforming growth factor beta-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is an essential regulator of DC survival and immune system homeostasis and function. Deficiency of TAK1 in CD11c(+) cells induced markedly elevated apoptosis, leading to the depletion of DC populations, especially the CD8(+) and CD103(+) DC subsets in lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues, respectively. TAK1 also contributed to DC development by promoting the generation of DC precursors. Prosurvival signals from Toll-like receptors, CD40 and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) are integrated by TAK1 in DCs, which in turn mediated activation of downstream NF-κB and AKT-Foxo pathways and established a gene-expression program. TAK1 deficiency in DCs caused a myeloid proliferative disorder characterized by expansion of neutrophils and inflammatory monocytes, disrupted T-cell homeostasis, and prevented effective T-cell priming and generation of regulatory T cells. Moreover, TAK1 signaling in DCs was required to prevent myeloid proliferation even in the absence of lymphocytes, indicating a previously unappreciated regulatory mechanism of DC-mediated control of myeloid cell-dependent inflammation. Therefore, TAK1 orchestrates a prosurvival checkpoint in DCs that affects the homeostasis and function of the immune system.

  14. Commissioning and quality assurance for VMAT delivery systems: An efficient time-resolved system using real-time EPID imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwan, Benjamin J; Barnes, Michael P; Hindmarsh, Jonathan; Lim, Seng B; Lovelock, Dale M; Fuangrod, Todsaporn; O'Connor, Daryl J; Keall, Paul J; Greer, Peter B

    2017-08-01

    speed exhibited less profile stability. MLC positional accuracy was not observed to be dependent on the degree of interdigitation. MLC speed was measured for each individual leaf and slower leaf speeds were shown to be compensated for by lower dose rates. The test procedures were found to be sensitive to 1 mm systematic MLC errors, 1 mm random MLC errors, 0.4 mm MLC gap errors and synchronization errors between the MLC, dose rate and gantry angle controls systems of 1°. In general, parameters measured by both EPID and log files agreed with the plan, however, a greater average departure from the plan was evidenced by the EPID measurements. QA test plans and analysis methods have been developed to assess the performance of each dynamic component of VMAT deliveries individually and as a function of gantry angle. This methodology relies solely on time-resolved EPID imaging without the presence of a phantom and has been shown to be sensitive to a range of delivery errors. The procedures developed in this work are both comprehensive and time-efficient and can be used for streamlined commissioning and QA of VMAT delivery systems. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  15. Prostaglandin E2 EP2 and EP4 receptor activation mediates cAMP-dependent hyperpolarization and exocytosis of renin in juxtaglomerular cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Ulla Glenert; Stubbe, Jane; Uhrenholt, Torben Rene

    2005-01-01

    /l), AE1-259-01 (1 nmol/l), EP4-selective agonist AE1-329 (1 nmol/l), and IP agonist iloprost (1 micromol/l) significantly increased C(m) mediated by PKA. The EP4 antagonist AE3-208 (10 nmol/l) blocked the effect of EP4 agonist but did not alter the response to PGE(2). Application of both EP4 antagonist....... The membrane potential hyperpolarized significantly after PGE(2), butaprost, AE1-329 and AE1-259 and outward current was augmented in a PKA-dependent fashion. PGE(2)-stimulated outward current, but not C(m) change, was abolished by the BK(Ca) channel inhibitor iberiotoxin (300 nmol/l). EP2 and EP4 m......RNA was detected in sampled JG cells, and the preglomerular and glomerular vasculature was immunopositive for EP4. Thus IP, EP2, and EP4 receptors are associated with JG cells, and their activation leads to rapid PKA-mediated exocytotic fusion and release of renin granules....

  16. Poster — Thur Eve — 65: A dosimetric comparison of isocentric and non-isocentric coplanar SBRT VMAT plans for peripheral lung tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conroy, L; Liu, HW; Lau, H; Smith, WL

    2014-01-01

    Volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivers lung sterotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in shorter treatment time and less monitor units with comparable coverage and organ at risk sparing compared to conventional SBRT treatments. Isocentric VMAT treatment of peripheral lung tumours occasionally requires couch shifts that can inhibit 360° gantry rotation, resulting in additional imaging shifts for each treatment session, and increased potential for involuntary in-fraction motion. Here, we investigate whether non-isocentric VMAT plans can achieve comparable plan quality to isocentric plans for peripheral lung tumours. Three patient plans were selected with targets displaced > 8.5 cm (range: 8.8 – 9.9 cm) laterally from patient midline. For each patient, a plan with isocentre placed within the target volume (isocentric plan) was created and optimized. The same optimization parameters were then used to create a plan with the isocentre at patient midline (non-isocentric plan). Plan quality was evaluated and compared based on planning target volume (PTV) coverage, high dose spillage, dose homogeneity, intermediate dose spillage, dose fall-off gradient, and organ at risk contraints. Non-isocentric plans of equivalent plan quality to isocentric plans were achieved for all patients by optimizing collimator rotations. Field isocentres can be placed at patient midline, as opposed to inside the target volume, with no significant degradation in VMAT plan quality for lateral tumour displacements up to 10 cm. Non-isocentric treatment of peripheral lung tumours could result in decreased overall treatment session time and eliminate the need for imaging shifts prior to VMAT treatment

  17. Implementation of respiratory-gated VMAT on a Versa HD linear accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Jeffrey E; Flynn, Ryan T; Hyer, Daniel E

    2017-09-01

    The accurate delivery of respiratory-gated volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) treatment plans presents a challenge since the gantry rotation and collimator leaves must be repeatedly stopped and set into motion during each breathing cycle. In this study, we present the commissioning process for an Anzai gating system (AZ-733VI) on an Elekta Versa HD linear accelerator and make recommendations for successful clinical implementation. The commissioning tests include central axis dose consistency, profile consistency, gating beam-on/off delay, and comparison of gated versus nongated gamma pass rates for patient-specific quality assurance using four clinically commissioned photon energies: 6 MV, 6 FFF, 10 MV, and 10 FFF. The central axis dose constancy between gated and nongated deliveries was within 0.6% for all energies and the analysis of open field profiles for gated and nongated deliveries showed an agreement of 97.8% or greater when evaluated with a percent difference criteria of 1%. The measurement of the beam-on/off delay was done by evaluating images of a moving ball-bearing phantom triggered by the gating system and average beam-on delays of 0.22-0.29 s were observed. No measurable beam-off delay was present. Measurements of gated VMAT dose distributions resulted in decrements as high as 9% in the gamma passing rate as compared to nongated deliveries when evaluated against the planned dose distribution at 3%/3 mm. By decreasing the dose rate, which decreases the gantry speed during gated delivery, the gamma passing rates of gated and nongated treatments can be made equivalent. We present an empirically derived formula to limit the maximum dose rate during VMAT deliveries and show that by implementing a reduced dose rate, a gamma passing rate of greater than 95% (3%/3 mm) was obtained for all plan measurements. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Association of

  18. Chk1 inhibition activates p53 through p38 MAPK in tetraploid cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, Ilio; Senovilla, Laura; Galluzzi, Lorenzo; Criollo, Alfredo; Vivet, Sonia; Castedo, Maria; Kroemer, Guido

    2008-07-01

    We have previously shown that tetraploid cancer cells succumb through a p53-dependent apoptotic pathway when checkpoint kinase 1 (Chk1) is depleted by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) or inhibited with 7-hydroxystaurosporine (UCN-01). Here, we demonstrate that Chk1 inhibition results in the activating phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK). Depletion of p38 MAPK by transfection with a siRNA targeting the alpha isoform of p38 MAPK (p38alpha MAPK) abolishes the phosphorylation of p53 on serines 15 and 46 that is induced by Chk1 knockdown. The siRNA-mediated downregulation and pharmacological inhibition of p38alpha MAPK (with SB 203580) also reduces cell death induced by Chk1 knockdown or UCN-01. These results underscore the role of p38 MAPK as a pro-apoptotic kinase in the p53-dependant pathway for the therapeutic elimination of polyploidy cells.

  19. SU-F-T-442: Dose Distribution Comparison for Post-Laryngectomy Stoma Area Between Conventional AP and VMAT Plans with Or Without Bolus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, B [University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zhang, J; Cho-Lim, J [VA Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); University of California, Irvine, Orange, CA (United States); Leu, M [VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Inouye, W [VA Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); Lorentz, W [University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Lee, S [University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); VA Long Beach Healthcare System, Long Beach, CA (United States); VA Greater Los Angeles Healthcare System, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To compare dose distributions of conventional AP vs. VMAT treatment plans with or without bolus around post-laryngectomy stoma. Methods: Radiation dose coverage for post-laryngectomy stoma was analyzed using a set of real-case CT-simulation images. After meticulous contouring of the catheter cuff, stoma lumen, peri-stoma skin and subclinical tumor bed at the larynx, the resulting dosimetry plans were analyzed with or without a 5 mm bolus placement. Wet gauze was used to minimize the effect of any air gap. Four plans were generated: AP superclavicular (SCV) plan with or without bolus, and VMAT plan with or without bolus. A dose of 60Gy in 30 fractions was prescribed at 3 cm depth for AP SCV plan, and to 95% of the PTV volume for VMAT plan. Results: For the conventional AP SCV plan, the peri-stoma skin dose is sensitive to bolus placement as well as air gap compensation by wetted gauze (V95% of 20.7%, 33.0% and 94.8% for no bolus, bolus without and with air gap compensation, respectively). For stoma lumen, the dose drops off rapidly in depth. The catheter cuff may have certain dose-buildup effect, but air gap around it and under the bolus placed can pose a more serious problem. The dose distributions of the two VMAT plans are moderately different for peri-stoma skin (V95% of 95.0% with bolus and air gap compensation, and 82.3% without bolus), but nearly identical for stoma lumen (V95% of 91.5% and 92.0%, respectively). VMAT allows beamlets with different angles of incidence that helped achieve such dose distribution around the stoma even without bolus placement. Conclusion: Overall, the dose coverage around the stoma in the VMAT plan is better than the conventional AP SCV plan. To achieve optimal dose distribution, it is still recommended to place physical bolus and reduce the air gaps.

  20. Experience-Dependent Equilibration of AMPAR-Mediated Synaptic Transmission during the Critical Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Seok Han

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Experience-dependent synapse refinement is essential for functional optimization of neural circuits. However, how sensory experience sculpts excitatory synaptic transmission is poorly understood. Here, we show that despite substantial remodeling of synaptic connectivity, AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission remains at equilibrium during the critical period in the mouse primary visual cortex. The maintenance of this equilibrium requires neurogranin (Ng, a postsynaptic calmodulin-binding protein important for synaptic plasticity. With normal visual experience, loss of Ng decreased AMPAR-positive synapse numbers, prevented AMPAR-silent synapse maturation, and increased spine elimination. Importantly, visual deprivation halted synapse loss caused by loss of Ng, revealing that Ng coordinates experience-dependent AMPAR-silent synapse conversion to AMPAR-active synapses and synapse elimination. Loss of Ng also led to sensitized long-term synaptic depression (LTD and impaired visually guided behavior. Our synaptic interrogation reveals that experience-dependent coordination of AMPAR-silent synapse conversion and synapse elimination hinges upon Ng-dependent mechanisms for constructive synaptic refinement during the critical period.

  1. Self-Control Strength Depletion Reduces Self-Efficacy and Impairs Exercise Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Jeffrey D; Bray, Steven R

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of task self-efficacy as a psychological factor involved in the relationship between self-control depletion and physical endurance. Participants (N = 37) completed two isometric handgrip endurance trials, separated by a Stroop task, which was either congruent (control) or incongruent (causing depletion). Task self-efficacy for the second endurance trial was measured following the Stroop task. Participants in the depletion condition reported lower task self-efficacy and showed a greater reduction in performance on the second endurance trial when compared with controls. Task self-efficacy also mediated the relationship between self-control depletion and endurance performance. The results of this study provide evidence that task self-efficacy is negatively affected following self-control depletion. We recommend that task self-efficacy be further investigated as a psychological factor accounting for the negative change in self-control performance of physical endurance and sport tasks following self-control strength depletion.

  2. Examining depletion theories under conditions of within-task transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Gene A; Lau, Kevin K H; Wingert, Kimberly M; Ball, B Hunter; Blais, Chris

    2017-07-01

    In everyday life, mental fatigue can be detrimental across many domains including driving, learning, and working. Given the importance of understanding and accounting for the deleterious effects of mental fatigue on behavior, a growing body of literature has studied the role of motivational and executive control processes in mental fatigue. In typical laboratory paradigms, participants complete a task that places demand on these self-control processes and are later given a subsequent task. Generally speaking, decrements to subsequent task performance are taken as evidence that the initial task created mental fatigue through the continued engagement of motivational and executive functions. Several models have been developed to account for negative transfer resulting from this "ego depletion." In the current study, we provide a brief literature review, specify current theoretical approaches to ego-depletion, and report an empirical test of current models of depletion. Across 4 experiments we found minimal evidence for executive control depletion along with strong evidence for motivation mediated ego depletion. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. A Requirement for ZAK Kinase Activity in Canonical TGF-β Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Nyati

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The sterile alpha motif and leucine zipper containing kinase ZAK (AZK, MLT, MLK7, is a MAPK-kinase kinase (MKKK. Like most MAPKKKs which are known to activate the c-Jun. amino-terminal kinase (JNK pathway, ZAK has been shown to participate in the transduction of Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β-mediated non-canonical signaling. A role for ZAK in SMAD-dependent, canonical TGF-β signaling has not been previously appreciated. Using a combination of functional genomics and biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that ZAK regulates canonical TGFβRI/II signaling in lung and breast cancer cell lines and may serve as a key node in the regulation of TGFBR kinase activity. Remarkably, we demonstrate that siRNA mediated depletion of ZAK strongly inhibited TGF-β dependent SMAD2/3 activation and subsequent promoter activation (SMAD binding element driven luciferase expression; SBE4-Luc. A ZAK specific inhibitor (DHP-2, dose-dependently activated the bioluminescent TGFBR-kinase activity reporter (BTR, blocked TGF-β induced SMAD2/3 phosphorylation and SBE4-Luc activation and cancer cell-invasion. In aggregate, these findings identify a novel role for the ZAK kinase in canonical TGF-β signaling and an invasive cancer cell phenotype thus providing a novel target for TGF-β inhibition.

  4. A critical role of CDKN3 in Bcr-Abl-mediated tumorigenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghuang Chen

    Full Text Available CDKN3 (cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 3, a dual specificity protein phosphatase, dephosphorylates cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs and thus functions as a key negative regulator of cell cycle progression. Deregulation or mutations of CDNK3 have been implicated in various cancers. However, the role of CDKN3 in Bcr-Abl-mediated chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML remains unknown. Here we found that CDKN3 acts as a tumor suppressor in Bcr-Abl-mediated leukemogenesis. Overexpression of CDKN3 sensitized the K562 leukemic cells to imanitib-induced apoptosis and dramatically inhibited K562 xenografted tumor growth in nude mouse model. Ectopic expression of CDKN3 significantly reduced the efficiency of Bcr-Abl-mediated transformation of FDCP1 cells to growth factor independence. In contrast, depletion of CDKN3 expression conferred resistance to imatinib-induced apoptosis in the leukemic cells and accelerated the growth of xenograph leukemia in mice. In addition, we found that CDKN3 mutant (CDKN3-C140S devoid of the phosphatase activity failed to affect the K562 leukemic cell survival and xenografted tumor growth, suggesting that the phosphatase of CDKN3 was required for its tumor suppressor function. Furthermore, we observed that overexpression of CDKN3 reduced the leukemic cell survival by dephosphorylating CDK2, thereby inhibiting CDK2-dependent XIAP expression. Moreover, overexpression of CDKN3 delayed G1/S transition in K562 leukemic cells. Our results highlight the importance of CDKN3 in Bcr-Abl-mediated leukemogenesis, and provide new insights into diagnostics and therapeutics of the leukemia.

  5. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase by kainic acid mediates brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression through a NF-kappaB dependent mechanism in C6 glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Hana; Oh, Young Taek; Lee, Jung Yeon; Choi, Ji Hyun; Lee, Ju Hie; Baik, Hyung Hwan; Kim, Sung Soo; Choe, Wonchae; Yoon, Kyung-Sik; Ha, Joohun; Kang, Insug

    2008-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a key regulator of energy homeostasis. Kainic acid (KA), a prototype excitotoxin is known to induce brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in brain. In this study, we examined the role of AMPK in KA-induced BDNF expression in C6 glioma cells. We showed that KA and KA receptor agonist induced activation of AMPK and KA-induced AMPK activation was blocked by inhibition of Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CaMKK) β. We then showed that inhibition of AMPK by compound C, a selective inhibitor of AMPK, or small interfering RNA of AMPKα1 blocked KA-induced BDNF mRNA and protein expression. Inhibition of AMPK blocked KA-induced phosphorylation of CaMKII and I kappaB kinase (IKK) in C6 cells. Finally, we showed that inhibition of AMPK reduced DNA binding and transcriptional activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) in KA-treated cells. These results suggest that AMPK mediates KA-induced BDNF expression by regulating NF-κB activation

  6. Induction of osteoblast differentiation by selective activation of kinase-mediated actions of the estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kousteni, Stavroula; Almeida, Maria; Han, Li; Bellido, Teresita; Jilka, Robert L; Manolagas, Stavros C

    2007-02-01

    Estrogens control gene transcription by cis or trans interactions of the estrogen receptor (ER) with target DNA or via the activation of cytoplasmic kinases. We report that selective activation of kinase-mediated actions of the ER with 4-estren-3alpha,17beta-diol (estren) or an estradiol-dendrimer conjugate, each a synthetic compound that stimulates kinase-mediated ER actions 1,000 to 10,000 times more potently than direct DNA interactions, induced osteoblastic differentiation in established cell lines of uncommitted osteoblast precursors and primary cultures of osteoblast progenitors by stimulating Wnt and BMP-2 signaling in a kinase-dependent manner. In sharp contrast, 17beta-estradiol (E(2)) suppressed BMP-2-induced osteoblast progenitor commitment and differentiation. Consistent with the in vitro findings, estren, but not E(2), stimulated Wnt/beta-catenin-mediated transcription in T-cell factor-lacZ transgenic mice. Moreover, E(2) stimulated BMP signaling in mice in which ERalpha lacks DNA binding activity and classical estrogen response element-mediated transcription (ERalpha(NERKI/-)) but not in wild-type controls. This evidence reveals for the first time the existence of a large signalosome in which inputs from the ER, kinases, bone morphogenetic proteins, and Wnt signaling converge to induce differentiation of osteoblast precursors. ER can either induce it or repress it, depending on whether the activating ligand (and presumably the resulting conformation of the receptor protein) precludes or accommodates ERE-mediated transcription.

  7. Human Mediator Enhances Activator-Facilitated Recruitment of RNA Polymerase II and Promoter Recognition by TATA-Binding Protein (TBP) Independently of TBP-Associated Factors

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Shwu-Yuan; Zhou, Tianyuan; Chiang, Cheng-Ming

    2003-01-01

    Mediator is a general cofactor implicated in the functions of many transcriptional activators. Although Mediator with different protein compositions has been isolated, it remains unclear how Mediator facilitates activator-dependent transcription, independent of its general stimulation of basal transcription. To define the mechanisms of Mediator function, we isolated two forms of human Mediator complexes (Mediator-P.5 and Mediator-P.85) and demonstrated that Mediator-P.5 clearly functions by e...

  8. CD47 limits antibody dependent phagocytosis against non-malignant B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Sandra; Turman, Sean; Lekstrom, Kristen; Wilson, Susan; Herbst, Ronald; Wang, Yue

    2017-05-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the importance of CD47 in protecting malignant B cells from antibody dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP). Combined treatment of anti-CD47 and -CD20 antibodies synergistically augment elimination of tumor B cells in xenograft mouse models. This has led to the development of novel reagents that can potentially enhance killing of malignant B cells in patients. B cell depleting therapy is also a promising treatment for autoimmune patients. In the current study, we aimed to investigate whether or not CD47 protects non-malignant B cells from ADCP. We show that CD47 is expressed on all B cells in mice, with the highest level on plasma cells in bone marrow and spleen. Although its expression is dispensable for B cell development in mice, CD47 on B cells limits antibody mediated phagocytosis. B cell depletion following in vivo anti-CD19 treatment is more efficient in CD47-/- mice than in wild type mice. In vitro, both naïve and activated B cells from CD47-/- mice are more sensitive to ADCP than wild type B cells. Lastly, we show in an ADCP assay that blocking CD47 can enhance anti-CD19 antibody mediated phagocytosis of wild type B cells. These results suggest that in addition to its already demonstrated benefit in cancer, targeting CD47 may be used as an adjunct in combination with B cell depletion antibodies for treatment of autoimmune diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Oncogenic exon 2 mutations in Mediator subunit MED12 disrupt allosteric activation of cyclin C-CDK8/19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Min Ju; Shen, Hailian; Spaeth, Jason M; Tolvanen, Jaana H; Failor, Courtney; Knudtson, Jennifer F; McLaughlin, Jessica; Halder, Sunil K; Yang, Qiwei; Bulun, Serdar E; Al-Hendy, Ayman; Schenken, Robert S; Aaltonen, Lauri A; Boyer, Thomas G

    2018-03-30

    Somatic mutations in exon 2 of the RNA polymerase II transcriptional Mediator subunit MED12 occur at high frequency in uterine fibroids (UFs) and breast fibroepithelial tumors as well as recurrently, albeit less frequently, in malignant uterine leimyosarcomas, chronic lymphocytic leukemias, and colorectal cancers. Previously, we reported that UF-linked mutations in MED12 disrupt its ability to activate cyclin C (CycC)-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) in Mediator, implicating impaired Mediator-associated CDK8 activity in the molecular pathogenesis of these clinically significant lesions. Notably, the CDK8 paralog CDK19 is also expressed in myometrium, and both CDK8 and CDK19 assemble into Mediator in a mutually exclusive manner, suggesting that CDK19 activity may also be germane to the pathogenesis of MED12 mutation-induced UFs. However, whether and how UF-linked mutations in MED12 affect CDK19 activation is unknown. Herein, we show that MED12 allosterically activates CDK19 and that UF-linked exon 2 mutations in MED12 disrupt its CDK19 stimulatory activity. Furthermore, we find that within the Mediator kinase module, MED13 directly binds to the MED12 C terminus, thereby suppressing an apparent UF mutation-induced conformational change in MED12 that otherwise disrupts its association with CycC-CDK8/19. Thus, in the presence of MED13, mutant MED12 can bind, but cannot activate, CycC-CDK8/19. These findings indicate that MED12 binding is necessary but not sufficient for CycC-CDK8/19 activation and reveal an additional step in the MED12-dependent activation process, one critically dependent on MED12 residues altered by UF-linked exon 2 mutations. These findings confirm that UF-linked mutations in MED12 disrupt composite Mediator-associated kinase activity and identify CDK8/19 as prospective therapeutic targets in UFs. © 2018 Park et al.

  10. The role of serotonin in personality inference: tryptophan depletion impairs the identification of neuroticism in the face.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Robert; Sreenivas, Shubha; Read, Judi; Saunders, Kate E A; Rogers, Robert D

    2017-07-01

    Serotonergic mechanisms mediate the expression of personality traits (such as impulsivity, aggression and anxiety) that are linked to vulnerability to psychological illnesses, and modulate the identification of emotional expressions in the face as well as learning about broader classes of appetitive and aversive signals. Faces with neutral expressions signal a variety of socially relevant information, such that inferences about the big five personality traits, including Neuroticism, Extraversion and Agreeableness, can be accurately made on the basis of emotionally neutral facial photographs. Given the close link between Neuroticism and psychological distress, we investigated the effects of diminished central serotonin activity (achieved by tryptophan depletion) upon the accuracy of 52 healthy (non-clinical) adults' discriminations of personality from facial characteristics. All participants were able to discriminate reliably four of the big five traits. However, the tryptophan-depleted participants were specifically less accurate in discriminating Neuroticism than the matched non-depleted participants. These data suggest that central serotonin activity modulates the identification of not only negative facial emotional expression but also a broader class of signals about personality characteristics linked to psychological distress.

  11. Implementation of IMRT and VMAT using Delta4 phantom and portal dosimetry as dosimetry verification tools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daci, Lulzime, E-mail: lulzime.daci@nodlandssykehuset.no [Nordland Hospital Trust, Bodø (Norway); Malkaj, Partizan, E-mail: malkaj-p@hotmail.com [Faculty of Mathematics Engineering and Physics Engineering, Polytechnic University of Tirana (Albania)

    2016-03-25

    In this study we analyzed and compared the dose distribution of different IMRT and VMAT plans with the intent to provide pre-treatment quality assurance using two different tools. Materials/Methods: We have used the electronic portal imaging device EPID after calibration to dose and correction for the background offset signal and also the Delta4 phantom after en evaluation of angular sensitivity. The Delta4 phantom has a two-dimensional array with ionization chambers. We analyzed three plans for each anatomical site calculated by Eclipse treatment planning system. The measurements were analyzed using γ-evaluation method with passing criteria 3% absolute dose and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA). For all the plans the range of score has been from 97% to 99% for gantry fixed at 0° while for rotational planes there was a slightly decreased pass rates and above 95%. Point measurement with a ionization chamber were done in additional to see the accuracy of portal dosimetry and to evaluate the Delta4 device to various dose rates. Conclusions: Both Delt4 and Portal dosimetry shows good results between the measured and calculated doses. While Delta4 is more accurate in measurements EPID is more time efficient. We have decided to use both methods in the first steps of IMRT and VMAT implementation and later on to decide which of the tools to use depending on the complexity of plans, how much accurate we want to be and the time we have on the machine.

  12. Implementation of IMRT and VMAT using Delta4 phantom and portal dosimetry as dosimetry verification tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daci, Lulzime; Malkaj, Partizan

    2016-01-01

    In this study we analyzed and compared the dose distribution of different IMRT and VMAT plans with the intent to provide pre-treatment quality assurance using two different tools. Materials/Methods: We have used the electronic portal imaging device EPID after calibration to dose and correction for the background offset signal and also the Delta4 phantom after en evaluation of angular sensitivity. The Delta4 phantom has a two-dimensional array with ionization chambers. We analyzed three plans for each anatomical site calculated by Eclipse treatment planning system. The measurements were analyzed using γ-evaluation method with passing criteria 3% absolute dose and 3 mm distance to agreement (DTA). For all the plans the range of score has been from 97% to 99% for gantry fixed at 0° while for rotational planes there was a slightly decreased pass rates and above 95%. Point measurement with a ionization chamber were done in additional to see the accuracy of portal dosimetry and to evaluate the Delta4 device to various dose rates. Conclusions: Both Delt4 and Portal dosimetry shows good results between the measured and calculated doses. While Delta4 is more accurate in measurements EPID is more time efficient. We have decided to use both methods in the first steps of IMRT and VMAT implementation and later on to decide which of the tools to use depending on the complexity of plans, how much accurate we want to be and the time we have on the machine.

  13. First Experience With Real-Time EPID-Based Delivery Verification During IMRT and VMAT Sessions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodruff, Henry C.; Fuangrod, Todsaporn; Van Uytven, Eric; McCurdy, Boyd M.C.; Beek, Timothy van; Bhatia, Shashank; Greer, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Gantry-mounted megavoltage electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have become ubiquitous on linear accelerators. WatchDog is a novel application of EPIDs, in which the image frames acquired during treatment are used to monitor treatment delivery in real time. We report on the preliminary use of WatchDog in a prospective study of cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and identify the challenges of clinical adoption. Methods and Materials: At the time of submission, 28 cancer patients (head and neck, pelvis, and prostate) undergoing fractionated external beam radiation therapy (24 IMRT, 4 VMAT) had ≥1 treatment fraction verified in real time (131 fractions or 881 fields). EPID images acquired continuously during treatment were synchronized and compared with model-generated transit EPID images within a frame time (∼0.1 s). A χ comparison was performed to cumulative frames to gauge the overall delivery quality, and the resulting pass rates were reported graphically during treatment delivery. Every frame acquired (500-1500 per fraction) was saved for postprocessing and analysis. Results: The system reported the mean ± standard deviation in real time χ 91.1% ± 11.5% (83.6% ± 13.2%) for cumulative frame χ analysis with 4%, 4 mm (3%, 3 mm) criteria, global over the integrated image. Conclusions: A real-time EPID-based radiation delivery verification system for IMRT and VMAT has been demonstrated that aims to prevent major mistreatments in radiation therapy.

  14. First Experience With Real-Time EPID-Based Delivery Verification During IMRT and VMAT Sessions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodruff, Henry C., E-mail: henry.woodruff@newcastle.edu.au [Faculty of Science and Information Technology, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Fuangrod, Todsaporn [Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Van Uytven, Eric; McCurdy, Boyd M.C.; Beek, Timothy van [Division of Medical Physics, CancerCare Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Department of Radiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Bhatia, Shashank [Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Greer, Peter B. [Faculty of Science and Information Technology, School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, University of Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia); Department of Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle Hospital, Newcastle, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: Gantry-mounted megavoltage electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) have become ubiquitous on linear accelerators. WatchDog is a novel application of EPIDs, in which the image frames acquired during treatment are used to monitor treatment delivery in real time. We report on the preliminary use of WatchDog in a prospective study of cancer patients undergoing intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and identify the challenges of clinical adoption. Methods and Materials: At the time of submission, 28 cancer patients (head and neck, pelvis, and prostate) undergoing fractionated external beam radiation therapy (24 IMRT, 4 VMAT) had ≥1 treatment fraction verified in real time (131 fractions or 881 fields). EPID images acquired continuously during treatment were synchronized and compared with model-generated transit EPID images within a frame time (∼0.1 s). A χ comparison was performed to cumulative frames to gauge the overall delivery quality, and the resulting pass rates were reported graphically during treatment delivery. Every frame acquired (500-1500 per fraction) was saved for postprocessing and analysis. Results: The system reported the mean ± standard deviation in real time χ 91.1% ± 11.5% (83.6% ± 13.2%) for cumulative frame χ analysis with 4%, 4 mm (3%, 3 mm) criteria, global over the integrated image. Conclusions: A real-time EPID-based radiation delivery verification system for IMRT and VMAT has been demonstrated that aims to prevent major mistreatments in radiation therapy.

  15. Dosimetric Analysis of Unflattened (FFFB) and Flattened (FB) Photon Beam Energy for Gastric Cancers Using IMRT and VMAT-a Comparative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, Manindra; Yadav, Girigesh; Tripathi, Deepak; Kumar, Lalit; Kishore, Vimal; Dewan, Abhinav; Kumar, Gourav; Wahi, Inderjit Kaur; Gairola, Munish

    2018-03-08

    To evaluate the feasibility of flattening filter free beam (FFFB) for the treatment of gastric tumors and to review their benefits over 6MV flatten beam (6MV_FFB). Fifteen patients with histologically proven gastric carcinoma were selected. CT scans with slice thickness of 0.3 cm were acquired and planning target volume (PTV) and organ at risk (OAR) were delineated. Plans were made retrospectively for each patient for the prescription dose of 45 Gy/25 fractions to the PTV. Four isocentric plans were compared in the present study on Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA, USA). PTV D98% was 44.41 ± 0.12, 44.38 ± 0.13, 44.59 ± 0.14, and 44.49 ± 0.19 Gy for IMRT 6MV_FFB, IMRT 6MV_FFFB, VMAT 6MV_FFB, and VMAT 6MV_FFFB respectively. 6MV_FFFB beam minimizes the mean heart dose D mean (P = 0.001). VMAT dominates over IMRT when it came to kidney doses V 12Gy (P = 0.02), V 23Gy (P = 0.015), V 28Gy (P = 0.011), and D max (P < 0.01). VMAT has significantly reduced the doses to kidneys. It was analyzed that 6MV_FFFB significantly reduces the dose to normal tissues (P = 0.006 and P = 0.018). VMAT significantly reduces the TMU, which is required to deliver the similar dose by IMRT (P < 0.01). Unflattened beam spares the organs at risk significantly to avoid the chances of secondary malignancies and reduces the intra-fraction motion during treatment due to provision of higher dose rate. Hence, we conclude that 6MV unflattened beam can be used to treat gastric carcinoma.

  16. The tug-of-war between resource depletion and technological change in the global oil industry 1981-2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindholt, Lars

    2013-01-15

    We perform an empirical analysis of the extent to which ongoing technological change through RandD activity has offset the effect of ongoing depletion on the cost of finding additional reserves of oil in eight global regions. We introduce a finding cost function that among other factors depends on the cumulative number of past RandD expenses and cumulative past production, measuring technological change and depletion, respectively. For all our regions we find significant effects of both depletion and technological change on oil finding costs from 1981 to 2009, barring cyclical variations in finding costs that could come from changes in factor prices. For almost all regions technology more than mitigated depletion until around the mid-nineties. However, we find that depletion outweighed technological progress over the last decade.(author)

  17. Depletion of rat cortical norepinephrine and the inhibition of [3H]norepinephrine uptake by xylamine does not require monoamine oxidase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudley, M.W.

    1988-01-01

    Inhibition of monoamine oxidase A through pretreatment of rats with clorgyline or the pro-drug MDL 72,394 did not block the amine-depleting action of xylamine. Xylamine treatment resulted in a loss of approximately 60% of the control level of norepinephrine in the cerebral cortex. A 1-hr pretreatment, but not a 24-hr pretreatment, with the monoamine oxidase B inhibitor, L-deprenyl, prevented the depletion of norepinephrine by xylamine. In addition, pretreatment with MDL 72,974, a monoamine oxidase B inhibitor without amine-releasing or uptake - inhibiting effects, did not prevent cortical norepinephrine levels. Inhibition of monoamine oxidase by either MDL 72,974 or MDL 72,394 did not prevent the inhibition of [ 3 H]norepinephrine uptake into rat cortical synaptosomes by xylamine. These data indicate that monoamine oxidase does not mediate the amine-releasing or uptake inhibiting properties of xylamine. The protection afforded by L-deprenyl following a 1-hr pretreatment most probably was due to accumulation of its metabolite, L-amphetamine, which would inhibit the uptake carrier. A functional carrier is required for depletion since desipramine administered 1 hr prior to xylamine, was also able to prevent depletion of norepinephrine

  18. Role of oxidative stress in methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic toxicity mediated by protein kinase Cδ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Eun-Joo; Duong, Chu Xuan; Nguyen, Xuan-Khanh Thi; Li, Zhengyi; Bing, Guoying; Bach, Jae-Hyung; Park, Dae Hun; Nakayama, Keiichi; Ali, Syed F; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G; Cadet, Jean Lud; Nabeshima, Toshitaka; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2012-06-15

    This study examined the role of protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes in methamphetamine (MA)-induced dopaminergic toxicity. Multiple-dose administration of MA did not significantly alter PKCα, PKCβI, PKCβII, or PKCζ expression in the striatum, but did significantly increase PKCδ expression. Gö6976 (a co-inhibitor of PKCα and -β), hispidin (PKCβ inhibitor), and PKCζ pseudosubstrate inhibitor (PKCζ inhibitor) did not significantly alter MA-induced behavioral impairments. However, rottlerin (PKCδ inhibitor) significantly attenuated behavioral impairments in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, MA-induced behavioral impairments were not apparent in PKCδ knockout (-/-) mice. MA-induced oxidative stress (i.e., lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation) was significantly attenuated in rottlerin-treated mice and was not apparent in PKCδ (-/-) mice. Consistent with this, MA-induced apoptosis (i.e., terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling-positive apoptotic cells) was significantly attenuated in rottlerin-treated mice. Furthermore, MA-induced increases in the dopamine (DA) turnover rate and decreases in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity and the expression of TH, dopamine transporter (DAT), and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) were not significantly observed in rottlerin-treated or PKCδ (-/-) mice. Our results suggest that PKCδ gene expression is a key mediator of oxidative stress and dopaminergic damage induced by MA. Thus, inhibition of PKCδ may be a useful target for protection against MA-induced neurotoxicity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. In vivo imaging reveals rapid astrocyte depletion and axon damage in a model of neuromyelitis optica-related pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herwerth, Marina; Kalluri, Sudhakar Reddy; Srivastava, Rajneesh

    2016-01-01

    IgG autoantibodies against aquaporin-4 (AQP4), an astrocytic water channel. Antibodies against AQP4 can damage astrocytes via complement, but NMO histopathology also shows demyelination, and - importantly - axon injury, which may determine permanent deficits following NMO relapses. The dynamics...... antibodies in mice. RESULTS: We found that human AQP4 antibodies caused acute astrocyte depletion with initial oligodendrocyte survival. Within two hours of antibody application, we observed secondary axon injury in the form of progressive swellings. Astrocyte toxicity and axon damage were dependent on AQP4...... antibody concentration and complement, specifically C1q. INTERPRETATION: In vivo imaging of the spinal cord reveals the swift development of NMO-related acute axon injury following AQP4 antibody-mediated astrocyte depletion. This approach will be useful in studying the mechanisms underlying the spread...

  20. VMAT2 and Parkinson’s disease: harnessing the dopamine vesicle

    OpenAIRE

    Lohr, Kelly M; Miller, Gary W

    2014-01-01

    Despite a movement away from dopamine-focused Parkinson’s disease (PD) research, a recent surge of evidence now suggests that altered vesicular storage of dopamine may contribute to the demise of the nigral neurons in this disease. Human studies demonstrate that the vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2; SLC18A2) is dysfunctional in PD brain. Moreover, studies with transgenic mice suggest that there is an untapped reserve capacity of the dopamine vesicle that could be unbridled by increasi...

  1. Inhibiting fungal multidrug resistance by disrupting an activator-Mediator interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Joy L; Boeszoermenyi, Andras; Vale-Silva, Luis A; Torelli, Riccardo; Posteraro, Brunella; Sohn, Yoo-Jin; Ji, Fei; Gelev, Vladimir; Sanglard, Dominique; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Sadreyev, Ruslan I; Mukherjee, Goutam; Bhyravabhotla, Jayaram; Buhrlage, Sara J; Gray, Nathanael S; Wagner, Gerhard; Näär, Anders M; Arthanari, Haribabu

    2016-02-25

    Eukaryotic transcription activators stimulate the expression of specific sets of target genes through recruitment of co-activators such as the RNA polymerase II-interacting Mediator complex. Aberrant function of transcription activators has been implicated in several diseases. However, therapeutic targeting efforts have been hampered by a lack of detailed molecular knowledge of the mechanisms of gene activation by disease-associated transcription activators. We previously identified an activator-targeted three-helix bundle KIX domain in the human MED15 Mediator subunit that is structurally conserved in Gal11/Med15 Mediator subunits in fungi. The Gal11/Med15 KIX domain engages pleiotropic drug resistance transcription factor (Pdr1) orthologues, which are key regulators of the multidrug resistance pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in the clinically important human pathogen Candida glabrata. The prevalence of C. glabrata is rising, partly owing to its low intrinsic susceptibility to azoles, the most widely used antifungal agent. Drug-resistant clinical isolates of C. glabrata most commonly contain point mutations in Pdr1 that render it constitutively active, suggesting that this transcriptional activation pathway represents a linchpin in C. glabrata multidrug resistance. Here we perform sequential biochemical and in vivo high-throughput screens to identify small-molecule inhibitors of the interaction of the C. glabrata Pdr1 activation domain with the C. glabrata Gal11A KIX domain. The lead compound (iKIX1) inhibits Pdr1-dependent gene activation and re-sensitizes drug-resistant C. glabrata to azole antifungals in vitro and in animal models for disseminated and urinary tract C. glabrata infection. Determining the NMR structure of the C. glabrata Gal11A KIX domain provides a detailed understanding of the molecular mechanism of Pdr1 gene activation and multidrug resistance inhibition by iKIX1. We have demonstrated the feasibility of small-molecule targeting of a

  2. GABAergic activities control spike timing- and frequency-dependent long-term depression at hippocampal excitatory synapses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto Nishiyama

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available GABAergic interneuronal network activities in the hippocampus control a variety of neural functions, including learning and memory, by regulating θ and γ oscillations. How these GABAergic activities at pre- and post-synaptic sites of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells differentially contribute to synaptic function and plasticity during their repetitive pre- and post-synaptic spiking at θ and γ oscillations is largely unknown. We show here that activities mediated by postsynaptic GABAARs and presynaptic GABABRs determine, respectively, the spike timing- and frequency-dependence of activity-induced synaptic modifications at Schaffer collateral-CA1 excitatory synapses. We demonstrate that both feedforward and feedback GABAAR-mediated inhibition in the postsynaptic cell controls the spike timing-dependent long-term depression of excitatory inputs (“e-LTD” at the θ frequency. We also show that feedback postsynaptic inhibition specifically causes e-LTD of inputs that induce small postsynaptic currents (<70 pA with LTP timing, thus enforcing the requirement of cooperativity for induction of long-term potentiation at excitatory inputs (“e-LTP”. Furthermore, under spike-timing protocols that induce e-LTP and e-LTD at excitatory synapses, we observed parallel induction of LTP and LTD at inhibitory inputs (“i-LTP” and “i-LTD” to the same postsynaptic cells. Finally, we show that presynaptic GABABR-mediated inhibition plays a major role in the induction of frequency-dependent e-LTD at α and β frequencies. These observations demonstrate the critical influence of GABAergic interneuronal network activities in regulating the spike timing and frequency dependences of long-term synaptic modifications in the hippocampus.

  3. The interplay between SUCLA2, SUCLG2, and mitochondrial DNA depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, Chaya; Wang, Liya; Ostergaard, Elsebet

    2011-01-01

    SUCLA2-related mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion syndrome is a result of mutations in the β subunit of the ADP-dependent isoform of the Krebs cycle succinyl-CoA synthase (SCS). The mechanism of tissue specificity and mtDNA depletion is elusive but complementation by the GDP-dependent isoform en...

  4. Parasite-Mediated Degradation of Synthetic Ozonide Antimalarials Impacts In Vitro Antimalarial Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannangelo, Carlo; Stingelin, Lukas; Yang, Tuo; Tilley, Leann; Charman, Susan A; Creek, Darren J

    2018-03-01

    The peroxide bond of the artemisinins inspired the development of a class of fully synthetic 1,2,4-trioxolane-based antimalarials, collectively known as the ozonides. Similar to the artemisinins, heme-mediated degradation of the ozonides generates highly reactive radical species that are thought to mediate parasite killing by damaging critical parasite biomolecules. We examined the relationship between parasite dependent degradation and antimalarial activity for two ozonides, OZ277 (arterolane) and OZ439 (artefenomel), using a combination of in vitro drug stability and pulsed-exposure activity assays. Our results showed that drug degradation is parasite stage dependent and positively correlates with parasite load. Increasing trophozoite-stage parasitemia leads to substantially higher rates of degradation for both OZ277 and OZ439, and this is associated with a reduction in in vitro antimalarial activity. Under conditions of very high parasitemia (∼90%), OZ277 and OZ439 were rapidly degraded and completely devoid of activity in trophozoite-stage parasite cultures exposed to a 3-h drug pulse. This study highlights the impact of increasing parasite load on ozonide stability and in vitro antimalarial activity and should be considered when investigating the antimalarial mode of action of the ozonide antimalarials under conditions of high parasitemia. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. Mediatized Extreme Right Activism and Discourse

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Rikke Alberg

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of the German neo-fascist network The Immortals (Die Unsterblichen) who in 2011 performed a flash-mob disseminated on YouTube for the so- called ‘Become Immortal’ campaign. The street protest was designed for and adapted to the specific characteristics of online...... activism. It is a good example of how new contentious action repertoires in which online and street activism intertwine have also spread to extreme right groups. Despite its neo-fascist and extreme right content the ‘Become Immortal’ campaign serves as an illustrative case for the study of mediated...... and mediatized activism. In order to analyse of the protest form, the visual aesthetics and the discourse of ‘The Immortals’, the paper mobilises two concepts from media and communication studies: mediation and mediatization. It will be argued that that the current transformation of the extreme right: that is...

  6. Acrolein-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling is mediated by alkylation of thioredoxin reductase and thioredoxin 1☆☆☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Matthew J.; Spiess, Page C.; Hristova, Milena; Hondal, Robert J.; van der Vliet, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Cigarette smoking remains a major health concern worldwide, and many of the adverse effects of cigarette smoke (CS) can be attributed to its abundant electrophilic aldehydes, such as acrolein (2-propenal). Previous studies indicate that acrolein readily reacts with thioredoxin reductase 1 (TrxR1), a critical enzyme involved in regulation of thioredoxin (Trx)-mediated redox signaling, by alkylation at its selenocysteine (Sec) residue. Because alkylation of Sec within TrxR1 has significant implications for its enzymatic function, we explored the potential importance of TrxR1 alkylation in acrolein-induced activation or injury of bronchial epithelial cells. Exposure of human bronchial epithelial HBE1 cells to acrolein (1–30 μM) resulted in dose-dependent loss of TrxR thioredoxin reductase activity, which coincided with its alkylation, as determined by biotin hydrazide labeling, and was independent of initial GSH status. To test the involvement of TrxR1 in acrolein responses in HBE1 cells, we suppressed TrxR1 using siRNA silencing or augmented TrxR1 by cell supplementation with sodium selenite. Acrolein exposure of HBE1 cells induced dose-dependent activation of the MAP kinases, extracellular regulated1 kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38, and activation of JNK was markedly enhanced after selenite-mediated induction of TrxR1, and was associated with increased alkylation of TrxR1. Conversely, siRNA silencing of TrxR1 significantly suppressed the ability of acrolein to activate JNK, and also appeared to attenuate acrolein-dependent activation of ERK and p38. Alteration of initial TrxR1 levels by siRNA or selenite supplementation also affected initial Trx1 redox status and acrolein-mediated alkylation of Trx1, but did not significantly affect acrolein-mediated activation of HO-1 or cytotoxicity. Collectively, our findings indicate that alkylation of TrxR1 and/or Trx1 may contribute directly to acrolein-mediated activation of MAP kinases such as JNK

  7. Lithium potentiates GSK-3β activity by inhibiting phosphoinositide 3-kinase-mediated Akt phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian, Nie; Kanno, Takeshi; Jin, Yu; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Lithium suppresses Akt activity by reducing PI3K-mediated Akt phosphorylation. • Lithium enhances GSK-3β activity by reducing Akt-mediated GSK-3β phosphorylation. • Lithium suppresses GSK-3β activity through its direct inhibition. - Abstract: Accumulating evidence has pointed to the direct inhibitory action of lithium, an anti-depressant, on GSK-3β. The present study investigated further insight into lithium signaling pathways. In the cell-free assay Li 2 CO 3 significantly inhibited phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 at Ser473, but Li 2 CO 3 did not affect PI3K-mediated PI(3,4,5)P 3 production and 3-phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1)-mediated phosphorylation of Akt1 at Thr308. This indicates that lithium could enhance GSK-3β activity by suppressing Akt-mediated Ser9 phosphorylation of GSK-3β in association with inhibition of PI3K-mediated Akt activation. There was no direct effect of Li 2 CO 3 on Akt1-induced phosphorylation of GSK-3β at Ser9, but otherwise Li 2 CO 3 significantly reduced GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation of β-catenin at Ser33/37 and Thr41. This indicates that lithium directly inhibits GSK-3β in an Akt-independent manner. In rat hippocampal slices Li 2 CO 3 significantly inhibited phosphorylation of Akt1/2 at Ser473/474, GSK-3β at Ser9, and β-catenin at Ser33/37 and Thr41. Taken together, these results indicate that lithium exerts its potentiating and inhibiting bidirectional actions on GSK-3β activity

  8. Conditions for reliable time-resolved dosimetry of electronic portal imaging devices for fixed-gantry IMRT and VMAT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeo, Inhwan Jason; Patyal, Baldev; Mandapaka, Anant; Jung, Jae Won; Yi, Byong Yong; Kim, Jong Oh

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The continuous scanning mode of electronic portal imaging devices (EPID) that offers time-resolved information has been newly explored for verifying dynamic radiation deliveries. This study seeks to determine operating conditions (dose rate stability and time resolution) under which that mode can be used accurately for the time-resolved dosimetry of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) beams.Methods: The authors have designed the following test beams with variable beam holdoffs and dose rate regulations: a 10 × 10 cm open beam to serve as a reference beam; a sliding window (SW) beam utilizing the motion of a pair of multileaf collimator (MLC) leaves outside the 10 × 10 cm jaw; a step and shoot (SS) beam to move the pair in step; a volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) beam. The beams were designed in such a way that they all produce the same open beam output of 10 × 10 cm. Time-resolved ion chamber measurements at isocenter and time-resolved and integrating EPID measurements were performed for all beams. The time-resolved EPID measurements were evaluated through comparison with the ion chamber and integrating EPID measurements, as the latter are accepted procedures. For two-dimensional, time-resolved evaluation, a VMAT beam with an infield MLC travel was designed. Time-resolved EPID measurements and Monte Carlo calculations of such EPID dose images for this beam were performed and intercompared.Results: For IMRT beams (SW and SS), the authors found disagreement greater than 2%, caused by frame missing of the time-resolved mode. However, frame missing disappeared, yielding agreement better than 2%, when the dose rate of irradiation (and thus the frame acquisition rates) reached a stable and planned rate as the dose of irradiation was raised past certain thresholds (a minimum 12 s of irradiation per shoot used for SS IMRT). For VMAT, the authors found that dose rate does not affect the frame acquisition rate, thereby causing no frame missing

  9. Role of immune activation in CD4+ T-cell depletion in HIV-1 infected Indian patients.

    Science