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Sample records for activity spindle dynamics

  1. Aurora B suppresses microtubule dynamics and limits central spindle size by locally activating KIF4A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes Bastos, Ricardo; Gandhi, Sapan R.; Baron, Ryan D.; Gruneberg, Ulrike; Nigg, Erich A.

    2013-01-01

    Anaphase central spindle formation is controlled by the microtubule-stabilizing factor PRC1 and the kinesin KIF4A. We show that an MKlp2-dependent pool of Aurora B at the central spindle, rather than global Aurora B activity, regulates KIF4A accumulation at the central spindle. KIF4A phosphorylation by Aurora B stimulates the maximal microtubule-dependent ATPase activity of KIF4A and promotes its interaction with PRC1. In the presence of phosphorylated KIF4A, microtubules grew more slowly and showed long pauses in growth, resulting in the generation of shorter PRC1-stabilized microtubule overlaps in vitro. Cells expressing only mutant forms of KIF4A lacking the Aurora B phosphorylation site overextended the anaphase central spindle, demonstrating that this regulation is crucial for microtubule length control in vivo. Aurora B therefore ensures that suppression of microtubule dynamic instability by KIF4A is restricted to a specific subset of microtubules and thereby contributes to central spindle size control in anaphase. PMID:23940115

  2. Dynamic Response Analysis of Motorized Spindle System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li; LUO Yi-chao; XU Juan; XIAO Ru-feng; LI Xian-hui

    2013-01-01

    As to motorized spindle system, this paper builds a simplified 3D model of spindle and bearing, performs structure modal analysis, reveals its dynamic characteristics under the free model;furthermore, modifies bearing radial stiffness and number of model, and studies the change of modal parameters. On this basis, through the harmonic response analysis of the finite element model, dy-namic response characteristic caused by imbalance of monitored spindle system and law of vibration response to different amount of unbalance is analyzed.

  3. Measuring mitotic spindle dynamics in budding yeast

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    Plumb, Kemp

    In order to carry out its life cycle and produce viable progeny through cell division, a cell must successfully coordinate and execute a number of complex processes with high fidelity, in an environment dominated by thermal noise. One important example of such a process is the assembly and positioning of the mitotic spindle prior to chromosome segregation. The mitotic spindle is a modular structure composed of two spindle pole bodies, separated in space and spanned by filamentous proteins called microtubules, along which the genetic material of the cell is held. The spindle is responsible for alignment and subsequent segregation of chromosomes into two equal parts; proper spindle positioning and timing ensure that genetic material is appropriately divided amongst mother and daughter cells. In this thesis, I describe fluorescence confocal microscopy and automated image analysis algorithms, which I have used to observe and analyze the real space dynamics of the mitotic spindle in budding yeast. The software can locate structures in three spatial dimensions and track their movement in time. By selecting fluorescent proteins which specifically label the spindle poles and cell periphery, mitotic spindle dynamics have been measured in a coordinate system relevant to the cell division. I describe how I have characterised the accuracy and precision of the algorithms by simulating fluorescence data for both spindle poles and the budding yeast cell surface. In this thesis I also describe the construction of a microfluidic apparatus that allows for the measurement of long time-scale dynamics of individual cells and the development of a cell population. The tools developed in this thesis work will facilitate in-depth quantitative analysis of the non-equilibrium processes in living cells.

  4. Spindle alignment regulates the dynamic association of checkpoint proteins with yeast spindle pole bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Pereira, Gislene

    2009-01-01

    In many polarized cells, the accuracy of chromosome segregation depends on the correct positioning of the mitotic spindle. In budding yeast, the spindle positioning checkpoint (SPOC) delays mitotic exit when the anaphase spindle fails to extend toward the mother-daughter axis. However it remains to be established how spindle orientation is translated to SPOC components at the yeast spindle pole bodies (SPB). Here, we used photobleaching techniques to show that the dynamics with which Bub2-Bfa1 turned over at SPBs significantly increased upon SPOC activation. A version of Bfa1 that was stably associated with SPBs rendered the cells SPOC deficient without affecting other Bub2-Bfa1 functions, demonstrating the functional importance of regulating the dynamics of Bfa1 SPB association. In addition, we established that the SPOC kinase Kin4 is the major regulator of Bfa1 residence time at SPBs. We suggest that upon SPOC activation Bfa1-Bub2 spreads throughout the cytoplasm, thereby inhibiting mitotic exit.

  5. Simplified Dynamic Analysis of Grinders Spindle Node

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    Demec, Peter

    2014-12-01

    The contribution deals with the simplified dynamic analysis of surface grinding machine spindle node. Dynamic analysis is based on the use of the transfer matrix method, which is essentially a matrix form of method of initial parameters. The advantage of the described method, despite the seemingly complex mathematical apparatus, is primarily, that it does not require for solve the problem of costly commercial software using finite element method. All calculations can be made for example in MS Excel, which is advantageous especially in the initial stages of constructing of spindle node for the rapid assessment of the suitability its design. After detailing the entire structure of spindle node is then also necessary to perform the refined dynamic analysis in the environment of FEM, which it requires the necessary skills and experience and it is therefore economically difficult. This work was developed within grant project KEGA No. 023TUKE-4/2012 Creation of a comprehensive educational - teaching material for the article Production technique using a combination of traditional and modern information technology and e-learning.

  6. Magnetic suspension motorized spindle-cutting system dynamics analysis and vibration control review

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    Xiaoli QIAO

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The performance of high-speed spindle directly determines the development of high-end machine tools. The cutting system's dynamic characteristics and vibration control effect are inseparable with the performance of the spindle,which influence each other, synergistic effect together the cutting efficiency, the surface quality of the workpiece and tool life in machining process. So, the review status on magnetic suspension motorized spindle, magnetic suspension bearing-flexible rotor system dynamics modeling theory and status of active control technology of flexible magnetic suspension motorized spindle rotor vibration are studied, and the problems which present in the magnetic suspension flexible motorized spindle rotor systems are refined, and the development trend of magnetic levitation motorized spindle and the application prospect is forecasted.

  7. Dynamic spindle reflexes and the rigidity of Parkinsonism.

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    McLellan, D L

    1973-06-01

    The effects of stimulating the reflex arc from dynamic spindle endings were examined in patients with the rigidity of Parkinsonism and in control subjects. The arc was activated phasically by a tendon tap and by electrical stimulation in 15 patients. The effect of reinforcement by Jendrassik's manoeuvre was observed. The response to phasic activation indicated central facilitation of the reflex loop in the patients with Parkinsonism, with a concurrent decrease in fusimotor drive to dynamic spindles. These abnormalities could not be correlated with the severity of the patients' rigidity, and they did not alter when the rigidity was reduced by levodopa. The effect of activating dynamic spindle endings tonically by vibration at 50 Hz was also examined. The reflex contraction of the biceps and triceps muscles in response to vibration was found to be increased in 24 patients with rigidity compared with 24 control subjects. Patients with severe rigidity developed a more powerful contraction in response to vibration than patients with mild rigidity. The response to vibration was reduced by treatment with levodopa but the amount of this reduction could not be correlated with changes in the patients' rigidity.

  8. Characteristics of motorized spindle supported by active magnetic bearings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xie Zhenyu; Yu Kun; Wen Liantang; Wang Xiao; Zhou Hongkai

    2014-01-01

    A motorized spindle supported by active magnetic bearings (AMBs) is generally used for ultra-high-speed machining. Iron loss of radial AMB is very great owing to high rotation speed, and it will cause severe thermal deformation. The problem is particularly serious on the occasion of large power application, such as all electric aero-engine. In this study, a prototype motorized spin-dle supported by five degree-of-freedom AMBs is developed. Homopolar and heteropolar AMBs are independently adopted as radial bearings. The influences of the two types of radial AMBs on the dynamic characteristics of the motorized spindle are comparatively investigated by theoretical analysis, test modal analysis and actual operation of the system. The iron loss of the two types of radial AMBs is analyzed by finite element software and verified through run-down experiments of the system. The results show that the structures of AMB have less influence on the dynamic char-acteristics of the motorized spindle. However, the homopolar structure can effectively reduce the iron loss of the radial AMB and it is useful for improving the overall performance of the motorized spindle.

  9. Characteristics of motorized spindle supported by active magnetic bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Zhenyu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A motorized spindle supported by active magnetic bearings (AMBs is generally used for ultra-high-speed machining. Iron loss of radial AMB is very great owing to high rotation speed, and it will cause severe thermal deformation. The problem is particularly serious on the occasion of large power application, such as all electric aero-engine. In this study, a prototype motorized spindle supported by five degree-of-freedom AMBs is developed. Homopolar and heteropolar AMBs are independently adopted as radial bearings. The influences of the two types of radial AMBs on the dynamic characteristics of the motorized spindle are comparatively investigated by theoretical analysis, test modal analysis and actual operation of the system. The iron loss of the two types of radial AMBs is analyzed by finite element software and verified through run-down experiments of the system. The results show that the structures of AMB have less influence on the dynamic characteristics of the motorized spindle. However, the homopolar structure can effectively reduce the iron loss of the radial AMB and it is useful for improving the overall performance of the motorized spindle.

  10. Spindle pole mechanics studied in mitotic asters: dynamic distribution of spindle forces through compliant linkages.

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    Charlebois, Blake D; Kollu, Swapna; Schek, Henry T; Compton, Duane A; Hunt, Alan J

    2011-04-06

    During cell division, chromosomes must faithfully segregate to maintain genome integrity, and this dynamic mechanical process is driven by the macromolecular machinery of the mitotic spindle. However, little is known about spindle mechanics. For example, spindle microtubules are organized by numerous cross-linking proteins yet the mechanical properties of those cross-links remain unexplored. To examine the mechanical properties of microtubule cross-links we applied optical trapping to mitotic asters that form in mammalian mitotic extracts. These asters are foci of microtubules, motors, and microtubule-associated proteins that reflect many of the functional properties of spindle poles and represent centrosome-independent spindle-pole analogs. We observed bidirectional motor-driven microtubule movements, showing that microtubule linkages within asters are remarkably compliant (mean stiffness 0.025 pN/nm) and mediated by only a handful of cross-links. Depleting the motor Eg5 reduced this stiffness, indicating that Eg5 contributes to the mechanical properties of microtubule asters in a manner consistent with its localization to spindle poles in cells. We propose that compliant linkages among microtubules provide a mechanical architecture capable of accommodating microtubule movements and distributing force among microtubules without loss of pole integrity-a mechanical paradigm that may be important throughout the spindle.

  11. Age-Dependent Increase of Absence Seizures and Intrinsic Frequency Dynamics of Sleep Spindles in Rats

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    Evgenia Sitnikova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The risk of neurological diseases increases with age. In WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy, the incidence of epileptic spike-wave discharges is known to be elevated with age. Considering close relationship between epileptic spike-wave discharges and physiologic sleep spindles, it was assumed that age-dependent increase of epileptic activity may affect time-frequency characteristics of sleep spindles. In order to examine this hypothesis, electroencephalograms (EEG were recorded in WAG/Rij rats successively at the ages 5, 7, and 9 months. Spike-wave discharges and sleep spindles were detected in frontal EEG channel. Sleep spindles were identified automatically using wavelet-based algorithm. Instantaneous (localized in time frequency of sleep spindles was determined using continuous wavelet transform of EEG signal, and intraspindle frequency dynamics were further examined. It was found that in 5-months-old rats epileptic activity has not fully developed (preclinical stage and sleep spindles demonstrated an increase of instantaneous frequency from beginning to the end. At the age of 7 and 9 months, when animals developed matured and longer epileptic discharges (symptomatic stage, their sleep spindles did not display changes of intrinsic frequency. The present data suggest that age-dependent increase of epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats affects intrinsic dynamics of sleep spindle frequency.

  12. Spindle mechanics and dynamics during mitosis in Drosophila.

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    Kwon, Mijung; Scholey, Jonathan M

    2004-04-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent model for studying mitosis. Syncytial embryos are amenable to time-lapse imaging of hundreds of synchronously dividing spindles, allowing the quantitation of spindle and chromosome dynamics with unprecedented fidelity. Other Drosophila cell types, including neuroblasts, cultured cells, spermatocytes and oocytes, contain spindles that differ in their design, providing cells amenable to different types of experiments and allowing identification of common core mechanisms. The function of mitotic proteins can be studied using mutants, inhibitor microinjection and RNA interference (RNAi) to identify the full inventory of mitotic proteins encoded by the genome. Here, we review recent advances in understanding how ensembles of mitotic proteins coordinate spindle assembly and chromosome motion in this system.

  13. Dynamic Analysis of Axial Magnetic Forces for DVD Spindle Motors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The axial magnetic force, induced by the complicated flux linkage distribution from rotor magnet and stator slotted, is constructed by different relative heights and calculated by 3D finite element method (FEM) to analyze the dynamic characteristics for a DVD spindle motor. The axial magnetic force is designed to provide an axial stiffness and govern the natural frequency of the dynamic performance. According to the simulation results and experimental measurements, the dynamic behaviors are significantly improved with a variation of relative height of rotor magnet and stator slotted on a DVD spindle motor.

  14. p21-activated kinase 4 regulates mitotic spindle positioning and orientation.

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    Bompard, Guillaume; Morin, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    During mitosis, microtubules (MTs) are massively rearranged into three sets of highly dynamic MTs that are nucleated from the centrosomes to form the mitotic spindle. Tight regulation of spindle positioning in the dividing cell and chromosome alignment at the center of the metaphase spindle are required to ensure perfect chromosome segregation and to position the cytokinetic furrow that will specify the two daughter cells. Spindle positioning requires regulation of MT dynamics, involving depolymerase activities together with cortical and kinetochore-mediated pushing and pulling forces acting on astral MTs and kinetochore fibres. These forces rely on MT motor activities. Cortical pulling forces exerted on astral MTs depend upon dynein/dynactin complexes and are essential in both symmetric and asymmetric cell division. A well-established spindle positioning pathway regulating the cortical targeting of dynein/dynactin involves the conserved LGN (Leu-Gly-Asn repeat-enriched-protein) and NuMA (microtubule binding nuclear mitotic apparatus protein) complex. Spindle orientation is also regulated by integrin-mediated cell adhesion and actin retraction fibres that respond to mechanical stress and are influenced by the microenvironment of the dividing cell. Altering the capture of astral MTs or modulating pulling forces affects spindle position, which can impair cell division, differentiation and embryogenesis. In this general scheme, the activity of mitotic kinases such as Auroras and Plk1 (Polo-like kinase 1) is crucial. Recently, the p21-activated kinases (PAKs) emerged as novel important players in mitotic progression. In our recent article, we demonstrated that PAK4 regulates spindle positioning in symmetric cell division. In this commentary, and in light of recent published studies, we discuss how PAK4 could participate in the regulation of mechanisms involved in spindle positioning and orientation.

  15. Regulation of NDR1 activity by PLK1 ensures proper spindle orientation in mitosis.

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    Yan, Maomao; Chu, Lingluo; Qin, Bo; Wang, Zhikai; Liu, Xing; Jin, Changjiang; Zhang, Guanglan; Gomez, Marta; Hergovich, Alexander; Chen, Zhengjun; He, Ping; Gao, Xinjiao; Yao, Xuebiao

    2015-01-01

    Accurate chromosome segregation during mitosis requires the physical separation of sister chromatids which depends on correct position of mitotic spindle relative to membrane cortex. Although recent work has identified the role of PLK1 in spindle orientation, the mechanisms underlying PLK1 signaling in spindle positioning and orientation have not been fully illustrated. Here, we identified a conserved signaling axis in which NDR1 kinase activity is regulated by PLK1 in mitosis. PLK1 phosphorylates NDR1 at three putative threonine residues (T7, T183 and T407) at mitotic entry, which elicits PLK1-dependent suppression of NDR1 activity and ensures correct spindle orientation in mitosis. Importantly, persistent expression of non-phosphorylatable NDR1 mutant perturbs spindle orientation. Mechanistically, PLK1-mediated phosphorylation protects the binding of Mob1 to NDR1 and subsequent NDR1 activation. These findings define a conserved signaling axis that integrates dynamic kinetochore-microtubule interaction and spindle orientation control to genomic stability maintenance.

  16. An evaluation of spindle-shaft seizure accident sequences for the Schenck Dynamic Balancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bott, T.F.; Fischer, S.R.

    1998-11-01

    This study was conducted at the request of the USDOE/AL Dynamic Balancer Project Team to develop a set of representative accident sequences initiated by rapid seizure of the spindle shaft of the Schenck dynamic balancing machine used in the mass properties testing activities in Bay 12-60 at the Pantex Plant. This Balancer is used for balancing reentry vehicles. In addition, the study identified potential causes of possible spindle-shaft seizure leading to a rapid deceleration of the rotating assembly. These accident sequences extend to the point that the reentry vehicle either remains in stable condition on the balancing machine or leaves the machine with some translational and rotational motion. Fault-tree analysis was used to identify possible causes of spindle-shaft seizure, and failure modes and effects analysis identified the results of shearing of different machine components. Cause-consequence diagrams were used to help develop accident sequences resulting from the possible effects of spindle-shaft seizure. To make these accident sequences physically reasonable, the analysts used idealized models of the dynamics of rotating masses. Idealized physical modeling also was used to provide approximate values of accident parameters that lead to branching down different accident progression paths. The exacerbating conditions of balancing machine over-speed and improper assembly of the fixture to the face plate are also addressed.

  17. An evaluation of spindle-shaft seizure accident sequences for the Schenck Dynamic Balancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bott, T.F.; Fischer, S.R.

    1998-11-01

    This study was conducted at the request of the USDOE/AL Dynamic Balancer Project Team to develop a set of representative accident sequences initiated by rapid seizure of the spindle shaft of the Schenck dynamic balancing machine used in the mass properties testing activities in Bay 12-60 at the Pantex Plant. This Balancer is used for balancing reentry vehicles. In addition, the study identified potential causes of possible spindle-shaft seizure leading to a rapid deceleration of the rotating assembly. These accident sequences extend to the point that the reentry vehicle either remains in stable condition on the balancing machine or leaves the machine with some translational and rotational motion. Fault-tree analysis was used to identify possible causes of spindle-shaft seizure, and failure modes and effects analysis identified the results of shearing of different machine components. Cause-consequence diagrams were used to help develop accident sequences resulting from the possible effects of spindle-shaft seizure. To make these accident sequences physically reasonable, the analysts used idealized models of the dynamics of rotating masses. Idealized physical modeling also was used to provide approximate values of accident parameters that lead to branching down different accident progression paths. The exacerbating conditions of balancing machine over-speed and improper assembly of the fixture to the face plate are also addressed.

  18. Differential spike timing and phase dynamics of reticular thalamic and prefrontal cortical neuronal populations during sleep spindles.

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    Gardner, Richard J; Hughes, Stuart W; Jones, Matthew W

    2013-11-20

    The 8-15 Hz thalamocortical oscillations known as sleep spindles are a universal feature of mammalian non-REM sleep, during which they are presumed to shape activity-dependent plasticity in neocortical networks. The cortex is hypothesized to contribute to initiation and termination of spindles, but the mechanisms by which it implements these roles are unknown. We used dual-site local field potential and multiple single-unit recordings in the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN) and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of freely behaving rats at rest to investigate thalamocortical network dynamics during natural sleep spindles. During each spindle epoch, oscillatory activity in mPFC and TRN increased in frequency from onset to offset, accompanied by a consistent phase precession of TRN spike times relative to the cortical oscillation. In mPFC, the firing probability of putative pyramidal cells was highest at spindle initiation and termination times. We thus identified "early" and "late" cell subpopulations and found that they had distinct properties: early cells generally fired in synchrony with TRN spikes, whereas late cells fired in antiphase to TRN activity and also had higher firing rates than early cells. The accelerating and highly structured temporal pattern of thalamocortical network activity over the course of spindles therefore reflects the engagement of distinct subnetworks at specific times across spindle epochs. We propose that early cortical cells serve a synchronizing role in the initiation and propagation of spindle activity, whereas the subsequent recruitment of late cells actively antagonizes the thalamic spindle generator by providing asynchronous feedback.

  19. Spindle Activity Orchestrates Plasticity during Development and Sleep

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    Christoph Lindemann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spindle oscillations have been described during early brain development and in the adult brain. Besides similarities in temporal patterns and involved brain areas, neonatal spindle bursts (NSBs and adult sleep spindles (ASSs show differences in their occurrence, spatial distribution, and underlying mechanisms. While NSBs have been proposed to coordinate the refinement of the maturating neuronal network, ASSs are associated with the implementation of acquired information within existing networks. Along with these functional differences, separate synaptic plasticity mechanisms seem to be recruited. Here, we review the generation of spindle oscillations in the developing and adult brain and discuss possible implications of their differences for synaptic plasticity. The first part of the review is dedicated to the generation and function of ASSs with a particular focus on their role in healthy and impaired neuronal networks. The second part overviews the present knowledge of spindle activity during development and the ability of NSBs to organize immature circuits. Studies linking abnormal maturation of brain wiring with neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders highlight the importance to better elucidate neonatal plasticity rules in future research.

  20. Balanced Activity of Three Mitotic Motors Is Required for Bipolar Spindle Assembly and Chromosome Segregation

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    Roy G.H.P. van Heesbeen

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Bipolar spindle assembly requires force to organize the microtubule network. Here, we show that three motor proteins, namely Eg5, Kif15, and dynein, act together to produce the right force balance in the spindle. Excessive inward force results in monopolar spindle formation, while excessive outward force generation results in unstable spindles with splayed spindle poles. Blocking activity of all three motors prevents bipolar spindle formation, but established bipolar spindles are refractory to loss of all motor activity. Further analysis shows that although these preformed spindles remain bipolar, outward force generation is required to establish sufficient tension on kinetochores and to accomplish successful chromosome segregation. Together, these results show how Eg5, Kif15, and dynein work together to build a bipolar spindle and reveal an important role for antagonistic motors in chromosome segregation.

  1. Localized Aurora B activity spatially controls non-kinetochore microtubules during spindle assembly.

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    Tanenbaum, Marvin E; Medema, René H

    2011-12-01

    Efficient spindle assembly involves the generation of spatial cues around chromosomes that locally stabilize microtubule (MT) plus-ends. In addition to the small GTPase Ran, there is evidence that Aurora B kinase might also generate a spatial cue around chromosomes but direct proof for this is still lacking. Here, we find that the Aurora B substrate MCAK localizes to MT plus-ends throughout the mitotic spindle, but its accumulation is strongly reduced on MT plus-ends near chromatin, suggesting that a signal emanating from chromosomes negatively regulates MCAK plus-end binding. Indeed, we show that Aurora B is the kinase responsible for producing this chromosome-derived signal. These results are the first to visualize spatially restricted Aurora B kinase activity around chromosomes on an endogenous substrate and explain how Aurora B could spatially control the dynamics of non-kinetochore MTs during spindle assembly.

  2. Dynamic stability of spine using stability-based optimization and muscle spindle reflex.

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    Zeinali-Davarani, Shahrokh; Hemami, Hooshang; Barin, Kamran; Shirazi-Adl, Aboulfazl; Parnianpour, Mohamad

    2008-02-01

    A computational method for simulation of 3-D movement of the trunk under the control of 48 anatomically oriented muscle actions was developed. Neural excitation of muscles was set based on inverse dynamics approach along with the stability-based optimization. The effect of muscle spindle reflex response on the trunk movement stability was evaluated upon the application of a perturbation moment. The method was used to simulate the trunk movement from the upright standing to 60 degrees of flexion. Incorporation of the stability condition as an additional constraint in the optimization resulted in an increase in antagonistic activities demonstrating that the antagonistic co-activation acts to increase the trunk stability in response to self-induced postural internal perturbation. In presence of a 30 Nm flexion perturbation moment, muscle spindles decreased the induced deviation of the position and velocity profiles from the desired ones. The stability-generated co-activation decreased the reflexive response of muscle spindles to the perturbation demonstrating that the rise in muscle co-activation can ameliorate the corruption of afferent neural sensory system at the expense of higher loading of the spine.

  3. Dynamic characteristics of hard disk drive spindles supported by hydrodynamic bearings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Most hard disk spindles currently used are supported by grease lubricated deep-groove ball bearings.However, in the trend of increasing spindle speed and reducing size and cost, the shortcomings of ball bearing spin-dles, such as high non-repeatable run out, high acoustic noise and short life time at high running speed, make themunsuitable for high performance hard disk drives (HDD). On the contrary, the dynamic characteristics of hydrody-namic bearing spindles are superior to that of ball bearing spindles. Therefore, they are considered to be the substi-tute of ball bearing spindles in HDD. In this paper, a simulative setup of HDD is build up. The dynamic characteristicsof liquid lubricated spiral groove bearing(SGB) spindles are studied. The effects of both operating condition andbearing clearance are investigated. It is found that running speed of the spindle has significant influence on its dy-namic performance, while the load has little influence. The effect of clearance is also evident.

  4. Polo-like kinase-1 regulates kinetochore–microtubule dynamics and spindle checkpoint silencing

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    Liu, Dan; Davydenko, Olga

    2012-01-01

    Polo-like kinase-1 (Plk1) is a highly conserved kinase with multiple mitotic functions. Plk1 localizes to prometaphase kinetochores and is reduced at metaphase kinetochores, similar to many checkpoint signaling proteins, but Plk1 is not required for spindle checkpoint function. Plk1 is also implicated in stabilizing kinetochore–microtubule attachments, but these attachments are most stable when kinetochore Plk1 levels are low at metaphase. Therefore, it is unclear how Plk1 function at kinetochores can be understood in the context of its dynamic localization. In this paper, we show that Plk1 activity suppresses kinetochore–microtubule dynamics to stabilize initial attachments in prometaphase, and Plk1 removal from kinetochores is necessary to maintain dynamic microtubules in metaphase. Constitutively targeting Plk1 to kinetochores maintained high activity at metaphase, leading to reduced interkinetochore tension and intrakinetochore stretch, a checkpoint-dependent mitotic arrest, and accumulation of microtubule attachment errors. Together, our data show that Plk1 dynamics at kinetochores control two critical mitotic processes: initially establishing correct kinetochore–microtubule attachments and subsequently silencing the spindle checkpoint. PMID:22908307

  5. Evaluation of the Dynamicity of Mitotic Exit Network and Spindle Position Checkpoint Components on Spindle Pole Bodies by Fluorescence Recovery After Photobleaching (FRAP).

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    Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Pereira, Gislene

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) is a powerful technique to study in vivo binding and diffusion dynamics of fluorescently labeled proteins. In this chapter, we describe how to determine spindle pole body (SPB) binding dynamics of mitotic exit network (MEN) and spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) proteins using FRAP microscopy. Procedures presented here include the growth of the yeast cultures, sample preparation, image acquisition and analysis.

  6. Kinetochore flexibility: creating a dynamic chromosome-spindle interface.

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    O'Connell, Christopher B; Khodjakov, Alexey; McEwen, Bruce F

    2012-02-01

    Kinetochores are complex macromolecular assemblies that link chromosomes to the mitotic spindle, mediate forces for chromosome motion, and generate the checkpoint signal delaying anaphase onset until all chromosomes are incorporated into the spindle. Proper execution of these functions depends on precise interactions between kinetochores and microtubules. While the molecular composition of the kinetochore is well described, structural organization of this organelle at the molecular and atomic levels is just beginning to emerge. Recent structural studies across scales suggest that kinetochores should not be viewed as rigid static scaffolds. Instead, these organelles exhibit a surprising degree of flexibility that enables rapid adaptations to various types of interactions with the mitotic spindle. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Inhibition of clathrin by pitstop 2 activates the spindle assembly checkpoint and induces cell death in dividing HeLa cancer cells

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    Smith Charlotte M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During metaphase clathrin stabilises the mitotic spindle kinetochore(K-fibres. Many anti-mitotic compounds target microtubule dynamics. Pitstop 2™ is the first small molecule inhibitor of clathrin terminal domain and inhibits clathrin-mediated endocytosis. We investigated its effects on a second function for clathrin in mitosis. Results Pitstop 2 did not impair clathrin recruitment to the spindle but disrupted its function once stationed there. Pitstop 2 trapped HeLa cells in metaphase through loss of mitotic spindle integrity and activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint, phenocopying clathrin depletion and aurora A kinase inhibition. Conclusions Pitstop 2 is therefore a new tool for investigating clathrin spindle dynamics. Pitstop 2 reduced viability in dividing HeLa cells, without affecting dividing non-cancerous NIH3T3 cells, suggesting that clathrin is a possible novel anti-mitotic drug target.

  8. Microtubule Dynamics and Oscillating State for Mitotic Spindle

    CERN Document Server

    Rashid-Shomali, Safura

    2010-01-01

    We present a physical mechanism that can cause the mitotic spindle to oscillate. The driving force for this mechanism emerges from the polymerization of astral microtubules interacting with the cell cortex. We show that Brownian ratchet model for growing microtubules reaching the cell cortex, mediate an effective mass to the spindle body and therefore force it to oscillate. We compare the predictions of this mechanism with the previous mechanisms which were based on the effects of motor proteins. Finally we combine the effects of microtubules polymerization and motor proteins, and present the detailed phase diagram for possible oscillating states.

  9. A time-frequency analysis of the dynamics of cortical networks of sleep spindles from MEG-EEG recordings

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    Younes eZerouali

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sleep spindles are a hallmark of NREM sleep. They result from a widespread thalamo-cortical loop and involve synchronous cortical networks that are still poorly understood. We investigated whether brain activity during spindles can be characterized by specific patterns of functional connectivity among cortical generators. For that purpose, we developed a wavelet-based approach aimed at imaging the synchronous oscillatory cortical networks from simultaneous MEG-EEG recordings. First, we detected spindles on the EEG and extracted the corresponding frequency-locked MEG activity under the form of an analytic ridge signal in the time-frequency plane (Zerouali et al., 2013. Secondly, we performed source reconstruction of the ridge signal within the Maximum Entropy on the Mean framework (Amblard et al., 2004, yielding a robust estimate of the cortical sources producing observed oscillations. Lastly, we quantified functional connectivity among cortical sources using phase-locking values. The main innovations of this methodology are 1 to reveal the dynamic behavior of functional networks resolved in the time-frequency plane and 2 to characterize functional connectivity among MEG sources through phase interactions. We showed, for the first time, that the switch from fast to slow oscillatory mode during sleep spindles is required for the emergence of specific patterns of connectivity. Moreover, we show that earlier synchrony during spindles was associated with mainly intra-hemispheric connectivity whereas later synchrony was associated with global long-range connectivity. We propose that our methodology can be a valuable tool for studying the connectivity underlying neural processes involving sleep spindles, such as memory, plasticity or aging.

  10. A time-frequency analysis of the dynamics of cortical networks of sleep spindles from MEG-EEG recordings.

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    Zerouali, Younes; Lina, Jean-Marc; Sekerovic, Zoran; Godbout, Jonathan; Dube, Jonathan; Jolicoeur, Pierre; Carrier, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Sleep spindles are a hallmark of NREM sleep. They result from a widespread thalamo-cortical loop and involve synchronous cortical networks that are still poorly understood. We investigated whether brain activity during spindles can be characterized by specific patterns of functional connectivity among cortical generators. For that purpose, we developed a wavelet-based approach aimed at imaging the synchronous oscillatory cortical networks from simultaneous MEG-EEG recordings. First, we detected spindles on the EEG and extracted the corresponding frequency-locked MEG activity under the form of an analytic ridge signal in the time-frequency plane (Zerouali et al., 2013). Secondly, we performed source reconstruction of the ridge signal within the Maximum Entropy on the Mean framework (Amblard et al., 2004), yielding a robust estimate of the cortical sources producing observed oscillations. Lastly, we quantified functional connectivity among cortical sources using phase-locking values. The main innovations of this methodology are (1) to reveal the dynamic behavior of functional networks resolved in the time-frequency plane and (2) to characterize functional connectivity among MEG sources through phase interactions. We showed, for the first time, that the switch from fast to slow oscillatory mode during sleep spindles is required for the emergence of specific patterns of connectivity. Moreover, we show that earlier synchrony during spindles was associated with mainly intra-hemispheric connectivity whereas later synchrony was associated with global long-range connectivity. We propose that our methodology can be a valuable tool for studying the connectivity underlying neural processes involving sleep spindles, such as memory, plasticity or aging.

  11. A population-based model of the nonlinear dynamics of the thalamocortical feedback network displays intrinsic oscillations in the spindling (7-14 Hz) range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousif, Nada A B; Denham, Michael

    2005-12-01

    The thalamocortical network is modelled using the Wilson-Cowan equations for neuronal population activity. We show that this population model with biologically derived parameters possesses intrinsic nonlinear oscillatory dynamics, and that the frequency of oscillation lies within the spindle range. Spindle oscillations are an early sleep oscillation characterized by high-frequency bursts of action potentials followed by a period of quiescence, at a frequency of 7-14 Hz. Spindles are generally regarded as being generated by intrathalamic circuitry, as decorticated thalamic slices and the isolated thalamic reticular nucleus exhibit spindles. However, the role of cortical feedback has been shown to regulate and synchronize the oscillation. Previous modelling studies have mainly used conductance-based models and hence the mechanism relied upon the inclusion of ionic currents, particularly the T-type calcium current. Here we demonstrate that spindle-frequency oscillatory activity can also arise from the nonlinear dynamics of the thalamocortical circuit, and we use bifurcation analysis to examine the robustness of this oscillation in terms of the functional range of the parameters used in the model. The results suggest that the thalamocortical circuit has intrinsic nonlinear population dynamics which are capable of providing robust support for oscillatory activity within the frequency range of spindle oscillations.

  12. Automated three-dimensional single cell phenotyping of spindle dynamics, cell shape, and volume

    CERN Document Server

    Plumb, Kemp; Pelletier, Vincent; Kilfoil, Maria L

    2015-01-01

    We present feature finding and tracking algorithms in 3D in living cells, and demonstrate their utility to measure metrics important in cell biological processes. We developed a computational imaging hybrid approach that combines automated three-dimensional tracking of point-like features with surface determination from which cell (or nuclear) volume, shape, and planes of interest can be extracted. After validation, we applied the technique to real space context-rich dynamics of the mitotic spindle, and cell volume and its relationship to spindle length, in dividing living cells. These methods are additionally useful for automated segregation of pre-anaphase and anaphase spindle populations in budding yeast. We found that genetic deletion of the yeast kinesin-5 mitotic motor cin8 leads to large mother and daughter cells that were indistinguishable based on size, and that in those cells the spindle length becomes uncorrelated with cell size. The technique can be used to visualize and quantify tracked feature c...

  13. LIMK1 activity is required for MTOC localization and spindle bipolarity establishment during meiosis in mouse oocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xiaoyun; Li Xin; Ma Wei

    2015-01-01

    Aneuploid embryo generally leads to infertility, spontaneous abortion and birth defects, mainly resulting from abnormal chromosome segregation during maternal oocytes meiosis. Chromosome division is conducted by bipolar spindle which formed through an acentrosomal way, dependent on a unique microtubule organizing center ( MTOC) in mammalian oocytes, however, the molecular composition and functional regulation of MTOC is still not fully ex-plored. LIM kinases 1 (LIMK1) is a conserved serine/threonine kinase, a major regulator of actin and microtubule dynamics, involved in microtubule stability and spindle positioning during mitosis. So far little is known about LIMK1 protein expression and its roles in oocytes during meiosis. We reported here the protein expression and sub-cellular distribution of LIMK1 in mouse oocytes during meiosis. Western blot procedure detected high and stable expression of LIMK1 in mouse oocytes from germinal vesicle ( GV) stage to metaphase II ( MII) . In contrast, acti-vated LIMK1 ( phosphorylated at Thr508 , pLIMK1 Thr508 ) was only observed after germinal vesicle breakdown ( GVBD) , and gradually increased with peak levels at metaphase I ( MI) and MII. Immunofluorescence analysis showed that LIMK1 was co-localized with microtubules on the whole spindle structure, while pLIMK1Thr508 was con- centrated with key components of MTOC,pericentrin and -Tubulin, on spindle poles in mouse oocytes. Inhibition of LIMK1 activity by BMS3, a specific ATPase competitive inhibitor, distroyed the formation of bipolar spindle structure, disturbed MTOC integrity and MTOC proteins recruitment to spindle poles. Moreover, LIMK1 inhibition caused chromosome misalignment and meiotic progression arrest at MI stage. Therefore, LIMK1 activity is required for formation and maintenance of bipolar spindle in mouse oocytes,importantly, pLIMK1T508 is MTOC-associated protein,involved in establishment and positioning of MTOC.

  14. Spindle activity and monosynaptic reflex excitability during foreperiod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerilovsky, L; Struppler, A; Altmann, H; Velho, F

    1983-11-01

    Healthy volunteers were instructed to perform an isometric plantar foot flexion as quickly as possible after a foreperiod (FP) of 1000 msec defined by two clicks (warning signal (WS) and response signal (RS). In 6 volunteers the H reflex was evoked in triceps surae muscle and recorded by surface electrodes (stimulus intensity 30% of maximum). The H reflex was elicited at WS and RS as well as during FP at intervals of 100 msec. H reflex amplitudes were taken as a sign of monosynaptic reflex excitability (MSRE). Amplitudes during FP were compared with the average control values at rest. Relaxation of lower limb muscles before and during FP was controlled by EMG. MSRE was increased in the first part of FP with a maximum at 300 msec after WS and decreased in the second part, with a minimum at 800 msec after WS. In a second series of experiments, in 10 volunteers, single fiber activity from primary muscle spindle afferents was recorded with tungsten electrodes from deep peroneal nerve (6 records) and from tibial nerve (3 records). The activity of primary spindle afferents before and during the FP was calculated by instantaneous discharge frequency and histograms of spike distribution. The EMG was taken from sural triceps and anterior tibial muscles with needle electrodes; a mechanogram of tendon deflection was taken by an appropriate strain gauge. In 5 primary afferents without spontaneous activity at rest and during FP, discharge started with a delay of 10-15 msec after the onset of EMG activity during the motor reaction.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Dishevelled binds the Discs large 'Hook' domain to activate GukHolder-dependent spindle positioning in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua D Garcia

    Full Text Available Communication between cortical cell polarity cues and the mitotic spindle ensures proper orientation of cell divisions within complex tissues. Defects in mitotic spindle positioning have been linked to various developmental disorders and have recently emerged as a potential contributor to tumorigenesis. Despite the importance of this process to human health, the molecular mechanisms that regulate spindle orientation are not fully understood. Moreover, it remains unclear how diverse cortical polarity complexes might cooperate to influence spindle positioning. We and others have demonstrated spindle orientation roles for Dishevelled (Dsh, a key regulator of planar cell polarity, and Discs large (Dlg, a conserved apico-basal cell polarity regulator, effects which were previously thought to operate within distinct molecular pathways. Here we identify a novel direct interaction between the Dsh-PDZ domain and the alternatively spliced "I3-insert" of the Dlg-Hook domain, thus establishing a potential convergent Dsh/Dlg pathway. Furthermore, we identify a Dlg sequence motif necessary for the Dsh interaction that shares homology to the site of Dsh binding in the Frizzled receptor. Expression of Dsh enhanced Dlg-mediated spindle positioning similar to deletion of the Hook domain. This Dsh-mediated activation was dependent on the Dlg-binding partner, GukHolder (GukH. These results suggest that Dsh binding may regulate core interdomain conformational dynamics previously described for Dlg. Together, our results identify Dlg as an effector of Dsh signaling and demonstrate a Dsh-mediated mechanism for the activation of Dlg/GukH-dependent spindle positioning. Cooperation between these two evolutionarily-conserved cell polarity pathways could have important implications to both the development and maintenance of tissue homeostasis in animals.

  16. On the Free Vibration Modeling of Spindle Systems: A Calibrated Dynamic Stiffness Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Gaber

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of bearings on the vibrational behavior of machine tool spindles is investigated. This is done through the development of a calibrated dynamic stiffness matrix (CDSM method, where the bearings flexibility is represented by massless linear spring elements with tuneable stiffness. A dedicated MATLAB code is written to develop and to assemble the element stiffness matrices for the system’s multiple components and to apply the boundary conditions. The developed method is applied to an illustrative example of spindle system. When the spindle bearings are modeled as simply supported boundary conditions, the DSM model results in a fundamental frequency much higher than the system’s nominal value. The simply supported boundary conditions are then replaced by linear spring elements, and the spring constants are adjusted such that the resulting calibrated CDSM model leads to the nominal fundamental frequency of the spindle system. The spindle frequency results are also validated against the experimental data. The proposed method can be effectively applied to predict the vibration characteristics of spindle systems supported by bearings.

  17. Measurement Research of Motorized Spindle Dynamic Stiffness under High Speed Rotating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaopeng Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High speed motorized spindle has become a key functional unit of high speed machine tools and effectively promotes the development of machine tool technology. The development of higher speed and more power puts forward the stricter requirement for the performance of motorized spindle, especially the dynamic performance which affects the machining accuracy, reliability, and production efficiency. To overcome the problems of ineffective loading and dynamic performance measurement of motorized spindle, a noncontact electromagnetic loading device is developed. The cutting load can be simulated by using electromagnetic force. A new method of measuring force by force sensors is presented, and the steady and transient loading force could be measured exactly. After the high speed machine spindle is tested, the frequency response curves of the spindle relative to machine table are collected at 0~12000 rpm; then the relationships between stiffness and speeds as well as between damping ratio and speeds are obtained. The result shows that not only the static and dynamic stiffness but also the damping ratio declined with the increase of speed.

  18. Cdk and APC activities limit the spindle-stabilizing function of Fin1 to anaphase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodbury, Erika L; Morgan, David O

    2007-01-01

    The fidelity of chromosome segregation depends on proper regulation of mitotic spindle behaviour. In anaphase, spindle stability is promoted by the dephosphorylation of cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) substrates, which results from Cdk inactivation and phosphatase activation. Few of the critical Cdk targets have been identified. Here, we identify the budding-yeast protein Fin1 (ref. 7) as a spindle-stabilizing protein whose activity is strictly limited to anaphase by changes in its phosphorylation state and rate of degradation. Phosphorylation of Fin1 from S phase to metaphase, by the cyclin-dependent kinase Clb5-Cdk1, inhibits Fin1 association with the spindle. In anaphase, when Clb5-Cdk1 is inactivated, Fin1 is dephosphorylated by the phosphatase Cdc14. Fin1 dephosphorylation targets it to the poles and microtubules of the elongating spindle, where it contributes to spindle integrity. A non-phosphorylatable Fin1 mutant localizes to the spindle before anaphase and impairs efficient chromosome segregation. As cells complete mitosis and disassemble the spindle, the ubiqutin ligase APC(Cdh1) targets Fin1 for destruction. Our studies illustrate how phosphorylation-dependent changes in the behaviour of Cdk1 substrates influence complex mitotic processes.

  19. Unprotected Drosophila melanogaster telomeres activate the spindle assembly checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musarò, Mariarosaria; Ciapponi, Laura; Fasulo, Barbara; Gatti, Maurizio; Cenci, Giovanni

    2008-03-01

    In both yeast and mammals, uncapped telomeres activate the DNA damage response (DDR) and undergo end-to-end fusion. Previous work has shown that the Drosophila HOAP protein, encoded by the caravaggio (cav) gene, is required to prevent telomeric fusions. Here we show that HOAP-depleted telomeres activate both the DDR and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). The cell cycle arrest elicited by the DDR was alleviated by mutations in mei-41 (encoding ATR), mus304 (ATRIP), grp (Chk1) and rad50 but not by mutations in tefu (ATM). The SAC was partially overridden by mutations in zw10 (also known as mit(1)15) and bubR1, and also by mutations in mei-41, mus304, rad50, grp and tefu. As expected from SAC activation, the SAC proteins Zw10, Zwilch, BubR1 and Cenp-meta (Cenp-E) accumulated at the kinetochores of cav mutant cells. Notably, BubR1 also accumulated at cav mutant telomeres in a mei-41-, mus304-, rad50-, grp- and tefu-dependent manner. Our results collectively suggest that recruitment of BubR1 by dysfunctional telomeres inhibits Cdc20-APC function, preventing the metaphase-to-anaphase transition.

  20. Reflex influences on muscle spindle activity in relaxed human leg muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandevia, S C; Miller, S; Aniss, A M; Burke, D

    1986-07-01

    The study was designed to determine whether low-threshold cutaneous and muscle afferents from the foot reflexly activate gamma-motoneurons innervating relaxed muscles of the leg. In 15 experiments multiunit recordings were made from 21 nerve fascicles innervating triceps surae or tibialis anterior. In a further nine experiments the activity of 19 identified single muscle spindle afferents was recorded, 13 from triceps surae, 5 from tibialis anterior, and 1 from extensor digitorum longus. Trains of electrical stimuli (5 stimuli, 300 Hz) were delivered to the sural nerve at the ankle (intensity, twice sensory threshold) and the posterior tibial nerve at the ankle (intensity, 1.1 times motor threshold for the small muscles of the foot). In addition, a tap on the appropriate tendon at varying times after the stimuli was used to assess the dynamic responsiveness of the afferents under study. The conditioning electrical stimuli did not change the discharge of single spindle afferents. Recordings of rectified and averaged multiunit activity also revealed no change in the overall level of background neural activity following the electrical stimuli. The afferent responses to tendon taps did not differ significantly whether or not they were preceded by stimulation of the sural or posterior tibial nerves. These results suggest that low-threshold afferents from the foot do not produce significant activation of fusimotor neurons in relaxed leg muscles, at least as judged by their ability to alter the discharge of muscle spindle afferents. As there may be no effective background activity in fusimotor neurons innervating relaxed human muscles, it is possible that these inputs from the foot could influence the fusimotor system during voluntary contractions when the fusimotor neurons have been brought to firing threshold. In one subject trains of stimuli were delivered to the posterior tibial nerve at painful levels (30 times motor threshold). They produced an acceleration of the

  1. Sustaining sleep spindles through enhanced SK2 channel activity consolidates sleep and elevates arousal threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Ralf D.; Astori, Simone; Bond, Chris T.; Rovó, Zita; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Adelman, John P.; Franken, Paul; Lüthi, Anita

    2013-01-01

    Sleep spindles are synchronized 11–15 Hz electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillations predominant during non-rapid-eye-movement sleep (NREMS). Rhythmic bursting in the reticular thalamic nucleus (nRt), arising from interplay between Cav3.3-type Ca2+ channels and Ca2+-dependent small-conductance-type 2 (SK2) K+ channels, underlies spindle generation. Correlative evidence indicates that spindles contribute to memory consolidation and protection against environmental noise in human NREMS. Here, we describe a molecular mechanism through which spindle power is selectively extended and we probed the actions of intensified spindling in the naturally sleeping mouse. Using electrophysiological recordings in acute brain slices from SK2 channel-over-expressing (SK2-OE) mice, we found that nRt bursting was potentiated and thalamic circuit oscillations were prolonged. Moreover, nRt cells showed greater resilience to transit from burst to tonic discharge in response to gradual depolarization, mimicking transitions out of NREMS. Compared to wild-type littermates, chronic EEG recordings of SK2-OE mice contained less fragmented NREMS, while the NREMS EEG power spectrum was conserved. Furthermore, EEG spindle activity was prolonged at NREMS exit. Finally, when exposed to white noise, SK2-OE mice needed stronger stimuli to arouse. Increased nRt bursting thus strengthens spindles and improves sleep quality through mechanisms independent of EEG slow-waves (< 4 Hz), suggesting SK2 signaling as a new potential therapeutic target for sleep disorders and for neuropsychiatric diseases accompanied by weakened sleep spindles. PMID:23035101

  2. Sustaining sleep spindles through enhanced SK2-channel activity consolidates sleep and elevates arousal threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wimmer, Ralf D; Astori, Simone; Bond, Chris T; Rovó, Zita; Chatton, Jean-Yves; Adelman, John P; Franken, Paul; Lüthi, Anita

    2012-10-03

    Sleep spindles are synchronized 11-15 Hz electroencephalographic (EEG) oscillations predominant during nonrapid-eye-movement sleep (NREMS). Rhythmic bursting in the reticular thalamic nucleus (nRt), arising from interplay between Ca(v)3.3-type Ca(2+) channels and Ca(2+)-dependent small-conductance-type 2 (SK2) K(+) channels, underlies spindle generation. Correlative evidence indicates that spindles contribute to memory consolidation and protection against environmental noise in human NREMS. Here, we describe a molecular mechanism through which spindle power is selectively extended and we probed the actions of intensified spindling in the naturally sleeping mouse. Using electrophysiological recordings in acute brain slices from SK2 channel-overexpressing (SK2-OE) mice, we found that nRt bursting was potentiated and thalamic circuit oscillations were prolonged. Moreover, nRt cells showed greater resilience to transit from burst to tonic discharge in response to gradual depolarization, mimicking transitions out of NREMS. Compared with wild-type littermates, chronic EEG recordings of SK2-OE mice contained less fragmented NREMS, while the NREMS EEG power spectrum was conserved. Furthermore, EEG spindle activity was prolonged at NREMS exit. Finally, when exposed to white noise, SK2-OE mice needed stronger stimuli to arouse. Increased nRt bursting thus strengthens spindles and improves sleep quality through mechanisms independent of EEG slow waves (<4 Hz), suggesting SK2 signaling as a new potential therapeutic target for sleep disorders and for neuropsychiatric diseases accompanied by weakened sleep spindles.

  3. The sequential activation of the mitotic microtubule assembly pathways favors bipolar spindle formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazza, Tommaso; Malgaretti, Paolo; Vernos, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Centrosome maturation is the process by which the duplicated centrosomes recruit pericentriolar components and increase their microtubule nucleation activity before mitosis. The role of this process in cells entering mitosis has been mostly related to the separation of the duplicated centrosomes and thereby to the assembly of a bipolar spindle. However, spindles can form without centrosomes. In fact, all cells, whether they have centrosomes or not, rely on chromatin-driven microtubule assembly to form a spindle. To test whether the sequential activation of these microtubule assembly pathways, defined by centrosome maturation and nuclear envelope breakdown, plays any role in spindle assembly, we combined experiments in tissue culture cells and Xenopus laevis egg extracts with a mathematical model. We found that interfering with the sequential activation of the microtubule assembly pathways compromises bipolar spindle assembly in tissue culture cells but not in X. laevis egg extracts. Our data suggest a novel function for centrosome maturation that determines the contribution of the chromosomal microtubule assembly pathway and favors bipolar spindle formation in most animal cells in which tubulin is in limiting amounts. PMID:27489339

  4. Cell cycle regulation of the activity and subcellular localization of Plk1, a human protein kinase implicated in mitotic spindle function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golsteyn, R M; Mundt, K E; Fry, A M; Nigg, E A

    1995-06-01

    Correct assembly and function of the mitotic spindle during cell division is essential for the accurate partitioning of the duplicated genome to daughter cells. Protein phosphorylation has long been implicated in controlling spindle function and chromosome segregation, and genetic studies have identified several protein kinases and phosphatases that are likely to regulate these processes. In particular, mutations in the serine/threonine-specific Drosophila kinase polo, and the structurally related kinase Cdc5p of Saccharomyces cerevisae, result in abnormal mitotic and meiotic divisions. Here, we describe a detailed analysis of the cell cycle-dependent activity and subcellular localization of Plk1, a recently identified human protein kinase with extensive sequence similarity to both Drosophila polo and S. cerevisiae Cdc5p. With the aid of recombinant baculoviruses, we have established a reliable in vitro assay for Plk1 kinase activity. We show that the activity of human Plk1 is cell cycle regulated, Plk1 activity being low during interphase but high during mitosis. We further show, by immunofluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy, that human Plk1 binds to components of the mitotic spindle at all stages of mitosis, but undergoes a striking redistribution as cells progress from metaphase to anaphase. Specifically, Plk1 associates with spindle poles up to metaphase, but relocalizes to the equatorial plane, where spindle microtubules overlap (the midzone), as cells go through anaphase. These results indicate that the association of Plk1 with the spindle is highly dynamic and that Plk1 may function at multiple stages of mitotic progression. Taken together, our data strengthen the notion that human Plk1 may represent a functional homolog of polo and Cdc5p, and they suggest that this kinase plays an important role in the dynamic function of the mitotic spindle during chromosome segregation.

  5. Pacemaker activity in a sensory ending with multiple encoding sites : The cat muscle spindle primary ending

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banks, RW; Hulliger, M; Scheepstra, KA; Otten, E

    1997-01-01

    1. A combined physiological, histological and computer modelling study was carried out on muscle spindles of the cat tenuissimus muscle to examine whether there was any correlation between the functional interaction of putative encoding sites, operated separately by static and dynamic fusimotor neur

  6. Design of a Micro Milling Setup with an Active Magnetic Bearing Spindle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimman, M.H.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the design of a micro milling setup with an active magnetic bearing spindle. Micro milling is the mechanical removal of material with sub millimeter tools. An active magnetic bearing typically consists of a set of magnetic actuators, a control loop and position sensors. Activ

  7. Skp2 is required for Aurora B activation in cell mitosis and spindle checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Juan; Huang, Yu-Fan; Zhou, Xin-Ke; Zhang, Wei; Lian, Yi-Fan; Lv, Xiao-Bin; Gao, Xiu-Rong; Lin, Hui-Kuan; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Huang, Jian-Qing

    2015-01-01

    The Aurora B kinase plays a critical role in cell mitosis and spindle checkpoint. Here, we showed that the ubiquitin E3-ligase protein Skp2, also as a cell-cycle regulatory protein, was required for the activation of Aurora B and its downstream protein. When we restored Skp2 knockdown Hela cells with Skp2 and Skp2-LRR E3 ligase dead mutant we found that Skp2 could rescue the defect in the activation of Aurora B, but the mutant failed to do so. Furthermore, we discovered that Skp2 could interact with Aurora B and trigger Aurora B Lysine (K) 63-linked ubiquitination. Finally, we demonstrated the essential role of Skp2 in cell mitosis progression and spindle checkpoint, which was Aurora B dependent. Our results identified a novel ubiquitinated substrate of Skp2, and also indicated that Aurora B ubiquitination might serve as an important event for Aurora B activation in cell mitosis and spindle checkpoint.

  8. Modulation of jaw muscle spindle afferent activity following intramuscular injections with hypertonic saline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ro, J Y; Capra, N F

    2001-05-01

    Transient noxious chemical stimulation of small diameter muscle afferents modulates jaw movement-related responses of caudal brainstem neurons. While it is likely that the effect is mediated from the spindle afferents in the mesencephalic nucleus (Vmes) via the caudally projecting Probst's tract, the mechanisms of pain induced modulations of jaw muscle spindle afferents is not known. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that jaw muscle nociceptors gain access to muscle spindle afferents in the same muscle via central mechanisms and alter their sensitivity. Thirty-five neurons recorded from the Vmes were characterized as muscle spindle afferents based on their responses to passive jaw movements, muscle palpation, and electrical stimulation of the masseter nerve. Each cell was tested by injecting a small volume (250 microl) of either 5% hypertonic and/or isotonic saline into the receptor-bearing muscle. Twenty-nine units were tested with 5% hypertonic saline, of which 79% (23/29) showed significant modulation of mean firing rates (MFRs) during one or more phases of ramp-and-hold movements. Among the muscle spindle primary-like units (n = 12), MFRs of 4 units were facilitated, five reduced, two showed mixed responses and one unchanged. In secondary-like units (n = 17), MFRs of 9 were facilitated, three reduced and five unchanged. Thirteen units were tested with isotonic saline, of which 77% showed no significant changes of MFRs. Further analysis revealed that the hypertonic saline not only affected the overall output of muscle spindle afferents, but also increased the variability of firing and altered the relationship between afferent signal and muscle length. These results demonstrated that activation of muscle nociceptors significantly affects proprioceptive properties of jaw muscle spindles via central neural mechanisms. The changes can have deleterious effects on oral motor function as well as kinesthetic sensibility.

  9. Budding yeast dma proteins control septin dynamics and the spindle position checkpoint by promoting the recruitment of the Elm1 kinase to the bud neck.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlini, Laura; Fraschini, Roberta; Boettcher, Barbara; Barral, Yves; Lucchini, Giovanna; Piatti, Simonetta

    2012-01-01

    The first step towards cytokinesis in budding yeast is the assembly of a septin ring at the future site of bud emergence. Integrity of this ring is crucial for cytokinesis, proper spindle positioning, and the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC). This checkpoint delays mitotic exit and cytokinesis as long as the anaphase spindle does not properly align with the division axis. SPOC signalling requires the Kin4 protein kinase and the Kin4-regulating Elm1 kinase, which also controls septin dynamics. Here, we show that the two redundant ubiquitin-ligases Dma1 and Dma2 control septin dynamics and the SPOC by promoting the efficient recruitment of Elm1 to the bud neck. Indeed, dma1 dma2 mutant cells show reduced levels of Elm1 at the bud neck and Elm1-dependent activation of Kin4. Artificial recruitment of Elm1 to the bud neck of the same cells is sufficient to re-establish a normal septin ring, proper spindle positioning, and a proficient SPOC response in dma1 dma2 cells. Altogether, our data indicate that septin dynamics and SPOC function are intimately linked and support the idea that integrity of the bud neck is crucial for SPOC signalling.

  10. Budding yeast dma proteins control septin dynamics and the spindle position checkpoint by promoting the recruitment of the Elm1 kinase to the bud neck.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Merlini

    Full Text Available The first step towards cytokinesis in budding yeast is the assembly of a septin ring at the future site of bud emergence. Integrity of this ring is crucial for cytokinesis, proper spindle positioning, and the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC. This checkpoint delays mitotic exit and cytokinesis as long as the anaphase spindle does not properly align with the division axis. SPOC signalling requires the Kin4 protein kinase and the Kin4-regulating Elm1 kinase, which also controls septin dynamics. Here, we show that the two redundant ubiquitin-ligases Dma1 and Dma2 control septin dynamics and the SPOC by promoting the efficient recruitment of Elm1 to the bud neck. Indeed, dma1 dma2 mutant cells show reduced levels of Elm1 at the bud neck and Elm1-dependent activation of Kin4. Artificial recruitment of Elm1 to the bud neck of the same cells is sufficient to re-establish a normal septin ring, proper spindle positioning, and a proficient SPOC response in dma1 dma2 cells. Altogether, our data indicate that septin dynamics and SPOC function are intimately linked and support the idea that integrity of the bud neck is crucial for SPOC signalling.

  11. Design of a Micro Milling Setup with an Active Magnetic Bearing Spindle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kimman, M.H.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis describes the design of a micro milling setup with an active magnetic bearing spindle. Micro milling is the mechanical removal of material with sub millimeter tools. An active magnetic bearing typically consists of a set of magnetic actuators, a control loop and position sensors.

  12. The Nonlinear Stability Prediction and FEM Modeling of High-Speed Spindle System with Joints Dynamic Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available When predicting the nonlinear stability of high-speed spindle system, it is necessary to create an accurate model that reflects the dynamic characteristics of the whole system, including the spindle-bearing joint and spindle-holder-tool joints. In this paper, the distribution spring model of spindle-holder-tool joints was built with the consideration of its dynamic characteristics; the five-DOF dynamic model of the angle contact ball bearing was also established to study the influence of speed and preload on the spindle-bearing joint, both of which were used in the general whole complete spindle system FEM model. The rationality of the model was verified by comparison with the FRF of traditional rigid model and experiments. At last, the influences of speed and cutting force on the nonlinear stability were analyzed by amplitude spectrum, bifurcation, and Poincaré mapping. The results provided a theoretical basis and an evaluating criterion for nonlinear stability prediction and product surface quality improvement.

  13. RESEARCH ON MODELING AND CHARACTERISTICS OF THE SPINDLE DYNAMIC COUPLING ABSORBERING SYSTEM OF A SUPER-PRECISION SURFACE GRINDING MACHINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The bearing is described by constrain matrix, and the spindle system of a NC surface grinding machine is simplified as elastic-coupling beam, then modal synthesis method is used to establish the dynamic model of beam.Moreover, the response of the end of rotor is analyzed, and the natural frequency, principle mode and other dynamic characteristics of the coupling system are studied, the law of bearing stiffness to coupling frequency and amplitude of rotor is also found.Finally, according to the actual condition, a dynamic absorber is designed.The simulation and experimental results show that the amplitude of spindle can be declined effectively when the dynamic absorber is attached.

  14. Adapt or die: how eukaryotic cells respond to prolonged activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossio, Valentina; Galati, Elena; Piatti, Simonetta

    2010-12-01

    Many cancer-treating compounds used in chemotherapies, the so-called antimitotics, target the mitotic spindle. Spindle defects in turn trigger activation of the SAC (spindle assembly checkpoint), a surveillance mechanism that transiently arrests cells in mitosis to provide the time for error correction. When the SAC is satisfied, it is silenced. However, after a variable amount of time, cells escape from the mitotic arrest, even if the SAC is not satisfied, through a process called adaptation or mitotic slippage. Adaptation weakens the killing properties of antimitotics, ultimately giving rise to resistant cancer cells. We summarize here the mechanisms underlying this process and propose a strategy to identify the factors involved using budding yeast as a model system. Inhibition of factors involved in SAC adaptation could have important therapeutic applications by potentiating the ability of antimitotics to cause cell death.

  15. Widespread reduction in sleep spindle activity in socially anxious children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Ines; Groch, Sabine; Preiss, Andrea; Walitza, Susanne; Huber, Reto

    2017-05-01

    Social anxiety disorder (SAD) is one of the most prevalent psychiatric diseases typically emerging during childhood and adolescence. Biological vulnerabilities such as a protracted maturation of prefrontal cortex functioning together with heightened reactivity of the limbic system leading to increased emotional reactivity are discussed as factors contributing to the emergence and maintenance of SAD. Sleep slow wave activity (SWA, 0.75-4.5 Hz) and sleep spindle activity (9-16 Hz) reflect processes of brain maturation and emotion regulation. We used high-density electroencephalography to characterize sleep SWA and spindle activity and their relationship to emotional reactivity in children and adolescents suffering from SAD and healthy controls (HC). Subjectively rated arousal was assessed using an emotional picture-word association task. SWA did not differ between socially anxious and healthy participants. We found a widespread reduction in fast spindle activity (13-16 Hz) in SAD patients compared to HC. SAD patients rated negative stimuli to be more arousing and these arousal ratings were negatively correlated with fast spindle activity. These results suggest electrophysiological alterations that are evident at an early stage of psychopathology and that are closely linked to one core symptom of anxiety disorders such as increased emotional reactivity. The role of disturbed GABAergic neurotransmission is discussed as an underlying factor.

  16. Reduced Sleep Spindle Activity in Early-Onset and Elevated Risk for Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Jorge; Hoffmann, Robert; Armitage, Roseanne

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Sleep disturbances are common in major depressive disorder (MDD), although polysomnographic (PSG) abnormalities are more prevalent in adults than in children and adolescents with MDD. Sleep spindle activity (SPA) is associated with neuroplasticity mechanisms during brain maturation and is more abundant in childhood and adolescence than…

  17. Spindle-like activity appearing during paradoxical sleep in rats with iron-induced cortical focus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uezu,Eiko

    1982-06-01

    Full Text Available Under barbiturate anesthesia, male Wistar rats weighing 250-300 g were injected with 2.5 microliters of 0.2 M FeCl3 solution into the left sensori-motor cortex to induce an epileptic focus with minimal abnormal activities. Polygraphy started 1 week after the surgery, showed a spindle-like hypersynchronous activity that appeared not only in the slow wave sleep period but also during paradoxical sleep (PS. This activity had a frequency of 8-14 Hz. The amplitude was more than 200 mu v in the right (non-injected side cortex but very small in the left cortex (injected side. Isolated spike discharges were observed in an ECoG of slow wave sleep. Apart from this activity there was nothing resembling the usual sleep spindles.

  18. Time-frequency dynamics during sleep spindles on the EEG in rodents with a genetic predisposition to absence epilepsy (WAG/Rij rats)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hramov, Alexander E.; Sitnikova, Evgenija Y.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Grubov, Vadim V.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Khramova, Marina V.

    2015-03-01

    Sleep spindles are known to appear spontaneously in the thalamocortical neuronal network of the brain during slow-wave sleep; pathological processes in the thalamocortical network may be the reason of the absence epilepsy. The aim of the present work is to study developed changes in the time-frequency structure of sleep spindles during the progressive development of the absence epilepsy in WAG/Rij rats. EEG recordings were made at age 7 and 9 months. Automatic recognition and subsequent analysis of sleep spindles on the EEG were performed using the continuous wavelet transform. The duration of epileptic discharges and the total duration of epileptic activity were found to increase with age, while the duration of sleep spindles, conversely, decreased. In terms of the mean frequency, sleep spindles could be divided into three classes: `slow' (mean frequency 9.3Hz), `medium' (11.4Hz), and `fast' (13.5Hz). Slow and medium (transitional) spindles in five-month-old animals showed increased frequency from the beginning to the end of the spindle. The more intense the epilepsy is, the shorter are the durations of spindles of all types. The mean frequencies of `medium' and `fast' spindles were higher in rats with more intense signs of epilepsy. Overall, high epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats was linked with significant changes in spindles of the transitional type, with less marked changes in the two traditionally identified types of spindle, slow and fast.

  19. Taxifolin enhances andrographolide-induced mitotic arrest and apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells via spindle assembly checkpoint activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Rong Zhang

    Full Text Available Andrographolide (Andro suppresses proliferation and triggers apoptosis in many types of cancer cells. Taxifolin (Taxi has been proposed to prevent cancer development similar to other dietary flavonoids. In the present study, the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of the addition of Andro alone and Andro and Taxi together on human prostate carcinoma DU145 cells were assessed. Andro inhibited prostate cancer cell proliferation by mitotic arrest and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Although the effect of Taxi alone on DU145 cell proliferation was not significant, the combined use of Taxi with Andro significantly potentiated the anti-proliferative effect of increased mitotic arrest and apoptosis by enhancing the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose polymerase, and caspases-7 and -9. Andro together with Taxi enhanced microtubule polymerization in vitro, and they induced the formation of twisted and elongated spindles in the cancer cells, thus leading to mitotic arrest. In addition, we showed that depletion of MAD2, a component in the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC, alleviated the mitotic block induced by the two compounds, suggesting that they trigger mitotic arrest by SAC activation. This study suggests that the anti-cancer activity of Andro can be significantly enhanced in combination with Taxi by disrupting microtubule dynamics and activating the SAC.

  20. Taxifolin enhances andrographolide-induced mitotic arrest and apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells via spindle assembly checkpoint activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhong Rong; Al Zaharna, Mazen; Wong, Matthew Man-Kin; Chiu, Sung-Kay; Cheung, Hon-Yeung

    2013-01-01

    Andrographolide (Andro) suppresses proliferation and triggers apoptosis in many types of cancer cells. Taxifolin (Taxi) has been proposed to prevent cancer development similar to other dietary flavonoids. In the present study, the cytotoxic and apoptotic effects of the addition of Andro alone and Andro and Taxi together on human prostate carcinoma DU145 cells were assessed. Andro inhibited prostate cancer cell proliferation by mitotic arrest and activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Although the effect of Taxi alone on DU145 cell proliferation was not significant, the combined use of Taxi with Andro significantly potentiated the anti-proliferative effect of increased mitotic arrest and apoptosis by enhancing the cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, and caspases-7 and -9. Andro together with Taxi enhanced microtubule polymerization in vitro, and they induced the formation of twisted and elongated spindles in the cancer cells, thus leading to mitotic arrest. In addition, we showed that depletion of MAD2, a component in the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), alleviated the mitotic block induced by the two compounds, suggesting that they trigger mitotic arrest by SAC activation. This study suggests that the anti-cancer activity of Andro can be significantly enhanced in combination with Taxi by disrupting microtubule dynamics and activating the SAC.

  1. Mitotic spindle perturbations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tame, Mihoko Amy

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules are major components of the cytoskeleton and form the bipolar spindle apparatus during mitosis. The mitotic spindle consists of highly dynamic microtubule polymers that are under constant modulation, controlled by multiple motor proteins and microtubule-associated proteins. This tight s

  2. Increased sleep spindle activity in patients with Costello syndrome (HRAS gene mutation).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Marca, Giacomo; Leoni, Chiara; Dittoni, Serena; Battaglia, Domenica; Losurdo, Anna; Testani, Elisa; Colicchio, Salvatore; Gnoni, Valentina; Gambardella, Maria L; Mariotti, Paolo; Alfieri, Paolo; Tartaglia, Marco; Zampino, Giuseppe

    2011-06-01

    Costello syndrome is a congenital disorder because of HRAS gene mutation, frequently associated with neurologic impairment and sleep disorders. The aims of the study were to evaluate the sleep EEG, and particularly the sleep spindles, in a population of patients with Costello syndrome and to compare them with those characterizing unaffected subjects. Eleven subjects (5 men and 6 women) with Costello syndrome were included in the study; age ranged between 18 months and 31 years (mean, 9.6 ± 9.4 years). The diagnosis was posed on the basis of established clinical criteria and confirmed molecularly. Sleep EEG was studied by means of full-night, laboratory-based video-polysomnography, performed overnight, during hospitalization. Sleep activity was quantified by means of power spectral analysis. Patients heterozygous for an HRAS mutation exhibited increased EEG power in 12- to 15-Hz activity band compared with age-matched control subjects. In conclusion, the authors observed a consistent increase in the amplitude of cortical sleep spindles in all our subjects with an HRAS mutation. These "giant" spindles were not associated with any evidence of structural damage of the cortex or the thalami and should be considered as phenotypic feature of sleep EEG activity in Costello syndrome because of HRAS mutation.

  3. Comparative investigation on spindle behavior and MPF activity changes during oocyte maturation between gynogenetic and amphimictic crucian carp

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANGZHONGAN; QUNHUALI; 等

    1999-01-01

    The spindle behavior and MPF activity changes in the progression of oocyte maturation were investigated and compared with cytological observation and kinase assay between gynogenetic silver crucian carp and amphimictic colored crucian carp.MPF activity was measured by using histone H1 as phosphorylation substrate.There were two similar oscillatory MPF kinase activity changes during oocyte maturation in two kinds of fishes with different reproductive modes,but there existed some subtle difference between them.The subtle difference was that the first peak of MPF kinase activity was kept to a longerlasting time in the gynogenetic silver crucian carp than in the amphimictic colored crucian carp.It was suggested that the difference may be related to the spindle behavior changes,such as tripolar spindle formation and spindle rearrangement in the gynogenetic crucian carp.

  4. Spindle oscillations during asymmetric cell division require a threshold number of active cortical force generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecreaux, Jacques; Röper, Jens-Christian; Kruse, Karsten; Jülicher, Frank; Hyman, Anthony A; Grill, Stephan W; Howard, Jonathon

    2006-11-07

    Asymmetric division of the C. elegans zygote is due to the posterior-directed movement of the mitotic spindle during metaphase and anaphase. During this movement along the anterior-posterior axis, the spindle oscillates transversely. These motions are thought to be driven by a force-generating complex-possibly containing the motor protein cytoplasmic dynein-that is located at the cell cortex and pulls on microtubules growing out from the spindle poles. A theoretical analysis indicates that the oscillations might arise from mechanical coordination of the force-generating motors, and this coordination is mediated by the load dependence of the motors' detachment from the microtubules. The model predicts that the motor activity must exceed a threshold for oscillations to occur. We have tested the existence of a threshold by using RNA interference to gradually reduce the levels of dynein light intermediate chain as well as GPR-1 and GPR-2 that are involved in the G protein-mediated regulation of the force generators. We found an abrupt cessation of oscillations as expected if the motor activity dropped below a threshold. Furthermore, we can account for the complex choreography of the mitotic spindle-the precise temporal coordination of the buildup and die-down of the transverse oscillations with the posterior displacement-by a gradual increase in the processivity of a single type of motor machinery during metaphase and anaphase. The agreement between our results and modeling suggests that the force generators themselves have the intrinsic capability of generating oscillations when opposing forces exceed a threshold.

  5. MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 is required for mouse meiotic spindle assembly and kinetochore-microtubule attachment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Yuan

    Full Text Available MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2, a direct substrate of p38 MAPK, plays key roles in multiple physiological functions in mitosis. Here, we show for the first time the unique distribution pattern of MK2 in meiosis. Phospho-MK2 was localized on bipolar spindle minus ends and along the interstitial axes of homologous chromosomes extending over centromere regions and arm regions at metaphase of first meiosis (MI stage in mouse oocytes. At metaphase of second meiosis (MII stage, p-MK2 was localized on the bipolar spindle minus ends and at the inner centromere region of sister chromatids as dots. Knockdown or inhibition of MK2 resulted in spindle defects. Spindles were surrounded by irregular nondisjunction chromosomes, which were arranged in an amphitelic or syntelic/monotelic manner, or chromosomes detached from the spindles. Kinetochore-microtubule attachments were impaired in MK2-deficient oocytes because spindle microtubules became unstable in response to cold treatment. In addition, homologous chromosome segregation and meiosis progression were inhibited in these oocytes. Our data suggest that MK2 may be essential for functional meiotic bipolar spindle formation, chromosome segregation and proper kinetochore-microtubule attachments.

  6. Anthrax receptors position the spindle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minc, Nicolas; Piel, Matthieu

    2013-01-01

    Spindle orientation plays a pivotal role in tissue morphogenesis. An asymmetric anthrax receptor cap is revealed to promote activation of a formin to orient the spindle along the planar cell polarity (PCP) axis in zebrafish dorsal epiblast cells.

  7. Active Control for Multinode Unbalanced Vibration of Flexible Spindle Rotor System with Active Magnetic Bearing

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoli Qiao; Guojun Hu

    2017-01-01

    The unbalanced vibration of the spindle rotor system in high-speed cutting processes not only seriously affects the surface quality of the machined products, but also greatly reduces the service life of the electric spindle. However, since the unbalanced vibration is often distributed on different node positions, the multinode unbalanced vibration greatly exacerbates the difficulty of vibration control. Based on the traditional influence coefficient method for controlling the vibration of a f...

  8. Activity of the kinesin spindle protein inhibitor ispinesib (SB-715992) in models of breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purcell, James W; Davis, Jefferson; Reddy, Mamatha; Martin, Shamra; Samayoa, Kimberly; Vo, Hung; Thomsen, Karen; Bean, Peter; Kuo, Wen Lin; Ziyad, Safiyyah; Billig, Jessica; Feiler, Heidi S; Gray, Joe W; Wood, Kenneth W; Cases, Sylvaine

    2009-06-10

    Ispinesib (SB-715992) is a potent inhibitor of kinesin spindle protein (KSP), a kinesin motor protein essential for the formation of a bipolar mitotic spindle and cell cycle progression through mitosis. Clinical studies of ispinesib have demonstrated a 9% response rate in patients with locally advanced or metastatic breast cancer, and a favorable safety profile without significant neurotoxicities, gastrointestinal toxicities or hair loss. To better understand the potential of ispinesib in the treatment of breast cancer we explored the activity of ispinesib alone and in combination several therapies approved for the treatment of breast cancer. We measured the ispinesib sensitivity and pharmacodynamic response of breast cancer cell lines representative of various subtypes in vitro and as xenografts in vivo, and tested the ability of ispinesib to enhance the anti-tumor activity of approved therapies. In vitro, ispinesib displayed broad anti-proliferative activity against a panel of 53 breast cell-lines. In vivo, ispinesib produced regressions in each of five breast cancer models, and tumor free survivors in three of these models. The effects of ispinesib treatment on pharmacodynamic markers of mitosis and apoptosis were examined in vitro and in vivo, revealing a greater increase in both mitotic and apoptotic markers in the MDA-MB-468 model than in the less sensitive BT-474 model. In vivo, ispinesib enhanced the anti-tumor activity of trastuzumab, lapatinib, doxorubicin, and capecitabine, and exhibited activity comparable to paclitaxel and ixabepilone. These findings support further clinical exploration of KSP inhibitors for the treatment of breast cancer.

  9. Dynamic localization of C. elegans TPR-GoLoco proteins mediates mitotic spindle orientation by extrinsic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werts, Adam D; Roh-Johnson, Minna; Goldstein, Bob

    2011-10-01

    Cell divisions are sometimes oriented by extrinsic signals, by mechanisms that are poorly understood. Proteins containing TPR and GoLoco-domains (C. elegans GPR-1/2, Drosophila Pins, vertebrate LGN and AGS3) are candidates for mediating mitotic spindle orientation by extrinsic signals, but the mechanisms by which TPR-GoLoco proteins may localize in response to extrinsic cues are not well defined. The C. elegans TPR-GoLoco protein pair GPR-1/2 is enriched at a site of contact between two cells - the endomesodermal precursor EMS and the germline precursor P(2) - and both cells align their divisions toward this shared cell-cell contact. To determine whether GPR-1/2 is enriched at this site within both cells, we generated mosaic embryos with GPR-1/2 bearing a different fluorescent tag in different cells. We were surprised to find that GPR-1/2 distribution is symmetric in EMS, where GPR-1/2 had been proposed to function as an asymmetric cue for spindle orientation. Instead, GPR-1/2 is asymmetrically distributed only in P(2). We demonstrate a role for normal GPR-1/2 localization in P(2) division orientation. We show that MES-1/Src signaling plays an instructive role in P(2) for asymmetric GPR-1/2 localization and normal spindle orientation. We ruled out a model in which signaling localizes GPR-1/2 by locally inhibiting LET-99, a GPR-1/2 antagonist. Instead, asymmetric GPR-1/2 distribution is established by destabilization at one cell contact, diffusion, and trapping at another cell contact. Once the mitotic spindle of P(2) is oriented normally, microtubule-dependent removal of GPR-1/2 prevented excess accumulation, in an apparent negative-feedback loop. These results highlight the role of dynamic TPR-GoLoco protein localization as a key mediator of mitotic spindle alignment in response to instructive, external cues.

  10. Statistical analysis of sleep spindle occurrences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panas, Dagmara; Malinowska, Urszula; Piotrowski, Tadeusz; Żygierewicz, Jarosław; Suffczyński, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Spindles - a hallmark of stage II sleep - are a transient oscillatory phenomenon in the EEG believed to reflect thalamocortical activity contributing to unresponsiveness during sleep. Currently spindles are often classified into two classes: fast spindles, with a frequency of around 14 Hz, occurring in the centro-parietal region; and slow spindles, with a frequency of around 12 Hz, prevalent in the frontal region. Here we aim to establish whether the spindle generation process also exhibits spatial heterogeneity. Electroencephalographic recordings from 20 subjects were automatically scanned to detect spindles and the time occurrences of spindles were used for statistical analysis. Gamma distribution parameters were fit to each inter-spindle interval distribution, and a modified Wald-Wolfowitz lag-1 correlation test was applied. Results indicate that not all spindles are generated by the same statistical process, but this dissociation is not spindle-type specific. Although this dissociation is not topographically specific, a single generator for all spindle types appears unlikely.

  11. Upregulated Op18/stathmin activity causes chromosomal instability through a mechanism that evades the spindle assembly checkpoint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmfeldt, Per; Sellin, Mikael E. [Department of Molecular Biology, Umea University, SE-901 87 Umea (Sweden); Gullberg, Martin, E-mail: Martin.Gullberg@molbiol.umu.se [Department of Molecular Biology, Umea University, SE-901 87 Umea (Sweden)

    2010-07-15

    Op18/stathmin (Op18) is a microtubule-destabilizing protein that is phosphorylation-inactivated during mitosis and its normal function is to govern tubulin subunit partitioning during interphase. Human tumors frequently overexpress Op18 and a tumor-associated Q18{yields}E mutation has been identified that confers hyperactivity, destabilizes spindle microtubules, and causes mitotic aberrancies, polyploidization, and chromosome loss in K562 leukemia cells. Here we determined whether wild-type and mutant Op18 have the potential to cause chromosomal instability by some means other than interference with spindle assembly, and thereby bypassing the spindle assembly checkpoint. Our approach was based on Op18 derivatives with distinct temporal order of activity during mitosis, conferred either by differential phosphorylation inactivation or by anaphase-specific degradation through fusion with the destruction box of cyclin B1. We present evidence that excessive Op18 activity generates chromosomal instability through interference occurring subsequent to the metaphase-to-anaphase transition, which reduces the fidelity of chromosome segregation to spindle poles during anaphase. Similar to uncorrected merotelic attachment, this mechanism evades detection by the spindle assembly checkpoint and thus provides an additional route to chromosomal instability.

  12. Rotating waves during human sleep spindles organize global patterns of activity that repeat precisely through the night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Lyle; Piantoni, Giovanni; Koller, Dominik; Cash, Sydney S; Halgren, Eric; Sejnowski, Terrence J

    2016-01-01

    During sleep, the thalamus generates a characteristic pattern of transient, 11-15 Hz sleep spindle oscillations, which synchronize the cortex through large-scale thalamocortical loops. Spindles have been increasingly demonstrated to be critical for sleep-dependent consolidation of memory, but the specific neural mechanism for this process remains unclear. We show here that cortical spindles are spatiotemporally organized into circular wave-like patterns, organizing neuronal activity over tens of milliseconds, within the timescale for storing memories in large-scale networks across the cortex via spike-time dependent plasticity. These circular patterns repeat over hours of sleep with millisecond temporal precision, allowing reinforcement of the activity patterns through hundreds of reverberations. These results provide a novel mechanistic account for how global sleep oscillations and synaptic plasticity could strengthen networks distributed across the cortex to store coherent and integrated memories. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17267.001 PMID:27855061

  13. Antagonistic activities of Klp10A and Orbit regulate spindle length, bipolarity and function in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laycock, Joseph E; Savoian, Matthew S; Glover, David M

    2006-06-01

    The metaphase-spindle steady-state length occurs as spindle microtubules ;flux', incorporating new subunits at their plus ends, while simultaneously losing subunits from their minus ends. Orbit/Mast/CLASP is required for tubulin subunit addition at kinetochores, and several kinesins regulate spindle morphology and/or flux by serving as microtubule depolymerases. Here, we use RNA interference in S2 cells to examine the relationship between Orbit and the four predicted kinesin-type depolymerases encoded by the Drosophila genome (Klp10A, Klp59C, Klp59D and Klp67A). Single depletion of Orbit results in monopolar spindles, mitotic arrest and a subsequent increase in apoptotic cells. These phenotypes are rescued by co-depleting Klp10A but none of the other three depolymerases. Spindle bipolarity is restored by preventing the spindle collapse seen in cells that lack Orbit, leading to functional spindles that are similar to controls in shape and length. We conclude that Klp10A exclusively antagonises Orbit in the regulation of bipolar spindle formation and maintenance.

  14. Constitutive Cdk2 activity promotes aneuploidy while altering the spindle assembly and tetraploidy checkpoints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jahn, Stephan C; Corsino, Patrick E; Davis, Bradley J;

    2013-01-01

    instability. Expression of these complexes in the MCF10A cell line leads to retinoblastoma protein (Rb) hyperphosphorylation, a subsequent increase in proliferation rate, and increased expression of the spindle assembly checkpoint protein Mad2. This results in a strengthening of the spindle assembly...

  15. A comparative study of changes operated by sympathetic nervous system activation on spindle afferent discharge and on tonic vibration reflex in rabbit jaw muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passatore, M; Deriu, F; Grassi, C; Roatta, S

    1996-03-07

    The effect of sympathetic activation on the spindle afferent response to vibratory stimuli eliciting the tonic vibration reflex in jaw closing muscles was studied in precollicularly decerebrate rabbits. Stimulation of the cervical sympathetic trunk, at frequencies within the physiologic range, consistently induced a decrease in spindle response to muscle vibration, which was often preceded by a transient enhancement. Spindle discharge was usually correlated with the EMG activity in the masseter muscle and the tension reflexly developed by jaw muscles. The changes in spindle response to vibration were superimposed on variations of the basal discharge which exhibited different patterns in the studied units, increases in the firing rate being more frequently observed. These effects were mimicked by close arterial injection of the selective alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. Data presented here suggest that sympathetically-induced modifications of the tonic vibration reflex are due to changes exerted on muscle spindle afferent information.

  16. Monitoring spindle orientation: Spindle position checkpoint in charge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caydasi, Ayse K; Ibrahim, Bashar; Pereira, Gislene

    2010-12-11

    Every cell division in budding yeast is inherently asymmetric and counts on the correct positioning of the mitotic spindle along the mother-daughter polarity axis for faithful chromosome segregation. A surveillance mechanism named the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC), monitors the orientation of the mitotic spindle and prevents cells from exiting mitosis when the spindle fails to align along the mother-daughter axis. SPOC is essential for maintenance of ploidy in budding yeast and similar mechanisms might exist in higher eukaryotes to ensure faithful asymmetric cell division. Here, we review the current model of SPOC activation and highlight the importance of protein localization and phosphorylation for SPOC function.

  17. Monitoring spindle orientation: Spindle position checkpoint in charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Gislene

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Every cell division in budding yeast is inherently asymmetric and counts on the correct positioning of the mitotic spindle along the mother-daughter polarity axis for faithful chromosome segregation. A surveillance mechanism named the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC, monitors the orientation of the mitotic spindle and prevents cells from exiting mitosis when the spindle fails to align along the mother-daughter axis. SPOC is essential for maintenance of ploidy in budding yeast and similar mechanisms might exist in higher eukaryotes to ensure faithful asymmetric cell division. Here, we review the current model of SPOC activation and highlight the importance of protein localization and phosphorylation for SPOC function.

  18. Dampened hippocampal oscillations and enhanced spindle activity in an asymptomatic model of developmental cortical malformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cid, Elena; Gomez-Dominguez, Daniel; Martin-Lopez, David; Gal, Beatriz; Laurent, François; Ibarz, Jose M.; Francis, Fiona; Menendez de la Prida, Liset

    2014-01-01

    Developmental cortical malformations comprise a large spectrum of histopathological brain abnormalities and syndromes. Their genetic, developmental and clinical complexity suggests they should be better understood in terms of the complementary action of independently timed perturbations (i.e., the multiple-hit hypothesis). However, understanding the underlying biological processes remains puzzling. Here we induced developmental cortical malformations in offspring, after intraventricular injection of methylazoxymethanol (MAM) in utero in mice. We combined extensive histological and electrophysiological studies to characterize the model. We found that MAM injections at E14 and E15 induced a range of cortical and hippocampal malformations resembling histological alterations of specific genetic mutations and transplacental mitotoxic agent injections. However, in contrast to most of these models, intraventricularly MAM-injected mice remained asymptomatic and showed no clear epilepsy-related phenotype as tested in long-term chronic recordings and with pharmacological manipulations. Instead, they exhibited a non-specific reduction of hippocampal-related brain oscillations (mostly in CA1); including theta, gamma and HFOs; and enhanced thalamocortical spindle activity during non-REM sleep. These data suggest that developmental cortical malformations do not necessarily correlate with epileptiform activity. We propose that the intraventricular in utero MAM approach exhibiting a range of rhythmopathies is a suitable model for multiple-hit studies of associated neurological disorders. PMID:24782720

  19. Dampened hippocampal oscillations and enhanced spindle activity in an asymptomatic model of developmental cortical malformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eCid

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Developmental cortical malformations comprise a large spectrum of histopathological brain abnormalities and syndromes. Their genetic, developmental and clinical complexity suggests they should be better understood in terms of the complementary action of independently timed perturbations (i.e. the multiple-hit hypothesis. However, understanding the underlying biological processes remains puzzling. Here we induced developmental cortical malformations in offspring, after intraventricular injection of methylazoxymethanol (MAM in utero in mice. We combined extensive histological and electrophysiological studies to characterize the model. We found that MAM injections at E14 and E15 induced a range of cortical and hippocampal malformations resembling histological alterations of specific genetic mutations and transplacental mitotoxic agent injections. However, in contrast to most of these models, intraventricularly MAM-injected mice remained asymptomatic and showed no clear epilepsy-related phenotype as tested in long-term chronic recordings and with pharmacological manipulations. Instead, they exhibited a non-specific reduction of hippocampal-related brain oscillations (mostly in CA1; including theta, gamma and HFOs; and enhanced thalamocortical spindle activity during non-REM sleep. These data suggest that developmental cortical malformations do not necessarily correlate with epileptiform activity. We propose that the intraventricular in utero MAM approach exhibiting a range of rhythmopathies is a suitable model for multiple-hit studies of associated neurological disorders.

  20. Metaphase Spindle Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun M. Kapoor

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A microtubule-based bipolar spindle is required for error-free chromosome segregation during cell division. In this review I discuss the molecular mechanisms required for the assembly of this dynamic micrometer-scale structure in animal cells.

  1. Analysis of static and dynamic characteristic of spindle system and its structure optimization in camshaft grinding machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jianjun; Li, Chengzhe; Wu, Zhi

    2017-08-01

    As an important part of the valve opening and closing controller in engine, camshaft has high machining accuracy requirement in designing. Taking the high-speed camshaft grinder spindle system as the research object and the spindle system performance as the optimizing target, this paper firstly uses Solidworks to establish the three-dimensional finite element model (FEM) of spindle system, then conducts static analysis and the modal analysis by applying the established FEM in ANSYS Workbench, and finally uses the design optimization function of the ANSYS Workbench to optimize the structure parameter in the spindle system. The study results prove that the design of the spindle system fully meets the production requirements, and the performance of the optimized spindle system is promoted. Besides, this paper provides an analysis and optimization method for other grinder spindle systems.

  2. THE MORPHOLOGICAL CHANGES IN MUSCLE SPINDLES AND ALTERATIONS IN CELL ACTIVITY OF THE RATS' RED NUCLEUS AFTER 2 WEEKS' SIMULATED WEIGHTLESSNESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Yongjin; Fan Xiaoli; Wu Sudi; Li Qiang

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the morphological changes of soleus muscle spindle and electrical activity of neurons in Red Nucleus(RN) of the rat after 2 weeks' simulated weightlessness, and to reveal the interaction between proprioceptive inputs of muscle spindles and reciprocal alterations in RN under simulated weightlessness. Methods Twenty female rats were exposed to weightlessness simulated by tail-suspension for 14 days (SW-14d). Body weight(200-220g) matched female rats were control group(Con). The morphological changes in isolated muscle spindle of soleus muscle, the discharges of red nucleus neurons were observed after 14d tail-suspensions by silver staining and extracellular recording respectively. Results Compared with control group ,the nerve ending of muscle spindle in SW-14d was distorted, degenerated and dissolved; the diameters of intrafusal fibers and capsule in equatorial region of soleus muscle spindles were diminished(P<0.05). The spontaneous cell activity and discharge of RN neurons (spikes/s) induced by afferent firing from muscle spindles after injection of succinylcholine were reduced after 2 weeks' simulated weightlessness respectively (18.44±5.96 vs. 10.19±6.88, 32.50±8.08 vs. 16.86±5.97, P<0.01). Conclusion The degeneration of muscle spindle induced by simulated weightlessness may be one of the causes that led to alterations in discharges of RN.

  3. Dynamic Test and Research of Spindle Rotation Error%主轴回转误差的动态测试和研究∗

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙军; 黄圆; 秦显军; 钱彬彬

    2015-01-01

    In order to realize the error of measuring spindle rotation, to achieve dynamic separation of spin-dle rotation accuracy, paper uses mathematical statistics on LabVIEW software to develop a separate spindle error dynamic simulation software by mathematical statistics and theoretical basis for the design of a Rotary error test system based on LabVIEW spindle. The system consists of combining CompactRIO embedded sys-tem controller, LabVIEW software programming, data collection, data processing functions and data dis-play. The system is used to measure the actual spindle rotation accuracy to obtain high-precision spindle er-ror number.%为实现主轴回转误差的测量,实现主轴回转精度的动态分离,文章运用数理统计法在LabVIEW软件上开发了一套主轴回转误差动态分离模拟软件,并由数理统计法为理论基础设计出一个基于LabVIEW的主轴回转误差测试系统。该系统由结合嵌入式系统CompactRIO为控制器、LabVIEW软件编程,可以实现数据采集、数据处理和数据显示的功能。该系统用于机床主轴回转精度的实际测量,得到了高精度的主轴回转误差数据,为主轴回转误差的动态测量提供技术支持。

  4. Kinesin-5-independent mitotic spindle assembly requires the antiparallel microtubule crosslinker Ase1 in fission yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincon, Sergio A.; Lamson, Adam; Blackwell, Robert; Syrovatkina, Viktoriya; Fraisier, Vincent; Paoletti, Anne; Betterton, Meredith D.; Tran, Phong T.

    2017-05-01

    Bipolar spindle assembly requires a balance of forces where kinesin-5 produces outward pushing forces to antagonize the inward pulling forces from kinesin-14 or dynein. Accordingly, Kinesin-5 inactivation results in force imbalance leading to monopolar spindle and chromosome segregation failure. In fission yeast, force balance is restored when both kinesin-5 Cut7 and kinesin-14 Pkl1 are deleted, restoring spindle bipolarity. Here we show that the cut7Δpkl1Δ spindle is fully competent for chromosome segregation independently of motor activity, except for kinesin-6 Klp9, which is required for anaphase spindle elongation. We demonstrate that cut7Δpkl1Δ spindle bipolarity requires the microtubule antiparallel bundler PRC1/Ase1 to recruit CLASP/Cls1 to stabilize microtubules. Brownian dynamics-kinetic Monte Carlo simulations show that Ase1 and Cls1 activity are sufficient for initial bipolar spindle formation. We conclude that pushing forces generated by microtubule polymerization are sufficient to promote spindle pole separation and the assembly of bipolar spindle in the absence of molecular motors.

  5. Evidence that the spindle assembly checkpoint does not regulate APC(Fzy) activity in Drosophila female meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batiha, Osamah; Swan, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) plays an important role in mitotic cells to sense improper chromosome attachment to spindle microtubules and to inhibit APC(Fzy)-dependent destruction of cyclin B and Securin; consequent initiation of anaphase until correct attachments are made. In Drosophila , SAC genes have been found to play a role in ensuring proper chromosome segregation in meiosis, possibly reflecting a similar role for the SAC in APC(Fzy) inhibition during meiosis. We found that loss of function mutations in SAC genes, Mad2, zwilch, and mps1, do not lead to the predicted rise in APC(Fzy)-dependent degradation of cyclin B either globally throughout the egg or locally on the meiotic spindle. Further, the SAC is not responsible for the inability of APC(Fzy) to target cyclin B and promote anaphase in metaphase II arrested eggs from cort mutant females. Our findings support the argument that SAC proteins play checkpoint independent roles in Drosophila female meiosis and that other mechanisms must function to control APC activity.

  6. Analysis of EEG activity during sleep - brain hemisphere symmetry of two classes of sleep spindles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolen, Magdalena M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents automatic analysis of some selected human electroencephalographic patterns during deep sleep using the Matching Pursuit (MP) algorithm. The periodicity of deep sleep EEG patterns was observed by calculating autocorrelation functions of their percentage contributions. The study confirmed the increasing trend of amplitude-weighted average frequency of sleep spindles from frontal to posterior derivations. The dominant frequencies from the left and the right brain hemisphere were strongly correlated.

  7. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenq-Wei Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development.

  8. Spindle Bursts in Neonatal Rat Cerebral Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jenq-Wei; Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous and sensory evoked spindle bursts represent a functional hallmark of the developing cerebral cortex in vitro and in vivo. They have been observed in various neocortical areas of numerous species, including newborn rodents and preterm human infants. Spindle bursts are generated in complex neocortical-subcortical circuits involving in many cases the participation of motor brain regions. Together with early gamma oscillations, spindle bursts synchronize the activity of a local neuronal network organized in a cortical column. Disturbances in spindle burst activity during corticogenesis may contribute to disorders in cortical architecture and in the activity-dependent control of programmed cell death. In this review we discuss (i) the functional properties of spindle bursts, (ii) the mechanisms underlying their generation, (iii) the synchronous patterns and cortical networks associated with spindle bursts, and (iv) the physiological and pathophysiological role of spindle bursts during early cortical development.

  9. Microcephaly protein Asp focuses the minus ends of spindle microtubules at the pole and within the spindle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Ami; Goshima, Gohta

    2015-12-07

    Depletion of Drosophila melanogaster Asp, an orthologue of microcephaly protein ASPM, causes spindle pole unfocusing during mitosis. However, it remains unclear how Asp contributes to pole focusing, a process that also requires the kinesin-14 motor Ncd. We show that Asp localizes to the minus ends of spindle microtubule (MT) bundles and focuses them to make the pole independent of Ncd. We identified a critical domain in Asp exhibiting MT cross-linking activity in vitro. Asp was also localized to, and focuses the minus ends of, intraspindle MTs that were nucleated in an augmin-dependent manner and translocated toward the poles by spindle MT flux. Ncd, in contrast, functioned as a global spindle coalescence factor not limited to MT ends. We propose a revised molecular model for spindle pole focusing in which Asp at the minus ends cross-links MTs at the pole and within the spindle. Additionally, this study provides new insight into the dynamics of intraspindle MTs by using Asp as a minus end marker. © 2015 Ito and Goshima.

  10. A defect-driven diagnostic method for machine tool spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogl, Gregory W; Donmez, M Alkan

    2015-01-01

    Simple vibration-based metrics are, in many cases, insufficient to diagnose machine tool spindle condition. These metrics couple defect-based motion with spindle dynamics; diagnostics should be defect-driven. A new method and spindle condition estimation device (SCED) were developed to acquire data and to separate system dynamics from defect geometry. Based on this method, a spindle condition metric relying only on defect geometry is proposed. Application of the SCED on various milling and turning spindles shows that the new approach is robust for diagnosing the machine tool spindle condition.

  11. Statistical analysis of sleep spindle occurrences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmara Panas

    Full Text Available Spindles - a hallmark of stage II sleep - are a transient oscillatory phenomenon in the EEG believed to reflect thalamocortical activity contributing to unresponsiveness during sleep. Currently spindles are often classified into two classes: fast spindles, with a frequency of around 14 Hz, occurring in the centro-parietal region; and slow spindles, with a frequency of around 12 Hz, prevalent in the frontal region. Here we aim to establish whether the spindle generation process also exhibits spatial heterogeneity. Electroencephalographic recordings from 20 subjects were automatically scanned to detect spindles and the time occurrences of spindles were used for statistical analysis. Gamma distribution parameters were fit to each inter-spindle interval distribution, and a modified Wald-Wolfowitz lag-1 correlation test was applied. Results indicate that not all spindles are generated by the same statistical process, but this dissociation is not spindle-type specific. Although this dissociation is not topographically specific, a single generator for all spindle types appears unlikely.

  12. Mechanical design principles of a mitotic spindle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Jonathan J; Roque, Hélio; Antony, Claude; Nédélec, François

    2014-12-18

    An organised spindle is crucial to the fidelity of chromosome segregation, but the relationship between spindle structure and function is not well understood in any cell type. The anaphase B spindle in fission yeast has a slender morphology and must elongate against compressive forces. This 'pushing' mode of chromosome transport renders the spindle susceptible to breakage, as observed in cells with a variety of defects. Here we perform electron tomographic analyses of the spindle, which suggest that it organises a limited supply of structural components to increase its compressive strength. Structural integrity is maintained throughout the spindle's fourfold elongation by organising microtubules into a rigid transverse array, preserving correct microtubule number and dynamically rescaling microtubule length.

  13. 交流主动磁轴承电主轴线性二次型最优控制%Linear quadratic optimal control of electric spindle supported by AC active magnetic bearings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱熀秋; 黄振跃; 阮颖; 张维煜; 杨益飞

    2012-01-01

    Aiming at an electric spindle supported by AC active magnetic bearings (AMBs), designing controllers of the AMBs using the linear quadratic optimal control theory is proposed. The basic structure and operation principle of an electric spindle supported by AMBs were expounded, and a state equation of the electric spindle supported by the AMBs was set up. Based on introduction of the linear quadratic optimal control theory, centralized and decentralized parameter controllers of the electric spindle supported by the AMBs were designed. The simulation analysis and comparison between the centralized and decentralized parameter controllers was completed by Matlab software. The simulation test results show that the decentralized controllers designed by linear quadratic optimal control theory operate well under the rotor speed of 20 000 r/min of the electric spindle supported by AMBs, and the rotor is suspended steadily. The electric spindle supported by AMBs operates according to the perfect performance indicator, and the control system of the AMBs has good dynamic and static operation performance.%针对交流主动磁轴承电主轴,提出采用线性二次型最优控制理论设计磁轴承控制器.阐述了一种交流主动磁轴承支承的电主轴结构和工作原理,建立了电主轴系统的状态方程.在介绍线性二次型最优控制理论的基础上,采用线性二次型最优控制理论设计了5自由度交流磁轴承电主轴分散和集中参数控制器,并用Matlab软件对集中和分散控制器进行仿真和性能比较.仿真实验结果表明,交流主动磁轴承电主轴转子在20 000 r/min以下运行,采用线性二次型最优控制理论设计的分散控制器,能够实现转子稳定悬浮,交流主动磁轴承电主轴能够按理想的指标运行,并且具有良好的动、静态性能.

  14. Sequential activities of Dynein, Mud and Asp in centrosome-spindle coupling maintain centrosome number upon mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosveld, Floris; Ainslie, Anna; Bellaïche, Yohanns

    2017-09-01

    Centrosomes nucleate microtubules and are tightly coupled to the bipolar spindle to ensure genome integrity, cell division orientation and centrosome segregation. While the mechanisms of centrosome-dependent microtubule nucleation and bipolar spindle assembly have been the focus of numerous works, less is known on the mechanisms ensuring the centrosome-spindle coupling. The conserved NuMA protein (Mud in Drosophila) is best known for its role in spindle orientation. Here we analyzed the role of Mud and two of its interactors, Asp and Dynein, in the regulation of centrosome numbers in Drosophila epithelial cells. We found that Dynein and Mud mainly initiate centrosome-spindle coupling prior to nuclear envelope breakdown (NEB) by promoting correct centrosome positioning or separation, while Asp acts largely independently of Dynein and Mud to maintain centrosome-spindle coupling. Failure in the centrosome-spindle coupling leads to mis-segregation of the two centrosomes into one daughter cell resulting in cells with supernumerary centrosomes during subsequent divisions. Together, we propose that Dynein, Mud and Asp sequentially operate during the cell cycle to ensure efficient centrosome-spindle coupling in mitosis preventing centrosome mis-segregation to maintain centrosome number. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Ipl1/Aurora kinase suppresses S-CDK-driven spindle formation during prophase I to ensure chromosome integrity during meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise Newnham

    Full Text Available Cells coordinate spindle formation with DNA repair and morphological modifications to chromosomes prior to their segregation to prevent cell division with damaged chromosomes. Here we uncover a novel and unexpected role for Aurora kinase in preventing the formation of spindles by Clb5-CDK (S-CDK during meiotic prophase I and when the DDR is active in budding yeast. This is critical since S-CDK is essential for replication during premeiotic S-phase as well as double-strand break induction that facilitates meiotic recombination and, ultimately, chromosome segregation. Furthermore, we find that depletion of Cdc5 polo kinase activity delays spindle formation in DDR-arrested cells and that ectopic expression of Cdc5 in prophase I enhances spindle formation, when Ipl1 is depleted. Our findings establish a new paradigm for Aurora kinase function in both negative and positive regulation of spindle dynamics.

  16. Cell cycle regulation of central spindle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Masanori; Pavicic, Visnja; Grüneberg, Ulrike; Nigg, Erich A; Glotzer, Michael

    2004-08-19

    The bipolar mitotic spindle is responsible for segregating sister chromatids at anaphase. Microtubule motor proteins generate spindle bipolarity and enable the spindle to perform mechanical work. A major change in spindle architecture occurs at anaphase onset when central spindle assembly begins. This structure regulates the initiation of cytokinesis and is essential for its completion. Central spindle assembly requires the centralspindlin complex composed of the Caenorhabditis elegans ZEN-4 (mammalian orthologue MKLP1) kinesin-like protein and the Rho family GAP CYK-4 (MgcRacGAP). Here we describe a regulatory mechanism that controls the timing of central spindle assembly. The mitotic kinase Cdk1/cyclin B phosphorylates the motor domain of ZEN-4 on a conserved site within a basic amino-terminal extension characteristic of the MKLP1 subfamily. Phosphorylation by Cdk1 diminishes the motor activity of ZEN-4 by reducing its affinity for microtubules. Preventing Cdk1 phosphorylation of ZEN-4/MKLP1 causes enhanced metaphase spindle localization and defects in chromosome segregation. Thus, phosphoregulation of the motor domain of MKLP1 kinesin ensures that central spindle assembly occurs at the appropriate time in the cell cycle and maintains genomic stability.

  17. The N-terminal domain of DDA3 regulates the spindle-association of the microtubule depolymerase Kif2a and controls the mitotic function of DDA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Chang-Young; Fang, Guowei

    2009-10-01

    DDA3 is a microtubule-associated protein that controls chromosome congression and segregation by regulating the dynamics of the mitotic spindle. Depletion of DDA3 alters spindle structure, generates unaligned chromosomes at metaphase, and delays the mitotic progression. DDA3 interacts with the microtubule depolymerase Kif2a and controls the association of Kif2a to the mitotic spindle and the dynamic turnover of microtubules in the spindle. To understand the function and regulation of DDA3, we analyzed its domain structure and found that the C-terminal domain of DDA3 directly binds to microtubules in vitro and associates with the mitotic spindle in vivo. The N-terminal domain of DDA3 does not interact with microtubules, but acts dominant negatively over the wild-type protein. Ectopic expression of this domain prevents the endogenous DDA3 from association with the spindle and results in a high frequency of unaligned chromosomes in metaphase cells, a phenotype similar to that in metaphase cells depleted of DDA3. Mechanistically, expression of N-terminal DDA3 reduces the amount of spindle-associated Kif2a and increases the spindle microtubule density, pheno-copying those in DDA3-depleted cells. We conclude that DDA3 has a distinct domain structure. The C-terminal domain confers its ability to associate with the mitotic spindle, while the regulatory N-terminal domain controls the microtubule-binding by the C-terminal domain and determines the cellular activity of the DDA3 protein.

  18. The Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Is Not Essential for Viability of Human Cells with Genetically Lowered APC/C Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wild, Thomas; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; Narita, Takeo;

    2016-01-01

    -conjugating enzymes-UBE2C and UBE2S. We show that APC/C activity in human cells is tuned by the combinatorial use of three E2s, namely UBE2C, UBE2S, and UBE2D. Genetic deletion of UBE2C and UBE2S, individually or in combination, leads to discriminative reduction in APC/C function and sensitizes cells to UBE2D......The anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which inhibits the APC/C, are essential determinants of mitotic timing and faithful division of genetic material. Activation of the APC/C is known to depend on two APC/C-interacting E2 ubiquitin...... depletion. Reduction of APC/C activity results in loss of switch-like metaphase-to-anaphase transition and, strikingly, renders cells insensitive to chemical inhibition of MPS1 and genetic ablation of MAD2, both of which are essential for the SAC. These results provide insights into the regulation of APC...

  19. THE ROLE OF NUCLEUS RAPHE MAGNUS IN THE ANTINOCICEPTIVE EFFECT OF MUSCLE SPINDLE AFFERENTS IN THE RAT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of NRM in the antinociceptive effect of muscle spindle afferents, the influence of NRM lesion on the inhibitory effect of muscle spindle afferents on the nociceptive responses of wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons and the effects of the muscle spindle afferents on the NRM neuronal activities were observed. Methods The single units of WDR neurons in the spinal dorsal horn were recorded extracellularly, and the inhibitory effects of activating muscle spindle afferents by intravenous administration of succinyicholine (SCH) on the C-fibers evoked responses (C-responses) of WDR neurons were tested before and after lesion of NRM. The ef- fects of the muscle spindle afferents activated by administrating SCH on the single NRM neurons were also examined. Results ①lt was found that the C-responses of WDR neurons were significantly inhibited by intravenously adminis- tration of SCH, and the inhibitory effect was reduced after lesion of NRM ;②The activities of most of the NRM neu- rons could be changed significantly by administrating SCH. According to their responses, NRM neurons could be classified into three types:excitatory, inhibitory and non-responsive neurons, and the responses were dose-depen- dent. Conclusion These results suggest that the muscle spindle afferents evoked by SCH may activate the NRM neu- rons, which plays an important role in the antinociception of muscle spindle afferents.

  20. Reduced levels of Dusp3/Vhr phosphatase impair normal spindle bipolarity in an Erk1/2 activity-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tambe, Mahesh Balasaheb; Narvi, Elli; Kallio, Marko

    2016-08-01

    Dual specificity phosphatase-3 (Dusp3/Vhr) regulates cell cycle progression by counteracting the effects of mitogen-activated protein kinases (Mapk) Erk1/2 and Jnk. Despite the known upregulation of Dusp3 at M phase in mammalian cells, its mitotic functions are poorly characterized. Here, we report that loss of Dusp3 by RNAi leads to the formation of multipolar spindles in human mitotic cancer cells in an Erk1/2-dependent manner. In the phosphatase-silenced cells, the normal bipolar spindle structure was restored by chemical inhibition of Erk1/2 and ectopic overexpression of Dusp3. We propose that at M phase Dusp3 keeps Erk1/2 activity in check to facilitate normal mitosis.

  1. Precise control of a four degree-of-freedom permanent magnet biased active magnetic bearing system in a magnetically suspended direct-driven spindle using neural network inverse scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaodong; Su, Bokai; Chen, Long; Yang, Zebin; Xu, Xing; Shi, Zhou

    2017-05-01

    The capacity of improving the control accuracy and dynamic performance of a four degree-of-freedom (DOF) permanent magnet biased active magnetic bearing (PMBAMB) system is critical to developing and maintaining a high precision application in a magnetically suspended direct-driven spindle system. The 4-DOF PMBAMB system, however, is a multivariable, strong coupled and nonlinear system with unavoidable and unmeasured external disturbances, in addition to having parameter variations. The satisfactory control performance cannot be obtained by using traditional strategies. Therefore, it is important to present a novel control scheme to construct a robust controller with good closed-loop capability. This paper proposes a new decoupling control scheme for a 4-DOF PMBAMB in a direct-driven spindle system based on the neural network inverse (NNI) and 2- degree-of-freedom (DOF) internal model control method. By combining the inversion of the 4-DOF PMBAMB system with its original system, a new pseudolinear system can be developed. In addition, by introducing the 2-DOF internal model controller into the pseudolinear system to design extra closed-loop controllers, we can effectively eliminate the influence of the unmodeled dynamics to the decoupling control accuracy, as well as adjust the properties of tracking and disturbance rejection independently. The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  2. Theory of meiotic spindle assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furthauer, Sebastian; Foster, Peter; Needleman, Daniel; Shelley, Michael

    2016-11-01

    The meiotic spindle is a biological structure that self assembles from the intracellular medium to separate chromosomes during meiosis. It consists of filamentous microtubule (MT) proteins that interact through the fluid in which they are suspended and via the associated molecules that orchestrate their behavior. We aim to understand how the interplay between fluid medium, MTs, and regulatory proteins allows this material to self-organize into the spindle's highly stereotyped shape. To this end we develop a continuum model that treats the spindle as an active liquid crystal with MT turnover. In this active material, molecular motors, such as dyneins which collect MT minus ends and kinesins which slide MTs past each other, generate active fluid and material stresses. Moreover nucleator proteins that are advected with and transported along MTs control the nucleation and depolymerization of MTs. This theory captures the growth process of meiotic spindles, their shapes, and the essential features of many perturbation experiments. It thus provides a framework to think about the physics of this complex biological suspension.

  3. Mechanisms regulating regional cerebral activation during dynamic handgrip in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, James; Friedman, D B; Mitchell, J H

    1996-01-01

    (muscle spindles). The rCBF increased only during dynamic hand contraction; contralateral MS1 (OM +9) by 15% to 64 +/- 8.6 ml.100 g-1.min-1 (P ... +/- 8.6 ml.100 g-1.min-1 (P muscle spindles or metabolically sensitive nerve fibers, although the involvement of mechanoreceptors (group III or Ib) cannot be excluded....

  4. Review on the Dynamic Characteristics of Aerostatic Motorized Spindles%气体悬浮电主轴动态特性研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    熊万里; 侯志泉; 吕浪; 阳雪兵

    2011-01-01

    在高效超精密加工中,气体悬浮电主轴存在电动机高速拖动能力衰减过快、电磁偏心激振、高次谐波激振和电动机定、转子发热严重以及主轴高速带来的温度效应和气流惯性效应等一系列技术难题.因此有必要对气体悬浮电主轴动态特性的影响因素进行系统分析和深入总结.分析气体悬浮电主轴的技术现状以及存在的问题:从轴承结构、气体流动形态、电磁偏心激振和不平衡响应等四个方面对电主轴稳定性的影响进行评述;综述轴承类型、轴承参数、表面粗糙度和轴颈倾斜对系统刚度的影响:阐述系统临界转速和电动机转速-力矩特性以及主轴高速带来的温度变化和气流惯性对主轴系统的影响;围绕主轴的回转精度,对主要因素、回转误差形成机理和精度测试与误差分离技术逐一评述;最后对气体悬浮电主轴技术的发展趋势进行预测和展望.%There are a series of technical problems in the application of the aerostatic motorized spindle to meet the requirements of ultra-high speed and ultra-precision machining, such as electromagnetic losses of high frequency motor, eccentric electromagnetic excitation, high harmonic excitation, thermal effects and inertial effects caused by motor high speed running.Therefore, it is necessary to make systematic analysis and intensive review on the factors which influence the dynamic characteristics of aerostatic motorized spindle.The retrospection of the development history and status of the aerostatic motorized spindle is presented.The effects of critical factors on the stability of high speed motorized spindles are analyzed and commented from the aspects of aerostatic bearing structure, gas flow forms, eccentric electromagnetic excitation and unbalance response, then the influences of bearing type,bearing parameters optimization, surface roughness and journal inclination on the system stiffness are summarized

  5. Regulation of mitotic spindle asymmetry by SUMO and the spindle-assembly checkpoint in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisner, Christian; Kammerer, Daniel; Denoth, Annina; Britschi, Mirjam; Barral, Yves; Liakopoulos, Dimitris

    2008-08-26

    During mitosis, the kinetochore microtubules capture and segregate chromosomes, and the astral microtubules position the spindle within the cell. Although the spindle is symmetric, proper positioning of the spindle in asymmetrically dividing cells generally correlates with the formation of morphologically and structurally distinct asters [1]. In budding yeast, the spindle-orientation proteins Kar9 and dynein decorate only one aster of the metaphase spindle and direct it toward the bud [2, 3]. The mechanisms controlling the distribution of Kar9 and dynein remain unclear. Here, we show that SUMO regulates astral-microtubule function in at least two ways. First, Kar9 was sumoylated in vivo. Sumoylation and Cdk1-dependent phosphorylation of Kar9 independently promoted Kar9 asymmetry on the spindle. Second, proper regulation of kinetochore function by SUMO was also required for Kar9 asymmetry. Indeed, activation of the spindle-assembly checkpoint (SAC) due to SUMO and kinetochore defects promoted symmetric redistribution of Kar9 in a Mad2-dependent manner. The control of Kar9 distribution by the SAC was independent of Kar9 sumoylation and phosphorylation. Together, our data reveal that three independent mechanisms contribute to Kar9 asymmetry: Cdk1-dependent phosphorylation, sumoylation, and SAC signaling. Hence, the two seemingly independent spindle domains, kinetochores and astral microtubules, function in a tightly coordinated fashion.

  6. Column-spindle System Dynamic Model Based on Dynamic Characteristics of Joints%结合部动力学特性的立柱-主轴系统动力学模型研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    米良; 殷国富; 孙明楠; 王小虎

    2011-01-01

    针对某卧式加工中心动力学特性分析的需要,论述了主要影响其动力学特性的立柱-主轴系统中导轨结合部、螺栓结合部、滚珠丝杠结合部以及轴承4类结合面分布情况,提出各类结合部动力学参数提取方法与有限元建模方法.通过试验测试与有限元分析相结合的手段识别导轨结合部刚度与阻尼,利用赫兹接触理论计算出滚珠丝杠接触刚度.在此基础上,建立了某卧式加工中心立柱-主轴系统有限元分析模型,通过测试立柱-主轴系统轴端频率响应函数验证了该有限元分析模型的准确性,并分析得出了该立柱-主轴系统导轨结合部对系统动态性能的影响情况.%For the needs of dynamic analysis of the horizontal machining center, the distribution of linear guide, bolt joints, ball screw and bearing which main affect the dynamic characteristics of column-spindle system were discussed, then the dynamic parameters identifying method and finite element modeling method for these joints were presented. The stiffness and damping of linear guide were identified by the combination of experimental tests and finite element analysis, and the ball screw contact stiffness was calculated based on Hertz contact theory. On this basis, the finite element model for the column-spindle system of a horizontal machining center was established. The accuracy of the finite element analysis model was verified by testing the tool point frequency response function of column-spindle system. Then influence of linear guide for the dynamic characteristics of column-spindle system was analyzed.

  7. A cell cycle timer for asymmetric spindle positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy Campbell, Erin K; Werts, Adam D; Goldstein, Bob

    2009-04-21

    The displacement of the mitotic spindle to one side of a cell is important for many cells to divide unequally. While recent progress has begun to unveil some of the molecular mechanisms of mitotic spindle displacement, far less is known about how spindle displacement is precisely timed. A conserved mitotic progression mechanism is known to time events in dividing cells, although this has never been linked to spindle displacement. This mechanism involves the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), its activator Cdc20/Fizzy, its degradation target cyclin, and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK). Here we show that these components comprise a previously unrecognized timer for spindle displacement. In the Caenorhabditis elegans zygote, mitotic spindle displacement begins at a precise time, soon after chromosomes congress to the metaphase plate. We found that reducing the function of the proteasome, the APC, or Cdc20/Fizzy delayed spindle displacement. Conversely, inactivating CDK in prometaphase caused the spindle to displace early. The consequence of experimentally unlinking spindle displacement from this timing mechanism was the premature displacement of incompletely assembled components of the mitotic spindle. We conclude that in this system, asymmetric positioning of the mitotic spindle is normally delayed for a short time until the APC inactivates CDK, and that this delay ensures that the spindle does not begin to move until it is fully assembled. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that mitotic progression times spindle displacement in the asymmetric division of an animal cell. We speculate that this link between the cell cycle and asymmetric cell division might be evolutionarily conserved, because the mitotic spindle is displaced at a similar stage of mitosis during asymmetric cell divisions in diverse systems.

  8. A cell cycle timer for asymmetric spindle positioning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin K McCarthy Campbell

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The displacement of the mitotic spindle to one side of a cell is important for many cells to divide unequally. While recent progress has begun to unveil some of the molecular mechanisms of mitotic spindle displacement, far less is known about how spindle displacement is precisely timed. A conserved mitotic progression mechanism is known to time events in dividing cells, although this has never been linked to spindle displacement. This mechanism involves the anaphase-promoting complex (APC, its activator Cdc20/Fizzy, its degradation target cyclin, and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK. Here we show that these components comprise a previously unrecognized timer for spindle displacement. In the Caenorhabditis elegans zygote, mitotic spindle displacement begins at a precise time, soon after chromosomes congress to the metaphase plate. We found that reducing the function of the proteasome, the APC, or Cdc20/Fizzy delayed spindle displacement. Conversely, inactivating CDK in prometaphase caused the spindle to displace early. The consequence of experimentally unlinking spindle displacement from this timing mechanism was the premature displacement of incompletely assembled components of the mitotic spindle. We conclude that in this system, asymmetric positioning of the mitotic spindle is normally delayed for a short time until the APC inactivates CDK, and that this delay ensures that the spindle does not begin to move until it is fully assembled. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that mitotic progression times spindle displacement in the asymmetric division of an animal cell. We speculate that this link between the cell cycle and asymmetric cell division might be evolutionarily conserved, because the mitotic spindle is displaced at a similar stage of mitosis during asymmetric cell divisions in diverse systems.

  9. Correcting improper chromosome-spindle attachments during cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampson, Michael A; Renduchitala, Kishore; Khodjakov, Alexey; Kapoor, Tarun M

    2004-03-01

    For accurate segregation of chromosomes during cell division, microtubule fibres must attach sister kinetochores to opposite poles of the mitotic spindle (bi-orientation). Aurora kinases are linked to oncogenesis and have been implicated in the regulation of chromosome-microtubule attachments. Although loss of Aurora kinase activity causes an accumulation of mal-orientated chromosomes in dividing cells, it is not known how the active kinase corrects improper chromosome attachments. The use of reversible small-molecule inhibitors allows activation of protein function in living vertebrate cells with temporal control. Here we show that by removal of small-molecule inhibitors, controlled activation of Aurora kinase during mitosis can correct chromosome attachment errors by selective disassembly of kinetochore-microtubule fibres, rather than by alternative mechanisms involving initial release of microtubules from either kinetochores or spindle poles. Observation of chromosomes and microtubule dynamics with real-time high-resolution microscopy showed that mal-orientated, but not bi-orientated, chromosomes move to the spindle pole as both kinetochore-microtubule fibres shorten, followed by alignment at the metaphase plate. Our results provide direct evidence for a mechanism required for the maintenance of genome integrity during cell division.

  10. TPX2 phosphorylation maintains metaphase spindle length by regulating microtubule flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jingyan; Bian, Minglei; Xin, Guangwei; Deng, Zhaoxuan; Luo, Jia; Guo, Xiao; Chen, Hao; Wang, Yao; Jiang, Qing

    2015-01-01

    A steady-state metaphase spindle maintains constant length, although the microtubules undergo intensive dynamics. Tubulin dimers are incorporated at plus ends of spindle microtubules while they are removed from the minus ends, resulting in poleward movement. Such microtubule flux is regulated by the microtubule rescue factors CLASPs at kinetochores and depolymerizing protein Kif2a at the poles, along with other regulators of microtubule dynamics. How microtubule polymerization and depolymerization are coordinated remains unclear. Here we show that TPX2, a microtubule-bundling protein and activator of Aurora A, plays an important role. TPX2 was phosphorylated by Aurora A during mitosis. Its phospho-null mutant caused short metaphase spindles coupled with low microtubule flux rate. Interestingly, phosphorylation of TPX2 regulated its interaction with CLASP1 but not Kif2a. The effect of its mutant in shortening the spindle could be rescued by codepletion of CLASP1 and Kif2a that abolished microtubule flux. Together we propose that Aurora A–dependent TPX2 phosphorylation controls mitotic spindle length through regulating microtubule flux. PMID:26240182

  11. The spindle checkpoint and chromosome segregation in meiosis.

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    Gorbsky, Gary J

    2015-07-01

    The spindle checkpoint is a key regulator of chromosome segregation in mitosis and meiosis. Its function is to prevent precocious anaphase onset before chromosomes have achieved bipolar attachment to the spindle. The spindle checkpoint comprises a complex set of signaling pathways that integrate microtubule dynamics, biomechanical forces at the kinetochores, and intricate regulation of protein interactions and post-translational modifications. Historically, many key observations that gave rise to the initial concepts of the spindle checkpoint were made in meiotic systems. In contrast with mitosis, the two distinct chromosome segregation events of meiosis present a special challenge for the regulation of checkpoint signaling. Preservation of fidelity in chromosome segregation in meiosis, controlled by the spindle checkpoint, also has a significant impact in human health. This review highlights the contributions from meiotic systems in understanding the spindle checkpoint as well as the role of checkpoint signaling in controlling the complex divisions of meiosis.

  12. Self-Organization and Forces in the Mitotic Spindle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavin, Nenad; Tolić, Iva M

    2016-07-05

    At the onset of division, the cell forms a spindle, a precise self-constructed micromachine composed of microtubules and the associated proteins, which divides the chromosomes between the two nascent daughter cells. The spindle arises from self-organization of microtubules and chromosomes, whose different types of motion help them explore the space and eventually approach and interact with each other. Once the interactions between the chromosomes and the microtubules have been established, the chromosomes are moved to the equatorial plane of the spindle and ultimately toward the opposite spindle poles. These transport processes rely on directed forces that are precisely regulated in space and time. In this review, we discuss how microtubule dynamics and their rotational movement drive spindle self-organization, as well as how the forces acting in the spindle are generated, balanced, and regulated.

  13. Spatial signals link exit from mitosis to spindle position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Jill Elaine; Tsuchiya, Dai; Verdaasdonk, Jolien; Lacefield, Soni; Bloom, Kerry; Amon, Angelika

    2016-05-11

    In budding yeast, if the spindle becomes mispositioned, cells prevent exit from mitosis by inhibiting the mitotic exit network (MEN). The MEN is a signaling cascade that localizes to spindle pole bodies (SPBs) and activates the phosphatase Cdc14. There are two competing models that explain MEN regulation by spindle position. In the 'zone model', exit from mitosis occurs when a MEN-bearing SPB enters the bud. The 'cMT-bud neck model' posits that cytoplasmic microtubule (cMT)-bud neck interactions prevent MEN activity. Here we find that 1) eliminating cMT- bud neck interactions does not trigger exit from mitosis and 2) loss of these interactions does not precede Cdc14 activation. Furthermore, using binucleate cells, we show that exit from mitosis occurs when one SPB enters the bud despite the presence of a mispositioned spindle. We conclude that exit from mitosis is triggered by a correctly positioned spindle rather than inhibited by improper spindle position.

  14. Smurf2 as a novel mitotic regulator: From the spindle assembly checkpoint to tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Finola E

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The execution of the mitotic program with high fidelity is dependent upon precise spatiotemporal regulation of posttranslational protein modifications. For example, the timely polyubiquitination of critical mitotic regulators by Anaphase Promoting Complex/Cyclosome (APC/C is essential for the metaphase to anaphase transition and mitotic exit. The spindle assembly checkpoint prevents unscheduled activity of APC/C-Cdc20 in early mitosis, allowing bipolar attachment of kinetochores to mitotic spindle and facilitating equal segregation of sister chromatids. The critical effector of the spindle checkpoint, Mitotic arrest deficient 2 (Mad2, is recruited to unattached kinetochores forming a complex with other regulatory proteins to efficiently and cooperatively inhibit APC/C-Cdc20. A weakened and/or dysfunctional spindle checkpoint has been linked to the development of genomic instability in both cell culture and animal models, and evidence suggests that aberrant regulation of the spindle checkpoint plays a critical role in human carcinogenesis. Recent studies have illuminated a network of both degradative and non-degradative ubiquitination events that regulate the metaphase to anaphase transition and mitotic exit. Within this context, our recent work showed that the HECT (Homologous to E6-AP C-terminus-family E3 ligase Smurf2 (Smad specific ubiquitin regulatory factor 2, known as a negative regulator of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β signaling, is required for a functional spindle checkpoint by promoting the functional localization and stability of Mad2. Here we discuss putative models explaining the role of Smurf2 as a new regulator in the spindle checkpoint. The dynamic mitotic localization of Smurf2 to the centrosome and other critical mitotic structures provides implications about mitotic checkpoint control dependent on various ubiquitination events. Finally, deregulated Smurf2 activity may contribute to carcinogenesis by

  15. Point-process analysis of neural spiking activity of muscle spindles recorded from thin-film longitudinal intrafascicular electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citi, Luca; Djilas, Milan; Azevedo-Coste, Christine; Yoshida, Ken; Brown, Emery N; Barbieri, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    Recordings from thin-film Longitudinal Intra-Fascicular Electrodes (tfLIFE) together with a wavelet-based de-noising and a correlation-based spike sorting algorithm, give access to firing patterns of muscle spindle afferents. In this study we use a point process probability structure to assess mechanical stimulus-response characteristics of muscle spindle spike trains. We assume that the stimulus intensity is primarily a linear combination of the spontaneous firing rate, the muscle extension, and the stretch velocity. By using the ability of the point process framework to provide an objective goodness of fit analysis, we were able to distinguish two classes of spike clusters with different statistical structure. We found that spike clusters with higher SNR have a temporal structure that can be fitted by an inverse Gaussian distribution while lower SNR clusters follow a Poisson-like distribution. The point process algorithm is further able to provide the instantaneous intensity function associated with the stimulus-response model with the best goodness of fit. This important result is a first step towards a point process decoding algorithm to estimate the muscle length and possibly provide closed loop Functional Electrical Stimulation (FES) systems with natural sensory feedback information.

  16. Separating the spindle, checkpoint, and timer functions of BubR1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Zohra; Gagou, Mary E; Lefebvre, Christophe; Emre, Doruk; Karess, Roger E

    2009-11-30

    BubR1 performs several roles during mitosis, affecting the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), mitotic timing, and spindle function, but the interdependence of these functions is unclear. We have analyzed in Drosophila melanogaster the mitotic phenotypes of kinase-dead (KD) BubR1 and BubR1 lacking the N-terminal KEN box. bubR1-KD individuals have a robust SAC but abnormal spindles with thin kinetochore fibers, suggesting that the kinase activity modulates microtubule capture and/or dynamics but is relatively dispensable for SAC function. In contrast, bubR1-KEN flies have normal spindles but no SAC. Nevertheless, mitotic timing is normal as long as Mad2 is present. Thus, the SAC, timer, and spindle functions of BubR1 are substantially separable. Timing is shorter in bubR1-KEN mad2 double mutants, yet in these flies, lacking both critical SAC components, chromosomes still segregate accurately, reconfirming that in Drosophila, reliable mitosis does not need the SAC.

  17. Form and Function of Sleep Spindles across the Lifespan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany C. Clawson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the advent of EEG recordings, sleep spindles have been identified as hallmarks of non-REM sleep. Despite a broad general understanding of mechanisms of spindle generation gleaned from animal studies, the mechanisms underlying certain features of spindles in the human brain, such as “global” versus “local” spindles, are largely unknown. Neither the topography nor the morphology of sleep spindles remains constant throughout the lifespan. It is likely that changes in spindle phenomenology during development and aging are the result of dramatic changes in brain structure and function. Across various developmental windows, spindle activity is correlated with general cognitive aptitude, learning, and memory; however, these correlations vary in strength, and even direction, depending on age and metrics used. Understanding these differences across the lifespan should further clarify how these oscillations are generated and their function under a variety of circumstances. We discuss these issues, and their translational implications for human cognitive function. Because sleep spindles are similarly affected in disorders of neurodevelopment (such as schizophrenia and during aging (such as neurodegenerative conditions, both types of disorders may benefit from therapies based on a better understanding of spindle function.

  18. Optimized S-trityl-L-cysteine-based inhibitors of kinesin spindle protein with potent in vivo antitumor activity in lung cancer xenograft models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, James A D; Wang, Fang; Rath, Oliver; Kaan, Hung Yi Kristal; Talapatra, Sandeep K; Podgórski, Dawid; MacKay, Simon P; Kozielski, Frank

    2013-03-14

    The mitotic kinesin Eg5 is critical for the assembly of the mitotic spindle and is a promising chemotherapy target. Previously, we identified S-trityl-L-cysteine as a selective inhibitor of Eg5 and developed triphenylbutanamine analogues with improved potency, favorable drug-like properties, but moderate in vivo activity. We report here their further optimization to produce extremely potent inhibitors of Eg5 (K(i)(app) liabilities with CYP-metabolizing enzymes and hERG compared with ispinesib and SB-743921, which is important given the likely application of Eg5 inhibitors in combination therapies. We present the case for this preclinical series to be investigated in single and combination chemotherapies, especially targeting hematological malignancies.

  19. Phosphorylation-dependent protein interactions at the spindle midzone mediate cell cycle regulation of spindle elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khmelinskii, Anton; Roostalu, Johanna; Roque, Helio; Antony, Claude; Schiebel, Elmar

    2009-08-01

    The metaphase-to-anaphase transition is one of the most dramatic and highly regulated steps in cell division. At anaphase onset the protease separase dissolves sister chromatid cohesion. Simultaneously, the mitotic spindle elongates as interpolar microtubules (iMTs) slide apart at the spindle midzone, ensuring chromosome segregation. However, it remains unclear how spindle elongation is coordinated with cell cycle progression. Here we demonstrate that phosphorylation of the midzone organizer Ase1 controls localization and function of Cin8, a kinesin-5 that slides iMTs relative to each other. Phosphorylation of Ase1 by Cdk1 (cyclin-dependent kinase) inhibits Cin8 binding to iMTs, preventing bending and collapse of the metaphase spindle. In anaphase Ase1 dephosphorylation by the separase-activated phosphatase Cdc14 is necessary and sufficient for Cin8 recruitment to the midzone, where it drives spindle elongation. Our results reveal that sliding forces at the midzone are activated by separase and explain how spindle elongation is triggered with anaphase entry.

  20. Towards a quantitative understanding of mitotic spindle assembly and mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogilner, Alex; Craig, Erin

    2010-10-15

    The 'simple' view of the mitotic spindle is that it self-assembles as a result of microtubules (MTs) randomly searching for chromosomes, after which the spindle length is maintained by a balance of outward tension exerted by molecular motors on the MTs connecting centrosomes and chromosomes, and compression generated by other motors on the MTs connecting the spindle poles. This picture is being challenged now by mounting evidence indicating that spindle assembly and maintenance rely on much more complex interconnected networks of microtubules, molecular motors, chromosomes and regulatory proteins. From an engineering point of view, three design principles of this molecular machine are especially important: the spindle assembles quickly, it assembles accurately, and it is mechanically robust--yet malleable. How is this design achieved with randomly interacting and impermanent molecular parts? Here, we review recent interdisciplinary studies that have started to shed light on this question. We discuss cooperative mechanisms of spindle self-assembly, error correction and maintenance of its mechanical properties, speculate on analogy between spindle and lamellipodial dynamics, and highlight the role of quantitative approaches in understanding the mitotic spindle design.

  1. 一种基于主轴动态创成规律的回转误差反求算法%Reverse Algorithm for Rotary Errors Based on Dynamic Motion Law of Spindle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王菲; 徐光华; 张四聪; 梁霖; 宋磊

    2013-01-01

    对精密主轴回转误差与圆度误差动态创成规律进行深入研究,提出一种将主轴回转误差完全分离的解耦算法,详细介绍该算法的计算过程,并用具体实例进行了仿真,对计算结果进行分析.结果表明,采用所提出的方法能有效提高精密主轴回转误差的测试精度.%The dynamic motion law of precision spindle was researched. A new reverse method was put forward that could be used to separate the rotation error of the spindle completely. The computational process was introduced in detail. The simulations were made by examples, and the simulation results were analyzed. The results show that using the method, the testing accuracy of rotation error of precision spindle can be improved.

  2. Effects of cryopreservation on meiotic spindles of oocytes and its dynamics after thawing: clinical implications in oocyte freezing--a review article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, S U; Lien, Y R; Chao, K H; Ho, H N; Yang, Y S; Lee, T Y

    2003-04-28

    Embryo freezing has been a successful practice, but oocyte cryopreservation formerly achieved poorer results. This was mainly due to low rates of survival, fertilization, and development. The major dissimilarities for oocytes to embryos are the character of the plasma membrane, the presence of cortical granules, at the metaphase of meiosis II with the spindle system. In addition, the oocytes must be fertilized by sperm at the appropriate time. To improve the survival rate, a refined slow freezing method with increased sucrose concentration would dehydrate oocytes more sufficiently. Vitrification is another approach to prevent ice crystal formation. Intracytoplasmic sperm injection is used to overcome possible zona hardening from the release of cortical granules. The microtubules of meiotic spindles are vulnerable to the thermal changes and would depolymerize. Cryopreserved oocytes exhibited serious disturbances of the microtubules immediately after thawing. Fertilization of oocytes with disorganized spindles could lead to chromosomal aneuploidy, digyny, and arrest of cleavage. After incubation, the microtubules would repolymerize in a time-dependent way. Normal fertilization and development of cryopreserved oocytes improved after appropriate incubation and timing of insemination, compatible with recovery of the spindles. With the improvement of survival, fertilization, and cleavage, oocyte cryopreservation would gain an imperative role.

  3. An automatic sleep spindle detector based on wavelets and the teager energy operator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Beena; Redissi, Amira; Tafreshi, Reza

    2009-01-01

    Sleep spindles are one of the most important short-lasting rhythmic events occurring in the EEG during Non-Rapid Eye Movement sleep. Their accurate identification in a polysomnographic signal is essential for sleep professionals to help them mark Stage 2 sleep. Visual spindle scoring however is a tedious workload, as there are often a thousand spindles in an all-night recording. In this paper a novel approach for the automatic detection of sleep spindles based upon the Teager Energy Operator and wavelet packets has been presented. The Teager operator was found to accurately enhance periodic activity in epochs of the EEG containing spindles. The wavelet packet transform proved effective in accurately locating spindles in the time-frequency domain. The autocorrelation function of the resultant Teager signal and the wavelet packet energy ratio were used to identify epochs with spindles. These two features were integrated into a spindle detection algorithm which achieved an accuracy of 93.7%.

  4. The pacemaker role of thalamic reticular nucleus in controlling spike-wave discharges and spindles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Denggui; Liao, Fucheng; Wang, Qingyun

    2017-07-01

    Absence epilepsy, characterized by 2-4 Hz spike-wave discharges (SWDs), can be caused by pathological interactions within the thalamocortical system. Cortical spindling oscillations are also demonstrated to involve the oscillatory thalamocortical rhythms generated by the synaptic circuitry of the thalamus and cortex. This implies that SWDs and spindling oscillations can share the common thalamocortical mechanism. Additionally, the thalamic reticular nucleus (RE) is hypothesized to regulate the onsets and propagations of both the epileptic SWDs and sleep spindles. Based on the proposed single-compartment thalamocortical neural field model, we firstly investigate the stimulation effect of RE on the initiations, terminations, and transitions of SWDs. It is shown that the activations and deactivations of RE triggered by single-pulse stimuli can drive the cortical subsystem to behave as the experimentally observed onsets and self-abatements of SWDs, as well as the transitions from 2-spike and wave discharges (2-SWDs) to SWDs. In particular, with increasing inhibition from RE to the specific relay nucleus (TC), rich transition behaviors in cortex can be obtained through the upstream projection path, RE → TC → Cortex . Although some of the complex dynamical patterns can be expected from the earlier single compartment thalamocortical model, the effect of brain network topology on the emergence of SWDs and spindles, as well as the transitions between them, has not been fully investigated. We thereby develop a spatially extended 3-compartment coupled network model with open-/closed-end connective configurations, to investigate the spatiotemporal effect of RE on the SWDs and spindles. Results show that the degrees of activations of RE 1 can induce the rich spatiotemporal evolution properties including the propagations from SWDs to spindles within different compartments and the transitions between them, through the RE 1 → TC 1 → Cortex 1 and Cortex 1 → Cortex 2

  5. Sleep spindles predict stress-related increases in sleep disturbances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien Thanh eDang-Vu

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Predisposing factors place certain individuals at higher risk for insomnia, especially in the presence of precipitating conditions such as stressful life events. Sleep spindles have been shown to play an important role in the preservation of sleep continuity. Lower spindle density might thus constitute an objective predisposing factor for sleep reactivity to stress. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate the relationship between baseline sleep spindle density and the prospective change in insomnia symptoms in response to a standardized academic stressor. Methods: 12 healthy students had a polysomnography (PSG recording during a period of lower stress at the beginning of the academic semester, along with an assessment of insomnia complaints using the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI. They completed a second ISI assessment at the end of the semester, a period coinciding with the week prior to final examinations and thus higher stress. Spindle density, amplitude, duration and frequency, as well as sigma power were computed from C4-O2 electroencephalography (EEG derivation during stages N2-N3 of non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM sleep, across the whole night and for each NREM sleep period. To test for the relationship between spindle density and changes in insomnia symptoms in response to academic stress, spindle measurements at baseline were correlated with changes in ISI across the academic semester.Results: Spindle density (as well as spindle amplitude and sigma power, particularly during the first NREM sleep period, negatively correlated with changes in ISI (p < 0.05. Conclusion: Lower spindle activity, especially at the beginning of the night, prospectively predicted larger increases in insomnia symptoms in response to stress. This result indicates that individual differences in sleep spindle activity contribute to the differential vulnerability to sleep disturbances in the face of precipitating factors.

  6. The active form of the metabolic sensor: AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) directly binds the mitotic apparatus and travels from centrosomes to the spindle midzone during mitosis and cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Martin, Alejandro; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Menendez, Javier A

    2009-08-01

    The metabolic rheostat AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is unexpectedly required for proper cell division and faithful chromosomal segregation during mitosis. Although it is conceptually attractive to assume that AMPK-interpreted microenvironmental bioenergetics may strictly engage cell's energy status, cell grow, and cell division to avoid that energy stresses trigger cell death, the ultimate framework of AMPK activity towards chromosomal and cytoskeletal mitotic regulation is a question that remains unanswered. We herein reveal that the active form of the alpha-catalytic AMPK subunit (P-AMPKalpha(Thr172))-but not its total form (AMPKalpha)-transiently associates with several mitotic structures including centrosomes, spindle poles, the central spindle midzone and the midbody throughout all of the mitotic stages and cytokinesis in human cancer-derived epithelial cells. At prophase, P-AMPKalpha(Thr172) associates with the two asters of microtubules that begin to nucleate from mature centrosomes. The overlapping localization of P-AMPKalpha(Thr172) with the mitotic centrosomal Aurora-A kinase is also apparent on the microtubules near the spindle poles in metaphase and in early anaphase. This Aurora A-like centrosomal localization of P-AMPKalpha(Thr172) cannot be detected following chromatid separation following anaphase-telophase transition. Rather, toward the end of anaphase and in telophase P-AMPKalpha(Thr172) reactivity exhibited a similar but not identical localization to that occupied by the bona fide chromosomal passenger proteins INCENCP and Aurora-B. This localization of P-AMPKalpha(Thr172) at the central spindle and midbody persisted during the furrowing process and, at the completion of telophase, staining of P-AMPKalpha(Thr172) as doublet was apparent on either side of the midbody within the intercellular cytokinetic bridge. An identical mitotic geography of P-AMPKalpha(Thr172) was observed in cancer cells lacking the AMPK kinase LKB1, in non

  7. Centrosomes and the art of mitotic spindle maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchcliffe, Edward H

    2014-01-01

    The assembly of a bipolar spindle lies at the heart of mitotic chromosome segregation. In animal somatic cells, the process of spindle assembly involves multiple complex interactions between various cellular compartments, including an emerging antiparallel microtubule network, microtubule-associated motor proteins and spindle assembly factors, the cell's cortex, and the chromosomes themselves. The result is a dynamic structure capable of aligning pairs of sister chromatids, sensing chromosome misalignment, and generating force to segregate the replicated genome into two daughters. Because the centrosome lies at the center of the array of microtubule minus-ends, and the essential one-to-two duplication of the centrosome prior to mitosis is linked to cell cycle progression, this organelle has long been implicated as a device to generate spindle bipolarity. However, this classic model for spindle assembly is challenged by observations and experimental manipulations demonstrating that acentrosomal cells can and do form bipolar spindles, both mitotic and meiotic. Indeed, recent comprehensive proteomic analysis of centrosome-dependent versus independent mitotic spindle assembly mechanisms reveals a large, common set of genes required for both processes, with very few genes needed to differentiate between the two. While these studies cast doubt on an absolute role for the centrosome in establishing spindle polarity, it is clear that having too few or too many centrosomes results in abnormal chromosome segregation and aneuploidy. Here we review the case both for and against the role of the centrioles and centrosomes in ensuring proper assembly of a bipolar spindle, an essential element in the maintenance of genomic stability.

  8. Optical sensor for precision in-situ spindle health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rui

    An optical sensor which can record in-situ measurements of the dynamic runout of a precision miniature spindle system in a simple and low-cost manner is proposed in this dissertation. Spindle error measurement technology utilizes a cylindrical or spherical target artifact attached to the miniature spindle with non-contact sensors, typically capacitive sensors which are calibrated with a flat target surface not a curved target surface. Due to the different behavior of an electric field between a flat plate and a curved surface and an electric field between two flat plates, capacitive sensors is not suitable for measuring target surfaces smaller than its effective sensing area. The proposed sensor utilizes curved-edge diffraction (CED), which uses the effect of cylindrical surface curvature on the diffraction phenomenon in the transition regions adjacent to shadow, transmission, and reflection boundaries. The laser diodes light incident on the cylindrical surface of precision spindle and photodetectors collect the total field produced by the diffraction around the target surface. Laser diode in the different two direction are incident to the spindle shaft edges along the X and Y axes, four photodetectors collect the total fields produced by interference of multiple waves due to CED around the spindle shaft edges. The X and Y displacement can be obtained from the total fields using two differential amplifier configurations, respectively. Precision miniature spindle (shaft φ5.0mm) runout was measured, and the proposed sensor can perform curve at the different speed of rotation from 1500rpm to 8000rpm in the X and Y axes, respectively. On the other hand, CED also show changes for different running time and temperature of spindle. These results indicate that the proposed sensor promises to be effective for in-situ monitoring of the miniature spindle's health with high resolution, wide bandwidth, and low-cost.

  9. Tumor suppressor protein DAB2IP participates in chromosomal stability maintenance through activating spindle assembly checkpoint and stabilizing kinetochore-microtubule attachments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lan; Shang, Zeng-Fu; Abdisalaam, Salim; Lee, Kyung-Jong; Gupta, Arun; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Asaithamby, Aroumougame; Chen, Benjamin P.C.; Saha, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Defects in kinetochore-microtubule (KT-MT) attachment and the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) during cell division are strongly associated with chromosomal instability (CIN). CIN has been linked to carcinogenesis, metastasis, poor prognosis and resistance to cancer therapy. We previously reported that the DAB2IP is a tumor suppressor, and that loss of DAB2IP is often detected in advanced prostate cancer (PCa) and is indicative of poor prognosis. Here, we report that the loss of DAB2IP results in impaired KT-MT attachment, compromised SAC and aberrant chromosomal segregation. We discovered that DAB2IP directly interacts with Plk1 and its loss inhibits Plk1 kinase activity, thereby impairing Plk1-mediated BubR1 phosphorylation. Loss of DAB2IP decreases the localization of BubR1 at the kinetochore during mitosis progression. In addition, the reconstitution of DAB2IP enhances the sensitivity of PCa cells to microtubule stabilizing drugs (paclitaxel, docetaxel) and Plk1 inhibitor (BI2536). Our findings demonstrate a novel function of DAB2IP in the maintenance of KT-MT structure and SAC regulation during mitosis which is essential for chromosomal stability. PMID:27568005

  10. Spindle picker harvest speed effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    The gear drive of a modern John Deere Pro 16 picker unit was modified so that spindle speed was reduced without changing the drum speed. Three 1-row picking units were used in the study, one with the standard drive speeds, one with 25% reduction in spindle drive speed, and one with 50% reduction in...

  11. The Spindle Type Cotton Harvester

    Science.gov (United States)

    The spindle type cotton picker was commercialized during the mid 1900’s and is currently produced by two US agricultural equipment manufacturers, John Deere and CaseIH. Picking is the predominate machine harvest method used throughout the US and world. Harvesting efficiency of a spindle type cotton ...

  12. Asymmetric Localization of Components and Regulators of the Mitotic Exit Network at Spindle Pole Bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfone, Ilaria; Piatti, Simonetta

    2017-01-01

    Most proteins of the Mitotic Exit Network (MEN) and their upstream regulators localize at spindle pole bodies (SPBs) at least in some stages of the cell cycle. Studying the SPB localization of MEN factors has been extremely useful to elucidate their biological roles, organize them in a hierarchical pathway, and define their dynamics under different conditions.Recruitment to SPBs of the small GTPase Tem1 and the downstream kinases Cdc15 and Mob1/Dbf2 is thought to be essential for Cdc14 activation and mitotic exit, while that of the upstream Tem1 regulators (the Kin4 kinase and the GTPase activating protein Bub2-Bfa1) is important for MEN inhibition upon spindle mispositioning. Here, we describe the detailed fluorescence microscopy procedures that we use in our lab to analyze the localization at SPBs of Mitotic Exit Network (MEN) components tagged with GFP or HA epitopes.

  13. Coupling analysis of dynamic and tribological behavior of angle-contact ball bearings for electric spindle%电主轴角接触球轴承摩擦学和动力学耦合分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡赤兵; 黄丛领; 王保民

    2013-01-01

    Based on elastic hydrodynamic lubrication theory and dynamic theory,the coupling investigation of tribological and dynamics characteristics of angle-contact ball bearing (spindle bearings) was conducted.The dynamic simulation model was established with software Ansys and taking into consideration the tribological characteristics of the spindle bearings.The Reynolds equation and elastic equation of elastohydrodynamic lubrication were solved by using finite difference method to get the solution of the oil film reaction force.The dynamic simulation was carried out with Ansys and the characteristic curves of all motional parameters of the bearing parts were output.It was shown by the research that the speed was the important factor influencing the elastic hydrodynamic lubrication oil film within the spindle bearings.Under the same load,contact angle and other working conditions,the inner ball track oil film thickness of ceramic angle-contact ball bearing would increase first and then gradually reduce as speed increased,and the outer ball track oil film thickness would not change significantly with rotation speed at first and then decrease noticeably.%基于弹性流体动力润滑理论和动力学理论,对角接触球轴承(主轴轴承)进行摩擦学特性和动力学特性耦合研究.在Ansys软件中建立考虑主轴轴承摩擦学特性的动力学仿真模型,利用有限差分法求解弹流润滑的Reynolds方程和弹性方程,求解轴承油膜反力,在Ansys中进行动力学仿真,输出轴承零件各种运动参数特性曲线.研究表明,速度是影响主轴轴承内部弹流油膜的重要因素,在相同的预载荷、接触角等工况条件下,陶瓷角接触球轴承的内圈油膜厚度随转速增大先增大后逐渐减小,外圈油膜厚度随转速增大开始变化不明显,随后明显减小.

  14. Sleep Spindles as an Electrographic Element: Description and Automatic Detection Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorothée Coppieters ’t Wallant

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sleep spindle is a peculiar oscillatory brain pattern which has been associated with a number of sleep (isolation from exteroceptive stimuli, memory consolidation and individual characteristics (intellectual quotient. Oddly enough, the definition of a spindle is both incomplete and restrictive. In consequence, there is no consensus about how to detect spindles. Visual scoring is cumbersome and user dependent. To analyze spindle activity in a more robust way, automatic sleep spindle detection methods are essential. Various algorithms were developed, depending on individual research interest, which hampers direct comparisons and meta-analyses. In this review, sleep spindle is first defined physically and topographically. From this general description, we tentatively extract the main characteristics to be detected and analyzed. A nonexhaustive list of automatic spindle detection methods is provided along with a description of their main processing principles. Finally, we propose a technique to assess the detection methods in a robust and comparable way.

  15. Augmin promotes meiotic spindle formation and bipolarity in Xenopus egg extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petry, Sabine; Pugieux, Céline; Nédélec, François J; Vale, Ronald D

    2011-08-30

    Female meiotic spindles in many organisms form in the absence of centrosomes, the organelle typically associated with microtubule (MT) nucleation. Previous studies have proposed that these meiotic spindles arise from RanGTP-mediated MT nucleation in the vicinity of chromatin; however, whether this process is sufficient for spindle formation is unknown. Here, we investigated whether a recently proposed spindle-based MT nucleation pathway that involves augmin, an 8-subunit protein complex, also contributes to spindle morphogenesis. We used an assay system in which hundreds of meiotic spindles can be observed forming around chromatin-coated beads after introduction of Xenopus egg extracts. Spindles forming in augmin-depleted extracts showed reduced rates of MT formation and were predominantly multipolar, revealing a function of augmin in stabilizing the bipolar shape of the acentrosomal meiotic spindle. Our studies also have uncovered an apparent augmin-independent MT nucleation process from acentrosomal poles, which becomes increasingly active over time and appears to partially rescue the spindle defects that arise from augmin depletion. Our studies reveal that spatially and temporally distinct MT generation pathways from chromatin, spindle MTs, and acentrosomal poles all contribute to robust bipolar spindle formation in meiotic extracts.

  16. RNA- binding protein Stau2 is important for spindle integrity and meiosis progression in mouse oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yan; Du, Juan; Chen, Dandan; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Nana; Liu, Xiaoyun; Liu, Xiaoyu; Weng, Jing; Liang, Yuanjing; Ma, Wei

    2016-10-01

    Staufen2 (Stau2) is a double-stranded RNA-binding protein involved in cell fate decision by regulating mRNA transport, mRNA stability, translation, and ribonucleoprotein assembly. Little is known about Stau2 expression and function in mammalian oocytes during meiosis. Herein we report the sub-cellular distribution and function of Stau2 in mouse oocyte meiosis. Western blot analysis revealed high and stable expression of Stau2 in oocytes from germinal vesicle (GV) to metaphase II (MII). Immunofluorescence showed that Stau2 was evenly distributed in oocytes at GV stage, and assembled as filaments after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), particularly, colocalized with spindle at MI and MII. Stau2 was disassembled when microtubules were disrupted with nocodazole, on the other hand, when MTs were stabilized with taxol, Stau2 was not colocalized with the stabilized microtubules, but aggregated around the chromosomes array, indicating Stau2 assembly and colocalization with microtubules require both microtubule integrity and its normal dynamics. During interphase and mitosis of BHK and MEF cells, Stau2 was not distributed on microtubules, but colocalized with cis-Golgi marker GM130, implying its association with Golgi complex but not the spindle in fully differentiated somatic cells. Specific morpholino oligo-mediated Stau2 knockdown disrupted spindle formation, chromosome alignment and microtubule-kinetochore attachment in oocytes. The majority oocytes were arrested at MI stage, with bright MAD1 at kinetochores, indicating activation of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Some oocytes were stranded at telophase I (TI), implying suppressed first polar body extrution. Together these data demonstrate that Stau2 is required for spindle formation and timely meiotic progression in mouse oocytes.

  17. Signal transmission from motor axons to group Ia muscle spindle afferents: frequency responses and second-order non-linearities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windhorst, U; Kokkoroyiannis, T; Laouris, Y; Meyer-Lohmann, J

    1994-03-01

    Spinal recurrent inhibition via Renshaw cells and proprioceptive feedback via skeletal muscle and muscle spindle afferents have been hypothesized to constitute a compound feedback system [Windhorst (1989) Afferent Control of Posture and Locomotion; Windhorst (1993) Robots and Biological Systems--Towards a New Bionics]. To assess their detailed functions, it is necessary to know their dynamic characteristics. Previously we have extensively described the properties of signal transmission from motor axons to Renshaw cells using random motor axon stimulation and data analysis methods based thereupon. Using the same methods, we here compare these properties, in the cat, with those between motor axons and group Ia muscle spindle afferents in terms of frequency responses and nonlinear features. The frequency responses depend on the mean rate (carrier rate) of activation of motor axons and on the strength of coupling between motor units and spindles. In general, they are those of a second-order low-pass system with a cut-off at fairly low frequencies. This contrasts with the dynamics of motor axon-Renshaw cell couplings which are those of a much broader band-pass with its peak in the range of c. 2-15 Hz [Christakos (1987) Neuroscience 23, 613-623]. The second-order non-linearities in motor unit-muscle spindle signal lines are much more diverse than those in motor axon-Renshaw cell couplings. Although the average strength of response declines with mean stimulus rate in both subsystems, there is no systematic relationship between the amount of non-linearity and the average response in the former, whilst there is in the latter. The qualitative appearance of motor unit-muscle spindle non-linearities was complicated as was the average response to motor unit twitches. Thus, whilst Renshaw cells appear to dynamically reflect motor output rather faithfully, muscle spindles seem to signal local muscle fibre length changes and their dynamics. This would be consistent with the

  18. AMPK regulates mitotic spindle orientation through phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaiparambil, Jose T; Eggers, Carrie M; Marcus, Adam I

    2012-08-01

    The proper orientation of the mitotic spindle is essential for mitosis; however, how these events unfold at the molecular level is not well understood. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates energy homeostasis in eukaryotes, and AMPK-null Drosophila mutants have spindle defects. We show that threonine(172) phosphorylated AMPK localizes to the mitotic spindle poles and increases when cells enter mitosis. AMPK depletion causes a mitotic delay with misoriented spindles relative to the normal division plane and a reduced number and length of astral microtubules. AMPK-depleted cells contain mitotic actin bundles, which prevent astral microtubule-actin cortex attachments. Since myosin regulatory light chain (MRLC) is an AMPK downstream target and mediates actin function, we investigated whether AMPK signals through MRLC to control spindle orientation. Mitotic levels of serine(19) phosphorylated MRLC (pMRLC(ser19)) and spindle pole-associated pMRLC(ser19) are abolished when AMPK function is compromised, indicating that AMPK is essential for pMRLC(ser19) spindle pole activity. Phosphorylation of AMPK and MRLC in the mitotic spindle is dependent upon calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase kinase (CamKK) activity in LKB1-deficient cells, suggesting that CamKK regulates this pathway when LKB1 function is compromised. Taken together, these data indicate that AMPK mediates spindle pole-associated pMRLC(ser19) to control spindle orientation via regulation of actin cortex-astral microtubule attachments.

  19. Proprioceptive Feedback through a Neuromorphic Muscle Spindle Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Vannucci

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Connecting biologically inspired neural simulations to physical or simulated embodiments can be useful both in robotics, for the development of a new kind of bio-inspired controllers, and in neuroscience, to test detailed brain models in complete action-perception loops. The aim of this work is to develop a fully spike-based, biologically inspired mechanism for the translation of proprioceptive feedback. The translation is achieved by implementing a computational model of neural activity of type Ia and type II afferent fibers of muscle spindles, the primary source of proprioceptive information, which, in mammals is regulated through fusimotor activation and provides necessary adjustments during voluntary muscle contractions. As such, both static and dynamic γ-motoneurons activities are taken into account in the proposed model. Information from the actual proprioceptive sensors (i.e., motor encoders is then used to simulate the spindle contraction and relaxation, and therefore drive the neural activity. To assess the feasibility of this approach, the model is implemented on the NEST spiking neural network simulator and on the SpiNNaker neuromorphic hardware platform and tested on simulated and physical robotic platforms. The results demonstrate that the model can be used in both simulated and real-time robotic applications to translate encoder values into a biologically plausible neural activity. Thus, this model provides a completely spike-based building block, suitable for neuromorphic platforms, that will enable the development of sensory-motor closed loops which could include neural simulations of areas of the central nervous system or of low-level reflexes.

  20. Development of a Revolutionary High Speed Spindle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agba, Emmanuel I.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the development of a hydraulic motor driven spindle system to be employed for high speed machining of composite materials and metals. The spindle system is conceived to be easily retrofitted into conventional milling machines. The need for the hydraulic spindle arises because of the limitations placed on conventional electric motor driven spindles by the low cutting power and the presence of vibrational phenomena associated with voltage frequency at high rotational speeds. Also, the electric motors are usually large and expensive when power requirements are moderately high. In contrast, hydraulic motor driven spindles promise a distinct increase in spindle life over the conventional electric motor driven spindles. In this report, existing technologies applicable to spindle holder for severe operating conditions were reviewed, conceptual designs of spindle holder system were developed and evaluated, and a detailed design of an acceptable concept was conducted. Finally, a rapid prototype of the design was produced for design evaluation.

  1. Effects of Step Dynamic Interference Fit on Transmitting Torque Capacity of Motorized Spindle%电主轴阶梯动态过盈量对主轴扭矩传递能力的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马平; 莫德云; 吴广荣

    2013-01-01

    A GD-Ⅱ motorized spindle was introduced herein,the magnitude of step interference was also determined based on the dynamic interference fit theory,then the finite element model of the jointed structure was built and the effect of different initial interferences was also analyzed under dif-ferent running conditions.The analysis results show that the ability to transmit torque and the con-tact stress decrease with increasing spindle speed constantly,and the higher the spindle speed will lead to greater decreases of the transmitting torque capacity.The results also indicate that usingφ66H6/s6 andφ65.9H6/t6 ladder interference magnitude can well meet the job requirements.%以GD-栻型电主轴为研究对象,首先根据动静态过盈理论初步确定过盈形式和过盈量的大小,然后采用有限元方法对电主轴连接结构进行三维建模,研究不同主轴转速条件下,电主轴初始过盈量的变化对主轴与转子间接触面的应力分布和扭矩传递能力的影响规律。通过分析发现,随着主轴转速的升高,接触面应力和扭矩的传递能力不断减小,且主轴转速越高,扭矩减小越快,研究结果表明,采用毤66H6/s6和毤65.9H6/t6的阶梯过盈量能较好地满足工作要求。

  2. Dynamic Measurement for Error-Motion of Spindle Rotation Based on Wavelet De-noising%基于小波消噪的主轴回转精度动态测量法

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张丹; 侯力; 曾颖峰; 西庆坤; 王瑞

    2015-01-01

    Error-motion of spindle rotation affecting the machining accuracy of parts is one of main factors. Due to de-noising of spindle rotation error-motion with low pass filter in traditional fourier transform caused the loss of some useful signal, dynamic measurement for error-motion of spindle rotation based on wavelet de-noising is put forward. After analyzing the measuring principle and characteristic of the rotation error, the eccentricity error caused when installing standard ball is separated by selecting appropriate wavelet base and threshold value, and the signal-to-noise ratio is increased from 15. 447db to 18. 105db . Experimental result showed that the rotation precision on C616 with the proposed method in this paper was in accordance with DJ-HZ-1 machine tool rotation precision measuring instrument.%主轴回转精度是影响零件加工精度的主要因素之一。针对传统的傅里叶变换对主轴回转误差运动的采样信号进行消噪时,使用低通滤波器会损失主轴回转误差运动某些有用成分的问题,提出了基于小波变换的消噪滤波方法对主轴回转误差进行动态测量。文章在分析主轴回转误差的测试原理和信号特点的基础上,通过选用合适的小波基和阈值分离出基准球安装偏心误差,信号的信噪比由初始值15.447db提高为18.105db,去噪效果明显。实验结果表明,采用文中方法对C616主轴回转精度进行测量,其测量结果与DJ-HZ-1型机床回转精度测量分析仪的测量结果基本吻合。

  3. CENP-W plays a role in maintaining bipolar spindle structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarczyk, Agnieszka; Sullivan, Kevin F

    2014-01-01

    The CENP-W/T complex was previously reported to be required for mitosis. HeLa cells depleted of CENP-W displayed profound mitotic defects, with mitotic timing delay, disorganized prometaphases and multipolar spindles as major phenotypic consequences. In this study, we examined the process of multipolar spindle formation induced by CENP-W depletion. Depletion of CENP-W in HeLa cells labeled with histone H2B and tubulin fluorescent proteins induced rapid fragmentation of originally bipolar spindles in a high proportion of cells. CENP-W depletion was associated with depletion of Hec1 at kinetochores. The possibility of promiscuous centrosomal duplication was ruled out by immunofluorescent examination of centrioles. However, centrioles were frequently observed to be abnormally split. In addition, a large proportion of the supernumerary poles lacked centrioles, but were positively stained with different centrosomal markers. These observations suggested that perturbation in spindle force distribution caused by defective kinetochores could contribute to a mechanical mechanism for spindle pole disruption. 'Spindle free' nocodazole arrested cells did not exhibit pole fragmentation after CENP-W depletion, showing that pole fragmentation is microtubule dependent. Inhibition of centrosome separation by monastrol reduced the incidence of spindle pole fragmentation, indicating that Eg5 plays a role in spindle pole disruption. Surprisingly, CENP-W depletion rescued the monopolar spindle phenotype of monastrol treatment, with an increased frequency of bipolar spindles observed after CENP-W RNAi. We overexpressed the microtubule cross-linking protein TPX2 to create spindle poles stabilized by the microtubule cross-linking activity of TPX2. Spindle pole fragmentation was suppressed in a TPX2-dependent fashion. We propose that CENP-W, by influencing proper kinetochore assembly, particularly microtubule docking sites, can confer spindle pole resistance to traction forces exerted by

  4. CENP-W plays a role in maintaining bipolar spindle structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Kaczmarczyk

    Full Text Available The CENP-W/T complex was previously reported to be required for mitosis. HeLa cells depleted of CENP-W displayed profound mitotic defects, with mitotic timing delay, disorganized prometaphases and multipolar spindles as major phenotypic consequences. In this study, we examined the process of multipolar spindle formation induced by CENP-W depletion. Depletion of CENP-W in HeLa cells labeled with histone H2B and tubulin fluorescent proteins induced rapid fragmentation of originally bipolar spindles in a high proportion of cells. CENP-W depletion was associated with depletion of Hec1 at kinetochores. The possibility of promiscuous centrosomal duplication was ruled out by immunofluorescent examination of centrioles. However, centrioles were frequently observed to be abnormally split. In addition, a large proportion of the supernumerary poles lacked centrioles, but were positively stained with different centrosomal markers. These observations suggested that perturbation in spindle force distribution caused by defective kinetochores could contribute to a mechanical mechanism for spindle pole disruption. 'Spindle free' nocodazole arrested cells did not exhibit pole fragmentation after CENP-W depletion, showing that pole fragmentation is microtubule dependent. Inhibition of centrosome separation by monastrol reduced the incidence of spindle pole fragmentation, indicating that Eg5 plays a role in spindle pole disruption. Surprisingly, CENP-W depletion rescued the monopolar spindle phenotype of monastrol treatment, with an increased frequency of bipolar spindles observed after CENP-W RNAi. We overexpressed the microtubule cross-linking protein TPX2 to create spindle poles stabilized by the microtubule cross-linking activity of TPX2. Spindle pole fragmentation was suppressed in a TPX2-dependent fashion. We propose that CENP-W, by influencing proper kinetochore assembly, particularly microtubule docking sites, can confer spindle pole resistance to traction

  5. Sleep-spindle detection: crowdsourcing and evaluating performance of experts, non-experts and automated methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warby, Simon C.; Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Welinder, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Sleep spindles are discrete, intermittent patterns of brain activity observed in human electroencephalographic data. Increasingly, these oscillations are of biological and clinical interest because of their role in development, learning and neurological disorders. We used an Internet interface...... that crowdsourcing the scoring of sleep data is an efficient method to collect large data sets, even for difficult tasks such as spindle identification. Further refinements to spindle detection algorithms are needed for middle- to older-aged subjects....

  6. Expert and crowd-sourced validation of an individualized sleep spindle detection method employing complex demodulation and individualized normalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura eRay

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A spindle detection method was developed that: 1 extracts the signal of interest (i.e., spindle-related phasic changes in sigma relative to ongoing background sigma activity using complex demodulation, 2 accounts for variations of spindle characteristics across the night, scalp derivations and between individuals, and 3 employs a minimum number of sometimes arbitrary, user-defined parameters. Complex demodulation was used to extract instantaneous power in the spindle band. To account for intra- and inter-individual differences, the signal was z-score transformed using a 60s sliding window, per channel, over the course of the recording. Spindle events were detected with a z-score threshold corresponding to a low probability (e.g., 99th percentile. Spindle characteristics, such as amplitude, duration and oscillatory frequency, were derived for each individual spindle following detection, which permits spindles to be subsequently and flexibly categorized as slow or fast spindles from a single detection pass. Spindles were automatically detected in 15 young healthy subjects. Two experts manually identified spindles from C3 during Stage 2 sleep, from each recording; one employing conventional guidelines, and the other, identifying spindles with the aid of a sigma (11-16 Hz filtered channel. These spindles were then compared between raters and to the automated detection to identify the presence of true positives, true negatives, false positives and false negatives. This method of automated spindle detection resolves or avoids many of the limitations that complicate automated spindle detection, and performs well compared to a group of non-experts, and importantly, has good external validity with respect to the extant literature in terms of the characteristics of automatically detected spindles.

  7. Sleep spindle-related reactivation of category-specific cortical regions after learning face-scene associations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, Til O; Mölle, Matthias; Diedrichs, Jens

    2012-01-01

    ) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) recordings in humans, we show that sleep spindles play a key role in the reactivation of memory-related neocortical representations. On separate days, participants either learned face-scene associations or performed a visuomotor control task. Spindle-coupled......, reactivation did not only occur in temporal synchrony with spindle events but was tuned by ongoing variations in spindle amplitude. These learning-related increases in spindle-coupled neocortical activity were topographically specific because reactivation was restricted to the face- and scene-selective visual...... cortical areas previously activated during pre-sleep learning. Spindle-coupled hippocampal activation was stronger the better the participant had performed at prior learning. These results are in agreement with the notion that sleep spindles orchestrate the reactivation of new hippocampal...

  8. Intercentrosomal angular separation during mitosis plays a crucial role for maintaining spindle stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutradhar, S.; Basu, S.; Paul, R.

    2015-10-01

    Cell division through proper spindle formation is one of the key puzzles in cell biology. In most mammalian cells, chromosomes spontaneously arrange to achieve a stable bipolar spindle during metaphase which eventually ensures proper segregation of the DNA into the daughter cells. In this paper, we present a robust three-dimensional mechanistic model to investigate the formation and maintenance of a bipolar mitotic spindle in mammalian cells under different physiological constraints. Using realistic parameters, we test spindle viability by measuring the spindle length and studying the chromosomal configuration. The model strikingly predicts a feature of the spindle instability arising from the insufficient intercentrosomal angular separation and impaired sliding of the interpolar microtubules. In addition, our model successfully reproduces chromosomal patterns observed in mammalian cells, when activity of different motor proteins is perturbed.

  9. Force encoding in muscle spindles during stretch of passive muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kyle P; Lamotte D'Incamps, Boris; Zytnicki, Daniel; Ting, Lena H

    2017-09-01

    Muscle spindle proprioceptive receptors play a primary role in encoding the effects of external mechanical perturbations to the body. During externally-imposed stretches of passive, i.e. electrically-quiescent, muscles, the instantaneous firing rates (IFRs) of muscle spindles are associated with characteristics of stretch such as length and velocity. However, even in passive muscle, there are history-dependent transients of muscle spindle firing that are not uniquely related to muscle length and velocity, nor reproduced by current muscle spindle models. These include acceleration-dependent initial bursts, increased dynamic response to stretch velocity if a muscle has been isometric, and rate relaxation, i.e., a decrease in tonic IFR when a muscle is held at a constant length after being stretched. We collected muscle spindle spike trains across a variety of muscle stretch kinematic conditions, including systematic changes in peak length, velocity, and acceleration. We demonstrate that muscle spindle primary afferents in passive muscle fire in direct relationship to muscle force-related variables, rather than length-related variables. Linear combinations of whole muscle-tendon force and the first time derivative of force (dF/dt) predict the entire time course of transient IFRs in muscle spindle Ia afferents during stretch (i.e., lengthening) of passive muscle, including the initial burst, the dynamic response to lengthening, and rate relaxation following lengthening. Similar to acceleration scaling found previously in postural responses to perturbations, initial burst amplitude scaled equally well to initial stretch acceleration or dF/dt, though later transients were only described by dF/dt. The transient increase in dF/dt at the onset of lengthening reflects muscle short-range stiffness due to cross-bridge dynamics. Our work demonstrates a critical role of muscle cross-bridge dynamics in history-dependent muscle spindle IFRs in passive muscle lengthening conditions

  10. Left Supraclavicular Spindle Cell Lipoma

    OpenAIRE

    Oladejo Olaleye; Bertram Fu; Ram Moorthy; Charles Lawson; Myles Black; David Mitchell

    2010-01-01

    Background. Spindle cell lipoma (SCL) is a benign lipomatous tumour, typically occurring in the posterior neck, shoulder or upper back of elderly males. They compose of fat, CD34 positive spindle cells, and ropey collagen on a myxoid matrix. This case highlights a rare presentation of SCL and the need for pre-operative diagnosis. Case Report. A 63-year-old gentleman presented with a pre-existing left supraclavicular mass that had recently increased in size. FNA and CT Scans were performed and...

  11. Slipping past the spindle assembly checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Radhika; Kapoor, Tarun M

    2013-11-01

    Error-free genome segregation depends on the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), a signalling network that delays anaphase onset until chromosomes have established proper spindle attachments. Three reports now quantitatively examine the sensitivity and robustness of the SAC response.

  12. Autoassociative MLP in sleep spindle detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huupponen, E; Värri, A; Himanen, S L; Hasan, J; Lehtokangas, M; Saarinen, J

    2000-06-01

    Spindles are one of the most important short-lasting waveforms in sleep EEG. They are the hallmarks of the so-called Stage 2 sleep. Visual spindle scoring is a tedious workload, since there are often a thousand spindles in one all-night recording of some 8 hr. Automated methods for spindle detection typically use some form of fixed spindle amplitude threshold, which is poor with respect to inter-subject variability. In this work a spindle detection system allowing spindle detection without an amplitude threshold was developed. This system can be used for automatic decision making of whether or not a sleep spindle is present in the EEG at a certain point of time. An Autoassociative Multilayer Perceptron (A-MLP) network was employed for the decision making. A novel training procedure was developed to remove inconsistencies from the training data, which was found to improve the system performance significantly.

  13. Asymmetry of the budding yeast Tem1 GTPase at spindle poles is required for spindle positioning but not for mitotic exit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Scarfone

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The asymmetrically dividing yeast S. cerevisiae assembles a bipolar spindle well after establishing the future site of cell division (i.e., the bud neck and the division axis (i.e., the mother-bud axis. A surveillance mechanism called spindle position checkpoint (SPOC delays mitotic exit and cytokinesis until the spindle is properly positioned relative to the mother-bud axis, thereby ensuring the correct ploidy of the progeny. SPOC relies on the heterodimeric GTPase-activating protein Bub2/Bfa1 that inhibits the small GTPase Tem1, in turn essential for activating the mitotic exit network (MEN kinase cascade and cytokinesis. The Bub2/Bfa1 GAP and the Tem1 GTPase form a complex at spindle poles that undergoes a remarkable asymmetry during mitosis when the spindle is properly positioned, with the complex accumulating on the bud-directed old spindle pole. In contrast, the complex remains symmetrically localized on both poles of misaligned spindles. The mechanism driving asymmetry of Bub2/Bfa1/Tem1 in mitosis is unclear. Furthermore, whether asymmetry is involved in timely mitotic exit is controversial. We investigated the mechanism by which the GAP Bub2/Bfa1 controls GTP hydrolysis on Tem1 and generated a series of mutants leading to constitutive Tem1 activation. These mutants are SPOC-defective and invariably lead to symmetrical localization of Bub2/Bfa1/Tem1 at spindle poles, indicating that GTP hydrolysis is essential for asymmetry. Constitutive tethering of Bub2 or Bfa1 to both spindle poles impairs SPOC response but does not impair mitotic exit. Rather, it facilitates mitotic exit of MEN mutants, likely by increasing the residence time of Tem1 at spindle poles where it gets active. Surprisingly, all mutant or chimeric proteins leading to symmetrical localization of Bub2/Bfa1/Tem1 lead to increased symmetry at spindle poles of the Kar9 protein that mediates spindle positioning and cause spindle misalignment. Thus, asymmetry of the Bub2/Bfa1/Tem1

  14. Structures of actin-like ParM filaments show architecture of plasmid-segregating spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharat, Tanmay A M; Murshudov, Garib N; Sachse, Carsten; Löwe, Jan

    2015-07-02

    Active segregation of Escherichia coli low-copy-number plasmid R1 involves formation of a bipolar spindle made of left-handed double-helical actin-like ParM filaments. ParR links the filaments with centromeric parC plasmid DNA, while facilitating the addition of subunits to ParM filaments. Growing ParMRC spindles push sister plasmids to the cell poles. Here, using modern electron cryomicroscopy methods, we investigate the structures and arrangements of ParM filaments in vitro and in cells, revealing at near-atomic resolution how subunits and filaments come together to produce the simplest known mitotic machinery. To understand the mechanism of dynamic instability, we determine structures of ParM filaments in different nucleotide states. The structure of filaments bound to the ATP analogue AMPPNP is determined at 4.3 Å resolution and refined. The ParM filament structure shows strong longitudinal interfaces and weaker lateral interactions. Also using electron cryomicroscopy, we reconstruct ParM doublets forming antiparallel spindles. Finally, with whole-cell electron cryotomography, we show that doublets are abundant in bacterial cells containing low-copy-number plasmids with the ParMRC locus, leading to an asynchronous model of R1 plasmid segregation.

  15. Sleep spindle density in narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Julie Anja Engelhard; Nikolic, Miki; Hvidtfelt, Mathias; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Jennum, Poul

    2017-06-01

    Patients with narcolepsy type 1 (NT1) show alterations in sleep stage transitions, rapid-eye-movement (REM) and non-REM sleep due to the loss of hypocretinergic signaling. However, the sleep microstructure has not yet been evaluated in these patients. We aimed to evaluate whether the sleep spindle (SS) density is altered in patients with NT1 compared to controls and patients with narcolepsy type 2 (NT2). All-night polysomnographic recordings from 28 NT1 patients, 19 NT2 patients, 20 controls (C) with narcolepsy-like symptoms, but with normal cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin levels and multiple sleep latency tests, and 18 healthy controls (HC) were included. Unspecified, slow, and fast SS were automatically detected, and SS densities were defined as number per minute and were computed across sleep stages and sleep cycles. The between-cycle trends of SS densities in N2 and NREM sleep were evaluated within and between groups. Between-group comparisons in sleep stages revealed no significant differences in any type of SS. Within-group analyses of the SS trends revealed significant decreasing trends for NT1, HC, and C between first and last sleep cycle. Between-group analyses of SS trends between first and last sleep cycle revealed that NT2 differ from NT1 patients in the unspecified SS density in NREM sleep, and from HC in the slow SS density in N2 sleep. SS activity is preserved in NT1, suggesting that the ascending neurons to thalamic activation of SS are not significantly affected by the hypocretinergic system. NT2 patients show an abnormal pattern of SS distribution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Cardiac spindle cell hemangioma: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ju Young; Lee, In Jae; Min, Kwang Sun; Jeon, Eui Yong; Lee, Yul; Bae, Sang Hoon [Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Spindle cell hemangioma is an uncommon vascular lesion histologically resembling a cavernous hemangioma and Kaposi's sarcoma with a predilection for the extremities. There are no radiologic reports concerning cardiac spindle cell hemangioma in the current literature. We report here a case of cardiac spindle cell hemangioma.

  17. The Drosophila microtubule-associated protein mars stabilizes mitotic spindles by crosslinking microtubules through its N-terminal region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Zhang

    Full Text Available Correct segregation of genetic material relies on proper assembly and maintenance of the mitotic spindle. How the highly dynamic microtubules (MTs are maintained in stable mitotic spindles is a key question to be answered. Motor and non-motor microtubule associated proteins (MAPs have been reported to stabilize the dynamic spindle through crosslinking adjacent MTs. Mars, a novel MAP, is essential for the early development of Drosophila embryos. Previous studies showed that Mars is required for maintaining an intact mitotic spindle but did not provide a molecular mechanism for this function. Here we show that Mars is able to stabilize the mitotic spindle in vivo. Both in vivo and in vitro data reveal that the N-terminal region of Mars functions in the stabilization of the mitotic spindle by crosslinking adjacent MTs.

  18. Cep57, a NEDD1-binding pericentriolar material component, is essential for spindle pole integrity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qixi Wu; Runsheng He; Haining Zhou; Albert CH Yu; Bo Zhang; Junlin Teng; Jianguo Chen

    2012-01-01

    Formation of a bipolar spindle is indispensable for faithful chromosome segregation and cell division.Spindle integrity is largely dependent on the centrosome and the microtubule network.Centrosome protein Cep57 can bundle microtubules in mammalian cells.Its related protein (Cep57R) in Xenopus was characterized as a stabilization factor for microtubule-kinetochore attachment.Here we show that Cep57 is a pericentriolar material (PCM) component.Its interaction with NEDD1 is necessary for the centrosome localization of Cep57.Depletion of Cep57 leads to unaligned chromosomes and a multipolar spindle,which is induced by PCM fragmentation.In the absence of Cep57,centrosome microtubule array assembly activity is weakened,and the spindle length and microtubule density decrease.As a spindle microtubule-binding protein,Cep57 is also responsible for the proper organization of the spindle microtubule and localization of spindle pole focusing proteins.Collectively,these results suggest that Cep57,as a NEDD1binding centrosome component,could function as a spindle pole- and microtubule-stabilizing factor for establishing robust spindle architecture.

  19. Cep57, a NEDD1-binding pericentriolar material component, is essential for spindle pole integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qixi; He, Runsheng; Zhou, Haining; Yu, Albert C H; Zhang, Bo; Teng, Junlin; Chen, Jianguo

    2012-09-01

    Formation of a bipolar spindle is indispensable for faithful chromosome segregation and cell division. Spindle integrity is largely dependent on the centrosome and the microtubule network. Centrosome protein Cep57 can bundle microtubules in mammalian cells. Its related protein (Cep57R) in Xenopus was characterized as a stabilization factor for microtubule-kinetochore attachment. Here we show that Cep57 is a pericentriolar material (PCM) component. Its interaction with NEDD1 is necessary for the centrosome localization of Cep57. Depletion of Cep57 leads to unaligned chromosomes and a multipolar spindle, which is induced by PCM fragmentation. In the absence of Cep57, centrosome microtubule array assembly activity is weakened, and the spindle length and microtubule density decrease. As a spindle microtubule-binding protein, Cep57 is also responsible for the proper organization of the spindle microtubule and localization of spindle pole focusing proteins. Collectively, these results suggest that Cep57, as a NEDD1-binding centrosome component, could function as a spindle pole- and microtubule-stabilizing factor for establishing robust spindle architecture.

  20. The role of Hklp2 in the stabilization and maintenance of spindle bipolarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanneste, David; Takagi, Masatoshi; Imamoto, Naoko; Vernos, Isabelle

    2009-11-03

    Spindle bipolarity relies on a fine balance of forces exerted by various molecular motors [1-4]. In most animal cells, spindle bipolarity requires sustained outward forces to push the spindle poles apart, an activity that is provided by Eg5, a conserved homotetrameric plus-end-directed kinesin that crosslinks and slides antiparallel microtubules apart [5]. These pushing forces are balanced by inward minus-end-directed forces. Impairing both Eg5 and dynein restores the formation of functional bipolar spindles [4], although the mechanism at play is far from clear. The current model also fails to explain why in some systems Eg5 inhibition does not promote bipolar spindle collapse [6, 7] or why increasing Eg5 levels does not interfere with bipolar spindle assembly [8]. Moreover, the C. elegans Eg5 ortholog is not required for bipolar spindle formation [9]. We show here that the kinesin Hklp2 participates in the assembly and stabilization of the bipolar spindle. Hklp2 localizes to the mitotic microtubules in a TPX2-dependent manner and to the chromosomes through Ki67. Our data indicate that its mechanism of action is clearly distinct from and complementary to that of Eg5, providing an additional understanding of the mechanism driving the formation and maintenance of the bipolar spindle.

  1. Spindle formation, chromosome segregation and the spindle checkpoint in mammalian oocytes and susceptibility to meiotic error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, E; Kirsch-Volders, M; Parry, J; Eichenlaub-Ritter, U

    2008-03-12

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) monitors attachment to microtubules and tension on chromosomes in mitosis and meiosis. It represents a surveillance mechanism that halts cells in M-phase in the presence of unattached chromosomes, associated with accumulation of checkpoint components, in particular, Mad2, at the kinetochores. A complex between the anaphase promoting factor/cylosome (APC/C), its accessory protein Cdc20 and proteins of the SAC renders APC/C inactive, usually until all chromosomes are properly assembled at the spindle equator (chromosome congression) and under tension from spindle fibres. Upon release from the SAC the APC/C can target proteins like cyclin B and securin for degradation by the proteasome. Securin degradation causes activation of separase proteolytic enzyme, and in mitosis cleavage of cohesin proteins at the centromeres and arms of sister chromatids. In meiosis I only the cohesin proteins at the sister chromatid arms are cleaved. This requires meiosis specific components and tight regulation by kinase and phosphatase activities. There is no S-phase between meiotic divisions. Second meiosis resembles mitosis. Mammalian oocytes arrest constitutively at metaphase II in presence of aligned chromosomes, which is due to the activity of the cytostatic factor (CSF). The SAC has been identified in spermatogenesis and oogenesis, but gender-differences may contribute to sex-specific differential responses to aneugens. The age-related reduction in expression of components of the SAC in mammalian oocytes may act synergistically with spindle and other cell organelles' dysfunction, and a partial loss of cohesion between sister chromatids to predispose oocytes to errors in chromosome segregation. This might affect dose-response to aneugens. In view of the tendency to have children at advanced maternal ages it appears relevant to pursue studies on consequences of ageing on the susceptibility of human oocytes to the induction of meiotic error by

  2. Samurai sword sets spindle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reber, Simone; Hyman, Anthony A

    2011-12-09

    Although the parts list is nearly complete for many cellular structures, mechanisms that control their size remain poorly understood. Loughlin and colleagues now show that phosphorylation of a single residue of katanin, a microtubule-severing protein, largely accounts for the difference in spindle length between two closely related frogs.

  3. Left supraclavicular spindle cell lipoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olaleye, Oladejo; Fu, Bertram; Moorthy, Ram; Lawson, Charles; Black, Myles; Mitchell, David

    2010-01-01

    Background. Spindle cell lipoma (SCL) is a benign lipomatous tumour, typically occurring in the posterior neck, shoulder or upper back of elderly males. They compose of fat, CD34 positive spindle cells, and ropey collagen on a myxoid matrix. This case highlights a rare presentation of SCL and the need for pre-operative diagnosis. Case Report. A 63-year-old gentleman presented with a pre-existing left supraclavicular mass that had recently increased in size. FNA and CT Scans were performed and results discussed in the mutidisciplinary team meeting. Excisional biopsy was recommended. Radiology. CT neck showed a left supraclavicular mass of fatty density with fine internal septations. A low-grade liposarcoma could not be excluded. Histopathology. FNA was indeterminate. Histology of specimen showed bland spindle cells with no evidence of malignancy. Immuno-histochemistry showed SCL with CD34 positivity and negative staining on CDK4 and p16. Management. Excision biopsy of the mass was performed which was technically difficult as the mass invaginated around the brachial plexus. The patient recovered well post-operatively with no neurological deficits. Conclusion. Spindle cell lipoma is a rare benign tumour and a pre-operative diagnosis based on the clinical context, imaging and immuno-histochemistry is crucial to management.

  4. Regional Slow Waves and Spindles in Human Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nir, Yuval; Staba, Richard J.; Andrillon, Thomas; Vyazovskiy, Vladyslav V.; Cirelli, Chiara; Fried, Itzhak; Tononi, Giulio

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The most prominent EEG events in sleep are slow waves, reflecting a slow (waves and the underlying active and inactive neuronal states occur locally. Thus, especially in late sleep, some regions can be active while others are silent. We also find that slow waves can propagate, usually from medial prefrontal cortex to the medial temporal lobe and hippocampus. Sleep spindles, the other hallmark of NREM sleep EEG, are likewise predominantly local. Thus, intracerebral communication during sleep is constrained because slow and spindle oscillations often occur out-of-phase in different brain regions. PMID:21482364

  5. Kinetochore-microtubule attachment is sufficient to satisfy the human spindle assembly checkpoint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Etemad, Banafsheh; Kuijt, Timo E F; Kops, Geert J P L

    2015-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a genome surveillance mechanism that protects against aneuploidization. Despite profound progress on understanding mechanisms of its activation, it remains unknown what aspect of chromosome-spindle interactions is monitored by the SAC: kinetochore-microtubule

  6. Regulation of cell cycle by the anaphase spindle midzone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sluder Greenfield

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A number of proteins accumulate in the spindle midzone and midbody of dividing animal cells. Besides proteins essential for cytokinesis, there are also components essential for interphase functions, suggesting that the spindle midzone and/or midbody may play a role in regulating the following cell cycle. Results We microsurgically severed NRK epithelial cells during anaphase or telophase, such that the spindle midzone/midbody was associated with only one of the daughter cells. Time-lapse recording of cells severed during early anaphase indicated that the cell with midzone underwent cytokinesis-like cortical contractions and progressed normally through the interphase, whereas the cell without midzone showed no cortical contraction and an arrest or substantial delay in the progression of interphase. Similar microsurgery during telophase showed a normal progression of interphase for both daughter cells with or without the midbody. Microsurgery of anaphase cells treated with cytochalasin D or nocodazole indicated that interphase progression was independent of cortical ingression but dependent on microtubules. Conclusions We conclude that the mitotic spindle is involved in not only the separation of chromosomes but also the regulation of cell cycle. The process may involve activation of components in the spindle midzone that are required for the cell cycle, and/or degradation of components that are required for cytokinesis but may interfere with the cell cycle.

  7. Phase transition of spindle-associated protein regulate spindle apparatus assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Wang, Shusheng; Huang, Yuejia; He, Xiaonan; Cui, Honggang; Zhu, Xueliang; Zheng, Yixian

    2015-09-24

    Spindle assembly required during mitosis depends on microtubule polymerization. We demonstrate that the evolutionarily conserved low-complexity protein, BuGZ, undergoes phase transition or coacervation to promote assembly of both spindles and their associated components. BuGZ forms temperature-dependent liquid droplets alone or on microtubules in physiological buffers. Coacervation in vitro or in spindle and spindle matrix depends on hydrophobic residues in BuGZ. BuGZ coacervation and its binding to microtubules and tubulin are required to promote assembly of spindle and spindle matrix in Xenopus egg extract and in mammalian cells. Since several previously identified spindle-associated components also contain low-complexity regions, we propose that coacervating proteins may be a hallmark of proteins that comprise a spindle matrix that functions to promote assembly of spindles by concentrating its building blocks.

  8. Canoe binds RanGTP to promote Pins(TPR)/Mud-mediated spindle orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Brett; Johnston, Christopher A; Prehoda, Kenneth E; Doe, Chris Q

    2011-10-31

    Regulated spindle orientation maintains epithelial tissue integrity and stem cell asymmetric cell division. In Drosophila melanogaster neural stem cells (neuroblasts), the scaffolding protein Canoe (Afadin/Af-6 in mammals) regulates spindle orientation, but its protein interaction partners and mechanism of action are unknown. In this paper, we use our recently developed induced cell polarity system to dissect the molecular mechanism of Canoe-mediated spindle orientation. We show that a previously uncharacterized portion of Canoe directly binds the Partner of Inscuteable (Pins) tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain. The Canoe-Pins(TPR) interaction recruits Canoe to the cell cortex and is required for activation of the Pins(TPR)-Mud (nuclear mitotic apparatus in mammals) spindle orientation pathway. We show that the Canoe Ras-association (RA) domains directly bind RanGTP and that both the Canoe(RA) domains and RanGTP are required to recruit Mud to the cortex and activate the Pins/Mud/dynein spindle orientation pathway.

  9. Dynein, Lis1 and CLIP-170 counteract Eg5-dependent centrosome separation during bipolar spindle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanenbaum, Marvin E; Macůrek, Libor; Galjart, Niels; Medema, René H

    2008-12-17

    Bipolar spindle assembly critically depends on the microtubule plus-end-directed motor Eg5 that binds antiparallel microtubules and slides them in opposite directions. As such, Eg5 can produce the necessary outward force within the spindle that drives centrosome separation and inhibition of this antiparallel sliding activity results in the formation of monopolar spindles. Here, we show that upon depletion of the minus-end-directed motor dynein, or the dynein-binding protein Lis1, bipolar spindles can form in human cells with substantially less Eg5 activity, suggesting that dynein and Lis1 produce an inward force that counteracts the Eg5-dependent outward force. Interestingly, we also observe restoration of spindle bipolarity upon depletion of the microtubule plus-end-tracking protein CLIP-170. This function of CLIP-170 in spindle bipolarity seems to be mediated through its interaction with dynein, as loss of CLIP-115, a highly homologous protein that lacks the dynein-dynactin interaction domain, does not restore spindle bipolarity. Taken together, these results suggest that complexes of dynein, Lis1 and CLIP-170 crosslink and slide microtubules within the spindle, thereby producing an inward force that pulls centrosomes together.

  10. Uncovering the Molecular Machinery of the Human Spindle-An Integration of Wet and Dry Systems Biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rojas, Ana M.; Santamaria, Anna; Malik, Rainer

    2012-01-01

    The mitotic spindle is an essential molecular machine involved in cell division, whose composition has been studied extensively by detailed cellular biology, high-throughput proteomics, and RNA interference experiments. However, because of its dynamic organization and complex regulation it is dif....... Combining integrated bio-computational approaches and single gene experimental follow-ups could be key to exploring the still hidden regions of the human spindle system....... it is difficult to obtain a complete description of its molecular composition. We have implemented an integrated computational approach to characterize novel human spindle components and have analysed in detail the individual candidates predicted to be spindle proteins, as well as the network of predicted...... of interactions is still poorly characterised by experimental means and which are thought to influence the functionality of the mitotic spindle on a large scale. Our analyses suggest that we are still far from knowing the complete repertoire of functionally important components of the human spindle network...

  11. The GTPase Gem and its partner Kif9 are required for chromosome alignment, spindle length control, and mitotic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrieu, Guillaume; Quaranta, Muriel; Leprince, Corinne; Hatzoglou, Anastassia

    2012-12-01

    Within the Ras superfamily, Gem is a small GTP-binding protein that plays a role in regulating Ca(2+) channels and cytoskeletal remodeling in interphase cells. Here, we report for the first time that Gem is a spindle-associated protein and is required for proper mitotic progression. Functionally, loss of Gem leads to misaligned chromosomes and prometaphase delay. On the basis of different experimental approaches, we demonstrate that loss of Gem by RNA interference induces spindle elongation, while its enforced expression results in spindle shortening. The spindle length phenotype is generated through deregulation of spindle dynamics on Gem depletion and requires the expression of its downstream effector, the kinesin Kif9. Loss of Kif9 induces spindle abnormalities similar to those observed when Gem expression is repressed by siRNA. We further identify Kif9 as a new regulator of spindle dynamics. Kif9 depletion increases the steady-state levels of spindle α-tubulin by increasing the rate of microtubule polymerization. Overall, this study demonstrates a novel mechanism by which Gem contributes to the mitotic progression by maintaining correct spindle length through the kinesin Kif9.

  12. Characterization of Ring-Like F-Actin Structure as a Mechanical Partner for Spindle Positioning in Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hao; Zhu, Tongge; Xia, Peng; Seffens, William; Aikhionbare, Felix; Wang, Dongmei; Dou, Zhen; Yao, Xuebiao

    2014-01-01

    Proper spindle positioning and orientation are essential for accurate mitosis which requires dynamic interactions between microtubule and actin filament (F-actin). Although mounting evidence demonstrates the role of F-actin in cortical cytoskeleton dynamics, it remains elusive as to the structure and function of F-actin-based networks in spindle geometry. Here we showed a ring-like F-actin structure surrounding the mitotic spindle which forms since metaphase and maintains in MG132-arrested metaphase HeLa cells. This cytoplasmic F-actin structure is relatively isotropic and less dynamic. Our computational modeling of spindle position process suggests a possible mechanism by which the ring-like F-actin structure can regulate astral microtubule dynamics and thus mitotic spindle orientation. We further demonstrated that inhibiting Plk1, Mps1 or Myosin, and disruption of microtubules or F-actin polymerization perturbs the formation of the ring-like F-actin structure and alters spindle position and symmetric division. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized but important link between mitotic spindle and ring-like F-actin network in accurate mitosis and enables the development of a method to theoretically illustrate the relationship between mitotic spindle and cytoplasmic F-actin. PMID:25299690

  13. Next generation spindles for micromilling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pathak, Jay P. (Machine Tool Research Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL); Payne, Scott W. T. (Machine Tool Research Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL); Gill, David Dennis; Ziegert, John C. (Machine Tool Research Center, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL); Jokiel, Bernhard, Jr.

    2004-12-01

    There exists a wide variety of important applications for micro- and meso-scale mechanical systems in the commercial and defense sectors, which require high-strength materials and complex geometries that cannot be produced using current MEMS fabrication technologies. Micromilling has great potential to fill this void in MEMS technology by adding the capability of free form machining of complex 3D shapes from a wide variety and combination of traditional, well-understood engineering alloys, glasses and ceramics. Inefficiencies in micromilling result from the relationships between a cutting tool's breaking strength, the applied cutting force, and the metal removal rate. Because machining times in mesofeatures scale inversely to the part size, a feature 1/10th as large will take 10 times as long to machine. Also, required chip sizes of 1 m or less are cut with tools having edge radius of 2-3 m, the cutting edge effectively has a highly negative rake angle, cutting forces are increased significantly causing chip loads to be further reduced and the machining takes even longer than predicted above. However, cutting forces do not increase with cutting speed, so faster spindles with reduced tool runout are the path to achieve efficient mesoscale milling. This research explored the development of new ultra-high speed micromilling spindles. A novel air-bearing spindle design is discussed that will run at very high speeds (450,000 rpm) and provide very minimal runout allowing the best use of micromilling cutters and reducing overall machining time drastically. Two generations of this spindle design were completed; one with an air bearing supported tool shaft and one with a novel rolling element bearing supported tool shaft. Both designs utilized friction-drive systems that relied on diameter differences between the drive wheel (operating at speeds up to 90,000 rpm) and the tool shaft to achieve high rotational tool speeds. Runout, stiffness, and machining tests were

  14. A LCMT1-PME-1 methylation equilibrium controls mitotic spindle size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xiaoyu; Gholkar, Ankur; Senese, Silvia; Torres, Jorge Z

    2015-01-01

    Leucine carboxyl methyltransferase-1 (LCMT1) and protein phosphatase methylesterase-1 (PME-1) are essential enzymes that regulate the methylation of the protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2AC). LCMT1 and PME-1 have been linked to the regulation of cell growth and proliferation, but the underlying mechanisms have remained elusive. We show here an important role for an LCMT1-PME-1 methylation equilibrium in controlling mitotic spindle size. Depletion of LCMT1 or overexpression of PME-1 led to long spindles. In contrast, depletion of PME-1, pharmacological inhibition of PME-1 or overexpression of LCMT1 led to short spindles. Furthermore, perturbation of the LCMT1-PME-1 methylation equilibrium led to mitotic arrest, spindle assembly checkpoint activation, defective cell divisions, induction of apoptosis and reduced cell viability. Thus, we propose that the LCMT1-PME-1 methylation equilibrium is critical for regulating mitotic spindle size and thereby proper cell division.

  15. A spindle checkpoint functions during mitosis in the early Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encalada, Sandra E; Willis, John; Lyczak, Rebecca; Bowerman, Bruce

    2005-03-01

    During mitosis, chromosome segregation is regulated by a spindle checkpoint mechanism. This checkpoint delays anaphase until all kinetochores are captured by microtubules from both spindle poles, chromosomes congress to the metaphase plate, and the tension between kinetochores and their attached microtubules is properly sensed. Although the spindle checkpoint can be activated in many different cell types, the role of this regulatory mechanism in rapidly dividing embryonic animal cells has remained controversial. Here, using time-lapse imaging of live embryonic cells, we show that chemical or mutational disruption of the mitotic spindle in early Caenorhabditis elegans embryos delays progression through mitosis. By reducing the function of conserved checkpoint genes in mutant embryos with defective mitotic spindles, we show that these delays require the spindle checkpoint. In the absence of a functional checkpoint, more severe defects in chromosome segregation are observed in mutants with abnormal mitotic spindles. We also show that the conserved kinesin CeMCAK, the CENP-F-related proteins HCP-1 and HCP-2, and the core kinetochore protein CeCENP-C all are required for this checkpoint. Our analysis indicates that spindle checkpoint mechanisms are functional in the rapidly dividing cells of an early animal embryo and that this checkpoint can prevent chromosome segregation defects during mitosis.

  16. Timely Endocytosis of Cytokinetic Enzymes Prevents Premature Spindle Breakage during Mitotic Exit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheen Fei Chin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cytokinesis requires the spatio-temporal coordination of membrane deposition and primary septum (PS formation at the division site to drive acto-myosin ring (AMR constriction. It has been demonstrated that AMR constriction invariably occurs only after the mitotic spindle disassembly. It has also been established that Chitin Synthase II (Chs2p neck localization precedes mitotic spindle disassembly during mitotic exit. As AMR constriction depends upon PS formation, the question arises as to how chitin deposition is regulated so as to prevent premature AMR constriction and mitotic spindle breakage. In this study, we propose that cells regulate the coordination between spindle disassembly and AMR constriction via timely endocytosis of cytokinetic enzymes, Chs2p, Chs3p, and Fks1p. Inhibition of endocytosis leads to over accumulation of cytokinetic enzymes during mitotic exit, which accelerates the constriction of the AMR, and causes spindle breakage that eventually could contribute to monopolar spindle formation in the subsequent round of cell division. Intriguingly, the mitotic spindle breakage observed in endocytosis mutants can be rescued either by deleting or inhibiting the activities of, CHS2, CHS3 and FKS1, which are involved in septum formation. The findings from our study highlight the importance of timely endocytosis of cytokinetic enzymes at the division site in safeguarding mitotic spindle integrity during mitotic exit.

  17. Kinetochore-microtubule attachment is sufficient to satisfy the human spindle assembly checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemad, Banafsheh; Kuijt, Timo E F; Kops, Geert J P L

    2015-12-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a genome surveillance mechanism that protects against aneuploidization. Despite profound progress on understanding mechanisms of its activation, it remains unknown what aspect of chromosome-spindle interactions is monitored by the SAC: kinetochore-microtubule attachment or the force generated by dynamic microtubules that signals stable biorientation of chromosomes? To answer this, we uncoupled these two processes by expressing a non-phosphorylatable version of the main microtubule-binding protein at kinetochores (HEC1-9A), causing stabilization of incorrect kinetochore-microtubule attachments despite persistent activity of the error-correction machinery. The SAC is fully functional in HEC1-9A-expressing cells, yet cells in which chromosomes cannot biorient but are stably attached to microtubules satisfy the SAC and exit mitosis. SAC satisfaction requires neither intra-kinetochore stretching nor dynamic microtubules. Our findings support the hypothesis that in human cells the end-on interactions of microtubules with kinetochores are sufficient to satisfy the SAC without the need for microtubule-based pulling forces.

  18. MINITYPE MACHINING SYSTEM FOR DIAMOND LAPPING & POLISHING BY USING BRUSHLESS DIRECT CURRENT MOTOR AS PRECISE SPINDLE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Huinan; CHEN Dongsheng; ZHAO Yong; LIN Binquan

    2008-01-01

    A minitype precise spindle system which can machine precisely and stably in the process of diamond lapping and polishing is designed. In such minitype spindle system, the brushless DC spindle motor is used to drive the lapping finish table, which is built with fluid dynamic bearings. Some measures have been taken to make the lapping system dynamic balance, and a servo controller which can adjust the speed of motor from 1 200 r/min to 5 400 r/min is designed. Experiments show that the spindle system is reliable and stable for diamond polishing, and the detection results by atomic force microscope(AFM) show that the surfaces of diamond edge's Ra is 6.725 nm and whole diamond average Ra is 3.25 nm.

  19. Automated high-throughput quantification of mitotic spindle positioning from DIC movies of Caenorhabditis embryos.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Cluet

    Full Text Available The mitotic spindle is a microtubule-based structure that elongates to accurately segregate chromosomes during anaphase. Its position within the cell also dictates the future cell cleavage plan, thereby determining daughter cell orientation within a tissue or cell fate adoption for polarized cells. Therefore, the mitotic spindle ensures at the same time proper cell division and developmental precision. Consequently, spindle dynamics is the matter of intensive research. Among the different cellular models that have been explored, the one-cell stage C. elegans embryo has been an essential and powerful system to dissect the molecular and biophysical basis of spindle elongation and positioning. Indeed, in this large and transparent cell, spindle poles (or centrosomes can be easily detected from simple DIC microscopy by human eyes. To perform quantitative and high-throughput analysis of spindle motion, we developed a computer program ACT for Automated-Centrosome-Tracking from DIC movies of C. elegans embryos. We therefore offer an alternative to the image acquisition and processing of transgenic lines expressing fluorescent spindle markers. Consequently, experiments on large sets of cells can be performed with a simple setup using inexpensive microscopes. Moreover, analysis of any mutant or wild-type backgrounds is accessible because laborious rounds of crosses with transgenic lines become unnecessary. Last, our program allows spindle detection in other nematode species, offering the same quality of DIC images but for which techniques of transgenesis are not accessible. Thus, our program also opens the way towards a quantitative evolutionary approach of spindle dynamics. Overall, our computer program is a unique macro for the image- and movie-processing platform ImageJ. It is user-friendly and freely available under an open-source licence. ACT allows batch-wise analysis of large sets of mitosis events. Within 2 minutes, a single movie is processed

  20. Reflex changes in muscle spindle discharge during a voluntary contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aniss, A M; Gandevia, S C; Burke, D

    1988-03-01

    1. This study was undertaken to determine whether low-threshold cutaneous and muscle afferents from mechanoreceptors in the foot reflexly affect fusimotor neurons innervating the plantar and dorsiflexors of the ankle during voluntary contractions. 2. Recordings were made from 29 identified muscle spindle afferents innervating triceps surae and the pretibial flexors. Trains of electrical stimuli (5 stimuli, 300 impulses per second) were delivered to the sural nerve at the ankle (intensity: 2-4 times sensory threshold) and to the posterior tibial nerve at the ankle (intensity: 1.5-3 times motor threshold for the small muscles of the foot). The stimuli were delivered while the subject maintained an isometric voluntary contraction of the receptor-bearing muscle, sufficient to accelerate the discharge of each spindle ending. This ensured that the fusimotor neurons directed to the ending were active and influencing the spindle discharge. The effects of these stimuli on muscle spindle discharge were assessed using raster displays, frequencygrams, poststimulus time histograms (PSTHs) and cumulative sums ("CUSUMs") of the PSTHs. Reflex effects onto alpha-motoneurons were determined from poststimulus changes in the averaged rectified electromyogram (EMG). Reflex effects of these stimuli onto single-motor units were assessed in separate experiments using PSTHs and CUSUMs. 3. Electrical stimulation of the sural or posterior tibial nerves at nonnoxious levels had no significant effect on the discharge of the 14 spindle endings in the pretibial flexor muscles. The electrical stimuli also produced no significant change in discharge of 11 of 15 spindle endings in triceps surae. With the remaining four endings in triceps surae, the overall change in discharge appeared to be an increase for two endings (at latencies of 60 and 68 ms) and a decrease for two endings (at latencies of 110 and 150 ms). The difference in the incidence of the responses of spindle endings in tibialis

  1. Antagonistic spindle motors and MAPs regulate metaphase spindle length and chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrovatkina, Viktoriya; Fu, Chuanhai; Tran, Phong T

    2013-12-02

    Metaphase describes a phase of mitosis where chromosomes are attached and oriented on the bipolar spindle for subsequent segregation at anaphase. In diverse cell types, the metaphase spindle is maintained at characteristic constant length [1-3]. Metaphase spindle length is proposed to be regulated by a balance of pushing and pulling forces generated by distinct sets of spindle microtubules (MTs) and their interactions with motors and MT-associated proteins (MAPs). Spindle length is further proposed to be important for chromosome segregation fidelity, as cells with shorter- or longer-than-normal metaphase spindles, generated through deletion or inhibition of individual mitotic motors or MAPs, showed chromosome segregation defects. To test the force-balance model of spindle length control and its effect on chromosome segregation, we applied fast microfluidic temperature control with live-cell imaging to monitor the effect of deleting or switching off different combinations of antagonistic force contributors in the fission yeast metaphase spindle. We show that the spindle midzone proteins kinesin-5 cut7p and MT bundler ase1p contribute to outward-pushing forces and that the spindle kinetochore proteins kinesin-8 klp5/6p and dam1p contribute to inward-pulling forces. Removing these proteins individually led to aberrant metaphase spindle length and chromosome segregation defects. Removing these proteins in antagonistic combination rescued the defective spindle length and in some combinations also partially rescued chromosome segregation defects.

  2. Membrane Bistability in Thalamic Reticular Neurons During Spindle Oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentealba, Pablo; Timofeev, Igor; Bazhenov, Maxim; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Steriade, Mircea

    2010-01-01

    The thalamic reticular (RE) nucleus is a major source of inhibition in the thalamus. It plays a crucial role in regulating the excitability of thalamocortical networks and in generating some sleep rhythms. Current-clamp intracellular recordings of RE neurons in cats under barbiturate anesthesia revealed the presence of membrane bistability in ~20% of neurons. Bistability consisted of two alternate membrane potentials, separated by ~17–20 mV. While non-bistable (common) RE neurons fired rhythmic spike-bursts during spindles, bistable RE neurons fired tonically, with burst modulation, throughout spindle sequences. Bistability was strongly voltage dependent and only expressed under resting conditions (i.e. no current injection). The transition from the silent to the active state was a regenerative event that could be activated by brief depolarization, whereas brief hyperpolarizations could switch the membrane potential from the active to the silent state. These effects outlasted the current pulses. Corticothalamic stimulation could also switch the membrane potential from silent to active states. Addition of QX-314 in the recording micropipette either abolished or disrupted membrane bistability, suggesting INa(p) to be responsible for its generation. Thalamocortical cells presented various patterns of spindling that reflected the membrane bistability in RE neurons. Finally, experimental data and computer simulations predicted a role for RE neurons’ membrane bistability in inducing various patterns of spindling in target thalamocortical cells. We conclude that membrane bistability of RE neurons is an intrinsic property, likely generated by INa(p) and modulated by cortical influences, as well as a factor that determines different patterns of spindle rhythms in thalamocortical neurons. PMID:15331618

  3. Functional analysis of Survivin in spindle assembly in Xenopus egg extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canovas, Pedro M; Guadagno, Thomas M

    2007-01-01

    Survivin is a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) protein family that serves critical roles in mitosis and cytokinesis. Many studies have suggested Survivin's involvement in spindle regulation, but direct biochemical evidence for this has been lacking. Using the cell-free system of Xenopus egg extracts, we tested whether Survivin was necessary for the assembly of metaphase spindles. Removal or inhibition of Xenopus Survivin causes the disruption in the formation of metaphase spindles. In particular, we observe the generation of microtubule (MT) asters or poorly formed shortened spindle structures. In the latter phenotype the spindle structures display a decrease pole-to-pole length and a reduction of MTs around the chromatin indicating that Survivin may promote the stabilization of MT-chromatin interactions. In addition, function analysis of Survivin's conserved phosphorylation site Thr34 (Thr43 in Xenopus) and tubulin-binding domain was also assessed in regulating spindle assembly. Treatment of Xenopus egg extracts with a recombinant Survivin mutant that contained an alanine residue substitution at Thr43 (SURT43A mutant) or that was missing the C-terminal tubulin-binding domain (SURCL mutant) produced an increased frequency of MT asters and shorten abnormal spindle structures in Xenopus egg extracts. Interestingly, a phosphomimetic mutation made at residue Thr43 of Survivin (SURT43E mutant) generated a high frequency of MT asters implying that premature 'activation' of Survivin may interfere with an early stage of spindle assembly. Taken together, we propose that Survivin is a necessary component of the mitotic spindle and its phosphorylation at residue Thr43 is important for Survivin function in spindle assembly. 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Aurora A phosphorylates MCAK to control ran-dependent spindle bipolarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Ems-McClung, Stephanie C; Walczak, Claire E

    2008-07-01

    During mitosis, mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK) localizes to chromatin/kinetochores, a cytoplasmic pool, and spindle poles. Its localization and activity in the chromatin region are regulated by Aurora B kinase; however, how the cytoplasmic- and pole-localized MCAK are regulated is currently not clear. In this study, we used Xenopus egg extracts to form spindles in the absence of chromatin and centrosomes and found that MCAK localization and activity are tightly regulated by Aurora A. This regulation is important to focus microtubules at aster centers and to facilitate the transition from asters to bipolar spindles. In particular, we found that MCAK colocalized with NuMA and XMAP215 at the center of Ran asters where its activity is regulated by Aurora A-dependent phosphorylation of S196, which contributes to proper pole focusing. In addition, we found that MCAK localization at spindle poles was regulated through another Aurora A phosphorylation site (S719), which positively enhances bipolar spindle formation. This is the first study that clearly defines a role for MCAK at the spindle poles as well as identifies another key Aurora A substrate that contributes to spindle bipolarity.

  5. Early stages of spindle formation and independence of chromosome and microtubule cycles in Haemanthus endosperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, E A; Bajer, A S

    1998-01-01

    We analyzed transformation of the interphase microtubular cytoskeleton into the prophase spindle and followed the pattern of spindle axis determination. Microtubules in endosperm of the higher plant Haemanthus (Scadoxus) were stained by the immunogold and immunogold silver-enhanced methods. Basic structural units involved in spindle morphogenesis were "microtubule converging centers." We emphasized the importance of relative independence of chromosomal and microtubular cycles, and the influence of these cycles on the progress of mitosis. Cells with moderately desynchronized cycles were functional, but extreme desynchronization led to aberrant mitosis. There were three distinct phases of spindle development. The first one comprised interphase and early to mid-prophase. During this phase, the interphase microtubule meshwork radiating from the nuclear surface into the cytoplasm rearranged and formed a dense microtubule cage around the nucleus. The second phase comprised mid to late prophase, and resulted in the formation of normal (bipolar) or transitory aberrant (apolar or multipolar) prophase spindles. The third phase comprised late prophase with prometaphase. The onset of prometaphase was accompanied by a rapid association of microtubule converging centers with kinetochores. In this stage aberrant spindles transformed invariably into bipolar ones. Lateral association of a few bipolar kinetochore fibers at early prometaphase established the core of the bipolar spindle and its alignment. We concluded that (1) spindle formation is a largely independent microtubular process modified by the chromosomal/kinetochore cycle; and (2) the initial polarity of the spindle is established by microtubule converging centers, which are a functional substitute of the centrosome/MTOC. We believe that the dynamics of microtubule converging centers is an expression of microtubule self-organization driven by motor proteins as proposed by Mitchison [1992: Philos. Trans. R. Soc. Lond. B

  6. Left Supraclavicular Spindle Cell Lipoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oladejo Olaleye

    2010-01-01

    This case highlights a rare presentation of SCL and the need for pre-operative diagnosis. Case Report. A 63-year-old gentleman presented with a pre-existing left supraclavicular mass that had recently increased in size. FNA and CT Scans were performed and results discussed in the mutidisciplinary team meeting. Excisional biopsy was recommended. Radiology. CT neck showed a left supraclavicular mass of fatty density with fine internal septations. A low-grade liposarcoma could not be excluded. Histopathology. FNA was indeterminate. Histology of specimen showed bland spindle cells with no evidence of malignancy. Immuno-histochemistry showed SCL with CD34 positivity and negative staining on CDK4 and p16. Management. Excision biopsy of the mass was performed which was technically difficult as the mass invaginated around the brachial plexus. The patient recovered well post-operatively with no neurological deficits. Conclusion. Spindle cell lipoma is a rare benign tumour and a pre-operative diagnosis based on the clinical context, imaging and immuno-histochemistry is crucial to management.

  7. Optimization Study of the Efficient Spindle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In the field of yam dyeing, the most generally employed method is a type of package dyeing which uses a package of cheese stacked on a spindle made of a perforated robe. Spindles up to now, have been designed without considering the characteristics of dyeing liquid, focusing only on the geometric configuration which cause many problems such as lack of level dyeing. To improve the level dyeing and find the appropriate spindle configuration for the most effective dyeing process, this study examines the spindle flow-field in detail, using a computational method. Flow characteristics inside the spindle have been investigated with varying in porosity, porous diameter and the velocity of the flow. The results show that the total pressure of the flow through the spindle is used to overcom e body force. The characteristics of the flow from the porous spindle could also be observed. Based on the results from this study, an effective spindle configuration for level-dyeing has been proposed.

  8. Retropharyngeal spindle cell/plemorphic lipoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Kyung; Hwang, Seung Bae; Chung, Gyung Ho; Hong, Ki Hwang; Jang, Kyu Yun [Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-15

    Spindle cell/pleomorphic lipoma is an uncommon benign adipose tissue tumor most frequently arising from the subcutaneous tissue of the back, shoulder, head and neck, and extremities. The deep cervical spaces are the rarely affected locations. Herein we report on the imaging findings of spindle cell/pleomorphic lipoma involving the retropharyngeal space in an elderly woman.

  9. Nap sleep spindle correlates of intelligence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ujma, P.P.; Bodizs, R.; Gombos, F.; Stintzing, J.; Konrad, B.N.; Genzel, L.; Steiger, A.; Dresler, M.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep spindles are thalamocortical oscillations in non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, that play an important role in sleep-related neuroplasticity and offline information processing. Several studies with full-night sleep recordings have reported a positive association between sleep spindles and fl

  10. Poleward tubulin flux in spindles: regulation and function in mitotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buster, Daniel W; Zhang, Dong; Sharp, David J

    2007-08-01

    The poleward flux of tubulin subunits through spindle microtubules is a striking and conserved phenomenon whose function and molecular components remain poorly understood. To screen for novel components of the flux machinery, we utilized RNA interference to deplete regulators of microtubule dynamics, individually and in various combinations, from S2 cells and examined the resulting impact on flux rate. This led to the identification of two previously unknown flux inhibitors, KLP59C and KLP67A, and a flux promoter, Mini-spindles. Furthermore, we find that flux rate is regulated by functional antagonism among microtubule stabilizers and destabilizers specifically at plus ends. Finally, by examining mitosis on spindles in which flux has been up- or down-regulated or restored after the codepletion of antagonistic flux regulators, we show that flux is an integral contributor to anaphase A but is not responsible for chromosome congression, interkinetochore tension, or the establishment of normal spindle length during prometaphase/metaphase.

  11. Novel approach for determining the optimal axial preload of a simulating rotary table spindle system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAN Xiao-biao; XIE Tao; CHEN Wei-shan

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a new theoretical model to determine the optimal axial preload ora spindle system, for challenging the traditional method which relies heavily on experience of engineers. The axial preloading stiffness was treated as the sum of the spindle modal stiffness and the framework elastic stiffness, based on a novel concept that magnitude of preloads can be controlled by measuring the resonant frequency of a spindle system. By employing an example of a certain type of aircraft simulating rotary table, the modal stiffness was measured on the Agilent 35670A Dynamic Signal Analyzer by experimental modal analysis. The equivalent elastic stiffness was simulated by both finite element analysis in ANSYS(R) and a curve fitting in MATLAB(R). Results showed that the static preloading stiffness of the spindle was 7.2125×107 N/m, and that the optimal preloading force was 120.0848 N. Practical application proved the feasibility of our method.

  12. Research Progress of Key Technology of High-Speed and High Precision Motorized Spindles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIONG Wan-li; MI Hai-qing; HUANG Hon-gwu

    2005-01-01

    High speed machining and high precision machining are two tendencies of the manufacturing technology worldwide. The motorized spindle is the core component of the machine tools for achieving the high speed and high precise machining, which affects the general development level of the machine tools to a great extent. Progress of the key techniques is reviewed in this paper, in which the high speed and high precision spindle bearings, the dynamical and thermal characteristics of spindles, the design technique of the high frequency motors and the drivers, the anti-electromagnetic damage technique of the motors, and the machining and assembling technique are involved. Finally, tha development tendencies of the motorized spindles are presented.

  13. A spindle-like apparatus guides bacterial chromosome segregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptacin, Jerod L; Lee, Steven F; Garner, Ethan C; Toro, Esteban; Eckart, Michael; Comolli, Luis R; Moerner, W E; Shapiro, Lucy

    2010-08-01

    Until recently, a dedicated mitotic apparatus that segregates newly replicated chromosomes into daughter cells was believed to be unique to eukaryotic cells. Here we demonstrate that the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus segregates its chromosome using a partitioning (Par) apparatus that has surprising similarities to eukaryotic spindles. We show that the C. crescentus ATPase ParA forms linear polymers in vitro and assembles into a narrow linear structure in vivo. The centromere-binding protein ParB binds to and destabilizes ParA structures in vitro. We propose that this ParB-stimulated ParA depolymerization activity moves the centromere to the opposite cell pole through a burnt bridge Brownian ratchet mechanism. Finally, we identify the pole-specific TipN protein as a new component of the Par system that is required to maintain the directionality of DNA transfer towards the new cell pole. Our results elucidate a bacterial chromosome segregation mechanism that features basic operating principles similar to eukaryotic mitotic machines, including a multivalent protein complex at the centromere that stimulates the dynamic disassembly of polymers to move chromosomes into daughter compartments.

  14. Stability analysis of machine tool spindle under uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Dou

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Chatter is a harmful machining vibration that occurs between the workpiece and the cutting tool, usually resulting in irregular flaw streaks on the finished surface and severe tool wear. Stability lobe diagrams could predict chatter by providing graphical representations of the stable combinations of the axial depth of the cut and spindle speed. In this article, the analytical model of a spindle system is constructed, including a Timoshenko beam rotating shaft model and double sets of angular contact ball bearings with 5 degrees of freedom. Then, the stability lobe diagram of the model is developed according to its dynamic properties. The Monte Carlo method is applied to analyse the bearing preload influence on the system stability with uncertainty taken into account.

  15. Phosphorylated ERK5/BMK1 transiently accumulates within division spindles in mouse oocytes and preimplantation embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Ciemerych

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available MAP kinases of the ERK family play important roles in oocyte maturation, fertilization, and early embryo development. The role of the signaling pathway involving ERK5 MAP kinase during meiotic and mitotic M-phase of the cell cycle is not well known. Here, we studied the localization of the phosphorylated, and thus potentially activated, form of ERK5 in mouse maturing oocytes and mitotically dividing early embryos. We show that phosphorylation/dephosphorylation, i.e. likely activation/inactivation of ERK5, correlates with M-phase progression. Phosphorylated form of ERK5 accumulates in division spindle of both meiotic and mitotic cells, and precisely co-localizes with spindle microtubules at metaphase. This localization changes drastically in the anaphase, when phospho-ERK5 completely disappears from microtubules and transits to the cytoplasmic granular, vesicle-like structures. In telophase oocytes it becomes incorporated into the midbody. Dynamic changes in the localization of phospho-ERK5 suggests that it may play an important role both in meiotic and mitotic division. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011, Vol. 49, No. 3, 528–534

  16. Rotation of Meiotic Spindle Is Controlled by Microfilaments in Mouse Oocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Da-YuanChen; Jin-SongLi; LiLian; LeiLei; Zhi-MingHan; Qing-YuanSun

    2005-01-01

    The completion of meiosis requires the spatial and temporal coordination of cytokinesis and karyokirlesis. During meiotic maturation, many events, such as formation, location, and rotation of the meiotic spindle as well as chromosomal movement,Polar body extrusion,and pronuclear migration,are dependent on regulation of the cytoskeleton system.To study functions of microfilaments in meiosis,we induced metaphase Ⅱ(MII)mouse oocytes to resume meiosis by in vitro fertilization or parthenogenetic activation,and we treated such oocytes with cytochalasin B(CB).The changes of the meiotic spindle,as visualized in preparations stained for β-tubulin and chromation,were observed by fluorescent confocal microscopy.The meiotic spindle of Mll oocytes was observed to be parallel to the plasmalemma.After meiosis had resumed,the spindle rotated to the vertical position so that the second polar body could be extruded into the perivitelline space.When meiosis resumed and oocytes were treated with 10μg/ml of CB,the spindle rotation was inhibited.Consequently,the oocyte formed an extra pronucleus instead of extruding a second polar body.These results indicate that spindle rotation is essential for polar body extrusion;it is the microfilaments that play a crucial role in regulating rotation of the meiotic spindle.

  17. Alpha spindles as neurophysiological correlates indicating attentional shift in a simulated driving task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnleitner, Andreas; Simon, Michael; Kincses, Wilhelm E; Buchner, Axel; Schrauf, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The intention of this paper is to describe neurophysiological correlates of driver distraction with highly robust parameters in the EEG (i.e. alpha spindles). In a simulated driving task with two different secondary tasks (i.e. visuomotor, auditory), N=28 participants had to perform full stop brakes reacting to appearing stop signs and red traffic lights. Alpha spindle rate was significantly higher during an auditory secondary task and significantly lower during a visuomotor secondary task as compared to driving only. Alpha spindle duration was significantly shortened during a visuomotor secondary task. The results are consistent with the assumption that alpha spindles indicate active inhibition of visual information processing. Effects on the alpha spindles while performing secondary tasks on top of the driving task indicate attentional shift according to the task modality. As compared to alpha band power, both the measures of alpha spindle rate and alpha spindle duration were less vulnerable to artifacts and the effect sizes were larger, allowing for a more accurate description of the current driver state.

  18. Identification of MAC1: A Small Molecule That Rescues Spindle Bipolarity in Monastrol-Treated Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Obaidi, Naowras; Mitchison, Timothy J; Crews, Craig M; Mayer, Thomas U

    2016-06-17

    The genetic integrity of each organism is intimately tied to the correct segregation of its genome during mitosis. Insights into the underlying mechanisms are fundamental for both basic research and the development of novel strategies to treat mitosis-relevant diseases such as cancer. Due to their fast mode of action, small molecules are invaluable tools to dissect mitosis. Yet, there is a great demand for novel antimitotic compounds. We performed a chemical genetic suppression screen to identify compounds that restore spindle bipolarity in cells treated with Monastrol, an inhibitor of the mitotic kinesin Eg5. We identified one compound-MAC1-that rescued spindle bipolarity in cells lacking Eg5 activity. Mechanistically, MAC1 induces the formation of additional microtubule nucleation centers, which allows kinesin Kif15-dependent bipolar spindle assembly in the absence of Eg5 activity. Thus, our chemical genetic suppression screen revealed novel unexpected insights into the mechanism of spindle assembly in mammalian cells.

  19. Active dendrites enhance neuronal dynamic range.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo L Gollo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Since the first experimental evidences of active conductances in dendrites, most neurons have been shown to exhibit dendritic excitability through the expression of a variety of voltage-gated ion channels. However, despite experimental and theoretical efforts undertaken in the past decades, the role of this excitability for some kind of dendritic computation has remained elusive. Here we show that, owing to very general properties of excitable media, the average output of a model of an active dendritic tree is a highly non-linear function of its afferent rate, attaining extremely large dynamic ranges (above 50 dB. Moreover, the model yields double-sigmoid response functions as experimentally observed in retinal ganglion cells. We claim that enhancement of dynamic range is the primary functional role of active dendritic conductances. We predict that neurons with larger dendritic trees should have larger dynamic range and that blocking of active conductances should lead to a decrease in dynamic range.

  20. Dynamics of Minor Solar Activity \

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cauzzi, G.; Vial, J. C.; Falciani, R.; Falchi, A.; Smaldone, L. A.

    We present a program for coordinated observations between ground based observatories, mainly NSO/Sacramento Peak, and several instruments onboard SOHO (primarily SUMER). The scientific goal is the study of small activity phenomena, at high spatial and temporal resolution.

  1. Electro-acoustic behavior of the mitotic spindle: a semi-classical coarse-grained model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Havelka

    Full Text Available The regulation of chromosome separation during mitosis is not fully understood yet. Microtubules forming mitotic spindles are targets of treatment strategies which are aimed at (i the triggering of the apoptosis or (ii the interruption of uncontrolled cell division. Despite these facts, only few physical models relating to the dynamics of mitotic spindles exist up to now. In this paper, we present the first electromechanical model which enables calculation of the electromagnetic field coupled to acoustic vibrations of the mitotic spindle. This electromagnetic field originates from the electrical polarity of microtubules which form the mitotic spindle. The model is based on the approximation of resonantly vibrating microtubules by a network of oscillating electric dipoles. Our computational results predict the existence of a rapidly changing electric field which is generated by either driven or endogenous vibrations of the mitotic spindle. For certain values of parameters, the intensity of the electric field and its gradient reach values which may exert a not-inconsiderable force on chromosomes which are aligned in the spindle midzone. Our model may describe possible mechanisms of the effects of ultra-short electrical and mechanical pulses on dividing cells--a strategy used in novel methods for cancer treatment.

  2. A curved edge diffraction-utilized displacement sensor for spindle metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, ChaBum; Mahajan, Satish M.; Zhao, Rui; Jeon, Seongkyul

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new dimensional metrological sensing principle for a curved surface based on curved edge diffraction. Spindle error measurement technology utilizes a cylindrical or spherical target artifact attached to the spindle with non-contact sensors, typically a capacitive sensor (CS) or an eddy current sensor, pointed at the artifact. However, these sensors are designed for flat surface measurement. Therefore, measuring a target with a curved surface causes error. This is due to electric fields behaving differently between a flat and curved surface than between two flat surfaces. In this study, a laser is positioned incident to the cylindrical surface of the spindle, and a photodetector collects the total field produced by the diffraction around the target surface. The proposed sensor was compared with a CS within a range of 500 μm. The discrepancy between the proposed sensor and CS was 0.017% of the full range. Its sensing performance showed a resolution of 14 nm and a drift of less than 10 nm for 7 min of operation. This sensor was also used to measure dynamic characteristics of the spindle system (natural frequency 181.8 Hz, damping ratio 0.042) and spindle runout (22.0 μm at 2000 rpm). The combined standard uncertainty was estimated as 85.9 nm under current experiment conditions. It is anticipated that this measurement technique allows for in situ health monitoring of a precision spindle system in an accurate, convenient, and low cost manner.

  3. A curved edge diffraction-utilized displacement sensor for spindle metrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, ChaBum; Mahajan, Satish M; Zhao, Rui; Jeon, Seongkyul

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents a new dimensional metrological sensing principle for a curved surface based on curved edge diffraction. Spindle error measurement technology utilizes a cylindrical or spherical target artifact attached to the spindle with non-contact sensors, typically a capacitive sensor (CS) or an eddy current sensor, pointed at the artifact. However, these sensors are designed for flat surface measurement. Therefore, measuring a target with a curved surface causes error. This is due to electric fields behaving differently between a flat and curved surface than between two flat surfaces. In this study, a laser is positioned incident to the cylindrical surface of the spindle, and a photodetector collects the total field produced by the diffraction around the target surface. The proposed sensor was compared with a CS within a range of 500 μm. The discrepancy between the proposed sensor and CS was 0.017% of the full range. Its sensing performance showed a resolution of 14 nm and a drift of less than 10 nm for 7 min of operation. This sensor was also used to measure dynamic characteristics of the spindle system (natural frequency 181.8 Hz, damping ratio 0.042) and spindle runout (22.0 μm at 2000 rpm). The combined standard uncertainty was estimated as 85.9 nm under current experiment conditions. It is anticipated that this measurement technique allows for in situ health monitoring of a precision spindle system in an accurate, convenient, and low cost manner.

  4. Afferent Innervation, Muscle Spindles, and Contractures Following Neonatal Brachial Plexus Injury in a Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaou, Sia; Hu, Liangjun; Cornwall, Roger

    2015-10-01

    We used an established mouse model of elbow flexion contracture after neonatal brachial plexus injury (NBPI) to test the hypothesis that preservation of afferent innervation protects against contractures and is associated with preservation of muscle spindles and ErbB signaling. A model of preganglionic C5 through C7 NBPI was first tested in mice with fluorescent axons using confocal imaging to confirm preserved afferent innervation of spindles despite motor end plate denervation. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries were then created in wild-type mice. Four weeks later, we assessed total and afferent denervation of the elbow flexors by musculocutaneous nerve immunohistochemistry. Biceps muscle volume and cross-sectional area were measured by micro computed tomography. An observer who was blinded to the study protocol measured elbow flexion contractures. Biceps spindle and muscle fiber morphology and ErbB signaling pathway activity were assessed histologically and immunohistochemically. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries caused similar total denervation and biceps muscle atrophy. However, after preganglionic injuries, afferent innervation was partially preserved and elbow flexion contractures were significantly less severe. Spindles degenerated after postganglionic injury but were preserved after preganglionic injury. ErbB signaling was inactivated in denervated spindles after postganglionic injury but ErbB signaling activity was preserved in spindles after preganglionic injury with retained afferent innervation. Preganglionic and postganglionic injuries were associated with upregulation of ErbB signaling in extrafusal muscle fibers. Contractures after NBPI are associated with muscle spindle degeneration and loss of spindle ErbB signaling activity. Preservation of afferent innervation maintained spindle development and ErbB signaling activity, and protected against contractures. Pharmacologic modulation of ErbB signaling, which is being investigated as a

  5. A NudE/14-3-3 pathway coordinates Dynein and the Kinesin Khc73 to position the mitotic spindle

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Mitotic spindle position is controlled by interactions of cortical molecular motors with astral microtubules. In animal cells, Partner of Inscuteable (Pins) acts at the cortex to coordinate the activity of Dynein and Kinesin-73 (Khc73; Kif13B in mammals) to orient the spindle. Though the two motors move in opposite directions, their synergistic activity is required for robust Pins-mediated spindle orientation. Here we identify a physical connection between Dynein and Khc73 that mediates coope...

  6. Intrafusal muscle fibre types in frog spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, F H; Ito, F

    1989-04-01

    Muscle spindles from bullfrog semitendinosus, iliofibularis and sartorius muscles were examined with light and electron microscopy. Four types of intrafusal muscle fibre were identified according to their diameter, central nucleation and reticular zone arrangement: a large nuclear bag fibre, a medium nuclear bag fibre, and two types of small nuclear chain fibres with and without a reticular zone, respectively. It is suggested that they are comparable to the nuclear bag1, bag2 and chain fibres in mammalian muscle spindles.

  7. [Plus end tracking proteins and their role in mitotic spindle organization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajer, Seweryn; Kasprzak, Andrzej A

    2009-01-01

    Plus end tracking proteins (+TIPs) form a diverse protein family, members of which were found in all eukaryotes. Their characteristic feature is the ability of localisation on dynamically growing plus ends of microtubules. +TIPs perform many important functions during mitosis: they control microtubule growth, the recruitment of other proteins to the microtubule plus end and promote the interaction of microtubules with other elements of the spindle. In the article we describe the structure of main +TIPs groups, focusing especially on domains responsible for plus end tracking. We also discuss several mechanisms for plus-end accumulation, the influence of these proteins on microtubule dynamics and their importance in the spindle organization.

  8. Collective dynamics of active cytoskeletal networks

    CERN Document Server

    Köhler, Simone; Bausch, Andreas R

    2011-01-01

    Self organization mechanisms are essential for the cytoskeleton to adapt to the requirements of living cells. They rely on the intricate interplay of cytoskeletal filaments, crosslinking proteins and molecular motors. Here we present an in vitro minimal model system consisting of actin filaments, fascin and myosin-II filaments exhibiting pulsative collective long range dynamics. The reorganizations in the highly dynamic steady state of the active gel are characterized by alternating periods of runs and stalls resulting in a superdiffusive dynamics of the network's constituents. They are dominated by the complex competition of crosslinking molecules and motor filaments in the network: Collective dynamics are only observed if the relative strength of the binding of myosin-II filaments to the actin network allows exerting high enough forces to unbind actin/fascin crosslinks. The feedback between structure formation and dynamics can be resolved by combining these experiments with phenomenological simulations base...

  9. Uncovering the molecular machinery of the human spindle--an integration of wet and dry systems biology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M Rojas

    Full Text Available The mitotic spindle is an essential molecular machine involved in cell division, whose composition has been studied extensively by detailed cellular biology, high-throughput proteomics, and RNA interference experiments. However, because of its dynamic organization and complex regulation it is difficult to obtain a complete description of its molecular composition. We have implemented an integrated computational approach to characterize novel human spindle components and have analysed in detail the individual candidates predicted to be spindle proteins, as well as the network of predicted relations connecting known and putative spindle proteins. The subsequent experimental validation of a number of predicted novel proteins confirmed not only their association with the spindle apparatus but also their role in mitosis. We found that 75% of our tested proteins are localizing to the spindle apparatus compared to a success rate of 35% when expert knowledge alone was used. We compare our results to the previously published MitoCheck study and see that our approach does validate some findings by this consortium. Further, we predict so-called "hidden spindle hub", proteins whose network of interactions is still poorly characterised by experimental means and which are thought to influence the functionality of the mitotic spindle on a large scale. Our analyses suggest that we are still far from knowing the complete repertoire of functionally important components of the human spindle network. Combining integrated bio-computational approaches and single gene experimental follow-ups could be key to exploring the still hidden regions of the human spindle system.

  10. Meiosis-specific stable binding of augmin to acentrosomal spindle poles promotes biased microtubule assembly in oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombié, Nathalie; Głuszek, A Agata; Meireles, Ana M; Ohkura, Hiroyuki

    2013-06-01

    In the oocytes of many animals including humans, the meiotic spindle assembles without centrosomes. It is still unclear how multiple pathways contribute to spindle microtubule assembly, and whether they are regulated differently in mitosis and meiosis. Augmin is a γ-tubulin recruiting complex which "amplifies" spindle microtubules by generating new microtubules along existing ones in mitosis. Here we show that in Drosophila melanogaster oocytes Augmin is dispensable for chromatin-driven assembly of bulk spindle microtubules, but is required for full microtubule assembly near the poles. The level of Augmin accumulated at spindle poles is well correlated with the degree of chromosome congression. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching shows that Augmin stably associates with the polar regions of the spindle in oocytes, unlike in mitotic cells where it transiently and uniformly associates with the metaphase spindle. This stable association is enhanced by γ-tubulin and the kinesin-14 Ncd. Therefore, we suggest that meiosis-specific regulation of Augmin compensates for the lack of centrosomes in oocytes by actively biasing sites of microtubule generation within the spindle.

  11. Meiosis-specific stable binding of augmin to acentrosomal spindle poles promotes biased microtubule assembly in oocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Colombié

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the oocytes of many animals including humans, the meiotic spindle assembles without centrosomes. It is still unclear how multiple pathways contribute to spindle microtubule assembly, and whether they are regulated differently in mitosis and meiosis. Augmin is a γ-tubulin recruiting complex which "amplifies" spindle microtubules by generating new microtubules along existing ones in mitosis. Here we show that in Drosophila melanogaster oocytes Augmin is dispensable for chromatin-driven assembly of bulk spindle microtubules, but is required for full microtubule assembly near the poles. The level of Augmin accumulated at spindle poles is well correlated with the degree of chromosome congression. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching shows that Augmin stably associates with the polar regions of the spindle in oocytes, unlike in mitotic cells where it transiently and uniformly associates with the metaphase spindle. This stable association is enhanced by γ-tubulin and the kinesin-14 Ncd. Therefore, we suggest that meiosis-specific regulation of Augmin compensates for the lack of centrosomes in oocytes by actively biasing sites of microtubule generation within the spindle.

  12. Active Polar Two-Fluid Macroscopic Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleiner, Harald; Svensek, Daniel; Brand, Helmut R.

    2014-03-01

    We study the dynamics of systems with a polar dynamic preferred direction. Examples include the pattern-forming growth of bacteria (in a solvent, shoals of fish (moving in water currents), flocks of birds and migrating insects (flying in windy air). Because the preferred direction only exists dynamically, but not statically, the macroscopic variable of choice is the macroscopic velocity associated with the motion of the active units. We derive the macroscopic equations for such a system and discuss novel static, reversible and irreversible cross-couplings connected to this second velocity. We find a normal mode structure quite different compared to the static descriptions, as well as linear couplings between (active) flow and e.g. densities and concentrations due to the genuine two-fluid transport derivatives. On the other hand, we get, quite similar to the static case, a direct linear relation between the stress tensor and the structure tensor. This prominent ``active'' term is responsible for many active effects, meaning that our approach can describe those effects as well. In addition, we also deal with explicitly chiral systems, which are important for many active systems. In particular, we find an active flow-induced heat current specific for the dynamic chiral polar order.

  13. Sensory-evoked and spontaneous gamma and spindle bursts in neonatal rat motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Shuming; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J

    2014-08-13

    Self-generated neuronal activity originating from subcortical regions drives early spontaneous motor activity, which is a hallmark of the developing sensorimotor system. However, the neural activity patterns and role of primary motor cortex (M1) in these early movements are still unknown. Combining voltage-sensitive dye imaging (VSDI) with simultaneous extracellular multielectrode recordings in postnatal day 3 (P3)-P5 rat primary somatosensory cortex (S1) and M1 in vivo, we observed that tactile forepaw stimulation induced spindle bursts in S1 and gamma and spindle bursts in M1. Approximately 40% of the spontaneous gamma and spindle bursts in M1 were driven by early motor activity, whereas 23.7% of the M1 bursts triggered forepaw movements. Approximately 35% of the M1 bursts were uncorrelated to movements and these bursts had significantly fewer spikes and shorter burst duration. Focal electrical stimulation of layer V neurons in M1 mimicking physiologically relevant 40 Hz gamma or 10 Hz spindle burst activity reliably elicited forepaw movements. We conclude that M1 is already involved in somatosensory information processing during early development. M1 is mainly activated by tactile stimuli triggered by preceding spontaneous movements, which reach M1 via S1. Only a fraction of M1 activity transients trigger motor responses directly. We suggest that both spontaneously occurring and sensory-evoked gamma and spindle bursts in M1 contribute to the maturation of corticospinal and sensorimotor networks required for the refinement of sensorimotor coordination.

  14. The spindle protein CHICA mediates localization of the chromokinesin Kid to the mitotic spindle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santamaria, Anna; Nagel, Susanna; Sillje, Herman H W; Nigg, Erich A

    2008-01-01

    Microtubule-based motor proteins provide essential forces for bipolar organization of spindle microtubules and chromosome movement, prerequisites of chromosome segregation during the cell cycle. Here, we describe the functional characterization of a novel spindle protein, termed "CHICA," that was or

  15. New spindle morphogenesis model by Dynein,Nudel, and the spindle matrix

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Lih Lee; Patricia Wadsworth

    2009-01-01

    @@ It is well established that the mi-totic spindle, the organeile responsible for chromosome segregation during mitosis, is built from microtubules, motor proteins, and associated struc-tural and regulatory molecules. More controversial is the existence and identity of non-microtubule spindle components, collectively referred to as the matrix.

  16. [Receptor adaptation of muscle spindles treated in different ways].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalkind, V I; Rokotova, N A

    1978-11-01

    Comparison of the grades of 60 sensitive muscle spindle terminals on two actions: gradual stretch of the muscle and short intensive tetanization of the muscle nerve, showed that, irrespective of the mode of action, the character of adaptation remains the smae in majority of units. The speed of receptors adaptation depends not on the specific of testing precedures, but, apparently, on the means of connection of the sensitive terminals with different types of intrafusal muscle fibers with different elasticviscous properties. The possible reason for speedy adaptation of muscle receptors of elementary dynamic type, is discussed.

  17. Fast sleep spindle reduction in schizophrenia and healthy first-degree relatives: association with impaired cognitive function and potential intermediate phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Claudia; Schlipf, Manuel; Spietzack, Simone; Rausch, Franziska; Eisenacher, Sarah; Englisch, Susanne; Reinhard, Iris; Haller, Leila; Grimm, Oliver; Deuschle, Michael; Tost, Heike; Zink, Mathias; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Schredl, Michael

    2017-04-01

    Several studies in patients with schizophrenia reported a marked reduction in sleep spindle activity. To investigate whether the reduction may be linked to genetic risk of the illness, we analysed sleep spindle activity in healthy volunteers, patients with schizophrenia and first-degree relatives, who share an enriched set of schizophrenia susceptibility genes. We further investigated the correlation of spindle activity with cognitive function in first-degree relatives and whether spindle abnormalities affect both fast (12-15 Hz) and slow (9-12 Hz) sleep spindles. We investigated fast and slow sleep spindle activity during non-rapid eye movement sleep in a total of 47 subjects comprising 17 patients with schizophrenia, 13 healthy first-degree relatives and 17 healthy volunteers. Groups were balanced for age, gender, years of education and estimated verbal IQ. A subsample of relatives received additional testing for memory performance. Compared to healthy volunteers, fast spindle density was reduced in patients with schizophrenia and healthy first-degree relatives following a pattern consistent with an assumed genetic load for schizophrenia. The deficit in spindle density was specific to fast spindles and was associated with decreased memory performance. Our findings indicate familial occurrence of this phenotype and thus support the hypothesis that deficient spindle activity relates to genetic liability for schizophrenia. Furthermore, spindle reductions predict impaired cognitive function and are specific to fast spindles. This physiological marker should be further investigated as an intermediate phenotype of schizophrenia. It could also constitute a target for drug development, especially with regard to cognitive dysfunction.

  18. The chromosomal passenger complex and the spindle assembly checkpoint: kinetochore-microtubule error correction and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maia André F

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract During mitosis, correct bipolar chromosome attachment to the mitotic spindle is an essential prerequisite for the equal segregation of chromosomes. The spindle assembly checkpoint can prevent chromosome segregation as long as not all chromosome pairs have obtained bipolar attachment to the spindle. The chromosomal passenger complex plays a crucial role during chromosome alignment by correcting faulty chromosome-spindle interactions (e.g. attachments that do not generate tension. In the process of doing so, the chromosomal passenger complex generates unattached chromosomes, a specific situation that is known to promote checkpoint activity. However, several studies have implicated an additional, more direct role for the chromosomal passenger complex in enforcing the mitotic arrest imposed by the spindle assembly checkpoint. In this review, we discuss the different roles played by the chromosomal passenger complex in ensuring proper mitotic checkpoint function. Additionally, we discuss the possibility that besides monitoring the presence of unattached kinetochores, the spindle assembly checkpoint may also be capable of responding to chromosome-microtubule interactions that do not generate tension and we propose experimental set-ups to study this.

  19. The chromosomal passenger complex and the spindle assembly checkpoint: kinetochore-microtubule error correction and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vader, Gerben; Maia, André F; Lens, Susanne Ma

    2008-05-28

    During mitosis, correct bipolar chromosome attachment to the mitotic spindle is an essential prerequisite for the equal segregation of chromosomes. The spindle assembly checkpoint can prevent chromosome segregation as long as not all chromosome pairs have obtained bipolar attachment to the spindle. The chromosomal passenger complex plays a crucial role during chromosome alignment by correcting faulty chromosome-spindle interactions (e.g. attachments that do not generate tension). In the process of doing so, the chromosomal passenger complex generates unattached chromosomes, a specific situation that is known to promote checkpoint activity. However, several studies have implicated an additional, more direct role for the chromosomal passenger complex in enforcing the mitotic arrest imposed by the spindle assembly checkpoint. In this review, we discuss the different roles played by the chromosomal passenger complex in ensuring proper mitotic checkpoint function. Additionally, we discuss the possibility that besides monitoring the presence of unattached kinetochores, the spindle assembly checkpoint may also be capable of responding to chromosome-microtubule interactions that do not generate tension and we propose experimental set-ups to study this.

  20. Structural basis for the enhancement of virulence by viral spindles and their in vivo crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Elaine; Hijnen, Marcel; Bunker, Richard D; Boudes, Marion; Rajendran, Chitra; Aizel, Kaheina; Oliéric, Vincent; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Mitsuhashi, Wataru; Young, Vivienne; Ward, Vernon K; Bergoin, Max; Metcalf, Peter; Coulibaly, Fasséli

    2015-03-31

    The great benefits that chemical pesticides have brought to agriculture are partly offset by widespread environmental damage to nontarget species and threats to human health. Microbial bioinsecticides are considered safe and highly specific alternatives but generally lack potency. Spindles produced by insect poxviruses are crystals of the fusolin protein that considerably boost not only the virulence of these viruses but also, in cofeeding experiments, the insecticidal activity of unrelated pathogens. However, the mechanisms by which spindles assemble into ultra-stable crystals and enhance virulence are unknown. Here we describe the structure of viral spindles determined by X-ray microcrystallography from in vivo crystals purified from infected insects. We found that a C-terminal molecular arm of fusolin mediates the assembly of a globular domain, which has the hallmarks of lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases of chitinovorous bacteria. Explaining their unique stability, a 3D network of disulfide bonds between fusolin dimers covalently crosslinks the entire crystalline matrix of spindles. However, upon ingestion by a new host, removal of the molecular arm abolishes this stabilizing network leading to the dissolution of spindles. The released monooxygenase domain is then free to disrupt the chitin-rich peritrophic matrix that protects insects against oral infections. The mode of action revealed here may guide the design of potent spindles as synergetic additives to bioinsecticides.

  1. Purification of fluorescently labeled Saccharomyces cerevisiae Spindle Pole Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Trisha N.

    2016-01-01

    Centrosomes are components of the mitotic spindle responsible for organizing microtubules and establishing a bipolar spindle for accurate chromosome segregation. In budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the centrosome is called the spindle pole body, a highly organized tri-laminar structure embedded in the nuclear envelope. Here we describe a detailed protocol for the purification of fluorescently labeled spindle pole bodes from S. cerevisiae. Spindle pole bodies are purified from yeast using a TAP-tag purification followed by velocity sedimentation. This highly reproducible TAP-tag purification method improves upon previous techniques and expands the scope of in vitro characterization of yeast spindle pole bodies. The genetic flexibility of this technique allows for the study of spindle pole body mutants as well as the study of spindle pole bodies during different stages of the cell cycle. The ease and reproducibility of the technique makes it possible to study spindle pole bodies using a variety of biochemical, biophysical, and microscopic techniques. PMID:27193850

  2. Dynamic Active Contours for Visual Tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niethammer, Marc; Tannenbaum, Allen; Angenent, Sigurd

    2006-01-01

    Visual tracking using active contours is usually set in a static framework. The active contour tracks the object of interest in a given frame of an image sequence. A subsequent prediction step ensures good initial placement for the next frame. This approach is unnatural; the curve evolution gets decoupled from the actual dynamics of the objects to be tracked. True dynamical approaches exist, all being marker particle based and thus prone to the shortcomings of such particle-based implementations. In particular, topological changes are not handled naturally in this framework. The now classical level set approach is tailored for evolutions of manifolds of codimension one. However, dynamic curve evolution is at least a codimension two problem. We propose an efficient, level set based approach for dynamic curve evolution, which addresses the artificial separation of segmentation and prediction while retaining all the desirable properties of the level set formulation. It is based on a new energy minimization functional which, for the first time, puts dynamics into the geodesic active contour framework.

  3. Active Cyber Defense Dynamics Exhibiting Rich Phenomena

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Ren; Xu, Shouhuai

    2016-01-01

    The Internet is a man-made complex system under constant attacks (e.g., Advanced Persistent Threats and malwares). It is therefore important to understand the phenomena that can be induced by the interaction between cyber attacks and cyber defenses. In this paper, we explore the rich phenomena that can be exhibited when the defender employs active defense to combat cyber attacks. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study that shows that {\\em active cyber defense dynamics} (or more generally, {\\em cybersecurity dynamics}) can exhibit the bifurcation and chaos phenomena. This has profound implications for cyber security measurement and prediction: (i) it is infeasible (or even impossible) to accurately measure and predict cyber security under certain circumstances; (ii) the defender must manipulate the dynamics to avoid such {\\em unmanageable situations} in real-life defense operations.

  4. Sleep Spindles as Facilitators of Memory Formation and Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades important progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms of sleep spindle generation. At the same time a physiological role of sleep spindles is starting to be revealed. Behavioural studies in humans and animals have found significant correlations between the recall performance in different learning tasks and the amount of sleep spindles in the intervening sleep. Concomitant neurophysiological experiments showed a close relationship between sleep spindles and other sleep related EEG rhythms as well as a relationship between sleep spindles and synaptic plasticity. Together, there is growing evidence from several disciplines in neuroscience for a participation of sleep spindles in memory formation and learning.

  5. Corticothalamic Feedback Controls Sleep Spindle Duration In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonjean, Maxime; Baker, Tanya; Lemieux, Maxime; Timofeev, Igor; Sejnowski, Terrence; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2011-01-01

    Spindle oscillations are commonly observed during stage two of non-REM sleep. During sleep spindles, the cerebral cortex and thalamus interact through feedback connections. Both initiation and termination of spindle oscillations are thought to originate in the thalamus, based on thalamic recordings and computational models, although some in vivo results suggest otherwise. Here, we have used computer modeling and in vivo multisite recordings from the cortex and the thalamus in cats to examine the involvement of the cortex in spindle oscillations. We found that although the propagation of spindles depended on synaptic interaction within the thalamus, the initiation and termination of spindle sequences critically involved corticothalamic influences. PMID:21697364

  6. Effects of electrical and natural stimulation of skin afferents on the gamma-spindle system of the triceps surae muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, H; Sjölander, P; Sojka, P; Wadell, I

    1989-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the extent to which skin receptors might influence the responses of primary muscle spindle afferents via reflex actions on the fusimotor system. The experiments were performed on 43 cats anaesthetized with alpha-chloralose. The alterations in fusimotor activity were assessed from changes in the responses of the muscle spindle afferents to sinusoidal stretching of their parent muscles (triceps surae and plantaris). The mean rate of firing and the modulation of the afferent response were determined. Control measurements were made in absence of any cutaneous stimulation. Tests were made (a) during physiological stimulation of skin afferents of the ipsilateral pad or of the contralateral hindlimb, or (b) during repetitive electrical stimulation of the sural nerve in the ipsilateral hindlimb, or of sural or superficial peroneal nerve in the contralateral hindlimb. Of the total number of 113 units tested with repetitive electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral sural nerve (at 20 Hz), 24.8% exhibited predominantly dynamic fusimotor reflexes, 5.3% mixed or predominantly static fusimotor reflexes. One unit studied in a preparation with intact spinal cord exhibited static reflexes at low stimulation intensities and dynamic ones at higher stimulation strengths. The remaining units (69%) were uninfluenced. When the receptor-bearing muscle was held at constant length and a train of stimuli (at 20 Hz) was applied to the ipsilateral sural nerve, the action potentials in the primary muscle spindle afferent could be stimulus-locked to the 3rd or 4th pulse in the train (and to the pulses following thereafter), with a latency of about 24 ms from the effective pulse. This 1:1 pattern of driving seemed to be mediated via static and/or dynamic fusimotor neurons. Natural stimulation influenced comparatively few units (3 of 65 units tested from the ipsilateral pad and 10 of 98 tested from the contralateral hindlimb), but when the effects

  7. Do All Dinoflagellates have an Extranuclear Spindle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Eunyoung; Nam, Seung Won; Shin, Woongghi; Park, Myung Gil; Coats, D Wayne

    2015-11-01

    The syndinean dinoflagellates are a diverse assemblage of alveolate endoparasites that branch basal to the core dinoflagellates. Because of their phylogenetic position, the syndineans are considered key model microorganisms in understanding early evolution in the dinoflagellates. Closed mitosis with an extranuclear spindle that traverses the nucleus in cytoplasmic grooves or tunnels is viewed as one of the morphological features shared by syndinean and core dinoflagellates. Here we describe nuclear morphology and mitosis in the syndinean dinoflagellate Amoebophrya sp. from Akashiwo sanguinea, a member of the A. ceratii complex, as revealed by protargol silver impregnation, DNA specific fluorochromes, and transmission electron microscopy. Our observations show that not all species classified as dinoflagellates have an extranuclear spindle. In Amoebophrya sp. from A. sanguinea, an extranuclear microtubule cylinder located in a depression in the nuclear surface during interphase moves into the nucleoplasm via sequential membrane fusion events and develops into an entirely intranuclear spindle. Results suggest that the intranuclear spindle of Amoebophrya spp. may have evolved from an ancestral extranuclear spindle and indicate the need for taxonomic revision of the Amoebophryidae.

  8. Topological defects in confined populations of spindle-shaped cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclos, Guillaume; Erlenkämper, Christoph; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Most spindle-shaped cells (including smooth muscles and sarcomas) organize in vivo into well-aligned `nematic’ domains, creating intrinsic topological defects that may be used to probe the behaviour of these active nematic systems. Active non-cellular nematics have been shown to be dominated by activity, yielding complex chaotic flows. However, the regime in which live spindle-shaped cells operate, and the importance of cell-substrate friction in particular, remains largely unexplored. Using in vitro experiments, we show that these active cellular nematics operate in a regime in which activity is effectively damped by friction, and that the interaction between defects is controlled by the system’s elastic nematic energy. Due to the activity of the cells, these defects behave as self-propelled particles and pairwise annihilate until all displacements freeze as cell crowding increases. When confined in mesoscopic circular domains, the system evolves towards two identical +1/2 disclinations facing each other. The most likely reduced positions of these defects are independent of the size of the disk, the cells’ activity or even the cell type, but are well described by equilibrium liquid crystal theory. These cell-based systems thus operate in a regime more stable than other active nematics, which may be necessary for their biological function.

  9. Sleep spindle deficits in antipsychotic-naïve early course schizophrenia and in non-psychotic first-degree relatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dara S Manoach

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic medicated patients with schizophrenia have marked reductions in sleep spindle activity and a correlated deficit in sleep-dependent memory consolidation. Using archival data, we investigated whether antipsychotic-naïve early course patients with schizophrenia and young non-psychotic first-degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia also show reduced sleep spindle activity and whether spindle activity correlates with cognitive function and symptoms.Method: Sleep spindles during Stage 2 sleep were compared in antipsychotic-naïve adults newly diagnosed with psychosis, young non-psychotic first-degree relatives of schizophrenia patients and two samples of healthy controls matched to the patients and relatives. The relations of spindle parameters with cognitive measures and symptom ratings were examined.Results: Early course schizophrenia patients showed significantly reduced spindle activity relative to healthy controls and to early course patients with other psychotic disorders. Relatives of schizophrenia patients also showed reduced spindle activity compared with controls. Reduced spindle activity correlated with measures of executive function in early course patients, positive symptoms in schizophrenia and IQ estimates across groups.Conclusions: Like chronic medicated schizophrenia patients, antipsychotic-naïve early course schizophrenia patients and young non-psychotic relatives of individuals with schizophrenia have reduced sleep spindle activity. These findings indicate that the spindle deficit is not an antipsychotic side-effect or a general feature of psychosis. Instead, the spindle deficit may predate the onset of schizophrenia, persist throughout its course and be an endophenotype that contributes to cognitive dysfunction.

  10. EWSR1 regulates mitosis by dynamically influencing microtubule acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Long; Chen, Hui; Zhan, Yi-Qun; Yin, Rong-Hua; Li, Chang-Yan; Ge, Chang-Hui; Yu, Miao; Yang, Xiao-Ming

    2016-08-17

    EWSR1, participating in transcription and splicing, has been identified as a translocation partner for various transcription factors, resulting in translocation, which in turn plays crucial roles in tumorigenesis. Recent studies have investigated the role of EWSR1 in mitosis. However, the effect of EWSR1 on mitosis is poorly understood. Here, we observed that depletion of EWSR1 resulted in cell cycle arrest in the mitotic phase, mainly due to an increase in the time from nuclear envelope breakdown to metaphase, resulting in a high percentage of unaligned chromosomes and multipolar spindles. We also demonstrated that EWSR1 is a spindle-associated protein that interacts with α-tubulin during mitosis. EWSR1 depletion increased the cold-sensitivity of spindle microtubules, and decreased the rate of spindle assembly. EWSR1 regulated the level of microtubule acetylation in the mitotic spindle; microtubule acetylation was rescued in EWSR1-depleted mitotic cells following suppression of HDAC6 activity by its specific inhibitor or siRNA treatment. In summary, these results suggest that EWSR1 regulates the acetylation of microtubules in a cell cycle-dependent manner through its dynamic location on spindle MTs, and may be a novel regulator for mitosis progress independent of its translocation.

  11. Mechanical stability of bipolar spindle assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Malgaretti, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Assembly and stability of mitotic spindle is governed by the interplay of various intra-cellular forces, e.g. the forces generated by motor proteins by sliding overlapping anti-parallel microtubules (MTs) polymerized from the opposite centrosomes, the interaction of kinetochores with MTs, and the interaction of MTs with the chromosomes arms. We study the mechanical behavior and stability of spindle assembly within the framework of a minimal model which includes all these effects. For this model, we derive a closed--form analytical expression for the force acting between the centrosomes as a function of their separation distance and we show that an effective potential can be associated with the interactions at play. We obtain the stability diagram of spindle formation in terms of parameters characterizing the strength of motor sliding, repulsive forces generated by polymerizing MTs, and the forces arising out of interaction of MTs with kinetochores. The stability diagram helps in quantifying the relative effec...

  12. Spindle Assembly and Chromosome Segregation Requires Central Spindle Proteins in Drosophila Oocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Arunika; Shah, Shital J.; Fan, Bensen; Paik, Daniel; DiSanto, Daniel J.; Hinman, Anna Maria; Cesario, Jeffry M.; Battaglia, Rachel A.; Demos, Nicole; McKim, Kim S.

    2016-01-01

    Oocytes segregate chromosomes in the absence of centrosomes. In this situation, the chromosomes direct spindle assembly. It is still unclear in this system which factors are required for homologous chromosome bi-orientation and spindle assembly. The Drosophila kinesin-6 protein Subito, although nonessential for mitotic spindle assembly, is required to organize a bipolar meiotic spindle and chromosome bi-orientation in oocytes. Along with the chromosomal passenger complex (CPC), Subito is an important part of the metaphase I central spindle. In this study we have conducted genetic screens to identify genes that interact with subito or the CPC component Incenp. In addition, the meiotic mutant phenotype for some of the genes identified in these screens were characterized. We show, in part through the use of a heat-shock-inducible system, that the Centralspindlin component RacGAP50C and downstream regulators of cytokinesis Rho1, Sticky, and RhoGEF2 are required for homologous chromosome bi-orientation in metaphase I oocytes. This suggests a novel function for proteins normally involved in mitotic cell division in the regulation of microtubule–chromosome interactions. We also show that the kinetochore protein, Polo kinase, is required for maintaining chromosome alignment and spindle organization in metaphase I oocytes. In combination our results support a model where the meiotic central spindle and associated proteins are essential for acentrosomal chromosome segregation. PMID:26564158

  13. Functions of spindle check-point and its relationship to chromosome instability

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    It is generally believed that the equal distribution of genetic materials to two daughter cells during mitosis is the key to cell health and development. During the dynamic process, spindle checkpoint plays a very important role in chromosome movements and final sister chromatid separation. The equal and precise segregation of chromosomes contributes to the genomic stability while aberrant separations result in chromosome instability that causes pathogenesis of certain diseases such as Down's syndrome and cancers. Kinetochore and its regulatory proteins consist of the spindle checkpoint and determine the spatial and temporal orders of chromosome segregation.

  14. Extracellular Regulation of the Mitotic Spindle and Fate Determinants Driving Asymmetric Cell Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Prestina; Azzam, Mark; Hinck, Lindsay

    2017-01-01

    Stem cells use mode of cell division, symmetric (SCD) versus asymmetric (ACD), to balance expansion with self-renewal and the generation of daughter cells with different cell fates. Studies in model organisms have identified intrinsic mechanisms that govern this process, which involves partitioning molecular components between daughter cells, frequently through the regulation of the mitotic spindle. Research performed in vertebrate tissues is revealing both conservation of these intrinsic mechanisms and crucial roles for extrinsic cues in regulating the frequency of these divisions. Morphogens and positional cues, including planar cell polarity proteins and guidance molecules, regulate key signaling pathways required to organize cell/ECM contacts and spindle pole dynamics. Noncanonical WNT7A/VANGL2 signaling governs asymmetric cell division and the acquisition of cell fates through spindle pole orientation in satellite stem cells of regenerating muscle fibers. During cortical neurogenesis, the same pathway regulates glial cell fate determination by regulating spindle size, independent of its orientation. Sonic hedgehog (SHH) stimulates the symmetric expansion of cortical stem and cerebellar progenitor cells and contributes to cell fate acquisition in collaboration with Notch and Wnt signaling pathways. SLIT2 also contributes to stem cell homeostasis by restricting ACD frequency through the regulation of spindle orientation. The capacity to influence stem cells makes these secreted factors excellent targets for therapeutic strategies designed to enhance cell populations in degenerative disease or restrict cell proliferation in different types of cancers.

  15. Illusion caused by vibration of muscle spindles reveals an involvement of muscle spindle inputs in regulating isometric contraction of masseter muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukiboshi, Taisuke; Sato, Hajime; Tanaka, Yuto; Saito, Mitsuru; Toyoda, Hiroki; Morimoto, Toshifumi; Türker, Kemal Sitki; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Kang, Youngnam

    2012-11-01

    Spindle Ia afferents may be differentially involved in voluntary isometric contraction, depending on the pattern of synaptic connections in spindle reflex pathways. We investigated how isometric contraction of masseter muscles is regulated through the activity of their muscle spindles that contain the largest number of intrafusal fibers among skeletal muscle spindles by examining the effects of vibration of muscle spindles on the voluntary isometric contraction. Subjects were instructed to hold the jaw at resting position by counteracting ramp loads applied on lower molar teeth. In response to the increasing-ramp load, the root mean square (RMS) of masseter EMG activity almost linearly increased under no vibration, while displaying a steep linear increase followed by a slower increase under vibration. The regression line of the relationship between the load and RMS was significantly steeper under vibration than under no vibration, suggesting that the subjects overestimated the ramp load and excessively counteracted it as reflected in the emergence of bite pressure. In response to the decreasing-ramp load applied following the increasing one, the RMS hardly decreased under vibration unlike under no vibration, leading to a generation of bite pressure even after the offset of the negative-ramp load until the vibration was ceased. Thus the subjects overestimated the increasing rate of the load while underestimating the decreasing rate of the load, due to the vibration-induced illusion of jaw opening. These observations suggest that spindle Ia/II inputs play crucial roles both in estimating the load and in controlling the isometric contraction of masseter muscles in the jaw-closed position.

  16. Can loss of muscle spindle afferents explain the ataxic gait in Riley-Day syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macefield, Vaughan G; Norcliffe-Kaufmann, Lucy; Gutiérrez, Joel; Axelrod, Felicia B; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2011-11-01

    The Riley-Day syndrome is the most common of the hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathies (Type III). Among the well-recognized clinical features are reduced pain and temperature sensation, absent deep tendon reflexes and a progressively ataxic gait. To explain the latter we tested the hypothesis that muscle spindles, or their afferents, are absent in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III by attempting to record from muscle spindle afferents from a nerve supplying the leg in 10 patients. For comparison we also recorded muscle spindles from 15 healthy subjects and from two patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy IV, who have profound sensory disturbances but no ataxia. Tungsten microelectrodes were inserted percutaneously into fascicles of the common peroneal nerve at the fibular head. Intraneural stimulation within muscle fascicles evoked twitches at normal stimulus currents (10-30 µA), and deep pain (which often referred) at high intensities (1 mA). Microneurographic recordings from muscle fascicles revealed a complete absence of spontaneously active muscle spindles in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III; moreover, responses to passive muscle stretch could not be observed. Conversely, muscle spindles appeared normal in patients with hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy IV, with mean firing rates of spontaneously active endings being similar to those recorded from healthy controls. Intraneural stimulation within cutaneous fascicles evoked paraesthesiae in the fascicular innervation territory at normal stimulus intensities, but cutaneous pain was never reported during high-intensity stimulation in any of the patients. Microneurographic recordings from cutaneous fascicles revealed the presence of normal large-diameter cutaneous mechanoreceptors in hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy III. Our results suggest that the complete absence of functional muscle spindles in these patients explains

  17. Prolonged hyperpolarizing potentials precede spindle oscillations in the thalamic reticular nucleus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentealba, Pablo; Timofeev, Igor; Steriade, Mircea

    2004-01-01

    The thalamic reticular (RE) nucleus is a key structure in the generation of spindles, a hallmark bioelectrical oscillation during early stages of sleep. Intracellular recordings of RE neurons in vivo revealed the presence of prolonged hyperpolarizing potentials preceding spindles in a subgroup (30%) of neurons. These hyperpolarizations (6-10 mV) lasted for 200-300 ms and were present just before the onset of spontaneously occurring spindle waves. Corticothalamic volleys also were effective in generating such hyperpolarizations followed by spindles in RE neurons. A drop of up to 40% in the apparent input resistance (Rin) was associated with these hyperpolarizing potentials, suggesting an active process rather than disfacilitation. Accordingly, the reversal potential was approximately -100 mV for both spontaneous and cortically elicited hyperpolarizations, consistent with the activation of slow K+ conductances. QX-314 in the recording pipettes decreased both the amplitude and incidence of prolonged hyperpolarizations, suggesting the participation of G protein-dependent K+ currents in the generation of hyperpolarizations. Simultaneous extracellular and intracellular recordings in the RE nucleus demonstrated that some RE neurons discharged during the hyperpolarizations and, thus, may be implicated in their generation. The prolonged hyperpolarizations preceding spindles may play a role in the transition from tonic to bursting firing of RE neurons within a range of membrane potential (-60 to -65 mV) at which they set favorable conditions for the generation of low-threshold spike bursts that initiate spindle sequences. These data are further arguments for the generation of spindles within the thalamic RE nucleus. PMID:15210981

  18. Mitotic spindle proteomics in Chinese hamster ovary cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bonner, Mary Kate; Poole, Daniel S; Xu, Tao; Sarkeshik, Ali; Yates, 3rd, John R; Skop, Ahna R

    2011-01-01

    .... Here, we report a proteomic study of the mitotic spindle from Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells. Four different isolations of metaphase spindles were subjected to Multi-dimensional Protein Identification Technology...

  19. Regulation of mitotic progression by the spindle assembly checkpoint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lischetti, Tiziana; Nilsson, Jakob

    2015-01-01

    Equal segregation of sister chromatids during mitosis requires that pairs of kinetochores establish proper attachment to microtubules emanating from opposite poles of the mitotic spindle. The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) protects against errors in segregation by delaying sister separation...

  20. Dynamic active earth pressure on retaining structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deepankar Choudhury; Santiram Chatterjee

    2006-12-01

    Earth-retaining structures constitute an important topic of research in civil engineering, more so under earthquake conditions. For the analysis and design of retaining walls in earthquake-prone zones, accurate estimation of dynamic earth pressures is very important. Conventional methods either use pseudo-static approaches of analysis even for dynamic cases or a simple single-degree of freedom model for the retaining wall–soil system. In this paper, a simplified two-degree of freedom mass–spring–dashpot (2-DOF) dynamic model has been proposed to estimate the active earth pressure at the back of the retaining walls for translation modes of wall movement under seismic conditions. The horizontal zone of influence on dynamic earth force on the wall is estimated. Results in terms of displacement, velocity and acceleration-time history are presented for some typical cases, which show the final movement of the wall in terms of wall height, which is required for the design. The non-dimensional design chart proposed in the present study can be used to compute the total dynamic earth force on the wall under different input ground motion and backfill conditions. Finally, the results obtained have been compared with those of the available Scott model and the merits of the present results have been discussed.

  1. Mechanisms of centrosome separation and bipolar spindle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanenbaum, Marvin E; Medema, René H

    2010-12-14

    Accurate segregation of chromosomes during cell division is accomplished through the assembly of a bipolar microtubule-based structure called the mitotic spindle. Work over the past two decades has identified a core regulator of spindle bipolarity, the microtubule motor protein kinesin-5. However, an increasing body of evidence has emerged demonstrating that kinesin-5-independent mechanisms driving bipolar spindle assembly exist as well. Here, we discuss different pathways that promote initial centrosome separation and bipolar spindle assembly.

  2. Towards a quantitative understanding of mitotic spindle assembly and mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Mogilner, Alex; Craig, Erin

    2010-01-01

    The ‘simple’ view of the mitotic spindle is that it self-assembles as a result of microtubules (MTs) randomly searching for chromosomes, after which the spindle length is maintained by a balance of outward tension exerted by molecular motors on the MTs connecting centrosomes and chromosomes, and compression generated by other motors on the MTs connecting the spindle poles. This picture is being challenged now by mounting evidence indicating that spindle assembly and maintenance rely on much m...

  3. Lis1/dynactin regulates metaphase spindle orientation in Drosophila neuroblasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siller, Karsten H.; Doe, Chris Q.

    2008-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation in polarized cells determines whether they divide symmetrically or asymmetrically. Moreover, regulated spindle orientation may be important for embryonic development, stem cell biology, and tumor growth. Drosophila neuroblasts align their spindle along an apical/basal cortical polarity axis to self-renew an apical neuroblast and generate a basal differentiating cell. It is unknown whether the spindle alignment requires both apical and basal cues, nor have molecular motors been identified that regulate spindle movement. Using live imaging of neuroblasts within intact larval brains, we detect independent movement of both apical and basal spindle poles, suggesting that forces act on both poles. We show that reducing astral microtubules decreases the frequency of spindle movement, but not its maximum velocity, suggesting that one or few microtubules can move the spindle. Mutants in the Lis1/dynactin complex strongly decrease maximum and average spindle velocity, consistent with this motor complex mediating spindle/cortex forces. Loss of either astral microtubules or Lis1/dynactin leads to spindle/cortical polarity alignment defects at metaphase, but these are rescued by telophase. We propose that an early Lis1/dynactin-dependent pathway and a late Lis1/dynactin-independent pathway regulate neuroblast spindle orientation. PMID:18485341

  4. Dynamic patterns of academic forum activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Gao, Ya-Chun; Cai, Shi-Min; Zhou, Tao

    2016-11-01

    A mass of traces of human activities show rich dynamic patterns. In this article, we comprehensively investigate the dynamic patterns of 50 thousands of researchers' activities in Sciencenet, the largest multi-disciplinary academic community in China. Through statistical analyses, we found that (i) there exists a power-law scaling between the frequency of visits to an academic forum and the number of corresponding visitors, with the exponent being about 1.33; (ii) the expansion process of academic forums obeys the Heaps' law, namely the number of distinct visited forums to the number of visits grows in a power-law form with exponent being about 0.54; (iii) the probability distributions of time intervals and the number of visits taken to revisit the same academic forum both follow power-laws, indicating the existence of memory effect in academic forum activities. On the basis of these empirical results, we propose a dynamic model that incorporates the exploration, preferential return with memory effect, which can well reproduce the observed scaling laws.

  5. Four-dimensional visualization and quantitative analysis of meiotic spindle movements in live mouse oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, N; Zhang, L; Liu, B; Wang, P; Li, Y; Ma, W

    2012-09-01

    This paper made a different attempt of real-time observation of the meiotic spindle movements in living mouse oocyte using a convenient method. This method was based on an experimental phenomenon discovered in our work. In living mouse oocytes, a high concentration of calcium ions (Ca(2+)) was observed throughout the region occupied by the initial meiotic spindle. After Ca(2+) labelling with Fura-2, a weakly fluorescent area (WFA) appeared on each side of the chromosomes. The activities of the WFAs changed during spindle development. By real-time tracking of WFAs, we were able to indirectly observe the meiotic spindle movements. Occasionally, it was observed that the first meiotic spindle rotated from an orientation parallel to the cortex to become perpendicular, instead of migrating from the oocyte centre to the cortex along its axis. Moreover, we analysed this uncommon rotation of the first meiotic spindle and found that the whole rotation process can be divided into two phases: the early slow-speed rotation and the subsequent rapid-speed rotation. We further characterized this rotation with respect to rotational speed and acceleration at all the stages of development. By using a two-photon laser-scanning microscope in combination with Fura-2 dye that is nondamaging to oocytes, we provide a convenient method for indirect visualization and quantitative analysis of spindle movements by real-time tracking of WFAs. This method is easy to operate and master, and economical with time and effort. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Royal Microscopical Society.

  6. Evaluating and Improving Automatic Sleep Spindle Detection by Using Multi-Objective Evolutionary Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Yin Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Sleep spindles are brief bursts of brain activity in the sigma frequency range (11–16 Hz measured by electroencephalography (EEG mostly during non-rapid eye movement (NREM stage 2 sleep. These oscillations are of great biological and clinical interests because they potentially play an important role in identifying and characterizing the processes of various neurological disorders. Conventionally, sleep spindles are identified by expert sleep clinicians via visual inspection of EEG signals. The process is laborious and the results are inconsistent among different experts. To resolve the problem, numerous computerized methods have been developed to automate the process of sleep spindle identification. Still, the performance of these automated sleep spindle detection methods varies inconsistently from study to study. There are two reasons: (1 the lack of common benchmark databases, and (2 the lack of commonly accepted evaluation metrics. In this study, we focus on tackling the second problem by proposing to evaluate the performance of a spindle detector in a multi-objective optimization context and hypothesize that using the resultant Pareto fronts for deriving evaluation metrics will improve automatic sleep spindle detection. We use a popular multi-objective evolutionary algorithm (MOEA, the Strength Pareto Evolutionary Algorithm (SPEA2, to optimize six existing frequency-based sleep spindle detection algorithms. They include three Fourier, one continuous wavelet transform (CWT, and two Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT based algorithms. We also explore three hybrid approaches. Trained and tested on open-access DREAMS and MASS databases, two new hybrid methods of combining Fourier with HHT algorithms show significant performance improvement with F1-scores of 0.726–0.737.

  7. NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1 localizes to the mitotic spindle in human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Siegel

    Full Text Available NAD(PH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1 is an FAD containing quinone reductase that catalyzes the 2-electron reduction of a broad range of quinones. The 2-electron reduction of quinones to hydroquinones by NQO1 is believed to be a detoxification process since this reaction bypasses the formation of the highly reactive semiquinone. NQO1 is expressed at high levels in normal epithelium, endothelium and adipocytes as well as in many human solid tumors. In addition to its function as a quinone reductase NQO1 has been shown to reduce superoxide and regulate the 20 S proteasomal degradation of proteins including p53. Biochemical studies have indicated that NQO1 is primarily located in the cytosol, however, lower levels of NQO1 have also been found in the nucleus. In these studies we demonstrate using immunocytochemistry and confocal imaging that NQO1 was found associated with mitotic spindles in cells undergoing division. The association of NQO1 with the mitotic spindles was observed in many different human cell lines including nontransformed cells (astrocytes, HUVEC immortalized cell lines (HBMEC, 16HBE and cancer (pancreatic adenocarcinoma, BXPC3. Confocal analysis of double-labeling experiments demonstrated co-localization of NQO1with alpha-tubulin in mitotic spindles. In studies with BxPc-3 human pancreatic cancer cells the association of NQO1 with mitotic spindles appeared to be unchanged in the presence of NQO1 inhibitors ES936 or dicoumarol suggesting that NQO1 can associate with the mitotic spindle and still retain catalytic activity. Analysis of archival human squamous lung carcinoma tissue immunostained for NQO1 demonstrated positive staining for NQO1 in the spindles of mitotic cells. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate for the first time the association of the quinone reductase NQO1 with the mitotic spindle in human cells.

  8. Dynein and mast/orbit/CLASP have antagonistic roles in regulating kinetochore-microtubule plus-end dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Rita; Feijão, Tália; Gouveia, Susana; Pereira, António J; Matos, Irina; Sampaio, Paula; Maiato, Helder; Sunkel, Claudio E

    2009-07-15

    Establishment and maintenance of the mitotic spindle requires the balanced activity of microtubule-associated proteins and motors. In this study we have addressed how the microtubule plus-end tracking protein mast/orbit/CLASP and cytoplasmic dynein regulate this process in Drosophila melanogaster embryos and S2 cells. We show that mast accumulates at kinetochores early in mitosis, which is followed by a poleward streaming upon microtubule attachment. This leads to a reduction of mast levels at kinetochores during metaphase and anaphase that depends largely on the microtubule minus end-directed motor cytoplasmic dynein. Surprisingly, we also found that co-depletion of dynein rescues spindle bipolarity in mast-depleted cells, while restoring normal microtubule poleward flux. Our results suggest that mast and dynein have antagonistic roles in the local regulation of microtubule plus-end dynamics at kinetochores, which are important for the maintenance of spindle bipolarity and normal spindle length.

  9. Universal activity pattern in human interactive dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Formentin, Marco; Maritan, Amos; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the response function of human agents as demonstrated by written correspondence, uncovering a new universal pattern for how the reactive dynamics of individuals is distributed across the set of each agent's contacts. In long-term empirical data on email, we find that the set of response times considered separately for the messages to each different correspondent of a given writer, generate a family of heavy-tailed distributions, which have largely the same features for all agents, and whose characteristic times grow exponentially with the rank of each correspondent. We show this universal behavioral pattern emerges robustly by considering weighted moving averages of the priority-conditioned response-time probabilities generated by a basic prioritization model. Our findings clarify how the range of priorities in the inputs from one's environment underpin and shape the dynamics of agents embedded in a net of reactive relations. These newly revealed activity patterns constrain future models of com...

  10. Dynamic structure of active nematic shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Zhou, Ye; Rahimi, Mohammad; de Pablo, Juan J.

    2016-11-01

    When a thin film of active, nematic microtubules and kinesin motor clusters is confined on the surface of a vesicle, four +1/2 topological defects oscillate in a periodic manner between tetrahedral and planar arrangements. Here a theoretical description of nematics, coupled to the relevant hydrodynamic equations, is presented here to explain the dynamics of active nematic shells. In extensile microtubule systems, the defects repel each other due to elasticity, and their collective motion leads to closed trajectories along the edges of a cube. That motion is accompanied by oscillations of their velocities, and the emergence and annihilation of vortices. When the activity increases, the system enters a chaotic regime. In contrast, for contractile systems, which are representative of some bacterial suspensions, a hitherto unknown static structure is predicted, where pairs of defects attract each other and flows arise spontaneously.

  11. Absence of a conventional spindle mitotic checkpoint in the binucleated single-celled parasite Giardia intestinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markova, Kristyna; Uzlikova, Magdalena; Tumova, Pavla; Jirakova, Klara; Hagen, Guy; Kulda, Jaroslav; Nohynkova, Eva

    2016-10-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) joins the machinery of chromosome-to-spindle microtubule attachment with that of the cell cycle to prevent missegregation of chromosomes during mitosis. Although a functioning SAC has been verified in a limited number of organisms, it is regarded as an evolutionarily conserved safeguard mechanism. In this report, we focus on the existence of the SAC in a single-celled parasitic eukaryote, Giardia intestinalis. Giardia belongs to Excavata, a large and diverse supergroup of unicellular eukaryotes in which SAC control has been nearly unexplored. We show that Giardia cells with absent or defective mitotic spindles due to the inhibitory effects of microtubule poisons do not arrest in mitosis; instead, they divide without any delay, enter the subsequent cell cycle and even reduplicate DNA before dying. We identified a limited repertoire of kinetochore and SAC components in the Giardia genome, indicating that this parasite is ill equipped to halt mitosis before the onset of anaphase via SAC control of chromosome-spindle microtubule attachment. Finally, based on overexpression, we show that Giardia Mad2, a core SAC protein in other eukaryotes, localizes along intracytoplasmic portions of caudal flagellar axonemes, but never within nuclei, even in mitotic cells with blocked spindles, where the SAC should be active. These findings are consistent with the absence of a conventional SAC, known from yeast and metazoans, in the parasitic protist Giardia.

  12. Vehicle lateral dynamics stabilization using active suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drobný V.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the investigation of active nonlinear suspension control in order to stabilize the lateral vehicle motion in similar way as systems like ESP do. The lateral stabilization of vehicle based on braking forces can be alternatively provided by the different setting of suspension forces. The basis of this control is the nonlinear property of the tyres. The vehicle has at least four wheels and it gives one or more redundant vertical forces that can be used for the different distribution of vertical suspension forces in such a way that resulting lateral and/or longitudinal forces create the required correction moment for lateral dynamic vehicle stabilization.

  13. Electromagnetic imaging of dynamic brain activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosher, J.; Leahy, R. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Lewis, P.; Lewine, J.; George, J. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Singh, M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1991-12-31

    Neural activity in the brain produces weak dynamic electromagnetic fields that can be measured by an array of sensors. Using a spatio-temporal modeling framework, we have developed a new approach to localization of multiple neural sources. This approach is based on the MUSIC algorithm originally developed for estimating the direction of arrival of signals impinging on a sensor array. We present applications of this technique to magnetic field measurements of a phantom and of a human evoked somatosensory response. The results of the somatosensory localization are mapped onto the brain anatomy obtained from magnetic resonance images.

  14. THE ROLE OF RED NUCLEUS IN THE MODULATION OF SPINAL NOCICEPTIVE TRANSMISSION AND IN NOCICEPTION ELICITED BY MUSCLE SPINDLE AFFERENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐斌; 樊小力; 吴苏娣

    2003-01-01

    Objective To analyse the antinociceptive effect of red nucleus (RN) and its role in the antinociceptive effect of muscle spindle afferents. Methods The single units of RN or wide dynamic range (WDR) neuron in the spinal cord dorsal horn were extracelluarly recorded. The effects of RN stimulation on nociceptive responses (C-fibers-evoked responses, C-responses) of WDR neurons were observed. The influence of muscle spindle afferents elicited by intravenous administration of succinylcholine (Sch) on the spontaneous discharge of RN neurons and on C-responses of WDR neurons were observed. The effect of muscle spindle afferents on C-responses of WDR neurons after unilateral lesions of RN was also observed. Results Electrical stimulation of the RN produced a significantly inhibitory effect on the nociceptive responses of WDR neurons. RN neurons were excited by muscle spindle afferents. Muscle spindle afferents significantly inhibited C-response of WDR neurons and this inhibitory effect was reduced by lesions of RN. Conclusion RN neurons have a significant antinociceptive effect and might be involved in the antinociceptive effects elicited by muscle spindle afferents.

  15. THE ROLE OF BRAIN-STEM DISCENDING INHIBITORY SYSTEM IN THE ANTINOCICEPTIVE EFFECT ELICITED BY MUSCLE SPINDLE AFFERENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Objective To analyse the antinociceptive effect of muscle spindle afferents and the involved mechanism.Methods The single unit of wide dynamic range(WDR) neurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn were recorded extracelluarly.The effects of muscle spindle afferents elicited by intravenous administration of succinylcholine (Sch) on nociceptive responses (C-fibres-evoked responses,C-responses) of WDR neurons were observed before and after bilateral lesions of ventrolateral periaqueduct gray (PAG).And the effects of muscle spindle afferents on the spontaneous discharge of the tail-flick related cell in the rostral ventro medial medulla (RVM) and on the spontaneous discharge of the PAG neurons were observed.Results The C-responses of WDR neurons were significantly inhibited by muscle spindle afferents,and the inhibitory effects were reduced by bilateral lesions of ventrolateral PAG.The spontaneous discharge of the off-cell in the RVM was excited while the on-cell was inhibited by intravenous administration of Sch.The spontaneous discharge of the PAG neurons were excited by muscle spindle afferents.Conclusion Muscle spindle afferents show a distinct effect of antinociception.PAG-RVM descending inhibitory system may play an important role in this nociceptive modulative mechanism.

  16. Regulation of Kif15 localization and motility by the C-terminus of TPX2 and microtubule dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Barbara J.; Balchand, Sai K.; Wadsworth, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Mitotic motor proteins generate force to establish and maintain spindle bipolarity, but how they are temporally and spatially regulated in vivo is unclear. Prior work demonstrated that a microtubule-associated protein, TPX2, targets kinesin-5 and kinesin-12 motors to spindle microtubules. The C-terminal domain of TPX2 contributes to the localization and motility of the kinesin-5, Eg5, but it is not known whether this domain regulates kinesin-12, Kif15. We found that the C-terminal domain of TPX2 contributes to the localization of Kif15 to spindle microtubules in cells and suppresses motor walking in vitro. Kif15 and Eg5 are partially redundant motors, and overexpressed Kif15 can drive spindle formation in the absence of Eg5 activity. Kif15-dependent bipolar spindle formation in vivo requires the C-terminal domain of TPX2. In the spindle, fluorescent puncta of GFP-Kif15 move toward the equatorial region at a rate equivalent to microtubule growth. Reduction of microtubule growth with paclitaxel suppresses GFP-Kif15 motility, demonstrating that dynamic microtubules contribute to Kif15 behavior. Our results show that the C-terminal region of TPX2 regulates Kif15 in vitro, contributes to motor localization in cells, and is required for Kif15 force generation in vivo and further reveal that dynamic microtubules contribute to Kif15 behavior in vivo. PMID:27852894

  17. Presynaptic inhibition of muscle spindle and tendon organ afferents in the mammalian spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudomin, P

    1990-12-01

    More than 30 years ago, Frank and Fuortes proposed that the synaptic effectiveness of muscle spindle afferents associated with spinal motoneurones could be diminished by the activation of nerves from flexor muscles. Since that time, research has focused on disclosing the mode of operation and the spinal pathways involved in this presynaptic inhibitory control. Initially, it was assumed that the same last-order interneurones mediated presynaptic inhibition of both muscle spindle and tendon organ afferent fibres. More recent evidence indicates that the synaptic effectiveness of these two groups of afferents is controlled by separate sets of GABAergic interneurones synapsing directly with the intraspinal terminals of the afferent fibres. This unique arrangement allows for selective control of the information on muscle length or muscle tension, despite the convergence of muscle spindle and tendon organ afferents on second-order interneurones.

  18. Semaphorin-Plexin Signaling Controls Mitotic Spindle Orientation during Epithelial Morphogenesis and Repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xia, Jingjing; Swiercz, Jakub M.; Bañón-Rodríguez, Inmaculada

    2015-01-01

    Morphogenesis, homeostasis, and regeneration of epithelial tissues rely on the accurate orientation of cell divisions, which is specified by the mitotic spindle axis. To remain in the epithelial plane, symmetrically dividing epithelial cells align their mitotic spindle axis with the plane. Here, we...... show that this alignment depends on epithelial cell-cell communication via semaphorin-plexin signaling. During kidney morphogenesis and repair, renal tubular epithelial cells lacking the transmembrane receptor Plexin-B2 or its semaphorin ligands fail to correctly orient the mitotic spindle, leading...... to severe defects in epithelial architecture and function. Analyses of a series of transgenic and knockout mice indicate that Plexin-B2 controls the cell division axis by signaling through its GTPase-activating protein (GAP) domain and Cdc42. Our data uncover semaphorin-plexin signaling as a central...

  19. Structures of actin-like ParM filaments show architecture of plasmid-segregating spindles

    OpenAIRE

    Bharat, Tanmay A. M.; Murshudov, Garib N.; Sachse, Carsten; Löwe, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Active segregation of E. coli low-copy number plasmid R1 involves formation of a bipolar spindle made of left-handed double-helical actin-like ParM filaments 1-6 . ParR links the filaments with centromeric parC plasmid DNA, while facilitating the addition of subunits to ParM filaments 3,7-9 . Growing ParMRC spindles push sister plasmids to the cell poles 9,10 . Here, using modern electron cryomicroscopy methods we have investigated the structures and arrangements of ParM filaments in vitro an...

  20. Inhibition of TRIP1/S8/hSug1, a component of the human 19S proteasome, enhances mitotic apoptosis induced by spindle poisons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroshi Y; Gorbsky, Gary J

    2006-01-01

    Mitotic spindle poisons (e.g., Taxol and vinblastine), used as chemotherapy drugs, inhibit mitotic spindle function, activate the mitotic spindle checkpoint, arrest cells in mitosis, and then cause cell death by mechanisms that are poorly understood. By expression cloning, we identified a truncated version of human TRIP1 (also known as S8, hSug1), an AAA (ATPases associated with diverse cellular activities) family ATPase subunit of the 19S proteasome regulatory complex, as an enhancer of spindle poison-mediated apoptosis. Stable expression of the truncated TRIP1/S8/hSug1 in HeLa cells [OP-TRIP1(88-406)] resulted in a decrease of measurable cellular proteasome activity, indicating that OP-TRIP1(88-406) had a dominant-negative effect on proteasome function. OP-TRIP1(88-406) revealed an increased apoptotic response after treatment with spindle poisons or with proteasome inhibitors. The increased apoptosis coincided with a significant decrease in expression of BubR1, a kinase required for activation and maintenance of the mitotic spindle checkpoint in response to treatment with spindle poisons. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of TRIP1/S8/hSug1 resulted in a reduction of general proteasome activity and an increase in mitotic index. The siRNA treatment also caused increased cell death after spindle poison treatment. These results indicate that inhibition of TRIP1/S8/hSug1 function by expression of a truncated version of the protein or by siRNA-mediated suppression enhances cell death in response to spindle poison treatment. Current proteasome inhibitor drugs in trial as anticancer agents target elements of the 20S catalytic subcomplex. Our results suggest that targeting the ATPase subunits in 19S regulatory complex in the proteasome may enhance the antitumor effects of spindle poisons.

  1. Asymmetrization of first cleavage by transient disassembly of one spindle pole aster in the leech Helobdella robusta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaoyun; Weisblat, David A

    2006-04-01

    Unequal first cleavage is characteristic of a diverse group of protostome animals. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, unequal first cleavage is achieved through the interaction of an apparently symmetric mitotic spindle apparatus with a clearly polarized cell cortex. In the clitellate annelid Tubifex tubifex, by contrast, the spindle is monastral and contains only one gamma-tubulin-reactive centrosome; this monastral spindle is inherently asymmetric throughout mitosis. Here, we have used immunostaining for beta- and gamma-tubulin to follow spindle dynamics during the unequal first cleavage in another clitellate annelid, the leech Helobdella robusta. We find that the mitotic spindle is diastral and symmetric through early metaphase, then becomes asymmetric following the transient down-regulation of one centrosome, as judged by gamma-tubulin immunofluorescence. Low levels of drugs that affect microtubule dynamics can symmetrize the first cleavage without affecting the gamma-tubulin dynamics. Our results provide a striking example of the evolvability of cellular mechanisms underlying an unambiguously homologous developmental process.

  2. Dynamics of active cellular response under stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, Rumi; Zemel, Assaf; Safran, Samuel

    2008-03-01

    Forces exerted by and on adherent cells are important for many physiological processes such as wound healing and tissue formation. In addition, recent experiments have shown that stem cell differentiation is controlled, at least in part, by the elasticity of the surrounding matrix. Using a simple theoretical model that includes the forces due to both the mechanosensitive nature of cells and the elastic response of the matrix, we predict the dynamics of orientation of cells. The model predicts many features observed in measurements of cellular forces and orientation including the increase with time of the forces generated by cells in the absence of applied stress and the consequent decrease of the force in the presence of quasi-static stresses. We also explain the puzzling observation of parallel alignment of cells for static and quasi-static stresses and of nearly perpendicular alignment for dynamically varying stresses. In addition, we predict the response of the cellular orientation to a sinusoidally varying applied stress as a function of frequency. The dependence of the cell orientation angle on the Poisson ratio of the surrounding material can be used to distinguish systems in which cell activity is controlled by stress from those where cell activity is controlled by strain. Reference: Nature Physics, vol. 3, pp 655 (2007).

  3. Sympathetic modulation of muscle spindle afferent sensitivity to stretch in rabbit jaw closing muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roatta, S; Windhorst, U; Ljubisavljevic, M; Johansson, H; Passatore, M

    2002-04-01

    Previous reports showed that sympathetic stimulation affects the activity of muscle spindle afferents (MSAs). The aim of the present work is to study the characteristics of sympathetic modulation of MSA response to stretch: (i) on the dynamic and static components of the stretch response, and (ii) on group Ia and II MSAs to evaluate potentially different effects. In anaesthetised rabbits, the peripheral stump of the cervical sympathetic nerve (CSN) was stimulated at 10 impulses s(-1) for 45-90 s. The responses of single MSAs to trapezoidal displacement of the mandible were recorded from the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus. The following characteristic parameters were determined from averaged trapezoidal responses: initial frequency (IF), peak frequency at the end of the ramp (PF), and static index (SI). From these, other parameters were derived: dynamic index (DI = PF - SI), dynamic difference (DD = PF - IF) and static difference (SD = SI - IF). The effects of CSN stimulation were also evaluated during changes in the state of intrafusal muscle fibre contraction induced by succinylcholine and curare. In a population of 124 MSAs, 106 units (85.4 %) were affected by sympathetic stimulation. In general, while changes in resting discharge varied among different units (Ia vs. II) and experimental conditions (curarised vs. non-curarised), ranging from enhancement to strong depression of firing, the amplitude of the response to muscle stretches consistently decreased. This was confirmed and detailed in a quantitative analysis performed on 49 muscle spindle afferents. In both the non-curarised (23 units) and curarised (26 units) condition, stimulation of the CSN reduced the response amplitude in terms of DD and SD, but hardly affected DI. The effects were equally present in both Ia and II units; they were shown to be independent from gamma drive and intrafusal muscle tone and not secondary to muscle hypoxia. Sympathetic action on the resting discharge (IF) was less

  4. Intrafusal muscle fibre types in frog spindles.

    OpenAIRE

    Diwan, F H; Ito, F

    1989-01-01

    Muscle spindles from bullfrog semitendinosus, iliofibularis and sartorius muscles were examined with light and electron microscopy. Four types of intrafusal muscle fibre were identified according to their diameter, central nucleation and reticular zone arrangement: a large nuclear bag fibre, a medium nuclear bag fibre, and two types of small nuclear chain fibres with and without a reticular zone, respectively. It is suggested that they are comparable to the nuclear bag1, bag2 and chain fibres...

  5. Breast spindle cell tumours: about eight cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd El All Howayda S

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast spindle cell tumours (BSCTs, although rare, represent a heterogeneous group with different treatment modalities. This work was undertaken to evaluate the utility of fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC, histopathology and immunohistochemistry (IHC in differentiating BSCTs. Methods FNAC of eight breast masses diagnosed cytologically as BSCTs was followed by wide excision biopsy. IHC using a panel of antibodies against vimentin, pan-cytokeratin, s100, desmin, smooth muscle actin, CD34, and CD10 was evaluated to define their nature. Results FNAC defined the tumors as benign (n = 4, suspicious (n = 2 and malignant (n = 3, based on the cytopathological criteria of malignancy. Following wide excision biopsy, the tumors were reclassified into benign (n = 5 and malignant (n = 3. In the benign group, the diagnosis was raised histologically and confirmed by IHC for 3 cases (one spindle cell lipoma, one myofibroblastoma and one leiomyoma. For the remaining two cases, the diagnosis was set up after IHC (one fibromatosis and one spindle cell variant of adenomyoepithelioma. In the malignant group, a leiomyosarcoma was diagnosed histologically, while IHC was crucial to set up the diagnosis of one case of spindle cell carcinoma and one malignant myoepithelioma. Conclusion FNAC in BSCTs is an insufficient tool and should be followed by wide excision biopsy. The latter technique differentiate benign from malignant BSCTs and is able in 50% of the cases to set up the definite diagnosis. IHC is of value to define the nature of different benign lesions and is mandatory in the malignant ones for optimal treatment. Awareness of the different types of BSCTs prevents unnecessary extensive therapeutic regimes.

  6. Sleep spindles and intelligence: evidence for a sexual dimorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujma, Péter P; Konrad, Boris Nikolai; Genzel, Lisa; Bleifuss, Annabell; Simor, Péter; Pótári, Adrián; Körmendi, János; Gombos, Ferenc; Steiger, Axel; Bódizs, Róbert; Dresler, Martin

    2014-12-03

    Sleep spindles are thalamocortical oscillations in nonrapid eye movement sleep, which play an important role in sleep-related neuroplasticity and offline information processing. Sleep spindle features are stable within and vary between individuals, with, for example, females having a higher number of spindles and higher spindle density than males. Sleep spindles have been associated with learning potential and intelligence; however, the details of this relationship have not been fully clarified yet. In a sample of 160 adult human subjects with a broad IQ range, we investigated the relationship between sleep spindle parameters and intelligence. In females, we found a positive age-corrected association between intelligence and fast sleep spindle amplitude in central and frontal derivations and a positive association between intelligence and slow sleep spindle duration in all except one derivation. In males, a negative association between intelligence and fast spindle density in posterior regions was found. Effects were continuous over the entire IQ range. Our results demonstrate that, although there is an association between sleep spindle parameters and intellectual performance, these effects are more modest than previously reported and mainly present in females. This supports the view that intelligence does not rely on a single neural framework, and stronger neural connectivity manifesting in increased thalamocortical oscillations in sleep is one particular mechanism typical for females but not males.

  7. Presence of Meiotic Spindles Indicates Early Cleavage of Embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To assess whether the detection of the meiotic spindle could anticipate the appearance of early cleavage.Methods Oocytes were obtained from stimulated ovaries of consenting patients undergoing oocytes retrieval for ICSI.Spindles were imaged with the Polscope.After ICSI,oocytes with or without spindles were cultured for examination of early cleavage and embryo development.A total of 328 oocytes from 50 cycles were examined with the Polscope and inseminated by ICSI.Results Spindles were imaged in 81.7% of oocytes.After ICSI,more oocytes with spindles (78.4%) fertilized normally than oocytes without spindles (53.3%)(P<0.001).At 25-27 h post ICSI.more fertilized oocytes developed from oocytes with spindles (81.9%) were detected early cleavage than those from oocytes without spindles(28.1%)(P<0.001).Significantly more embryos with early cleavage (82.2%) developed to high quality embryos at d 3 compared with the embryos without early cleavage(48.3%)(P=0.001).The value of rs related to the relationship between spindles and early cleavage was 0.420(P<0.0001).Conclusion The existing of the early cleavage may have a predictive value on the opportunity of high quality embryos and the existing of the spindle may have a predictive value in the appearance of early cleavage.

  8. Cdc20 and Cks direct the spindle checkpoint-independent destruction of cyclin A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthuis, Rob; Clay-Farrace, Lori; van Zon, Wouter; Yekezare, Mona; Koop, Lars; Ogink, Janneke; Medema, Rene; Pines, Jonathon

    2008-01-01

    Successful mitosis requires the right protein be degraded at the right time. Central to this is the spindle checkpoint that prevents the destruction of securin and cyclin 131 when there are improperly attached chromosomes. The principal target of the checkpoint is Cdc20, which activates the anaphase

  9. Stable MCC binding to the APC/C is required for a functional spindle assembly checkpoint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hein, Jamin B; Nilsson, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) delays progression into anaphase until all chromosomes have aligned on the metaphase plate by inhibiting Cdc20, the mitotic co-activator of the APC/C. Mad2 and BubR1 bind and inhibit Cdc20, thereby forming the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC), which can bind...

  10. Cdc20 and Cks direct the spindle checkpoint-independent destruction of cyclin A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthuis, Rob; Clay-Farrace, Lori; van Zon, Wouter; Yekezare, Mona; Koop, Lars; Ogink, Janneke; Medema, Rene; Pines, Jonathon

    2008-01-01

    Successful mitosis requires the right protein be degraded at the right time. Central to this is the spindle checkpoint that prevents the destruction of securin and cyclin 131 when there are improperly attached chromosomes. The principal target of the checkpoint is Cdc20, which activates the

  11. Masseter length determines muscle spindle reflex excitability during jaw-closing movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naser-Ud-Din, Shazia; Sowman, Paul F; Sampson, Wayne J; Dreyer, Craig W; Türker, Kemal Sitki

    2011-04-01

    The masticatory muscles are considered to be important determinants of facial form, but little is known of the muscle spindle reflex characteristics and their relationship, if any, to face height. The aim of this study was to determine whether spindle reflexes, evoked by mechanical stimulation of an incisor and recorded on the masseter muscle, correlated with different facial patterns. Twenty-eight adult volunteers (16 women; ages, 19-38 years) underwent 2-N tap stimuli to their maxillary left central incisor during simulated mastication. Reflexes were recorded during local anesthesia of the stimulated tooth to eliminate the contribution from periodontal mechanoreceptors. Surface electromyograms of the reflex responses of the jaw muscles to these taps were recorded via bipolar electrodes on the masseter muscle and interpreted by using spike-triggered averaging of the surface electromyograms. Lateral cephalometric analysis was carried out with software (version 10.5, Dolphin, Los Angeles, Calif; and Mona Lisa, Canberra, Australia). Two-newton tooth taps produced principally excitatory reflex responses beginning at 17 ms poststimulus. Correlation analysis showed a significant relationship between these muscle spindle reflexes and facial heights: specifically, shorter face heights were associated with stronger spindle reflexes. This correlation was strongest between the derived measure of masseter length and the spindle reflex strength during jaw closure (r = -0.49, P = 0.008). These results suggest that a similar muscle spindle stimulus will generate a stronger reflex activation in the jaw muscles of patients with shorter faces compared with those with longer faces. This finding might help to explain the higher incidence of clenching or bruxism in those with short faces and also might, in the future, influence the design of orthodontic appliances and dental prostheses. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights

  12. Modeling Cytoskeletal Active Matter Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Robert

    Active networks of filamentous proteins and crosslinking motor proteins play a critical role in many important cellular processes. One of the most important microtubule-motor protein assemblies is the mitotic spindle, a self-organized active liquid-crystalline structure that forms during cell division and that ultimately separates chromosomes into two daughter cells. Although the spindle has been intensively studied for decades, the physical principles that govern its self-organization and function remain mysterious. To evolve a better understanding of spindle formation, structure, and dynamics, I investigate course-grained models of active liquid-crystalline networks composed of microtubules, modeled as hard spherocylinders, in diffusive equilibrium with a reservoir of active crosslinks, modeled as hookean springs that can adsorb to microtubules and and translocate at finite velocity along the microtubule axis. This model is investigated using a combination of brownian dynamics and kinetic monte carlo simulation. I have further refined this model to simulate spindle formation and kinetochore capture in the fission yeast S. pombe. I then make predictions for experimentally realizable perturbations in motor protein presence and function in S. pombe.

  13. New activity pattern in human interactive dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formentin, Marco; Lovison, Alberto; Maritan, Amos; Zanzotto, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the response function of human agents as demonstrated by written correspondence, uncovering a new pattern for how the reactive dynamics of individuals is distributed across the set of each agent’s contacts. In long-term empirical data on email, we find that the set of response times considered separately for the messages to each different correspondent of a given writer, generate a family of heavy-tailed distributions, which have largely the same features for all agents, and whose characteristic times grow exponentially with the rank of each correspondent. We furthermore show that this new behavioral pattern emerges robustly by considering weighted moving averages of the priority-conditioned response-time probabilities generated by a basic prioritization model. Our findings clarify how the range of priorities in the inputs from one’s environment underpin and shape the dynamics of agents embedded in a net of reactive relations. These newly revealed activity patterns might be universal, being present in other general interactive environments, and constrain future models of communication and interaction networks, affecting their architecture and evolution.

  14. Computer simulations predict that chromosome movements and rotations accelerate mitotic spindle assembly without compromising accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Raja; Wollman, Roy; Silkworth, William T; Nardi, Isaac K; Cimini, Daniela; Mogilner, Alex

    2009-09-15

    The mitotic spindle self-assembles in prometaphase by a combination of centrosomal pathway, in which dynamically unstable microtubules search in space until chromosomes are captured, and a chromosomal pathway, in which microtubules grow from chromosomes and focus to the spindle poles. Quantitative mechanistic understanding of how spindle assembly can be both fast and accurate is lacking. Specifically, it is unclear how, if at all, chromosome movements and combining the centrosomal and chromosomal pathways affect the assembly speed and accuracy. We used computer simulations and high-resolution microscopy to test plausible pathways of spindle assembly in realistic geometry. Our results suggest that an optimal combination of centrosomal and chromosomal pathways, spatially biased microtubule growth, and chromosome movements and rotations is needed to complete prometaphase in 10-20 min while keeping erroneous merotelic attachments down to a few percent. The simulations also provide kinetic constraints for alternative error correction mechanisms, shed light on the dual role of chromosome arm volume, and compare well with experimental data for bipolar and multipolar HT-29 colorectal cancer cells.

  15. A general thermal model of machine tool spindle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanfang Dong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As the core component of machine tool, the thermal characteristics of the spindle have a significant influence on machine tool running status. Lack of an accurate model of the spindle system, particularly the model of load–deformation coefficient between the bearing rolling elements and rings, severely limits the thermal error analytic precision of the spindle. In this article, bearing internal loads, especially the function relationships between the principal curvature difference F(ρ and auxiliary parameter nδ, semi-major axis a, and semi-minor axis b, have been determined; furthermore, high-precision heat generation combining the heat sinks in the spindle system is calculated; finally, an accurate thermal model of the spindle was established. Moreover, a conventional spindle with embedded fiber Bragg grating temperature sensors has been developed. By comparing the experiment results with simulation, it indicates that the model has good accuracy, which verifies the reliability of the modeling process.

  16. Mitotic spindle proteomics in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Kate Bonner

    Full Text Available Mitosis is a fundamental process in the development of all organisms. The mitotic spindle guides the cell through mitosis as it mediates the segregation of chromosomes, the orientation of the cleavage furrow, and the progression of cell division. Birth defects and tissue-specific cancers often result from abnormalities in mitotic events. Here, we report a proteomic study of the mitotic spindle from Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO cells. Four different isolations of metaphase spindles were subjected to Multi-dimensional Protein Identification Technology (MudPIT analysis and tandem mass spectrometry. We identified 1155 proteins and used Gene Ontology (GO analysis to categorize proteins into cellular component groups. We then compared our data to the previously published CHO midbody proteome and identified proteins that are unique to the CHO spindle. Our data represent the first mitotic spindle proteome in CHO cells, which augments the list of mitotic spindle components from mammalian cells.

  17. Evidence that Aurora B is implicated in spindle checkpoint signalling independently of error correction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santaguida, Stefano; Vernieri, Claudio; Villa, Fabrizio; Ciliberto, Andrea; Musacchio, Andrea

    2011-04-20

    Fidelity of chromosome segregation is ensured by a tension-dependent error correction system that prevents stabilization of incorrect chromosome-microtubule attachments. Unattached or incorrectly attached chromosomes also activate the spindle assembly checkpoint, thus delaying mitotic exit until all chromosomes are bioriented. The Aurora B kinase is widely recognized as a component of error correction. Conversely, its role in the checkpoint is controversial. Here, we report an analysis of the role of Aurora B in the spindle checkpoint under conditions believed to uncouple the effects of Aurora B inhibition on the checkpoint from those on error correction. Partial inhibition of several checkpoint and kinetochore components, including Mps1 and Ndc80, strongly synergizes with inhibition of Aurora B activity and dramatically affects the ability of cells to arrest in mitosis in the presence of spindle poisons. Thus, Aurora B might contribute to spindle checkpoint signalling independently of error correction. Our results support a model in which Aurora B is at the apex of a signalling pyramid whose sensory apparatus promotes the concomitant activation of error correction and checkpoint signalling pathways.

  18. Lte1 promotes mitotic exit by controlling the localization of the spindle position checkpoint kinase Kin4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, Jill E; Chan, Leon Y; Amon, Angelika

    2011-08-02

    For a daughter cell to receive a complete genomic complement, it is essential that the mitotic spindle be positioned accurately within the cell. In budding yeast, a signaling system known as the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) monitors spindle position and regulates the activity of the mitotic exit network (MEN), a GTPase signaling pathway that promotes exit from mitosis. The protein kinase Kin4 is a central component of the spindle position checkpoint. Kin4 primarily localizes to the mother cell and associates with spindle pole bodies (SPBs) located in the mother cell to inhibit MEN signaling. In contrast, the kinase does not associate with the SPB in the bud. Thus, only when a MEN bearing SPB leaves the mother cell and the spindle is accurately positioned along the mother-bud axis can MEN signaling occur and cell division proceed. Here, we describe a mechanism ensuring that Kin4 only associates with mother cell-located SPBs. The bud-localized MEN regulator Lte1, whose molecular function has long been unclear, prevents Kin4 that escapes into the bud from associating with SPBs in the daughter cell.

  19. JMJD5 (Jumonji Domain-containing 5) Associates with Spindle Microtubules and Is Required for Proper Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhimin; Wu, Junyu; Su, Xiaonan; Zhang, Ye; Pan, Lixia; Wei, Huimin; Fang, Qiang; Li, Haitao; Wang, Da-Liang; Sun, Fang-Lin

    2016-02-26

    Precise mitotic spindle assembly is a guarantee of proper chromosome segregation during mitosis. Chromosome instability caused by disturbed mitosis is one of the major features of various types of cancer. JMJD5 has been reported to be involved in epigenetic regulation of gene expression in the nucleus, but little is known about its function in mitotic process. Here we report the unexpected localization and function of JMJD5 in mitotic progression. JMJD5 partially accumulates on mitotic spindles during mitosis, and depletion of JMJD5 results in significant mitotic arrest, spindle assembly defects, and sustained activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC). Inactivating SAC can efficiently reverse the mitotic arrest caused by JMJD5 depletion. Moreover, JMJD5 is found to interact with tubulin proteins and associate with microtubules during mitosis. JMJD5-depleted cells show a significant reduction of α-tubulin acetylation level on mitotic spindles and fail to generate enough interkinetochore tension to satisfy the SAC. Further, JMJD5 depletion also increases the susceptibility of HeLa cells to the antimicrotubule agent. Taken together, these results suggest that JMJD5 plays an important role in regulating mitotic progression, probably by modulating the stability of spindle microtubules.

  20. Non-contact measurement and analysis of machine tool spindles

    OpenAIRE

    Clough, David A; Fletcher, Simon; Longstaff, Andrew P.

    2010-01-01

    Increasing demand on the manufacturing industry to produce tighter tolerance parts means it is\\ud necessary to gain a greater understanding of machine tool capabilities and error sources. A significant source of machine tool errors is down to spindle inaccuracies and performance, leading to part scrapping. Catastrophic spindle failure brings production to a standstill until a new spindle can be procured and installed, resulting in lost production time.\\ud This project aims to assess the effec...

  1. Myosin-10 independently influences mitotic spindle structure and mitotic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandquist, Joshua C; Larson, Matthew E; Hine, Ken J

    2016-06-01

    The iconic bipolar structure of the mitotic spindle is of extreme importance to proper spindle function. At best, spindle abnormalities result in a delayed mitosis, while worse outcomes include cell death or disease. Recent work has uncovered an important role for the actin-based motor protein myosin-10 in the regulation of spindle structure and function. Here we examine the contribution of the myosin tail homology 4 (MyTH4) domain of the myosin-10 tail to the protein's spindle functions. The MyTH4 domain is known to mediate binding to microtubules and we verify the suspicion that this domain contributes to myosin-10's close association with the spindle. More surprisingly, our data demonstrate that some but not all of myosin-10's spindle functions require microtubule binding. In particular, myosin-10's contribution to spindle pole integrity requires microtubule binding, whereas its contribution to normal mitotic progression does not. This is demonstrated by the observation that dominant negative expression of the wild-type MyTH4 domain produces multipolar spindles and an increased mitotic index, whereas overexpression of a version of the MyTH4 domain harboring point mutations that abrogate microtubule binding results in only the mitotic index phenotype. Our data suggest that myosin-10 helps to control the metaphase to anaphase transition in cells independent of microtubule binding. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Combination spindle-drive system for high precision machining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerth, Howard L.

    1977-07-26

    A combination spindle-drive is provided for fabrication of optical quality surface finishes. Both the spindle-and-drive utilize the spindle bearings for support, thereby removing the conventional drive-means bearings as a source of vibration. An airbearing spindle is modified to carry at the drive end a highly conductive cup-shaped rotor which is aligned with a stationary stator to produce torque in the cup-shaped rotor through the reaction of eddy currents induced in the rotor. This arrangement eliminates magnetic attraction forces and all force is in the form of torque on the cup-shaped rotor.

  3. Diverse functions of spindle assembly checkpoint genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Jewel A; Keyes, Brice E; Ng, Yvonne P Y; Freeman, C Onyi; Burke, Daniel J

    2006-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint regulates the metaphase-to-anaphase transition from yeast to humans. We examined the genetic interactions with four spindle assembly checkpoint genes to identify nonessential genes involved in chromosome segregation, to identify the individual roles of the spindle assembly checkpoint genes within the checkpoint, and to reveal potential complexity that may exist. We used synthetic genetic array (SGA) analysis using spindle assembly checkpoint mutants mad1, mad2, mad3, and bub3. We found 228 synthetic interactions with the four spindle assembly checkpoint mutants with substantial overlap in the spectrum of interactions between mad1, mad2, and bub3. In contrast, there were many synthetic interactions that were common to mad1, mad2, and bub3 that were not shared by mad3. We found shared interactions between pairs of spindle assembly checkpoint mutants, suggesting additional complexity within the checkpoint and unique interactions for all of the spindle assembly checkpoint genes. We show that most genes in the interaction network, including ones with unique interactions, affect chromosome transmission or microtubule function, suggesting that the complexity of interactions reflects diverse roles for the checkpoint genes within the checkpoint. Our analysis expands our understanding of the spindle assembly checkpoint and identifies new candidate genes with possible roles in chromosome transmission and mitotic spindle function.

  4. Spindle Cell Carcinoma of the Mandibular Gingiva - A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, Sangeeta R; Gaonkar, Pratyusha P; Bhandare, Prachi R; Tripathi, Nidhi; Sridharan, Gokul

    2016-02-01

    Spindle cell carcinoma is a malignancy of epithelial origin often mimicking its mesenchymal counterpart thus posing a diagnostic challenge. It is a rare biphasic malignant tumour mostly encountered in the upper aerodigestive tract. The chief differential diagnoses of spindle cell carcinoma are true superficial sarcomas and they especially need to be differentiated from fibrosarcoma. This presentation reports a spindle cell carcinoma of the gingiva and highlights the difficulties encountered in the diagnosis. It also emphasizes the importance of accurate and thorough diagnosis of malignant spindle cell lesions to determine the appropriate therapeutic modality.

  5. MAP kinase meets mitosis: A role for Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein in spindle checkpoint regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosner Marsha

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein (RKIP is an evolutionarily conserved protein that functions as a modulator of signaling by the MAP kinase cascade. Implicated as a metastasis suppressor, Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein depletion correlates with poor prognosis for breast, prostate and melanoma tumors but the mechanism is unknown. Recent evidence indicates that Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein regulates the mitotic spindle assembly checkpoint by controlling Aurora B Kinase activity, and the mechanism involves Raf/MEK/ERK signaling. In contrast to elevated MAP kinase signaling during the G1, S or G2 phases of the cell cycle that activates checkpoints and induces arrest or senescence, loss of RKIP during M phase leads to bypass of the spindle assembly checkpoint and the generation of chromosomal abnormalities. These results reveal a role for Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein and the MAP kinase cascade in ensuring the fidelity of chromosome segregation prior to cell division. Furthermore, these data highlight the need for precise titration of the MAP kinase signal to ensure the integrity of the spindle assembly process and provide a mechanism for generating genomic instability in tumors. Finally, these results raise the possibility that RKIP status in tumors could influence the efficacy of treatments such as poisons that stimulate the Aurora B-dependent spindle assembly checkpoint.

  6. Fabrication and characteristics of spindle Fe2O3@Au core/shell particles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Hong-xia; YAO Jian-lin; GU Ren-ao

    2009-01-01

    The fabrication and characteristics of spindle Fe2O3@Au core/shell particle were investigated, and the effect of the core/shell nanoparticles as the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS)-active substrates was studied. By using the seed-catalyzed reduction technique, anisotropic Fe2O3@Au core/shell particles with spindle morphology were successfully prepared. The Fe2O3 particles with spindle morphology were initially prepared as original cores. The Au nanoparticles of 2 nm were attached onto the Fe2O3 particles through organosilane molecules. Uniform Au shell formed onto Fe2O3 core modified by Au nanoparticles through the in-situ reduction of HAuCl4. The shell thickness was controlled through regulating the concentration of HAuCl4 solution. The results of TEM, XRD and UV-vis characterization show that the core/shell particles with the original shape of the Fe2O3 particles are obtained and these surfaces are covered by Au shell completely. The surface enhanced Raman spectrum of the probe molecules adsorbed on these core/shell substrates is strong and the intensity is enhanced with the increase of the thickness of Au shell or the aspect ratio of particles. The spindle Fe2O3@Au core/shell particles exhibit optimum (SERS) activity.

  7. Dynamical quorum sensing and clustering dynamics in a population of spatially distributed active rotators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Maeyama, Satomi

    2013-02-01

    A model of clustering dynamics is proposed for a population of spatially distributed active rotators. A transition from excitable to oscillatory dynamics is induced by the increase of the local density of active rotators. It is interpreted as dynamical quorum sensing. In the oscillation regime, phase waves propagate without decay, which generates an effectively long-range interaction in the clustering dynamics. The clustering process becomes facilitated and only one dominant cluster appears rapidly as a result of the dynamical quorum sensing. An exact localized solution is found to a simplified model equation, and the competitive dynamics between two localized states is studied numerically.

  8. Spindle cell haemangioma of the tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Kathryn E M; Felstead, Andrew M; Haacke, Norman; Theaker, Jeffrey; Brennan, Peter A; Colbert, Serryth D

    2016-11-01

    Spindle cell hemangioma (SCH) is an uncommon benign vascular tumor that rarely occurs in the mouth. We present an SCH arising in the tongue of a 52-year-old otherwise healthy woman. SCH should be considered in the differential diagnosis of vascular tumors in the oral cavity and not misinterpreted as a more aggressive vascular tumor. We describe the clinical presentation, investigation, differential diagnosis and management of this condition and a literature search showing published case reports. Although SCH rarely presents in the oral cavity it needs to be considered in the differential diagnosis of oral cavity tumors. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. TFG-MET fusion in an infantile spindle cell sarcoma with neural features

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flucke, Uta; van Noesel, Max M.; Wijnen, Marc; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Chun Liang; Sung, Yun Shao; Antonescu, Cristina R.

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of congenital and infantile sarcomas displaying a primitive, monomorphic spindle cell phenotype have been characterized to harbor recurrent gene fusions, including infantile fibrosarcoma and congenital spindle cell rhabdomyosarcoma. Here, we report an unusual spindle cell

  10. The KASH protein Kms2 coordinates mitotic remodeling of the spindle pole body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wälde, Sarah; King, Megan C

    2014-08-15

    Defects in the biogenesis of the spindle pole body (SPB), the yeast centrosome equivalent, can lead to monopolar spindles and mitotic catastrophe. The KASH domain protein Kms2 and the SUN domain protein Sad1 colocalize within the nuclear envelope at the site of SPB attachment during interphase and at the spindle poles during mitosis in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We show that Kms2 interacts with the essential SPB components Cut12 and Pcp1 and the Polo kinase Plo1. Depletion of Kms2 delays mitotic entry and leads to defects in the insertion of the SPB into the nuclear envelope, disrupting stable bipolar spindle formation. These effects are mediated in part by a delay in the recruitment of Plo1 to the SPB at mitotic entry. Plo1 activity supports mitotic SPB remodeling by driving a burst of incorporation of Cut12 and Pcp1. Thus, a fission yeast SUN-KASH complex plays an important role in supporting the remodeling of the SPB at mitotic entry.

  11. Spindle checkpoint-independent inhibition of mitotic chromosome segregation by Drosophila Mps1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althoff, Friederike; Karess, Roger E; Lehner, Christian F

    2012-06-01

    Monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1) is essential for the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC), which prevents anaphase onset in the presence of misaligned chromosomes. Moreover, Mps1 kinase contributes in a SAC-independent manner to the correction of erroneous initial attachments of chromosomes to the spindle. Our characterization of the Drosophila homologue reveals yet another SAC-independent role. As in yeast, modest overexpression of Drosophila Mps1 is sufficient to delay progression through mitosis during metaphase, even though chromosome congression and metaphase alignment do not appear to be affected. This delay in metaphase depends on the SAC component Mad2. Although Mps1 overexpression in mad2 mutants no longer causes a metaphase delay, it perturbs anaphase. Sister kinetochores barely move apart toward spindle poles. However, kinetochore movements can be restored experimentally by separase-independent resolution of sister chromatid cohesion. We propose therefore that Mps1 inhibits sister chromatid separation in a SAC-independent manner. Moreover, we report unexpected results concerning the requirement of Mps1 dimerization and kinase activity for its kinetochore localization in Drosophila. These findings further expand Mps1's significance for faithful mitotic chromosome segregation and emphasize the importance of its careful regulation.

  12. Sister chromatid tension and the spindle assembly checkpoint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezi, Luigi; Musacchio, Andrea

    2009-12-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) is a feedback control system that monitors the state of kinetochore/microtubule attachment during mitosis and halts cell cycle progression until all chromosomes are properly aligned at the metaphase plate. The state of chromosome-microtubule attachment is implicated as a crucial factor in the checkpoint response. On the contrary, lack of tension in the centromere-kinetochore region of sister chromatids has been shown to regulate a pathway of correction of undesired chromosome-microtubule connections, while the presence of tension is believed to promote the stabilization of attachments. We discuss how tension-sensitive phenomena, such as attachment correction and stabilization, relate to the SAC and we speculate on the existence of a single pathway linking error correction and SAC activation.

  13. IL-6 and mouse oocyte spindle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jashoman Banerjee

    Full Text Available Interleukin 6 (IL-6 is considered a major indicator of the acute-phase inflammatory response. Endometriosis and pelvic inflammation, diseases that manifest elevated levels of IL-6, are commonly associated with higher infertility. However, the mechanistic link between elevated levels of IL-6 and poor oocyte quality is still unclear. In this work, we explored the direct role of this cytokine as a possible mediator for impaired oocyte spindle and chromosomal structure, which is a critical hurdle in the management of infertility. Metaphase-II mouse oocytes were exposed to recombinant mouse IL-6 (50, 100 and 200 ng/mL for 30 minutes and subjected to indirect immunofluorescent staining to identify alterations in the microtubule and chromosomal alignment compared to untreated controls. The deterioration in microtubule and chromosomal alignment were evaluated utilizing both fluorescence and confocal microscopy, and were quantitated with a previously reported scoring system. Our results showed that IL-6 caused a dose-dependent deterioration in microtubule and chromosomal alignment in the treated oocytes as compared to the untreated group. Indeed, IL-6 at a concentration as low as 50 ng/mL caused deterioration in the spindle structure in 60% of the oocytes, which increased significantly (P<0.0001 as IL-6 concentration was increased. In conclusion, elevated levels of IL-6 associated with endometriosis and pelvic inflammation may reduce the fertilizing capacity of human oocyte through a mechanism that involves impairment of the microtubule and chromosomal structure.

  14. Active and Dynamic Nanomaterials Based on Active Biomolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Steven J.; Rivera, Susan B.; Boal, Andrew K.; Edwards, J. Matthew; Bauer, Joseph M.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Liu, Jun; Bunker, Bruce C.; Bachand, George D.

    2004-03-01

    Living organisms have evolved dynamic and adaptable materials that fundamentally differ from synthetic materials. These biomaterials use chemical energy to drive non-equilibrium assembly processes, and to reconfigure in response to external stimuli or life cycle changes. Two striking examples are the diatom's active assembly of silica into a patterned cytoskeleton, and the chameleon's active transport of pigment particles to rapidly change skin color. Advances in molecular biology and nanoscale materials synthesis now present the opportunity for integrating biomolecules with synthetic components to produce new types of materials with novel assembly and adaptation capabilities. Our group has begun utilizing kinesin motor proteins and microtubules (MTs) to explore the construction of biomimetic materials. Initial work has focused on characterizing and engineering the properties of the biomolecules for robust performance in artificial systems. We have characterized the biochemical and biophysical properties of a kinesin motor protein from a thermostable fungus, and have evaluated strategies for stabilizing and functionalizing the MTs. We also have developed strategies for directed transport of MT shuttles, and for controlling the loading and unloading of nanoscale cargo.

  15. Combining time-frequency and spatial information for the detection of sleep spindles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eO'Reilly

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available EEG sleep spindles are short (0.5-2.0 s bursts of activity in the 11-16 Hz band occurring during non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep. This sporadic activity is thought to play a role in memory consolidation, brain plasticity, and protection of sleep integrity. Many automatic detectors have been proposed to assist or replace experts for sleep spindle scoring. However, these algorithms usually detect too many events making it difficult to achieve a good tradeoff between sensitivity (Se and false detection rate (FDr. In this work, we propose a semi-automatic detector comprising a sensitivity phase based on well-established criteria followed by a specificity phase using spatial and spectral criteria.In the sensitivity phase, selected events are those which amplitude in the 10 – 16 Hz band and spectral ratio characteristics both reject a null hypothesis (p <0.1 stating that the considered event is not a spindle. This null hypothesis is constructed from events occurring during rapid eye movement (REM sleep epochs. In the specificity phase, a hierarchical clustering of the selected candidates is done based on events’ frequency and spatial position along the anterior-posterior axis. Only events from the classes grouping most (at least 80% spindles scored by an expert are kept. We obtain Se = 93.2% and FDr = 93.0% in the first phase and Se = 85.4% and FDr = 86.2% in the second phase. For these two phases, Matthew’s correlation coefficients are respectively 0.228 and 0.324. Results suggest that spindles are defined by specific spatio-spectral properties and that automatic detection methods can be improved by considering these features.

  16. Sleep Spindles as Biomarker for Early Detection of Neurodegenerative Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to the use of sleep spindles as a novel biomarker for early diagnosis of synucleinopathies, in particular Parkinson's disease (PD). The method is based on automatic detection of sleep spindles. The method may be combined with measurements of one or more further...

  17. Mitotic spindle assembly: May the force be with you

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesbeen, R.G.H.P. van

    2015-01-01

    The research described in this thesis is focused on multiple pathways required for assembly of a bipolar mitotic spindle. Proper assembly of a bipolar mitotic spindle is essential for the generation of stable kinetochore-microtubule attachments and correct segregation of the sister chromatids. Defec

  18. On the Spatial Configuration of the Mitotic Spindle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Weijia; Sun, Limin; Lu, Kunquan; Tang, Xiaowei

    1995-03-01

    An experimental simulation using electrorheological (ER) fluid is developed to investigate the spatial configuration of the mitotic spindle. In the presence of two different kinds of electric field, the structures of particle arrangement in ER fluid are similar to the configuration of the mitotic spindle of the animal and plant cells respectively.

  19. Mechanisms of Centrosome Separation and Bipolar Spindle Assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanenbaum, Marvin E.; Medema, Rene H.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate segregation of chromosomes during cell division is accomplished through the assembly of a bipolar microtubule-based structure called the mitotic spindle. Work over the past two decades has identified a core regulator of spindle bipolarity, the microtubule motor protein kinesin-5. However, a

  20. The Nek6 and Nek7 protein kinases are required for robust mitotic spindle formation and cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Regan, Laura; Fry, Andrew M

    2009-07-01

    Nek6 and Nek7 are members of the NIMA-related serine/threonine kinase family. Previous work showed that they contribute to mitotic progression downstream of another NIMA-related kinase, Nek9, although the roles of these different kinases remain to be defined. Here, we carried out a comprehensive analysis of the regulation and function of Nek6 and Nek7 in human cells. By generating specific antibodies, we show that both Nek6 and Nek7 are activated in mitosis and that interfering with their activity by either depletion or expression of reduced-activity mutants leads to mitotic arrest and apoptosis. Interestingly, while completely inactive mutants and small interfering RNA-mediated depletion delay cells at metaphase with fragile mitotic spindles, hypomorphic mutants or RNA interference treatment combined with a spindle assembly checkpoint inhibitor delays cells at cytokinesis. Importantly, depletion of either Nek6 or Nek7 leads to defective mitotic progression, indicating that although highly similar, they are not redundant. Indeed, while both kinases localize to spindle poles, only Nek6 obviously localizes to spindle microtubules in metaphase and anaphase and to the midbody during cytokinesis. Together, these data lead us to propose that Nek6 and Nek7 play independent roles not only in robust mitotic spindle formation but also potentially in cytokinesis.

  1. Individual and Group Dynamics in Purchasing Activity

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Lei; Fan, Chao; Liu, Xue-Jiao

    2010-01-01

    As a major part of the daily operation in an enterprise, purchasing frequency is of constant change. Recent approaches on the human dynamics can provide some new insights into the economic behaviors of companies in the supply chain. This paper captures the attributes of creation times of purchasing orders to an individual vendor, as well as to all vendors, and further investigates whether they have some kind of dynamics by applying logarithmic binning to the construction of distribution plot. It's found that the former displays a power-law distribution with approximate exponent 2.0, while the latter is fitted by a mixture distribution with both power-law and exponential characteristics. Obviously, two distinctive characteristics are presented for the interval time distribution from the perspective of individual dynamics and group dynamics. Actually, this mixing feature can be attributed to the fitting deviations as they are negligible for individual dynamics, but those of different vendors are cumulated and t...

  2. Thermal Error Modelling of the Spindle Using Neurofuzzy Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingan Feng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a new combined model to predict the spindle deformation, which combines the grey models and the ANFIS (adaptive neurofuzzy inference system model. The grey models are used to preprocess the original data, and the ANFIS model is used to adjust the combined model. The outputs of the grey models are used as the inputs of the ANFIS model to train the model. To evaluate the performance of the combined model, an experiment is implemented. Three Pt100 thermal resistances are used to monitor the spindle temperature and an inductive current sensor is used to obtain the spindle deformation. The experimental results display that the combined model can better predict the spindle deformation compared to BP network, and it can greatly improve the performance of the spindle.

  3. First observation of a muscle spindle in fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, N; Miyoshi, S; Toh, H

    1983-03-01

    In many groups of vertebrates, the muscle spindle is a specialized sensory organ for the detection of muscle stretching. The structure of the spindle varies among vertebrate classes. Moreover, Barker has asserted that Amphibia are the most primitive vertebrates to possess muscle spindles. Extensive studies, made mainly on the locomotor myotome, seem to show that the muscle receptors of fish are less specialized than those of more advanced animals, and that muscle spindles are absent. However, little attention has been paid to the jaw-closing muscle. We report here our finding of a very simple muscle spindle with a single intrafusal fibre in the well-developed jaw-closing muscle, adductor mandibulae, in a primitive teleostean, Oncorhynchus masou (Brevoort).

  4. High-speed AMB machining spindle model updating and model validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wroblewski, Adam C.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Pesch, Alexander H.

    2011-04-01

    High-Speed Machining (HSM) spindles equipped with Active Magnetic Bearings (AMBs) have been envisioned to be capable of automated self-identification and self-optimization in efforts to accurately calculate parameters for stable high-speed machining operation. With this in mind, this work presents rotor model development accompanied by automated model-updating methodology followed by updated model validation. The model updating methodology is developed to address the dynamic inaccuracies of the nominal open-loop plant model when compared with experimental open-loop transfer function data obtained by the built in AMB sensors. The nominal open-loop model is altered by utilizing an unconstrained optimization algorithm to adjust only parameters that are a result of engineering assumptions and simplifications, in this case Young's modulus of selected finite elements. Minimizing the error of both resonance and anti-resonance frequencies simultaneously (between model and experimental data) takes into account rotor natural frequencies and mode shape information. To verify the predictive ability of the updated rotor model, its performance is assessed at the tool location which is independent of the experimental transfer function data used in model updating procedures. Verification of the updated model is carried out with complementary temporal and spatial response comparisons substantiating that the updating methodology is effective for derivation of open-loop models for predictive use.

  5. Modeling of Self-Vibratory Drilling Head-Spindle System for Predictions of Bearings Lifespan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Forestier

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The machining of deep holes is limited due to inadequate chip evacuation, which induces tool breakage. To limit this drawback, retreat cycles and lubrication are used. An alternative response to the evacuation problem is based on high-speed vibratory drilling. A specific tool holder induces axial self-maintained vibration of the drill, which enables the chips to be split. The chips are thus of a small size and can be evacuated. To anticipate the potential risk of decreased spindle lifespan associated with these vibrations, a model of the behavior of the system (spindle—self-vibrating drilling head—tool is elaborated. In order to assess the dynamic behavior of the system, this study develops a rotor-based finite element model, integrated with the modelling of component interfaces. The current results indicate that the simulations are consistent with the experimental measurements. The influence of spindle speed and feed rate on bearing lifespan is highlighted.

  6. Joined at the hip: kinetochores, microtubules, and spindle assembly checkpoint signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacristan, Carlos; Kops, Geert J P L

    2015-01-01

    Error-free chromosome segregation relies on stable connections between kinetochores and spindle microtubules. The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) monitors such connections and relays their absence to the cell cycle machinery to delay cell division. The molecular network at kinetochores that is responsible for microtubule binding is integrated with the core components of the SAC signaling system. Molecular-mechanistic understanding of how the SAC is coupled to the kinetochore-microtubule interface has advanced significantly in recent years. The latest insights not only provide a striking view of the dynamics and regulation of SAC signaling events at the outer kinetochore but also create a framework for understanding how that signaling may be terminated when kinetochores and microtubules connect.

  7. "Artificial mitotic spindle" generated by dielectrophoresis and protein micropatterning supports bidirectional transport of kinesin-coated beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uppalapati, Maruti; Huang, Ying-Ming; Aravamuthan, Vidhya; Jackson, Thomas N; Hancock, William O

    2011-01-01

    The mitotic spindle is a dynamic assembly of microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins that controls the directed movement of chromosomes during cell division. Because proper segregation of the duplicated genome requires that each daughter cell receives precisely one copy of each chromosome, numerous overlapping mechanisms have evolved to ensure that every chromosome is transported to the cell equator during metaphase. However, due to the inherent redundancy in this system, cellular studies using gene knockdowns or small molecule inhibitors have an inherent limit in defining the sufficiency of precise molecular mechanisms as well as quantifying aspects of their mechanical performance. Thus, there exists a need for novel experimental approaches that reconstitute important aspects of the mitotic spindle in vitro. Here, we show that by microfabricating Cr electrodes on quartz substrates and micropatterning proteins on the electrode surfaces, AC electric fields can be used to assemble opposed bundles of aligned and uniformly oriented microtubules as found in the mitotic spindle. By immobilizing microtubule ends on each electrode, analogous to anchoring at centrosomes, solutions of motor or microtubule binding proteins can be introduced and their resulting dynamics analyzed. Using this "artificial mitotic spindle" we show that beads functionalized with plus-end kinesin motors move in an oscillatory manner analogous to the movements of chromosomes and severed chromosome arms during metaphase. Hence, features of directional instability, an established characteristic of metaphase chromosome dynamics, can be reconstituted in vitro using a pair of uniformly oriented microtubule bundles and a plus-end kinesin functionalized bead.

  8. Sleep Spindle Density Predicts the Effect of Prior Knowledge on Memory Consolidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennies, Nora; Lambon Ralph, Matthew A; Kempkes, Marleen; Cousins, James N; Lewis, Penelope A

    2016-03-30

    Information that relates to a prior knowledge schema is remembered better and consolidates more rapidly than information that does not. Another factor that influences memory consolidation is sleep and growing evidence suggests that sleep-related processing is important for integration with existing knowledge. Here, we perform an examination of how sleep-related mechanisms interact with schema-dependent memory advantage. Participants first established a schema over 2 weeks. Next, they encoded new facts, which were either related to the schema or completely unrelated. After a 24 h retention interval, including a night of sleep, which we monitored with polysomnography, participants encoded a second set of facts. Finally, memory for all facts was tested in a functional magnetic resonance imaging scanner. Behaviorally, sleep spindle density predicted an increase of the schema benefit to memory across the retention interval. Higher spindle densities were associated with reduced decay of schema-related memories. Functionally, spindle density predicted increased disengagement of the hippocampus across 24 h for schema-related memories only. Together, these results suggest that sleep spindle activity is associated with the effect of prior knowledge on memory consolidation. Episodic memories are gradually assimilated into long-term memory and this process is strongly influenced by sleep. The consolidation of new information is also influenced by its relationship to existing knowledge structures, or schemas, but the role of sleep in such schema-related consolidation is unknown. We show that sleep spindle density predicts the extent to which schemas influence the consolidation of related facts. This is the first evidence that sleep is associated with the interaction between prior knowledge and long-term memory formation. Copyright © 2016 Hennies et al.

  9. Sustained spindle-assembly checkpoint response requires de novo transcription and translation of cyclin B1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lúcia Mena

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Microtubule-targeting drugs induce mitotic delay at pro-metaphase by preventing the spindle assembly checkpoint to be satisfied. However, especially after prolonged treatments, cells can escape this arrest in a process called mitotic slippage. The mechanisms underlying the spindle assembly checkpoint and slippage are not fully understood. It has been generally accepted that during mitosis there is a temporary shutdown of high-energy-consuming processes, such as transcription and translation. However, the synthesis of specific proteins is maintained or up-regulated since protein synthesis is necessary for entry into and progression through mitosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work we investigated whether the mitotic arrest caused by the mitotic checkpoint is independent of transcription and translation. By using immunofluorescent microscopy and western blotting, we demonstrate that inhibition of either of these processes induces a shortening of the mitotic arrest caused by the nocodazole treatment, and ultimately leads to mitotic slippage. Our western blotting and RTQ-PCR results show that inhibition of transcription during mitotic arrest does not affect the expression of the spindle checkpoint proteins, whereas it induces a significant decrease in the mRNA and protein levels of Cyclin B1. The exogenous expression of Cyclin B1 substantially rescued the mitotic phenotype in nocodazole cells treated with the inhibitors of transcription and translation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This work emphasizes the importance of transcription and translation for the maintenance of the spindle assembly checkpoint, suggesting the existence of a mechanism dependent on cyclin B1 gene regulation during mitosis. We propose that continuous transcription of mitotic regulators is required to sustain the activation of the spindle assembly checkpoint.

  10. Dissecting the role of MPS1 in chromosome biorientation and the spindle checkpoint through the small molecule inhibitor reversine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santaguida, Stefano; Tighe, Anthony; D'Alise, Anna Morena; Taylor, Stephen S; Musacchio, Andrea

    2010-07-12

    The catalytic activity of the MPS1 kinase is crucial for the spindle assembly checkpoint and for chromosome biorientation on the mitotic spindle. We report that the small molecule reversine is a potent mitotic inhibitor of MPS1. Reversine inhibits the spindle assembly checkpoint in a dose-dependent manner. Its addition to mitotic HeLa cells causes the ejection of Mad1 and the ROD-ZWILCH-ZW10 complex, both of which are important for the spindle checkpoint, from unattached kinetochores. By using reversine, we also demonstrate that MPS1 is required for the correction of improper chromosome-microtubule attachments. We provide evidence that MPS1 acts downstream from the AURORA B kinase, another crucial component of the error correction pathway. Our experiments describe a very useful tool to interfere with MPS1 activity in human cells. They also shed light on the relationship between the error correction pathway and the spindle checkpoint and suggest that these processes are coregulated and are likely to share at least a subset of their catalytic machinery.

  11. Individual and group dynamics in purchasing activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lei; Guo, Jin-Li; Fan, Chao; Liu, Xue-Jiao

    2013-01-01

    As a major part of the daily operation in an enterprise, purchasing frequency is in constant change. Recent approaches on the human dynamics can provide some new insights into the economic behavior of companies in the supply chain. This paper captures the attributes of creation times of purchase orders to an individual vendor, as well as to all vendors, and further investigates whether they have some kind of dynamics by applying logarithmic binning to the construction of distribution plots. It’s found that the former displays a power-law distribution with approximate exponent 2.0, while the latter is fitted by a mixture distribution with both power-law and exponential characteristics. Obviously, two distinctive characteristics are presented for the interval time distribution from the perspective of individual dynamics and group dynamics. Actually, this mixing feature can be attributed to the fitting deviations as they are negligible for individual dynamics, but those of different vendors are cumulated and then lead to an exponential factor for group dynamics. To better describe the mechanism generating the heterogeneity of the purchase order assignment process from the objective company to all its vendors, a model driven by product life cycle is introduced, and then the analytical distribution and the simulation result are obtained, which are in good agreement with the empirical data.

  12. Use of the Protein Ontology (PRO for Multi-Faceted Analysis of Biological Processes: a Case Study of the Spindle Checkpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E Ross

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available As a member of the Open Biomedical Ontologies (OBO foundry, the Protein Ontology (PRO provides an ontological representation of protein forms and complexes and their relationships. Annotations in PRO can be assigned to individual protein forms and complexes, each distinguishable down to the level of post-translational modification, thereby allowing for a more precise depiction of protein function than is possible with annotations to the gene as a whole. Moreover, PRO is fully interoperable with other OBO ontologies and integrates knowledge from other protein-centric resources such as UniProt and Reactome. Here we demonstrate the value of the PRO framework in the investigation of the spindle checkpoint, a highly conserved biological process that relies extensively on protein modification and protein complex formation. The spindle checkpoint maintains genomic integrity by monitoring the attachment of chromosomes to spindle microtubules and delaying cell cycle progression until the spindle is fully assembled. Using PRO in conjunction with other bioinformatics tools, we explored the cross-species conservation of spindle checkpoint proteins, including phosphorylated forms and complexes; studied the impact of phosphorylation on spindle checkpoint function; and examined the interactions of spindle checkpoint proteins with the kinetochore, the site of checkpoint activation. Our approach can be generalized to any biological process of interest.

  13. The protein phosphatase 2A functions in the spindle position checkpoint by regulating the checkpoint kinase Kin4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Leon Y; Amon, Angelika

    2009-07-15

    In budding yeast, a surveillance mechanism known as the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) ensures accurate genome partitioning. In the event of spindle misposition, the checkpoint delays exit from mitosis by restraining the activity of the mitotic exit network (MEN). To date, the only component of the checkpoint to be identified is the protein kinase Kin4. Furthermore, how the kinase is regulated by spindle position is not known. Here, we identify the protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) in complex with the regulatory subunit Rts1 as a component of the SPOC. Loss of PP2A-Rts1 function abrogates the SPOC but not other mitotic checkpoints. We further show that the protein phosphatase functions upstream of Kin4, regulating the kinase's phosphorylation and localization during an unperturbed cell cycle and during SPOC activation, thus defining the phosphatase as a key regulator of SPOC function.

  14. Dynamic Labyrinthine Pattern in an Active Liquid Film

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Yong-Jun; Yoshikawa, Kenichi

    2012-01-01

    We report the generation of a dynamic labyrinthine pattern in an active alcohol film. A dynamic labyrinthine pattern is formed along the contact line of air/pentanol/aqueous three phases. The contact line shows a clear time-dependent change with regard to both perimeter and area of a domain. An autocorrelation analysis of time-development of the dynamics of the perimeter and area revealed a strong geometric correlation between neighboring patterns. The pattern showed autoregressive behavior. The behavior of the dynamic pattern is strikingly different from those of stationary labyrinthine patterns. The essential aspects of the observed dynamic pattern are reproduced by a diffusion-controlled geometric model.

  15. Polycystic kidney disease protein fibrocystin localizes to the mitotic spindle and regulates spindle bipolarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingjing; Wu, Maoqing; Wang, Shixuan; Shah, Jagesh V; Wilson, Patricia D; Zhou, Jing

    2010-09-01

    Autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease (ARPKD) is a significant hereditary renal disease occurring in infancy and childhood, which presents with greatly enlarged echogenic kidneys, ultimately leading to renal insufficiency and end-stage renal disease. ARPKD is caused by mutations in a single gene PKHD1, which encodes fibrocystin/polyductin (FPC), a large single transmembrane protein generally known to be on the primary cilium, basal body and plasma membrane. Here, using our newly generated antibody raised against the entire C-terminal intracellular cytoplasmic domain (ICD) of FPC, as well as our previously well-characterized antibody against a peptide of ICD, we report for the first time that at least one isoform of FPC is localized to the centrosome and mitotic spindle of dividing cells in multiple cell lines, including MDCK, mIMCD3, LLC-PK1, HEK293, RCTEC and HFCT cells. Using short-hairpin-mediated RNA interference, we show that the inhibition of FPC function in MDCK and mIMCD3 cells leads to centrosome amplification, chromosome lagging and multipolar spindle formation. Consistent with our in vitro findings, we also observed centrosome amplification in the kidneys from human ARPKD patients. These findings demonstrate a novel function of FPC in centrosome duplication and mitotic spindle assembly during cell division. We propose that mitotic defects due to FPC dysfunction contribute to cystogenesis in ARPKD.

  16. A dynamic policy for grouping maintenance activities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.E. Wildeman (Ralph); R. Dekker (Rommert); A.C.J.M. Smit

    1997-01-01

    textabstractA maintenance activity carried out on a technical system often involves a system-dependent set-up cost that is the same for all maintenance activities carried out on that system. Grouping activities thus saves costs since execution of a group of activities requires only one set-up. Many

  17. VHL loss causes spindle misorientation and chromosome instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Claudio R; Toso, Alberto; Gutbrodt, Katrin L; Reggi, Sabina P; Frew, Ian J; Schraml, Peter; Hergovich, Alexander; Moch, Holger; Meraldi, Patrick; Krek, Wilhelm

    2009-08-01

    Error-free mitosis depends on fidelity-monitoring checkpoint systems that ensure correct temporal and spatial coordination of chromosome segregation by the microtubule spindle apparatus. Defects in these checkpoint systems can lead to genomic instability, an important aspect of tumorigenesis. Here we show that the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) tumour suppressor protein, pVHL, which is inactivated in hereditary and sporadic forms of renal cell carcinoma, localizes to the mitotic spindle in mammalian cells and its functional inactivation provokes spindle misorientation, spindle checkpoint weakening and chromosomal instability. Spindle misorientation is linked to unstable astral microtubules and is supressed by the restoration of wild-type pVHL in pVHL-deficient cells, but not in naturally-occurring VHL disease mutants that are defective in microtubule stabilization. Impaired spindle checkpoint function and chromosomal instability are the result of reduced Mad2 (mitotic arrest deficient 2) levels actuated by pVHL-inactivation and are rescued by re-expression of either Mad2 or pVHL in VHL-defective cells. An association between VHL inactivation, reduced Mad2 levels and increased aneuploidy was also found in human renal cancer, implying that the newly identified functions of pVHL in promoting proper spindle orientation and chromosomal stability probably contribute to tumour suppression.

  18. A displacement spindle in a micro/nano level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Kuang-Chao; Lai, Zi-Fa; Wu, Peitsung; Chen, Yung-Chang; Chen, Yejin; Jäger, Gerd

    2007-06-01

    This paper presents two micro/nano level displacement sensors, which consist of a mini LDGI (linear diffraction grating interferometer) and a focus probe. These two sensors are integrated into the spindle system of a micro/nano-CMM. This micro/nano spindle system is fixed on a rectangular granite bridge to achieve the z-axis function. The motion of the spindle is driven by an ultrasonic motor on a precision cross-roller slide. Its displacement is fed back by the LDGI. A DVD pick-up head is modified with its S-curve principle as the non-contact focus probe. Mounting the probe onto the spindle head, it is possible to achieve a large displacement and nanoresolution measuring spindle system with a feedback nanomotion control scheme. After accuracy calibration and error compensation, the spindle motion to 10 mm can perform 10 nm positioning accuracy and 30 nm measurement accuracy. Experiments on some ultraprecision profiles have shown the capability of this spindle system.

  19. Distinct Kinesin-14 mitotic mechanisms in spindle bipolarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Dimitre R; Kenny, Katelyn; Seo, Lan; Moyer, Amanda; Allen, Jessica; Paluh, Janet L

    2009-11-01

    Kinesin-like proteins are integral to formation and function of a conserved mitotic spindle apparatus that directs chromosome segregation and precedes cell division. Ubiquitous to the mechanism of spindle assembly and stability are balanced Kinesin-5 promoting and Kinesin-14 opposing forces. Distinct Kinesin-14 roles in bipolarity in eukaryotes have not been shown, but are suggested by gamma-tubulin-based pole interactions that affect establishment and by microtubule cross-linking and sliding that maintain bipolarity and spindle length. Distinct roles also imply specialized functional domains. By cross-species analysis of compatible mechanisms in establishing mitotic bipolarity we demonstrate that Kinesin-14 human HSET (HsHSET) functionally replaces Schizosaccharomyces pombe Pkl1 and its action is similarly blocked by mutation in a Kinesin-14 binding site on gamma-tubulin. Drosophila DmNcd localizes preferentially to bundled interpolar microtubules in fission yeast and does not replace SpPkl1. Analysis of twenty-six Kinesin-14 derivatives, including Tail, Stalk or Neck-Motor chimeras, for spindle localization, spindle assembly and mitotic progression defined critical domains. The Tail of SpPkl1 contains functional elements enabling its role in spindle assembly that are distinct from but transferable to DmNcd, whereas HsHSET function utilizes both Tail and Stalk features. Our analysis is the first to demonstrate distinct mechanisms between SpPkl1 and DmNcd, and reveal that HsHSET shares functional overlap in spindle pole mechanisms.

  20. Sleep spindling and fluid intelligence across adolescent development: sex matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Róbert eBódizs

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Evidence supports the intricate relationship between sleep electroencephalogram (EEG spindling and cognitive abilities in children and adults. Although sleep EEG changes during adolescence index fundamental brain reorganization, a detailed analysis of sleep spindling and the spindle-intelligence relationship was not yet provided for adolescents. Therefore, adolescent development of sleep spindle oscillations were studied in a home polysomnographic study focusing on the effects of chronological age and developmentally acquired overall mental efficiency (fluid IQ with sex as a potential modulating factor. Subjects were 24 healthy adolescents (12 males with an age range of 15–22 years (mean: 18 years and fluid IQ of 91-126 (mean: 104.12, Raven Progressive Matrices Test. Slow spindles (SSs and fast spindles (FSs were analyzed in 21 EEG derivations by using the individual adjustment method. A significant age-dependent increase in average FS density (r = .57; p = .005 was found. Moreover, fluid IQ correlated with FS density (r = .43; p = .04 and amplitude (r = .41; p = .049. The latter effects were entirely driven by particularly reliable FS-IQ correlations in females [r = .80 (p = .002 and r = .67 (p = .012, for density and amplitude, respectively]. Region-specific analyses revealed that these correlations peak in the fronto-central regions. The control of the age-dependence of FS measures and IQ scores did not considerably reduce the spindle-IQ correlations with respect to FS density. The only positive spindle-index of fluid IQ in males turned out to be the frequency of FSs (r = .60, p = .04. Increases in FS density during adolescence may index reshaped structural connectivity related to white matter maturation in the late developing human brain. The continued development over this age range of cognitive functions is indexed by specific measures of sleep spindling unravelling gender differences in adolescent brain maturation and perhaps cognitive

  1. A FRET-based study reveals site-specific regulation of spindle position checkpoint proteins at yeast centrosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryaznova, Yuliya; Koca Caydasi, Ayse; Malengo, Gabriele; Sourjik, Victor; Pereira, Gislene

    2016-05-09

    The spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) is a spindle pole body (SPB, equivalent of mammalian centrosome) associated surveillance mechanism that halts mitotic exit upon spindle mis-orientation. Here, we monitored the interaction between SPB proteins and the SPOC component Bfa1 by FRET microscopy. We show that Bfa1 binds to the scaffold-protein Nud1 and the γ-tubulin receptor Spc72. Spindle misalignment specifically disrupts Bfa1-Spc72 interaction by a mechanism that requires the 14-3-3-family protein Bmh1 and the MARK/PAR-kinase Kin4. Dissociation of Bfa1 from Spc72 prevents the inhibitory phosphorylation of Bfa1 by the polo-like kinase Cdc5. We propose Spc72 as a regulatory hub that coordinates the activity of Kin4 and Cdc5 towards Bfa1. In addition, analysis of spc72∆ cells shows that a mitotic-exit-promoting dominant signal, which is triggered upon elongation of the spindle into the bud, overrides the SPOC. Our data reinforce the importance of daughter-cell-associated factors and centrosome-based regulations in mitotic exit and SPOC control.

  2. Ultrasound assisted synthesis of monoclinic structured spindle BiVO4 particles with hollow structure and its photocatalytic property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Cao, Lixin; Su, Ge; Liu, Haisong; Wang, Xiangfei; Zhang, Lan

    2010-04-01

    Bismuth vanadate (BiVO(4)) spindle particles with monoclinic scheelite structure have been successfully synthesized via a facile sonochemical method. The as-prepared BiVO(4) photocatalyst exhibited a hollow interior structure constructed from the self-assembly of cone shape primary nanocrystals. A possible oriented attachment growth mechanism has been proposed based on the results of time-dependent experiments, which indicates the formation of spindle particles is mainly attributed to the phase transformation procedure induced by ultrasound irradiation. A series of morphology evolutions of BiVO(4) from compact microspheres, to hollow microspheres, and then to spindle particles have been arrested in the process of sonochemical treatment. Optical absorption experiments revealed the BiVO(4) spindle had strong absorption in the visible light region. A much higher photocatalytic activity of these spindle particles was found in comparison with the SSR-BiVO(4) material for degradation of rhodamine-B under visible light irradiation, which may be ascribed to its special single-crystalline nanostructure.

  3. Temporal and compartment-specific signals coordinate mitotic exit with spindle position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caydasi, Ayse Koca; Khmelinskii, Anton; Duenas-Sanchez, Rafael; Kurtulmus, Bahtiyar; Knop, Michael; Pereira, Gislene

    2017-01-24

    The spatiotemporal control of mitotic exit is crucial for faithful chromosome segregation during mitosis. In budding yeast, the mitotic exit network (MEN) drives cells out of mitosis, whereas the spindle position checkpoint (SPOC) blocks MEN activity when the anaphase spindle is mispositioned. How the SPOC operates at a molecular level remains unclear. Here, we report novel insights into how mitotic signalling pathways orchestrate chromosome segregation in time and space. We establish that the key function of the central SPOC kinase, Kin4, is to counterbalance MEN activation by the cdc fourteen early anaphase release (FEAR) network in the mother cell compartment. Remarkably, Kin4 becomes dispensable for SPOC function in the absence of FEAR. Cells lacking both FEAR and Kin4 show that FEAR contributes to mitotic exit through regulation of the SPOC component Bfa1 and the MEN kinase Cdc15. Furthermore, we uncover controls that specifically promote mitotic exit in the daughter cell compartment.

  4. Evidence that Aurora B is implicated in spindle checkpoint signalling independently of error correction

    OpenAIRE

    Santaguida, Stefano; Vernieri, Claudio; Villa, Fabrizio; Ciliberto, Andrea; Musacchio, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Fidelity of chromosome segregation is ensured by a tension-dependent error correction system that prevents stabilization of incorrect chromosome–microtubule attachments. Unattached or incorrectly attached chromosomes also activate the spindle assembly checkpoint, thus delaying mitotic exit until all chromosomes are bioriented. The Aurora B kinase is widely recognized as a component of error correction. Conversely, its role in the checkpoint is controversial. Here, we report an analysis of the...

  5. Coordinated alpha and gamma control of muscles and spindles in movement and posture

    OpenAIRE

    Si eLi; Cheng eZhuang; Manzhao eHao; Xin eHe; Juan Carlos eMarquez Ruiz; Chuanxin Minos Niu; Ning eLan

    2015-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that both α and γ motoneurons are active during movement and posture, but how does the central motor system coordinate the α-γ controls in these tasks remains sketchy due to lack of in vivo data. Here a computational model of α-γ control of muscles and spindles was used to investigate α-γ integration and coordination for movement and posture. The model comprised physiologically realistic spinal circuitry, muscles, proprioceptors, and skeletal biomechanics. In the mo...

  6. The kinesin-13 KLP10A motor regulates oocyte spindle length and affects EB1 binding without altering microtubule growth rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin K. Do

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Kinesin-13 motors are unusual in that they do not walk along microtubules, but instead diffuse to the ends, where they remove tubulin dimers, regulating microtubule dynamics. Here we show that Drosophila kinesin-13 klp10A regulates oocyte meiosis I spindle length and is haplo-insufficient – KLP10A, reduced by RNAi or a loss-of-function P element insertion mutant, results in elongated and mispositioned oocyte spindles, and abnormal cortical microtubule asters and aggregates. KLP10A knockdown by RNAi does not significantly affect microtubule growth rates in oocyte spindles, but, unexpectedly, EB1 binding and unbinding are slowed, suggesting a previously unobserved role for kinesin-13 in mediating EB1 binding interactions with microtubules. Kinesin-13 may regulate spindle length both by disassembling subunits from microtubule ends and facilitating EB1 binding to plus ends. We also observe an increased number of paused microtubules in klp10A RNAi knockdown spindles, consistent with a reduced frequency of microtubule catastrophes. Overall, our findings indicate that reduced kinesin-13 decreases microtubule disassembly rates and affects EB1 interactions with microtubules, rather than altering microtubule growth rates, causing spindles to elongate and abnormal cortical microtubule asters and aggregates to form.

  7. Improving the Dynamics of Suspension Bridges using Active Control Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thoft-Christensen, Palle

    Improving the dynamics of suspension bridge using active control is discussed in this paper. The main dynamic problem with long suspension bridges is the aeroelastic phenomenon called flutter. Flutter oscillations of a bridge girder is a stability problem and the oscillations are perpendicular...

  8. Competing dynamic phases of active polymer networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Simon; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Dinner, Aaron R.

    Recent experiments on in-vitro reconstituted assemblies of F-actin, myosin-II motors, and cross-linking proteins show that tuning local network properties can changes the fundamental biomechanical behavior of the system. For example, by varying cross-linker density and actin bundle rigidity, one can switch between contractile networks useful for reshaping cells, polarity sorted networks ideal for directed molecular transport, and frustrated networks with robust structural properties. To efficiently investigate the dynamic phases of actomyosin networks, we developed a coarse grained non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulation of model semiflexible filaments, molecular motors, and cross-linkers with phenomenologically defined interactions. The simulation's accuracy was verified by benchmarking the mechanical properties of its individual components and collective behavior against experimental results at the molecular and network scales. By adjusting the model's parameters, we can reproduce the qualitative phases observed in experiment and predict the protein characteristics where phase crossovers could occur in collective network dynamics. Our model provides a framework for understanding cells' multiple uses of actomyosin networks and their applicability in materials research. Supported by the Department of Defense (DoD) through the National Defense Science & Engineering Graduate Fellowship (NDSEG) Program.

  9. HURP permits MTOC sorting for robust meiotic spindle bipolarity, similar to extra centrosome clustering in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Manuel; Kolano, Agnieszka; Kwon, Mijung; Li, Chao-Chin; Tsai, Ting-Fen; Pellman, David; Brunet, Stéphane; Verlhac, Marie-Hélène

    2010-12-27

    In contrast to somatic cells, formation of acentriolar meiotic spindles relies on the organization of microtubules (MTs) and MT-organizing centers (MTOCs) into a stable bipolar structure. The underlying mechanisms are still unknown. We show that this process is impaired in hepatoma up-regulated protein (Hurp) knockout mice, which are viable but female sterile, showing defective oocyte divisions. HURP accumulates on interpolar MTs in the vicinity of chromosomes via Kinesin-5 activity. By promoting MT stability in the spindle central domain, HURP allows efficient MTOC sorting into distinct poles, providing bipolarity establishment and maintenance. Our results support a new model for meiotic spindle assembly in which HURP ensures assembly of a central MT array, which serves as a scaffold for the genesis of a robust bipolar structure supporting efficient chromosome congression. Furthermore, HURP is also required for the clustering of extra centrosomes before division, arguing for a shared molecular requirement of MTOC sorting in mammalian meiosis and cancer cell division.

  10. Core muscle activation during dynamic upper limb exercises in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnanen, Sami P; Siekkinen, Kirsti M; Häkkinen, Arja H; Mälkiä, Esko A; Kautiainen, Hannu J; Ylinen, Jari J

    2012-12-01

    Although several everyday functions and sporting activities demand controlled use of the abdominal and back muscles while working with the upper limbs, the activity of core muscles during dynamic upper limb exercises in the standing position has not been studied extensively. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine abdominal and back muscle activity during dynamic upper limb exercises while standing and to evaluate whether dynamic exercises are appropriate for strengthening muscles. The activation of the rectus abdominis, obliquus externus abdominis, longissimus, and multifidus muscles during dynamic bilateral or unilateral shoulder exercises with or without fixation of the pelvis was measured in 20 healthy women using surface electromyography. Trunk muscle activation during isometric maximum contraction was used as a comparative reference. With bilateral shoulder extension and unilateral shoulder horizontal adduction, abdominal muscle activity was >60% of activity during reference exercises. With unilateral shoulder horizontal abduction and shoulder extension exercises, back muscle activity was >60% of the activity level reference exercise. Muscle activation levels were 35-64% lower during shoulder horizontal adduction and abduction without fixation compared with exercises with fixation. The results indicate that upper limb exercises performed in the standing position are effective for activating core muscles. Bilateral and unilateral shoulder extension and unilateral shoulder horizontal abduction and adduction with the pelvis fixed elicited the greatest activity of the core muscles.

  11. A NEW DYNAMIC DEFENSE MODEL BASED ON ACTIVE DECEPTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Jing; Sun Zhixin; Gu Qiang

    2009-01-01

    Aiming at the traditional passive deception models, this paper constructs a Decoy Platform based on Intelligent Agent (DPIA) to realize dynamic defense. The paper explores a new dynamic defense model based on active deception, introduces its architecture, and expatiates on communication methods and security guarantee in information transference. Simulation results show that the DPIA can attract hacker agility and activity, lead abnormal traffic into it, distribute a large number of attack data, and ensure real network security.

  12. The spatial arrangement of chromosomes during prometaphase facilitates spindle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magidson, Valentin; O'Connell, Christopher B; Lončarek, Jadranka; Paul, Raja; Mogilner, Alex; Khodjakov, Alexey

    2011-08-19

    Error-free chromosome segregation requires stable attachment of sister kinetochores to the opposite spindle poles (amphitelic attachment). Exactly how amphitelic attachments are achieved during spindle assembly remains elusive. We employed photoactivatable GFP and high-resolution live-cell confocal microscopy to visualize complete 3D movements of individual kinetochores throughout mitosis in nontransformed human cells. Combined with electron microscopy, molecular perturbations, and immunofluorescence analyses, this approach reveals unexpected details of chromosome behavior. Our data demonstrate that unstable lateral interactions between kinetochores and microtubules dominate during early prometaphase. These transient interactions lead to the reproducible arrangement of chromosomes in an equatorial ring on the surface of the nascent spindle. A computational model predicts that this toroidal distribution of chromosomes exposes kinetochores to a high density of microtubules which facilitates subsequent formation of amphitelic attachments. Thus, spindle formation involves a previously overlooked stage of chromosome prepositioning which promotes formation of amphitelic attachments.

  13. Spindle extraction method for ISAR image based on Radon transform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xia; Zheng, Sheng; Zeng, Xiangyun; Zhu, Daoyuan; Xu, Gaogui

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a method of spindle extraction of target in inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) image is proposed which depends on Radon Transform. Firstly, utilizing Radon Transform to detect all straight lines which are collinear with these line segments in image. Then, using Sobel operator to detect image contour. Finally, finding all intersections of each straight line and image contour, the two intersections which have maximum distance between them is the two ends of this line segment and the longest line segment of all line segments is spindle of target. According to the proposed spindle extraction method, one hundred simulated ISAR images which are respectively rotated 0 degrees, 10 degrees, 20 degrees, 30 degrees and 40 degrees in counterclockwise are used to do experiment and the proposed method and the detection results are more close to the real spindle of target than the method based on Hough Transform .

  14. Asymmetric spindle pole formation in CPAP-depleted mitotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Miseon; Chang, Jaerak; Chang, Sunghoe; Lee, Kyung S; Rhee, Kunsoo

    2014-02-21

    CPAP is an essential component for centriole formation. Here, we report that CPAP is also critical for symmetric spindle pole formation during mitosis. We observed that pericentriolar material between the mitotic spindle poles were asymmetrically distributed in CPAP-depleted cells even with intact numbers of centrioles. The length of procentrioles was slightly reduced by CPAP depletion, but the length of mother centrioles was not affected. Surprisingly, the young mother centrioles of the CPAP-depleted cells are not fully matured, as evidenced by the absence of distal and subdistal appendage proteins. We propose that the selective absence of centriolar appendages at the young mother centrioles may be responsible for asymmetric spindle pole formation in CPAP-depleted cells. Our results suggest that the neural stem cells with CPAP mutations might form asymmetric spindle poles, which results in premature initiation of differentiation.

  15. v-Src causes delocalization of Mklp1, Aurora B, and INCENP from the spindle midzone during cytokinesis failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soeda, Shuhei [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Inohana 1-8-1, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Nakayama, Yuji, E-mail: nakayama@mb.kyoto-phu.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Inohana 1-8-1, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Kyoto Pharmaceutical University, 5 Nakauchi-cho, Misasagi, Yamashina-ku, Kyoto 607-8414 (Japan); Honda, Takuya; Aoki, Azumi; Tamura, Naoki; Abe, Kohei; Fukumoto, Yasunori [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Inohana 1-8-1, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Yamaguchi, Naoto, E-mail: nyama@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Molecular Cell Biology, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Inohana 1-8-1, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan)

    2013-06-10

    Src-family tyrosine kinases are aberrantly activated in cancers, and this activation is associated with malignant tumor progression. v-Src, encoded by the v-src transforming gene of the Rous sarcoma virus, is a mutant variant of the cellular proto-oncogene c-Src. Although investigations with temperature sensitive mutants of v-Src have shown that v-Src induces many oncogenic processes, the effects on cell division are unknown. Here, we show that v-Src inhibits cellular proliferation of HCT116, HeLa S3 and NIH3T3 cells. Flow cytometry analysis indicated that inducible expression of v-Src results in an accumulation of 4N cells. Time-lapse analysis revealed that binucleation is induced through the inhibition of cytokinesis, a final step of cell division. The localization of Mklp1, which is essential for cytokinesis, to the spindle midzone is inhibited in v-Src-expressing cells. Intriguingly, Aurora B, which regulates Mklp1 localization at the midzone, is delocalized from the spindle midzone and the midbody but not from the metaphase chromosomes upon v-Src expression. Mklp2, which is responsible for the relocation of Aurora B from the metaphase chromosomes to the spindle midzone, is also lost from the spindle midzone. These results suggest that v-Src inhibits cytokinesis through the delocalization of Mklp1 and Aurora B from the spindle midzone, resulting in binucleation. -- Highlights: • v-Src inhibits cell proliferation of HCT116, HeLa S3 and NIH3T3 cells. • v-Src induces binucleation together with cytokinesis failure. • v-Src causes delocalization of Mklp1, Aurora B and INCENP from the spindle midzone.

  16. Active cage model of glassy dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodor, Étienne; Hayakawa, Hisao; Visco, Paolo; van Wijland, Frédéric

    2016-07-01

    We build up a phenomenological picture in terms of the effective dynamics of a tracer confined in a cage experiencing random hops to capture some characteristics of glassy systems. This minimal description exhibits scale invariance properties for the small-displacement distribution that echo experimental observations. We predict the existence of exponential tails as a crossover between two Gaussian regimes. Moreover, we demonstrate that the onset of glassy behavior is controlled only by two dimensionless numbers: the number of hops occurring during the relaxation of the particle within a local cage and the ratio of the hopping length to the cage size.

  17. Aurora B regulates spindle bipolarity in meiosis in vertebrate oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Hua; Ma, Chunqi; Zhang, Xuan; Li, Ruizhen; Miller, Ann L; Bement, William M; Liu, X Johné

    2012-07-15

    Aurora B (Aur-B) plays multiple roles in mitosis, of which the best known are to ensure bi-orientation of sister chromatids by destabilizing incorrectly attached kinetochore microtubules and to participate in cytokinesis. Studies in Xenopus egg extracts, however, have indicated that Aur-B and the chromosome passenger complex play an important role in stabilizing chromosome-associated spindle microtubules. Aur-B stabilizes spindle microtubules in the egg extracts by inhibiting the catastrophe kinesin MCAK. Whether or not Aur-B plays a similar role in intact oocytes remains unknown. Here we have employed a dominant-negative Aur-B mutant (Aur-B122R, in which the ATP-binding lysine(122) is replaced with arginine) to investigate the function of Aur-B in spindle assembly in Xenopus oocytes undergoing meiosis. Overexpression of Aur-B122R results in short bipolar spindles or monopolar spindles, with higher concentrations of Aur-B122R producing mostly the latter. Simultaneous inhibition of MCAK translation in oocytes overexpressing Aur-B122R results in suppression of monopolar phenotype, suggesting that Aur-B regulates spindle bipolarity by inhibiting MCAK. Furthermore, recombinant MCAK-4A protein, which lacks all four Aur-B phosphoryaltion sites and is therefore insensitive to Aur-B inhibition but not wild-type MCAK, recapitulated the monopolar phenotype in the oocytes. These results suggest that in vertebrate oocytes that lack centrosomes, one major function of Aur-B is to stabilize chromosome-associated spindle microtubules to ensure spindle bipolarity.

  18. The Aurora B kinase in chromosome biorientation and spindle checkpoint signalling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica eKrenn

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Aurora B, a member of the Aurora family of serine/threonine protein kinases, is a key player in chromosome segregation. As part of a macromolecular complex known as the chromosome passenger complex, Aurora B concentrates early during mitosis in the proximity of centromeres and kinetochores, the sites of attachment of chromosomes to spindle microtubules. There, it contributes to a number of processes that impart fidelity to cell division, including kinetochore stabilization, kinetochore-microtubule attachment, and the regulation of a surveillance mechanism named the spindle assembly checkpoint. In the regulation of these processes, Aurora B is the fulcrum of a remarkably complex network of interactions that feed back on its localization and activation state. In this review we discuss the multiple roles of Aurora B during mitosis, focusing in particular on its role at centromeres and kinetochores. Many details of the network of interactions at these locations remain poorly understood, and we focus here on several crucial outstanding questions.

  19. Active dynamics of tissue shear flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popović, Marko; Nandi, Amitabha; Merkel, Matthias; Etournay, Raphaël; Eaton, Suzanne; Jülicher, Frank; Salbreux, Guillaume

    2017-03-01

    We present a hydrodynamic theory to describe shear flows in developing epithelial tissues. We introduce hydrodynamic fields corresponding to state properties of constituent cells as well as a contribution to overall tissue shear flow due to rearrangements in cell network topology. We then construct a generic linear constitutive equation for the shear rate due to topological rearrangements and we investigate a novel rheological behaviour resulting from memory effects in the tissue. We identify two distinct active cellular processes: generation of active stress in the tissue, and actively driven topological rearrangements. We find that these two active processes can produce distinct cellular and tissue shape changes, depending on boundary conditions applied on the tissue. Our findings have consequences for the understanding of tissue morphogenesis during development.

  20. Cytogenetic Analysis of a Pseudoangiomatous Pleomorphic/Spindle Cell Lipoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagopoulos, Ioannis; Gorunova, Ludmila; Lobmaier, Ingvild; Andersen, Hege Kilen; Bjerkehagen, Bodil; Heim, Sverre

    2017-05-01

    Pseudoangiomatous pleomorphic/spindle cell lipoma is a rare subtype of pleomorphic/spindle cell lipoma. Only approximately 20 such tumors have been described. Genetic information on pseudoangiomatous pleomorphic/spindle cell lipoma is restricted to a single case in which deletion of the forkhead box O1 (FOXO1) gene was found, using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). G-banding and FISH analyses were performed on a pseudoangiomatous pleomorphic/spindle cell lipoma. G-banding of tumor cells showed complex karyotypic changes including loss of chromosome 13. FISH analysis revealed that the deleted region contained the RB1 gene (13q14.2) and the part of chromosome arm 13q (q14.2-q14.3) in which spans the TRIM13 gene, the two non-coding RNA genes, DLEU1 and DLEU2, and the genetic markers RH44686 and D13S25. Several acquired genomic aberrations were found in the tumor. Among them was loss of chromosome 13 material. Results confirm the (cyto)genetic similarity between pseudoangiomatous pleomorphic/spindle cell lipoma and spindle cell lipomas. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  1. Muscle spindles in the human bulbospongiosus and ischiocavernosus muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peikert, Kevin; May, Christian Albrecht

    2015-07-01

    Muscle spindles are crucial for neuronal regulation of striated muscles, but their presence and involvement in the superficial perineal muscles is not known. Bulbospongiosus and ischiocavernosus muscle specimens were obtained from 31 human cadavers. Serial sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, Sirius red, antibodies against Podocalyxin, myosin heavy chain isoforms (MyHC-slow tonic, S46; MyHC-2a/2x, A4.74), and neurofilament for the purpose of muscle spindle screening, counting, and characterization. A low but consistent number of spindles were detected in both muscles. The muscles contained few intrafusal fibers, but otherwise showed normal spindle morphology. The extrafusal fibers of both muscles were small in diameter. The presence of muscle spindles in bulbospongiosus and ischiocavernosus muscles supports physiological models of pelvic floor regulation and may provide a basis for further clinical observations regarding sexual function and micturition. The small number of muscle spindles points to a minor level of proprioceptive regulation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Is human muscle spindle afference dependent on perceived size of error in visual tracking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuda, N; Wessberg, J; Vallbo, A B

    1997-04-01

    Impulses of 16 muscle spindle afferents from finger extensor muscles were recorded from the radial nerve along with electromyographic (EMG) activity and kinematics of joint movement. Twelve units were classified as Ia and 4 as II spindle afferents. Subjects were requested to perform precision movements at a single metacarpophalangeal joint in an indirect visual tracking task. Similar movements were executed under two different conditions, i.e. with high and low error gain. The purpose was to explore whether different precision demands were associated with different spindle firing rates. With high error gain, a small but significantly higher impulse rate was found in pooled data from Ia afferents during lengthening movements but not during shortening movements, nor with II afferents. EMG was also significantly higher with high error gain in recordings with Ia afferents. When the effect of EMG was factored out, using partial correlation analysis, the significant difference in Ia firing rate vanished. The findings suggest that fusimotor drive as well as skeletomotor activity were both marginally higher when the precision demand was higher, whereas no indication of independent fusimotor adjustments was found. These results are discussed with respect to data from behaving animals and the role of fusimotor independence in various limb muscles proposed.

  3. Emergence of collective dynamical chirality for achiral active particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huijun; Ding, Huai; Pu, Mingfeng; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2017-01-25

    Emergence of collective dynamical chirality (CDC) at mesoscopic scales plays a key role in many formation processes of chiral structures in nature, which may also provide possible routines for people to fabricate complex chiral architectures. So far, most of the reported CDCs have been found in systems of active objects with individual structure chirality or/and dynamical chirality, and whether CDC can arise from simple and achiral units is still an attractive mystery. Here, we report a spontaneous formation of CDC in a system of both dynamically and structurally achiral particles motivated by active motion of cells adhered onto a substrate. Active motion, confinement and hydrodynamic interaction are found to be the three key factors. Detailed analysis shows that the system can support abundant collective dynamical behaviors, including rotating droplets, rotating bubbles, CDC oscillations, arrays of collective rotations, and interesting transitions such as chirality transition, structure transition and state reentrance.

  4. Evaluation of Friction Torque and Heat Quantity Generated in Spindle (1st Report) : Development of Evaluation System and Evaluation of Air Spindle Characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    横山, 和宏; 鈴木, 孝昌; 平倉, 隆史; 森脇, 俊道; Yokoyama, Kazuhiro; Suzuki, Takamasa; Hirakura, Takashi; Moriwaki, Toshimichi

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents a new method to evaluate the friction torque and the heat quantity generated in a spindle system. The decrease in the rotational speed of spindle during the free run period is precisely measured, and the angular deceleration is calculated. The heat quantity generated during the spindle rotation is evaluated as the product of the moment of inertia of spindle, the angular deceleration and the angular velocity. A device is newly developed to measure the rotational speed of sp...

  5. The Maize Divergent spindle-1 (dv1) Gene Encodes a Kinesin-14A Motor Protein Required for Meiotic Spindle Pole Organization

    OpenAIRE

    Higgins, David M.; Nannas, Natalie J.; R Kelly Dawe

    2016-01-01

    The classic maize mutant divergent spindle-1 (dv1) causes failures in meiotic spindle assembly and a decrease in pollen viability. By analyzing two independent dv1 alleles we demonstrate that this phenotype is caused by mutations in a member of the kinesin-14A subfamily, a class of C-terminal, minus-end directed microtubule motors. Further analysis demonstrates that defects in early spindle assembly are rare, but that later stages of spindle organization promoting the formation of finely focu...

  6. Collective dynamics of active cytoskeletal networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Köhler

    Full Text Available Self organization mechanisms are essential for the cytoskeleton to adapt to the requirements of living cells. They rely on the intricate interplay of cytoskeletal filaments, crosslinking proteins and molecular motors. Here we present an in vitro minimal model system consisting of actin filaments, fascin and myosin-II filaments exhibiting pulsatile collective dynamics and superdiffusive transport properties. Both phenomena rely on the complex competition of crosslinking molecules and motor filaments in the network. They are only observed if the relative strength of the binding of myosin-II filaments to the actin network allows exerting high enough forces to unbind actin/fascin crosslinks. This is shown by varying the binding strength of the acto-myosin bond and by combining the experiments with phenomenological simulations based on simple interaction rules.

  7. Carbofuran alters centrosome and spindle organization, and delays cell division in oocytes and mitotic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, Ozgur; Semiz, Olcay; Can, Alp

    2015-04-01

    Although many countries banned of its usage, carbofuran (CF) is still one of the most commonly used carbamate derivative insecticides against insects and nematodes in agriculture and household, threatening the human and animal health by contaminating air, water, and food. Our goal was to evaluate the potential toxic effects of CF on mammalian oocytes besides mitotic cells. Caspase-dependent apoptotic pathway was assessed by immunofluorescence and western blot techniques. Alterations in the meiotic spindle formation after CF exposure throughout the in vitro maturation of mice oocyte-cumulus complexes (COCs) were analyzed by using a 3D confocal laser microscope. Maturation efficiency and kinetics were assessed by direct observation of the COCs. Results indicated that the number of TUNEL-positive cells increased in CF-exposed groups, particularly higher doses (>250 µM) in a dose-dependent fashion. The ratio of anticleaved caspase-3 labeled cells in those groups positively correlated with TUNEL-positivity. Western blot analysis confirmed a significant increase in active caspase-3 activity. CF caused a dose-dependent accumulation of oocytes at prometaphase-I (PM-I) of meiosis. Partial loss of spindle microtubules (MTs) was noted, which consequently gave rise to a diamond shape spindle. Aberrant pericentrin foci were noted particularly in PM-I and metaphase-I (M-I) stages. Conclusively, CF (1) induces programmed cell death in a dose-dependent manner, and (2) alters spindle morphology most likely through a mechanism that interacts with MT assembly and/or disorientation of pericentriolar proteins. Overall, data suggest that CF could give rise to aneuploidy or cell death in higher doses, therefore reduce fertilization and implantation rates. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Spindle-shaped nanoscale yolk/shell magnetic stirring bars for heterogeneous catalysis in macro- and microscopic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuliang; Cao, Changyan; Peng, Li; Huang, Peipei; Sun, Yongbin; Wei, Fang; Song, Weiguo

    2016-01-28

    A new type of spindle-shaped nanoscale yolk/shell magnetic stirring bar containing noble metal nanoparticles was prepared. The as-synthesized Pd-Fe@meso-SiO2 not only showed impressive activity and stability as a heterogeneous catalyst in a macroscopic flask system, but also acted as an efficient nanoscale magnetic stir bar in a microscopic droplet system.

  9. Activating and inhibiting connections in biological network dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knight Rob

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many studies of biochemical networks have analyzed network topology. Such work has suggested that specific types of network wiring may increase network robustness and therefore confer a selective advantage. However, knowledge of network topology does not allow one to predict network dynamical behavior – for example, whether deleting a protein from a signaling network would maintain the network's dynamical behavior, or induce oscillations or chaos. Results Here we report that the balance between activating and inhibiting connections is important in determining whether network dynamics reach steady state or oscillate. We use a simple dynamical model of a network of interacting genes or proteins. Using the model, we study random networks, networks selected for robust dynamics, and examples of biological network topologies. The fraction of activating connections influences whether the network dynamics reach steady state or oscillate. Conclusion The activating fraction may predispose a network to oscillate or reach steady state, and neutral evolution or selection of this parameter may affect the behavior of biological networks. This principle may unify the dynamics of a wide range of cellular networks. Reviewers Reviewed by Sergei Maslov, Eugene Koonin, and Yu (Brandon Xia (nominated by Mark Gerstein. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section.

  10. The Spindle Unit of Machine Tool(Ⅱ)%机床的主轴单元(下)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张曙; 张柄生; 卫汉华

    2016-01-01

    通过回顾机床主轴发展历程,指出电主轴在高端数控机床的应用日益广泛。继而详尽地阐述了机床主轴单元的设计要点,包括轴承、润滑和冷却以及刀具接口等。接着对主轴的静动态和热性能分析以及建模仿真进行了全面介绍。最后指出主轴的工况监控、智能化和自适应控制是新一代电主轴的重要特征和未来发展趋势。%Reviewing the development of machine tool spindle, it points out that the application of motorized spindle in high-end CNC machine tools is becoming more and more widely. It shows the detail about the design key points of machine tool spindle unit such as bearing, lubrication, cooling and cutting tool interface. It illus-trates the static and dynamic and thermal performance analysis and modeling simulation for spindle unit, pre-sents the important characteristics and the future development trend in condition monitoring, intelligent and adaptive control ect.

  11. Method for vibration response simulation and sensor placement optimization of a machine tool spindle system with a bearing defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Hongrui; Niu, Linkai; He, Zhengjia

    2012-01-01

    Bearing defects are one of the most important mechanical sources for vibration and noise generation in machine tool spindles. In this study, an integrated finite element (FE) model is proposed to predict the vibration responses of a spindle bearing system with localized bearing defects and then the sensor placement for better detection of bearing faults is optimized. A nonlinear bearing model is developed based on Jones' bearing theory, while the drawbar, shaft and housing are modeled as Timoshenko's beam. The bearing model is then integrated into the FE model of drawbar/shaft/housing by assembling equations of motion. The Newmark time integration method is used to solve the vibration responses numerically. The FE model of the spindle-bearing system was verified by conducting dynamic tests. Then, the localized bearing defects were modeled and vibration responses generated by the outer ring defect were simulated as an illustration. The optimization scheme of the sensor placement was carried out on the test spindle. The results proved that, the optimal sensor placement depends on the vibration modes under different boundary conditions and the transfer path between the excitation and the response.

  12. Detection of static and dynamic activities using uniaxial accelerometers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltink, Petrus H.; Bussmann, Hans B.J.; de Vries, Wiebe; de Vries, W.; Martens, Wim L.J.; van Lummel, Rob C.

    1996-01-01

    Rehabilitation treatment may be improved by objective analysis of activities of daily living. For this reason, the feasibility of distinguishing several static and dynamic activities (standing, sitting, lying, walking, ascending stairs, descending stairs, cycling) using a small set of two or three

  13. Sperm cell surface dynamics during activation and fertilization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boerke, A.

    2013-01-01

    Before the sperm cell can reach the oocyte it needs to be activated and to undergo a series of preparative steps. The sperm surface dynamics was studied in relation to this activation process and the modifications and removal of sperm surface components havebeen investigated. Bicarbonate-induced rad

  14. Phospho-Bcl-xL(Ser62) influences spindle assembly and chromosome segregation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianfang; Beauchemin, Myriam; Bertrand, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Functional analysis of a series of phosphorylation mutants reveals that Bcl-xL(Ser62Ala) influences cell entry into anaphase and mitotic exit in taxol-exposed cells compared with cells expressing wild-type Bcl-xL or a series of other phosphorylation mutants, an effect that appears to be independent of its anti-apoptotic activity. During normal mitosis progression, Bcl-xL(Ser62) is strongly phosphorylated by PLK1 and MAPK14/SAPKp38α at the prometaphase, metaphase, and the anaphase boundaries, while it is de-phosphorylated at telophase and cytokinesis. Phospho-Bcl-xL(Ser62) localizes in centrosomes with γ-tubulin and in the mitotic cytosol with some spindle-assembly checkpoint signaling components, including PLK1, BubR1, and Mad2. In taxol- and nocodazole-exposed cells, phospho-Bcl-xL(Ser62) also binds to Cdc20- Mad2-, BubR1-, and Bub3-bound complexes, while Bcl-xL(Ser62Ala) does not. Silencing Bcl-xL expression and expressing the phosphorylation mutant Bcl-xL(Ser62Ala) lead to an increased number of cells harboring mitotic spindle defects including multipolar spindle, chromosome lagging and bridging, aneuploidy with micro-, bi-, or multi-nucleated cells, and cells that fail to resolve undergo mitosis within 6 h. Together, the data indicate that during mitosis, Bcl-xL(Ser62) phosphorylation impacts on spindle assembly and chromosome segregation, influencing chromosome stability. Observations of mitotic cells harboring aneuploidy with micro-, bi-, or multi-nucleated cells, and cells that fail to resolve undergo mitosis within 6 h were also made with cells expressing the phosphorylation mutant Bcl-xL(Ser49Ala) and dual mutant Bcl-xL(Ser49/62Ala).

  15. Interleukin-6 receptor in spindle-shaped stromal cells, a prognostic determinant of early breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labovsky, Vivian; Martinez, Leandro Marcelo; Calcagno, María de Luján; Davies, Kevin Mauro; García-Rivello, Hernán; Wernicke, Alejandra; Feldman, Leonardo; Giorello, María Belén; Matas, Ayelén; Borzone, Francisco Raúl; Howard, Scott C; Chasseing, Norma Alejandra

    2016-10-01

    Spindle-shaped stromal cells, like carcinoma-associated fibroblasts and mesenchymal stem cells, influence tumor behavior and can serve as parameters in the clinical diagnosis, therapy, and prognosis of early breast cancer. Therefore, the aim of this study is to explore the clinicopathological significance of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-induced ligand (TRAIL) receptors (Rs) 2 and 4 (TRAIL-R2 and R4), and interleukin-6 R (IL-6R) in spindle-shaped stromal cells, not associated with the vasculature, as prognostic determinants of early breast cancer patients. Receptors are able to trigger the migratory activity, among other functions, of these stromal cells. We conducted immunohistochemical analysis for the expression of these receptors in spindle-shaped stromal cells, not associated with the vasculature, of primary tumors from early invasive breast cancer patients, and analyzed their association with clinicopathological characteristics. Here, we demonstrate that the elevated levels of TRAIL-R2, TRAIL-R4, and IL-6R in these stromal cells were significantly associated with a higher risk of metastatic occurrence (p = 0.034, 0.026, and 0.006; respectively). Moreover, high expression of TRAIL-R4 was associated with shorter disease-free survival and metastasis-free survival (p = 0.013 and 0.019; respectively). Also, high expression of IL-6R was associated with shorter disease-free survival, metastasis-free survival, and overall survival (p = 0.003, 0.001, and 0.003; respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that IL-6R expression was an independent prognostic factor for disease-free survival and metastasis-free survival (p = 0.035). This study is the first to demonstrate that high levels of IL-6R expression in spindle-shaped stromal cells, not associated with the vasculature, could be used to identify early breast cancer patients with poor outcomes.

  16. Topography-specific spindle frequency changes in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Suzana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sleep spindles, as detected on scalp electroencephalography (EEG, are considered to be markers of thalamo-cortical network integrity. Since obstructive sleep apnea (OSA is a known cause of brain dysfunction, the aim of this study was to investigate sleep spindle frequency distribution in OSA. Seven non-OSA subjects and 21 patients with OSA (11 mild and 10 moderate were studied. A matching pursuit procedure was used for automatic detection of fast (≥13Hz and slow (Hz spindles obtained from 30min samples of NREM sleep stage 2 taken from initial, middle and final night thirds (sections I, II and III of frontal, central and parietal scalp regions. Results Compared to non-OSA subjects, Moderate OSA patients had higher central and parietal slow spindle percentage (SSP in all night sections studied, and higher frontal SSP in sections II and III. As the night progressed, there was a reduction in central and parietal SSP, while frontal SSP remained high. Frontal slow spindle percentage in night section III predicted OSA with good accuracy, with OSA likelihood increased by 12.1%for every SSP unit increase (OR 1.121, 95% CI 1.013 - 1.239, p=0.027. Conclusions These results are consistent with diffuse, predominantly frontal thalamo-cortical dysfunction during sleep in OSA, as more posterior brain regions appear to maintain some physiological spindle frequency modulation across the night. Displaying changes in an opposite direction to what is expected from the aging process itself, spindle frequency appears to be informative in OSA even with small sample sizes, and to represent a sensitive electrophysiological marker of brain dysfunction in OSA.

  17. Research on Dynamic Model's Building of Active Magnetic Suspension Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Jian; YAN Guo-zheng; LI Li-chuan; WANG Kun-dong

    2006-01-01

    An experimental method is introduced in this paper to build the dynamics of AMSS (the active magnetic suspension system), which doesn't depend on system's physical parameters. The rotor can be reliably suspended under the unit feedback control system designed with the primary dynamic model obtained. Online identification in frequency domain is processed to give the precise model. Comparisons show that the experimental method is much closer to the precise model than the theoretic method based on magnetic circuit law. So this experimental method is a good choice to build the primary dynamic model of AMSS.

  18. Anthrax toxin receptor 2a controls mitotic spindle positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castanon, I; Abrami, L; Holtzer, L; Heisenberg, C P; van der Goot, F G; González-Gaitán, M

    2013-01-01

    Oriented mitosis is essential during tissue morphogenesis. The Wnt/planar cell polarity (Wnt/PCP) pathway orients mitosis in a number of developmental systems, including dorsal epiblast cell divisions along the animal-vegetal (A-V) axis during zebrafish gastrulation. How Wnt signalling orients the mitotic plane is, however, unknown. Here we show that, in dorsal epiblast cells, anthrax toxin receptor 2a (Antxr2a) accumulates in a polarized cortical cap, which is aligned with the embryonic A-V axis and forecasts the division plane. Filamentous actin (F-actin) also forms an A-V polarized cap, which depends on Wnt/PCP and its effectors RhoA and Rock2. Antxr2a is recruited to the cap by interacting with actin. Antxr2a also interacts with RhoA and together they activate the diaphanous-related formin zDia2. Mechanistically, Antxr2a functions as a Wnt-dependent polarized determinant, which, through the action of RhoA and zDia2, exerts torque on the spindle to align it with the A-V axis.

  19. Evolution and Dynamics of a Solar Active Prominence

    CERN Document Server

    Magara, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    The life of a solar active prominence, one of the most remarkable objects on the Sun, is full of dynamics; after first appearing on the Sun the prominence continuously evolves with various internal motions and eventually produces a global eruption toward the interplane- tary space. Here we report that the whole life of an active prominence is successfully re- produced by performing as long-term a magnetohydrodynamic simulation of a magnetized prominence plasma as was ever done. The simulation reveals underlying dynamic processes that give rise to observed properties of an active prominence: invisible subsurface flows self- consistently produce the cancellation of magnetic flux observed at the photosphere, while observed and somewhat counterintuitive strong upflows are driven against gravity by en- hanced gas pressure gradient force along a magnetic field line locally standing vertical. The most highlighted dynamic event, transition into an eruptive phase, occurs as a natural con- sequence of the self-consiste...

  20. Protein-water dynamics in antifreeze protein III activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yao; Bäumer, Alexander; Meister, Konrad; Bischak, Connor G.; DeVries, Arthur L.; Leitner, David M.; Havenith, Martina

    2016-03-01

    We combine Terahertz absorption spectroscopy (THz) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism for the antifreeze activity of one class of antifreeze protein, antifreeze protein type III (AFP-III) with a focus on the collective water hydrogen bond dynamics near the protein. After summarizing our previous work on AFPs, we present a new investigation of the effects of cosolutes on protein antifreeze activity by adding sodium citrate to the protein solution of AFP-III. Our results reveal that for AFP-III, unlike some other AFPs, the addition of the osmolyte sodium citrate does not affect the hydrogen bond dynamics at the protein surface significantly, as indicated by concentration dependent THz measurements. The present data, in combination with our previous THz measurements and molecular simulations, confirm that while long-range solvent perturbation is a necessary condition for the antifreeze activity of AFP-III, the local binding affinity determines the size of the hysteresis.

  1. Testing a Low-Influence Spindle Drive Motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hale, L; Wulff, T; Sedgewick, J

    2003-11-05

    Precision spindles used for diamond turning and other applications requiring low error motion generally require a drive system that ideally applies a pure torque to the rotating spindle. Frequently a frameless motor, that is, one without its own bearings, is directly coupled to the spindle to make a compact and simple system having high resonant frequencies. Although in addition to delivering drive torque, asymmetries in the motor cause it to generate disturbance loads (forces and moments) which influence the spindle error motion of the directly coupled system. This paper describes the tests and results for a particular frameless, brushless DC motor that was originally developed for military and space applications requiring very low torque ripple. Because the construction of the motor should also lead to very low disturbance loads, it was selected for use on a new diamond turning and grinding machine under developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The level of influence for this motor-spindle combination is expected to be of order one nanometer for radial and axial error motion.

  2. Spindle neurons of the human anterior cingulate cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimchinsky, E. A.; Vogt, B. A.; Morrison, J. H.; Hof, P. R.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The human anterior cingulate cortex is distinguished by the presence of an unusual cell type, a large spindle neuron in layer Vb. This cell has been noted numerous times in the historical literature but has not been studied with modern neuroanatomic techniques. For instance, details regarding the neuronal class to which these cells belong and regarding their precise distribution along both ventrodorsal and anteroposterior axes of the cingulate gyrus are still lacking. In the present study, morphological features and the anatomic distribution of this cell type were studied using computer-assisted mapping and immunocytochemical techniques. Spindle neurons are restricted to the subfields of the anterior cingulate cortex (Brodmann's area 24), exhibiting a greater density in anterior portions of this area than in posterior portions, and tapering off in the transition zone between anterior and posterior cingulate cortex. Furthermore, a majority of the spindle cells at any level is located in subarea 24b on the gyral surface. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that the neurofilament protein triple was present in a large percentage of these neurons and that they did not contain calcium-binding proteins. Injections of the carbocyanine dye DiI into the cingulum bundle revealed that these cells are projection neurons. Finally, spindle cells were consistently affected in Alzheimer's disease cases, with an overall loss of about 60%. Taken together, these observations indicate that the spindle cells of the human cingulate cortex represent a morphological subpopulation of pyramidal neurons whose restricted distribution may be associated with functionally distinct areas.

  3. Escherichia coli activity characterization using a laser dynamic speckle technique

    CERN Document Server

    Ramírez-Miquet, Evelio E; Contreras-Alarcón, Orestes R

    2012-01-01

    The results of applying a laser dynamic speckle technique to characterize bacterial activity are presented. The speckle activity was detected in two-compartment Petri dishes. One compartment was inoculated and the other one was left as a control blank. The speckled images were processed by the recently reported temporal difference method. Three inoculums of 0.3, 0.5, and 0.7 McFarland units of cell concentration were tested; each inoculum was tested twice for a total of six experiments. The dependences on time of the mean activity, the standard deviation of activity and other descriptors of the speckle pattern evolution were calculated for both the inoculated compartment and the blank. In conclusion the proposed dynamic speckle technique allows characterizing the activity of Escherichia coli bacteria in solid medium.

  4. Protein Dynamics in Organic Media at Varying Water Activity Studied by Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wedberg, Nils Hejle Rasmus Ingemar; Abildskov, Jens; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2012-01-01

    In nonaqueous enzymology, control of enzyme hydration is commonly approached by fixing the thermodynamic water activity of the medium. In this work, we present a strategy for evaluating the water activity in molecular dynamics simulations of proteins in water/organic solvent mixtures. The method...... relies on determining the water content of the bulk phase and uses a combination of Kirkwood−Buff theory and free energy calculations to determine corresponding activity coefficients. We apply the method in a molecular dynamics study of Candida antarctica lipase B in pure water and the organic solvents...... methanol, tert-butyl alcohol, methyl tert-butyl ether, and hexane, each mixture at five different water activities. It is shown that similar water activity yields similar enzyme hydration in the different solvents. However, both solvent and water activity are shown to have profound effects on enzyme...

  5. Human Nek7-interactor RGS2 is required for mitotic spindle organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Edmarcia Elisa; Hehnly, Heidi; Perez, Arina Marina; Meirelles, Gabriela Vaz; Smetana, Juliana Helena Costa; Doxsey, Stephen; Kobarg, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The mitotic spindle apparatus is composed of microtubule (MT) networks attached to kinetochores organized from 2 centrosomes (a.k.a. spindle poles). In addition to this central spindle apparatus, astral MTs assemble at the mitotic spindle pole and attach to the cell cortex to ensure appropriate spindle orientation. We propose that cell cycle-related kinase, Nek7, and its novel interacting protein RGS2, are involved in mitosis regulation and spindle formation. We found that RGS2 localizes to the mitotic spindle in a Nek7-dependent manner, and along with Nek7 contributes to spindle morphology and mitotic spindle pole integrity. RGS2-depletion leads to a mitotic-delay and severe defects in the chromosomes alignment and congression. Importantly, RGS2 or Nek7 depletion or even overexpression of wild-type or kinase-dead Nek7, reduced γ-tubulin from the mitotic spindle poles. In addition to causing a mitotic delay, RGS2 depletion induced mitotic spindle misorientation coinciding with astral MT-reduction. We propose that these phenotypes directly contribute to a failure in mitotic spindle alignment to the substratum. In conclusion, we suggest a molecular mechanism whereupon Nek7 and RGS2 may act cooperatively to ensure proper mitotic spindle organization.

  6. Deterministic dynamics of neural activity during absence seizures in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Gaoxiang; Li, Xiaoli; Dang, Chuangyin; Richards, Douglas A.

    2009-04-01

    The study of brain electrical activities in terms of deterministic nonlinear dynamics has recently received much attention. Forbidden ordinal patterns (FOP) is a recently proposed method to investigate the determinism of a dynamical system through the analysis of intrinsic ordinal properties of a nonstationary time series. The advantages of this method in comparison to others include simplicity and low complexity in computation without further model assumptions. In this paper, the FOP of the EEG series of genetic absence epilepsy rats from Strasbourg was examined to demonstrate evidence of deterministic dynamics during epileptic states. Experiments showed that the number of FOP of the EEG series grew significantly from an interictal to an ictal state via a preictal state. These findings indicated that the deterministic dynamics of neural networks increased significantly in the transition from the interictal to the ictal states and also suggested that the FOP measures of the EEG series could be considered as a predictor of absence seizures.

  7. Controlled Activation of Protein Rotational Dynamics Using Smart Hydrogel Tethering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beech, Brenda M.; Xiong, Yijia; Boschek, Curt B.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Bigelow, Diana J.; Mcateer, Kathleen; Squier, Thomas C.

    2014-09-05

    Stimulus-responsive hydrogel materials that stabilize and control protein dynamics have the potential to enable a range of applications to take advantage of the inherent specificity and catalytic efficiencies of proteins. Here we describe the modular construction of a hydrogel using an engineered calmodulin (CaM) within a polyethylene glycol (PEG) matrix that involves the reversible tethering of proteins through an engineered CaM-binding sequence. For these measurements, maltose binding protein (MBP) was isotopically labeled with [13C] and [15N], permitting dynamic structural measurements using TROSY-HSQC NMR spectroscopy. Upon initial formation of hydrogels protein dynamics are suppressed, with concomitant increases in protein stability. Relaxation of the hydrogel matrix following transient heating results in the activation of protein dynamics and restoration of substrate-induced large-amplitude domain motions necessary for substrate binding.

  8. Structure and dynamics of a constitutively active neurotensin receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumm, Brian E. [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Rockville, MD (United States). National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Dept. of Health and Human Services; Lee, Sangbae [Beckman Research Inst. of the City of Hope, Duarte, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular Immunology; Bhattacharya, Supriyo [Beckman Research Inst. of the City of Hope, Duarte, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular Immunology; Botos, Istvan [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Bethesda, MD (United States). National Inst. of Diabetes and; White, Courtney F. [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Rockville, MD (United States). National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Dept. of Health and Human Services; Du, Haijuan [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Rockville, MD (United States). National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Dept. of Health and Human Services; Vaidehi, Nagarajan [Beckman Research Inst. of the City of Hope, Duarte, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular Immunology; Grisshammer, Reinhard [National Inst. of Health (NIH), Rockville, MD (United States). National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, Dept. of Health and Human Services

    2016-12-07

    Many G protein-coupled receptors show constitutive activity, resulting in the production of a second messenger in the absence of an agonist; and naturally occurring constitutively active mutations in receptors have been implicated in diseases. To gain insight into mechanistic aspects of constitutive activity, we report here the 3.3 Å crystal structure of a constitutively active, agonist-bound neurotensin receptor (NTSR1) and molecular dynamics simulations of agonist-occupied and ligand-free receptor. Comparison with the structure of a NTSR1 variant that has little constitutive activity reveals uncoupling of the ligand-binding domain from conserved connector residues, that effect conformational changes during GPCR activation. Furthermore, molecular dynamics simulations show strong contacts between connector residue side chains and increased flexibility at the intracellular receptor face as features that coincide with robust signalling in cells. The loss of correlation between the binding pocket and conserved connector residues, combined with altered receptor dynamics, possibly explains the reduced neurotensin efficacy in the constitutively active NTSR1 and a facilitated initial engagement with G protein in the absence of agonist.

  9. Adaptive changes in the kinetochore architecture facilitate proper spindle assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magidson, Valentin; Paul, Raja; Yang, Nachen; Ault, Jeffrey G; O'Connell, Christopher B; Tikhonenko, Irina; McEwen, Bruce F; Mogilner, Alex; Khodjakov, Alexey

    2015-09-01

    Mitotic spindle formation relies on the stochastic capture of microtubules at kinetochores. Kinetochore architecture affects the efficiency and fidelity of this process with large kinetochores expected to accelerate assembly at the expense of accuracy, and smaller kinetochores to suppress errors at the expense of efficiency. We demonstrate that on mitotic entry, kinetochores in cultured human cells form large crescents that subsequently compact into discrete structures on opposite sides of the centromere. This compaction occurs only after the formation of end-on microtubule attachments. Live-cell microscopy reveals that centromere rotation mediated by lateral kinetochore-microtubule interactions precedes the formation of end-on attachments and kinetochore compaction. Computational analyses of kinetochore expansion-compaction in the context of lateral interactions correctly predict experimentally observed spindle assembly times with reasonable error rates. The computational model suggests that larger kinetochores reduce both errors and assembly times, which can explain the robustness of spindle assembly and the functional significance of enlarged kinetochores.

  10. Spindle cell lesions of the breast - An approach to diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tay, Timothy Kwang Yong; Tan, Puay Hoon

    2017-09-01

    Spindle cell lesions of the breast are among the less common entities encountered in breast pathology. They encompass a whole spectrum of benign reactive lesions to high grade malignant neoplasms. An accurate diagnosis is important to ensure that the patient receives the appropriate management. While this group of conditions broadly share the same basic morphology of a lesion composed of spindle cells, there are often recognizable differences on histology, which coupled with ancillary studies and correlation with the clinical and imaging findings, can help one to arrive at a specific diagnosis. On core biopsy however, spindle cell lesions pose significant interpretive challenges and a firm diagnosis is often not possible. We share our approach to this group of conditions, with a focus on the more common entities, highlighting their key clinical, imaging and pathological features. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Dynamic Tracking of Web Activity Accessed by Users Using Cookies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.V.S. Jaharsh Samayan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The motive of this study is to suggest a protocol which can be implemented to observe the activities of any node within a network whose contribution to the organization needs to be measured. Many associates working in any organization misuse the resources allocated to them and waste their working time in unproductive work which is of no use to the organization. In order to tackle this problem the dynamic approach in monitoring web pages accessed by user using cookies gives a very efficient way of tracking all the activities of the individual and store in cookies which are generated based on their recent web activity and display a statistical information of how the users web activity for the time period has been utilized for every IP-address in the network. In a ever challenging dynamic world monitoring the productivity of the associates in the organization plays an utmost important role.

  12. Input techniques that dynamically change their cursor activation area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten; Hornbæk, Kasper

    2007-01-01

    cursor, whose activation area always contains the closest object, and two variants of cell cursors, whose activation areas contain a set of objects in the vicinity of the cursor. We report two experiments that compare these techniques to a point cursor; in one experiment participants use a touchpad......Efficient pointing is crucial to graphical user interfaces, and input techniques that dynamically change their activation area may yield improvements over point cursors by making objects selectable at a distance. Input techniques that dynamically change their activation area include the bubble...... for operating the input techniques, in the other a mouse. In both experiments, the bubble cursor is fastest and participants make fewer errors with it. Participants also unanimously prefer this technique. For small targets, the cell cursors are generally more accurate than the point cursor; in the second...

  13. Enhanced oxidation resistance of active nanostructures via dynamic size effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yi; Xiao, Jianping; Yu, Liang; Liu, Qingfei; Ning, Yanxiao; Zhou, Zhiwen; Chen, Hao; Huang, Wugen; Liu, Ping; Bao, Xinhe

    2017-02-01

    A major challenge limiting the practical applications of nanomaterials is that the activities of nanostructures (NSs) increase with reduced size, often sacrificing their stability in the chemical environment. Under oxidative conditions, NSs with smaller sizes and higher defect densities are commonly expected to oxidize more easily, since high-concentration defects can facilitate oxidation by enhancing the reactivity with O2 and providing a fast channel for oxygen incorporation. Here, using FeO NSs as an example, we show to the contrary, that reducing the size of active NSs can drastically increase their oxidation resistance. A maximum oxidation resistance is found for FeO NSs with dimensions below 3.2 nm. Rather than being determined by the structure or electronic properties of active sites, the enhanced oxidation resistance originates from the size-dependent structural dynamics of FeO NSs in O2. We find this dynamic size effect to govern the chemical properties of active NSs.

  14. The transforming parasite Theileria co-opts host cell mitotic and central spindles to persist in continuously dividing cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad von Schubert

    Full Text Available The protozoan parasite Theileria inhabits the host cell cytoplasm and possesses the unique capacity to transform the cells it infects, inducing continuous proliferation and protection against apoptosis. The transforming schizont is a multinucleated syncytium that resides free in the host cell cytoplasm and is strictly intracellular. To maintain transformation, it is crucial that this syncytium is divided over the two daughter cells at each host cell cytokinesis. This process was dissected using different cell cycle synchronization methods in combination with the targeted application of specific inhibitors. We found that Theileria schizonts associate with newly formed host cell microtubules that emanate from the spindle poles, positioning the parasite at the equatorial region of the mitotic cell where host cell chromosomes assemble during metaphase. During anaphase, the schizont interacts closely with host cell central spindle. As part of this process, the schizont recruits a host cell mitotic kinase, Polo-like kinase 1, and we established that parasite association with host cell central spindles requires Polo-like kinase 1 catalytic activity. Blocking the interaction between the schizont and astral as well as central spindle microtubules prevented parasite segregation between the daughter cells during cytokinesis. Our findings provide a striking example of how an intracellular eukaryotic pathogen that evolved ways to induce the uncontrolled proliferation of the cells it infects usurps the host cell mitotic machinery, including Polo-like kinase 1, one of the pivotal mitotic kinases, to ensure its own persistence and survival.

  15. Trim32 facilitates degradation of MYCN on spindle poles and induces asymmetric cell division in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Hideki; Kaneko, Yasuhiko

    2014-10-01

    Asymmetric cell division (ACD) is a physiologic process during development and tissue homeostasis. ACD produces two unequal daughter cells: one has stem/progenitor cell activity and the other has potential for differentiation. Recent studies showed that misregulation of the balance between self-renewal and differentiation by ACD may lead to tumorigenesis in Drosophila neuroblasts. However, it is still largely unknown whether human cancer stem-like cells exhibit ACD or not. Here, using human neuroblastoma cells as an ACD model, we found that MYCN accumulates at spindle poles by GSK-3β phosphorylation during mitosis. In parallel, the ACD-related ubiquitin ligase Trim32 was recruited to spindle poles by CDK1/cyclin B-mediated phosphorylation. Trim32 interacted with MYCN at spindle poles during mitosis, facilitating proteasomal degradation of MYCN at spindle poles and inducing ACD. Trim32 also suppressed sphere formation of neuroblastoma-initiating cells, suggesting that the mechanisms of ACD produce differentiated neuroblastoma cells that will eventually die. Thus, Trim32 is a positive regulator of ACD that acts against MYCN and should be considered as a tumor-suppressor candidate. Our findings offer novel insights into the mechanisms of ACD and clarify its contributions to human tumorigenesis. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Polo-like kinase Cdc5 regulates Spc72 recruitment to spindle pole body in the methylotrophic yeast Ogataea polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maekawa, Hiromi; Neuner, Annett; Rüthnick, Diana; Schiebel, Elmar; Pereira, Gislene; Kaneko, Yoshinobu

    2017-08-30

    Cytoplasmic microtubules (cMT) control mitotic spindle positioning in many organisms, and are therefore pivotal for successful cell division. Despite its importance, the temporal control of cMT formation remains poorly understood. Here we show that unlike the best-studied yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, position of pre-anaphase nucleus is not strongly biased toward bud neck in Ogataea polymorpha and the regulation of spindle positioning becomes active only shortly before anaphase. This is likely due to the unstable property of cMTs compared to those in S. cerevisiae. Furthermore, we show that cMT nucleation/anchoring is restricted at the level of recruitment of the γ-tubulin complex receptor, Spc72, to spindle pole body (SPB), which is regulated by the polo-like kinase Cdc5. Additionally, electron microscopy revealed that the cytoplasmic side of SPB is structurally different between G1 and anaphase. Thus, polo-like kinase dependent recruitment of γ-tubulin receptor to SPBs determines the timing of spindle orientation in O. polymorpha.

  17. JAM-A regulates cortical dynein localization through Cdc42 to control planar spindle orientation during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncay, Hüseyin; Brinkmann, Benjamin F; Steinbacher, Tim; Schürmann, Annika; Gerke, Volker; Iden, Sandra; Ebnet, Klaus

    2015-08-26

    Planar spindle orientation in polarized epithelial cells depends on the precise localization of the dynein-dynactin motor protein complex at the lateral cortex. The contribution of cell adhesion molecules to the cortical localization of the dynein-dynactin complex is poorly understood. Here we find that junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A) regulates the planar orientation of the mitotic spindle during epithelial morphogenesis. During mitosis, JAM-A triggers a transient activation of Cdc42 and PI(3)K, generates a gradient of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 at the cortex and regulates the formation of the cortical actin cytoskeleton. In the absence of functional JAM-A, dynactin localization at the cortex is reduced, the mitotic spindle apparatus is misaligned and epithelial morphogenesis in three-dimensional culture is compromised. Our findings indicate that a PI(3)K- and cortical F-actin-dependent pathway of planar spindle orientation operates in polarized epithelial cells to regulate epithelial morphogenesis, and we identify JAM-A as a junctional regulator of this pathway.

  18. MLL/WDR5 Complex Regulates Kif2A Localization to Ensure Chromosome Congression and Proper Spindle Assembly during Mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aamir; Veeranki, Sailaja Naga; Chinchole, Akash; Tyagi, Shweta

    2017-06-19

    Mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL), along with multisubunit (WDR5, RbBP5, ASH2L, and DPY30) complex catalyzes the trimethylation of H3K4, leading to gene activation. Here, we characterize a chromatin-independent role for MLL during mitosis. MLL and WDR5 localize to the mitotic spindle apparatus, and loss of function of MLL complex by RNAi results in defects in chromosome congression and compromised spindle formation. We report interaction of MLL complex with several kinesin and dynein motors. We further show that the MLL complex associates with Kif2A, a member of the Kinesin-13 family of microtubule depolymerase, and regulates the spindle localization of Kif2A during mitosis. We have identified a conserved WDR5 interaction (Win) motif, so far unique to the MLL family, in Kif2A. The Win motif of Kif2A engages in direct interactions with WDR5 for its spindle localization. Our findings highlight a non-canonical mitotic function of MLL complex, which may have a direct impact on chromosomal stability, frequently compromised in cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Dynamic neural activity during stress signals resilient coping

    OpenAIRE

    Sinha, Rajita; Lacadie, Cheryl M; Constable, R. Todd; Seo, Dongju

    2016-01-01

    We live in a time of increasing terror, stress, and trauma, and yet humans show a remarkable ability to cope under high stress states. How the brain supports such active resilient coping is not well-understood. Findings showed high stress levels are accompanied by dynamic brain signals in circuits representing the stress reaction, adaptation, and behavioral control responses. In addition, a ventromedial prefrontal cortical region showed initial decreases in brain activation, but then mobilize...

  20. VMC-1000主轴箱模态分析及改进设计%Modal analysis and modification design of the VMC-1000 spindle box

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡君君; 徐武彬; 张宏献; 唐满宾

    2011-01-01

    Natural and dynamic property of machine spindle box is one of the most important influencing factors to working accuracy,type VMC-1000 was studied.Based on finite element modal analysis,the imperfection of the machine spindle box was pointed out and a way was presented to improve the structure. In addition,the two different spindle boxes were analyzed with stiffness analysis to get the Maximum Deformation and Maximum stress of spindle box. According to the modal analysis and static analysis,the improved spindle box has high stiffness.%机床主轴箱的固有动态特性直接影响到机床的加工精度,以VMC-1000立式加工中心主轴箱为研究对象,应用有限元软件对其进行模态分析,提出了该主轴箱的薄弱环节.针对薄弱环节对箱体进行改进设计,通过比较分析,验证了改进的有效性.同时对两种结构刚度分析,得出主轴箱的最大变形量和最大应力,证实了改进的箱体结构具有较高的刚度.

  1. Active site modeling in copper azurin molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizzuti, B; Swart, M; Sportelli, L; Guzzi, R

    2004-01-01

    Active site modeling in molecular dynamics simulations is investigated for the reduced state of copper azurin. Five simulation runs (5 ns each) were performed at room temperature to study the consequences of a mixed electrostatic/constrained modeling for the coordination between the metal and the po

  2. Active synchronization between two different chaotic dynamical system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maheri, M. [Institute for Mathematical Research, 43400 UPM, Serdang, Selengor (Malaysia); Arifin, N. Md; Ismail, F. [Department of Mathematics, 43400 UPM, Serdang, Selengor (Malaysia)

    2015-05-15

    In this paper we investigate on the synchronization problem between two different chaotic dynamical system based on the Lyapunov stability theorem by using nonlinear control functions. Active control schemes are used for synchronization Liu system as drive and Rossler system as response. Numerical simulation by using Maple software are used to show effectiveness of the proposed schemes.

  3. Acentrosomal spindle assembly and chromosome segregation during oocyte meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumont, Julien; Desai, Arshad

    2012-05-01

    The ability to reproduce relies in most eukaryotes on specialized cells called gametes. Gametes are formed by the process of meiosis in which, after a single round of replication, two successive cell divisions reduce the ploidy of the genome. Fusion of gametes at fertilization reconstitutes diploidy. In most animal species, chromosome segregation during female meiosis occurs on spindles assembled in the absence of the major microtubule-organizing center, the centrosome. In mammals, oocyte meiosis is error prone and underlies most birth aneuploidies. Here, we review recent work on acentrosomal spindle formation and chromosome alignment/separation during oocyte meiosis in different animal models.

  4. Fibrillarin redistributes to the spindle poles and partially colocalizes with NuMA during mitosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Fibrillarin, a major protein in the nucleolus, is known to redistribute during mitosis from the nucleolus to the cytosol, and is related to the dynamics of post-mitotic reassembly of the nucleolus. To better understand the dynamic behavior and the relationship with other cytoplasmic structures, we have now expressed fibrillarin-pDsRed1 fusion protein in HeLa cells. The results showed that a part of fibrillarin was associated with mitotic spindle poles in the mitotic cells. Nocodazole-induced microtubule depolymerization resulted in fibrillarin redistribution throughout the cytoplasm, and removal of nocodazole resulted in relocalization of fibrillarin at the polar region during the mitotic spindles reassembly. In a mitotic cell free system, fibrillarin was found in the center of taxol-induced microtubule asters. Moreover, fibrillarin was found to colocalize with the nuclear mitotic apparatus protein (NuMA) at the poles of mitotic cells. Therefore, it is postulated that the polar redistribution of fibrillarin is mediated by microtubules.

  5. Dynamics of Fractal Cluster Gels with Embedded Active Colloids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szakasits, Megan E.; Zhang, Wenxuan; Solomon, Michael J.

    2017-08-01

    We find that embedded active colloids increase the ensemble-averaged mean squared displacement of particles in otherwise passively fluctuating fractal cluster gels. The enhancement in dynamics occurs by a mechanism in which the active colloids contribute to the average dynamics both directly through their own active motion and indirectly through their excitation of neighboring passive colloids in the fractal network. Fractal cluster gels are synthesized by addition of magnesium chloride to an initially stable suspension of 1.0 μ m polystyrene colloids in which a dilute concentration of platinum coated Janus colloids has been dispersed. The Janus colloids are thereby incorporated into the fractal network. We measure the ensemble-averaged mean squared displacement of all colloids in the gel before and after the addition of hydrogen peroxide, a fuel that drives diffusiophoretic motion of the Janus particles. The gel mean squared displacement increases by up to a factor of 3 for an active to passive particle ratio of 1 ∶20 and inputted active energy—defined based on the hydrogen peroxide's effect on colloid swim speed and run length—that is up to 9.5 times thermal energy, on a per particle basis. We model the enhancement in gel particle dynamics as the sum of a direct contribution from the displacement of the Janus particles themselves and an indirect contribution from the strain field that the active colloids induce in the surrounding passive particles.

  6. Eya1 controls cell polarity, spindle orientation, cell fate and Notch signaling in distal embryonic lung epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Hashash, Ahmed H K; Turcatel, Gianluca; Al Alam, Denise; Buckley, Sue; Tokumitsu, Hiroshi; Bellusci, Saverio; Warburton, David

    2011-04-01

    Cell polarity, mitotic spindle orientation and asymmetric division play a crucial role in the self-renewal/differentiation of epithelial cells, yet little is known about these processes and the molecular programs that control them in embryonic lung distal epithelium. Herein, we provide the first evidence that embryonic lung distal epithelium is polarized with characteristic perpendicular cell divisions. Consistent with these findings, spindle orientation-regulatory proteins Insc, LGN (Gpsm2) and NuMA, and the cell fate determinant Numb are asymmetrically localized in embryonic lung distal epithelium. Interfering with the function of these proteins in vitro randomizes spindle orientation and changes cell fate. We further show that Eya1 protein regulates cell polarity, spindle orientation and the localization of Numb, which inhibits Notch signaling. Hence, Eya1 promotes both perpendicular division as well as Numb asymmetric segregation to one daughter in mitotic distal lung epithelium, probably by controlling aPKCζ phosphorylation. Thus, epithelial cell polarity and mitotic spindle orientation are defective after interfering with Eya1 function in vivo or in vitro. In addition, in Eya1(-/-) lungs, perpendicular division is not maintained and Numb is segregated to both daughter cells in mitotic epithelial cells, leading to inactivation of Notch signaling. As Notch signaling promotes progenitor cell identity at the expense of differentiated cell phenotypes, we test whether genetic activation of Notch could rescue the Eya1(-/-) lung phenotype, which is characterized by loss of epithelial progenitors, increased epithelial differentiation but reduced branching. Indeed, genetic activation of Notch partially rescues Eya1(-/-) lung epithelial defects. These findings uncover novel functions for Eya1 as a crucial regulator of the complex behavior of distal embryonic lung epithelium.

  7. Dynamic Changes of Nitrate Reductase Activity within 24 Hours

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The research aimed to study the circadian rhythm of nitrate re- ductase activity (NRA) in plant. [Method] The wheat plants at heading stage were used as the materials for the measurement of dynamic changes of nitrate reductase activity (NRA) within 24 h under the conditions of constant high temperature. [Resulti The fluctuation of NRA in wheat changed greatly from 20:00 pm to 11:00 am. The enzyme activity remained constant, but at 14:00 the enzyme activity was the high- est, higher than all the other time points except the enzyme activity measured at11:00. The enzyme activity was the lowest of 17:00, which was lower than all the other time points except the enzyme activity measured at 2:00. [Conclusion] There were autonomous rhythm changes of NRA in wheat in a certain degree.

  8. Dynamic neural activity during stress signals resilient coping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Rajita; Lacadie, Cheryl M; Constable, R Todd; Seo, Dongju

    2016-08-02

    Active coping underlies a healthy stress response, but neural processes supporting such resilient coping are not well-known. Using a brief, sustained exposure paradigm contrasting highly stressful, threatening, and violent stimuli versus nonaversive neutral visual stimuli in a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study, we show significant subjective, physiologic, and endocrine increases and temporally related dynamically distinct patterns of neural activation in brain circuits underlying the stress response. First, stress-specific sustained increases in the amygdala, striatum, hypothalamus, midbrain, right insula, and right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) regions supported the stress processing and reactivity circuit. Second, dynamic neural activation during stress versus neutral runs, showing early increases followed by later reduced activation in the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC), left DLPFC, hippocampus, and left insula, suggested a stress adaptation response network. Finally, dynamic stress-specific mobilization of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (VmPFC), marked by initial hypoactivity followed by increased VmPFC activation, pointed to the VmPFC as a key locus of the emotional and behavioral control network. Consistent with this finding, greater neural flexibility signals in the VmPFC during stress correlated with active coping ratings whereas lower dynamic activity in the VmPFC also predicted a higher level of maladaptive coping behaviors in real life, including binge alcohol intake, emotional eating, and frequency of arguments and fights. These findings demonstrate acute functional neuroplasticity during stress, with distinct and separable brain networks that underlie critical components of the stress response, and a specific role for VmPFC neuroflexibility in stress-resilient coping.

  9. Satellite Dynamic Damping via Active Force Control Augmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varatharajoo, Renuganth

    2012-07-01

    An approach that incorporates the Active Force Control (AFC) technique into a conventional Proportional-Derivative (PD) controller is proposed for a satellite active dynamic damping towards a full attitude control. The AFC method has been established to facilitate a robust motion control of dynamical systems in the presence of disturbances, parametric uncertainties and changes that are commonly prevalent in the real-world environment. The usefulness of the method can be extended by introducing intelligent mechanisms to approximate the mass or inertia matrix of the dynamic system to trigger the compensation effect of the controller. AFC is a technique that relies on the appropriate estimation of the inertial or mass parameters of the dynamic system and the measurements of the acceleration and force signals induced by the system if practical implementation is ever considered. In AFC, it is shown that the system subjected to a number of disturbances remains stable and robust via the compensating action of the control strategy. We demonstrate that it is possible to design a spacecraft attitude feedback controller that will ensure the system dynamics set point remains unchanged even in the presence of the disturbances provided that the actual disturbances can be modeled effectively. In order to further facilitate this analysis, a combined energy and attitude control system (CEACS) is proposed as a model satellite attitude control actuator. All the governing equations are established and the proposed satellite attitude control architecture is made amenable to numerical treatments. The results show that the PD-AFC attitude damping performances are superiorly better than that of the solely PD type. It is also shown that the tunings of the AFC system gains are crucial to ensure a better attitude damping performance and this process is mandatory for AFC systems. Finally, the results demonstrate an important satellite dynamic damping enhancement capability using the AFC

  10. The chromosomal passenger complex and the spindle assembly checkpoint: kinetochore-microtubule error correction and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Maia André F; Vader Gerben; Lens Susanne MA

    2008-01-01

    Abstract During mitosis, correct bipolar chromosome attachment to the mitotic spindle is an essential prerequisite for the equal segregation of chromosomes. The spindle assembly checkpoint can prevent chromosome segregation as long as not all chromosome pairs have obtained bipolar attachment to the spindle. The chromosomal passenger complex plays a crucial role during chromosome alignment by correcting faulty chromosome-spindle interactions (e.g. attachments that do not generate tension). In ...

  11. Dynamics of telomerase activity in response to acute psychological stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epel, Elissa S.; Lin, Jue; Dhabhar, Firdaus S.; Wolkowitz, Owen M.; Puterman, E; Karan, Lori; Blackburn, Elizabeth H.

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase activity plays an essential role in cel0l survival, by lengthening telomeres and promoting cell growth and longevity. It is now possible to quantify the low levels of telomerase activity in human leukocytes. Low basal telomerase activity has been related to chronic stress in people and to chronic glucocorticoid exposure in vitro. Here we test whether leukocyte telomerase activity changes under acute psychological stress. We exposed 44 elderly women, including 22 high stress dementia caregivers and 22 matched low stress controls, to a brief laboratory psychological stressor, while examining changes in telomerase activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). At baseline, caregivers had lower telomerase activity levels than controls, but during stress telomerase activity increased similarly in both groups. Across the entire sample, subsequent telomerase activity increased by 18% one hour after the end of the stressor (p<0.01). The increase in telomerase activity was independent of changes in numbers or percentages of monocytes, lymphocytes, and specific T cell types, although we cannot fully rule out some potential contribution from immune cell redistribution in the change in telomerase activity. Telomerase activity increases were associated with greater cortisol increases in response to the stressor. Lastly, psychological response to the tasks (greater threat perception) was also related to greater telomerase activity increases in controls. These findings uncover novel relationships of dynamic telomerase activity with exposure to an acute stressor, and with two classic aspects of the stress response -- perceived psychological stress and neuroendocrine (cortisol) responses to the stressor. PMID:20018236

  12. Aerobic storage under dynamic conditions in activated sludge processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majone, M.; Dircks, K.

    1999-01-01

    In activated sludge processes, several plant configurations (like plug-flow configuration of the aeration tanks, systems with selectors, contact-stabilization processes or SBR processes) impose a concentration gradient of the carbon sources to the biomass. As a consequence, the biomass grows under...... mechanisms can also contribute to substrate removal, depending on the microbial composition and the previous "history" of the biomass. In this paper the type and the extent of this dynamic response is discussed by review of experimental studies on pure cultures, mixed cultures and activated sludges...... and with main reference to its relevance on population dynamics in the activated sludge. Possible conceptual approaches to storage modelling are also presented, including both structured and unstructured modelling. (C) 1999 IAWQ Published by Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  13. Activation of the insular cortex during dynamic exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williamson, James; Nobrega, A C; McColl, R

    1997-01-01

    role as a site for regulation of autonomic activity. 2. Eight subjects were studied during voluntary active cycling and passively induced cycling. Additionally, four of the subjects underwent passive movement combined with electrical stimulation of the legs. 3. Increases in regional cerebral blood flow...... during active, but not passive cycling. There were no significant changes in rCBF for the right insula. Also, the magnitude of rCBF increase for leg primary motor areas was significantly greater for both active cycling and passive cycling combined with electrical stimulation compared with passive cycling...... alone. 5. These findings provide the first evidence of insular activation during dynamic exercise in humans, suggesting that the left insular cortex may serve as a site for cortical regulation of cardiac autonomic (parasympathetic) activity. Additionally, findings during passive cycling with electrical...

  14. Calculation and structural analysis for the rigidity of air spindle in the single point diamond turning lathe

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Chenhui; Xu, Qiao; Zhang, Feihu; Zhang, Jianfeng

    2007-12-01

    Ultra-precision machining for optical lens is a key subject in the field of modern optics machining, the focus of which is the higher demands for profile precision and surface roughness. As a kind of deterministic machining, the single point diamond turning lathe is widely used in the optical field, thus higher stabilization for the turning lathe is required with small amplitude of vibrations in a broad frequency-domain. The single point diamond turning lathe now boast its various forms both at home and abroad, and the vertical flying cutting milling style is an important branch. This kind of lathe is characterized with low guide rail velocity and main errors of this part are the alignment error of guide rail, the disturbance evolved by driving components, and the low velocity crawl. Such errors are presented as low-frequency profile error on the workpiece surface, and often relate to the guide rail velocity. The rotate speed of the spindle is higher comparatively, and the system is composed as a vibration element with mass, air-rigidity, air-damping and the periodicity impact vibration. As a result, this vibration can copy to the work piece by the tool nose in machining process, so we must manage to reduce the vibration for high machining precision. This paper is to deduce the proper dynamic parameter for reducing the spindle vibration and optimize the spindle structure via dynamic calculation for the diamond turning lathes used and bring forward the reformative idea for the lathes.

  15. Tourist activated networks: Implications for dynamic packaging systems in tourism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zach, Florian; Fesenmaier, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses tourist activated networks as a concept to inform technological applications supporting dynamic bundling and en-route recommendations. Empirical data was collected from travellers who visited a regional destination in the US and then analyzed with respect to its network...... structure. The results indicate that the tourist activated network for the destination is rather sparse and that there are clearly differences in core and peripheral nodes. The findings illustrate the structure of a tourist activated network and provide implications for technology design and tourism...

  16. Nonlinear dynamic interrelationships between real activity and stock returns

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lanne, Markku; Nyberg, Henri

    We explore the differences between the causal and noncausal vector autoregressive (VAR) models in capturing the real activity-stock return-relationship. Unlike the conventional linear VAR model, the noncausal VAR model is capable of accommodating various nonlinear characteristics of the data....... In quarterly U.S. data, we find strong evidence in favor of noncausality, and the best causal and noncausal VAR models imply quite different dynamics. In particular, the linear VAR model appears to underestimate the importance of the stock return shock for the real activity, and the real activity shock...

  17. Involvement of Spindles in Memory Consolidation Is Slow Wave Sleep-Specific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Roy; Hofman, Winni F.; Talamini, Lucia M.

    2012-01-01

    Both sleep spindles and slow oscillations have been implicated in sleep-dependent memory consolidation. Whereas spindles occur during both light and deep sleep, slow oscillations are restricted to deep sleep, raising the possibility of greater consolidation-related spindle involvement during deep sleep. We assessed declarative memory retention…

  18. Development of a Spindle Thermal Error Characterization and Compensation Sensor System for Machining Center Accuracy Enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    vertical spindle CNC machining center, "* a Sundstrand series 20 Omnimill horizontal spindle CNC machining center, * a Producto A-1738 vertical spindle CNC...hardware and software developed during this program have been successfully commercialized by API. Currently API is marketing this system under the trade name

  19. Nonequilibrium dynamics of active matter with correlated noise: A dynamical renormalization group study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kachan, Devin; Levine, Alex; Bruinsma, Robijn

    2014-03-01

    Biology is rife with examples of active materials - soft matter systems driven into nonequilibrium steady states by energy input at the micro scale. For example, solutions of active micron scale swimmers produce active fluids showing phenomena reminiscent of turbulent convection at low Reynolds number; cytoskeletal networks driven by endogenous molecular motors produce active solids whose mechanics and low frequency strain fluctuations depend sensitively on motor activity. One hallmark of these systems is that they are driven at the micro scale by temporally correlated forces. In this talk, we study how correlated noise at the micro scale leads to novel long wavelength and long time scale dynamics at the macro scale in a simple model system. Specifically, we study the fluctuations of a ϕ4 scalar field obeying model A dynamics and driven by noise with a finite correlation time τ. We show that the effective dynamical system at long length and time scales is driven by white noise with a renormalized amplitude and renormalized transport coefficients. We discuss the implications of this result for a broad class of active matter systems driven at the micro scale by colored noise.

  20. Spatial factors and muscle spindle input influence the generation of neuromuscular responses to stimulation of the human foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layne, Charles S.; Forth, Katharine E.; Abercromby, Andrew F. J.

    2005-05-01

    Removal of the mechanical pressure gradient on the soles leads to physiological adaptations that ultimately result in neuromotor degradation during spaceflight. We propose that mechanical stimulation of the soles serves to partially restore the afference associated with bipedal loading and assists in attenuating the negative neuromotor consequences of spaceflight. A dynamic foot stimulus device was used to stimulate the soles in a variety of conditions with different stimulation locations, stimulation patterns and muscle spindle input. Surface electromyography revealed the lateral side of the sole elicited the greatest neuromuscular response in ankle musculature, followed by the medial side, then the heel. These responses were modified by preceding stimulation. Neuromuscular responses were also influenced by the level of muscle spindle input. These results provide important information that can be used to guide the development of a "passive" countermeasure that relies on sole stimulation and can supplement existing exercise protocols during spaceflight.

  1. An anillin-Ect2 complex stabilizes central spindle microtubules at the cortex during cytokinesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Frenette

    Full Text Available Cytokinesis occurs due to the RhoA-dependent ingression of an actomyosin ring. During anaphase, the Rho GEF (guanine nucleotide exchange factor Ect2 is recruited to the central spindle via its interaction with MgcRacGAP/Cyk-4, and activates RhoA in the central plane of the cell. Ect2 also localizes to the cortex, where it has access to RhoA. The N-terminus of Ect2 binds to Cyk-4, and the C-terminus contains conserved DH (Dbl homologous and PH (Pleckstrin Homology domains with GEF activity. The PH domain is required for Ect2's cortical localization, but its molecular function is not known. In cultured human cells, we found that the PH domain interacts with anillin, a contractile ring protein that scaffolds actin and myosin and interacts with RhoA. The anillin-Ect2 interaction may require Ect2's association with lipids, since a novel mutation in the PH domain, which disrupts phospholipid association, weakens their interaction. An anillin-RacGAP50C (homologue of Cyk-4 complex was previously described in Drosophila, which may crosslink the central spindle to the cortex to stabilize the position of the contractile ring. Our data supports an analogous function for the anillin-Ect2 complex in human cells and one hypothesis is that this complex has functionally replaced the Drosophila anillin-RacGAP50C complex. Complexes between central spindle proteins and cortical proteins could regulate the position of the contractile ring by stabilizing microtubule-cortical interactions at the division plane to ensure the generation of active RhoA in a discrete zone.

  2. Emulated muscle spindle and spiking afferents validates VLSI neuromorphic hardware as a testbed for sensorimotor function and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Chuanxin M; Nandyala, Sirish K; Sanger, Terence D

    2014-01-01

    The lack of multi-scale empirical measurements (e.g., recording simultaneously from neurons, muscles, whole body, etc.) complicates understanding of sensorimotor function in humans. This is particularly true for the understanding of development during childhood, which requires evaluation of measurements over many years. We have developed a synthetic platform for emulating multi-scale activity of the vertebrate sensorimotor system. Our design benefits from Very Large Scale Integrated-circuit (VLSI) technology to provide considerable scalability and high-speed, as much as 365× faster than real-time. An essential component of our design is the proprioceptive sensor, or muscle spindle. Here we demonstrate an accurate and extremely fast emulation of a muscle spindle and its spiking afferents, which are computationally expensive but fundamental for reflex functions. We implemented a well-known rate-based model of the spindle (Mileusnic et al., 2006) and a simplified spiking sensory neuron model using the Izhikevich approximation to the Hodgkin-Huxley model. The resulting behavior of our afferent sensory system is qualitatively compatible with classic cat soleus recording (Crowe and Matthews, 1964b; Matthews, 1964, 1972). Our results suggest that this simplified structure of the spindle and afferent neuron is sufficient to produce physiologically-realistic behavior. The VLSI technology allows us to accelerate this behavior beyond 365× real-time. Our goal is to use this testbed for predicting years of disease progression with only a few days of emulation. This is the first hardware emulation of the spindle afferent system, and it may have application not only for emulation of human health and disease, but also for the construction of compliant neuromorphic robotic systems.

  3. Characterizing and modeling the dynamics of activity and popularity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    Full Text Available Social media, regarded as two-layer networks consisting of users and items, turn out to be the most important channels for access to massive information in the era of Web 2.0. The dynamics of human activity and item popularity is a crucial issue in social media networks. In this paper, by analyzing the growth of user activity and item popularity in four empirical social media networks, i.e., Amazon, Flickr, Delicious and Wikipedia, it is found that cross links between users and items are more likely to be created by active users and to be acquired by popular items, where user activity and item popularity are measured by the number of cross links associated with users and items. This indicates that users generally trace popular items, overall. However, it is found that the inactive users more severely trace popular items than the active users. Inspired by empirical analysis, we propose an evolving model for such networks, in which the evolution is driven only by two-step random walk. Numerical experiments verified that the model can qualitatively reproduce the distributions of user activity and item popularity observed in empirical networks. These results might shed light on the understandings of micro dynamics of activity and popularity in social media networks.

  4. Characterizing and Modeling the Dynamics of Activity and Popularity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peng; Li, Menghui; Gao, Liang; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru

    2014-01-01

    Social media, regarded as two-layer networks consisting of users and items, turn out to be the most important channels for access to massive information in the era of Web 2.0. The dynamics of human activity and item popularity is a crucial issue in social media networks. In this paper, by analyzing the growth of user activity and item popularity in four empirical social media networks, i.e., Amazon, Flickr, Delicious and Wikipedia, it is found that cross links between users and items are more likely to be created by active users and to be acquired by popular items, where user activity and item popularity are measured by the number of cross links associated with users and items. This indicates that users generally trace popular items, overall. However, it is found that the inactive users more severely trace popular items than the active users. Inspired by empirical analysis, we propose an evolving model for such networks, in which the evolution is driven only by two-step random walk. Numerical experiments verified that the model can qualitatively reproduce the distributions of user activity and item popularity observed in empirical networks. These results might shed light on the understandings of micro dynamics of activity and popularity in social media networks. PMID:24586586

  5. Characteristics of high-voltage electroencephalogram spindles and facial muscular activities in haioperidol-induced catalepsy rats%氟哌啶醇致僵直大鼠皮质高电压纺锤波节律及面部肌电特征

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨晨; 陈磊; 葛顺楠; 付建; 朱俊玲; 高国栋

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究氟哌啶醇对成年大鼠在自由活动状态下大脑皮质高电压纺锤波( high-voltage spindles,HVSs)及相应面部肌电活动的影响.方法 通过在体多通道电生理记录技术结合视频录像,对可自由活动的大鼠进行皮质脑电和面部肌电长程记录,观察氟哌啶醇致僵直大鼠皮质HVSs节律数量及相应面部活动及肌电的变化.结果 在清醒静止状态下,正常大鼠自发出现HVSs节律,面部可见触须震颤,经腹腔注射氟哌啶醇1.0mg/kg和3.0 mg/kg后,大鼠呈现僵直状态,HVSs节律数量增加,面部抽搐活动增多,波及范围扩大,强度增加,肌电显示节律性活动增多、持续时间延长.结论 氟哌啶醇作为多巴胺D2受体拮抗剂可增强HVSs节律及面部抽搐,提示多巴胺D2受体参与HVSs节律的调节.%Objective To study the effects of haloperidol on neocortical high-voltage spindles (HVSs) and accompanied facial muscular activities in freely moving adult rats. Methods Continuous video, neocortical electroencephalogram (EEG) and facial electromyography (EMG) were recorded simultaneously for more than six hours in freely moving rats. The number of HVSs and the facial muscular activities were analyzed after administration of saline or haloperidol. Results Spontaneous HVSs and whisker twitching were observed in normal rats during behavioral waking-immobility. In the haloperidol-induced catalepsy rats (intraperitoneal injection of 1.0 mg/kg and 3.0 mg/kg haloperidol, respectively), the number of HVSs and companied facial rhythmic muscular activities increased; tremor intensity was enhanced in eyes, ears and even in the dorsal of neck without gross body movement, the duration of rhythmic muscular activities was prolonged. Conclusions Haloperidol, the dopamine D2 receptors antagonist, could enhance HVSs and facial twitching, indicating that dopamine D2 receptors maybe contribute to the regulation of the HVSs, and the abnormal HVSs may be the

  6. An active vision system for multitarget surveillance in dynamic environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtari, Ardevan; Benhabib, Beno

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents a novel agent-based method for the dynamic coordinated selection and positioning of active-vision cameras for the simultaneous surveillance of multiple objects-of-interest as they travel through a cluttered environment with a-priori unknown trajectories. The proposed system dynamically adjusts not only the orientation but also the position of the cameras in order to maximize the system's performance by avoiding occlusions and acquiring images with preferred viewing angles. Sensor selection and positioning are accomplished through an agent-based approach. The proposed sensing-system reconfiguration strategy has been verified via simulations and implemented on an experimental prototype setup for automated facial recognition. Both simulations and experimental analyses have shown that the use of dynamic sensors along with an effective online dispatching strategy may tangibly improve the surveillance performance of a sensing system.

  7. Experimental study on bearing preload optimum of machine tool spindle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Tao; Xu, Guanghua; Zhang, Qin; Hua, Cheng; Zhang, Hu; Jiang, Kuosheng

    2012-05-01

    An experimental study is conducted to investigate the possibility and the effect of temperature rise and vibration level of bearing by adjusting axial preloads and radial loads in spindle bearing test rig. The shaft of the test rig is driven by a motorized high speed spindle at the range of 0~20000 rpm. The axial preloads and radial loads on bearings are controlled by using hydraulic pressure which can be adjusted automatically. Temperature rise and radial vibration of test bearings are measured by thermocouples and Polytec portable laser vibrometer PDV100. Experiment shows that the temperature rise of bearings is nonlinear varying with the increase of radial loads, but temperature rise almost increases linearly with the increase of axial preload and rotating speed. In this paper, an alternate axial preload is used for bearings. When the rotating speed passes through the critical speed of the shaft, axial preload of bearings will have a remarkable effect. The low preload could reduce bearing vibration and temperature rise for bearings as well. At the others speed, the high preload could improve the vibration performance of high speed spindle and the bearing temperature was lower than that of the constant pressure preload spindle.

  8. Sleep spindle alterations in patients with Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Julie Anja Engelhard; Nikolic, Miki; Warby, Simon C.;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify changes of sleep spindles (SS) in the EEG of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Five sleep experts manually identified SS at a central scalp location (C3-A2) in 15 PD and 15 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Each SS was given a confidence score...

  9. Sleep spindle alterations in patients with Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Julie Anja Engelhard; Nikolic, Miki; Warby, Simon C.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify changes of sleep spindles (SS) in the EEG of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Five sleep experts manually identified SS at a central scalp location (C3-A2) in 15 PD and 15 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Each SS was given a confidence score...

  10. A direct role of Mad1 in the spindle assembly checkpoint beyond Mad2 kinetochore recruitment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruse, Thomas; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo; Sedgwick, Garry G;

    2014-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures accurate chromosome segregation by delaying entry into anaphase until all sister chromatids have become bi-oriented. A key component of the SAC is the Mad2 protein, which can adopt either an inactive open (O-Mad2) or active closed (C-Mad2) conformation...... in the SAC beyond recruitment of C-Mad2 to kinetochores has not yet been addressed. Here, we show that Mad1 is required for mitotic arrest even when C-Mad2 is artificially recruited to kinetochores, indicating that it has indeed an additional function in promoting the checkpoint. The C-terminal globular...

  11. Crosstalk between circadian rhythmicity, mitochondrial dynamics and macrophage bactericidal activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva-Ramírez, Jacqueline; Moreno-Altamirano, María Maximina B; Pineda-Olvera, Benjamín; Cauich-Sánchez, Patricia; Sánchez-García, F Javier

    2014-01-01

    Biological functions show rhythmic fluctuations with 24-hr periodicity regulated by circadian proteins encoded by the so-called ‘clock’ genes. The absence or deregulation of circadian proteins in mice leads to metabolic disorders and in vitro models have shown that the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages follows a circadian rhythm so showing a link between circadian rhythmicity, metabolism and immunity. Recent evidence reveals that mitochondrial shape, position and size, collectively referred to as mitochondrial dynamics, are related to both cell metabolism and immune function. However, studies addressing the simultaneous crosstalk between circadian rhythm, mitochondrial dynamics and cell immune function are scarce. Here, by using an in vitro model of synchronized murine peritoneal macrophages, we present evidence that the mitochondrial dynamics and the mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) follow a circadian rhythmic pattern. In addition, it is shown that the fusion of mitochondria along with high Δψm, indicative of high mitochondrial activity, precede the highest phagocytic and bactericidal activity of macrophages on Salmonella typhimurium. Taken together, our results suggest a timely coordination between circadian rhythmicity, mitochondrial dynamics, and the bactericidal capacity of macrophages. PMID:24903615

  12. Trypsinogen activation as observed in accelerated molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boechi, Leonardo; Pierce, Levi; Komives, Elizabeth A; McCammon, J Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Serine proteases are involved in many fundamental physiological processes, and control of their activity mainly results from the fact that they are synthetized in an inactive form that becomes active upon cleavage. Three decades ago Martin Karplus's group performed the first molecular dynamics simulations of trypsin, the most studied member of the serine protease family, to address the transition from the zymogen to its active form. Based on the computational power available at the time, only high frequency fluctuations, but not the transition steps, could be observed. By performing accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) simulations, an interesting approach that increases the configurational sampling of atomistic simulations, we were able to observe the N-terminal tail insertion, a crucial step of the transition mechanism. Our results also support the hypothesis that the hydrophobic effect is the main force guiding the insertion step, although substantial enthalpic contributions are important in the activation mechanism. As the N-terminal tail insertion is a conserved step in the activation of serine proteases, these results afford new perspective on the underlying thermodynamics of the transition from the zymogen to the active enzyme.

  13. A "Kane's Dynamics" Model for the Active Rack Isolation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, R. D.; Beech, G. S.; Rao, N. N. S.; Rupert, J. K.; Kim, Y. K.

    2001-01-01

    Many microgravity space science experiments require vibratory acceleration levels unachievable without active isolation. The Boeing Corporation's Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS) employs a novel combination of magnetic actuation and mechanical linkages to address these isolation requirements on the International Space Station (ISS). ARIS provides isolation at the rack (International Standard Payload Rack (ISPR)) level. Effective model-based vibration isolation requires: (1) an appropriate isolation device, (2) an adequate dynamic (i.e., mathematical) model of that isolator, and (3) a suitable, corresponding controller. ARIS provides the ISS response to the first requirement. This paper presents one response to the second, in a state space framework intended to facilitate an optimal-controls approach to the third. The authors use "Kane's Dynamics" to develop a state-space, analytical (algebraic) set of linearized equations of motion for ARIS.

  14. A "Kanes's Dynamics" Model for the Active Rack Isolation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, R. David; Beech, Geoffrey

    1999-01-01

    Many microgravity space-science experiments require vibratory acceleration levels unachievable without active isolation. The Boeing Corporation's Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS) employs a novel combination of magnetic actuation and mechanical linkages, to address these isolation requirements on the International Space Station (ISS). ARIS provides isolation at the rack (international Standard Payload Rack, or ISPR) level. Effective model-based vibration isolation requires (1) an appropriate isolation device, (2) an adequate dynamic (i.e., mathematical) model of that isolator, and (3) a suitable, corresponding controller. ARIS provides the ISS response to the first requirement. This paper presents one response to the second, in a state-space framework intended to facilitate an optimal-controls approach to the third. The authors use "Kane's Dynamics" to develop an state-space, analytical (algebraic) set of linearized equations of motion for ARIS.

  15. Dynamic active constraints for hyper-redundant flexible robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwok, Ka-Wai; Mylonas, George P; Sun, Loi Wah; Lerotic, Mirna; Clark, James; Athanasiou, Thanos; Darzi, Ara; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2009-01-01

    In robot-assisted procedures, the surgeon's ability can be enhanced by navigation guidance through the use of virtual fixtures or active constraints. This paper presents a real-time modeling scheme for dynamic active constraints with fast and simple mesh adaptation under cardiac deformation and changes in anatomic structure. A smooth tubular pathway is constructed which provides assistance for a flexible hyper-redundant robot to circumnavigate the heart with the aim of undertaking bilateral pulmonary vein isolation as part of a modified maze procedure for the treatment of debilitating arrhythmia and atrial fibrillation. In contrast to existing approaches, the method incorporates detailed geometrical constraints with explicit manipulation margins of the forbidden region for an entire articulated surgical instrument, rather than just the end-effector itself. Detailed experimental validation is conducted to demonstrate the speed and accuracy of the instrument navigation with and without the use of the proposed dynamic constraints.

  16. Persistent activity in neural networks with dynamic synapses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omri Barak

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Persistent activity states (attractors, observed in several neocortical areas after the removal of a sensory stimulus, are believed to be the neuronal basis of working memory. One of the possible mechanisms that can underlie persistent activity is recurrent excitation mediated by intracortical synaptic connections. A recent experimental study revealed that connections between pyramidal cells in prefrontal cortex exhibit various degrees of synaptic depression and facilitation. Here we analyze the effect of synaptic dynamics on the emergence and persistence of attractor states in interconnected neural networks. We show that different combinations of synaptic depression and facilitation result in qualitatively different network dynamics with respect to the emergence of the attractor states. This analysis raises the possibility that the framework of attractor neural networks can be extended to represent time-dependent stimuli.

  17. bir1 deletion causes malfunction of the spindle assembly checkpoint and apoptosis in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun eRen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Cell division in yeast is a highly regulated and well studied event. Various checkpoints are placed throughout the cell cycle to ensure faithful segregation of sister chromatids. Unexpected events, such as DNA damage or oxidative stress, cause the activation of checkpoint(s and cell cycle arrest. Malfunction of the checkpoints may induce cell death. We previously showed that under oxidative stress, the budding yeast cohesin Mcd1, a homolog of human Rad21, was cleaved by the caspase-like protease Esp1. The cleaved Mcd1 C-terminal fragment was then translocated to mitochondria, causing apoptotic cell death. In the present study, we demonstrated that Bir1 plays an important role in spindle assembly checkpoint and cell death. Similar to H2O2 treatment, deletion of BIR1 using a BIR1-degron strain caused degradation of the securin Pds1, which binds and inactivates Esp1 until metaphase-anaphase transition in a normal cell cycle. BIR1 deletion caused an increase level of ROS and mis-location of Bub1, a major protein for spindle assembly checkpoint. In wild type, Bub1 was located at the kinetochores, but was primarily in the cytoplasm in bir1 deletion strain. When BIR1 was deleted, addition of nocodazole was unable to retain the Bub1 localization on kietochores, further suggesting that Bir1 is required to activate and maintain the spindle assembly checkpoint. Our study suggests that the BIR1 function in cell cycle regulation works in concert with its anti-apoptosis function.

  18. Dynamics of muscle activation during tonic-clonic seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conradsen, Isa; Moldovan, Mihai; Jennum, Poul; Wolf, Peter; Farina, Dario; Beniczky, Sándor

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of our study was to elucidate the dynamics of muscle activation during generalised tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS). We recorded surface electromyography (EMG) from the deltoid muscle during 26 GTCS from 13 patients and compared it with GTCS-like events acted by 10 control subjects. GTCS consisted of a sequence of phases best described quantitatively by dynamics of the low frequency (LF) wavelet component (2-8Hz). Contrary to the traditional view, the tonic phase started with a gradual increase in muscle activity. A longer clonic phase was associated with a shorter onset of the tonic phase and a higher seizure occurrence. Increase in LF occurred during the onset phase and during the transition from the tonic to the clonic phase, corresponding to the vibratory movements. The clonic phase consisted of EMG discharges of remarkably constant duration (0.2s) separated by silent periods (SP) of exponentially increasing duration - features that could not be reproduced voluntarily. The last SP was longer in seizures with higher EMG peak frequency whereas the energy of the last clonus was higher in seizures with a short clonic phase. We found specific features of muscle activation dynamics during GTCS. Our findings suggest that the same inhibitory mechanisms that contribute to GTCS termination counteract seizure initiation, accounting for the gradual onset. Both active inhibition and mechanisms related to metabolic depletion act synergistically to stop the seizure. Analysis of the ictal EMG dynamics is a valuable tool for monitoring the balance between pro-convulsive and anti-convulsive factors. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Dynamics of muscle activation during tonic-clonic seizures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conradsen, Isa; Moldovan, Mihai; Jennum, Poul

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to elucidate the dynamics of muscle activation during generalised tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS). We recorded surface electromyography (EMG) from the deltoid muscle during 26 GTCS from 13 patients and compared it with GTCS-like events acted by 10 control subjects. GTCS ...... is a valuable tool for monitoring the balance between pro-convulsive and anti-convulsive factors....

  20. The Maize Divergent spindle-1 (dv1) Gene Encodes a Kinesin-14A Motor Protein Required for Meiotic Spindle Pole Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, David M; Nannas, Natalie J; Dawe, R Kelly

    2016-01-01

    The classic maize mutant divergent spindle-1 (dv1) causes failures in meiotic spindle assembly and a decrease in pollen viability. By analyzing two independent dv1 alleles we demonstrate that this phenotype is caused by mutations in a member of the kinesin-14A subfamily, a class of C-terminal, minus-end directed microtubule motors. Further analysis demonstrates that defects in early spindle assembly are rare, but that later stages of spindle organization promoting the formation of finely focused spindle poles are strongly dependent on Dv1. Anaphase is error-prone in dv1 lines but not severely so, and the majority of cells show normal chromosome segregation. Live-cell imaging of wild type and mutant plants carrying CFP-tagged β-tubulin confirm that meiosis in dv1 lines fails primarily at the pole-sharpening phase of spindle assembly. These data indicate that plant kinesin-14A proteins help to enforce bipolarity by focusing spindle poles and that this stage of spindle assembly is not required for transition through the spindle checkpoint but improves the accuracy of chromosome segregation.

  1. The maize Divergent spindle-1 (dv1 gene encodes a kinesin-14A motor protein required for meiotic spindle pole organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Higgins

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The classic maize mutant divergent spindle-1 (dv1 causes failures in meiotic spindle assembly and a decrease in pollen viability. By analyzing two independent dv1 alleles we demonstrate that this phenotype is caused by mutations in a member of the kinesin-14A subfamily, a class of C-terminal, minus-end directed microtubule motors. Further analysis demonstrates that defects in early spindle assembly are rare, but that later stages of spindle organization promoting the formation of finely focused spindle poles are strongly dependent on Dv1. Anaphase is error-prone in dv1 lines but not severely so, and the majority of cells show normal chromosome segregation. Live-cell imaging of wild type and mutant plants carrying CFP-tagged β-tubulin confirm that meiosis in dv1 lines fails primarily at the pole-sharpening phase of spindle assembly. These data indicate that plant kinesin-14A proteins help to enforce bipolarity by focusing spindle poles and that this stage of spindle assembly is not required for transition through the spindle checkpoint but improves the accuracy of chromosome segregation.

  2. Global segregation of cortical activity and metastable dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratton, Peter; Wiles, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Cortical activity exhibits persistent metastable dynamics. Assemblies of neurons transiently couple (integrate) and decouple (segregate) at multiple spatiotemporal scales; both integration and segregation are required to support metastability. Integration of distant brain regions can be achieved through long range excitatory projections, but the mechanism supporting long range segregation is not clear. We argue that the thalamocortical matrix connections, which project diffusely from the thalamus to the cortex and have long been thought to support cortical gain control, play an equally-important role in cortical segregation. We present a computational model of the diffuse thalamocortical loop, called the competitive cross-coupling (CXC) spiking network. Simulations of the model show how different levels of tonic input from the brainstem to the thalamus could control dynamical complexity in the cortex, directing transitions between sleep, wakefulness and high attention or vigilance. The model also explains how mutually-exclusive activity could arise across large portions of the cortex, such as between the default-mode and task-positive networks. It is robust to noise but does not require noise to autonomously generate metastability. We conclude that the long range segregation observed in brain activity and required for global metastable dynamics could be provided by the thalamocortical matrix, and is strongly modulated by brainstem input to the thalamus.

  3. Global segregation of cortical activity and metastable dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter eStratton

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cortical activity exhibits persistent metastable dynamics. Assemblies of neurons transiently couple (integrate and decouple (segregate at multiple spatiotemporal scales; both integration and segregation are required to support metastability. Integration of distant brain regions can be achieved through long range excitatory projections, but the mechanism supporting long range segregation is not clear. We argue that the thalamocortical matrix connections, which project diffusely from the thalamus to the cortex and have long been thought to support cortical gain control, play an equally-important role in cortical segregation. We present a computational model of the diffuse thalamocortical loop, called the competitive cross-coupling (CXC spiking network. Simulations of the model show how different levels of tonic input from the brainstem to the thalamus could control dynamical complexity in the cortex, directing transitions between sleep, wakefulness and high attention or vigilance. The model also explains how mutually-exclusive activity could arise across large portions of the cortex, such as between the default-mode and task-positive networks. It is robust to noise but does not require noise to autonomously generate metastability. We conclude that the long range segregation observed in brain activity and required for global metastable dynamics could be provided by the thalamocortical matrix, and is strongly modulated by brainstem input to the thalamus.

  4. Recent insights into spindle function in mammalian oocytes and early embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Katie; FitzHarris, Greg

    2013-09-01

    Errors in chromosome segregation in oocytes and early embryos lead to embryo aneuploidy, which contributes to early pregnancy loss. At the heart of chromosome segregation is the spindle, a dynamic biomechanical machine fashioned from microtubules, which is tasked with gathering and sorting chromosomes and dispatching them to the daughter cells at the time of cell division. Understanding the causes of segregation error in the oocyte and early embryo will undoubtedly hinge on a thorough understanding of the mechanism of spindle assembly and function in these highly specialized cellular environments. The recent advent of live imaging approaches to observe chromosome segregation in real-time in oocytes and embryos, paired with gene-silencing techniques and specific inhibition for assessing the function of a protein of interest, has led to a substantial advance in our understanding of chromosome segregation in early mammalian development. These studies have uncovered numerous mechanistic differences between oocytes, embryos, and traditional model systems. In addition, a flurry of recent studies using naturally aged mice as the model for human aging have begun to shed light on the increased levels of aneuploidy seen in embryos from older mothers. Here we review these recent developments and consider what has been learned about the causes of chromosome missegregation in early development.

  5. CPAP Treatment Partly Normalizes Sleep Spindle Features in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunamäki, Tiia; Huupponen, Eero; Loponen, Juho

    2017-01-01

    Objective. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) decreases sleep spindle density and frequency. We evaluated the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on different features of sleep spindles. Methods. Twenty OSA patients underwent two night polysomnographies in a diagnostic phase and one night polysomnography after 6 months of CPAP treatment. The control group comprised 20 healthy controls. Sleep spindles were analyzed by a previously developed automated method. Unilateral and bilateral spindles were identified in central and frontopolar brain locations. Spindle density and frequency were determined for the first and last half of the NREM time. Results. The density of bilateral central spindles, which did not change in the untreated OSA patients, increased towards the morning hours during CPAP treatment and in the controls. Central spindles did not become faster with sleep in OSA patients and the central spindles remained slow in the left hemisphere even with CPAP. Conclusion. CPAP treatment normalized spindle features only partially. The changes may be associated with deficits in thalamocortical spindle generating loops. Significance. This study shows that some sleep spindle changes persist after CPAP treatment in OSA patients. The association of these changes to daytime symptoms in OSA patients needs to be further evaluated. PMID:28261503

  6. Fission yeast cells undergo nuclear division in the absence of spindle microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Castagnetti

    Full Text Available Mitosis in eukaryotic cells employs spindle microtubules to drive accurate chromosome segregation at cell division. Cells lacking spindle microtubules arrest in mitosis due to a spindle checkpoint that delays mitotic progression until all chromosomes have achieved stable bipolar attachment to spindle microtubules. In fission yeast, mitosis occurs within an intact nuclear membrane with the mitotic spindle elongating between the spindle pole bodies. We show here that in fission yeast interference with mitotic spindle formation delays mitosis only briefly and cells proceed to an unusual nuclear division process we term nuclear fission, during which cells perform some chromosome segregation and efficiently enter S-phase of the next cell cycle. Nuclear fission is blocked if spindle pole body maturation or sister chromatid separation cannot take place or if actin polymerization is inhibited. We suggest that this process exhibits vestiges of a primitive nuclear division process independent of spindle microtubules, possibly reflecting an evolutionary intermediate state between bacterial and Archeal chromosome segregation where the nucleoid divides without a spindle and a microtubule spindle-based eukaryotic mitosis.

  7. Physical determinants of bipolar mitotic spindle assembly and stability in fission yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Robert; Edelmaier, Christopher; Sweezy-Schindler, Oliver; Lamson, Adam; Gergely, Zachary R.; O’Toole, Eileen; Crapo, Ammon; Hough, Loren E.; McIntosh, J. Richard; Glaser, Matthew A.; Betterton, Meredith D.

    2017-01-01

    Mitotic spindles use an elegant bipolar architecture to segregate duplicated chromosomes with high fidelity. Bipolar spindles form from a monopolar initial condition; this is the most fundamental construction problem that the spindle must solve. Microtubules, motors, and cross-linkers are important for bipolarity, but the mechanisms necessary and sufficient for spindle assembly remain unknown. We describe a physical model that exhibits de novo bipolar spindle formation. We began with physical properties of fission-yeast spindle pole body size and microtubule number, kinesin-5 motors, kinesin-14 motors, and passive cross-linkers. Our model results agree quantitatively with our experiments in fission yeast, thereby establishing a minimal system with which to interrogate collective self-assembly. By varying the features of our model, we identify a set of functions essential for the generation and stability of spindle bipolarity. When kinesin-5 motors are present, their bidirectionality is essential, but spindles can form in the presence of passive cross-linkers alone. We also identify characteristic failed states of spindle assembly—the persistent monopole, X spindle, separated asters, and short spindle, which are avoided by the creation and maintenance of antiparallel microtubule overlaps. Our model can guide the identification of new, multifaceted strategies to induce mitotic catastrophes; these would constitute novel strategies for cancer chemotherapy. PMID:28116355

  8. 基于垂直两点法的电主轴回转精度分析%Two Rotary Precision Analysis Method Based on Vertical Spindle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆峰; 沈鸿波; 张啸飞; 张丽秀; 吴玉厚; 张珂

    2014-01-01

    应用垂直两点法设计测试系统,对电主轴回转精度进行动态测量。该系统主要由标准棒、高精度非接触式电涡流传感器组成。通过建立误差分离数学模型,对垂直两点法测量电主轴回转精度进行分析,利用垂直两点法分离误差方法对实验数据进行处理,得到电主轴在不同转速下的回转精度,研究表明电主轴转速在10000 r/min以上时回转误差较小并趋于稳定,找出影响电主轴回转精度的因素并进行了归纳。对电主轴回转精度在线监测和转速控制提供了重要的理论、实验依据。%Application of vertical two-point method designed to test systems for electric spindle rotation ac-curacy dynamic measurement. The system consists of standard bars, high-precision non-contact eddy current sensor. Analyzed by a mathematical model to establish error separation, measurement of two spindle rotation accuracy. The use of two isolated error method for processing the experimental data obtained spindle rotation accuracy at different speeds. Studies have shown that when the spindle speed of 10,000 rpm rotational error is small and tends to be more stable. Identify the factors that affect the accuracy of spindle rotation and sum-marized. Spindle rotation accuracy on-line monitoring and speed control provides an important theoretical, experimental basis.

  9. A comparison of two sleep spindle detection methods based on all night averages: individually adjusted versus fixed frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Péter Przemyslaw Ujma

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sleep spindles are frequently studied for their relationship with state and trait cognitive variables, and they are thought to play an important role in sleep-related memory consolidation. Due to their frequent occurrence in NREM sleep, the detection of sleep spindles is only feasible using automatic algorithms, of which a large number is available. We compared subject averages of the spindle parameters computed by a fixed frequency (11-13 Hz for slow spindles, 13-15 Hz for fast spindles automatic detection algorithm and the individual adjustment method (IAM, which uses individual frequency bands for sleep spindle detection. Fast spindle duration and amplitude are strongly correlated in the two algorithms, but there is little overlap in fast spindle density and slow spindle parameters in general. The agreement between fixed and manually determined sleep spindle frequencies is limited, especially in case of slow spindles. This is the most likely reason for the poor agreement between the two detection methods in case of slow spindle parameters. Our results suggest that while various algorithms may reliably detect fast spindles, a more sophisticated algorithm primed to individual spindle frequencies is necessary for the detection of slow spindles as well as individual variations in the number of spindles in general.

  10. Nonlinear Dynamical Analysis on Four Semi-Active Dynamic Vibration Absorbers with Time Delay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Shen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper four semi-active dynamic vibration absorbers (DVAs are analytically studied, where the time delay induced by measurement and execution in control procedure is included in the system. The first-order approximate analytical solutions of the four semi-active DVAs are established by the averaging method, based on the illustrated phase difference of the motion parameters. The comparisons between the analytical and the numerical solutions are carried out, which verify the correctness and satisfactory precision of the approximate analytical solutions. Then the effects of the time delay on the dynamical responses are analyzed, and it is found that the stability conditions for the steady-state responses of the primary systems are all periodic functions of time delay, with the same period as the excitation one. At last the effects of time delay on control performance are discussed.

  11. Effects of postural threat on spinal stretch reflexes: evidence for increased muscle spindle sensitivity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horslen, Brian C; Murnaghan, Chantelle D; Inglis, J Timothy; Chua, Romeo; Carpenter, Mark G

    2013-08-01

    Standing balance is often threatened in everyday life. These threats typically involve scenarios in which either the likelihood or the consequence of falling is higher than normal. When cats are placed in these scenarios they respond by increasing the sensitivity of muscle spindles imbedded in the leg muscles, presumably to increase balance-relevant afferent information available to the nervous system. At present, it is unknown whether humans also respond to such postural threats by altering muscle spindle sensitivity. Here we present two studies that probed the effects of postural threat on spinal stretch reflexes. In study 1 we manipulated the threat associated with an increased consequence of a fall by having subjects stand at the edge of an elevated surface (3.2 m). In study 2 we manipulated the threat by increasing the likelihood of a fall by occasionally tilting the support surface on which subjects stood. In both scenarios we used Hoffmann (H) and tendon stretch (T) reflexes to probe the spinal stretch reflex circuit of the soleus muscle. We observed increased T-reflex amplitudes and unchanged H-reflex amplitudes in both threat scenarios. These results suggest that the synaptic state of the spinal stretch reflex is unaffected by postural threat and that therefore the muscle spindles activated in the T-reflexes must be more sensitive in the threatening conditions. We propose that this increase in sensitivity may function to satisfy the conflicting needs to restrict movement with threat, while maintaining a certain amount of sensory information related to postural control.

  12. Enhanced oxidation resistance of active nanostructures via dynamic size effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yun; Yang, Fan; Zhang, Yi; Xiao, Jianping; Yu, Liang; Liu, Qingfei; Ning, Yanxiao; Zhou, Zhiwen; Chen, Hao; Huang, Wugen; Liu, Ping; Bao, Xinhe

    2017-01-01

    A major challenge limiting the practical applications of nanomaterials is that the activities of nanostructures (NSs) increase with reduced size, often sacrificing their stability in the chemical environment. Under oxidative conditions, NSs with smaller sizes and higher defect densities are commonly expected to oxidize more easily, since high-concentration defects can facilitate oxidation by enhancing the reactivity with O2 and providing a fast channel for oxygen incorporation. Here, using FeO NSs as an example, we show to the contrary, that reducing the size of active NSs can drastically increase their oxidation resistance. A maximum oxidation resistance is found for FeO NSs with dimensions below 3.2 nm. Rather than being determined by the structure or electronic properties of active sites, the enhanced oxidation resistance originates from the size-dependent structural dynamics of FeO NSs in O2. We find this dynamic size effect to govern the chemical properties of active NSs. PMID:28223687

  13. The tyrosine phosphatase PRL-1 localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum and the mitotic spindle and is required for normal mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Kirby, Celeste E; Herbst, Ronald

    2002-11-29

    PRL-1 is one of three closely related protein-tyrosine phosphatases, which are characterized by C-terminal farnesylation. Recent reports suggest that they are involved in the regulation of cell proliferation and transformation. However, their biological function has not yet been determined. Here we show that PRL-1 mRNA is overexpressed in a number of human tumor cell lines, including HeLa cells. Using immunofluorescence we studied the subcellular localization of endogenous PRL-1, and our results demonstrate that PRL-1 exhibits cell cycle-dependent localization; in non-mitotic HeLa cells, PRL-1 is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum in a farnesylation-dependent manner. In mitotic cells PRL-1 relocalizes to the centrosomes and the spindle apparatus, proximal to the centrosomes, in a farnesylation-independent manner. Conditional expression of a catalytic domain mutant in HeLa cells results in a delay in the progression of cells through mitosis but has no effect on other phases of the cell cycle. Further, expression of a farnesylation site PRL-1 mutant results in mitotic defects, characterized by chromosomal bridges in anaphase and lagging chromosomes, without affecting spindle checkpoint function. Together, these results suggest that PRL-1 function is regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner and implicate PRL-1 in regulating progression through mitosis, possibly by modulating spindle dynamics.

  14. Multi-dimensional dynamics of human electromagnetic brain activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tetsuo eKida

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetoencephalography (MEG and electroencephalography (EEG are invaluable neuroscientific tools for unveiling human neural dynamics in three dimensions (space, time, and frequency, which are associated with a wide variety of perceptions, cognition, and actions. MEG/EEG also provides different categories of neuronal indices including activity magnitude, connectivity, and network properties along the three dimensions. In the last 20 years, interest has increased in inter-regional connectivity and complex network properties assessed by various sophisticated scientific analyses. We herein review the definition, computation, short history, and pros and cons of connectivity and complex network (graph-theory analyses applied to MEG/EEG signals. We briefly describe recent developments in source reconstruction algorithms essential for source-space connectivity and network analyses. Furthermore, we discuss a relatively novel approach used in MEG/EEG studies to examine the complex dynamics represented by human brain activity. The correct and effective use of these neuronal metrics provides a new insight into the multi-dimensional dynamics of the neural representations of various functions in the complex human brain.

  15. Multi-Dimensional Dynamics of Human Electromagnetic Brain Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kida, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Emi; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2015-01-01

    Magnetoencephalography (MEG) and electroencephalography (EEG) are invaluable neuroscientific tools for unveiling human neural dynamics in three dimensions (space, time, and frequency), which are associated with a wide variety of perceptions, cognition, and actions. MEG/EEG also provides different categories of neuronal indices including activity magnitude, connectivity, and network properties along the three dimensions. In the last 20 years, interest has increased in inter-regional connectivity and complex network properties assessed by various sophisticated scientific analyses. We herein review the definition, computation, short history, and pros and cons of connectivity and complex network (graph-theory) analyses applied to MEG/EEG signals. We briefly describe recent developments in source reconstruction algorithms essential for source-space connectivity and network analyses. Furthermore, we discuss a relatively novel approach used in MEG/EEG studies to examine the complex dynamics represented by human brain activity. The correct and effective use of these neuronal metrics provides a new insight into the multi-dimensional dynamics of the neural representations of various functions in the complex human brain.

  16. Dynamics of Users Activity on Web-Blogs

    CERN Document Server

    Koziol, Zbigniew

    2014-01-01

    Activity of users on Internet discussion forums is analyzed. The rank of users is shown to be approximated better by stretched-exponential function than by Zipfs law. Cumulative distribution function is found as an excellent tool in analysis of the dynamics of the collective social phenomena. We are able to approximate the number of blog comments with time by simple functions that resemble Fermi-Dirac distribution function: probability of posting a comment is given by $P(t)=P_0(t) / (1+P_0(t)$, where $P_0(t)=exp(a \\cdot log(t/t_0))$. It is argued that dynamics of blog entries by a specific user ought to be related to personality of each user.

  17. Stochastic dynamics of active swimmers in linear flows

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval, Mario; Subramanian, Ganesh; Lauga, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Most classical work on the hydrodynamics of low-Reynolds-number swimming addresses deterministic locomotion in quiescent environments. Thermal fluctuations in fluids are known to lead to a Brownian loss of the swimming direction. As most cells or synthetic swimmers are immersed in external flows, we consider theoretically in this paper the stochastic dynamics of a model active particle (a self-propelled sphere) in a steady general linear flow. The stochasticity arises both from translational diffusion in physical space, and from a combination of rotary diffusion and run-and-tumble dynamics in orientation space. We begin by deriving a general formulation for all components of the long-time mean square displacement tensor for a swimmer with a time-dependent swimming velocity and whose orientation decorrelates due to rotary diffusion alone. This general framework is applied to obtain the convectively enhanced mean-squared displacements of a steadily-swimming particle in three canonical linear flows (extension, s...

  18. The dynamic range of response set activation during action sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behmer, Lawrence P; Crump, Matthew J C

    2017-03-01

    We show that theories of response scheduling for sequential action can be discriminated on the basis of their predictions for the dynamic range of response set activation during sequencing, which refers to the momentary span of activation states for completed and to-be-completed actions in a response set. In particular, theories allow that future actions in a plan are partially activated, but differ with respect to the width of the range, which refers to the number of future actions that are partially activated. Similarly, theories differ on the width of the range for recently completed actions that are assumed to be rapidly deactivated or gradually deactivated in a passive fashion. We validate a new typing task for measuring momentary activation states of actions across a response set during action sequencing. Typists recruited from Amazon Mechanical Turk copied a paragraph by responding to a "go" signal that usually cued the next letter but sometimes cued a near-past or future letter (n-3, -2, -1, 0, +2, +3). The activation states for producing letters across go-signal positions can be inferred from RTs and errors. In general, we found evidence of graded parallel activation for future actions and rapid deactivation of more distal past actions. (PsycINFO Database Record

  19. Visual experience modulates spatio-temporal dynamics of circuit activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lang eWang

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Persistent reduction in sensory drive in early development results in multiple plastic changes of different cortical synapses. How these experience-dependent modifications affect the spatio-temporal dynamics of signal propagation in neocortical circuits is poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that brief visual deprivation significantly affects the propagation of electrical signals in the primary visual cortex. The spatio-temporal spread of circuit activation upon direct stimulation of its input layer (Layer 4 is reduced, as is the activation of Layer 2/3 – the main recipient of the output from Layer 4. Our data suggest that the decrease in spatio-temporal activation of L2/3 depends on reduced L4 output, and is not intrinsically generated within L2/3. The data shown here suggest that changes in the synaptic components of the visual cortical circuit result not only in alteration of local integration of excitatory and inhibitory inputs, but also in a significant decrease in overall circuit activation. Furthermore, our data indicate a differential effect of visual deprivation on L4 and L2/3, suggesting that while feedforward activation of L2/3 is reduced, its activation by long range, within layer inputs is unaltered. Thus, brief visual deprivation induces experience-dependent circuit re-organization by modulating not only circuit excitability, but also the spatio-temporal patterns of cortical activation within and between layers.

  20. Mto2 multisite phosphorylation inactivates non-spindle microtubule nucleation complexes during mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borek, Weronika E; Groocock, Lynda M; Samejima, Itaru; Zou, Juan; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Rappsilber, Juri; Sawin, Kenneth E

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule nucleation is highly regulated during the eukaryotic cell cycle, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. During mitosis in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cytoplasmic microtubule nucleation ceases simultaneously with intranuclear mitotic spindle assembly. Cytoplasmic nucleation depends on the Mto1/2 complex, which binds and activates the γ-tubulin complex and also recruits the γ-tubulin complex to both centrosomal (spindle pole body) and non-centrosomal sites. Here we show that the Mto1/2 complex disassembles during mitosis, coincident with hyperphosphorylation of Mto2 protein. By mapping and mutating multiple Mto2 phosphorylation sites, we generate mto2-phosphomutant strains with enhanced Mto1/2 complex stability, interaction with the γ-tubulin complex and microtubule nucleation activity. A mutant with 24 phosphorylation sites mutated to alanine, mto2[24A], retains interphase-like behaviour even in mitotic cells. This provides a molecular-level understanding of how phosphorylation 'switches off' microtubule nucleation complexes during the cell cycle and, more broadly, illuminates mechanisms regulating non-centrosomal microtubule nucleation.

  1. Mto2 multisite phosphorylation inactivates non-spindle microtubule nucleation complexes during mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borek, Weronika E.; Groocock, Lynda M.; Samejima, Itaru; Zou, Juan; de Lima Alves, Flavia; Rappsilber, Juri; Sawin, Kenneth E.

    2015-01-01

    Microtubule nucleation is highly regulated during the eukaryotic cell cycle, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are largely unknown. During mitosis in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, cytoplasmic microtubule nucleation ceases simultaneously with intranuclear mitotic spindle assembly. Cytoplasmic nucleation depends on the Mto1/2 complex, which binds and activates the γ-tubulin complex and also recruits the γ-tubulin complex to both centrosomal (spindle pole body) and non-centrosomal sites. Here we show that the Mto1/2 complex disassembles during mitosis, coincident with hyperphosphorylation of Mto2 protein. By mapping and mutating multiple Mto2 phosphorylation sites, we generate mto2-phosphomutant strains with enhanced Mto1/2 complex stability, interaction with the γ-tubulin complex and microtubule nucleation activity. A mutant with 24 phosphorylation sites mutated to alanine, mto2[24A], retains interphase-like behaviour even in mitotic cells. This provides a molecular-level understanding of how phosphorylation ‘switches off' microtubule nucleation complexes during the cell cycle and, more broadly, illuminates mechanisms regulating non-centrosomal microtubule nucleation. PMID:26243668

  2. Relations between ultrastructure of mitotic spindle and chromosome translocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jadwiga A. Tarkowska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dividing endosperm cells of Haemanthus katherinae Bak. treated with an 0.25 per cent mixture of water-soluble glycosides from Nerium oleander were insepected in a light microscope (LM and severe disturbances were found in all phases of mitosis. The same cells were observed in the electron microscope (EM and relations were noted and analysed between the chromosome arrangement and the submicroscopic structure of the mitotuc spindle. The successive steps in the disintegration of the formed spindle are described: fragmentatiun of all microtubules (MTs starting from the poles, disappearance of non-kinetachore MTs and further the external MTs of the kineto,chore bundle. The central (internal parallel ones remain the longest at the kinerf,ochares. Oleander glycosides cause disintegration of the existing MTs and prevent formation of new ones. The causes of restitution transformations in the successive phases of mitosis are discussed.

  3. Analysis on Failure Mode Severity of Machining Center Spindle System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guixiang Shen; Shuguang Sun; Yingzhi Zhang; Xiaoyan Qi; Bingkun Chen

    2015-01-01

    According to the subjectivity and fuzziness of analysis on failure mode severity about spindle system of machining center, an analysis model of the failure mode severity of such a system is proposed based on the new fault severity index system, improved analytic hierarchy process ( IAHP ) and entropy⁃based fuzzy comprehensive evaluation. IAHP and entropy methods are adopted to determine the comprehensive failure severity index weight. The evaluation result is obtained after the factor set, comment set, weight set, and other parameters are determined, and then the level of risk degree and numerical value order of every spindle system failure mode is given. By taking an example, we verify that the proposed method can quantify the qualitative problem comprehensively, obtain more accurate analysis results, and provide the theoretical reference for mechanization and sequencing of failure mode effect analysis in reliability analysis. The calculation results can also serve as the basis of failure mode, effects, and criticality analysis in the subsequent step.

  4. Radiation-induced spindle cell sarcoma: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Mubeen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation has been known to induce malignant transformation in human beings. Radiation-induced sarcomas are a late sequel of radiation therapy. Most sarcomas have been reported to occur after exposure to a radiation dose of 55 Gray (Gy and above, with a dose ranging from 16 to 112 Gys. Spindle cell sarcomas, arising after radiotherapy given to treat the carcinoma of head and neck region is a very uncommon sequel. This is a rare case report of spindle cell sarcoma of left maxilla, in a 24-year-old male, occurring as a late complication of radiotherapy with Cobalt-60 given for the treatment of retinoblastoma of the left eye 21 years back.

  5. Static and Dynamic Modeling of a Solar Active Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Harry P.; Winebarger, Amy R.

    2007-09-01

    Recent hydrostatic simulations of solar active regions have shown that it is possible to reproduce both the total intensity and the general morphology of the high-temperature emission observed at soft X-ray wavelengths using static heating models. These static models, however, cannot account for the lower temperature emission. In addition, there is ample observational evidence that the solar corona is highly variable, indicating a significant role for dynamical processes in coronal heating. Because they are computationally demanding, full hydrodynamic simulations of solar active regions have not been considered previously. In this paper we make first application of an impulsive heating model to the simulation of an entire active region, AR 8156 observed on 1998 February 16. We model this region by coupling potential field extrapolations to full solutions of the time-dependent hydrodynamic loop equations. To make the problem more tractable we begin with a static heating model that reproduces the emission observed in four different Yohkoh Soft X-Ray Telescope (SXT) filters and consider impulsive heating scenarios that yield time-averaged SXT intensities that are consistent with the static case. We find that it is possible to reproduce the total observed soft X-ray emission in all of the SXT filters with a dynamical heating model, indicating that nanoflare heating is consistent with the observational properties of the high-temperature solar corona. At EUV wavelengths the simulated emission shows more coronal loops, but the agreement between the simulation and the observation is still not acceptable.

  6. Sleep spindle alterations in patients with Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Julie Anja Engelhard; Nikolic, Miki; Warby, Simon C.;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify changes of sleep spindles (SS) in the EEG of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). Five sleep experts manually identified SS at a central scalp location (C3-A2) in 15 PD and 15 age- and sex-matched control subjects. Each SS was given a confidence score...... in patients with PD or other neurodegenerative disorders (NDDs)....

  7. Acentrosomal Spindle Assembly & Chromosome Segregation During Oocyte Meiosis

    OpenAIRE

    Dumont, Julien; Desai, Arshad

    2012-01-01

    The ability to reproduce relies in most eukaryotes on specialized cells called gametes. Gametes are formed by the process of meiosis in which, after a single round of replication, two successive cell divisions reduce the ploidy of the genome. Fusion of gametes at fertilization reconstitutes diploidy. In most animal species, chromosome segregation during female meiosis occurs on spindles assembled in the absence of the major microtubule-organizing center, the centrosome. In mammals, oocyte mei...

  8. Dynamic regulation of Polycomb group activity during plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, Marian; Grossniklaus, Ueli

    2012-11-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) complexes play important roles in phase transitions and cell fate determination in plants and animals, by epigenetically repressing sets of genes that promote either proliferation or differentiation. The continuous differentiation of new organs in plants, such as leaves or flowers, requires a highly dynamic PcG function, which can be induced, modulated, or repressed when necessary. In this review, we discuss the recent advance in understanding PcG function in plants and focus on the diverse molecular mechanisms that have been described to regulate and counteract PcG activity in Arabidopsis.

  9. Spindle assembly checkpoint and its regulators in meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shao-Chen; Kim, Nam-Hyung

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Meiosis is a unique form of cell division in which cells divide twice but DNA is duplicated only once. Errors in chromosome segregation during meiosis will result in aneuploidy, followed by loss of the conceptus during pregnancy or birth defects. During mitosis, cells utilize a mechanism called the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) to ensure faithful chromosome segregation. A similar mechanism has been uncovered for meiosis in the last decade, especially in the past several years. METHODS For this review, we included data and relevant information obtained through a PubMed database search for all articles published in English from 1991 through 2011 which included the term 'meiosis', 'spindle assembly checkpoint', or 'SAC'. RESULTS There are 91 studies included. Evidence for the existence of SAC functions in meiosis is provided by studies on the SAC proteins mitotic-arrest deficient-1 (Mad1), Mad2, budding uninhibited by benzimidazole-1 (Bub1), Bub3, BubR1 and Mps1; microtubule-kinetochore attachment regulators Ndc80 complex, chromosomal passenger complex, mitotic centromere-associated kinesin (MCAK), kinetochore null 1 (KNL1) and Mis12 complex and spindle stability regulators. CONCLUSIONS SAC and its regulators exist and function in meiosis, and their malfunctions may cause germ cell aneuploidy. However, species and sexual differences exist. Moreover, interaction of SAC components with other regulators is still poorly understood, which needs further study.

  10. Sleep spindles and intelligence in early childhood-developmental and trait-dependent aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujma, Péter P; Sándor, Piroska; Szakadát, Sára; Gombos, Ferenc; Bódizs, Róbert

    2016-12-01

    Sleep spindles act as a powerful marker of individual differences in cognitive ability. Sleep spindle parameters correlate with both age-related changes in cognitive abilities and with the age-independent concept of IQ. While some studies have specifically demonstrated the relationship between sleep spindles and intelligence in young children, our previous work in older subjects revealed sex differences in the sleep spindle correlates of IQ, which was never investigated in small children before. We investigated the relationship between age, Raven Colored Progressive Matrices (CPM) scores and sleep spindles in 28 young children (age 4-8 years, 15 girls). We specifically investigated sex differences in the psychometric correlates of sleep spindles. We also aimed to separate the correlates of sleep spindles that are because of age-related maturation from other effects that reflect an age-independent relationship between sleep spindles and general intelligence. Our results revealed a modest positive correlation between fast spindle amplitude and age. Raven CPM scores positively correlated with both slow and fast spindle amplitude, but this effect remained a tendency in males and vanished after correcting for the effects of age. Age-corrected correlations between Raven CPM scores and both slow and fast spindle amplitude were only significant in females. Overall, our results show that in male children sleep spindles are a maturational marker, but in female children they indicate trait-like intelligence, in line with previous studies in adolescent and adult subjects. Thalamocortical white matter connectivity may be the underlying mechanism behind both higher spindle amplitude and higher intelligence in female, but not male subjects. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  11. The Sal-like 4 - integrin α6β1 network promotes cell migration for metastasis via activation of focal adhesion dynamics in basal-like breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itou, Junji; Tanaka, Sunao; Li, Wenzhao; Iida, Atsuo; Sehara-Fujisawa, Atsuko; Sato, Fumiaki; Toi, Masakazu

    2017-01-01

    During metastasis, cancer cell migration is enhanced. However, the mechanisms underlying this process remain elusive. Here, we addressed this issue by functionally analyzing the transcription factor Sal-like 4 (SALL4) in basal-like breast cancer cells. Loss-of-function studies of SALL4 showed that this transcription factor is required for the spindle-shaped morphology and the enhanced migration of cancer cells. SALL4 also up-regulated integrin gene expression. The impaired cell migration observed in SALL4 knockdown cells was restored by overexpression of integrin α6 and β1. In addition, we clarified that integrin α6 and β1 formed a heterodimer. At the molecular level, loss of the SALL4 - integrin α6β1 network lost focal adhesion dynamics, which impairs cell migration. Over-activation of Rho is known to inhibit focal adhesion dynamics. We observed that SALL4 knockdown cells exhibited over-activation of Rho. Aberrant Rho activation was suppressed by integrin α6β1 expression, and pharmacological inhibition of Rho activity restored cell migration in SALL4 knockdown cells. These results indicated that the SALL4 - integrin α6β1 network promotes cell migration via modulation of Rho activity. Moreover, our zebrafish metastasis assays demonstrated that this gene network enhances cell migration in vivo. Our findings identify a potential new therapeutic target for the prevention of metastasis, and provide an improved understanding of cancer cell migration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. v-Src-induced nuclear localization of YAP is involved in multipolar spindle formation in tetraploid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakae, Keiko; Ikeuchi, Masayoshi; Kuga, Takahisa; Saito, Youhei; Yamaguchi, Naoto; Nakayama, Yuji

    2017-01-01

    The protein-tyrosine kinase, c-Src, is involved in a variety of signaling events, including cell division. We have reported that v-Src, which is a mutant variant of the cellular proto-oncogene, c-Src, causes delocalization of Aurora B kinase, resulting in a furrow regression in cytokinesis and the generation of multinucleated cells. However, the effect of v-Src on mitotic spindle formation is unknown. Here we show that v-Src-expressing HCT116 and NIH3T3 cells undergo abnormal cell division, in which cells separate into more than two cells. Upon v-Src expression, the proportion of multinucleated cells is increased in a time-dependent manner. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that v-Src increases the number of cells having a ≥4N DNA content. Microscopic analysis showed that v-Src induces the formation of multipolar spindles with excess centrosomes. These results suggest that v-Src induces multipolar spindle formation by generating multinucleated cells. Tetraploidy activates the tetraploidy checkpoint, leading to a cell cycle arrest of tetraploid cells at the G1 phase, in which the nuclear exclusion of the transcription co-activator YAP plays a critical role. In multinucleated cells that are induced by cytochalasin B and the Plk1 inhibitor, YAP is excluded from the nucleus. However, v-Src prevents this nuclear exclusion of YAP through a decrease in the phosphorylation of YAP at Ser127 in multinucleated cells. Furthermore, v-Src decreases the expression level of p53, which also plays a critical role in the cell cycle arrest of tetraploid cells. These results suggest that v-Src promotes abnormal spindle formation in at least two ways: generation of multinucleated cells and a weakening of the tetraploidy checkpoint. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reduced ability to recover from spindle disruption and loss of kinetochore spindle assembly checkpoint proteins in oocytes from aged mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Yan; Holt, Janet E; Lane, Simon I R; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Merriman, Julie A; Jones, Keith T

    2014-01-01

    Currently, maternal aging in women, based on mouse models, is thought to raise oocyte aneuploidy rates, because chromosome cohesion deteriorates during prophase arrest, and Sgo2, a protector of centromeric cohesion, is lost. Here we show that the most common mouse strain, C57Bl6/J, is resistant to maternal aging, showing little increase in aneuploidy or Sgo2 loss. Instead it demonstrates significant kinetochore-associated loss in the spindle assembly checkpoint protein Mad2 and phosphorylated Aurora C, which is involved in microtubule-kinetochore error correction. Their loss affects the fidelity of bivalent segregation but only when spindle organization is impaired during oocyte maturation. These findings have an impact clinically regarding the handling of human oocytes ex vivo during assisted reproductive techniques and suggest there is a genetic basis to aneuploidy susceptibility.

  14. Characterizing and Modeling the Dynamics of Activity and Popularity

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Peng; Gao, Liang; Fan, Ying; Di, Zengru

    2013-01-01

    Social media, regarded as two-layer networks consisting of users and items, turn out to be the most important channels for access to massive information in the era of Web 2.0. The dynamics of human activity and item popularity is a crucial issue in social media networks. In this paper, by analyzing the growth of user activity and item popularity in four empirical social media networks, i.e., Amazon, Flickr, Delicious and Wikipedia, it is found that cross links between users and items are more likely to be created by active users and to be acquired by popular items, where user activity and item popularity are measured by the number of cross links associated with users and items. This indicates that users generally trace popular items, overall. However, it is found that the inactive users much more severely trace popular items than the active users. Inspired by empirical analysis, we propose an evolving model for such networks, in which the evolution is driven only by two-step random walk. Numerical experiments...

  15. Incorporating planned activities and events in a dynamic multi-day activity agenda generator

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijland, L.; Arentze, T.; Timmermans, H.J.P.

    2012-01-01

    Daily agenda formation is influenced by formal commitments, satisfaction of needs surpassing some threshold and the desire to conduct particular activities in anticipation of socially and religiously driven events such as birthdays, Christmas, etc. As part of a research program to develop a dynamic

  16. Activity clocks: spreading dynamics on temporal networks of human contact

    CERN Document Server

    Gauvin, Laetitia; Cattuto, Ciro; Barrat, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Dynamical processes on time-varying complex networks are key to un- derstanding and modeling a broad variety of processes in socio-technical systems. Here we focus on empirical temporal networks of human proxim- ity and we aim at understanding the factors that, in simulation, shape the arrival time distribution of simple spreading processes. Abandoning the notion of wall-clock time in favour of node-specific clocks based on activ- ity exposes robust statistical patterns in the arrival times across different social contexts. Using randomization strategies and generative models constrained by data, we show that these patterns can be understood in terms of heterogeneous inter-event time distributions coupled with hetero- geneous numbers of events per edge. We also show, both empirically and by using a synthetic dataset, that significant deviations from the above behavior can be caused by the presence of edge classes with strong activity correlations.

  17. Protein Phosphatase 1 inactivates Mps1 to ensure efficient Spindle Assembly Checkpoint silencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Margarida; Osswald, Mariana; Leça, Nelson; Barbosa, João; Pereira, António J; Maiato, Helder; Sunkel, Claudio E; Conde, Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Faithfull genome partitioning during cell division relies on the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint (SAC), a conserved signaling pathway that delays anaphase onset until all chromosomes are attached to spindle microtubules. Mps1 kinase is an upstream SAC regulator that promotes the assembly of an anaphase inhibitor through a sequential multi-target phosphorylation cascade. Thus, the SAC is highly responsive to Mps1, whose activity peaks in early mitosis as a result of its T-loop autophosphorylation. However, the mechanism controlling Mps1 inactivation once kinetochores attach to microtubules and the SAC is satisfied remains unknown. Here we show in vitro and in Drosophila that Protein Phosphatase 1 (PP1) inactivates Mps1 by dephosphorylating its T-loop. PP1-mediated dephosphorylation of Mps1 occurs at kinetochores and in the cytosol, and inactivation of both pools of Mps1 during metaphase is essential to ensure prompt and efficient SAC silencing. Overall, our findings uncover a mechanism of SAC inactivation required for timely mitotic exit. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.25366.001 PMID:28463114

  18. LOX is a novel mitotic spindle-associated protein essential for mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boufraqech, Myriem; Wei, Darmood; Weyemi, Urbain; Zhang, Lisa; Quezado, Martha; Kalab, Petr; Kebebew, Electron

    2016-01-01

    LOX regulates cancer progression in a variety of human malignancies. It is overexpressed in aggressive cancers and higher expression of LOX is associated with higher cancer mortality. Here, we report a new function of LOX in mitosis. We show that LOX co-localizes to mitotic spindles from metaphase to telophase, and p-H3(Ser10)-positive cells harbor strong LOX staining. Further, purification of mitotic spindles from synchronized cells show that LOX fails to bind to microtubules in the presence of nocodazole, whereas paclitaxel treated samples showed enrichment in LOX expression, suggesting that LOX binds to stabilized microtubules. LOX knockdown leads to G2/M phase arrest; reduced p-H3(Ser10), cyclin B1, CDK1, and Aurora B. Moreover, LOX knockdown significantly increased sensitivity of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents that target microtubules. Our findings suggest that LOX has a role in cancer cell mitosis and may be targeted to enhance the activity of microtubule inhibitors for cancer therapy. PMID:27296552

  19. Molecular basis of Kar9-Bim1 complex function during mating and spindle positioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manatschal, Cristina; Farcas, Ana-Maria; Degen, Miriam Steiner; Bayer, Mathias; Kumar, Anil; Landgraf, Christiane; Volkmer, Rudolf; Barral, Yves; Steinmetz, Michel O.

    2016-01-01

    The Kar9 pathway promotes nuclear fusion during mating and spindle alignment during metaphase in budding yeast. How Kar9 supports the different outcome of these two divergent processes is an open question. Here, we show that three sites in the C-terminal disordered domain of Kar9 mediate tight Kar9 interaction with the C-terminal dimerization domain of Bim1 (EB1 orthologue). Site1 and Site2 contain SxIP motifs; however, Site3 defines a novel type of EB1-binding site. Whereas Site2 and Site3 mediate Kar9 recruitment to microtubule tips, nuclear movement, and karyogamy, only Site2 functions in spindle positioning during metaphase. Site1 in turn plays an inhibitory role during mating. Additionally, the Kar9-Bim1 complex is involved in microtubule-independent activities during mating. Together, our data reveal how multiple and partially redundant EB1-binding sites provide a microtubule-associated protein with the means to modulate its biochemical properties to promote different molecular processes during cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:27682587

  20. Clathrin is spindle-associated but not essential for mitosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Borlido

    Full Text Available Clathrin is a multimeric protein involved in vesicle coat assembly. Recently clathrin distribution was reported to change during the cell cycle and was found to associate with the mitotic spindle. Here we test whether the recruitment of clathrin to the spindle is indicative of a critical functional contribution to mitosis.Previously a chicken pre-B lymphoma cell line (DKO-R was developed in which the endogenous clathrin heavy chain alleles were replaced with the human clathrin heavy chain under the control of a tetracycline-regulatable promoter. Receptor-mediated and fluid-phase endocytosis were significantly inhibited in this line following clathrin knockout, and we used this to explore the significance of clathrin heavy chain expression for cell cycle progression. We confirmed using confocal microscopy that clathrin colocalised with tubulin at mitotic spindles. Using a propidium iodide flow cytometric assay we found no statistical difference in the cell cycle distribution of the knockout cells versus the wild-type. Additionally, we showed that the ploidy and the recovery kinetics following cell cycle arrest with nocodazole were unchanged by repressing clathrin heavy chain expression.We conclude that the association of clathrin with the mitotic spindle and the contribution of clathrin to endocytosis are evolutionarily conserved. However we find that the contribution of clathrin to mitosis is less robust and dependent on cellular context. In other cell-lines silencing RNA has been used by others to knockdown clathrin expression resulting in an increase in the mitotic index of the cells. We show an effect on the G2/M phase population of clathrin knockdown in HEK293 cells but show that repressing clathrin expression in the DKO-R cell-line has no effect on the size of this population. Consequently this work highlights the need for a more detailed molecular understanding of the recruitment and function of clathrin at the spindle, since the

  1. Dynamic positioning system based on active disturbance rejection technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhengling; Guo, Chen; Fan, Yunsheng

    2015-08-01

    A dynamically positioned vessel, by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) and the certifying class societies (DNV, ABS, LR, etc.), is defined as a vessel that maintains its position and heading (fixed location or pre-determined track) exclusively by means of active thrusters. The development of control technology promotes the upgrading of dynamic positioning (DP) systems. Today there are two different DP systems solutions available on the market: DP system based on PID regulator and that based on model-based control. Both systems have limited disturbance rejection capability due to their design principle. In this paper, a new DP system solution is proposed based on Active Disturbance Rejection Control (ADRC) technology. This technology is composed of Tracking-Differentiator (TD), Extended State Observer (ESO) and Nonlinear Feedback Combination. On one hand, both TD and ESO can act as filters and can be used in place of conventional filters; on the other hand, the total disturbance of the system can be estimated and compensated by ESO, which therefore enhances the system's disturbance rejection capability. This technology's advantages over other methods lie in two aspects: 1) This method itself can not only achieve control objectives but also filter noisy measurements without other specialized filters; 2) This method offers a new useful approach to suppress the ocean disturbance. The simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Mechanics of post-cam engagement during simulated dynamic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Clare K; Clary, Chadd W; Cyr, Adam J; Maletsky, Lorin P; Rullkoetter, Paul J

    2013-09-01

    Posterior-stabilized (PS) total knee arthroplasty (TKA) components employ a tibial post and femoral cam mechanism to guide anteroposterior knee motion in lieu of the posterior cruciate ligament. Some PS TKA patients report a clicking sensation when the post and cam engage, while severe wear and fracture of the post; we hypothesize that these complications are associated with excessive impact velocity at engagement. We evaluated the effect of implant design on engagement dynamics of the post-cam mechanism and resulting polyethylene stresses during dynamic activity. In vitro simulation of a knee bend activity was performed for four cadaveric specimens implanted with PS TKA components. Post-cam engagement velocity and flexion angle at initial contact were determined. The experimental data were used to validate computational predictions of PS mechanics using the same loading conditions. A lower limb model was subsequently utilized to compare engagement mechanics of eight TKA designs, relating differences between implants to geometric design features. Flexion angle and post-cam velocity at engagement demonstrated considerable ranges among designs (23°-89°, and 0.05-0.22 mm/°, respectively). Post-cam velocity was correlated (r = 0.89) with tibiofemoral condylar design features. Condylar geometry, in addition to post-cam geometry, played a significant role in minimizing engagement velocity and forces and stresses in the post. This analysis guides selection and design of PS implants that facilitate smooth post-cam engagement and reduce edge loading of the post.

  3. Molecular Dynamics of "Fuzzy" Transcriptional Activator-Coactivator Interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie S Scholes

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional activation domains (ADs are generally thought to be intrinsically unstructured, but capable of adopting limited secondary structure upon interaction with a coactivator surface. The indeterminate nature of this interface made it hitherto difficult to study structure/function relationships of such contacts. Here we used atomistic accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD simulations to study the conformational changes of the GCN4 AD and variants thereof, either free in solution, or bound to the GAL11 coactivator surface. We show that the AD-coactivator interactions are highly dynamic while obeying distinct rules. The data provide insights into the constant and variable aspects of orientation of ADs relative to the coactivator, changes in secondary structure and energetic contributions stabilizing the various conformers at different time points. We also demonstrate that a prediction of α-helical propensity correlates directly with the experimentally measured transactivation potential of a large set of mutagenized ADs. The link between α-helical propensity and the stimulatory activity of ADs has fundamental practical and theoretical implications concerning the recruitment of ADs to coactivators.

  4. Inter-expert and intra-expert reliability in sleep spindle scoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Welinder, Peter; Sørensen, Helge Bjarup Dissing

    2015-01-01

    with higher reliability than the estimation of spindle duration. Reliability of sleep spindle scoring can be improved by using qualitative confidence scores, rather than a dichotomous yes/no scoring system. Conclusions We estimate that 2–3 experts are needed to build a spindle scoring dataset......Objectives To measure the inter-expert and intra-expert agreement in sleep spindle scoring, and to quantify how many experts are needed to build a reliable dataset of sleep spindle scorings. Methods The EEG dataset was comprised of 400 randomly selected 115 s segments of stage 2 sleep from 110...... sleeping subjects in the general population (57 ± 8, range: 42–72 years). To assess expert agreement, a total of 24 Registered Polysomnographic Technologists (RPSGTs) scored spindles in a subset of the EEG dataset at a single electrode location (C3-M2). Intra-expert and inter-expert agreements were...

  5. Microtubule organization within mitotic spindles revealed by serial block face scanning electron microscopy and image analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Faye M; Honnor, Thomas R; Clarke, Nicholas I; Starling, Georgina P; Beckett, Alison J; Johansen, Adam M; Brettschneider, Julia A; Prior, Ian A; Royle, Stephen J

    2017-05-15

    Serial block face scanning electron microscopy (SBF-SEM) is a powerful method to analyze cells in 3D. Here, working at the resolution limit of the method, we describe a correlative light-SBF-SEM workflow to resolve microtubules of the mitotic spindle in human cells. We present four examples of uses for this workflow that are not practical by light microscopy and/or transmission electron microscopy. First, distinguishing closely associated microtubules within K-fibers; second, resolving bridging fibers in the mitotic spindle; third, visualizing membranes in mitotic cells, relative to the spindle apparatus; and fourth, volumetric analysis of kinetochores. Our workflow also includes new computational tools for exploring the spatial arrangement of microtubules within the mitotic spindle. We use these tools to show that microtubule order in mitotic spindles is sensitive to the level of TACC3 on the spindle. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Surface shape control of the workpiece in a double-spindle triple-workstation wafer grinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xianglong, Zhu; Renke, Kang; Zhigang, Dong; Guang, Feng

    2011-10-01

    Double-spindle triple-workstation (DSTW) ultra precision grinders are mainly used in production lines for manufacturing and back thinning large diameter (>= 300 mm) silicon wafers for integrated circuits. It is important, but insufficiently studied, to control the wafer shape ground on a DSTW grinder by adjusting the inclination angles of the spindles and work tables. In this paper, the requirements of the inclination angle adjustment of the grinding spindles and work tables in DSTW wafer grinders are analyzed. A reasonable configuration of the grinding spindles and work tables in DSTW wafer grinders are proposed. Based on the proposed configuration, an adjustment method of the inclination angle of grinding spindles and work tables for DSTW wafer grinders is put forward. The mathematical models of wafer shape with the adjustment amount of inclination angles for both fine and rough grinding spindles are derived. The proposed grinder configuration and adjustment method will provide helpful instruction for DSTW wafer grinder design.

  7. EFFECT OF ANGELICA SINENSIS ON AFFERENT DISCHARGE OF SINGLE MUSCLE SPINDLE IN TOADS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高云芳; 樊小力

    2004-01-01

    Objective In drugs for invigorating blood circulation, to find a herb that can stimulate afferent discharge of muscle spindle. Methods A single muscle spindle was isolated from sartorial muscle of toad. Using air-gap technique, afferent discharge of the muscle spindle was recorded. Effects of Angelica Sinensis, Salvia Miltiorrhiza, and Safflower on afferent discharge of the muscle spindle were observed. Results Angelica Sinensis could distinctly increase afferent discharge frequency of the muscle spindle, and this increase was dose-dependent. But Salvia Miltiorrhiza and Safflower had no this excitatory effect. Conclusion It is known that Angelica Sinensis can invigorate blood circulation, and we have found its excitatory effect on muscle spindle which makes it possible to serve people with muscle atrophy if more evidences from clinical experiments are available.

  8. Large Tailed Spindle Viruses of Archaea: a New Way of Doing Viral Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochstein, Rebecca; Bollschweiler, Daniel; Engelhardt, Harald; Lawrence, C Martin; Young, Mark

    2015-09-01

    Viruses of Archaea continue to surprise us. Archaeal viruses have revealed new morphologies, protein folds, and gene content. This is especially true for large spindle viruses, which infect only Archaea. We present a comparison of particle morphologies, major coat protein structures, and gene content among the five characterized large spindle viruses to elucidate defining characteristics. Structural similarities and a core set of genes support the grouping of the large spindle viruses into a new superfamily.

  9. Control of cleavage spindle orientation in Caenorhabditis elegans: The role of the genes par-2 and par-3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, N.N.; Kirby, C.M.; Kemphues, K.J. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1995-02-01

    Polarized asymmetric divisions play important roles in the development of plants and animals. The first two embryonic cleavages of Caenorhabditis elegans provide an opportunity to study the mechanisms controlling polarized asymmetric divisions. The first cleavage is unequal, producing daughters with different sizes and fates. The daughter blastomeres divide with different orientations at the second cleavage; the anterior blastomere divides equally across the long axis of the egg, whereas the posterior blastomere divides unequally along the long axis. We report here the results of our analysis of the genes par-2 and par-3 with respect to their contribution to the polarity of these divisions. Strong loss-of-function mutations in both genes lead to an equal first cleavage and an altered second cleavage. Interestingly, the mutations exhibit striking gene-specific differences at the second cleavage. The par-2 mutations lead to transverse spindle orientations in both blastomeres, whereas par-3 mutations lead to longitudinal spindle orientations in both blastomeres. The spindle orientation defects correlate with defects in centrosome movements during both the first and the second cell cycle. Temperature shift experiments with par-2 (it5ts) indicate that the par-2(+) activity is not required after the two-cell stage. Analysis of double mutants shows that par-3 is epistatic to par-2. We propose a model wherein par-2(+) and par-3(+) act in concert during the first cell cycle to affect asymmetric modification of the cytoskeleton. This polar modification leads to different behaviors of centrosomes in the anterior and posterior and leads ultimately to blastomere-specific spindle orientations at the second cleavage. 44 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Dynein Light Intermediate Chain 2 Facilitates the Metaphase to Anaphase Transition by Inactivating the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagar P Mahale

    Full Text Available The multi-functional molecular motor cytoplasmic dynein performs diverse essential roles during mitosis. The mechanistic importance of the dynein Light Intermediate Chain homologs, LIC1 and LIC2 is unappreciated, especially in the context of mitosis. LIC1 and LIC2 are believed to exist in distinct cytoplasmic dynein complexes as obligate subunits. LIC1 had earlier been reported to be required for metaphase to anaphase progression by inactivating the kinetochore-microtubule attachment-sensing arm of the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC. However, the functional importance of LIC2 during mitosis remains elusive. Here we report prominent novel roles for the LIC2 subunit of cytoplasmic dynein in regulating the spindle assembly checkpoint. LIC2 depletion in mammalian cells led to prolonged metaphase arrest in the presence of an active SAC and also to stretched kinetochores, thus implicating it in SAC inactivation. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy of SAC components revealed accumulation of both attachment- and tension-sensing checkpoint proteins at metaphase kinetochores upon LIC2 depletion. These observations support a stronger and more diverse role in checkpoint inactivation for LIC2 in comparison to its close homolog LIC1. Our study uncovers a novel functional hierarchy during mitotic checkpoint inactivation between the closely related but homologous LIC subunits of cytoplasmic dynein. These subtle functional distinctions between dynein subpopulations could be exploited to study specific aspects of the spindle assembly checkpoint, which is a key mediator of fidelity in eukaryotic cell division.

  11. A 5-DOF Model for Aeroengine Spindle Dual-rotor System Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Qinghua; DENG Sier; TENG Hongfei

    2011-01-01

    This paper develops a five degrees of freedom (5-DOF) model for aeroengine spindle dual-rotor system dynamic analysis.In this system, the dual rotors are supported on two angular contact ball bearings and two deep groove ball bearings, one of the latter-mentioned bearings works as the inter-shaft bearing.Driven by respective motors, the dual rotors have different co-rotating speeds.The proposed model mathematically formulates the nonlinear displacements, elastic deflections and contact forces of beatings with consideration of 5-DOF and coupling of dual rotors.The nonlinear equations of motions of dual rotors with 5-DOF are solved using Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg algorithm.In order to investigate the effect of the introduced 5-DOF and nonlinear dynamic bearing model, we compare the proposed model with two models: the 3-DOF model of this system only considering three translational degrees of freedom (Gupta, 1993, rotational freedom is neglected); the 5-DOF model where the deep groove ball bearings are simplified as linear elastic spring (Guskov, 2007).The simulation results verify Gupta's prediction (1993) and show that the rotational freedom of rotors and nonlinear dynamic model of bearings have great effect on the system dynamic simulation.The quantitative results are given as well.

  12. The 3Ms of central spindle assembly: microtubules, motors and MAPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glotzer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    During metaphase, sister chromatids are positioned at the midpoint of the microtubule-based mitotic spindle in preparation for their segregation. The onset of anaphase triggers inactivation of the key mitotic kinase cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) and the polewards movement of sister chromatids. During anaphase, the mitotic spindle reorganizes in preparation for cytokinesis. Kinesin motor proteins and microtubule-associated proteins bundle the plus ends of interpolar microtubules and generate the central spindle, which regulates cleavage furrow initiation and the completion of cytokinesis. Complementary approaches, including cell biology, genetics and computational modelling, have provided new insights into the mechanism and regulation of central spindle assembly.

  13. REM sleep behaviour disorder is associated with lower fast and higher slow sleep spindle densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Reilly, Christian; Godin, Isabelle; Montplaisir, Jacques; Nielsen, Tore

    2015-12-01

    To investigate differences in sleep spindle properties and scalp topography between patients with rapid eye movement sleep behaviour disorder (RBD) and healthy controls, whole-night polysomnograms of 35 patients diagnosed with RBD and 35 healthy control subjects matched for age and sex were compared. Recordings included a 19-lead 10-20 electroencephalogram montage and standard electromyogram, electrooculogram, electrocardiogram and respiratory leads. Sleep spindles were automatically detected using a standard algorithm, and their characteristics (amplitude, duration, density, frequency and frequency slope) compared between groups. Topological analyses of group-discriminative features were conducted. Sleep spindles occurred at a significantly (e.g. t34 = -4.49; P = 0.00008 for C3) lower density (spindles ∙ min(-1) ) for RBD (mean ± SD: 1.61 ± 0.56 for C3) than for control (2.19 ± 0.61 for C3) participants. However, when distinguishing slow and fast spindles using thresholds individually adapted to the electroencephalogram spectrum of each participant, densities smaller (31-96%) for fast but larger (20-120%) for slow spindles were observed in RBD in all derivations. Maximal differences were in more posterior regions for slow spindles, but over the entire scalp for fast spindles. Results suggest that the density of sleep spindles is altered in patients with RBD and should therefore be investigated as a potential marker of future neurodegeneration in these patients.

  14. Research on Control System of Spindle Drive for High Speed Spinning Machine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏建

    2001-01-01

    Through analyzing the principle of spindle drive of winding mechanism for high speed spinning machine,the article not only describes a kind of mode of spindle drive for take-up motion on the basis of control method of constant velocity winding, but also introduces the design technique of software and hardware for the control system of mechatronics of spindle drive mode for take- up motion on the basis of constant velocity winding for high speed spinning machine with single-chip microcomputer. The mathematical model to describe the spindle rotating speed is established. It is an important technology for high speed spinning machine and provides a feasible application way.

  15. Noninvasive three-dimensional live imaging methodology for the spindles at meiosis and mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jing-gao; Huo, Tiancheng; Tian, Ning; Chen, Tianyuan; Wang, Chengming; Zhang, Ning; Zhao, Fengying; Lu, Danyu; Chen, Dieyan; Ma, Wanyun; Sun, Jia-lin; Xue, Ping

    2013-05-01

    The spindle plays a crucial role in normal chromosome alignment and segregation during meiosis and mitosis. Studying spindles in living cells noninvasively is of great value in assisted reproduction technology (ART). Here, we present a novel spindle imaging methodology, full-field optical coherence tomography (FF-OCT). Without any dye labeling and fixation, we demonstrate the first successful application of FF-OCT to noninvasive three-dimensional (3-D) live imaging of the meiotic spindles within the mouse living oocytes at metaphase II as well as the mitotic spindles in the living zygotes at metaphase and telophase. By post-processing of the 3-D dataset obtained with FF-OCT, the important morphological and spatial parameters of the spindles, such as short and long axes, spatial localization, and the angle of meiotic spindle deviation from the first polar body in the oocyte were precisely measured with the spatial resolution of 0.7 μm. Our results reveal the potential of FF-OCT as an imaging tool capable of noninvasive 3-D live morphological analysis for spindles, which might be useful to ART related procedures and many other spindle related studies.

  16. Spindle cell melanocytic lesions--part I: an approach to compound naevoidal pattern lesions with spindle cell morphology and Spitzoid pattern lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Shachar; Al Habeeb, Ayman; Ghazarian, Danny

    2010-04-01

    Melanocytic lesions show great morphological diversity in their architecture and the cytomorphological appearance of their composite cells. Whereas functional melanocytes reveal a dendritic cytomorphology and territorial isolation, lesional naevomelanocytes and melanoma cells typically show epithelioid, spindled or mixed cytomorphologies and a range of architectural arrangements. Spindling is common to melanocytic lesions, and may be either a characteristic feature or a divergent appearance. The presence of spindle cells may mask the melanocytic nature of a lesion, and is often disconcerting, either because of its infrequent appearance in a particular lesion or its interpretation as a dedifferentiated phenotype. Spindle cell melanocytic lesions follow the full spectrum of potential biological outcomes, and difficulty may be experienced judging the nature of a lesion because of a lack of consistently reliable features to predict biological behaviour. Over time, recognition of numerous histomorphological features that may portend a more aggressive lesion have been identified. However, the translation of these features into a diagnostic entity requires a gestalt approach. Although most spindle cell melanocytic lesions can reliably be resolved with this standard approach, problem areas do exist and cause no end of grief to the surgical pathologist or dermatopathologist. In this review, the authors present their algorithmic approach to spindle cell melanocytic lesions and discuss each entity in turn, in order to (1) model a systematic approach to such lesions, and (2) provide familiarity with those melanocytic lesions that either typically or occasionally display a spindled cytomorphology.

  17. Effects of FGFR2 kinase activation loop dynamics on catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    The structural mechanisms by which receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate catalytic activity are diverse and often based on subtle changes in conformational dynamics. The regulatory mechanism of one such RTK, fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) kinase, is still unknown, as the numerous crystal structures of the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms of the kinase domains show no apparent structural change that could explain how phosphorylation could enable catalytic activity. In this study, we use several enhanced sampling molecular dynamics (MD) methods to elucidate the structural changes to the kinase’s activation loop that occur upon phosphorylation. We show that phosphorylation favors inward motion of Arg664, while simultaneously favoring outward motion of Leu665 and Pro666. The latter structural change enables the substrate to bind leading to its resultant phosphorylation. Inward motion of Arg664 allows it to interact with the γ-phosphate of ATP as well as the substrate tyrosine. We show that this stabilizes the tyrosine and primes it for the catalytic phosphotransfer, and it may lower the activation barrier of the phosphotransfer reaction. Our work demonstrates the value of including dynamic information gleaned from computer simulation in deciphering RTK regulatory function. PMID:28151998

  18. Effects of FGFR2 kinase activation loop dynamics on catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Jerome M; Sparks, Samuel; Cowburn, David

    2017-02-01

    The structural mechanisms by which receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate catalytic activity are diverse and often based on subtle changes in conformational dynamics. The regulatory mechanism of one such RTK, fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) kinase, is still unknown, as the numerous crystal structures of the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms of the kinase domains show no apparent structural change that could explain how phosphorylation could enable catalytic activity. In this study, we use several enhanced sampling molecular dynamics (MD) methods to elucidate the structural changes to the kinase's activation loop that occur upon phosphorylation. We show that phosphorylation favors inward motion of Arg664, while simultaneously favoring outward motion of Leu665 and Pro666. The latter structural change enables the substrate to bind leading to its resultant phosphorylation. Inward motion of Arg664 allows it to interact with the γ-phosphate of ATP as well as the substrate tyrosine. We show that this stabilizes the tyrosine and primes it for the catalytic phosphotransfer, and it may lower the activation barrier of the phosphotransfer reaction. Our work demonstrates the value of including dynamic information gleaned from computer simulation in deciphering RTK regulatory function.

  19. Effects of FGFR2 kinase activation loop dynamics on catalytic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome M Karp

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The structural mechanisms by which receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs regulate catalytic activity are diverse and often based on subtle changes in conformational dynamics. The regulatory mechanism of one such RTK, fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2 kinase, is still unknown, as the numerous crystal structures of the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms of the kinase domains show no apparent structural change that could explain how phosphorylation could enable catalytic activity. In this study, we use several enhanced sampling molecular dynamics (MD methods to elucidate the structural changes to the kinase's activation loop that occur upon phosphorylation. We show that phosphorylation favors inward motion of Arg664, while simultaneously favoring outward motion of Leu665 and Pro666. The latter structural change enables the substrate to bind leading to its resultant phosphorylation. Inward motion of Arg664 allows it to interact with the γ-phosphate of ATP as well as the substrate tyrosine. We show that this stabilizes the tyrosine and primes it for the catalytic phosphotransfer, and it may lower the activation barrier of the phosphotransfer reaction. Our work demonstrates the value of including dynamic information gleaned from computer simulation in deciphering RTK regulatory function.

  20. Dynamic recruitment of active proteasomes into polyglutamine initiated inclusion bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schipper-Krom, Sabine; Juenemann, Katrin; Jansen, Anne H; Wiemhoefer, Anne; van den Nieuwendijk, Rianne; Smith, Donna L; Hink, Mark A; Bates, Gillian P; Overkleeft, Hermen; Ovaa, Huib; Reits, Eric

    2014-01-03

    Neurodegenerative disorders such as Huntington's disease are hallmarked by neuronal intracellular inclusion body formation. Whether proteasomes are irreversibly recruited into inclusion bodies in these protein misfolding disorders is a controversial subject. In addition, it has been proposed that the proteasomes may become clogged by the aggregated protein fragments, leading to impairment of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Here, we show by fluorescence pulse-chase experiments in living cells that proteasomes are dynamically and reversibly recruited into inclusion bodies. As these recruited proteasomes remain catalytically active and accessible to substrates, our results challenge the concept of proteasome sequestration and impairment in Huntington's disease, and support the reported absence of proteasome impairment in mouse models of Huntington's disease. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. All rights reserved.

  1. High resolution dynamical mapping of social interactions with active RFID

    CERN Document Server

    Barrat, Alain; Colizza, Vittoria; Pinton, Jean-Francois; Broeck, Wouter Van den; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present an experimental framework to gather data on face-to-face social interactions between individuals, with a high spatial and temporal resolution. We use active Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) devices that assess contacts with one another by exchanging low-power radio packets. When individuals wear the beacons as a badge, a persistent radio contact between the RFID devices can be used as a proxy for a social interaction between individuals. We present the results of a pilot study %recently performed during a conference, and a subsequent preliminary data analysis, that provides an assessment of our method and highlights its versatility and applicability in many areas concerned with human dynamics.

  2. Dynamic Discontinuous Control for Active Control of Mechanical Vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orestes Llanes Santiago

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This article shows the use of the discontinuous control using dynamic sliding modes for the active isolation of vibrations in mechanical systems. This type of control law constitutes a robust feedback control policy due to its insensitivity to external disturbance inputs, certain immunity to model parameter variations, within known bounds, and to the ever present modelling errors.  The whole theoretical analysis is applied to a lineal model of two degrees of freedom of the vehicle's suspension where the irregularities of the land represent of direct  way the external interferences to the system . To carry out the isolation an electro-hydraulic operator it is used. Simulations are performed which validate the proposed approach.

  3. An analogy between optical turbulence and activator-inhibitor dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Spineanu, F

    2016-01-01

    The propagation of laser beams through madia with cubic nonlinear polarization is part of a wide range of practical applications. The processes that are involved are at the limit of extreme (cuasi-singular) concentration of intensity and the transversal modulational instability, the saturation and defocusing effect of the plasma generated through avalanche and multi-photon (MPI) ionization are competing leading to a complicated pattern of intensity in the transversal plane. This regime has been named \\textquotedblleft optical turbulence\\textquotedblright and it has been studied in experiments and numerical simulations. Led by the similarity of the portraits we have investigated the possibility that the mechanism that underlies the creation of the complex pattern of the intensity field is the manifestation of the dynamics \\textit{activator-inhibitor}. In a previous work we have considered a unique connection, the \\textit{complex Landau-Ginzburg equation}, a common ground for the nonlinear Schrodinger equation ...

  4. TOTAL ANTIOXIDANT ACTIVITY OF SOME BASIDIOMYCETES STRAINS IN GROWTH DYNAMIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Fedotov

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to the study of total antioxidant activity (AOA in the growth dynamics of basidiomycetes strains in their periodic surface cultivation on glucose-peptone medium. Subjects of research are mycelium and culture filtrate (CF from 57 strains, 5 of which are belong to 5 types of Polyporales order, and 52 of which are belong to the 7 types of Agaricales order. In order to study the dynamics of growth used method for determining the weight of absolutely dry biomass accumulation (ADB. Total AOA of mycological material was evaluated by inhibition of lipid peroxidation products accumulation intensity in the model oxidation reaction of Tween-80 by air oxygen. It was found that the most productive in terms of the accumulation of ADB are strains F. velutipes F-610 and P. eryngii P-er. Lowest values of ADB accumulation recorded for strains P. ostreatus P-14 and P-192 and P. citrinopileatus P sіtr. Were selected the most productive strains of Basidiomycetes for the level of total AOA in mycelium and CF. There are strains P. eryngii P-er, P. citrinopileatus P sіtr, P. ostreatus P-035, F. hepatica Fh-08, A. cylindracea 960, P. ostreatus P-081, P-082, P-087, P. citrinopileatus P sіtr. Has not been established the dependence between the growth and the antioxidant activity of the 9- and 12-day fungal cultures. Selected producers of natural antioxidants may be used as biological agents in biotechnology.

  5. Brain activity correlates with emotional perception induced by dynamic avatars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Hagar; Christensen, Andrea; Flash, Tamar; Giese, Martin A; Malach, Rafael

    2015-11-15

    An accurate judgment of the emotional state of others is a prerequisite for successful social interaction and hence survival. Thus, it is not surprising that we are highly skilled at recognizing the emotions of others. Here we aimed to examine the neuronal correlates of emotion recognition from gait. To this end we created highly controlled dynamic body-movement stimuli based on real human motion-capture data (Roether et al., 2009). These animated avatars displayed gait in four emotional (happy, angry, fearful, and sad) and speed-matched neutral styles. For each emotional gait and its equivalent neutral gait, avatars were displayed at five morphing levels between the two. Subjects underwent fMRI scanning while classifying the emotions and the emotional intensity levels expressed by the avatars. Our results revealed robust brain selectivity to emotional compared to neutral gait stimuli in brain regions which are involved in emotion and biological motion processing, such as the extrastriate body area (EBA), fusiform body area (FBA), superior temporal sulcus (STS), and the amygdala (AMG). Brain activity in the amygdala reflected emotional awareness: for visually identical stimuli it showed amplified stronger response when the stimulus was perceived as emotional. Notably, in avatars gradually morphed along an emotional expression axis there was a parametric correlation between amygdala activity and emotional intensity. This study extends the mapping of emotional decoding in the human brain to the domain of highly controlled dynamic biological motion. Our results highlight an extensive level of brain processing of emotional information related to body language, which relies mostly on body kinematics.

  6. Connections between microtubules and endoplasmic reticulum in mitotic spindle

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    J. A. Tarkowska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dividing endosperm cells of Haemanthus katherinae Bak. were treated with an 0.025 per cent aqueous solution of an oleander glycosides mixture which produces severe disturtaances in the mitotic spindle and high hypertrophy of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER in the whole cells. There appear between the kinetochore microtubules (MTs numerous elongated and narrow ER cisterns, particularly well visible when the number of kinetochore MTs is reduced. Both these structures (MTs and ER are frequently connected by cross-bridges. The presumable role of these connections is discused.

  7. Thermal Error Modelling of the Spindle Using Neurofuzzy Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Jingan Feng; Xiaoqi Tang; Yanlei Li; Bao Song

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new combined model to predict the spindle deformation, which combines the grey models and the ANFIS (adaptive neurofuzzy inference system) model. The grey models are used to preprocess the original data, and the ANFIS model is used to adjust the combined model. The outputs of the grey models are used as the inputs of the ANFIS model to train the model. To evaluate the performance of the combined model, an experiment is implemented. Three Pt100 thermal resistances are use...

  8. Spindle cell hemangioma: Unusual presentation of an uncommon tumor

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    Olalere Omoyosola Gbolahan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spindle cell hemangioma (SCH is an uncommon tumor that usually presents as subcutaneous or deep dermal nodule affecting the extremities and is typically <2 cm in size. A few cases have been reported in the head and neck region. To the best of the authors' knowledge, there are no previous reports of SCH occurring in the orbit in the English literature. We, therefore, report the case of a large SCH involving the right orbit of a healthy 9-year-old Nigerian girl.

  9. Experimental muscle pain produces central modulation of proprioceptive signals arising from jaw muscle spindles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capra, N F; Ro, J Y

    2000-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of intramuscular injection with hypertonic saline, a well-established experimental model for muscle pain, on central processing of proprioceptive input from jaw muscle spindle afferents. Fifty-seven cells were recorded from the medial edge of the subnucleus interpolaris (Vi) and the adjacent parvicellular reticular formation from 11 adult cats. These cells were characterized as central units receiving jaw muscle spindle input based on their responses to electrical stimulation of the masseter nerve, muscle palpation and jaw stretch. Forty-five cells, which were successfully tested with 5% hypertonic saline, were categorized as either dynamic-static (DS) (n=25) or static (S) (n=20) neurons based on their responses to different speeds and amplitudes of jaw movement. Seventy-six percent of the cells tested with an ipsilateral injection of hypertonic saline showed a significant modulation of mean firing rates (MFRs) during opening and/or holding phases. The most remarkable saline-induced change was a significant reduction of MFR during the hold phase in S units (100%, 18/18 modulated). Sixty-nine percent of the DS units (11/16 modulated) also showed significant changes in MFRs limited to the hold phase. However, in the DS neurons, the MFRs increased in seven units and decreased in four units. Finally, five DS neurons showed significant changes of MFRs during both opening and holding phases. Injections of isotonic saline into the ipsilateral masseter muscle had little effect, but hypertonic saline injections made into the contralateral masseter muscle produced similar results to ipsilateral injections with hypertonic saline. These results unequivocally demonstrate that intramuscular injection with an algesic substance, sufficient to produce muscle pain, produces significant changes in the proprioceptive properties of the jaw movement-related neurons. Potential mechanisms involved in saline-induced changes in the

  10. Structure, distribution and innervation of muscle spindles in avian fast and slow skeletal muscle

    Science.gov (United States)

    OVALLE, WILLIAM K.; DOW, PIERRE R.; NAHIRNEY, PATRICK C.

    1999-01-01

    Muscle spindles in 2 synergistic avian skeletal muscles, the anterior (ALD) and posterior (PLD) latissimus dorsi, were studied by light and electron microscopy to determine whether morphological or quantitative differences existed between these sensory receptors. Differences were found in the density, distribution and location of muscle spindles in the 2 muscles. They also differed with respect to the morphology of their capsules and intracapsular components. The slow ALD possessed muscle spindles which were evenly distributed throughout the muscle, whereas in the fast PLD they were mainly concentrated around the single nerve entry point into the muscle. The muscle spindle index (number of spindles per gram wet muscle weight) in the ALD was more than double that of its fast-twitch PLD counterpart (130.5±2.0 vs 55.4±2.0 respectively, n=6). The number of intrafusal fibres per spindle ranged from 1 to 8 in the ALD and 2 to 9 in the PLD, and their diameters varied from 5.0 to 16.0 μm and 4.5 to 18.5 μm, respectively. Large diameter intrafusal fibres were more frequently encountered in spindles of the PLD. Unique to the ALD was the presence of monofibre muscle spindles (12.7% of total spindles observed in ALD) which contained a solitary intrafusal fibre. In muscle spindles of both the ALD and PLD, sensory nerve endings terminated in a spiral fashion on the intrafusal fibres in their equatorial regions. Motor innervation was restricted to either juxtaequatorial or polar regions of the intrafusal fibres. Outer capsule components were extensive in polar and juxtaequatorial regions of ALD spindles, whereas inner capsule cells of PLD spindles were more numerous in juxtaequatorial and equatorial regions. Overall, muscle spindles of the PLD exhibited greater complexity with respect to the number of intrafusal fibres per spindle, range of intrafusal fibre diameters and development of their inner capsules. It is postulated that the differences in muscle spindle density and

  11. Thermal influence of the Couette flow in a hydrostatic spindle on the machining precision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dongju; Fan, Jinwei; Li, Haiyong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhang, Feihu

    2013-05-01

    Hydrostatic spindles are increasingly used in precision machine tools. Thermal error is the key factor affecting the machining accuracy of the spindle, and research has focused on spindle thermal errors through examination of the influence of the temperature distribution, thermal deformation and spindle mode. However, seldom has any research investigated the thermal effects of the associated Couette flow. To study the heat transfer mechanism in spindle systems, the criterion of the heat transfer direction according to the temperature distribution of the Couette flow at different temperatures is deduced. The method is able to deal accurately with the significant phenomena occurring at every place where thermal energy flowed in such a spindle system. The variation of the motion error induced by thermal effects on a machine work-table during machining is predicated by establishing the thermo-mechanical error model of the hydrostatic spindle for a high precision machine tool. The flow state and thermal behavior of a hydrostatic spindle is analyzed with the evaluated heat power and the coefficients of the convective heat transfer over outer surface of the spindle are calculated, and the thermal influence on the oil film stiffness is evaluated. Thermal drift of the spindle nose is measured with an inductance micrometer, the thermal deformation data 1.35 μm after running for 4 h is consistent with the value predicted by the finite element analysis's simulated result 1.28 μm, and this demonstrates that the simulation method is feasible. The thermal effects on the processing accuracy from the flow characteristics of the fluid inside the spindle are analyzed for the first time.

  12. Evolution of Parallel Spindles Like genes in plants and highlight of unique domain architecture#

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    Consiglio Federica M

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polyploidy has long been recognized as playing an important role in plant evolution. In flowering plants, the major route of polyploidization is suggested to be sexual through gametes with somatic chromosome number (2n. Parallel Spindle1 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPS1 was recently demonstrated to control spindle orientation in the 2nd division of meiosis and, when mutated, to induce 2n pollen. Interestingly, AtPS1 encodes a protein with a FHA domain and PINc domain putatively involved in RNA decay (i.e. Nonsense Mediated mRNA Decay. In potato, 2n pollen depending on parallel spindles was described long time ago but the responsible gene has never been isolated. The knowledge derived from AtPS1 as well as the availability of genome sequences makes it possible to isolate potato PSLike (PSL and to highlight the evolution of PSL family in plants. Results Our work leading to the first characterization of PSLs in potato showed a greater PSL complexity in this species respect to Arabidopsis thaliana. Indeed, a genomic PSL locus and seven cDNAs affected by alternative splicing have been cloned. In addition, the occurrence of at least two other PSL loci in potato was suggested by the sequence comparison of alternatively spliced transcripts. Phylogenetic analysis on 20 Viridaeplantae showed the wide distribution of PSLs throughout the species and the occurrence of multiple copies only in potato and soybean. The analysis of PSLFHA and PSLPINc domains evidenced that, in terms of secondary structure, a major degree of variability occurred in PINc domain respect to FHA. In terms of specific active sites, both domains showed diversification among plant species that could be related to a functional diversification among PSL genes. In addition, some specific active sites were strongly conserved among plants as supported by sequence alignment and by evidence of negative selection evaluated as difference between non-synonymous and

  13. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A.

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response.

  14. Dynamical theory of active cellular response to external stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De, Rumi; Safran, Samuel A

    2008-09-01

    We present a comprehensive, theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes both the forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix as well as forces due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate the time-dependent response of both the magnitude and the direction of the elastic dipole that characterizes the active forces exerted by the cell, for various situations. For static or quasistatic external stress, cells orient parallel to the stress while for high frequency dynamic external stress, cells orient nearly perpendicular. Both numerical and analytical calculations of these effects are presented. In addition we predict the relaxation time for the cellular response for both slowly and rapidly varying external stresses; several characteristic scaling regimes for the relaxation time as a function of applied frequency are predicted. We also treat the case of cells for which the regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions is controlled by strain (instead of stress) and show that the predicted dependence of the cellular orientation on the Poisson ratio of the matrix can differentiate strain vs stress regulation of cellular response.

  15. Persistent dynamic attractors in activity patterns of cultured neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenaar, Daniel A.; Nadasdy, Zoltan; Potter, Steve M.

    2006-05-01

    Three remarkable features of the nervous system—complex spatiotemporal patterns, oscillations, and persistent activity—are fundamental to such diverse functions as stereotypical motor behavior, working memory, and awareness. Here we report that cultured cortical networks spontaneously generate a hierarchical structure of periodic activity with a strongly stereotyped population-wide spatiotemporal structure demonstrating all three fundamental properties in a recurring pattern. During these “superbursts,” the firing sequence of the culture periodically converges to a dynamic attractor orbit. Precursors of oscillations and persistent activity have previously been reported as intrinsic properties of the neurons. However, complex spatiotemporal patterns that are coordinated in a large population of neurons and persist over several hours—and thus are capable of representing and preserving information—cannot be explained by known oscillatory properties of isolated neurons. Instead, the complexity of the observed spatiotemporal patterns implies large-scale self-organization of neurons interacting in a precise temporal order even in vitro, in cultures usually considered to have random connectivity.

  16. Arecoline arrests cells at prometaphase by deregulating mitotic spindle assembly and spindle assembly checkpoint: implication for carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Chu; Tsai, Yi-Shan; Huang, Jau-Ling; Lee, Ka-Wo; Kuo, Ching-Chuan; Wang, Chung-Sheng; Huang, A-Mei; Chang, Jang-Yang; Jong, Yuh-Jyh; Lin, Chang-Shen

    2010-04-01

    One apparent feature of cancerous cells is genomic instability, which may include various types of chromosomal aberrations, such as translocation, aneuploidy, and the presence of micronuclei inside the cells. Mutagenic factors that promote the emergence of genomic instability are recognized as risk factors for the development of human malignancies. In Asia, betel quid (BQ) chewing is one of such risk factors for oral cancer. Areca nut is an essential constitute of BQ and is declared as a group I carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. However, the molecular and cellular mechanisms regarding the carcinogenicity of areca nut are not fully explored. Here we reported that arecoline, a major alkaloid of areca nut, could arrest cells at prometaphase with large amounts of misaligned chromosomes. This prometaphase arrest was evidenced by condensed chromosome pattern, increased histone H3 phosphorylation, and accumulation of mitotic proteins, including aurora A and cyclin B(1). To investigate the molecular mechanisms accounting for arecoline-induced prometaphase arrest, we found that arecoline could stabilize mitotic spindle assembly, which led to distorted organization of mitotic spindles, misalignment of chromosomes, and up-regulation of spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) genes. The SAC proteins BubR1 and Mps1 were differentially modified between the cells treated with arecoline and nocodazole. This together with aurora A overexpression suggested that SAC might be partly suppressed by arecoline. As a result, the arecoline-exposed cells might produce progeny that contained various chromosomal aberrations and exhibited genomic instability. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Modal Analysis of High Speed Motorized Spindle for Camshaft Grinder Based on the Finite Element Method%基于有限元方法的高速凸轮轴磨床电主轴的模态分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张尚; 柳懿麟; 彭碧; 郑孟昆

    2012-01-01

    利用有限元法分析高速凸轮轴磨床主轴的动态特性,并对前后轴承的刚度和止推轴承的位置进行分析,为类似的液压主轴设计提供依据.%By adoption of the finite element analysis to analyze the dynamic characteristics of the spindle in high-speed camshaft grinding machine and analysis of the location of the thrust bearing and the stiffness of front and rear bearings. It is able to provide theoretical references in design of hydraulic spindles.

  18. Tax Evasion Dynamics in Romania Reflected by Fiscal Inspection Activities

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    CORINA-MARIA ENE

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to provide a panoramic view of the dynamics of tax evasion in Romania, reflected in terms of fiscal inspection activities. The author used the official data published by the institutions with attributions on the line of identification and fighting against tax evasion (National Agency of Fiscal Administration and Financial Guard with the view to reflect the real situation concerning the number of inspections, quantify and sanction tax evasion for 2003-2008 periods. Although the number of fiscal inspections and the number of tax payers who have violated the rules of fiscal discipline decreased compared with 2003, the frequency of tax evasion remained. At the same time, based on the data referring to the level and dynamics of the tax dodger phenomenon appreciations have been made regarding the fiscal discipline of the Romanian tax payer and to the attitude of the qualified institutions in discovering and sanctioning the fraudulent tax evasion. In this respect, the author observed that the level of willingness of tax legislation in relation to the Romanian tax payer has not changed considerably.The level of identified tax evasion reported to real GDP increased slightly. This situation can be interpreted as a success of institutions in charge of identification and fighting of tax evasion, a result of the increase of fiscal inspection number and detection probability, but also a result of GDP growth at a rate lower than the identified tax evasion. The author has also tried to find a causality relation between the option for tax evasion and corruption. The author found that a corrupt environment facilitates the decision to evade depending on detection probability, penalty system and bribery level as discouraging factors for tax evasion. The level of identified tax evasion is smaller than the real level of entire tax evasion, an important part being impossible to determine because of corruption.

  19. Active site conformational dynamics in human uridine phosphorylase 1.

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    Tarmo P Roosild

    Full Text Available Uridine phosphorylase (UPP is a central enzyme in the pyrimidine salvage pathway, catalyzing the reversible phosphorolysis of uridine to uracil and ribose-1-phosphate. Human UPP activity has been a focus of cancer research due to its role in activating fluoropyrimidine nucleoside chemotherapeutic agents such as 5-fluorouracil (5-FU and capecitabine. Additionally, specific molecular inhibitors of this enzyme have been found to raise endogenous uridine concentrations, which can produce a cytoprotective effect on normal tissues exposed to these drugs. Here we report the structure of hUPP1 bound to 5-FU at 2.3 A resolution. Analysis of this structure reveals new insights as to the conformational motions the enzyme undergoes in the course of substrate binding and catalysis. The dimeric enzyme is capable of a large hinge motion between its two domains, facilitating ligand exchange and explaining observed cooperativity between the two active sites in binding phosphate-bearing substrates. Further, a loop toward the back end of the uracil binding pocket is shown to flexibly adjust to the varying chemistry of different compounds through an "induced-fit" association mechanism that was not observed in earlier hUPP1 structures. The details surrounding these dynamic aspects of hUPP1 structure and function provide unexplored avenues to develop novel inhibitors of this protein with improved specificity and increased affinity. Given the recent emergence of new roles for uridine as a neuron protective compound in ischemia and degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, inhibitors of hUPP1 with greater efficacy, which are able to boost cellular uridine levels without adverse side-effects, may have a wide range of therapeutic applications.

  20. An Overview of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint Status in Oral Cancer

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    José Henrique Teixeira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Abnormal chrom