WorldWideScience

Sample records for activity optical

  1. Active optical clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN JingBiao

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the principles and techniques of active optical clock, a special laser combining the laser physics of one-atom laser, bad-cavity gas laser, super-cavity stabilized laser and optical atomic clock together. As a simple example, an active optical clock based on thermal strontium atomic beam shows a quantum-limited linewidth of 0.51 Hz, which is insensitive to laser cavity-length noise, and may surpass the recorded narrowest 6.7 Hz of Hg ion optical clock and 1.5 Hz of very recent optical lattice clock. The estimated 0.1 Hz one-second instability and 0.27 Hz uncertainty are limited only by the rela-tivistic Doppler effect, and can be improved by cold atoms.

  2. Active Optical Lattice Filters

    OpenAIRE

    Gary Evans; MacFarlane, Duncan L.; Govind Kannan; Jian Tong; Issa Panahi; Vishnupriya Govindan; L. Roberts Hunt

    2005-01-01

    Optical lattice filter structures including gains are introduced and analyzed. The photonic realization of the active, adaptive lattice filter is described. The algorithms which map between gains space and filter coefficients space are presented and studied. The sensitivities of filter parameters with respect to gains are derived and calculated. An example which is relevant to adaptive signal processing is also provided.

  3. Active Optics in Modern, Large Optical Telescopes

    OpenAIRE

    Noethe, Lothar

    2001-01-01

    Active optics is defined as the control of the shape and the alignment of the components of an optical system at low temporal frequencies. For modern large telescopes with flexible monolithic or segmented primary mirrors and also flexible structures this technique is indispensable to reach a performance which is either diffraction limited for an operation in space or limited by the atmosphere for an operation on the ground. This article first describes the theory of active optics, both of the...

  4. Active Optics in LAMOST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ding-Qiang Su; Xiang-Qun Cui

    2004-01-01

    Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope (LAMOST)is one of the major national projects under construction in China. Active optics is one of the most important technologies for new large telescopes. It is used for correcting telescope errors generated by gravitational and thermal changes. Here,however, we use this technology to realize the configuration of LAMOST, -a task that cannot be done in the traditional way. A comprehensive and intensive research on the active optics used in LAMOST is also reported, including an open-loop control method and an auxiliary closed-loop control method. Another important development is in our pre-calibration method of open-loop control, which is with some new features: simultaneous calculation of the forces and displacements of force actuators and displacement actuators; the profile of mirror can be arbitrary;the mirror surface shape is not expressed by a fitting polynomial, but is derived from the mirror surface shape formula which is highly accurate; a proof is given that the solution of the pre-calibration method is the same as the least squares solution.

  5. Optically Active Organic Microrings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Beermann, J.; Bozhevolnyi, S.I.;

    2003-01-01

    -hexaphenyl molecules are generated on mica surfaces, possessing narrow size distributions with mean diameters of a few micrometers, wall widths of 100 to 200 nm, and wall heights of several hundred nanometers. Polarized linear and nonlinear optics reveals that the rings are made up of radially o...

  6. Optical Design and Active Optics Methods in Astronomy

    OpenAIRE

    Lemaitre, Gerard R.

    2013-01-01

    Optical designs for astronomy involve implementation of active optics and adaptive optics from X-ray to the infrared. Developments and results of active optics methods for telescopes, spectrographs and coronagraph planet finders are presented. The high accuracy and remarkable smoothness of surfaces generated by active optics methods also allow elaborating new optical design types with high aspheric and/or non-axisymmetric surfaces. Depending on the goal and performance requested for a deforma...

  7. Active Faraday optical frequency standards

    CERN Document Server

    Zhuang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    We propose the mechanism of active Faraday optical clock, and experimentally demonstrate active Faraday optical frequency standards based on 852 nm narrow bandwidth Faraday atomic filter by the method of velocity-selective optical pumping of cesium vapor. The center frequency of the active Faraday optical frequency standards is determined by the cesium 6 $^{2}S_{1/2}$ $F$ = 4 to 6 $^{2}P_{3/2}$ $F'$ = 4 and 5 crossover transition line. The optical heterodyne beat between two similar independent setups shows that the frequency linewidth reaches 996(26) Hz, which is 5.3 $\\times$ 10$^{3}$ times smaller than the natural linewidth of the cesium 852 nm transition line. The maximum emitted light power reaches 75 $\\upmu$W. The active Faraday optical frequency standards reported here have advantages of narrow linewidth and reduced cavity pulling, which can readily be extended to other atomic transition lines of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms trapped in optical lattices at magic wavelengths, making it useful for...

  8. Optical Design and Active Optics Methods in Astronomy

    CERN Document Server

    Lemaitre, Gerard R

    2013-01-01

    Optical designs for astronomy involve implementation of active optics and adaptive optics from X-ray to the infrared. Developments and results of active optics methods for telescopes, spectrographs and coronagraph planet finders are presented. The high accuracy and remarkable smoothness of surfaces generated by active optics methods also allow elaborating new optical design types with high aspheric and/or non-axisymmetric surfaces. Depending on the goal and performance requested for a deformable optical surface analytical investigations are carried out with one of the various facets of elasticity theory: small deformation thin plate theory, large deformation thin plate theory, shallow spherical shell theory, weakly conical shell theory. The resulting thickness distribution and associated bending force boundaries can be refined further with finite element analysis. Keywords: active optics, optical design, elasticity theory, astronomical optics, diffractive optics, X-ray optics

  9. Optical control of antibacterial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velema, Willem A.; van der Berg, Jan Pieter; Hansen, Mickel J.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial resistance is a major problem in the modern world, stemming in part from the build-up of antibiotics in the environment. Novel molecular approaches that enable an externally triggered increase in antibiotic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution and auto-inactivation are highly desirable. Here we report a responsive, broad-spectrum, antibacterial agent that can be temporally activated with light, whereupon it auto-inactivates on the scale of hours. The use of such a ‘smart’ antibiotic might prevent the build-up of active antimicrobial material in the environment. Reversible optical control over active drug concentration enables us to obtain pharmacodynamic information. Precisely localized control of activity is achieved, allowing the growth of bacteria to be confined to defined patterns, which has potential for the development of treatments that avoid interference with the endogenous microbial population in other parts of the organism.

  10. Optical design and active optics methods in astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaitre, Gerard R.

    2013-03-01

    Optical designs for astronomy involve implementation of active optics and adaptive optics from X-ray to the infrared. Developments and results of active optics methods for telescopes, spectrographs and coronagraph planet finders are presented. The high accuracy and remarkable smoothness of surfaces generated by active optics methods also allow elaborating new optical design types with high aspheric and/or non-axisymmetric surfaces. Depending on the goal and performance requested for a deformable optical surface analytical investigations are carried out with one of the various facets of elasticity theory: small deformation thin plate theory, large deformation thin plate theory, shallow spherical shell theory, weakly conical shell theory. The resulting thickness distribution and associated bending force boundaries can be refined further with finite element analysis.

  11. International Standardization Activities for Optical Amplifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haruo Okamura

    2003-01-01

    International standardization activities for Optical Amplifiers at IECTC86 and ITU-T SG15 are reviewed. Current discussions include Optical Amplifier safety guideline, Reliability standard, Rest methods of Noise and PMD, Definitions of Raman amplifier parameters and OA classification.

  12. Nondispersive optical activity of meshed helical metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Sung; Kim, Teun-Teun; Kim, Hyeon-Don; Kim, Kyungjin; Min, Bumki

    2014-11-17

    Extreme optical properties can be realized by the strong resonant response of metamaterials consisting of subwavelength-scale metallic resonators. However, highly dispersive optical properties resulting from strong resonances have impeded the broadband operation required for frequency-independent optical components or devices. Here we demonstrate that strong, flat broadband optical activity with high transparency can be obtained with meshed helical metamaterials in which metallic helical structures are networked and arranged to have fourfold rotational symmetry around the propagation axis. This nondispersive optical activity originates from the Drude-like response as well as the fourfold rotational symmetry of the meshed helical metamaterials. The theoretical concept is validated in a microwave experiment in which flat broadband optical activity with a designed magnitude of 45° per layer of metamaterial is measured. The broadband capabilities of chiral metamaterials may provide opportunities in the design of various broadband optical systems and applications.

  13. Measurement of optical activity of honey bee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Gutiérrez, Mauricio; Olivares-Pérez, Arturo; Salgado-Verduzco, Marco Antonio; Ibarra-Torres, Juan Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Optical activity of some substances, such as chiral molecules, often exhibits circular birefringence. Circular birefringence causes rotation of the vibration plane of the plane polarized light as it passes through the substance. In this work we present optical characterization of honey as function of the optical activity when it is placed in a polariscope that consists of a light source and properly arranged polarizing elements.

  14. Optical Activity of Planar Achiral Metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Plum, E; Zheludev, N I

    2008-01-01

    We report that the classical phenomena of optical activity and circular dichroism, which are traditionally associated with chirality (helicity) of organic molecules, proteins and inorganic structures, can be observed in non-chiral artificial media. Intriguingly, our metamaterial structure yields exceptionally strong resonant optical activity, which also leads to the appearance of a backward wave, a characteristic sign of negative-index media.

  15. Optical magnetism and optical activity in nonchiral planar plasmonic metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guozhou; Li, Qiang; Yang, Lizhen; Wu, Lijun

    2016-07-01

    We investigate optical magnetism and optical activity in a simple planar metamolecule composed of double U-shaped metal split ring resonators (SRRs) twisted by 90° with respect to one another. Compared to a single SRR, the resonant energy levels are split and strong magnetic response can be observed due to inductive and conductive coupling. More interestingly, the nonchiral structures exhibit strong optical gyrotropy (1100°/λ) under oblique incidence, benefiting from the strong electromagnetic coupling. A chiral molecule model is proposed to shed light on the physical origin of optical activity. These artificial chiral metamaterials could be utilized to control the polarization of light and promise applications in enantiomer sensing-based medicine, biology, and drug development.

  16. Efficient Synthesis of Optically Active Alcohols

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    J.S. Chen; Z.R. Dong; Y.Y. Li; B.Z. Li; Y. Xing; W.Y. Shen; G. Chen; X.Q. Zhang; J. X. Gao

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Optically active secondary alcohols are versatile building blocks for synthesis of unnatural biological active compounds and functional materials. Therefore, study on efficient synthesis of optically active alcohols is becoming an important subject in synthetic organic chemistry. Catalytic asymmetric reduction of carbonyl compounds is a practical method to create chiral alcohols. For the past decades, a large number of catalytic methods have been developed to achieve this goal.

  17. Integrated optical devices using bacteriorhodopsin as active nonlinear optical material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dér, András; Fábián, László; Valkai, Sándor; Wolff, Elmar; Ramsden, Jeremy; Ormos, Pál

    2006-08-01

    Coupling of optical data-processing devices with microelectronics, telecocommunication and sensory functions, is among the biggest challenges in molecular electronics. Intensive research is going on to find suitable nonlinear optical materials that could meet the demanding requirements of optoelectronic applications, especially regarding high sensitivity and stability. In addition to inorganic and organic crystals, biological molecules have also been considered for use in integrated optics, among which the bacterial chromoprotein, bacteriorhodopsin (bR) generated the most interest. bR undergoes enormous absorption and concomitant refractive index changes upon initiation of a cyclic series of photoreactions by a burst of actinic light. This effect can be exploited to create highly versatile all-optical logical elements. We demonstrate the potential of this approach by investigating the static and dynamic response of several basic elements of integrated optical devices. Our results show that, due to its relatively high refractive index changes, bR can be used as an active nonlinear optical material to produce a variety of integrated optical switching and modulation effects.

  18. Optical theorem detectors for active scatterers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marengo, Edwin A.; Tu, Jing

    2015-10-01

    We develop a new theory of the optical theorem for scalar fields in nonhomogeneous media which can be bounded or unbounded. It applies to arbitrary lossless backgrounds and quite general probing fields. The derived formulation holds for arbitrary passive scatterers, which can be dissipative, as well as for the more general class of active scatterers which are composed of a (passive) scatterer component and an active, radiating (antenna) component. The generalization of the optical theorem to active scatterers is relevant to many applications such as surveillance of active targets including certain cloaks and invisible scatterers and wireless communications. The derived theoretical framework includes the familiar real power optical theorem describing power extinction due to both dissipation and scattering as well as a novel reactive optical theorem related to the reactive power changes. The developed approach naturally leads to three optical theorem indicators or statistics which can be used to detect changes or targets in unknown complex media. The paper includes numerical simulation results that illustrate the application of the derived optical theorem results to change detection in complex and random media.

  19. Synthesis and reactions of optically active cyanohydrins

    OpenAIRE

    Effenberger, Franz

    1994-01-01

    Cyanohydrins have always held a place of importance both as technical products and as reagents in organic chemistry. It is surprising, therefore, that optically active Cyanohydrins have been extensively investigated and employed for syntheses relatively recently. This can be explained by the fact that only in the past few years have enzymatic methods made chiral Cyanohydrins readily available in high optical purity. Chiral Cyanohydrins are widespread in nature in the form of the respective gl...

  20. Photovoltaic concentrator assembly with optically active cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesniak, Adam P

    2014-01-21

    A photovoltaic concentrator assembly that includes a housing that defines an internal volume and includes a rim, wherein the rim defines an opening into the internal volume, a photovoltaic cell positioned in the internal volume, and an optical element that includes an optically active body and a flange extending outward from the body, wherein the flange is sealingly engaged with the rim of the housing to enclose the internal volume.

  1. Optical control of antibacterial activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Velema, Willem A.; van der Berg, Jan Pieter; Hansen, Mickel J.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial resistance is a major problem in the modern world, stemming in part from the build-up of antibiotics in the environment. Novel molecular approaches that enable an externally triggered increase in antibiotic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution and auto-inactivation are highly desir

  2. Spontaneous natural optical activity in disordered media

    CERN Document Server

    Pinheiro, F A; Papasimakis, N; Zheludev, N I

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate natural optical activity in disordered ensembles of non-chiral plasmonic resonators. We show that the statistical distributions of rotatory power and spatial dichroism are strongly dependent on the scattering mean free path in diffusive random media. This result is explained in terms of the intrinsic geometric chirality of disordered media, as they lack mirror symmetry. We argue that chirality and natural optical activity of disordered systems can be quantified by the standard deviation of both rotatory power and spatial dichroism. Our results are based on microscopic electromagnetic wave transport theory coupled to vectorial Green's matrix method for pointlike scatterers, and are independently confirmed by full-wave simulations.

  3. The Adaptive Optics Summer School Laboratory Activities

    CERN Document Server

    Ammons, S Mark; Armstrong, J D; Crossfield, Ian; Do, Tuan; Fitzgerald, Mike; Harrington, David; Hickenbotham, Adam; Hunter, Jennifer; Johnson, Jess; Johnson, Luke; Li, Kaccie; Lu, Jessica; Maness, Holly; Morzinski, Katie; Norton, Andrew; Putnam, Nicole; Roorda, Austin; Rossi, Ethan; Yelda, Sylvana

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) is a new and rapidly expanding field of instrumentation, yet astronomers, vision scientists, and general AO practitioners are largely unfamiliar with the root technologies crucial to AO systems. The AO Summer School (AOSS), sponsored by the Center for Adaptive Optics, is a week-long course for training graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in the underlying theory, design, and use of AO systems. AOSS participants include astronomers who expect to utilize AO data, vision scientists who will use AO instruments to conduct research, opticians and engineers who design AO systems, and users of high-bandwidth laser communication systems. In this article we describe new AOSS laboratory sessions implemented in 2006-2009 for nearly 250 students. The activity goals include boosting familiarity with AO technologies, reinforcing knowledge of optical alignment techniques and the design of optical systems, and encouraging inquiry into critical scientific questions in vision science using AO sys...

  4. Surface enhanced Raman optical activity (SEROA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, Salim; Blanch, E.W.

    2008-01-01

    Raman optical activity (ROA) directly monitors the stereochemistry of chiral molecules and is now an incisive probe of biomolecular structure. ROA spectra contain a wealth of information on tertiary folding, secondary structure and even the orientation of individual residues in proteins and nucle...

  5. Integration of active and passive polymer optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Schøler, Mikkel; Kristensen, Anders

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate a wafer scale fabrication process for integration of active and passive polymer optics: Polymer DFB lasers and waveguides. Polymer dye DFB lasers are fabricated by combined nanoimprint and photolithography (CNP). The CNP fabrication relies on an UV transparent stamp with nm sized...

  6. Transmission matrix of a uniaxial optically active crystal platelet

    OpenAIRE

    Zomer, Fabian

    2005-01-01

    Expressions corresponding to the transmission of a uniaxial optically active crystal platelet are provided for an optical axis parallel and perpendicular to the plane of interface. The optical activity is taken into account by a consistent multipolar expansion of the crystal medium response due to the path of an electromagnetic wave. Numerical examples of the effect of the optical activity are given for quartz platelets of chosen thicknesses. The optical activity's effects on the variations o...

  7. Target for optically activated seekers and trackers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakin, C. T.; Willett, N. F.

    1984-05-01

    This abstract discloses a target for optically activated seekers and trackers (TOAST) which provides for calibrated and variable target characteristics such as size, intensity, spatial position, color and interfering background. The TOAST has a first ilumination system providing a target light beam through an adjustable iris which controls image size. The target beam passes through a collimator lens which focuses the light at infinity. With the target beam focused at infinity, the motion of an elevation plate lengthens or shortens the distance from the collimator lens to a one motion mirror. The target beam is attenuated by a variable filter driven by a servo-motor, and a color selection process is provided by passing the beam through spectral filters. A background light beam with background imagery is provided to the beamsplitter mirror and mixed with the target image so as to simulate the target environment encountered by an operating optically activated seeker and tracker.

  8. Actively controlled thin-shell space optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denoyer, Keith K.; Flint, Eric M.; Main, John A.; Lindler, Jason E.

    2003-08-01

    Increasingly, scientific and military missions require the use of space-based optical systems. For example, new capabilities are required for imaging terrestrial like planets, for surveillance, and for directed energy applications. Given the difficulties in producing and launching large optics, it is doubtful that refinements of conventional technology will meet future needs, particularly in a cost-effective manner. To meet this need, recent research has been investigating the feasibility of a new class of ultra-lightweight think-skin optical elements that combine recent advances in lightweight thermally formed materials, active materials, and novel sensing and control architectures. If successful, the approach may lead to an order of magnitude reduction in space optics areal density, improved large scale manufacturing capability, and dramatic reductions in manufacturing and launch costs. In a recent effort, a one meter thin-film mirror like structure was fabricated. This paper provides an overview of tools used to model and simulate this structure as well as results from structural dynamic testing. In addition, progress in the area of non-contact global shape control using smart materials is presented.

  9. On the classical theory of molecular optical activity

    CERN Document Server

    Frolov, Alexei M

    2010-01-01

    The basic principles of classical and semi-classical theories of molecular optical activity are discussed. These theories are valid for dilute solutions of optically active organic molecules. It is shown that all phenomena known in the classical theory of molecular optical activity can be described with the use of one pseudo-scalar which is a uniform function of the incident light frequency $\\omega$. The relation between optical rotation and circular dichroism is derived from the basic Kramers-Kronig relations. In our discussion of the general theory of molecular optical activity we introduce the tensor of molecular optical activity. It is shown that to evaluate the optical rotation and circular dichroism at arbitrary frequencies one needs to know only nine (3 + 6) molecular tensors. The quantum (or semi-classical) theory of molecular optical activity is also briefly discussed. We also raise the possibility of measuring the optical rotation and circular dichroism at wavelengths which correspond to the vacuum ...

  10. Active optics control development at the LBT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, David S.; Biddick, Christopher; Hill, John M.

    2014-07-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) is built around two 8.4 m-diameter primary mirrors placed with a centerline separation of 14.4 m in a common altitude/azimuth mount. Each side of the telescope can utilize a deployable prime focus instrument; alternatively, the beam can be directed to a Gregorian instrument by utilizing a deployable secondary mirror. The direct-Gregorian beam can be intercepted and redirected to several bent-Gregorian instruments by utilizing a deployable tertiary mirror. Two of the available bent-Gregorian instruments are interferometers, capable of coherently combining the beams from the two sides of the telescope. Active optics can utilize as many as 26 linearly independent degrees of freedom to position the primary, secondary and tertiary mirrors to control optical collimation while the telescope operates in its numerous observing modes. Additionally, by applying differential forces at 160 locations on each primary mirror, active optics controls the primary mirror figure. The authors explore the challenges associated with collimation and primary mirror figure control at the LBT and outline the ongoing related development aimed at optimizing image quality and preparing the telescope for interferometric operations.

  11. Feasibility of Extreme Ultraviolet Active Optical Clock

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANG Wei; CHEN Jing-Biao

    2011-01-01

    @@ We propose an experimental scheme of vacuum ultraviolet(VUV)and extreme ultraviolet(XUV)optical fre-quency standards with noble gas atoms.Considering metastable state 3P2 noble atoms pumped by a conventional discharging method,the atomic beam is collimated with transverse laser cooling at the metastable state and en-ters into the laser cavity in the proposed setup.Due to stimulated emission from the metasable state to the ground state inside the laser cavity consisting of VUV reflection coating mirrors,our calculations show that with enough population inversion to compensate for the cavity loss,an active optical frequency standard at VUV and XUV is feasible.

  12. Passive and Active Fiber Optic Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digonnet, Michel Jean-Francois

    This thesis is concerned with the development and characterization of both passive and active fiber-optic components for applications in single-mode fiber systems, in particular in the new technology of fiber sensors and signal processors. These components include single-mode fiber directional couplers, vital to many optical fiber systems, all-fiber wavelength multiplexers, with potential applications in communication systems and active fiber devices, and single-crystal fiber lasers and amplifiers as miniature light sources and signal regenerators. The fiber directional couplers involved in this work, fabricated by a polishing process, are described in detail. Experimental characterization of their coupling, loss and unique tuning properties, and their respective dependence on the coupler geometrical parameters, are reported. A theoretical model of fiber-to-fiber coupling is also developed and shown to be a very useful and accurate tool in the design and study of this type of fiber couplers. The dependence of the coupling properties of fiber couplers on the signal wavelength is studied both theoretically and experimentally for applications in wavelength division multiplexing. All-fiber multiplexers exhibiting a good wavelength selectivity and unique tunability are described and shown to operate according to the coupler model. Work on active fiber devices explores the potential of the new technology of single-crystal fibers grown by the laser-heated floating-zone technique. The status of crystal fiber growth is reported, together with the basic physical and optical characteristics of these fibers. A theoretical model of the effects of fiber model structure on the gain and laser operation of active fibers is also developed to predict the performance of lasers and amplifiers in a fiber form. Several conceptual pumping schemes are described which offer solutions to the difficult problem of optically pumping small diameter fiber amplifiers. The experimental

  13. Vibrational optical activity principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nafie, Laurence A

    2011-01-01

    This unique book stands as the only comprehensive introduction to vibrational optical activity (VOA) and is the first single book that serves as a complete reference for this relatively new, but increasingly important area of molecular spectroscopy. Key features:A single-source reference on this topic that introduces, describes the background and foundation of this area of spectroscopy.Serves as a guide on how to use it to carry out applications with relevant problem solving.Depth and breadth of the subject is presented in a logical, complete and progressive fashion. A

  14. Optical activity and Alfred Werner's coordination chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Karl-Heinz; Berke, Heinz

    2011-03-01

    It is widely accepted, that Pasteur's seminal discovery of the opposite optical activity of ammonium sodium tartrate enantiomorphs in solution gave the spark to organic stereochemistry and led to the development of the tetrahedron model by van't Hoff and Le Bel. The proof that chirality is inherently connected to octahedral coordination chemistry fostered greatly Werner's spatial views of metal complexes and his coordination theory. The actual proof of principle was established via separation of diastereomeric camphor sulfonate salts of racemic metal complexes. PMID:20928897

  15. Integrated optical devices using bacteriorhodopsin as active nonlinear optical material

    OpenAIRE

    Dér, A; Fábián, L.; Valkai, S.; Wolff, E.; Ramsden, Jeremy J.; Ormos, P.

    2006-01-01

    Coupling of optical data-processing devices with microelectronics, telecocommunication and sensory functions, is among the biggest challenges in molecular electronics. Intensive research is going on to find suitable nonlinear optical materials that could meet the demanding requirements of optoelectronic applications, especially regarding high sensitivity and stability. In addition to inorganic and organic crystals, biological molecules have also been considered for use in in...

  16. The Parameters Selection of SMA Optically Activated an Its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Zhi-min; CHEN Yu-ming; YU Xiao-lei

    2002-01-01

    Shape Memory Alloy ( SMA ) optically activated is the key technology of optical SMA activator.According to the shape memory mechanism of SMA, researches are done on the activating response time and light wavelength of activating source etc of SMA optically activated to approach the parameters selection of optical activation. SMA has the optimum efficiency in the range of 13 seconds to 27 seconds when SMA is illuminated continuously by wavelength of 675um; The power of light wave has a low effect on SMA; The longer the activating wavelength, the quicker the response time of SMA activated. If the proper activating time and activating wavelength are adopted, and the structure deformation of composite material of SMA imbedded may be actively controlled, an ideal effect will be gotten. The research provides an evidence for the design of optical SMA activator and is of great significance to its application. The research on smart structure has a wide application prospect.

  17. Detecting eavesdropping activity in fiber optic networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Gregory G.

    The secure transmission of data is critical to governments, military organizations, financial institutions, health care providers and other enterprises. The primary method of securing in-transit data is though data encryption. A number of encryption methods exist but the fundamental approach is to assume an eavesdropper has access to the encrypted message but does not have the computing capability to decrypt the message in a timely fashion. Essentially, the strength of security depends on the complexity of the encryption method and the resources available to the eavesdropper. The development of future technologies, most notably quantum computers and quantum computing, is often cited as a direct threat to traditional encryption schemes. It seems reasonable that additional effort should be placed on prohibiting the eavesdropper from coming into possession of the encrypted message in the first place. One strategy for denying possession of the encrypted message is to secure the physical layer of the communications path. Because the majority of transmitted information is over fiber-optic networks, it seems appropriate to consider ways of enhancing the integrity and security of the fiber-based physical layer. The purpose of this research is to investigate the properties of light, as they are manifested in single mode fiber, as a means of insuring the integrity and security of the physical layer of a fiber-optic based communication link. Specifically, the approach focuses on the behavior of polarization in single mode fiber, as it is shown to be especially sensitive to fiber geometry. Fiber geometry is necessarily modified during the placement of optical taps. The problem of detecting activity associated with the placement of an optical tap is herein approached as a supervised machine learning anomaly identification task. The inputs include raw polarization measurements along with additional features derived from various visualizations of the raw data (the inputs are

  18. Human psychophysiological activity monitoring methods using fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyczkowski, M.; Uzieblo-Zyczkowska, B.

    2010-10-01

    The paper presents the concept of fiber optic sensor system for human psycho-physical activity detection. A fiber optic sensor that utilizes optical phase interferometry or intensity in modalmetric to monitor a patient's vital signs such as respiration cardiac activity, blood pressure and body's physical movements. The sensor, which is non-invasive, comprises an optical fiber interferometer that includes an optical fiber proximately situated to the patient so that time varying acusto-mechanical signals from the patient are coupled into the optical fiber. The system can be implemented in embodiments ranging form a low cost in-home to a high end product for in hospital use.

  19. Active optics with a minimum number of actuators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaitre, Gerard R.

    2014-06-01

    Optics for astronomy implies powerful developments of active and adaptive optics methods applied to instrumentation from X-rays to the near infrared for the design of telescopes, spectrographs, and coronagraph planet finders. This presentation particularly emphasizes the development of active optics methods. Highly accurate and remarkably smooth surfaces from active optics methods allow new optical systems that use highly aspheric and non-axisymmetric - freeform - surfaces. Depending on the goal and performance required for a deformable optical surface, elasticity theory analysis is carried out either with small deformation thin plate theory, large deformation thin plate theory, shallow spherical shell theory, or the weakly conical shell theory. A mirror thickness distribution is then determined as a function of associated bending actuators and boundary conditions. For a given optical shape to generate, one searches for optical solutions with a minimum number of actuators.

  20. Optically active mechanical modes of tapered optical fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Wuttke, Chrisitan; Rauschenbeutel, Arno

    2013-01-01

    Tapered optical fibers with a nanofiber waist are widely used tools for efficient coupling of light to photonic devices or quantum emitters via the nanofiber's evanescent field. In order to ensure well-controlled coupling, the phase and polarization of the nanofiber guided light field have to be stable. Here, we show that in typical tapered optical fibers these quantities exhibit high-frequency thermal fluctuations. They originate from high-Q torsional oscillations that opto-mechanically couple to the nanofiber-guided light. We present a simple ab-initio theoretical model that quantitatively explains the torsional mode spectrum and that can be used to design tapered optical fibers with tailored mechanical properties.

  1. Extrinsic chirality: Tunable optically active reflectors and perfect absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plum, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Conventional three-dimensional (3D) chiral media can exhibit optical activity for transmitted waves, but optical activity for reflected waves is negligible. This work shows that mirror asymmetry of the experimental arrangement—extrinsic 3D chirality—leads to giant optical activity for reflected waves with fundamentally different characteristics. It is demonstrated experimentally that extrinsically 3D-chiral illumination of a lossy metasurface backed by a mirror enables tunable circular dichroism and circular birefringence as well as perfect absorption of circularly polarized waves. In contrast, such polarization phenomena vanish for conventional optically active media backed by a mirror.

  2. Baker's Yeast Mediated Reduction of Optically Active Diketone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG, Guo-Jun(郑国君); GAO, Xiao-Lei(高晓蕾); CHEN, Jin-Chun(陈锦春); LI, Yu-Lin(李裕林)

    2004-01-01

    Baker's yeast mediated reduction of optically active diketone is described. The two keto groups are efficiently differentiated and the ee value of the recovered material is considerably raised. It affords highly optically active key intermediates efficiently for the synthesis of natural polyhydroxylated agarofuran products.

  3. A note on optical activity and extrinsic chirality

    CERN Document Server

    Arteaga, Oriol

    2015-01-01

    It has been assumed that optical activity can be measured by illuminating alternatively a material with left- and right- handed circular polarized light and analyzing the differential response. This simple and intuitive approach is in general incorrect, and has led to misleading idea that extrinsic chirality involves optical activity.

  4. Active Learning Environment with Lenses in Geometric Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tural, Güner

    2015-01-01

    Geometric optics is one of the difficult topics for students within physics discipline. Students learn better via student-centered active learning environments than the teacher-centered learning environments. So this study aimed to present a guide for middle school teachers to teach lenses in geometric optics via active learning environment…

  5. Optical Switching for Dynamic Distribution of Wireless-Over-Fiber Signals in Active Optical Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegas Olmos, Juan José; Rodes, Guillermo; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2012-01-01

    of a four wavelength-division-multiplexed channel system operating on a WiMax frequency band and employing an orthogonal-frequency-division-multiplexing modulation at 625 Mbits/s per channel, transmission of the data over 20 km of optical fiber, and active switching in a 1 × 16 active optical switch...

  6. Gratings in passive and active optical waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berendt, Martin Ole

    1999-01-01

    This research project has focused on gratings in optical waveguides. These gratings may be produced by UV photon imprinting in optical fibers or planar technology waveguides. The gratings are optical waveguide equivalents of bulk dielectric mirrors or diffraction grating. For a grating in a waveg......This research project has focused on gratings in optical waveguides. These gratings may be produced by UV photon imprinting in optical fibers or planar technology waveguides. The gratings are optical waveguide equivalents of bulk dielectric mirrors or diffraction grating. For a grating...... mode losses confirmed. An elaborated grating model, including the detailed shape of the index modulation, has been developed. This model improves the interpretation of grating growth dynamic, which is of value to both; analysis of the UV imprinting set-ups, and to the investigation of photosensitivity...... mechanisms in silica. An other important part of the project aimed at perfection of distributed feed back DFB fiber lasers. At the outset of this project, DFB fiber lasers had been demonstrated, now the DFB fiber lasers are in commercial production. One of the problems that had to be overcome was to secure...

  7. Active reflective components for adaptive optical zoom systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jungwirth, Matthew Edward Lewis

    This dissertation presents the theoretical and experimental exploration of active reflective components specifically for large-aperture adaptive optical zoom systems. An active reflective component can change its focal length by physically deforming its reflecting surface. Adaptive optical zoom (AOZ) utilizes active components in order to change magnification and achieve optical zoom, as opposed to traditional zooming systems that move elements along the optical axis. AOZ systems are theoretically examined using a novel optical design theory that enables a full-scale tradespace analysis, where optical design begins from a broad perspective and optimizes to a particular system. The theory applies existing strategies for telescope design and aberration simulation to AOZ, culminating in the design of a Cassegrain objective with a 3.3X zoom ratio and a 375mm entrance aperture. AOZ systems are experimentally examined with the development of a large-aperture active mirror constructed of a composite material called carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP). The active CFRP mirror uses a novel actuation method to change radius of curvature, where actuators press against two annular rings placed on the mirror's back. This method enables the radius of curvature to increase from 2000mm to 2010mm. Closed-loop control maintains good optical performance of 1.05 waves peak-to-valley (with respect to a HeNe laser) when the active CFRP mirror is used in conjunction with a commercial deformable mirror.

  8. Optical activity of chitosan films with induced anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gegel, Natalia O.; Shipovskaya, Anna B.

    2016-04-01

    The optical anisotropy and optical activity of salt and basic chitosan films, both initial and modified in formic acid vapor were studied. The modification of such films was found to be accompanied by induced time-stable optical anisotropy, by varying the values of specific optical rotation [α] and an inversion of the sign of [α]. The angular dependences (indicatrices) of the specific optical rotation of films on the orientation angle of the sample relative to the direction of the polarization vector of the incident light beam in a plane perpendicular to the beam were obtained. The indicatrices of the initial chitosan films have an almost symmetrical character while those of the films modified in formic acid vapor are irregular. It is concluded of the formation of a vitrified cholesteric mesophase in the chitosan films with induced optical anisotropy.

  9. Coherent control of optical activity and optical anisotropy of thin metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Mousavi, Seyedmohammad A; Shi, Jinhui; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2013-01-01

    The future fibre optic communications network will rely on photons as carriers of information, which may be stored in intensity, polarization or phase of light. However, processing of such optical information usually relies on electronics. Aiming to avoid the conversion between optical and electronic signals, modulation of light with light based on optical nonlinearity has become a major research field, but real integrated all-optical systems face thermal management and energy challenges. On the other hand, it has recently been demonstrated that the interaction of two coherent light beams on a thin, lossy, linear material can lead to large and ultrafast intensity modulation at arbitrarily low power resulting from coherent absorption. Here we demonstrate that birefringence and optical activity (linear and circular birefringence and dichroism) of functional materials can be coherently controlled by placing a thin material slab into a standing wave formed by the signal and control waves. Efficient control of the...

  10. Giant optical activity of sugar in thin soap films.

    OpenAIRE

    Emile, Janine; Emile, Olivier; Ghoufi, Aziz; Moréac, Alain; Casanova, Federico; Ding, Minxia; Houizot, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    We report on enhanced experimental optical activity measurements of thin soap films in the presence of sugar. This unusual optical activity is linked to the intramolecular chiral conformation of the glucose molecules at the air/liquid interface. Choosing sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) as a model surfactant and glucose as model sugar, favorable interactions between the anionic group -OSO3(-)- and the glucose molecules are highlighted. This induces an interfacial anchoring of glucose molecules lea...

  11. Ultrafast chiroptical spectroscopy: Monitoring optical activity in quick time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanju Rhee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Optical activity spectroscopy provides rich structural information of biologically important molecules in condensed phases. However, a few intrinsic problems of conventional method based on electric field intensity measurement scheme prohibited its extension to time domain technique. We have recently developed new types of optical activity spectroscopic methods capable of measuring chiroptical signals with femtosecond pulses. It is believed that these novel approaches will be applied to a variety of ultrafast chiroptical studies.

  12. DISSYMMETRY MODEL OF MOLECULAR POLARIZABILITY AND OPTICAL ACTIVITY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周志华; 汤杰

    1991-01-01

    Dissymmetry model of molecular polarizability divided into some layers within a sphere,some rules and sequence according to the magnitude of polarizability replaced by bond refraction for many groups have been suggested.The relationship between the dissymmetry of molecular polarizability arrounding the dissymmetric carbon atom and the direction of optical activity has been discussed .The accuracy is above 95 persent to use our model and rules to determine over 6000 compounds of optical activity.

  13. Raman optical activity of proteins and glycoproteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smyth, E

    2000-03-01

    Raman optical activity (ROA), measured in this project as a small difference in the intensity of Raman scattering from chiral molecules in right- and left-circularly polarised incident laser light, offers the potential to provide more information about the structure of biological molecules in aqueous solution than conventional spectroscopic techniques. Chapter one contains a general discussion of the relative merits of different spectroscopic techniques for structure determination of biomolecules, as well as a brief introduction to ROA. In Chapter two a theoretical analysis of ROA is developed, which extends the discussion in chapter one. The spectrometer setup and sample preparation is then discussed in chapter three. Instrument and sample conditions are monitored to ensure that the best results are obtained. As with any experimental project problems occur, which may result in a degradation of the spectra obtained. The cause of these problems was explored and remedied whenever possible. Chapter four introduces a brief account of protein, glycoprotein and carbohydrate structure and function, with a particular emphasis on the structure of proteins. In the remaining chapters experimental ROA results on proteins and glycoproteins, with some carbohydrate samples, from a wide range of sources are examined. For example, in chapter five some {beta}-sheet proteins are examined. Structural features in these proteins are examined in the extended amide III region of their ROA spectra, revealing that ROA is sensitive to the rigidity or flexibility inherent in proteins. Chapter six concentrates on a group of proteins (usually glycoproteins) known as the serine proteinase inhibitors (serpins). Medically, the serpins are one of the most important groups of proteins of current interest, with wide-ranging implications in conditions such as Down's syndrome, Alzheimer's disease, and emphysema with associated cirrhosis of the liver. With favourable samples and conditions ROA

  14. Magneto-Optical Activity in High Index Dielectric Nanoantennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, N.; Froufe-Pérez, L. S.; Sáenz, J. J.; García-Martín, A.

    2016-08-01

    The magneto-optical activity, namely the polarization conversion capabilities of high-index, non-absorbing, core-shell dielectric nanospheres is theoretically analyzed. We show that, in analogy with their plasmonic counterparts, the polarization conversion in resonant dielectric particles is linked to the amount of electromagnetic field probing the magneto-optical material in the system. However, in strong contrast with plasmon nanoparticles, due to the peculiar distribution of the internal fields in resonant dielectric spheres, the magneto-optical response is fully governed by the magnetic (dipolar and quadrupolar) resonances with little effect of the electric ones.

  15. Magneto-Optical Activity in High Index Dielectric Nanoantennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Sousa, N; Froufe-Pérez, L S; Sáenz, J J; García-Martín, A

    2016-01-01

    The magneto-optical activity, namely the polarization conversion capabilities of high-index, non-absorbing, core-shell dielectric nanospheres is theoretically analyzed. We show that, in analogy with their plasmonic counterparts, the polarization conversion in resonant dielectric particles is linked to the amount of electromagnetic field probing the magneto-optical material in the system. However, in strong contrast with plasmon nanoparticles, due to the peculiar distribution of the internal fields in resonant dielectric spheres, the magneto-optical response is fully governed by the magnetic (dipolar and quadrupolar) resonances with little effect of the electric ones. PMID:27488903

  16. Magneto-Optical Activity in High Index Dielectric Nanoantennas

    CERN Document Server

    de Sousa, N; Sáenz, J J; García-Martín, A

    2016-01-01

    The magneto-optical activity, namely the polarization conversion capabilities of high-index, non-absorbing, core-shell dielectric nanospheres is theoretically analyzed. We show that, in analogy with their plasmonic counterparts, the polarization conversion in resonant dielectric particles is linked to the amount of electromagnetic field probing the magneto-optical material in the system. However, in strong contrast with plasmon nanoparticles, due to the peculiar distribution of the internal fields in resonant dielectric spheres, the magneto-optical response is fully governed by the magnetic (dipolar and quadrupolar) resonances with little effect of the electric ones.

  17. Active Learning Strategies for Introductory Light and Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoloff, David R.

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that traditional approaches are ineffective in teaching physics concepts, including light and optics concepts. A major focus of the work of the Activity Based Physics Group has been on the development of active learning curricula like RealTime Physics (RTP) labs and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs). Among…

  18. Active stabilization of the optical part in fiber optic quantum cryptography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balygin, K. A.; Klimov, A. N.; Kulik, S. P.; Molotkov, S. N.

    2016-03-01

    The method of active stabilization of the polarization and other parameters of the optical part of a two-pass fiber optic quantum cryptography has been proposed and implemented. The method allows the completely automated maintenance of the visibility of interference close to an ideal value ( V ≥ 0.99) and the reduction of the instrumental contribution to the error in primary keys (QBER) to 0.5%.

  19. Novel implementations of optical switch control module and 3D-CSP for 10 Gbps active optical access system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakayama, Koji; Okuno, Michitaka; Matsuoka, Yasunobu; Hosomi, Kazuhiko; Sagawa, Misuzu; Sugawara, Toshiki

    2009-11-01

    We propose an optical switch control procedure for high-performance and cost-effective 10 Gbps Active Optical Access System (AOAS) in which optical switches are used instead of optical splitters in PON (Passive Optical Network). We demonstrate the implemented optical switch control module on Optical Switching Unit (OSW) with logic circuits works effectively. We also propose a compact optical 3D-CSP (Chip Scale Package) to achieve the high performance of AOAS without losing cost advantage of PON. We demonstrate the implemented 3D-CSP works effectively.

  20. Influence of optical activity on rogue waves propagating in chiral optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temgoua, D D Estelle; Kofane, T C

    2016-06-01

    We derive the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation in chiral optical fiber with right- and left-hand nonlinear polarization. We use the similarity transformation to reduce the generalized chiral NLS equation to the higher-order integrable Hirota equation. We present the first- and second-order rational solutions of the chiral NLS equation with variable and constant coefficients, based on the modified Darboux transformation method. For some specific set of parameters, the features of chiral optical rogue waves are analyzed from analytical results, showing the influence of optical activity on waves. We also generate the exact solutions of the two-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations, which describe optical activity effects on the propagation of rogue waves, and their properties in linear and nonlinear coupling cases are investigated. The condition of modulation instability of the background reveals the existence of vector rogue waves and the number of stable and unstable branches. Controllability of chiral optical rogue waves is examined by numerical simulations and may bring potential applications in optical fibers and in many other physical systems. PMID:27415269

  1. Influence of optical activity on rogue waves propagating in chiral optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temgoua, D. D. Estelle; Kofane, T. C.

    2016-06-01

    We derive the nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation in chiral optical fiber with right- and left-hand nonlinear polarization. We use the similarity transformation to reduce the generalized chiral NLS equation to the higher-order integrable Hirota equation. We present the first- and second-order rational solutions of the chiral NLS equation with variable and constant coefficients, based on the modified Darboux transformation method. For some specific set of parameters, the features of chiral optical rogue waves are analyzed from analytical results, showing the influence of optical activity on waves. We also generate the exact solutions of the two-component coupled nonlinear Schrödinger equations, which describe optical activity effects on the propagation of rogue waves, and their properties in linear and nonlinear coupling cases are investigated. The condition of modulation instability of the background reveals the existence of vector rogue waves and the number of stable and unstable branches. Controllability of chiral optical rogue waves is examined by numerical simulations and may bring potential applications in optical fibers and in many other physical systems.

  2. Enhanced sensing of molecular optical activity with plasmonic nanohole arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Gorkunov, Maxim V; Kondratov, Alexey V

    2016-01-01

    Prospects of using metal hole arrays for the enhanced optical detection of molecular chirality in nanosize volumes are investigated. Light transmission through the holes filled with an optically active material is modeled and the activity enhancement by more than an order of magnitude is demonstrated. The spatial resolution of the chirality detection is shown to be of a few tens of nanometers. From comparing the effect in arrays of cylindrical holes and holes of complex chiral shape, it is concluded that the detection sensitivity is determined by the plasmonic near field enhancement. The intrinsic chirality of the arrays due to their shape appears to be less important.

  3. FTTA System Demo Using Optical Fiber-Coupled Active Antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Neumann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The convergence of optical and wireless systems such as Radio-over-Fiber (RoF networks is the key to coping with the increasing bandwidth demands due to the increasing popularity of video and other high data rate applications. A high level of integration of optical technologies enables simple base stations with a fiber-to-the-antenna (FTTA approach. In this paper, we present a complete full-duplex RoF–FTTA system consisting of integrated active fiber-coupled optical receiving and transmitting antennas that are directly connected to a standard single mode fiber optical link. Data rates up to 1 Gbit/s could be shown without advanced modulation formats on a 1.5 GHz carrier frequency. The antennas as well as the whole system are explained and the results of the system experiments are discussed.

  4. All-optical active switching in individual semiconductor nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccione, Brian; Cho, Chang-Hee; van Vugt, Lambert K.; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2012-10-01

    The imminent limitations of electronic integrated circuits are stimulating intense activity in the area of nanophotonics for the development of on-chip optical components, and solutions incorporating direct-bandgap semiconductors are important in achieving this end. Optical processing of data at the nanometre scale is promising for circumventing these limitations, but requires the development of a toolbox of components including emitters, detectors, modulators, waveguides and switches. In comparison to components fabricated using top-down methods, semiconductor nanowires offer superior surface properties and stronger optical confinement. They are therefore ideal candidates for nanoscale optical network components, as well as model systems for understanding optical confinement. Here, we demonstrate all-optical switching in individual CdS nanowire cavities with subwavelength dimensions through stimulated polariton scattering, as well as a functional NAND gate built from multiple switches. The device design exploits the strong light-matter coupling present in these nanowires, leading to footprints that are a fraction of those of comparable silicon-based dielectric contrast and photonic crystal devices.

  5. Optical-radio positional offsets for active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Orosz, G

    2013-01-01

    Context. It will soon become possible to directly link the most accurate radio reference frame with the Gaia optical reference frame using many common extragalactic objects. It is important to know the level of coincidence between the radio and optical positions of compact active galactic nuclei (AGN). Aims. Using the best catalogues available at present, we investigate how many AGN with significantly large optical-radio positional offsets exist as well as the possible causes of these offsets. Methods. We performed a case study by finding optical counterparts to the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF2) radio sources in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 9 (DR9). The ICRF2 catalogue was used as a reference because the radio positions determined by Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observations are about two orders of magnitude more accurate than the optical positions. Results. We find 1297 objects in common for ICRF2 and SDSS DR9. Statistical analysis of the optical-radio differ...

  6. Molecular structures of viruses from Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanch, Ewan W.; Hecht, Lutz; Syme, Christopher D.;

    2002-01-01

    A vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) study of a range of different structural types of virus exemplified by filamentous bacteriophage fd, tobacco mosaic virus, satellite tobacco mosaic virus, bacteriophage MS2 and cowpea mosaic virus has revealed that, on account of its sensitivity to chira...

  7. Flow Velocity Measurement by Image Processing of Optically Activated Tracers

    OpenAIRE

    Gharib, M.; Hernan, M. A.; Yavrouian, A. H.; Sarohia, V.

    1985-01-01

    A computerized flow visualization technique capable of quantifying the flow field automatically has been developed. This technique uses afterglowing effect of optically activated phosphorescent particles to retrieve vectorial information on each trace. By using this information, in conjunction with computer image processing, the flow field of a free surface transient vortex was investigated.

  8. Multicolour Optical Photometry of Active Geostationary Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolley, A.; Wade, G.; Bedard, D.

    Although broadband photometry has been used to infer information about artificial satellites since soon after the launch of Sputnik 1, the development of photometric techniques for non-resolved space object identification or characterisation has been hampered by the large number of variables involved. Many individual studies, and some long ongoing experiments, have used costly metre-class telescopes to obtain data despite other experiments demonstrating that much more flexible and affordable small aperture telescopes may be suitable for the task. In addition, due to the highly time consuming and weather dependent nature of obtaining photometric observations, many studies have suffered from data sets of limited size, or relied upon simulations to support their claims. With this in mind, an experiment was conducted with the aim of determining the utility of small aperture telescopes for conducting broadband photometry of satellites for the purpose of non-resolved space object identification and characterisation. A 14 inch Celestron CG-14 telescope was used to gain multiple night-long, high temporal resolution data sets of six active geostationary satellites. The results of the experiment cast doubt on the efficacy of some of the previous approaches to obtaining and analysing photometric data. It was discovered that geostationary satellite lightcurves can vary to a greater degree than has generally been recognised, and colour ratios vary considerably with changes in the illumination/observation geometry, making it difficult to use colour for satellite discrimination. Evidence was also detected of variations in the spectral energy distribution of sunlight reflected off satellite surface materials, which could have implications for surface material characterisation and techniques that aim to separate satellite body and solar panel contributions to the total observed spectra.

  9. Optical imaging of neural and hemodynamic brain activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schei, Jennifer Lynn

    Optical imaging technologies can be used to record neural and hemodynamic activity. Neural activity elicits physiological changes that alter the optical tissue properties. Specifically, changes in polarized light are concomitant with neural depolarization. We measured polarization changes from an isolated lobster nerve during action potential propagation using both reflected and transmitted light. In transmission mode, polarization changes were largest throughout the center of the nerve, suggesting that most of the optical signal arose from the inner nerve bundle. In reflection mode, polarization changes were largest near the edges, suggesting that most of the optical signal arose from the outer sheath. To overcome irregular cell orientation found in the brain, we measured polarization changes from a nerve tied in a knot. Our results show that neural activation produces polarization changes that can be imaged even without regular cell orientations. Neural activation expends energy resources and elicits metabolic delivery through blood vessel dilation, increasing blood flow and volume. We used spectroscopic imaging techniques combined with electrophysiological measurements to record evoked neural and hemodynamic responses from the auditory cortex of the rat. By using implantable optics, we measured responses across natural wake and sleep states, as well as responses following different amounts of sleep deprivation. During quiet sleep, evoked metabolic responses were larger compared to wake, perhaps because blood vessels were more compliant. When animals were sleep deprived, evoked hemodynamic responses were smaller following longer periods of deprivation. These results suggest that prolonged neural activity through sleep deprivation may diminish vascular compliance as indicated by the blunted vascular response. Subsequent sleep may allow vessels to relax, restoring their ability to deliver blood. These results also suggest that severe sleep deprivation or chronic

  10. Low-cost active optical system for fire surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utkin, A. B.; Lavrov, A. V.; Vilar, R. M.

    2009-06-01

    Detection of smoke plumes using active optical sensors provides many advantages with respect to passive methods of fire surveillance. However, the price of these sensors is often too high as compared to passive fire detection instruments, such as infrared and video cameras. This article describes robust and cost effective diode-laser optical sensor for automatic fire surveillance in industrial environment. Physical aspects of the sensing process allowing to simplify the hardware and software design, eventually leading to significant reduction of manufacturing and maintenance costs, are discussed.

  11. Optical packaging activities at Institute of Microelectronics (IME), Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Keng-Hwa; Sudharsanam, Krishnamachari; Pamidighantam, Ramana V.; Yeo, Yongkee; Iyer, Mahadevan K.

    2002-08-01

    The development of optoelectronic components for gigabit Ethernet communications is converging towards access networks where the cost of device makes a significant impact on the market acceptance. Device fabrication and packaging cost have to be brought down with novel assembly and packaging methods. Singapore has established a reputation in semiconductor device development and fabrication with excellent process and packaging facilities. Institute of Microelectronics (IME) was founded in 1991 to add value to the Singapore electronics industry. IME is involved in the development of active and passive photonics components using Silicon and polymer materials. We present a brief report on the development activities taking place in the field of optical component packaging at IME in recent years. We present a review of our competence and some of the optical device packaging activities that are being undertaken.

  12. Laser-heating-based active optics for synchrotron radiation applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Fugui; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2016-01-01

    Active optics has attracted considerable interest from researchers in synchrotron radiation facilities, because of its capacity for x-ray wavefront correction. Here, we report a novel and efficient technique for correcting or modulating a mirror surface profile based on laser-heating-induced thermal expansion. An experimental study of the characteristics of the surface thermal deformation response indicates that the power of a milliwatt laser yields a bump height as low as sub-nanometer scale, and that variation of the spot size modulates the response function width effectively. In addition, the capacity of the laser-heating technique for free-form surface modulation is demonstrated via a surface correction experiment. The developed method is a promising new approach towards effective x-ray active optics coupled with at-wavelength metrology techniques.

  13. Hemodynamic responses to functional activation accessed by optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Songlin; Li, Pengcheng; Yang, Yuanyuan; Lv, Xiaohua; Luo, Qingming

    2006-01-01

    A multi-wavelength light-emitting diode (LED) and laser diode (LD) based optical imaging system was developed to visualize the changes in cerebral blood flow, oxygenation following functional activation simultaneously in rodent cortex. The 2-D blood flow image was accessed by laser speckle contrast imaging, and the spectroscopic imaging of intrinsic signal was used for the calculation of oxyhemoglobin (HbO), deoxyhemoglobin (Hb) and total hemoglobin (HbT) concentration. The combination of spectroscopic imaging and laser speckle contrast imaging provides the capability to simultaneously investigate the spatial and temporal blood flow and hemoglobin concentration changes with high resolution, which may lead to a better understanding of the coupling between neuronal activation and vascular responses. The optical imaging system been built is compact and convenient to investigators. And it is reliable to acquire raw data. In present study, the hemodynamic responses to cortical spreading depression (CSD) in parietal cortex of ~-chloralose/urethan anesthetized rats were demonstrated.

  14. Optically Active Metasurface with Non-Chiral Plasmonic Nanoantennas

    OpenAIRE

    Shaltout, Amr; Liu, Jingjing; Shalaev, V.M.; Kildishev, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    We design, fabricate, and experimentally demonstrate an optically active metasurface of lambda/50 thickness that rotates linearly polarized fight by 450 over a broadband wavelength range in the near IR region. The rotation is achieved through the use of a planar array of plasmonic nanoantennas, which generates a fixed phase-shift between the left circular polarized and right circular polarized components of the incident light. Our approach is built on a new supercell metasurface design method...

  15. Synthesis of Optically Active Polystyrene Catalyzed by Monophosphine Pd Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouffroy, Matthieu; Armspach, Dominique; Matt, Dominique; Osakada, Kohtaro; Takeuchi, Daisuke

    2016-07-11

    Cationic Pd(II) monophosphine complexes derived from α- and β-cyclodextrins (CDs) promote the homopolymerization of styrene under carbon monoxide pressure. Although reversible CO coordination takes place under catalytic conditions according to (13) C NMR studies with (13) C-enriched CO, both complexes catalyze the formation of CO-free styrene polymers. These macromolecules display optical activity as a result of the presence of stereoregular sequences within the overall atactic polymer.

  16. Anatomical Atlas-Guided Diffuse Optical Tomography of Brain Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Custo, Anna; Boas, David A.; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Dan, Ippeita; Mesquita, Rickson; Fischl, Bruce; Grimson, W. Eric L.; Wells, Williams

    2009-01-01

    We describe a neuro imaging protocol that utilizes an anatomical atlas of the human head to guide Diffuse optical tomography of human brain activation. The protocol is demonstrated by imaging the hemodynamic response to median nerve stimulation in three healthy subjects, and comparing the images obtained using a head atlas with the images obtained using the subject-specific head anatomy. The results indicate that using the head atlas anatomy it is possible to reconstruct the location of the b...

  17. Dispersion relations and sum rules for natural optical activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dispersion relations and sum rules are derived for the complex rotatory power of an arbitrary linear (nonmagnetic) isotropic medium showing natural optical activity. Both previously known dispersion relations and sum rules as well as new ones are obtained. It is shown that the Rosenfeld-Condon dispersion formula is inconsistent with the expected asymptotic behavior at high frequencies. A new dispersion formula based on quantum eletro-dynamics removes this inconsistency; however, it still requires modification in the low-frequency limit. (Author)

  18. Synthesis of Optically Active Polystyrene Catalyzed by Monophosphine Pd Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouffroy, Matthieu; Armspach, Dominique; Matt, Dominique; Osakada, Kohtaro; Takeuchi, Daisuke

    2016-07-11

    Cationic Pd(II) monophosphine complexes derived from α- and β-cyclodextrins (CDs) promote the homopolymerization of styrene under carbon monoxide pressure. Although reversible CO coordination takes place under catalytic conditions according to (13) C NMR studies with (13) C-enriched CO, both complexes catalyze the formation of CO-free styrene polymers. These macromolecules display optical activity as a result of the presence of stereoregular sequences within the overall atactic polymer. PMID:27218801

  19. Activities report of the Division of Optical Technology (FOA 33)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letalick, Dietmar

    1988-11-01

    Research on hydro-optics; laser remote sensing; coherent CO2 laser radar; optical signatures; atmospheric transmission; ionizing radiation effects on electronics; fiber optics; optical processing; and terrain models is summarized.

  20. Sparse matrix approximation method for an active optical control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Timothy P.; Lyon, Richard G.; Dorband, John E.; Hollis, Jan M.

    2001-12-01

    We develop a sparse matrix approximation method to decompose a wave front into a basis set of actuator influence functions for an active optical system consisting of a deformable mirror and a segmented primary mirror. The wave front used is constructed by Zernike polynomials to simulate the output of a phase-retrieval algorithm. Results of a Monte Carlo simulation of the optical control loop are compared with the standard, nonsparse approach in terms of accuracy and precision, as well as computational speed and memory. The sparse matrix approximation method can yield more than a 50-fold increase in the speed and a 20-fold-reduction in matrix size and a commensurate decrease in required memory, with less than 10% degradation in solution accuracy. Our method is also shown to be better than when elements are selected for the sparse matrix on a magnitude basis alone. We show that the method developed is a viable alternative to use of the full control matrix in a phase-retrieval-based active optical control system.

  1. Optical Assessment of Caries Lesion Structure and Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert Chulsung

    New, more sophisticated diagnostic tools are needed for the detection and characterization of caries lesions in the early stages of development. It is not sufficient to simply detect caries lesions, methods are needed to assess the activity of the lesion and determine if chemical or surgical intervention is needed. Previous studies have demonstrated that polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) can be used to nondestructively image the subsurface lesion structure and measure the thickness of the highly mineralized surface zone. Other studies have demonstrated that the rate of dehydration can be correlated with the lesion activity and that the rate can be measured using optical methods. The main objective of this work was to test the hypothesis that optical methods can be used to assess lesion activity on tooth coronal and root surfaces. Simulated caries models were used to develop and validate an algorithm for detecting and measuring the highly mineralized surface layer using PS-OCT. This work confirmed that the algorithm was capable of estimating the thickness of the highly mineralized surface layer with high accuracy. Near-infrared (NIR) reflectance and thermal imaging methods were used to assess activity of caries lesions by measuring the state of lesion hydration. NIR reflectance imaging performed the best for artificial enamel and natural coronal caries lesion samples, particularly at wavelengths coincident with the water absorption band at 1460-nm. However, thermal imaging performed the best for artificial dentin and natural root caries lesion samples. These novel optical methods outperformed the conventional methods (ICDAS II) in accurately assessing lesion activity of natural coronal and root caries lesions. Infrared-based imaging methods have shown potential for in-vivo applications to objectively assess caries lesion activity in a single examination. It is likely that if future clinical trials are a success, this novel imaging

  2. Optical Control of Living Cells Electrical Activity by Conjugated Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Nicola; Bossio, Caterina; Vaquero Morata, Susana; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Antognazza, Maria Rosa

    2016-01-28

    Hybrid interfaces between organic semiconductors and living tissues represent a new tool for in-vitro and in-vivo applications. In particular, conjugated polymers display several optimal properties as substrates for biological systems, such as good biocompatibility, excellent mechanical properties, cheap and easy processing technology, and possibility of deposition on light, thin and flexible substrates. These materials have been employed for cellular interfaces like neural probes, transistors for excitation and recording of neural activity, biosensors and actuators for drug release. Recent experiments have also demonstrated the possibility to use conjugated polymers for all-optical modulation of the electrical activity of cells. Several in-vitro study cases have been reported, including primary neuronal networks, astrocytes and secondary line cells. Moreover, signal photo-transduction mediated by organic polymers has been shown to restore light sensitivity in degenerated retinas, suggesting that these devices may be used for artificial retinal prosthesis in the future. All in all, light sensitive conjugated polymers represent a new approach for optical modulation of cellular activity. In this work, all the steps required to fabricate a bio-polymer interface for optical excitation of living cells are described. The function of the active interface is to transduce the light stimulus into a modulation of the cell membrane potential. As a study case, useful for in-vitro studies, a polythiophene thin film is used as the functional, light absorbing layer, and Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK-293) cells are employed as the biological component of the interface. Practical examples of successful control of the cell membrane potential upon stimulation with light pulses of different duration are provided. In particular, it is shown that both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing effects on the cell membrane can be achieved depending on the duration of the light stimulus. The reported

  3. Optical Control of Living Cells Electrical Activity by Conjugated Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Nicola; Bossio, Caterina; Vaquero Morata, Susana; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Antognazza, Maria Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid interfaces between organic semiconductors and living tissues represent a new tool for in-vitro and in-vivo applications. In particular, conjugated polymers display several optimal properties as substrates for biological systems, such as good biocompatibility, excellent mechanical properties, cheap and easy processing technology, and possibility of deposition on light, thin and flexible substrates. These materials have been employed for cellular interfaces like neural probes, transistors for excitation and recording of neural activity, biosensors and actuators for drug release. Recent experiments have also demonstrated the possibility to use conjugated polymers for all-optical modulation of the electrical activity of cells. Several in-vitro study cases have been reported, including primary neuronal networks, astrocytes and secondary line cells. Moreover, signal photo-transduction mediated by organic polymers has been shown to restore light sensitivity in degenerated retinas, suggesting that these devices may be used for artificial retinal prosthesis in the future. All in all, light sensitive conjugated polymers represent a new approach for optical modulation of cellular activity. In this work, all the steps required to fabricate a bio-polymer interface for optical excitation of living cells are described. The function of the active interface is to transduce the light stimulus into a modulation of the cell membrane potential. As a study case, useful for in-vitro studies, a polythiophene thin film is used as the functional, light absorbing layer, and Human Embryonic Kidney (HEK-293) cells are employed as the biological component of the interface. Practical examples of successful control of the cell membrane potential upon stimulation with light pulses of different duration are provided. In particular, it is shown that both depolarizing and hyperpolarizing effects on the cell membrane can be achieved depending on the duration of the light stimulus. The reported

  4. Multistate transitions and quantum oscillations of optical activity

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco, Celia; 10.1103/PhysRevA.00.002100

    2012-01-01

    We consider the effects of multistate transitions on the tunneling racemization of chiral molecules. This requires going beyond simple two-state models of enantiomers and to include transitions within a multiple-level quantum-mechanical system.We derive an effective two-level description which accounts for transitions from the enantiomers to an arbitrary number of excited states as an application of the Weisskopf-Wigner approximation scheme. Modifications to the optical activity from these additional states are considered in general terms under the assumption of \\textit{CPT} invariance and then under T invariance. Some formal dynamical analogies between enantiomers and the neutral K-meson system are discussed.

  5. Active Learning Strategies for Introductory Light and Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoloff, David R.

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that traditional approaches are ineffective in teaching physics concepts, including light and optics concepts. A major focus of the work of the Activity Based Physics Group has been on the development of active learning curricula like RealTime Physics (RTP) labs and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs). Among the characteristics of these curricula are: (1) use of a learning cycle in which students are challenged to compare predictions—discussed with their peers in small groups—to observations of the physical world, (2) use of guided hands-on work to construct basic concepts from observations, and (3) use of computer-based tools. It has been possible to change the lecture and laboratory learning environments at a large number of universities, colleges, and high schools without changing the structure of the introductory course. For example, in the United States, nearly 200 physics departments have adopted RTP, and many others use pre-publication, open-source versions or have adopted the RTP approach to develop their own labs. Examples from RTP and ILDs (including optics magic tricks) are described in this paper.

  6. Changing University Students’ Alternative Conceptions of Optics by Active Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zalkida Hadžibegović

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Active learning is individual and group participation in effective activities such as in-class observing, writing, experimenting, discussion, solving problems, and talking about to-be-learned topics. Some instructors believe that active learning is impossible, or at least extremely difficult to achieve in large lecture sessions. Nevertheless, the truly impressive implementation results of theSCALE-UP learning environment suggest that such beliefs are false (Beichner et al., 2000. In this study, we present a design of an active learning environment with positive effect on students. The design is based on the following elements: (1 helping students to learn from interactive lecture experiment; (2 guiding students to use justified explanation and prediction after observing and exploring a phenomenon; (3 developing a conceptual question sequencedesigned for use in an interactive lecture with students answering questions in worksheets by writing and drawing; (4 evaluating students’ conceptual change and gains by questions related to light reflection, refraction, and image formation in an exam held a week after the active learning session. Data were collected from 95 science freshmen with different secondary school backgrounds. They participated in geometrical optics classes organized for collecting research results during and after only one active learning session.The results have showed that around 60% of the students changed their initial alternative conceptions of vision and of image formation. It was also found that a large group of university students is likely to be engaged in active learning, shifting from a passive role they usually play during teacher’s lectures.

  7. Optical Properties of Active Regions in Terahertz Quantum Cascade Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyksik, M.; Motyka, M.; Rudno-Rudziński, W.; Sęk, G.; Misiewicz, J.; Pucicki, D.; Kosiel, K.; Sankowska, I.; Kubacka-Traczyk, J.; Bugajski, M.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, AlGaAs/GaAs superlattice, with layers' sequence and compositions imitating the active and injector regions of a quantum cascade laser designed for emission in the terahertz spectral range, was investigated. Three independent absorption-like optical spectroscopy techniques were employed in order to study the band structure of the minibands formed within the conduction band. Photoreflectance measurements provided information about interband transitions in the investigated system. Common transmission spectra revealed, in the target range of intraband transitions, mainly a number of lines associated with the phonon-related processes, including two-phonon absorption. In contrast, differential transmittance realized by means of Fourier-transform spectroscopy was utilized to probe the confined states of the conduction band. The obtained energy separation between the second and third confined electron levels, expected to be predominantly contributing to the lasing, was found to be ~9 meV. The optical spectroscopy measurements were supported by numerical calculations performed in the effective mass approximation and XRD measurements for layers' width verification. The calculated energy spacings are in a good agreement with the experimental values.

  8. Optically active metasurface with non-chiral plasmonic nanoantennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaltout, Amr; Liu, Jingjing; Shalaev, Vladimir M; Kildishev, Alexander V

    2014-08-13

    We design, fabricate, and experimentally demonstrate an optically active metasurface of λ/50 thickness that rotates linearly polarized light by 45° over a broadband wavelength range in the near IR region. The rotation is achieved through the use of a planar array of plasmonic nanoantennas, which generates a fixed phase-shift between the left circular polarized and right circular polarized components of the incident light. Our approach is built on a new supercell metasurface design methodology: by judiciously designing the location and orientation of individual antennas in the structural supercells, we achieve an effective chiral metasurface through a collective operation of nonchiral antennas. This approach simplifies the overall structure when compared to designs with chiral antennas and also enables a chiral effect which quantitatively depends solely on the supercell geometry. This allows for greater tolerance against fabrication and temperature effects. PMID:25051158

  9. Reverberation Mapping of Optical Emission Lines in Five Active Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Fausnaugh, M M; Bentz, M C; Denney, K D; De Rosa, G; Peterson, B M; Kochanek, C S; Pogge, R W; Adams, S M; Barth, A J; Beatty, Thomas G; Bhattacharjee, A; Borman, G A; Boroson, T A; Bottorff, M C; Brown, Jacob E; Brown, Jonathan S; Brotherton, M S; Coker, C T; Crawford, S M; Croxall, K V; Eftekharzadeh, Sarah; Eracleous, Michael; Joner, M D; Henderson, C B; Holoien, T W -S; Horne, Keith; Hutchison, T; Kaspi, Shai; Kim, S; King, Anthea L; Li, Miao; Lochhaas, Cassandra; Ma, Zhiyuan; MacInnis, F; Manne-Nicholas, E R; Mason, M; Montuori, Carmen; Mosquera, Ana; Mudd, Dale; Musso, R; Nazarov, S V; Nguyen, M L; Okhmat, D N; Onken, Christopher A; Ou-Yang, B; Pancoast, A; Pei, L; Penny, Matthew T; Poleski, Radoslaw; Rafter, Stephen; Romero-Colmenero, E; Runnoe, Jessie; Sand, David J; Schimoia, Jaderson S; Sergeev, S G; Shappee, B J; Simonian, Gregory V; Somers, Garrett; Spencer, M; Starkey, D; Stevens, Daniel J; Tayar, Jamie; Treu, T; Valenti, Stefano; Van Saders, J; Villanueva, S; Villforth, C; Weiss, Yaniv; Winkler, H; Zhu, W

    2016-01-01

    We present the first results from an optical reverberation mapping campaign executed in 2014, targeting the active galactic nuclei (AGN) MCG+08-11-011, NGC 2617, NGC 4051, 3C 382, and Mrk 374. Our targets have diverse and interesting observational properties, including a "changing look" AGN and a broad-line radio galaxy. Based on continuum-H$\\beta$ lags, we measure black hole masses for all five targets. We also obtain H$\\gamma$ and He{\\sc ii}\\,$\\lambda 4686$ lags for all objects except 3C 382. The He{\\sc ii}\\,$\\lambda 4686$ lags indicate radial stratification of the BLR, and the masses derived from different emission lines are in general agreement. The relative responsivities of these lines are also in qualitative agreement with photoionization models. These spectra have extremely high signal-to-noise ratios (100--300 per pixel) and there are excellent prospects for obtaining velocity-resolved reverberation signatures.

  10. Raman Optical Activity and Raman Spectra of Amphetamine Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.; Shim, Irene; White, Peter Cyril;

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical calculations and preliminary measurements of vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of different species of amphetamine (amphetamine and amphetamine-H+) are reported for the first time. The quantum chemical calculations were carried out as hybrid ab initio DFT......-molecular orbital calculations by use of the Gaussian 03W pro- gram, based on complete geometry minimizations of the conformational energy of the S-(+)-amphetamine molecule, the S-(+)-amphetamine-H+ ion, and the R-(–)-amphetamine molecule. Following this, harmonic frequency calculations have been made, providing...... are employed for identification purposes. The DFT calculations show that the most stable conformations are those allowing for close contact between the aromatic ring and the amine hydrogen atoms. The internal rotational barrier within the same amphetamine enanti- omer has a considerable influence on the Raman...

  11. An analogy between optical turbulence and activator-inhibitor dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Spineanu, F

    2016-01-01

    The propagation of laser beams through madia with cubic nonlinear polarization is part of a wide range of practical applications. The processes that are involved are at the limit of extreme (cuasi-singular) concentration of intensity and the transversal modulational instability, the saturation and defocusing effect of the plasma generated through avalanche and multi-photon (MPI) ionization are competing leading to a complicated pattern of intensity in the transversal plane. This regime has been named \\textquotedblleft optical turbulence\\textquotedblright and it has been studied in experiments and numerical simulations. Led by the similarity of the portraits we have investigated the possibility that the mechanism that underlies the creation of the complex pattern of the intensity field is the manifestation of the dynamics \\textit{activator-inhibitor}. In a previous work we have considered a unique connection, the \\textit{complex Landau-Ginzburg equation}, a common ground for the nonlinear Schrodinger equation ...

  12. Active fiber optic technologies used as tamper-indicating devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Safeguards and Seals Evaluation Program is evaluating new fiber optic active seal technologies for use at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The goal of the program is to investigate active seal technologies that can monitor secured containers storing special nuclear materials (SNM) within DOE vaults. Specifically investigated were active seal technologies that can be used as tamper-indicating devices to monitor secured containers within vaults while personnel remain outside the vault area. Such a system would allow minimal access into vaults while ensuring container content accountability. The purpose of this report is to discuss tamper-indicating devices that were evaluated for possible DOE use. While previous seal evaluations (Phase I and II) considered overall facility applications, this discussion focuses specifically on their use in vault storage situations. The report will highlight general background information, specifications and requirements, and test procedures. Also discussed are the systems available from four manufacturers: Interactive Technologies, Inc., Fiber SenSys, Inc., Inovonics, Inc., and Valve Security Systems

  13. Active fiber optic technologies used as tamper-indicating devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horton, P.R.V.; Waddoups, I.G.

    1995-11-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Safeguards and Seals Evaluation Program is evaluating new fiber optic active seal technologies for use at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The goal of the program is to investigate active seal technologies that can monitor secured containers storing special nuclear materials (SNM) within DOE vaults. Specifically investigated were active seal technologies that can be used as tamper-indicating devices to monitor secured containers within vaults while personnel remain outside the vault area. Such a system would allow minimal access into vaults while ensuring container content accountability. The purpose of this report is to discuss tamper-indicating devices that were evaluated for possible DOE use. While previous seal evaluations (Phase I and II) considered overall facility applications, this discussion focuses specifically on their use in vault storage situations. The report will highlight general background information, specifications and requirements, and test procedures. Also discussed are the systems available from four manufacturers: Interactive Technologies, Inc., Fiber SenSys, Inc., Inovonics, Inc., and Valve Security Systems.

  14. Optically powered active sensing system for Internet Of Things

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Chen; Wang, Jin; Yin, Long; Yang, Jing; Jiang, Jian; Wan, Hongdan

    2014-10-01

    Internet Of Things (IOT) drives a significant increase in the extent and type of sensing technology and equipment. Sensors, instrumentation, control electronics, data logging and transmission units comprising such sensing systems will all require to be powered. Conventionally, electrical powering is supplied by batteries or/and electric power cables. The power supply by batteries usually has a limited lifetime, while the electric power cables are susceptible to electromagnetic interference. In fact, the electromagnetic interference is the key issue limiting the power supply in the strong electromagnetic radiation area and other extreme environments. The novel alternative method of power supply is power over fiber (PoF) technique. As fibers are used as power supply lines instead, the delivery of the power is inherently immune to electromagnetic radiation, and avoids cumbersome shielding of power lines. Such a safer power supply mode would be a promising candidate for applications in IOT. In this work, we built up optically powered active sensing system, supplying uninterrupted power for the remote active sensors and communication modules. Also, we proposed a novel maximum power point tracking technique for photovoltaic power convertors. In our system, the actual output efficiency greater than 40% within 1W laser power. After 1km fiber transmission and opto-electric power conversion, a stable electric power of 210mW was obtained, which is sufficient for operating an active sensing system.

  15. Comparative pharmacological activity of optical isomers of phenibut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambrova, Maija; Zvejniece, Liga; Liepinsh, Edgars; Cirule, Helena; Zharkova, Olga; Veinberg, Grigory; Kalvinsh, Ivars

    2008-03-31

    Phenibut (3-phenyl-4-aminobutyric acid) is a GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)-mimetic psychotropic drug which is clinically used in its racemic form. The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of racemic phenibut and its optical isomers in pharmacological tests and GABAB receptor binding studies. In pharmacological tests of locomotor activity, antidepressant and pain effects, S-phenibut was inactive in doses up to 500 mg/kg. In contrast, R-phenibut turned out to be two times more potent than racemic phenibut in most of the tests. In the forced swimming test, at a dose of 100 mg/kg only R-phenibut significantly decreased immobility time. Both R-phenibut and racemic phenibut showed analgesic activity in the tail-flick test with R-phenibut being slightly more active. An GABAB receptor-selective antagonist (3-aminopropyl)(diethoxymethyl)phosphinic acid (CGP35348) inhibited the antidepressant and antinociceptive effects of R-phenibut, as well as locomotor depressing activity of R-phenibut in open field test in vivo. The radioligand binding experiments using a selective GABAB receptor antagonist [3H]CGP54626 revealed that affinity constants for racemic phenibut, R-phenibut and reference GABA-mimetic baclofen were 177+/-2, 92+/-3, 6.0+/-1 microM, respectively. We conclude that the pharmacological activity of racemic phenibut relies on R-phenibut and this correlates to the binding affinity of enantiomers of phenibut to the GABAB receptor. PMID:18275958

  16. Multilayer Active Control For Structural Damping And Optical-Path Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Zahidul H.; Spanos, John T.; Fanson, James L.

    1995-01-01

    Two active-control concepts incorporated into system for suppression of vibrations in truss structure and regulation of length of optical path on structure to nanometer level. Optical-path-length-control subsystem contains two feedback control loops to obtain active damping in wide amplitude-and-frequency range. Concept described in more detail in number of previous articles, including "Stabilizing Optical-Path Length on a Vibrating Structure" (NPO-19040), "Controllable Optical Delay Line for Stellar Interferometry" (NPO-18686), "Test Bed for Control of Optical-Path Lengths" (NPO-18487).

  17. CdSe-single-nanoparticle based active tips for near-field optical microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Chevalier, N; Woehl, J C; Reiss, P; Bleuse, J; Chandezon, F; Huant, S

    2005-01-01

    We present a method to realize active optical tips for use in near-field optics that can operate at room temperature. A metal-coated optical tip is covered with a thin polymer layer stained with CdSe nanocrystals or nanorods at low density. The time analysis of the emission rate and emission spectra of the active tips reveal that a very small number of particles - possibly down to only one - can be made active at the tip apex. This opens the way to near-field optics with a single inorganic nanoparticle as a light source.

  18. Twisted split-ring-resonator photonic metamaterial with huge optical activity

    CERN Document Server

    Decker, M; Soukoulis, C M; Linden, S; Wegener, M

    2010-01-01

    Coupled split-ring-resonator metamaterials have previously been shown to exhibit large coupling effects, which are a prerequisite for obtaining large effective optical activity. By a suitable lateral arrangement of these building blocks, we completely eliminate linear birefringence and obtain pure optical activity and connected circular optical dichroism. Experiments at around 100-THz frequency and corresponding modeling are in good agreement. Rotation angles of about 30 degrees for 205nm sample thickness are derived.

  19. Resonance Raman Optical Activity of Single Walled Chiral Carbon Nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Péter R; Koltai, János; Surján, Péter R; Kürti, Jenő; Szabados, Ágnes

    2016-07-21

    Resonance (vibrational) Raman Optical Activity (ROA) spectra of six chiral single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are studied by theoretical means. Calculations are performed imposing line group symmetry. Polarizability tensors, computed at the π-electron level, are differentiated with respect to DFT normal modes to generate spectral intensities. This computational protocol yields a ROA spectrum in good agreement with the only experiment on SWCNT, available at present. In addition to the conventional periodic electric dipole operator we introduce magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole operators, suitable for conventional k-space calculations. Consequences of the complex nature of the wave function on the scattering cross section are discussed in detail. The resonance phenomenon is accounted for by the short time approximation. Involvement of fundamental vibrations in the region of the intermediate frequency modes is found to be more notable in ROA than in Raman spectra. Calculations indicate exceptionally strong resonance enhancement of SWCNT ROA signals. Resonance ROA profile of the (6,5) tube shows an interesting sign change that may be exploited experimentally for SWCNT identification. PMID:27315548

  20. Origin invariance in vibrational resonance Raman optical activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidal, Luciano N., E-mail: lnvidal@utfpr.edu.br; Cappelli, Chiara, E-mail: chiara.cappelli@unipi.it [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Università di Pisa, Via Moruzzi 3, 56124 Pisa (Italy); Egidi, Franco [Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Barone, Vincenzo [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2015-05-07

    A theoretical investigation on the origin dependence of the vibronic polarizabilities, isotropic and anisotropic rotational invariants, and scattering cross sections in Resonance Raman Optical Activity (RROA) spectroscopy is presented. Expressions showing the origin dependence of these polarizabilities were written in the resonance regime using the Franck-Condon (FC) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) approximations for the electronic transition moments. Differently from the far-from-resonance scattering regime, where the origin dependent terms cancel out when the rotational invariants are calculated, RROA spectrum can exhibit some origin dependence even for eigenfunctions of the electronic Hamiltonian. At the FC level, the RROA spectrum is completely origin invariant if the polarizabilities are calculated using a single excited state or for a set of degenerate states. Otherwise, some origin effects can be observed in the spectrum. At the HT level, RROA spectrum is origin dependent even when the polarizabilities are evaluated from a single excited state but the origin effect is expected to be small in this case. Numerical calculations performed for (S)-methyloxirane, (2R,3R)-dimethyloxirane, and (R)-4-F-2-azetidinone at both FC and HT levels using the velocity representation of the electric dipole and quadrupole transition moments confirm the predictions of the theory and show the extent of origin effects and the effectiveness of suggested ways to remove them.

  1. Realistic Instrumentation Platform for Active and Passive Optical Remote Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brydegaard, Mikkel; Merdasa, Aboma; Gebru, Alem; Jayaweera, Hiran; Svanberg, Sune

    2016-02-01

    We describe the development of a novel versatile optical platform for active and passive remote sensing of environmental parameters. Applications include assessment of vegetation status and water quality. The system is also adapted for ecological studies, such as identification of flying insects including agricultural pests. The system is based on two mid-size amateur astronomy telescopes, continuous-wave diode lasers at different wavelengths ranging from violet to the near infrared, and detector facilities including quadrant photodiodes, two-dimensional and line scan charge-coupled device cameras, and a compact digital spectrometer. Application examples include remote Ramanlaser-induced fluorescence monitoring of water quality at 120 m distance, and insect identification at kilometer ranges using the recorded wing beat frequency and its spectrum of overtones. Because of the low cost this developmental platform is very suitable for advanced research projects in developing countries and has, in fact, been multiplied during hands-on workshops and is now being used by a number of groups at African universities. PMID:26772187

  2. Calculation of Raman optical activity spectra for vibrational analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutter, Shaun T; Zielinski, François; Popelier, Paul L A; Blanch, Ewan W

    2015-05-01

    By looking back on the history of Raman Optical Activity (ROA), the present article shows that the success of this analytical technique was for a long time hindered, paradoxically, by the deep level of detail and wealth of structural information it can provide. Basic principles of the underlying theory are discussed, to illustrate the technique's sensitivity due to its physical origins in the delicate response of molecular vibrations to electromagnetic properties. Following a short review of significant advances in the application of ROA by UK researchers, we dedicate two extensive sections to the technical and theoretical difficulties that were overcome to eventually provide predictive power to computational simulations in terms of ROA spectral calculation. In the last sections, we focus on a new modelling strategy that has been successful in coping with the dramatic impact of solvent effects on ROA analyses. This work emphasises the role of complementarity between experiment and theory for analysing the conformations and dynamics of biomolecules, so providing new perspectives for methodological improvements and molecular modelling development. For the latter, an example of a next-generation force-field for more accurate simulations and analysis of molecular behaviour is presented. By improving the accuracy of computational modelling, the analytical capabilities of ROA spectroscopy will be further developed so generating new insights into the complex behaviour of molecules.

  3. Infrared optical activity: electric field approaches in time domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Hanju; Choi, Jun-Ho; Cho, Minhaeng

    2010-12-21

    Vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy provides detailed information about the absolute configurations of chiral molecules including biomolecules and synthetic drugs. This method is the infrared (IR) analogue of the more popular electronic CD spectroscopy that uses the ultraviolet and visible ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum. Because conventional electronic CD spectroscopy measures the difference in signal intensity, problems such as weak signal and low time-resolution can limit its utility. To overcome the difficulties associated with that approach, we have recently developed femtosecond IR optical activity (IOA) spectrometry, which directly measures the IOA free-induction-decay (FID), the impulsive chiroptical IR response that occurs over time. In this Account, we review the time-domain electric field measurement and calculation methods used to simultaneously characterize VCD and related vibrational optical rotatory dispersion (VORD) spectra. Although conventional methods measure the electric field intensity, this vibrational technique is based on a direct phase-and-amplitude measurement of the electric field of the chiroptical signal over time. This method uses a cross-polarization analyzer to carry out heterodyned spectral interferometry. The cross-polarization scheme enables us to selectively remove the achiral background signal, which is the dominant noise component present in differential intensity measurement techniques. Because we can detect the IOA FID signal in a phase-amplitude-sensitive manner, we can directly characterize the time-dependent electric dipole/magnetic dipole response function and the complex chiral susceptibility that contain information about the angular oscillations of charged particles. These parameters yield information about the VCD and VORD spectra. In parallel with such experimental developments, we have also calculated the IOA FID signal and the resulting VCD spectrum. These simulations use a quantum mechanical

  4. Broadband angle- and permittivity-insensitive nondispersive optical activity based on chiral metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Kun; Su, Zhaoxian; Ding, Changlin; Liu, Yahong; Luo, Chunrong; Zhao, Xiaopeng; Bhattarai, Khagendra; Zhou, Jiangfeng

    2016-01-01

    Because of the strong inherent resonances, the giant optical activity obtained via chiral metamaterials generally suffers from high dispersion, which has been a big stumbling block to broadband applications. In this paper, we propose a type of chiral metamaterial consisting of interconnected metal helix structures with four-fold symmetry, which exhibits nonresonant Drude-like response and can therefore avoid the highly dispersive optical activity resulting from resonances. It shows that the well-designed chiral metamaterial can achieve nondispersive and pure optical activity with high transmittance in a broadband frequency range. And the optical activity of multi-layer chiral metamaterials is proportional to the layer numbers of single-layer chiral metamaterial. Most remarkably, the broadband behaviors of nondispersive optical activity and high transmission are insensitive to the incident angles of electromagnetic waves and permittivity of dielectric substrate, thereby enabling more flexibility in polarizatio...

  5. Efficient high repetition rate electro-optic Q-switched laser with an optically active langasite crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shihui; Yu, Haohai; Zhang, Huaijin; Han, Xuekun; Lu, Qingming; Ma, Changqin; Boughton, Robert I.; Wang, Jiyang

    2016-07-01

    With an optically active langasite (LGS) crystal as the electro-optic Q-switch, we demonstrate an efficient Q-switched laser with a repetition rate of 200 kHz. Based on the theoretical analysis of the interaction between optical activity and electro-optic property, the optical activity of the crystal has no influence on the birefringence during Q-switching if the quarter wave plate used was rotated to align with the polarization direction. With a Nd:LuVO4 crystal possessing a large emission cross-section and a short fluorescence lifetime as the gain medium, a stable LGS Q-switched laser was designed with average output power of 4.39 W, corresponding to a slope efficiency of 29.4% and with a minimum pulse width of 5.1 ns. This work represents the highest repetition rate achieved so far in a LGS Q-switched laser and it can provide a practical Q-switched laser with a tunable high repetition rates for many applications, such as materials processing, laser ranging, medicine, military applications, biomacromolecule materials, remote sensing, etc.

  6. The fiber-optic imaging and manipulation of neural activity during animal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Daisuke; Murayama, Masanori

    2016-02-01

    Recent progress with optogenetic probes for imaging and manipulating neural activity has further increased the relevance of fiber-optic systems for neural circuitry research. Optical fibers, which bi-directionally transmit light between separate sites (even at a distance of several meters), can be used for either optical imaging or manipulating neural activity relevant to behavioral circuitry mechanisms. The method's flexibility and the specifications of the light structure are well suited for following the behavior of freely moving animals. Furthermore, thin optical fibers allow researchers to monitor neural activity from not only the cortical surface but also deep brain regions, including the hippocampus and amygdala. Such regions are difficult to target with two-photon microscopes. Optogenetic manipulation of neural activity with an optical fiber has the advantage of being selective for both cell-types and projections as compared to conventional electrophysiological brain tissue stimulation. It is difficult to extract any data regarding changes in neural activity solely from a fiber-optic manipulation device; however, the readout of data is made possible by combining manipulation with electrophysiological recording, or the simultaneous application of optical imaging and manipulation using a bundle-fiber. The present review introduces recent progress in fiber-optic imaging and manipulation methods, while also discussing fiber-optic system designs that are suitable for a given experimental protocol. PMID:26427958

  7. Computerized Stokes analysis of optically active polymer films

    CERN Document Server

    Georgiev, Georgi

    2010-01-01

    Optics labs are an integral part of the advanced curriculum for physics majors. Students majoring in other disciplines, like chemistry, biology or engineering rarely have the opportunity to learn about the most recent optical techniques and mathematical representation used in today’s science and industry optics. Stokes analysis of polarization of light is one of those methods that are increasingly necessary but are seldom taught outside advanced physics or optics classes that are limited to physics majors. On the other hand biology and chemistry majors already use matrix and polarization techniques in the labs for their specialty, which makes the transition to matrix calculations seamless. Since most of the students in those majors postpone their enrollment in physics, most of the registered in those classes are juniors and seniors, enabling them to handle those techniques. We chose to study polymer samples to aid students majoring in other disciplines, especially chemistry and engineering, with understa...

  8. Direct optical observation of disclination effects in active photonic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Snow, B.D.; Adikan, F.R.M.; J.C.Gates; Gawith, C.B.E.; Dyadyusha, A.; Major, Huw E.; Kaczmarek, M.; P.G.R.Smith

    2008-01-01

    Liquid crystals (LC) are increasingly finding uses in fields outside of display optics. Their strong electro-optic response can be used in applications such as tunable photonic devices, for example, to make tunable planar Bragg gratings. While Bragg gratings are well known as fixed wavelength reflectors, the application of a liquid crystal can convert these fixed reflectors into tunable filter elements, with potential applications in telecommunications networks [1]. We have previously demonst...

  9. Impact of optical antennas on active optoelectronic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonakdar, Alireza; Mohseni, Hooman

    2014-10-01

    Remarkable progress has been made in the fabrication and characterization of optical antennas that are integrated with optoelectronic devices. Herein, we describe the fundamental reasons for and experimental evidence of the dramatic improvements that can be achieved by enhancing the light-matter interaction via an optical antenna in both photon-emitting and -detecting devices. In addition, integration of optical antennas with optoelectronic devices can lead to the realization of highly compact multifunctional platforms for future integrated photonics, such as low-cost lab-on-chip systems. In this review paper, we further focus on the effect of optical antennas on the detectivity of infrared photodetectors. One particular finding is that the antenna can have a dual effect on the specific detectivity, while it can elevate light absorption efficiency of sub-wavelength detectors, it can potentially increase the noise of the detectors due to the enhanced spontaneous emission rate. In particular, we predict that the detectivity of interband photon detectors can be negatively affected by the presence of optical antennas across a wide wavelength region covering visible to long wavelength infrared bands. In contrast, the detectivity of intersubband detectors could be generally improved with a properly designed optical antenna.

  10. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Ninth Edition Optics: Ninth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommen

  11. Surface plasmons and magneto-optic activity in hexagonal Ni anti-dot arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaioannou, Evangelos Th; Kapaklis, Vassilios; Melander, Emil; Hjörvarsson, Björgvin; Pappas, Spiridon D; Patoka, Piotr; Giersig, Michael; Fumagalli, Paul; Garcia-Martin, Antonio; Ctistis, Georgios

    2011-11-21

    The influence of surface plasmons on the magneto-optic activity in a two-dimensional hexagonal array is addressed. The experiments were performed using hexagonal array of circular holes in a ferromagnetic Ni film. Well pronounced troughs are observed in the optical reflectivity, resulting from the presence of surface plasmons. The surface plasmons are found to strongly enhance the magneto-optic response (Kerr rotation), as compared to a continuous film of the same composition. The influence of the hexagonal symmetry of the pattern on the coupling between the plasmonic excitations is demonstrated, using optical diffraction measurements and theoretical calculations of the magneto-optic and of the angular dependence of the optical activity. PMID:22109411

  12. Optically active substituted polyacetylene@carbon nanotube hybrids: Preparation, characterization and infrared emissivity property study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bu, Xiaohai; Zhou, Yuming, E-mail: ymzhou@seu.edu.cn; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Yongjuan; Zhang, Zewu; He, Man

    2014-08-15

    Optically active substituted polyacetylene@multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SPA@MWCNTs) nanohybrids were fabricated by wrapping helical SPA copolymers onto the surface of modified nanotubes through ester bonding linkage. SPA copolymer based on chiral phenylalanine and serine was pre-polymerized by a rhodium zwitterion catalyst in THF, and evidently proved to possess strong optical activity and adopt a predominately one-handed helical conformation. Various characterizations including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that the SPA had been covalently grafted onto the nanotubes without destroying their original graphite structure. The wrapped SPA was found to exhibit an enhancement in thermal stability and still maintained considerable optical activity after grafting. The infrared emissivity property of the nanohybrids at 8–14 μm was investigated in addition. The results indicated that the SPA@MWCNTs hybrid matrix could possess a much lower infrared emissivity value (ε=0.707) than raw MWCNTs, which might be due to synergistic effect of the unique helical conformation of optically active SPA and strengthened interfacial interaction between the organic polymers and inorganic nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: Optically active SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids with low infrared emissivity. - Highlights: • Synthesis of optically active SPA copolymer derived from serine and phenylalanine. • Preparation and characterization of optically active SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids. • Application study of the SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids (ε=0.707) in lowering the infrared emissivity.

  13. Optically active substituted polyacetylene@carbon nanotube hybrids: Preparation, characterization and infrared emissivity property study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optically active substituted polyacetylene@multiwalled carbon nanotubes (SPA@MWCNTs) nanohybrids were fabricated by wrapping helical SPA copolymers onto the surface of modified nanotubes through ester bonding linkage. SPA copolymer based on chiral phenylalanine and serine was pre-polymerized by a rhodium zwitterion catalyst in THF, and evidently proved to possess strong optical activity and adopt a predominately one-handed helical conformation. Various characterizations including Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) demonstrated that the SPA had been covalently grafted onto the nanotubes without destroying their original graphite structure. The wrapped SPA was found to exhibit an enhancement in thermal stability and still maintained considerable optical activity after grafting. The infrared emissivity property of the nanohybrids at 8–14 μm was investigated in addition. The results indicated that the SPA@MWCNTs hybrid matrix could possess a much lower infrared emissivity value (ε=0.707) than raw MWCNTs, which might be due to synergistic effect of the unique helical conformation of optically active SPA and strengthened interfacial interaction between the organic polymers and inorganic nanoparticles. - Graphical abstract: Optically active SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids with low infrared emissivity. - Highlights: • Synthesis of optically active SPA copolymer derived from serine and phenylalanine. • Preparation and characterization of optically active SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids. • Application study of the SPA@MWCNTs nanohybrids (ε=0.707) in lowering the infrared emissivity

  14. Surface plasmons and magneto-optic activity in hexagonal Ni anti-dot arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Papaioannou, E. Th.; Kapaklis, Vassilios; Melander, Emil; Hjörvarsson, Björgvin; Pappas, Spiridon D.; Patoka, Piotr; Giersig, Michael; Fumagalli, Paul; García-Martín, Antonio; Ctistis, Georgios

    2011-01-01

    The influence of surface plasmons on the magneto-optic activity in a two-dimensional hexagonal array is addressed. The experiments were performed using hexagonal array of circular holes in a ferromagnetic Ni film. Well pronounced troughs are observed in the optical reflectivity, resulting from the presence of surface plasmons. The surface plasmons are found to strongly enhance the magneto-optic response (Kerr rotation), as compared to a continuous film of the same composition. The influence o...

  15. Correction method of secondary reflection effects in measurement of electro-optic coefficient in optically active materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaire, Ph.; Georges, M.

    1992-07-01

    The propagation of light in linearly birefringent and optically active media, such as Bi 12SiO 20 crystals (BSO), has been widely studied by several workers. Various measurement methods of the electro-optic coefficient r41 have been described. One family of those methods consisting in measurement of the light polarization ellipticity after through the crystal has been analysed. Due to the high reflectivity of such crystals, we show that the effect of the secondary reflections can not be neglected. We present the theoretical description and analysis of this effect for one of these methods and we propose a corrective algorithm.

  16. Controllable optical activity of gold nanorod and chiral quantum dot assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhening; Guo, Jun; Liu, Wenjing; Li, Zhengtao; Han, Bing; Zhang, Wei; Tang, Zhiyong

    2013-12-16

    The optical coupling between Au nanorods (Au NRs) and chiral quantum dots (QDs) in assemblies is investigated by both experiment and theoretical calculations. The coupled optical activity in the visible-light region can be manipulated by changing either the aspect ratio of Au NRs or the size of QDs (left). PMID:24346941

  17. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Eighth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommended for engineering st

  18. An electrically-activated dynamic tissue-equivalent phantom for assessment of diffuse optical imaging systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebden, Jeremy C; Brunker, Joanna; Correia, Teresa; Price, Ben D; Gibson, Adam P; Everdell, N L [Department of Medical Physics and Bioengineering, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2008-01-21

    A novel design of solid dynamic phantom with tissue-like optical properties is presented, which contains variable regions of contrast which are activated electrically. Reversible changes in absorption are produced by localized heating of targets impregnated with thermochromic pigment. A portable, battery-operated prototype has been constructed, and its optical and temporal characteristics have been investigated. The phantom has been developed as a means of assessing the performance of diffuse optical imaging systems, such as those used to monitor haemodynamic changes in the brain and other tissues. Images of the phantom have been reconstructed using data acquired with a continuous wave optical topography system.

  19. An electrically-activated dynamic tissue-equivalent phantom for assessment of diffuse optical imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebden, Jeremy C.; Brunker, Joanna; Correia, Teresa; Price, Ben D.; Gibson, Adam P.; Everdell, N. L.

    2008-01-01

    A novel design of solid dynamic phantom with tissue-like optical properties is presented, which contains variable regions of contrast which are activated electrically. Reversible changes in absorption are produced by localized heating of targets impregnated with thermochromic pigment. A portable, battery-operated prototype has been constructed, and its optical and temporal characteristics have been investigated. The phantom has been developed as a means of assessing the performance of diffuse optical imaging systems, such as those used to monitor haemodynamic changes in the brain and other tissues. Images of the phantom have been reconstructed using data acquired with a continuous wave optical topography system.

  20. Integration of Optical Manipulation and Electrophysiological Tools to Modulate and Record Activity in Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Difato, F.; Schibalsky, L.; Benfenati, F.; Blau, A.

    2011-07-01

    We present an optical system that combines IR (1064 nm) holographic optical tweezers with a sub-nanosecond-pulsed UV (355 nm) laser microdissector for the optical manipulation of single neurons and entire networks both on transparent and non-transparent substrates in vitro. The phase-modulated laser beam can illuminate the sample concurrently or independently from above or below assuring compatibility with different types of microelectrode array and patch-clamp electrophysiology. By combining electrophysiological and optical tools, neural activity in response to localized stimuli or injury can be studied and quantified at sub-cellular, cellular, and network level.

  1. Lanthanide-Activated Fiber Materials for Broadband Optical Amplifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Gyu Choi; Bong Je Park; Doo Hee Cho; Hong Seok Seo; Myung Hyun Lee; Kyong Hon Kim

    2003-01-01

    Some intra-4 f-configurational transitions of lanthanide, of which radiative emissions cover in wavelengths the optical communication window of the currently available OH-free silica-based line fibers, are discussed in terms of relationship between their emission properties and host fiber materials.

  2. Active control of electromagnetic radiation through an enhanced thermo-optic effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Chong; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Shining; Genov, Dentcho A

    2015-01-01

    The control of electromagnetic radiation in transformation optical metamaterials brings the development of vast variety of optical devices. Of a particular importance is the possibility to control the propagation of light with light. In this work, we use a structured planar cavity to enhance the thermo-optic effect in a transformation optical waveguide. In the process, a control laser produces apparent inhomogeneous refractive index change inside the waveguides. The trajectory of a second probe laser beam is then continuously tuned in the experiment. The experimental results agree well with the developed theory. The reported method can provide a new approach toward development of transformation optical devices where active all-optical control of the impinging light can be achieved. PMID:25746689

  3. Single Molecule Instrument for Surface Enhanced Raman Optical Activity of Biomolecules Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Stereochemistry is an essential element of our organic life. Only certain enantiomers are useful as drugs for the human body. Raman Optical Activity (ROA) and...

  4. Single Molecule Instrument for Surface Enhanced Raman Optical Activity of Biomolecules Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Stereochemistry is an essential element of our organic life. Only certain enantiomers are useful as drugs for the human body. Raman optical activity (ROA) provides...

  5. Coherent phonon optics in a chip with an electrically controlled active device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyser, Caroline L; Akimov, Andrey V; Campion, Richard P; Kent, Anthony J

    2015-02-05

    Phonon optics concerns operations with high-frequency acoustic waves in solid media in a similar way to how traditional optics operates with the light beams (i.e. photons). Phonon optics experiments with coherent terahertz and sub-terahertz phonons promise a revolution in various technical applications related to high-frequency acoustics, imaging, and heat transport. Previously, phonon optics used passive methods for manipulations with propagating phonon beams that did not enable their external control. Here we fabricate a phononic chip, which includes a generator of coherent monochromatic phonons with frequency 378 GHz, a sensitive coherent phonon detector, and an active layer: a doped semiconductor superlattice, with electrical contacts, inserted into the phonon propagation path. In the experiments, we demonstrate the modulation of the coherent phonon flux by an external electrical bias applied to the active layer. Phonon optics using external control broadens the spectrum of prospective applications of phononics on the nanometer scale.

  6. Integrated Active and Passive Polymer Optical Components with nm to mm Features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Schøler, Mikkel; Kristensen, Anders

    2007-01-01

    We present wafer-scale fabrication of integrated active and passive polymer optics with nm to mm features. First order DFB lasers, defined in dye doped SU-8 resist are integrated with SU-8 waveguides.......We present wafer-scale fabrication of integrated active and passive polymer optics with nm to mm features. First order DFB lasers, defined in dye doped SU-8 resist are integrated with SU-8 waveguides....

  7. Integration of active materials with silicon micromachining: applications to optical MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouy, Jean-Philippe; Arakawa, Yasuhiko; Fujita, Hiroyuki

    2001-11-01

    Most of the MOEMS including optical switches and micro optical benches are developed on silicon. As for the MEMS, the main reason is that silicon has consistently been the material of choice for the microelectronics industry, due to a mature processing technology which offers the possibility to integrate MEMS devices with Integrated Circuits in a low cost batch fabrication process. However, since the beginning of Optoelectronic, silicon has been suffering from its poor efficiency to emit light because of its indirect band gap. Optical active devices can be integrated on silicon by combining specific active materials in order to keep the main advantage of silicon micromachining for MOEMS applications. This paper illustrates this purpose through one project developed in the frame of the LIMMS, joint laboratory between France and Japan. This project deals with optical active devices for which silicon micromachining technology has been employed to fabricate an organic semiconductors based light emitted diode on silicon substrate.

  8. Growth of Optically Active p-Phenylene Needles on Mica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2002-01-01

    Structural and optical properties of p-phenylene oligomers (p-nP, n=4, 5, 6) grown on mica (0 0 0 1) are investigated via low energy electron diffraction (LEED) using a multi-channelplate LEED as well as linear absorption spectroscopy and fluorescence microscopy. Single-crystalline fibres of laying...... p-6P molecules with lengths of up to 1 mm are grown at elevated mica surface temperatures. The needles are mutually parallel oriented and form large domains of size 20×10 mm2. Their orientation on the surface is controlled by interaction with surface dipole fields. These fibres allow us easy...

  9. High Nonlinear Optic Activity Chromophore- Design and Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Mingqian; Thomas M. Leslie

    2004-01-01

    Chromophores are the center piece of second order nonlinear optical (NLO) materials.The common chromophore consists of a Donor-Bridge-Acceptor structure. Donors and acceptors are connected by a bridge and together they make a fully conjugated system. Based on our previously synthesized novelacceptors [1], we have synthesized a large number of high electro-optic chromophores. In this paper, we report four general types of chromophore that were.synthesized during the last few years in our laboratory. Due to The general nature of our chromophore's structure it is best described as:In these structures, R2 and R3 are different groups or a spiro ring junction. Since they are connected to the chromophore with an SP3 hybridized carbon at the furan ring, they are both out of the plane of the conjugated chromophore system. This unique design greatly increases the chromophore's solubility and processability. We believe this design also prevents the highly dipolar,flat chromophores from achieving - stacking resulting on easier poling and a higher EO coefficient.Our poling results proved our hypothesis with a world record 70 pm/V EO coefficient has been obtained at 1550nm in this class of chromophores.

  10. Research based activities in teacher professional development on optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Marisa; Stefanel, Alberto

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this research is to understand how teachers take ownership of content given them in formative intervention modules and transform it into suggestions and materials for teaching. To this end a module on optics was designed for a group of kindergarten, primary and lower secondary school teachers which sought to integrate meta-cultural, experiential and situated approaches with various context specific factors. The study investigated how teachers deal with conceptual difficulties in the module and how they adapt it to their school situations with data being gathered through a variety of tools. It emerged that the most difficult concepts teachers encountered at the formative stage were those they most often incorporated into their materials. The steps taken in this process of appropriation were then reviewed via a collaborative discussion among the teachers themselves on the materials they had produced.

  11. The in vivo activation of persistent nanophosphors for optical imaging of vascularization, tumours and grafted cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldiney, Thomas; Bessière, Aurélie; Seguin, Johanne; Teston, Eliott; Sharma, Suchinder K.; Viana, Bruno; Bos, Adrie J. J.; Dorenbos, Pieter; Bessodes, Michel; Gourier, Didier; Scherman, Daniel; Richard, Cyrille

    2014-04-01

    Optical imaging for biological applications requires more sensitive tools. Near-infrared persistent luminescence nanoparticles enable highly sensitive in vivo optical detection and complete avoidance of tissue autofluorescence. However, the actual generation of persistent luminescence nanoparticles necessitates ex vivo activation before systemic administration, which prevents long-term imaging in living animals. Here, we introduce a new generation of optical nanoprobes, based on chromium-doped zinc gallate, whose persistent luminescence can be activated in vivo through living tissues using highly penetrating low-energy red photons. Surface functionalization of this photonic probe can be adjusted to favour multiple biomedical applications such as tumour targeting. Notably, we show that cells can endocytose these nanoparticles in vitro and that, after intravenous injection, we can track labelled cells in vivo and follow their biodistribution by a simple whole animal optical detection, opening new perspectives for cell therapy research and for a variety of diagnosis applications.

  12. Complementary chiral metasurface with strong broadband optical activity and enhanced transmission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Yan-Peng [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 29 Zhongguancun East Road, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang, Yong-Liang; Dong, Xian-Zi, E-mail: dongxianzi@mail.ipc.ac.cn, E-mail: xmduan@mail.ipc.ac.cn; Zheng, Mei-Ling; Li, Jing; Liu, Jie; Zhao, Zhen-Sheng [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 29 Zhongguancun East Road, Beijing 100190 (China); Duan, Xuan-Ming, E-mail: dongxianzi@mail.ipc.ac.cn, E-mail: xmduan@mail.ipc.ac.cn [Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 29 Zhongguancun East Road, Beijing 100190 (China); Chongqing Institute of Green and Intelligent Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 266 Fangzheng Ave, Shuitu Technology Development Zone, Beibei District, Chongqing 400714 (China)

    2014-01-06

    We present the design and realization of ultra-thin chiral metasurfaces with giant broadband optical activity in the infrared wavelength. The chiral metasurfaces consisting of periodic hole arrays of complementary asymmetric split ring resonators are fabricated by femtosecond laser two-photon polymerization. Enhanced transmission with strong polarization conversion up to 97% is observed owing to the chiral surface plasmons resulting from mirror symmetry broken. The dependence of optical activity on the degree of structural asymmetry is investigated. This simple planar metasurface is expected to be useful for designing ultra-thin active devices and tailoring the polarization behavior of complex metallic nanostructures.

  13. A cerium glass fiber-optic active target for high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fiber-optic plate imaging system has been developed for active target and tracking applications, in which the active element is Ce(3+) in a silicate glass. Particle tracks and interactions have been recorded with a hit density of /approx gt/4/mm for minimum ionizing particles and with a spatial resolution σ /similar to/ 28μm

  14. Morphology and optical properties of aluminum oxide formed into oxalic electrolyte with addition surface active agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazarkin, B.; Stsiapanau, A.; Zhilinski, V.; Chernik, A.; Bezborodov, V.; Kozak, G.; Danilovich, S.; Smirnov, A.

    2016-08-01

    The article discusses the results of investigations of porous films of alumina, formed into oxalic electrolyte with addition surface active agents, in particular, ordering structure, roughness of a surface, the optical transparency of the electrolyte concentration and surface active agents. Also discusses the features of the formation of porous films of temperature and IR radiation.

  15. Active-optical debris detection: a means for highly accurate position determination of space debris orbits

    OpenAIRE

    Riede, Wolfgang; Hampf, Daniel; Wagner, Paul; Giesen, Adolf

    2014-01-01

    In low Earth orbit (LEO), space debris is usually being tracked by radar facilities. However, optical systems can yield a complementary approach, especially towards high resolution measurements. A particular interesting approach is the method of active-optical observation using a pulsed laser source to derive the distance to the orbital object by a time-of-flight measurement. By combining it with the telescope pointing angles this yields the possibility of fast and accurate 3-D position measu...

  16. A case of unilateral optic disc swelling with chronic active Epstein–Barr virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Aizawa, Naoko; Nakazawa, Toru; Shimura, Masahiko

    2010-01-01

    Ocular complications of chronic active Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection have rarely been reported and are usually associated with systemic symptoms. We described a 17-year-old boy with unilateral optic disc swelling without any systemic symptoms at the initial onset. Antibody titers to EBV were markedly elevated. Treatment with immunosuppressants and corticosteroids dramatically relieved all his symptoms, including unilateral optic swelling and visual field abnormalities.

  17. Optically-Induced Neuronal Activity Is Sufficient to Promote Functional Motor Axon Regeneration In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Patricia J; Jones, Laura N; Mulligan, Amanda; Goolsby, William; Wilhelm, Jennifer C; English, Arthur W

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injuries are common, and functional recovery is very poor. Beyond surgical repair of the nerve, there are currently no treatment options for these patients. In experimental models of nerve injury, interventions (such as exercise and electrical stimulation) that increase neuronal activity of the injured neurons effectively enhance axon regeneration. Here, we utilized optogenetics to determine whether increased activity alone is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration. In thy-1-ChR2/YFP transgenic mice in which a subset of motoneurons express the light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin (ChR2), we activated axons in the sciatic nerve using blue light immediately prior to transection and surgical repair of the sciatic nerve. At four weeks post-injury, direct muscle EMG responses evoked with both optical and electrical stimuli as well as the ratio of these optical/electrical evoked EMG responses were significantly greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, significantly more ChR2+ axons successfully re-innervated the gastrocnemius muscle in mice that received optical treatment. Sections of the gastrocnemius muscles were reacted with antibodies to Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2 (SV2) to quantify the number of re-occupied motor endplates. The number of SV2+ endplates was greater in mice that received optical treatment. The number of retrogradely-labeled motoneurons following intramuscular injection of cholera toxin subunit B (conjugated to Alexa Fluor 555) was greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, the acute (1 hour), one-time optical treatment resulted in robust, long-lasting effects compared to untreated animals as well as untreated axons (ChR2-). We conclude that neuronal activation is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration, and this regenerative effect is specific to the activated neurons. PMID:27152611

  18. Optically-Induced Neuronal Activity Is Sufficient to Promote Functional Motor Axon Regeneration In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia J Ward

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injuries are common, and functional recovery is very poor. Beyond surgical repair of the nerve, there are currently no treatment options for these patients. In experimental models of nerve injury, interventions (such as exercise and electrical stimulation that increase neuronal activity of the injured neurons effectively enhance axon regeneration. Here, we utilized optogenetics to determine whether increased activity alone is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration. In thy-1-ChR2/YFP transgenic mice in which a subset of motoneurons express the light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin (ChR2, we activated axons in the sciatic nerve using blue light immediately prior to transection and surgical repair of the sciatic nerve. At four weeks post-injury, direct muscle EMG responses evoked with both optical and electrical stimuli as well as the ratio of these optical/electrical evoked EMG responses were significantly greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, significantly more ChR2+ axons successfully re-innervated the gastrocnemius muscle in mice that received optical treatment. Sections of the gastrocnemius muscles were reacted with antibodies to Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2 (SV2 to quantify the number of re-occupied motor endplates. The number of SV2+ endplates was greater in mice that received optical treatment. The number of retrogradely-labeled motoneurons following intramuscular injection of cholera toxin subunit B (conjugated to Alexa Fluor 555 was greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, the acute (1 hour, one-time optical treatment resulted in robust, long-lasting effects compared to untreated animals as well as untreated axons (ChR2-. We conclude that neuronal activation is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration, and this regenerative effect is specific to the activated neurons.

  19. Optical Transition Probability of Nd3+ Ions Doped in Ferroelectric PLZT for Active Electro-Optical Applications

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bao-Zeng; ZHENG Zhi-Qiang; YANG Ji-Wen; LI Ke-Wen; JIANG Hua; CHEN Xue-Sheng; WANG An-Ting; XIE Jian-Ping; MING Hai

    2005-01-01

    The optical transition probability of Nd3+ (0.5 mol%) doped lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate (PLZT) is investigated. The absolute intensities of its forced electric dipole transitions between 400nm and 1 000 nm were measured, from which we obtain three phenomenological parameters, Ω2 = 0.787 × 10-20 cm2, Ω4 = 1.182 ×10-20 cm2, and Ω6 = 1.042 × 10-20 cm2, according to the Judd-Ofelt theory. The radiation lifetime (346.9μs)of the 4F3/2 metastable state, the stimulated emission cross-section σij (2.49 × 10-21 cm2, 6.51 × 10-21 cm2,2.17 × 10-21 cm12) and the fluorescence branch ratios are calculated. We also measured the fluorescence lifetime(155.84μs) and calculated the quantum efficiency (46.1%). The analysis reveals that Nd3+-doped PLZT, based on its large electro-optical effect, has potential applications in active optical devices.

  20. Probing the Active Galactic Nuclei using optical spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivek, M.

    Variability studies offer one of the best tools for understanding the physical conditions present in regions close to the central engine in an AGN. We probed the various properties of AGN through time variability studies of spectral lines in the optical wavelengths using the 2m telescope in IUCAA Girawali observatory. The absorption line variability studies are mainly concentrated in understanding the nature of outflows in quasars. Quasar outflows have a huge impact on the evolution of central supermassive blackholes, their host galaxies and the surrounding intergalactic medium. Studying the variability in these Broad Absorption Lines (BALs) can help us understand the structure, evolution, and basic physical properties of these outflows. We conducted a repeated Low ionization BAL monitoring program with 27 LoBALs (Low Ionization BALs) at z 0.3-2.1 covering timescales from 3.22 to 7.69 years in the quasar rest frame. We see a variety of phenomena, including some BALs that either appeared or disappeared completely and some BALs which do not vary over the observation period. In one case, the excited fine structure lines have changed dramatically. One source shows signatures of radiative acceleration. Here, we present the results from this program. Emission line studies are concentrated in understanding the peculiar characteristics of a dual-AGN source SDSS J092712.64+294344.0.

  1. Optical activity of catalytic elements of hetero-metallic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Apell, S. Peter; Wadell, Carl; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    Interaction of light with metals in the form of surface plasmons is used in a wide range of applications in which the scattering decay channel is important. The absorption channel is usually thought of as unwanted and detrimental to the efficiency of the device. This is true in many applications, however, recent studies have shown that maximization of the decay channel of surface plasmons has potentially significant uses. One of these is the creation of electron-hole pairs or hot electrons which can be used for e.g. catalysis. Here, we study the optical properties of hetero-metallic nanostructures that enhance light interaction with the catalytic elements of the nanostructures. A hybridized LSPR that matches the spectral characteristic of the light source is excited. This LSPR through coupling between the plasmonic elements maximizes light absorption in the catalytic part of the nanostructure. Numerically calculated visible light absorption in the catalytic nanoparticles is enhanced 12-fold for large catalytic disks and by more 30 for small nanoparticles on the order of 5 nm. In experiments we measure a sizable increase in the absorption cross section when small palladium nanoparticles are coupled to a large silver resonator. These observations suggest that heterometallic nanostructures can enhance catalytic reaction rates.

  2. Dual and chiral objects for optical activity in general scattering directions

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Optically active artificial structures have attracted tremendous research attention. Such structures must meet two requirements: Lack of spatial inversion symmetries and, a condition usually not explicitly considered, the structure shall preserve the helicity of light, which implies that there must be a vanishing coupling between the states of opposite polarization handedness among incident and scattered plane waves. Here, we put forward and demonstrate that a unit cell made from chiraly arranged electromagnetically dual scatterers serves exactly this purpose. We prove this by demonstrating optical activity of such unit cell in general scattering directions.

  3. Functional imaging of glucose-evoked rat islet activities using transient intrinsic optical signals

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Xin-Cheng; Cui, Wan-Xing; Li, Yi-Chao; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Rong-Wen; Thompson, Anthony; Amthor, Franklin; Wang, Xu-Jing

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate intrinsic optical signal (IOS) imaging of intact rat islet, which consists of many endocrine cells working together. A near-infrared digital microscope was employed for optical monitoring of islet activities evoked by glucose stimulation. Dynamic NIR images revealed transient IOS responses in the islet activated by low-dose (2.75mM) and high-dose (5.5mM) glucose stimuli. Comparative experiments and quantitative analysis indicated that both glucose metabolism and calcium/insulin...

  4. Optically monitored wet chemical preparation of SEIRA active metallic nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enders, Dominik; Nakayama, Tomonobu [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0044 (Japan); Nanoscale Quantum Conductor Array Project, ICORP, JST, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama, 332-0012 (Japan); Nagao, Tadaaki; Aono, Masakazu [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0044 (Japan); Nanoscale Quantum Conductor Array Project, ICORP, JST, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama, 332-0012 (Japan); WPI Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics (MANA), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0044 (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    The use of wet chemical methods for the preparation of surface enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) active nanostructures has gained much interest in the last years because of its easiness, simplicity, and the low time consumption compared to the known ultra high vacuum based methods. We present a two-step wet-chemical preparation method of plasmonic SEIRA active nanostructures. While in the first step spherical Au nanoparticles are deposited on the SiO{sub 2}/Si surface, these nanoparticles are grown in the second step to form elongated tabular islands close to the percolation threshold. In situ monitoring of the preparation process by IR spectroscopy ensures the control of film morphology during the preparation process and enables the reproducible fabrication of highly sensitive SEIRA films. A comparison of our Au films with SEIRA inactive Au films shows, that in IR spectra of octadecanethiol, the CH stretching vibrational peaks are enhanced by several orders of magnitude.

  5. Integrated optical gyroscope using active long-range surface plasmon-polariton waveguide resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tong; Qian, Guang; Wang, Yang-Yang; Xue, Xiao-Jun; Shan, Feng; Li, Ruo-Zhou; Wu, Jing-Yuan; Zhang, Xiao-Yang

    2014-01-24

    Optical gyroscopes with high sensitivity are important rotation sensors for inertial navigation systems. Here, we present the concept of integrated resonant optical gyroscope constructed by active long-range surface plasmon-polariton (LRSPP) waveguide resonator. In this gyroscope, LRSPP waveguide doped gain medium is pumped to compensate the propagation loss, which has lower pump noise than that of conventional optical waveguide. Peculiar properties of single-polarization of LRSPP waveguide have been found to significantly reduce the polarization error. The metal layer of LRSPP waveguide is electro-optical multiplexed for suppression of reciprocal noises. It shows a limited sensitivity of ~10(-4) deg/h, and a maximum zero drift which is 4 orders of magnitude lower than that constructed by conventional single-mode waveguide.

  6. Standardization in fiber-optic sensing for structural safety: activities in the ISHMII and IEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habel, Wolfgang R.; Krebber, K.; Daum, W.

    2015-03-01

    Fiber-optic sensors are increasingly established in the sensor market. Their advantages have unquestionably been verified by numerous demonstrations to enhance the operational performance of aged structures or to monitor the structural behavior of safety-relevant structures or their components. However, there are some barriers in use due to a lack of extensive standardization of fiber-optic sensors. This leads very often to restraints in the user's community. The paper shows the status in international standardization of fiber-optic sensors as well as current activities in leading institutions such as IEC and ISHMII and others with the purpose of providing relevant standards for a broader use of selected fiber-optic sensor technologies.

  7. Backward reflection analysis of transmitting channel of active laser ranging optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jinsuk; Koh, Hae Seog

    2013-09-01

    The designed Active LDR(Laser Detection and Ranging) System contains high-power Laser and its diameter is approximately 24mm. Although the laser transmitting channel and receiving optic channel are completely separated from each other and doesn't share any of the optical components in design, each channel shares 4 wedge scanners, which are to overcome the narrow FOV(Field of View) of the optical system. Any backward reflection back to the fiber laser end must be carefully studied since it can damage the LD(Laser Diodes), the inner components of the laser unit because of the high amplification factor of the laser unit. In this study, the stray light caused by the transmitting channel's laser and inner reflection by optical components were analyzed by ASAP(Advanced System Analysis Program) software. We also can confirm the operability and stability of the system by more than 6 months of operation of the system.

  8. Sensitive optical detection of alkaline phosphatase activity with quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Xiangling [Laboratory of Controllable Preparation and Application of Nanomaterials, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 29, Zhongguancun East Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100190 (China); The State Key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Chen, Zhenzhen; Chen, Xiaoying; Liu, Jing [Laboratory of Controllable Preparation and Application of Nanomaterials, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 29, Zhongguancun East Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100190 (China); Tang, Fangqiong, E-mail: tangfq@mail.ipc.ac.cn [Laboratory of Controllable Preparation and Application of Nanomaterials, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 29, Zhongguancun East Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-01-15

    A simple method has been developed to detect the activity of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) by the changing of fluorescence intensities of the quantum dots (QDs). In this system, the fluorescence intensities of the QDs were quenched by p-nitrophenol (pNP) which was produced in the process of ALP catalytic reaction. A series of linear calibration curves of the activity of ALP were obtained in different pH buffer solutions. The wide linear range was 3–1000 U L{sup −1} and the detection limit was 3 U L{sup −1} (S/N=3). Furthermore, the experimental conditions of biosensor were optimized, and anti-interference ability was presented. The activity of ALP was also detected in serum and the recovery of ALP in serum samples was more than 95%. The excellent performance of this biosensor indicates that it can be used in practice detection of ALP. -- Highlights: • A sensitive ALP biosensor is constructed based on QDs without complex processes. • The analysis processing is very convenient, simple and rapid. • The detection mechanism of the ALP biosensor is studied by XPS. • The paper proposes a feasible approach for some substrates or enzymes detecting.

  9. An optical tweezer-based study of antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yogesha; Sarbari Bhattacharya; M K Rabinal; Sharath Ananthamurthy

    2012-08-01

    Understanding and characterizing microbial activity reduction in the presence of antimicrobial agents can help in the design and manufacture of antimicrobial drugs. We demonstrate the use of an optical tweezer setup in recording the changes in bacterial activity with time, induced by the presence of foreign bodies in a bacterial suspension. This is achieved by monitoring the fluctuations of an optically trapped polystyrene bead immersed in it. Examining the changes in the fluctuation pattern of the bead with time provides an accurate characterization of the reduction in the microbial activity. Here, we report on the effect of addition of silver nanoparticles on bacterial cultures of Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. We observe a decrease in the bacterial activity with time for the investigated bacterial samples. This method in our opinion, enables one to track changes in bacterial activity levels as a function of time of contact with the antibacterial agent with greater efficacy than traditional cell counting methods.

  10. Novel silica surface charge density mediated control of the optical properties of embedded optically active materials and its application for fiber optic pH sensing at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congjun; Ohodnicki, Paul R.; Su, Xin; Keller, Murphy; Brown, Thomas D.; Baltrus, John P.

    2015-01-01

    Silica and silica incorporated nanocomposite materials have been extensively studied for a wide range of applications. Here we demonstrate an intriguing optical effect of silica that, depending on the solution pH, amplifies or attenuates the optical absorption of a variety of embedded optically active materials with very distinct properties, such as plasmonic Au nanoparticles, non-plasmonic Pt nanoparticles, and the organic dye rhodamine B (not a pH indicator), coated on an optical fiber. Interestingly, the observed optical response to varying pH appears to follow the surface charge density of the silica matrix for all the three different optically active materials. To the best of our knowledge, this optical effect has not been previously reported and it appears universal in that it is likely that any optically active material can be incorporated into the silica matrix to respond to solution pH or surface charge density variations. A direct application of this effect is for optical pH sensing which has very attractive features that can enable minimally invasive, remote, real time and continuous distributed pH monitoring. Particularly, as demonstrated here, using highly stable metal nanoparticles embedded in an inorganic silica matrix can significantly improve the capability of pH sensing in extremely harsh environments which is of increasing importance for applications in unconventional oil and gas resource recovery, carbon sequestration, water quality monitoring, etc. Our approach opens a pathway towards possible future development of robust optical pH sensors for the most demanding environmental conditions. The newly discovered optical effect of silica also offers the potential for control of the optical properties of optically active materials for a range of other potential applications such as electrochromic devices.Silica and silica incorporated nanocomposite materials have been extensively studied for a wide range of applications. Here we demonstrate an

  11. Optics outreach activities with elementary school kids from public education in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viera-González, P.; Sánchez-Guerrero, G.; Ruiz-Mendoza, J.; Cárdenas-Ortiz, G.; Ceballos-Herrera, D.; Selvas-Aguilar, R.

    2014-09-01

    This work shows the results obtained from the "O4K" Project supported by International Society for Optics and Photonis (SPIE) and the Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (UANL) through its SPIE Student Chapter and the Dr. Juan Carlos Ruiz-Mendoza, outreach coordinator of the Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas of the UANL. Undergraduate and graduate students designed Optics representative activities using easy-access materials that allow the interaction of children with optics over the exploration, observation and experimentation, taking as premise that the best way to learn Science is the interaction with it. Several activities were realized through the 2011-2013 events with 1,600 kids with ages from 10 to 12; the results were analyzed using surveys. One of the principal conclusions is that in most of the cases the children changed their opinions about Sciences in a positive way.

  12. The age of enlightenment: evolving opportunities in brain research through optical manipulation of neuronal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason eJerome

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Optical manipulation of neuronal activity has rapidly developed into the most powerful and widely used approach to study mechanisms related to neuronal connectivity over a range of scales. Since the early use of single site uncaging to map network connectivity, rapid technological development of light modulation techniques has added important new options, such as fast scanning photostimulation, massively parallel control of light stimuli, holographic uncaging and 2-photon stimulation techniques. Exciting new developments in optogenetics complement neurotransmitter uncaging techniques by providing cell-type specificity and in vivo usability, providing optical access to the neural substrates of behavior. Here we review the rapid evolution of methods for the optical manipulation of neuronal activity, emphasizing crucial recent developments.

  13. Optical Sensor/Actuator Locations for Active Structural Acoustic Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padula, Sharon L.; Palumbo, Daniel L.; Kincaid, Rex K.

    1998-01-01

    Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have extensive experience using active structural acoustic control (ASAC) for aircraft interior noise reduction. One aspect of ASAC involves the selection of optimum locations for microphone sensors and force actuators. This paper explains the importance of sensor/actuator selection, reviews optimization techniques, and summarizes experimental and numerical results. Three combinatorial optimization problems are described. Two involve the determination of the number and position of piezoelectric actuators, and the other involves the determination of the number and location of the sensors. For each case, a solution method is suggested, and typical results are examined. The first case, a simplified problem with simulated data, is used to illustrate the method. The second and third cases are more representative of the potential of the method and use measured data. The three case studies and laboratory test results establish the usefulness of the numerical methods.

  14. Structure and behaviour of proteins, nucleic acids and viruses from vibrational Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barron, L.D.; Blanch, E.W.; McColl, I.H.;

    2003-01-01

    On account of its sensitivity to chirality Raman optical activity (ROA), which may be measured as a small difference in vibrational Raman scattering from chiral molecules in right- and left-circularly polarized incident light, is a powerful probe of structure and behaviour of biomolecules in aque...

  15. New insight into the solution structures of wheat gluten proteins from Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanch, E.W.; Kasarda, D.D.; Hecht, L.;

    2003-01-01

    Vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of the wheat proteins a-gliadin (A-gliadin), omega-liadin, and a 30 kDa peptide called T-A-1 from the high molecular weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) Dx5 were measured to obtain new information about their solution structures. The spectral data sho...

  16. Solution structures of potato virus X and narcissus mosaic virus from Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanch, Ewan W.; Robinson, David J.; Hecht, Lutz;

    2002-01-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) and narcissus mosaic virus (NMV) were studied using vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) in order to obtain new information on the structures of their coat protein subunits. The ROA spectra of the two intact virions are very similar to each other and similar to that of to...

  17. Observation of SERS effect in Raman optical activity, a new tool for chiral vibrational spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, Salim

    2006-01-01

    A new tool for chiral vibrational spectroscopy is here reported. A Surface Enhanced effect was observed using Raman Optical Activity (ROA). This observation opens new possibilities for ROA as a tool for vibrational spectroscopy. The combination of surface enhanced effect SE and ROA into SEROA...

  18. Optical activity of microemulsion induced by electric field and its tunable behaviors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Xiaopeng(赵晓鹏); ZHAO; Qian(赵乾); XIANG; Liqin(向礼琴)

    2003-01-01

    It has been shown that optical activity can occur in microemulsion under external electric field and rotation angle can also be tuned by the electric field. A set of microemulsions (water/Span80/transformer oil) with different water concentration were prepared and their optical activity was measured with the changes of applied electric field and θ, the angle between the electric vector of the incident linearly polarized light and the external electric field, using an automatic polarimeter. The experiments indicate that when none of the external electric field, water concentration and θ are zero, there is optical activity in microemulsions. For a given concentration, rotation angle ψ increases with electric field, and it firstly increases, passes through a maximum at C = C0,then monotonically decreases as C increases when electric field keeps constant. The relationship between the rotation angle and θ is also obtained. It is thought that the electric field-induced destroy of spatial symmetry of microemulsion is responsible for the optical activity of microemulsion.

  19. New method in synthesizing an optical active intermediate for (R,R)-formoterol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Fan; Lei Chen; Li Hai; Yong Wu

    2008-01-01

    (R)-1-(4-Methoxyphenyl)propan-2-amine 2a, an optical active intermediate for (R,R)-formoterol, was synthesized from D-alanine in 65% overall yield by using a simple route, which contained protecting amino group, cyclization, coupling with Grignard reagent, reduction and deprotection.

  20. Optical activity and circular dichroism of plasmonic nanorod assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosravi Khorashad, Larousse; Liu, Na; Govorov, Alexander O.

    Plasmonic circular dichroism (CD) has offered an efficient spectroscopy method for the electronic, chemical, and structural properties of different types of light active molecules in the subwavelength regime. Among the different chiral geometries of metal nanoparticles utilized by the plasmonic CD spectroscopy, gold nanorods (AuNRs) have shown strong CD signals in the visible frequency range. In this work, we theoretically study the CD signals of AuNR arrangements in order to mimic structures and chemical bonds of chiral biomolecules. In particular, our twisted three-AuNR geometries resemble a molecular structure of tartaric acid. This molecule played an important role in the discovery of chemical chirality. In our study, we show that the strength of CD signals changes dramatically by tuning the interparticle distances and angles. Since the CD signals are typically weak, we develop reliable computational approaches to calculate the plasmonic CD. Manipulating interparticle distances, size, and molecular bond angles result in full control over peak positions, handedness, and positive and negative bands which are observed in the CD spectra. This work has been supported under the grant from Volkswagen Foundation. We also acknowledge the financial support of Condensed Matter and Surface Science program of Ohio University.

  1. The fabrication and characterisation of piezoelectric actuators for active x-ray optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dou; Rodriguez Sanmartin, Daniel; Button, Tim W.; Meggs, Carl; Atkins, Carolyn; Doel, Peter; Brooks, David; Feldman, Charlotte; Willingale, Richard; Michette, Alan; Pfauntsch, Slawka; Sahraei, Shahin; James, Ady; Dunare, Camelia; Stevenson, Tom; Parkes, William; Smith, Andrew; Wang, Hongchang

    2009-08-01

    Piezoelectric actuators are widely employed in adaptive optics to enable an actively controlled mirror surface and improve the optical resolution and sensitivity. Currently two new prototype adaptive X-ray optical systems are under development through the Smart X-ray Optics project in a UK based consortium. One proposed technology is micro-structured optical arrays (MOAs) which uses aligned micro-channels structures obtained by deep silicon etching using both dry and wet techniques and bonded piezoelectric actuators to produce a micro-focused X-ray source for biological applications. The other technology is large scale optics which uses a thin shell mirror segment with 20-40 bonded piezo-actuators for the next generation of X-ray telescopes with an aim to achieve a resolution greater than that currently available by Chandra (0.5"). The Functional Materials Group of Birmingham University has the capability of fabricating a wide range of piezo-actuators including, for example, unimorph, bimorph and active fibre composites (AFC) by using a viscous plastic processing technique. This offers flexibility in customising the shapes (from planar to 3-D helix) and feature sizes (>20 μm) of the actuators, as well as achieving good piezoelectric properties. PZT unimorph actuators are being developed in this programme according to the design and implementation of the proposed mirror and array structures. Precise controls on the dimension, thickness, surface finishing and the curvature have been achieved for delivering satisfactory actuators. Results are presented regarding the fabrication and characterisation of such piezo-actuators, as well as the progress on the large optic and MOAs prototypes employing the piezo-actuators.

  2. Activation of cell signaling via optical manipulation of gold-coated liposomes encapsulating signaling molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsinger, Gabriel V.; Leung, Sarah J.; Romanowski, Marek

    2013-02-01

    Many diseases involve changes in cell signaling cascades, as seen commonly in drug resistant cancers. To better understand these intricate signaling events in diseased cells and tissues, experimental methods of probing cellular communication at a single to multi-cell level are required. We recently introduced a general platform for activation of selected signaling pathways by optically controlled delivery and release of water soluble factors using gold-coated liposomes. In the example presented here, we encapsulated inositol trisphosphate (IP3), a ubiquitous intracellular secondary messenger involved in GPCR and Akt signaling cascades, within 100 nm gold-coated liposomes. The high polarizability of the liposome's unique gold pseudo-shell allows stable optical trapping for subcellular manipulation in the presence of cells. We take this optical manipulation further by optically injecting IP3-containing liposomes into the cytosol of a single cell to initiate localized cell signaling. Upon optical injection of liposomal IP3 into a single ovarian carcinoma cell, we observed localized activation as reported by changes in Indo-1 fluorescence intensity. With established gap junctions between the injected cell and neighboring cells, we monitored propagation of this signaling to and through nearby cells.

  3. A cerium glass fiber-optic active target for high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fiber-optic plate imaging system has been developed for active target and tracking applications, in which the active element is Ce(3+) in a silicate glass. Particle tracks and interactions have been recorded with a hit density of greater than or equal to 4/mm for minimum ionizing particles and with a spatial resolution sigma approx. = 28μ m.) The properties of cerium scintillation glass are discussed

  4. New light sources and sensors for active optical 3D inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osten, Wolfgang; Jueptner, Werner P. O.

    1999-11-01

    The implementation of active processing strategies in optical 3D-inspection needs the availability of flexible hardware solutions. The system components illumination and sensor/detector are actively involved in the processing chain by a feedback loop that is controlled by the evaluation process. Therefore this article deals with new light sources and sensor which appeared recently on the market and can be applied successfully for the implementation of active processing principles. Some applications where such new components are used to implement an active measurement strategy are presented.

  5. Active Figure Control Effects on Mounting Strategy for X-Ray Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Atkins, Carolyn; Roche, Jacqueline M.; ODell, Stephen L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.

    2014-01-01

    As part of ongoing development efforts at MSFC, we have begun to investigate mounting strategies for highly nested xray optics in both full-shell and segmented configurations. The analytical infrastructure for this effort also lends itself to investigation of active strategies. We expect that a consequence of active figure control on relatively thin substrates is that errors are propagated to the edges, where they might affect the effective precision of the mounting points. Based upon modeling, we describe parametrically, the conditions under which active mounts are preferred over fixed ones, and the effect of active figure corrections on the required number, locations, and kinematic characteristics of mounting points.

  6. Analysis of Active Figure Control Effects on Mounting Strategy for X-Ray Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey J.; Roche, Jacqueline M.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Elsner, Ryan F.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Weisskopf, Martin C.

    2014-01-01

    As part of ongoing development efforts at MSFC, we have begun to investigate mounting strategies for highly nested x-ray optics in both full-shell and segmented configurations. The analytical infrastructure for this effort also lends itself to investigation of active strategies. We expect that a consequence of active figure control on relatively thin substrates is that errors are propagated to the edges, where they might affect the effective precision of the mounting points. Based upon modeling, we describe parametrically, the conditions under which active mounts are preferred over fixed ones, and the effect of active figure corrections on the required number, locations, and kinematic characteristics of mounting points.

  7. Bayesian modeling of perceived surface slant from actively-generated and passively-observed optic flow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corrado Caudek

    Full Text Available We measured perceived depth from the optic flow (a when showing a stationary physical or virtual object to observers who moved their head at a normal or slower speed, and (b when simulating the same optic flow on a computer and presenting it to stationary observers. Our results show that perceived surface slant is systematically distorted, for both the active and the passive viewing of physical or virtual surfaces. These distortions are modulated by head translation speed, with perceived slant increasing directly with the local velocity gradient of the optic flow. This empirical result allows us to determine the relative merits of two alternative approaches aimed at explaining perceived surface slant in active vision: an "inverse optics" model that takes head motion information into account, and a probabilistic model that ignores extra-retinal signals. We compare these two approaches within the framework of the bayesian theory. The "inverse optics" bayesian model produces veridical slant estimates if the optic flow and the head translation velocity are measured with no error; because of the influence of a "prior" for flatness, the slant estimates become systematically biased as the measurement errors increase. The bayesian model, which ignores the observer's motion, always produces distorted estimates of surface slant. Interestingly, the predictions of this second model, not those of the first one, are consistent with our empirical findings. The present results suggest that (a in active vision perceived surface slant may be the product of probabilistic processes which do not guarantee the correct solution, and (b extra-retinal signals may be mainly used for a better measurement of retinal information.

  8. Influence of Physical and Chemical Modification on the Optical Rotatory Dispersion and Biological Activity of Chitosan Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Shipovskaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The optical and bactericidal properties of acetic and basic chitosan films were studied. By the ORD technique, we found that these films differed in the values of their specific optical rotation and of their rotary and dispersive constants. A sign inversion of was observed when the acetic chitosan films were heat-treated. The bactericidal activity of the initial and dehydrated acetic films was analyzed, and their moisture content and optical and biological activities were compared.

  9. Optical Activation of Germanium Plasmonic Antennas in the Mid-Infrared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Marco P; Schmidt, Christian; Sakat, Emilie; Stock, Johannes; Samarelli, Antonio; Frigerio, Jacopo; Ortolani, Michele; Paul, Douglas J; Isella, Giovanni; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Biagioni, Paolo; Brida, Daniele

    2016-07-22

    Impulsive interband excitation with femtosecond near-infrared pulses establishes a plasma response in intrinsic germanium structures fabricated on a silicon substrate. This direct approach activates the plasmonic resonance of the Ge structures and enables their use as optical antennas up to the mid-infrared spectral range. The optical switching lasts for hundreds of picoseconds until charge recombination redshifts the plasma frequency. The full behavior of the structures is modeled by the electrodynamic response established by an electron-hole plasma in a regular array of antennas.

  10. Cost-effective and monitoring-active technique for TDM-passive optical networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chang-Chia; Lin, Hong-Mao; Tarn, Chen-Wen; Lin, Huang-Liang

    2014-08-01

    A reliable, detection-active and cost-effective method which employs the hello and heartbeat signals for branched node distinguishing to monitor fiber fault in any branch of distribution fibers of a time division multiplexing passive optical network (TDM-PON) is proposed. With this method, the material cost of building an optical network monitor system for a TDM-PON with 168 ONUs and the time of identifying a multiple branch faults is significantly reduced in a TDM-PON system of any scale. A fault location in a 1 × 32 TDM-PON system using this method to identify the fault branch is demonstrated.

  11. Optical Activation of Germanium Plasmonic Antennas in the Mid-Infrared.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Marco P; Schmidt, Christian; Sakat, Emilie; Stock, Johannes; Samarelli, Antonio; Frigerio, Jacopo; Ortolani, Michele; Paul, Douglas J; Isella, Giovanni; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Biagioni, Paolo; Brida, Daniele

    2016-07-22

    Impulsive interband excitation with femtosecond near-infrared pulses establishes a plasma response in intrinsic germanium structures fabricated on a silicon substrate. This direct approach activates the plasmonic resonance of the Ge structures and enables their use as optical antennas up to the mid-infrared spectral range. The optical switching lasts for hundreds of picoseconds until charge recombination redshifts the plasma frequency. The full behavior of the structures is modeled by the electrodynamic response established by an electron-hole plasma in a regular array of antennas. PMID:27494498

  12. Optical activity and defect/dopant evolution in ZnO implanted with Er

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of annealing on the optical properties and defect/dopant evolution in wurtzite (0001) ZnO single crystals implanted with Er ions are studied using a combination of Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry and photoluminescence measurements. The results suggest a lattice recovery behavior dependent on ion dose and involving formation/evolution of an anomalous multipeak defect distribution, thermal stability of optically active Er complexes, and Er outdiffusion. An intermediate defect band occurring between the surface and ion-induced defects in the bulk is stable up to 900 °C and has a photoluminescence signature around 420 nm well corresponding to Zn interstitials. The optical activity of the Er atoms reaches a maximum after annealing at 700 °C but is not directly associated to the ideal Zn site configuration, since the Er substitutional fraction is maximal already in the as-implanted state. In its turn, annealing at temperatures above 700 °C leads to dissociation of the optically active Er complexes with subsequent outdiffusion of Er accompanied by the efficient lattice recovery

  13. High-power fiber optic cable with integrated active sensors for live process monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomster, Ola; Blomqvist, Mats; Bergstrand, Hans; Pålsson, Magnus

    2012-03-01

    In industrial applications using high-brilliance lasers at power levels up to and exceeding 20 kW and similarly direct diode lasers of 10 kW, there is an increasing demand to continuously monitor component status even in passive components such as fiber-optic cables. With fiber-optic cables designed according to the European Automotive Industry fiber standard interface there is room for integrating active sensors inside the connectors. In this paper we present the integrated active sensors in the new Optoskand QD fiber-optic cable designed to handle extreme levels of power losses, and how these sensors can be employed in industrial manufacturing. The sensors include photo diodes for detection of scattered light inside the fiber connector, absolute temperature of the fiber connector, difference in temperature of incoming and outgoing cooling water, and humidity measurement inside the fiber connector. All these sensors are connected to the fiber interlock system, where interlock break enable functions can be activated when measured signals are higher than threshold levels. It is a very fast interlock break system as the control of the signals is integrated in the electronics inside the fiber connector. Also, since all signals can be logged it is possible to evaluate what happened inside the connector before the interlock break instance. The communication to the fiber-optic connectors is via a CAN interface. Thus it is straightforward to develop the existing laser host control to also control the CAN-messages from the QD sensors.

  14. Optical activity and defect/dopant evolution in ZnO implanted with Er

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azarov, Alexander; Galeckas, Augustinas; Kuznetsov, Andrej; Monakhov, Edouard; Svensson, Bengt G. [Department of Physics, Centre for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048, Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway); Hallén, Anders [Royal Institute of Technology, KTH-ICT, Electrum 229, SE-164 40 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-09-28

    The effects of annealing on the optical properties and defect/dopant evolution in wurtzite (0001) ZnO single crystals implanted with Er ions are studied using a combination of Rutherford backscattering/channeling spectrometry and photoluminescence measurements. The results suggest a lattice recovery behavior dependent on ion dose and involving formation/evolution of an anomalous multipeak defect distribution, thermal stability of optically active Er complexes, and Er outdiffusion. An intermediate defect band occurring between the surface and ion-induced defects in the bulk is stable up to 900 °C and has a photoluminescence signature around 420 nm well corresponding to Zn interstitials. The optical activity of the Er atoms reaches a maximum after annealing at 700 °C but is not directly associated to the ideal Zn site configuration, since the Er substitutional fraction is maximal already in the as-implanted state. In its turn, annealing at temperatures above 700 °C leads to dissociation of the optically active Er complexes with subsequent outdiffusion of Er accompanied by the efficient lattice recovery.

  15. Optical activity of a single MnAs cluster: Birefringence or Kerr effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuschner, M.; Klar, P. J.; Heimbrodt, W.; Rühle, W. W.; Hara, S.; Stolz, W.; Volz, K.; Kurz, T.; Loidl, A.; Krug von Nidda, H.-A.

    2006-06-01

    We have grown In 0.54Ga 0.46As:Mn/MnAs granular paramagnetic-ferromagnetic hybrid structures by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy. The MnAs clusters have a Curie temperature of about 320 K. We have studied the optical activity of individual ferromagnetic MnAs clusters embedded in the paramagnetic In 0.54Ga 0.46As:Mn matrix at room temperature by far-field depolarization measurements. A scanning near-field optical microscopy set-up in constant height mode ( ≈100 nm above the sample surface) was used to achieve a high spatial resolution. Individual MnAs clusters rotate the linear polarization of the incoming light by almost 2∘ in this reflection geometry. This optical activity was analyzed in terms of birefringence and polar Kerr effect and correlated with the structural and magnetic properties of the MnAs clusters as determined by ferromagnetic resonance measurements. The optical activity of the MnAs clusters turns out to be dominated by linear birefringence caused by the uniaxial symmetry of the hexagonal crystal structure of MnAs. The polar Kerr effect plays a minor role in this experiment.

  16. Optical activity of a single MnAs cluster: Birefringence or Kerr effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leuschner, M. [Department of Physics and Material Sciences Center, Philipps University, Renthof 5, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Klar, P.J. [Department of Physics and Material Sciences Center, Philipps University, Renthof 5, 35032 Marburg (Germany)]. E-mail: peter.klar@physik.uni-marburg.de; Heimbrodt, W. [Department of Physics and Material Sciences Center, Philipps University, Renthof 5, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Ruehle, W.W. [Department of Physics and Material Sciences Center, Philipps University, Renthof 5, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Hara, S. [Department of Physics and Material Sciences Center, Philipps University, Renthof 5, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Fujitsu Laboratories Ltd., 10-1 Morinosato-Wakamiya, Atsugi 243-0197 (Japan); Stolz, W. [Department of Physics and Material Sciences Center, Philipps University, Renthof 5, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Volz, K. [Department of Physics and Material Sciences Center, Philipps University, Renthof 5, 35032 Marburg (Germany); Kurz, T. [Experimentalphysik V, Elektronische Korrelationen und Magnetismus, Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg, 86135 Augsburg (Germany); Loidl, A. [Experimentalphysik V, Elektronische Korrelationen und Magnetismus, Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg, 86135 Augsburg (Germany); Krug von Nidda, H.-A. [Experimentalphysik V, Elektronische Korrelationen und Magnetismus, Institut fuer Physik, Universitaet Augsburg, 86135 Augsburg (Germany)

    2006-06-15

    We have grown In{sub 0.54}Ga{sub 0.46}As:Mn/MnAs granular paramagnetic-ferromagnetic hybrid structures by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy. The MnAs clusters have a Curie temperature of about 320K. We have studied the optical activity of individual ferromagnetic MnAs clusters embedded in the paramagnetic In{sub 0.54}Ga{sub 0.46}As:Mn matrix at room temperature by far-field depolarization measurements. A scanning near-field optical microscopy set-up in constant height mode ({approx}100nm above the sample surface) was used to achieve a high spatial resolution. Individual MnAs clusters rotate the linear polarization of the incoming light by almost 2{sup -}bar in this reflection geometry. This optical activity was analyzed in terms of birefringence and polar Kerr effect and correlated with the structural and magnetic properties of the MnAs clusters as determined by ferromagnetic resonance measurements. The optical activity of the MnAs clusters turns out to be dominated by linear birefringence caused by the uniaxial symmetry of the hexagonal crystal structure of MnAs. The polar Kerr effect plays a minor role in this experiment.

  17. Determination of bacterial activity by use of an evanescent-wave fiber-optic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, M Shelly; Kishen, Anil; Sing, Lim Chu; Asundi, Anand

    2002-12-01

    A novel technique based on fiber-optic evanescent-wave spectroscopy is proposed for the detection of bacterial activity in human saliva. The sensor determines th e specific concentration of Streptococcus mutans in saliva, which is a major causative factor in dental caries. In this design, one prepares the fiber-optic bacterial sensor by replacing a portion of the cladding region of a multimode fiber with a dye-encapsulated xerogel, using the solgel technique. The exponential decay of the evanescent wave at the core-cladding interface of a multimode fiber is utilized for the determination of bacterial activity in saliva. The acidogenic profile of Streptococcus mutans is estimated by use of evanescent-waveabsorption spectra at various levels of bacterial activity. PMID:12477126

  18. A thin film active-lens with translational control for dynamically programmable optical zoom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Sungryul; Park, Suntak; Park, Bongje; Nam, Saekwang; Park, Seung Koo; Kyung, Ki-Uk

    2015-08-01

    We demonstrate a thin film active-lens for rapidly and dynamically controllable optical zoom. The active-lens is composed of a convex hemispherical polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) lens structure working as an aperture and a dielectric elastomer (DE) membrane actuator, which is a combination of a thin DE layer made with PDMS and a compliant electrode pattern using silver-nanowires. The active-lens is capable of dynamically changing focal point of the soft aperture as high as 18.4% through its translational movement in vertical direction responding to electrically induced bulged-up deformation of the DE membrane actuator. Under operation with various sinusoidal voltage signals, the movement responses are fairly consistent with those estimated from numerical simulation. The responses are not only fast, fairly reversible, and highly durable during continuous cyclic operations, but also large enough to impart dynamic focus tunability for optical zoom in microscopic imaging devices with a light-weight and ultra-slim configuration.

  19. Determination of bacterial activity by use of an evanescent-wave fiber-optic sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, M. Shelly; Kishen, Anil; Sing, Lim Chu; Asundi, Anand

    2002-12-01

    A novel technique based on fiber-optic evanescent-wave spectroscopy is proposed for the detection of bacterial activity in human saliva. The sensor determines the specific concentration of Streptococcus mutans in saliva, which is a major causative factor in dental caries. In this design, one prepares the fiber-optic bacterial sensor by replacing a portion of the cladding region of a multimode fiber with a dye-encapsulated xerogel, using the solgel technique. The exponential decay of the evanescent wave at the core-cladding interface of a multimode fiber is utilized for the determination of bacterial activity in saliva. The acidogenic profile of Streptococcus mutans is estimated by use of evanescent-wave absorption spectra at various levels of bacterial activity.

  20. Influence of prolonged optic flow stimuli on spontaneous activities of cat PMLS neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Changes in neuronal spontaneous activities after prolonged optic flow stimulation (using the three basic flow modes: translation, radiation and rotation) were investigated by extracellular single-unit recording in cortical area PMLS of the cat. The results showed that the evoked responses decreased with the prolongation of visual stimuli, and the spontaneous activities usually dropped to a lower level after the stimuli were withdrawn. Generally, the reduction in spontaneous activities was larger after adaptation in the preferred direction than in the non-preferred direction. This difference was much pronounced to translation stimuli, but relatively insignificant to radiation and rotation. These points suggest that non-specific fatigue may act as the key factor in adaptation to simple translation, while some kinds of more complicated, direction-specific mechanism may be involved in adaptation to the complex optic flow patterns. In addition, PMLS may play an important role in perception and adaptation to complex motion and the relevant motion after-effects.

  1. Active optics system of the ASTRI SST-2M prototype for the Cherenkov Telescope Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiol, Daniele; Capobianco, Gerardo; Fantinel, Daniela; Giro, Enrico; Lessio, Luigi; Loreggia, Davide; Rodeghiero, Gabriele; Russo, Federico; Volpicelli, Antonio C.

    2014-07-01

    ASTRI (Astrofisica con Specchi a Tecnologia Replicante Italiana) SST-2M is an end-to-end prototype of Small Size class of Telescope for the Cherenkov Telescope Array. It will apply a dual mirror configuration to Imaging Atmospheric Cherenkov Telescopes. The 18 segments composing the primary mirror (diameter 4.3 m) are equipped with an active optics system enabling optical re-alignment during telescope slew. The secondary mirror (diameter 1.8 m) can be moved along three degrees of freedom to perform focus and tilt corrections. We describe the kinematic model used to predict the system performance as well as the hardware and software design solution that will be implemented for optics control.

  2. Lorentz factor distribution of blazars from the optical Fundamental plane of black hole activity

    CERN Document Server

    Saikia, Payaswini; Falcke, Heino

    2016-01-01

    Blazar radiation is dominated by a relativistic jet which can be modeled at first approximation using just two intrinsic parameters - the Lorentz factor $\\Gamma$ and the viewing angle $\\theta$. Blazar jet observations are often beamed due to relativistic effects, complicating the understanding of these intrinsic properties. The most common way to estimate blazar Lorentz factors needs the estimation of apparent jet speeds and Doppler beaming factors. We present a new and independent method of constructing the blazar Lorentz factor distribution, using the optical fundamental plane of black hole activity. The optical fundamental plane is a plane stretched out by both the supermassive black holes and the X-ray binaries, in the 3D space provided by their [OIII] line luminosity, radio luminosity and black hole mass. We use the intrinsic radio luminosity obtained from the optical fundamental plane to constrain the boosting parameters of the VLBA Imaging and Polarimetry Survey (VIPS) blazar sample. We find a blazar b...

  3. Engineering near-infrared single-photon emitters with optically active spins in ultrapure silicon carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, F.; Stender, B.; Trupke, M.; Simin, D.; Pflaum, J.; Dyakonov, V.; Astakhov, G. V.

    2015-07-01

    Vacancy-related centres in silicon carbide are attracting growing attention because of their appealing optical and spin properties. These atomic-scale defects can be created using electron or neutron irradiation; however, their precise engineering has not been demonstrated yet. Here, silicon vacancies are generated in a nuclear reactor and their density is controlled over eight orders of magnitude within an accuracy down to a single vacancy level. An isolated silicon vacancy serves as a near-infrared photostable single-photon emitter, operating even at room temperature. The vacancy spins can be manipulated using an optically detected magnetic resonance technique, and we determine the transition rates and absorption cross-section, describing the intensity-dependent photophysics of these emitters. The on-demand engineering of optically active spins in technologically friendly materials is a crucial step toward implementation of both maser amplifiers, requiring high-density spin ensembles, and qubits based on single spins.

  4. Modeling of On-Chip Optical Nonreciprocity with an Active Microcavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Wen

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available On-chip nonreciprocal light transport holds a great impact on optical information processing and communications based upon integrated photonic devices. By harvesting gain-saturation nonlinearity, we recently demonstrated on-chip optical asymmetric transmission at telecommunication bands with superior nonreciprocal performances using only one active whispering-gallery-mode microtoroid resonator, beyond the commonly adopted magneto-optical (Faraday effect. Here, detailed theoretical analysis is presented with respect to the reported scheme. Despite the fact that our model is simply the standard coupled-mode theory, it agrees well with the experiment and describes the essential one-way light transport in this nonreciprocal device. Further discussions, including the connection with the second law of thermodynamics and Fano resonance, are also briefly made in the end.

  5. CHARACTERIZING THE OPTICAL VARIABILITY OF BRIGHT BLAZARS: VARIABILITY-BASED SELECTION OF FERMI ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate the use of optical photometric variability to select and identify blazars in large-scale time-domain surveys, in part to aid in the identification of blazar counterparts to the ∼30% of γ-ray sources in the Fermi 2FGL catalog still lacking reliable associations. Using data from the optical LINEAR asteroid survey, we characterize the optical variability of blazars by fitting a damped random walk model to individual light curves with two main model parameters, the characteristic timescales of variability τ, and driving amplitudes on short timescales σ-circumflex. Imposing cuts on minimum τ and σ-circumflex allows for blazar selection with high efficiency E and completeness C. To test the efficacy of this approach, we apply this method to optically variable LINEAR objects that fall within the several-arcminute error ellipses of γ-ray sources in the Fermi 2FGL catalog. Despite the extreme stellar contamination at the shallow depth of the LINEAR survey, we are able to recover previously associated optical counterparts to Fermi active galactic nuclei with E ≥ 88% and C = 88% in Fermi 95% confidence error ellipses having semimajor axis r < 8'. We find that the suggested radio counterpart to Fermi source 2FGL J1649.6+5238 has optical variability consistent with other γ-ray blazars and is likely to be the γ-ray source. Our results suggest that the variability of the non-thermal jet emission in blazars is stochastic in nature, with unique variability properties due to the effects of relativistic beaming. After correcting for beaming, we estimate that the characteristic timescale of blazar variability is ∼3 years in the rest frame of the jet, in contrast with the ∼320 day disk flux timescale observed in quasars. The variability-based selection method presented will be useful for blazar identification in time-domain optical surveys and is also a probe of jet physics.

  6. High-temperature optically activated GaAs power switching for aircraft digital electronic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berak, J. M.; Grantham, D. H.; Swindal, J. L.; Black, J. F.; Allen, L. B.

    1983-01-01

    Gallium arsenide high-temperature devices were fabricated and assembled into an optically activated pulse-width-modulated power control for a torque motor typical of the kinds used in jet engine actuators. A bipolar heterojunction phototransistor with gallium aluminum arsenide emitter/window, a gallium arsenide junction field-effect power transistor and a gallium arsenide transient protection diode were designed and fabricated. A high-temperature fiber optic/phototransistor coupling scheme was implemented. The devices assembled into the demonstrator were successfully tested at 250 C, proving the feasibility of actuator-located switching of control power using optical signals transmitted by fibers. Assessments of the efficiency and technical merits were made for extension of this high-temperature technology to local conversion of optical power to electrical power and its control at levels useful for driving actuators. Optical power sources included in the comparisons were an infrared light-emitting diode, an injection laser diode, tungsten-halogen lamps and arc lamps. Optical-to-electrical power conversion was limited to photovoltaics located at the actuator. Impedance matching of the photovoltaic array to the load was considered over the full temperature range, -55 C to 260 C. Loss of photovoltaic efficiency at higher temperatures was taken into account. Serious losses in efficiency are: (1) in the optical source and the cooling which they may require in the assumed 125 C ambient, (2) in the decreased conversion efficiency of the gallium arsenide photovoltaic at 260 C, and (3) in impedance matching. Practical systems require improvements in these areas.

  7. Active disturbance rejection controller of fine tracking system for free space optical communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ning; Liu, Yang; Chen, Xinglin; Wang, Yan

    2013-08-01

    Free space optical communication is one of the best approaches in future communications. Laser beam's acquisition, pointing and tracking are crucial technologies of free space optical communication. Fine tracking system is important component of APT (acquisition, pointing and tracking) system. It cooperates with the coarse pointing system in executing the APT mission. Satellite platform vibration and disturbance, which reduce received optical power, increase bit error rate and affect seriously the natural performance of laser communication. For the characteristic of satellite platform, an active disturbance rejection controller was designed to reduce the vibration and disturbance. There are three major contributions in the paper. Firstly, the effects of vibration on the inter satellite optical communications were analyzed, and the reasons and characters of vibration of the satellite platform were summarized. The amplitude-frequency response of a filter was designed according to the power spectral density of platform vibration of SILEX (Semiconductor Inter-satellite Laser Experiment), and then the signals of platform vibration were generated by filtering white Gaussian noise using the filter. Secondly, the fast steering mirror is a key component of the fine tracking system for optical communication. The mechanical design and model analysis was made to the tip/tilt mirror driven by the piezoelectric actuator and transmitted by the flexure hinge. The transfer function of the fast steering mirror, camera, D/A data acquisition card was established, and the theory model of transfer function of this system was further obtained. Finally, an active disturbance rejection control method is developed, multiple parallel extended state observers were designed for estimation of unknown dynamics and external disturbance, and the estimated states were used for nonlinear feedback control and compensation to improve system performance. The simulation results show that the designed

  8. Optical observations of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko with the Nordic Optical Telescope. Comet activity before the solar conjunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaprudin, B.; Lehto, H. J.; Nilsson, K.; Pursimo, T.; Somero, A.; Snodgrass, C.; Schulz, R.

    2015-11-01

    Context. 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P) is a short-period Jupiter-family comet that was chosen as a target for the Rosetta mission by the European Space Agency (ESA). Monitoring of 67P with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT; La Palma, Spain) intends to aid this mission by providing ground-based reference information about the overall activity of the target and its astrometric position before the rendezvous. One motivation for our observations was to monitor sudden major increases in activity because they might have affected the Rosetta mission planning. None were observed. Ground-based photometric observations register the global activity of the comet, while the Rosetta spacecraft mostly measures local events. These data combined can lead to new insights into the comet behavior. Aims: The aim of this work is to perform the photometric and the astrometric monitoring of comet 67P with the NOT and to compare the results with the latest predictions for its position and activity. A new method of fitting extended-source components to the target surface brightness distribution was developed and applied to the data to estimate the size and contribution of the coma to the total brightness of the target. Methods: Comet 67P was monitored by the NOT in service mode during the period between 12.5.2013 and 11.11.2014. The very first observations were performed in the V band alone, but in the latest observations, the R band was used as well to estimate the color and nature of activity of the target. We applied a new method for estimating the coma size by deconvolving the point spread function profile from the image, which used Markov chain Monte Carlo and Bayesian statistics. This method will also be used for coma size estimations in further observations after the solar conjunction of 67P. Results: Photometric magnitudes in two colors were monitored during the period of observations. At the end of April 2014, the beginning of activity was observed. In late September 2014, a

  9. A study of aliphatic amino acids using simulated vibrational circular dichroism and Raman optical activity spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Ganesan, Aravindhan; Wang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Vibrational optical activity (VOA) spectra, such as vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra, of aliphatic amino acids are simulated using density functional theory (DFT) methods in both gas phase (neutral form) and solution (zwitterionic form), together with their respective infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of the amino acids. The DFT models, which are validated by excellent agreements with the available experimental Raman and ROA spectra of alanine in solution, are employed to study other aliphatic amino acids. The inferred (IR) intensive region (below 2000 cm-1) reveals the signature of alkyl side chains, whereas the Raman intensive region (above 3000 cm-1) contains the information of the functional groups in the amino acids. Furthermore, the chiral carbons of the amino acids (except for glycine) dominate the VCD and ROA spectra in the gas phase, but the methyl group vibrations produce stronger VCD and ROA signals in solution. The C-H related asymmetric vibrations domina...

  10. Influence of the interface on the optical activity of confined glucose films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emile, Olivier; Emile, Janine; Ghoufi, Aziz

    2016-09-01

    We report on the time evolution of the optical activity of a thinning liquid film containing glucose, and confined between two glass slides. This dynamics strongly depends on the presence of surfactant molecules. With sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), we evidence favorable interactions of sugar molecules with the sulfate group. As previously observed for a freely suspended soap film in the air (see Emile et al., 2013), this corresponds to an anchoring of glucose molecules at the interface. For glucose alone, we also highlight a molecular rearrangement that is not instantaneous and occurs after several minutes. This interfacial organization leads to an unusual giant optical activity that is different with or without SDS. Molecular simulations confirm the anchoring of the glucose molecules at the glass/liquid interface, and show a different molecular orientation in each case. PMID:27254252

  11. Lattice location and optical activation of rare earth implanted GaN

    CERN Document Server

    Wahl, U; Lorenz, K; Correia, J G; Monteiro, T; De Vries, B; Vantomme, A; Vianden, R

    2003-01-01

    This paper reviews the current knowledge on rare earths (REs) implanted into GaN with a special focus on their lattice location and on the optical activation by means of thermal annealing. While emission channeling experiments have given information on the lattice location of rare earths following low-dose (around 10$^{13}$ cm$^{-2}$) implantation, both in the as-implanted state and after annealing up to 900°C, the lattice location of higher-dose implants (10$^{14}-10^{15}$ cm$^{-2}$) and their defect annealing behaviour were studied using the Rutherford backscattering/channeling method. The available channeling and luminescence results suggest that the optical activation of implanted REs in GaN is related to their incorporation in substitutional Ga sites combined with the effective removal of the implantation damage.

  12. Functional imaging of glucose-evoked rat islet activities using transient intrinsic optical signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xin-Cheng; Cui, Wan-Xing; Li, Yi-Chao; Zhang, Wei; Lu, Rong-Wen; Thompson, Anthony; Amthor, Franklin; Wang, Xu-Jing

    2012-05-01

    We demonstrate intrinsic optical signal (IOS) imaging of intact rat islet, which consists of many endocrine cells working together. A near-infrared digital microscope was employed for optical monitoring of islet activities evoked by glucose stimulation. Dynamic NIR images revealed transient IOS responses in the islet activated by low-dose (2.75 mM) and high-dose (5.5 mM) glucose stimuli. Comparative experiments and quantitative analysis indicated that both glucose metabolism and calcium/insulin dynamics might contribute to the observed IOS responses. Further investigation of the IOS imaging technology may provide a high resolution method for ex vivo functional examination of the islet, which is important for advanced study of diabetes associated islet dysfunctions and for improved quality control of donor islets for transplantation.

  13. Vibrational spectroscopic and non-linear optical activity studies on nicotinanilide : A DFT approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular structure of nicotinanilide was optimized by the DFT/B3LYP method with cc-pVTZ basis set using Gaussian 09 program. The first order hyperpolarizability of the molecule was calculated, which exhibits the higher nonlinear optical activity. The natural bond orbital analysis confirms the presence of intramolecular charge transfer and the hydrogen bonding interaction, which leads to the higher nonlinear optical activity of the molecule. The Frontier molecular orbitals analysis of the molecule shows that the delocalization of electron density occurs within the molecule. The lower energy gap indicates that the hydrogen bond formation between the charged species. The vibrational frequencies were calculated and assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation using the VEDA 4.0 program and the corresponding vibrational spectra were simulated. Hence, the nicotinanilide molecule can be a good candidate for second-order NLO material

  14. Optically Active Chiral Auxiliary Benzyloxyphenylglycinol for Preparation of Oxazolidine and Its Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Ying-huan; CHEN Jin; WU Tong-hao; BAI Xu

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the recovery of amino alcohols as chiral auxiliaries, optically active p-benzyloxyphenylglycinol and its corresponding oxazolidine of 1-naphthylcarboxaldehyde were prepared. Grignard additions to the oxazolidine followed by electrophilic quench and acidic hydrolysis afforded an aldehyde(compound 8)(later it was reduced to an alcohol, compound 9) in an excellent enantiomeric excess and a good recovery of the chiral amino alcohol. This research provides a model study of chiral amino alcohols in solid phase asymmetric synthesis.

  15. Physiochemical, Optical and Biological Activity of Chitosan-Chromone Derivative for Biomedical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Joonseok Koh; Santosh Kumar

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the physiochemical, optical and biological activity of chitosan-chromone derivative. The chitosan-chromone derivative gels were prepared by reacting chitosan with chromone-3-carbaldehyde, followed by solvent exchange, filtration and drying by evaporation. The identity of Schiff base was confirmed by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. The chitosan-chromone derivative was evaluated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric...

  16. Versatile illumination platform and fast optical switch to give standard observation camera gated active imaging capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasser, R.; Peyronneaudi, Benjamin; Yon, Kevin; Aubry, Marie

    2015-10-01

    CILAS, subsidiary of Airbus Defense and Space, develops, manufactures and sales laser-based optronics equipment for defense and homeland security applications. Part of its activity is related to active systems for threat detection, recognition and identification. Active surveillance and active imaging systems are often required to achieve identification capacity in case for long range observation in adverse conditions. In order to ease the deployment of active imaging systems often complex and expensive, CILAS suggests a new concept. It consists on the association of two apparatus working together. On one side, a patented versatile laser platform enables high peak power laser illumination for long range observation. On the other side, a small camera add-on works as a fast optical switch to select photons with specific time of flight only. The association of the versatile illumination platform and the fast optical switch presents itself as an independent body, so called "flash module", giving to virtually any passive observation systems gated active imaging capacity in NIR and SWIR.

  17. Translational Optic Flow Induces Shifts in Direction of Active Forward and Backward Self-Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenzo Sakurai

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we reported that when observers passively experience real linear oscillatory somatic motion while viewing orthogonal visual optic flow patterns, their perceived motion direction is intermediate to those specified by visual and vestibular information individually (Sakurai et al., 2002, ACV; 2003, ECVP; 2010, VSS; Kubodera et al., 2010, APCV. Here, we extend those studies to active somatic motion, measuring the angular shift in body direction after active body motion while viewing synchronized orthogonal optic flow. Experimental visual stimuli consisted of 1 second of translating leftward (rightward random-dots and 1 second of random noise. Control stimuli consisted of two 1-second intervals of random noise separated by a static interval. Observers viewed the stimulus for 30 seconds through a face-mounted display while actively stepping forward and backward such that their forward body movement was synchronized with the random-dot translational motion. Observers' body direction was measured before and after each trial. Translational optic flow induced shifts in body direction that were opposite to shifts in perceived direction with passive viewing in our previous reports. Observers may have compensated their body motion in response to perceived direction shifts similar to those we reported for passive viewing.

  18. Rare earth ion implantation and optical activation in nitride semiconductors for multicolor emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to understand the behavior of nitride semiconductors when submitted to ion implantation, we have used 300 keV europium at fluences from 1012 to above 1017 ions cm−2. Subsequently, Rutherford backscattering (RBS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to investigate the evolution of damage. The optical properties were investigated prior to and after annealing. It was found that the behavior of the three compounds (AlN, GaN InN) under ion implantation is rather different: whereas InN breaks down at very low fluences (∼1012 ions cm−2), the damage formation mechanisms are similar in AlN and GaN. In both compounds, extended defects such as stacking faults play a critical role. However, they exhibit different stability, as a consequence, GaN transforms to nanocrystalline state from the surface at a fluence of around 2.5 × 1015 ions cm−2, whereas AlN undergoes a chemical amorphization starting at the projected range (Rp), when implanted to extremely high Eu fluences >1017 ionscm−2. As for the optical activation, the formation of highly stable extended defects in these compounds constitutes a real challenge for the annealing of heavily doped layers, and it was noticed that for a substantial optical activation, the implantation fluences should be kept low (<1015 Eu at cm−2). (invited article)

  19. Activation of Organic Photovoltaic Light Detectors Using Bend Leakage from Optical Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Matthew J; Willis, Matthew S; Kumar, Pankaj; Holdsworth, John L; Bezuidenhout, Henco; Zhou, Xiaojing; Belcher, Warwick; Dastoor, Paul C

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the detection and subsequent utilization of leaked light from bends in a silica optical fiber using organic photovoltaic detectors. The optic power lost by single mode and multimode silica optical fibers was calibrated for bend radii between 1 and 7 mm for 532 and 633 nm light, exhibiting excellent agreement with previous theoretical solutions. The spatial location of maximum power leakage on the exterior of the fiber was found to exist in the same plane as the fiber, with a 10° offset from the normal. Two different organic photovoltaic detectors fabricated using a poly(3-hexylthiophene):indene-C60-bisadduct donor-acceptor blend cast from chloroform and chlorobenzene were fabricated to detect the leaked light. The two detectors exhibited different photovoltaic performances, predominantly due to different active layer thicknesses. Both devices showed sensitivity to leakage light, exhibiting voltages between 200 and 300 mV in response to leaked light from the fiber. The temporal responses of the devices were observed to differ, with a rise time from 10% to 90% of maximum voltage of 1430 μs for the chlorobenzene device, and a corresponding rise time of 490 μs for the higher performing chloroform device. The two OPVs were used to simultaneously detect leaked light from induced bends in the optical fiber, with the differing temporal profiles employed to create a unique time-correlated detection signal with enhanced security. The delay between detection of each OPV voltage could be systematically varied, allowing for either a programmable and secure single detection signal or triggering of multiple events with variable time resolution. The results reported in this study present exciting avenues toward the deployment of this simple and noninvasive optical detection system in a range of different applications.

  20. Development of active/adaptive lightweight optics for the next generation of telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghigo, M.; Basso, S.; Citterio, O.; Mazzoleni, F.; Vernani, D.

    2006-02-01

    The future large optical telescopes will have such large dimensions to require innovative technical solutions either in the engineering and optical fields. Their optics will have dimensions ranging from 30 to 100 m. and will be segmented. It is necessary to develop a cost effective industrial process, fast and efficient, to create the thousands of segments neeededs to assemble the mirrors of these instruments. INAF-OAB (Astronomical Observatory of Brera) is developing with INAF-Arcetri (Florence Astronomical Observatory) a method of production of lightweight glass optics that is suitable for the manufacturing of these segments. These optics will be also probably active and therefore the segments have to be thin, light and relatively flexible. The same requirements are valid also for the secondary adaptive mirrors foreseen for these telescopes and that therefore will benefit from the same technology. The technique under investigation foresees the thermal slumping of thin glass segments using a high quality ceramic mold (master). The sheet of glass is placed onto the mold and then, by means of a suitable thermal cycle, the glass is softened and its shape is changed copying the master shape. At the end of the slumping the correction of the remaining errors will be performed using the Ion Beam Figuring technique, a non-contact deterministic technique. To reduce the time spent for the correction it will be necessary to have shape errors on the segments as small as possible. A very preliminary series of experiments already performed on reduced size segments have shown that it is possible to copy a master shape with high accuracy (few microns PV) and it is very likely that copy accuracies of 1 micron or less are possible. The paper presents in detail the concepts of the proposed process and describes our current efforts that are aimed at the production of a scaled demonstrative adaptive segment of 50 cm of diameter.

  1. Activation of Organic Photovoltaic Light Detectors Using Bend Leakage from Optical Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Matthew J; Willis, Matthew S; Kumar, Pankaj; Holdsworth, John L; Bezuidenhout, Henco; Zhou, Xiaojing; Belcher, Warwick; Dastoor, Paul C

    2016-03-01

    This work investigates the detection and subsequent utilization of leaked light from bends in a silica optical fiber using organic photovoltaic detectors. The optic power lost by single mode and multimode silica optical fibers was calibrated for bend radii between 1 and 7 mm for 532 and 633 nm light, exhibiting excellent agreement with previous theoretical solutions. The spatial location of maximum power leakage on the exterior of the fiber was found to exist in the same plane as the fiber, with a 10° offset from the normal. Two different organic photovoltaic detectors fabricated using a poly(3-hexylthiophene):indene-C60-bisadduct donor-acceptor blend cast from chloroform and chlorobenzene were fabricated to detect the leaked light. The two detectors exhibited different photovoltaic performances, predominantly due to different active layer thicknesses. Both devices showed sensitivity to leakage light, exhibiting voltages between 200 and 300 mV in response to leaked light from the fiber. The temporal responses of the devices were observed to differ, with a rise time from 10% to 90% of maximum voltage of 1430 μs for the chlorobenzene device, and a corresponding rise time of 490 μs for the higher performing chloroform device. The two OPVs were used to simultaneously detect leaked light from induced bends in the optical fiber, with the differing temporal profiles employed to create a unique time-correlated detection signal with enhanced security. The delay between detection of each OPV voltage could be systematically varied, allowing for either a programmable and secure single detection signal or triggering of multiple events with variable time resolution. The results reported in this study present exciting avenues toward the deployment of this simple and noninvasive optical detection system in a range of different applications. PMID:26891938

  2. Noticeable positive Doppler effect on optical bistability in an N-type active Raman gain atomic system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Zeng-Guang; Niu Yue-Ping; Zhang Jing-Tao; Gong Shang-Qing

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the Doppler effect on optical bistability in an N type active Raman gain atomic system inside an optical ring cavity.It is shown that the Doppler effect can greatly enhance the dispersion and thus create the bistable behaviour or greatly increase the bistable region,which has been known as the positive Doppler effect on optical bistability.In addition,we find that a positive Doppler effect can change optical bistability from the hybrid dispersion-gain type to a dispersive type.

  3. A note on periodicity of long-term variations of optical continuum in active galactic nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Kai-Xing; Bi, Shao-Lan; Wang, Jian-Min

    2016-01-01

    Graham et al. found a sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and quasars from the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS) that have long-term periodic variations in optical continuum, the nature of the periodicity remains uncertain. We investigate the periodic variability characteristics of the sample by testing the relations of the observed variability periods with AGN optical luminosity, black hole mass and accretion rates, and find no significant correlations. We also test the observed periods in several different aspects related to accretion disks surrounding single black holes, such as the Keplerian rotational periods of 5100~\\AA\\ photon-emission regions and self-gravity dominated regions and the precessing period of warped disks. These tests shed new lights on understanding AGN variability in general. Under the assumption that the periodic behavior is associated with SMBHB systems in particular, we compare the separations ($\\mathscr{D}_{\\bullet}$) against characteristic radii of broad-line regions (...

  4. Multiwavelength active optics Shack-Hartmann sensor for seeing and turbulence outer scale monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Martinez, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Real-time seeing and outer scale estimation at the location of the focus of a telescope is fundamental for the adaptive optics systems dimensioning and performance prediction, as well as for the operational aspects of instruments. This study attempts to take advantage of multiwavelength long exposure images to instantaneously and simultaneously derive the turbulence outer scale and seeing from the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of seeing-limited images taken at the focus of a telescope. These atmospheric parameters are commonly measured in most observatories by different methods located away from the telescope platform, and thus differing from the effective estimates at the focus of a telescope, mainly because of differences in pointing orientation, height above the ground, or local seeing bias (dome contribution). Long exposure images can either directly be provided by any multiwavelength scientific imager or spectrograph, or alternatively from a modified active optics Shack-Hartmann sensor (AOSH). From m...

  5. Bio-optofluidics and Bio-photonics: Programmable Phase Optics activities at DTU Fotonik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Pedersen, Finn;

    We present ongoing research and development activities for constructing a compact next generation BioPhotonics Workstation and a Bio-optofluidic Cell Sorter (cell-BOCS) for all-optical micromanipulation platforms utilizing low numerical aperture beam geometries. Unlike conventional high NA optical...... tweezers, the BioPhotonics workstation is e.g. capable of long range 3D manipulation. This enables a variety of biological studies such as manipulation of intricate microfabricated assemblies or for automated and parallel optofluidic cell sorting. To further reduce its overhead, we propose ways of making...... the BioPhotonics Workstation platform more photon efficient by studying the 3D distribution of the counter propagating beams and utilizing the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) method for illuminating the applied spatial light modulators....

  6. Tunable optical activity in three-level nonchiral terahertz nanostructures under symmetrical incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shifang Guo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We develop a theory of original quantum mechanism for finding strong optical activity quantum optical system in three-level non-chiral nanostructures, where symmetrical incidence (the propagation of the incident light is vertical to the plane of nanostructures is considered. The theory is validated via both analytical and numerical analysis of specifically designed non-chiral coupled quantum dots models. In particular, by proper designing of the incidence, tunable terahertz wave polarized even in the opposite direction of the incidence is obtained. The effect could be explored for developing novel highly efficient terahertz polarization rotator and modulators, and may lead to the appearance of a new class of negative index terahertz nanostructures.

  7. Magnetically induced optical activity and dichroism of gadolinium oxide nanoparticle-based ferrofluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Nibedita; Devi, Manasi; Mohanta, Dambarudhar [Nanoscience and Soft Matter Laboratory, Department of Physics, Tezpur University, PO Napaam, Tezpur 784 028, Assam (India); Saha, Abhijit [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Kolkata Centre, III/LB-8 Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700 098 (India)

    2012-02-15

    The present work reports on magnetically induced optical activity (such as Faraday rotation and linear dichroism) of pristine and gamma-irradiated gadolinium oxide (Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanoparticle-based ferrofluids. The ferrofluids were produced by dispersing N-cetyl-N,N,N-trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB)-coated {approx}9-nm-sized Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} particles in a carrier fluid of ethanol. The ferrofluids were then irradiated with 1.25 MeV energetic gamma rays (dose: 868 Gy and 2.635 kGy). Irradiation-led formation of a number of point defects was revealed through high resolution electron microscopy. The interaction of light with the ionized point defects is believed to have caused substantial improvement in the magneto-optic response of irradiated magnetic fluids.

  8. On X-ray Optical Depth in the Coronae of Active Stars

    CERN Document Server

    Testa, Paola; Peres, Giovanni; Huenemoerder, David P

    2007-01-01

    We have investigated the optical thickness of the coronal plasma through the analysis of high-resolution X-ray spectra of a large sample of active stars observed with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer on Chandra. In particular, we probed for the presence of significant resonant scattering in the strong Lyman series lines arising from hydrogen-like oxygen and neon ions. The active RS CVn-type binaries II Peg and IM Peg and the single M dwarf EV Lac show significant optical depth. For these active coronae, the Lya/Lyb ratios are significantly depleted as compared with theoretical predictions and with the same ratios observed in similar active stars. Interpreting these decrements in terms of resonance scattering of line photons out of the line-of-sight, we are able to derive an estimate for the typical size of coronal structures, and from these we also derive estimates of coronal filling factors. For all three sources we find that the both the photon path length as a fraction of the stellar radiu...

  9. Actively phase-controlled coupling between plasmonic waveguides via in-between gain-assisted nanoresonator: nanoscale optical logic gates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Kum-Song; Han, Yong-Ha; Ri, Chol-Song; Im, Song-Jin

    2016-08-15

    The development of nanoscale optical logic gates has attracted immense attention due to increasing demand for ultrahigh-speed and energy-efficient optical computing and data processing, however, suffers from the difficulty in precise control of phase difference of the two optical signals. We propose a novel conception of nanoscale optical logic gates based on actively phase-controlled coupling between two plasmonic waveguides via an in-between gain-assisted nanoresonator. Precise control of phase difference between the two plasmonic signals can be performed by manipulating pumping rate at an appropriate frequency detuning, enabling a high contrast between the output logic states "1" and "0." Without modification of the structural parameters, different logic functions can be provided. This active nanoscale optical logic device is expected to be quite energy-efficient with ideally low energy consumption on the order of 0.1 fJ/bit. Analytical calculations and numerical experiments demonstrate the validity of the proposed concept.

  10. Early optical follow-up of the nearby active star DG CVn during its 2014 superflare

    CERN Document Server

    Caballero-Garcia, M D; Jelinek, M; Castro-Tirado, A J; Cwiek, A; Claret, A; Opiela, R; Zarnecki, A F; Gorosabel, J; Oates, S R; Cunniffe, R; Jeong, S; Hudec, R; Sokolov, V V; Makarov, D I; Tello, J C; Lara-Gil, O; Kubanek, P; Guziy, S; Bai, J; Fan, Y; Wang, C; Park, I H

    2015-01-01

    DG CVn is a binary system in which one of the components is an M type dwarf ultra fast rotator, only three of which are known in the solar neighborhood. Observations of DG CVn by the Swift satellite and several ground-based observatories during its super-flare event on 2014 allowed us to perform a complete hard X-ray - optical follow-up of a super-flare from the red-dwarf star. The observations support the fact that the super-flare can be explained by the presence of (a) large active region(s) on the surface of the star. Such activity is similar to the most extreme solar flaring events. This points towards a plausible extrapolation between the behaviour from the most active red-dwarf stars and the processes occurring in the Sun.

  11. Active differential optical absorption spectroscopy for NO2 gas pollution using blue light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljalal, Abdulaziz; Gasmi, Khaled; Al-Basheer, Watheq

    2015-05-01

    Availability of high intensity light emitting diodes in the blue region offer excellent opportunity for using them in active Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) to detect air pollution. Their smooth and relatively broad spectral emissions as well as their long life make them almost ideal light sources for active DOAS. In this study, we report the usage of a blue light emitting diode in an active DOAS setup to measure traces of NO2 gas and achieving few parts per billion detection limit for a path length of 300 m. Details of the setup will be presented along with the effects on measurement accuracy due to shifts in the measured spectra calibration and due to using theoretical instrument Gaussian function instead of the measured instrument function.

  12. Nuclear activity versus star formation: emission-line diagnostics at ultraviolet and optical wavelengths

    CERN Document Server

    Feltre, Anna; Gutkin, Julia

    2015-01-01

    In the context of observations of the rest-frame ultraviolet and optical emission from distant galaxies, we explore the emission-line properties of photoionization models of active and inactive galaxies. Our aim is to identify new line-ratio diagnostics to discriminate between gas photoionization by active galactic nuclei (AGN) and star formation. We use a standard photoionization code to compute the emission from AGN narrow-line regions and compare this with calculations of the nebular emission from star-forming galaxies achieved using the same code. We confirm the appropriateness of widely used optical spectral diagnostics of nuclear activity versus star formation and explore new diagnostics at ultraviolet wavelengths. We find that combinations of a collisionally excited metal line or line multiplet, such as CIV 1548,1551, OIII]1661,1666, NIII]1750, [SiIII]1883+[SiIII]1892 and [CIII]1907+CIII]1909, with the HeII 1640 recombination line are individually good discriminants of the nature of the ionizing source...

  13. Wide-field optical mapping of neural activity and brain haemodynamics: considerations and novel approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ying; Shaik, Mohammed A.; Kozberg, Mariel G.; Thibodeaux, David N.; Zhao, Hanzhi T.; Yu, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Although modern techniques such as two-photon microscopy can now provide cellular-level three-dimensional imaging of the intact living brain, the speed and fields of view of these techniques remain limited. Conversely, two-dimensional wide-field optical mapping (WFOM), a simpler technique that uses a camera to observe large areas of the exposed cortex under visible light, can detect changes in both neural activity and haemodynamics at very high speeds. Although WFOM may not provide single-neuron or capillary-level resolution, it is an attractive and accessible approach to imaging large areas of the brain in awake, behaving mammals at speeds fast enough to observe widespread neural firing events, as well as their dynamic coupling to haemodynamics. Although such wide-field optical imaging techniques have a long history, the advent of genetically encoded fluorophores that can report neural activity with high sensitivity, as well as modern technologies such as light emitting diodes and sensitive and high-speed digital cameras have driven renewed interest in WFOM. To facilitate the wider adoption and standardization of WFOM approaches for neuroscience and neurovascular coupling research, we provide here an overview of the basic principles of WFOM, considerations for implementation of wide-field fluorescence imaging of neural activity, spectroscopic analysis and interpretation of results. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience’. PMID:27574312

  14. Tailored spectroscopic and optical properties in rare earth-activated glass-ceramics planar waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristic, Davor; Van Tran, Thi Thanh; Dieudonné, Belto; Cristina, Armellini; Berneschi, Simone; Chiappini, Andrea; Chiasera, Alessandro; Varas, Stefano; Carpentiero, Alessandro; Mazzola, Maurizio; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero; Pelli, Stefano; Speranza, Giorgio; Feron, Patrice; Duverger Arfuso, Claire; Cibiel, Gilles; Turrell, Sylvia; Tran Ngoc, Khiem; Boulard, Brigitte; Righini, Giancarlo C.; Ferrari, Maurizio

    2013-03-01

    Glass ceramic activated by rare earth ions are nanocomposite systems that exhibit specific morphologic, structural and spectroscopic properties allowing to develop interesting new physical concepts, for instance the mechanism related to the transparency, as well as novel photonic devices based on the enhancement of the luminescence. At the state of art the fabrication techniques based on bottom-up and top-down approaches appear to be viable although a specific effort is required to achieve the necessary reliability and reproducibility of the preparation protocols. In particular, the dependence of the final product on the specific parent glass and on the employed synthesis still remain an important task of the research in material science. Glass-ceramic waveguides overcome some of the efficiency problems experienced with conventional waveguides. These two-phase materials are composed of nanocrystals embedded in an amorphous matrix. The respective volume fractions of the crystalline and amorphous phases determine the properties of the glass ceramic. They also represent a valid alternative to widely used glass hosts such as silica as an effective optical medium for light propagation and luminescence enhancement. Looking to application, the enhanced spectroscopic properties typical of glass ceramic in respect to those of the amorphous structures constitute an important point for the development of integrated optics devices, including optical amplifiers, monolithic waveguide laser, novel sensors, coating of spherical microresonators, and up and down converters for solar energy exploitation.

  15. Disease Activity and Conversion into Multiple Sclerosis after Optic Neuritis Is Treated with Erythropoietin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sühs, Kurt-Wolfram; Papanagiotou, Panagiotis; Hein, Katharina; Pul, Refik; Scholz, Kerstin; Heesen, Christoph; Diem, Ricarda

    2016-01-01

    Changes in cerebral lesion load by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients from a double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase II study on erythropoietin in clinically isolated optic neuritis (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00355095) were analyzed. Therefore, patients with acute optic neuritis were assigned to receive either 33,000 IU of recombinant human erythropoietin (IV) daily for three days, or a placebo, as an add-on to methylprednisolone. Of 35 patients, we investigated changes in cerebral lesion load in MRIs obtained at baseline and at weeks 4, 8, and 16. In 5 of the 35 patients, we found conversion into multiple sclerosis (MS) based on MRI progression only. These five patients had received the placebo. Another five patients showed MRI progression together with relapses. Three of these patients had received erythropoietin, and two the placebo. Yet, analyzing the change in absolute numbers of periventricular, juxtacortical, and infratentorial lesions including gadolinium-enhancing lesions, there were no significant differences between the groups. Although effective in terms of retinal nerve fiber layer protection, erythropoietin treatment of acute isolated optic neuritis did not influence further evolution of MRI lesions in the brain when comparing absolute numbers. However, early conversion from clinically isolated syndrome to MS assessed by MRI activity seemed to occur more frequently in the placebo-treated group. PMID:27706045

  16. Lorentz factor distribution of blazars from the optical Fundamental Plane of black hole activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saikia, Payaswini; Körding, Elmar; Falcke, Heino

    2016-09-01

    Blazar radiation is dominated by a relativistic jet which can be modelled at first approximation using just two intrinsic parameters - the Lorentz factor Γ and the viewing angle θ. Blazar jet observations are often beamed due to relativistic effects, complicating the understanding of these intrinsic properties. The most common way to estimate blazar Lorentz factors needs the estimation of apparent jet speeds and Doppler beaming factors. We present a new and independent method of constructing the blazar Lorentz factor distribution, using the optical Fundamental Plane of black hole activity. The optical Fundamental Plane is a plane stretched out by both the supermassive black holes and the X-ray binaries, in the 3D space provided by their [O III] line luminosity, radio luminosity and black hole mass. We use the intrinsic radio luminosity obtained from the optical Fundamental Plane to constrain the boosting parameters of the VLBA Imaging and Polarimetry Survey blazar sample. We find a blazar bulk Lorentz factor distribution in the form of a power law as N(Γ) ∝ Γ-2.1 ± 0.4 for the Γ range of 1-40. We also discuss the viewing angle distribution of the blazars and the dependence of our results on the input parameters.

  17. Active galactic nuclei synapses: X-ray versus optical classifications using artificial neural networks

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez-Martin, O; Acosta-Pulido, J A; Masegosa, J; Papadakis, I E; Rodriguez-Espinosa, J M; Marquez, I; Hernandez-Garcia, L

    2014-01-01

    (Abridged) Many classes of active galactic nuclei (AGN) have been defined entirely throughout optical wavelengths while the X-ray spectra have been very useful to investigate their inner regions. However, optical and X-ray results show many discrepancies that have not been fully understood yet. The aim of this paper is to study the "synapses" between the X-ray and optical classifications. For the first time, the new EFLUXER task allowed us to analyse broad band X-ray spectra of emission line nuclei (ELN) without any prior spectral fitting using artificial neural networks (ANNs). Our sample comprises 162 XMM-Newton/pn spectra of 90 local ELN in the Palomar sample. It includes starbursts (SB), transition objects (T2), LINERs (L1.8 and L2), and Seyferts (S1, S1.8, and S2). The ANNs are 90% efficient at classifying the trained classes S1, S1.8, and SB. The S1 and S1.8 classes show a wide range of S1- and S1.8-like components. We suggest that this is related to a large degree of obscuration at X-rays. The S1, S1.8...

  18. Field-effect active plasmonics for ultracompact electro-optic switching

    OpenAIRE

    Müstecaplıoğlu, Özgür E.; Çetin, Arif E.; Yanık, Ahmet A.; Mertiri, Alket; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Altuğ, Hatice

    2012-01-01

    Field-effect active plasmonics for ultracompact electro-optic switching Arif E. Çetin, Ahmet A. Yanik, Alket Mertiri, Shyamsunder Erramilli, Özgür E. Müstecaplolu, and Hatice Altug Citation: Applied Physics Letters 101, 121113 (2012); doi: 10.1063/1.4754139 View online: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4754139 View Table of Contents: http://scitation.aip.org/content/aip/journal/apl/101/12?ver=pdfcov Published by the AIP Publishing Articles you may be interested in A proposal f...

  19. Enhanced optical precursors by Doppler effect via active Raman gain process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yandong; Niu, Yueping; Zhang, Lida; Yang, Aihong; Jiang, Lin; Gong, Shangqing

    2012-08-15

    A scheme for enhancing precursor pulse by Doppler effect is proposed in a room-temperature active-Raman-gain medium. Due to abnormal dispersion between two gain peaks, main fields are advanced and constructively interfere with optical precursors, which leads to enhancement of the transient pulse at the rise edge of the input. Moreover, after Doppler averaging, the abnormal dispersion intensifies and the constructive interference between precursors and main fields is much strengthened, which boosts the transient spike. Simulation results demonstrate that the peak intensity of precursors could be enhanced nearly 20 times larger than that of the input.

  20. Enhanced optical precursors by Doppler effect via active Raman gain process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yandong; Niu, Yueping; Zhang, Lida; Yang, Aihong; Jiang, Lin; Gong, Shangqing

    2012-08-15

    A scheme for enhancing precursor pulse by Doppler effect is proposed in a room-temperature active-Raman-gain medium. Due to abnormal dispersion between two gain peaks, main fields are advanced and constructively interfere with optical precursors, which leads to enhancement of the transient pulse at the rise edge of the input. Moreover, after Doppler averaging, the abnormal dispersion intensifies and the constructive interference between precursors and main fields is much strengthened, which boosts the transient spike. Simulation results demonstrate that the peak intensity of precursors could be enhanced nearly 20 times larger than that of the input. PMID:23381248

  1. Synthesis and aggregation study of optically active tetra--[()-2-octanyloxy]-substituted copper and nickel phthalocyanines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fang-Di Cong; Gui Gao; Jian-Xin Li; Guo-Qing Huang; Zhen Wei; Feng-Yang Yu; Xi-Guang Du; Ke-Zhi Xing

    2010-11-01

    The optically active tetra--[()-2-octanyloxy]-substituted copper and nickel phthalocyanines were synthesized via a two-step route with 4-nitro-phthalonitrile and ()-2-octanol as the starting materials. Both compounds are fully characterized by MS, 1H NMR, UV-Vis, IR, CD and elemental analysis, and soluble in common organic solvents except methanol. The results showed that they were dispersed into single molecules in chloroform and dichloromethane, but prone to congregate into H-type aggregates in ethanol and diethyl ether. They assembled to H-type aggregates with left-handed helix when deposited as thin films.

  2. Actively Q-switched erbium-doped fiber ring laser with a nanosecond ceramic optical switch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An actively Q-switched erbium-doped fiber laser with a fiber-pigtailed nanosecond ceramic optical switch is experimentally investigated in this paper. Firstly, the ceramic optical switch was systematically characterized. Then, it was used to actively Q-switch an all-fiber erbium-doped fiber ring laser. Stable Q-switching laser pulses with a repetition rate from 2 kHz–40 kHz were achieved. The minimum pulse width was measured to be ∼25 ns at 2 kHz when pumped at 150 mW, and the corresponding maximum peak power was ∼2.9 W. Multi-peak pulses were observed at low repetition rates and the reasons for these were analyzed. This study shows that a nanosecond ceramic switch can be used as a good Q switch due to its low insertion loss, high on/off ratio, ultrafast response, and low electrical power consumption. (paper)

  3. Helical polyurethane-attapulgite nanocomposite: Preparation, characterization and study of optical activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helical polyurethane-attapulgite (BM-ATT) based on R-1,1'-binaphthyl-2',2-diol (R-BINOL) composite was prepared after the surface modification of attapulgite (ATT). BM-ATT was characterized by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HTEM) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy. FT-IR and XRD analyses indicate that the helical polyurethane has been successfully grafted onto the surfaces of the modified ATT without destroying the original crystalline structure of ATT. BM-ATT exhibits the rod-like structure by SEM, TEM, and HTEM photographs. BM-ATT displays obvious Cotton effect for some absorbance in VCD spectrum, and its optical activity results from the singlehanded conformation of helical polyurethane. - Graphical Abstract: Helical polyurethane-attapulgite (BM-ATT) based on R-1,1'-binaphthyl-2',2-diol (R-BINOL) nanocomposite was prepared after surface modification of attapulgite (ATT). This rod-like composite is coated by the optically active polyurethane shell on the surfaces.

  4. Optically active polyurethane@indium tin oxide nanocomposite: Preparation, characterization and study of infrared emissivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Silane coupling agent of KH550 was used to connect the ITO and polyurethanes. ► Infrared emissivity values of the hybrids were compared and analyzed. ► Interfacial synergistic action and orderly secondary structure were the key factors. -- Abstract: Optically active polyurethane@indium tin oxide and racemic polyurethane@indium tin oxide nanocomposites (LPU@ITO and RPU@ITO) were prepared by grafting the organics onto the surfaces of modified ITO nanoparticles. LPU@ITO and RPU@ITO composites based on the chiral and racemic tyrosine were characterized by FT-IR, UV–vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM, TEM, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and the infrared emissivity values (8–14 μm) were investigated in addition. The results indicated that the polyurethanes had been successfully grafted onto the surfaces of ITO without destroying the crystalline structure. Both composites possessed the lower infrared emissivity values than the bare ITO nanoparticles, which indicated that the interfacial interaction had great effect on the infrared emissivity. Furthermore, LPU@ITO based on the optically active polyurethane had the virtue of regular secondary structure and more interfacial synergistic actions between organics and inorganics, thus it exhibited lower infrared emissivity value than RPU@ITO based on the racemic polyurethane.

  5. Optically active polyurethane@indium tin oxide nanocomposite: Preparation, characterization and study of infrared emissivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Yong [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Jiangsu Optoelectronic Functional Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Nanjing 211189 (China); Zhou, Yuming, E-mail: ymzhou@seu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Jiangsu Optoelectronic Functional Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Nanjing 211189 (China); Ge, Jianhua [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Jiangsu Optoelectronic Functional Materials and Engineering Laboratory, Nanjing 211189 (China); Yang, Xiaoming [Suzhou Sidike New Material Technology Co., Ltd., Suzhou 215400 (China)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: ► Silane coupling agent of KH550 was used to connect the ITO and polyurethanes. ► Infrared emissivity values of the hybrids were compared and analyzed. ► Interfacial synergistic action and orderly secondary structure were the key factors. -- Abstract: Optically active polyurethane@indium tin oxide and racemic polyurethane@indium tin oxide nanocomposites (LPU@ITO and RPU@ITO) were prepared by grafting the organics onto the surfaces of modified ITO nanoparticles. LPU@ITO and RPU@ITO composites based on the chiral and racemic tyrosine were characterized by FT-IR, UV–vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM, TEM, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and the infrared emissivity values (8–14 μm) were investigated in addition. The results indicated that the polyurethanes had been successfully grafted onto the surfaces of ITO without destroying the crystalline structure. Both composites possessed the lower infrared emissivity values than the bare ITO nanoparticles, which indicated that the interfacial interaction had great effect on the infrared emissivity. Furthermore, LPU@ITO based on the optically active polyurethane had the virtue of regular secondary structure and more interfacial synergistic actions between organics and inorganics, thus it exhibited lower infrared emissivity value than RPU@ITO based on the racemic polyurethane.

  6. The optical emission lines of type 1 X-ray bright Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    La Mura, G; Ciroi, S; Cracco, V; Di Mille, F; Rafanelli, P

    2013-01-01

    A strong X-ray emission is one of the defining signatures of nuclear activity in galaxies. According to the Unified Model for Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), both the X-ray radiation and the prominent broad emission lines, characterizing the optical and UV spectra of Type 1 AGNs, are originated in the innermost regions of the sources, close to the Super Massive Black Holes (SMBH), which power the central engine. Since the emission is concentrated in a very compact region (with typical size $r 2000 km/s) and narrow line (1000 km/s < FWHMH$_{\\rm H\\beta}\\, \\leq$ 2000 km/s) emitting objects, it has been observed that the kinematic and ionization properties of matter close to the SMBHs are related together, and, in particular, that ionization is higher in narrow line sources. Here we report on the study of the optical and X-ray spectra of a sample of Type 1 AGNs, selected from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) database, within an upper redshift limit of z = 0.35, and detected at X-ray energies. We present anal...

  7. Simulating surface-enhanced Raman optical activity using atomistic electrodynamics-quantum mechanical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chulhai, Dhabih V; Jensen, Lasse

    2014-10-01

    Raman optical activity has proven to be a powerful tool for probing the geometry of small organic and biomolecules. It has therefore been expected that the same mechanisms responsible for surface-enhanced Raman scattering may allow for similar enhancements in surface-enhanced Raman optical activity (SEROA). However, SEROA has proved to be an experimental challenge and mirror-image SEROA spectra of enantiomers have so far not been measured. There exists a handful of theories to simulate SEROA, all of which treat the perturbed molecule as a point-dipole object. To go beyond these approximations, we present two new methods to simulate SEROA: the first is a dressed-tensors model that treats the molecule as a point-dipole and point-quadrupole object; the second method is the discrete interaction model/quantum mechanical (DIM/QM) model, which considers the entire charge density of the molecule. We show that although the first method is acceptable for small molecules, it fails for a medium-sized one such as 2-bromohexahelicene. We also show that the SEROA mode intensities and signs are highly sensitive to the nature of the local electric field and gradient, the orientation of the molecule, and the surface plasmon frequency width. Our findings give some insight into why experimental SEROA, and in particular observing mirror-image SEROA for enantiomers, has been difficult.

  8. Multipolar Effects in the Optical Active Second Harmonic Generation from Sawtooth Chiral Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Huimin; Guo, Yuxiang; Gao, Wensheng; Ma, Jie; Zhong, Yongchun; Tam, Wing Yim; Chan, C T; Wong, Kam Sing

    2016-02-25

    Based on the facts that chiral molecules response differently to left- and right-handed circular polarized light, chiroptical effects are widely employed for determining structure chirality, detecting enantiomeric excess, or controlling chemical reactions of molecules. Compared to those in natural materials, chiroptical behaviors can be significantly amplified in chiral plasmonic metamaterials due to the concentrated local fields in the structure. The on-going research towards giant chiroptical effects in metamaterial generally focus on optimizing the field-enhancement effects. However, the observed chiroptical effects in metamaterials rely on more complicated factors and various possibilities towards giant chiroptical effects remains unexplored. Here we study the optical-active second harmonic generation (SHG) behaviors in a pair of planar sawtooth gratings with mirror-imaged patterns. Significant multipolar effects were observed in the polarization-dependent SHG curves. We show that the chirality of the nanostructure not only give rise to nonzero chiral susceptibility tensor components within the electric-dipole approximation, but also lead to different levels of multipolar interactions for the two orthogonal circular polarizations that further enhance the nonlinear optical activity of the material. Our results thus indicate novel ways to optimize nonlinear plasmonic structures and achieve giant chiroptical response via multipolar interactions.

  9. Four-Wave Optical Parametric Amplification in a Raman-Active Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichiro Kida

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Four-wave optical parametric amplification (FWOPA in a Raman-active medium is experimentally investigated by use of an air-filled hollow fiber. A femtosecond pump pulse shorter than the period of molecular motion excites the coherent molecular motion of the Raman-active molecules during the parametric amplification of a signal pulse. The excited coherent motion modulates the frequency of the signal pulse during the parametric amplification, and shifts it to lower frequencies. The magnitude of the frequency redshift depends on the pump intensity, resulting in intensity-dependent spectral characteristics that are different from those in the FWOPA induced in a noble-gas-filled hollow fiber.

  10. Identification of prefrontal cortex (BA10) activation while performing Stroop test using diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadka, Sabin; Chityala, Srujan R.; Tian, Fenghua; Liu, Hanli

    2011-03-01

    Stroop test is commonly used as a behavior-testing tool for psychological examinations that are related to attention and cognitive control of the human brain. Studies have shown activations in Broadmann area 10 (BA10) of prefrontal cortex (PFC) during attention and cognitive process. The use of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) for human brain mapping is becoming more prevalent. In this study we expect to find neural correlates between the performed cognitive tasks and hemodynamic signals detected by a DOT system. Our initial observation showed activation of oxy-hemoglobin concentration in BA 10, which is consistent with some results seen by positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our study demonstrates the possibility of combining DOT with Stroop test to quantitatively investigate cognitive functions of the human brain at the prefrontal cortex.

  11. Sleeping dendrites: fiber-optic measurements of dendritic calcium activity in freely moving and sleeping animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Seibt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendrites are the post-synaptic sites of most excitatory and inhibitory synapses in the brain, making them the main location of cortical information processing and synaptic plasticity. Although current hypotheses suggest a central role for sleep in proper cognitive function and brain plasticity, virtually nothing is known about changes in dendritic activity across the sleep-wake cycle and how waking experience modifies this activity. To start addressing these questions, we developed a method that allows long-term recordings of EEGs/EMG combined with in vivo cortical calcium (Ca2+ activity in freely moving and sleeping rats. We measured Ca2+ activity from populations of dendrites of layer (L 5 pyramidal neurons (n = 13 rats that we compared with Ca2+ activity from populations of neurons in L2/3 (n = 11 rats. L5 and L2/3 neurons were labelled using bolus injection of OGB1-AM or GCaMP6 (1. Ca2+ signals were detected using a fiber-optic system (cannula diameter = 400µm, transmitting the changes in fluorescence to a photodiode. Ca2+ fluctuations could then be correlated with ongoing changes in brain oscillatory activity during 5 major brain states: active wake [AW], quiet wake [QW], NREM, REM and NREM-REM transition (or intermediate state, [IS]. Our Ca2+ recordings show large transients in L5 dendrites and L2/3 neurons that oscillate predominantly at frequencies In summary, we show that this technique is successful in monitoring fluctuations in ongoing dendritic Ca2+ activity during natural brain states and allows, in principle, to combine behavioral measurement with imaging from various brain regions (e.g. deep structures in freely behaving animals. Using this method, we show that Ca2+ transients from populations of L2/3 neurons and L5 dendrites are deferentially regulated across the sleep/wake cycle, with dendritic activity being the highest during the IS sleep. Our correlation analysis suggests that specific sleep EEG activity during NREM and IS

  12. Fully characterization of an active optical filter based on an equivalent-phase-shifted DFB-SOA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Ye; Li, Ming; Shi, Nuannuan; Tang, Jian; Sun, Shuqian; Zhang, Lihong; Li, Wei; Zhu, Ninghua

    2016-10-01

    A fully characterization of an active optical filter based on an equivalent-phase-shifted DFB-SOA has been theoretically analyzed and experimentally demonstrated in this paper. By employing an optical vector network analyzer (OVNA), transmission characteristics of the equivalent-phase-shifted DFB-SOA are obtained. The influences of driven current on transmission characteristics of the equivalent-phase-shifted DFB-SOA are also investigated. In addition to the advantage of integration, the proposed equivalent-phase-shifted DFB-SOA also shows significant application in design of photonic devices for all-optical signal processing and computing.

  13. Active photonic sensor communication cable for field application of optical data and power transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthau, Eike; Rieske, Ralf; Zerna, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Omitting electrically conducting wires for sensor communication and power supply promises protection for sensor systems and monitored structures against lightning or high voltages, prevention of explosion hazards, and reduction of susceptibility to tampering. The ability to photonically power remote systems opens up the full range of electrical sensors. Power-over-fiber is an attractive option in electromagnetically sensitive environments, particularly for longterm, maintenance-free applications. It can deliver uninterrupted power sufficient for elaborate sensors, data processing or even actuators alongside continuous high speed data communication for remote sensor application. This paper proposes an active photonic sensor communication system, which combines the advantages of optical data links in terms of immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI), high bandwidth, hardiness against tampering or eavesdropping, and low cable weight with the robustness one has come to expect from industrial or military electrical connectors. An application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) is presented that implements a closed-loop regulation of the sensor power supply to guarantee continuous, reliable data communications while maintaining a highly efficient, adaptive sensor supply scheme. It is demonstrated that the resulting novel photonic sensor communication cable can handle sensors and actuators differing orders of magnitude with respect to power consumption. The miniaturization of the electro-optical converters and driving electronics is as important to the presented development as the energy efficiency of the detached, optically powered sensor node. For this reason, a novel photonic packaging technology based on wafer-level assembly of the laser power converters by means of passive alignment will be disclosed in this paper.

  14. A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS-active optical fiber sensor based on a three-dimensional sensing layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyu Liu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To fabricate a new surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS-active optical fiber sensor, the design and preparation of SERS-active sensing layer is one of important topics. In this study, we fabricated a highly sensitive three-dimensional (3D SERS-active sensing layer on the optical fiber terminal via in situ polymerizing a porous polymer material on a flat optical fiber terminal through thermal-induced process, following with the photochemical silver nanoparticles growth. The polymerized polymer formed a 3D porous structure with the pore size of 0.29–0.81 μm, which were afterward decorated with abundant silver nanoparticles with the size of about 100 nm, allowing for higher SERS enhancement. This SERS-active optical fiber sensor was applied for the determination of 4-mercaptopyridine, crystal violet and maleic acid The enhancement factor of this SERS sensing layer can be reached as about 108. The optical fiber sensor with high sensitive SERS-active porous polymer is expected for online analysis and environment detection.

  15. Robot-assisted motor activation monitored by time-domain optical brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkellner, O.; Wabnitz, H.; Schmid, S.; Steingräber, R.; Schmidt, H.; Krüger, J.; Macdonald, R.

    2011-07-01

    Robot-assisted motor rehabilitation proved to be an effective supplement to conventional hand-to-hand therapy in stroke patients. In order to analyze and understand motor learning and performance during rehabilitation it is desirable to develop a monitor to provide objective measures of the corresponding brain activity at the rehabilitation progress. We used a portable time-domain near-infrared reflectometer to monitor the hemodynamic brain response to distal upper extremity activities. Four healthy volunteers performed two different robot-assisted wrist/forearm movements, flexion-extension and pronation-supination in comparison with an unassisted squeeze ball exercise. A special headgear with four optical measurement positions to include parts of the pre- and postcentral gyrus provided a good overlap with the expected activation areas. Data analysis based on variance of time-of-flight distributions of photons through tissue was chosen to provide a suitable representation of intracerebral signals. In all subjects several of the four detection channels showed a response. In some cases indications were found of differences in localization of the activated areas for the various tasks.

  16. Optical Absorption Property and Photo-catalytic Activity of Tin Dioxide-doped Titanium Dioxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI,Huai-Xiang; XIA,Rong-Hua; JIANG,Zheng-Wei; CHEN,Shan-Shan; CHEN,De-Zhan

    2008-01-01

    SnO2-doped TiO2 films and composite oxide powders have been prepared by a sol-gel method. Ti(OC4H9)4 and SnCl4·5H2O were used as precursors and C2H5OH was used as solvent. The optical absorption measurements indicate that the composite oxide SnO2-TiO2 thin films exhibit smaller optical energy band gaps than pure TiO2 thin films and the optical energy band gap decreases as calcining temperature increases. X-ray diffraction was used to characterize the phase transition for the composite oxide powders at different calcining temperatures. Aanatase phase is the main crystal structure in both pure TiO2 and Sn0.05Ti0.95O2 samples if calcining temperature is below 500℃. The rutile phase has appeared and coexisted with the anatase crystal phase for both pure TiO2 and Sn0.05Ti0.95O2 composite oxides when calcining was at 600℃ . Transmission electron microscopy analysis shows a smaller grain size in Sn0.05Ti0.95O2 powders than TiO2 powders calcined at 600℃. When calcining temperature is 700℃ , there is only rutile phase in Sn0.05Ti0.95O2 samples, but there are still two crystal phases, anatase and rutile, coexisting in the pure TiO2 samples. Assuming the grain growth obeys the first order kinetics, Arrhenius empirical relation has been used to estimate the activation energy of 47.486 and 33.103 kJ·mol-1 for the grain growth of TiO2 and Sn0.05Ti0.95O2, respectively. The photo-catalytic activity of the powder samples has been examined by measuring the degradation of methylene blue solution under ultra-violet irradiation. Two effective factors of photo-catalytic activity namely, the content of SnO2 in the TiO2 samples and the calcining temperature, have been optimized based on the photo-catalytic degradation of methylene blue solution.

  17. Absolute frequency synthesis of pulsed coherent light waves through phase-modulation active optical feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, K; Horiguchi, T; Koyamada, Y

    1996-11-15

    A novel method for the broadband absolute frequency synthesis of pulsed coherent lightwaves is demonstrated. It is based on pulse recirculation around an active optical feedback ring containing a delay-line fiber, an external phase modulator, an acousto-optic frequency shifter (AOFS), and a high-finesse Fabry-Perot étalon. The modulation frequency F(M) and the frequency shift F(AO) that are due to AOFS are designed so that their sum or difference equals the free-spectral range of the étalon and F(AO) is set at larger than the half-width at full maximum of its resonant peaks. If one of the peak frequencies is tuned to the frequency of the initial pulse, the frequency of the recirculating pulse jumps to the next peak for each round trip. In the experiment the absolute frequency is synthesized over a frequency span of 700 GHz around the initial stabilized frequency of the master laser.

  18. A note on periodicity of long-term variations of optical continuum in active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Kai-Xing; Li, Yan-Rong; Bi, Shao-Lan; Wang, Jian-Min

    2016-06-01

    Graham et al. found a sample of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and quasars from the Catalina Real-time Transient Survey (CRTS) that have long-term periodic variations in optical continuum. The nature of the periodicity remains uncertain. We investigate the periodic variability characteristics of the sample by testing the relations of the observed variability periods with AGN optical luminosity, black hole mass and accretion rates, and find no significant correlations. We also test the observed periods in several different aspects related to accretion discs surrounding single black holes, such as the Keplerian rotational periods of 5100 Å photon-emission regions and self-gravity dominated regions and the precessing period of warped discs. These tests shed new lights on understanding AGN variability in general. Under the assumption that the periodic behaviour is associated with supermassive black hole binary systems in particular, we compare the separations (r {D}_{bullet }) against characteristic radii of broad-line regions (R_riptscriptstyle BLR) of the binaries and find r {D}_{bullet }≈ 0.05R_riptscriptstyle BLR. This interestingly implies that these binaries have only circumbinary BLRs.

  19. Innocent or guilty? Redox activity in and magnetic and optical behaviour of dinuclear molydenum complexes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jon A McCleverty; Michael D Ward

    2002-08-01

    The phenomenon of `non-innocence’, first articulated by Jørgensen in 1966, is briefly reviewed. Spectroelectrochemical studies of a range of dinuclear complexes of the type [{Mo(NO)Tp∗Cl}2(bridge)] (bridge = dipyridyls) and [{Mo(O)Tp∗Cl}2(bridge)] (bridge = diphenolates) which are redox active, show that oxidised or reduced forms of these species exhibit `non-innocence’. The spectral behaviour is associated with metal-to-ligand or ligand-to-metal charge transfer phenomena, probably the first time that monodentate bridging ligands have been implicated in `non-innocent’ behaviour. These bridging ligands also determine the nature and extent of magnetic interaction between the unpaired spins in [{Mo(NO)Tp∗Cl}2(bridge)] and [{Mo(O)Tp∗Cl}2(bridge)], the dominant mechanism of spin-exchange relying on the extent of $\\eth$-delocalisation within the bridging ligands. The unusual optical behaviour of these dinuclear complexes when oxidised (oxomolybdenum diphenolates) or reduced (nitrosyl molybdenum dipyridyls) has led to the exploration of electrochromism as a means to develop variable optical attenuators operating in the near-infrared region.

  20. A low-luminosity type-1 QSO sample; III. Optical spectroscopic properties and activity classification

    CERN Document Server

    Tremou, E; Zuther, J; Eckart, A; Valencia-Schneider, M; Vitale, M; Shan, C

    2015-01-01

    We report on the optical spectroscopic analysis of a sample of 99 low-luminosity quasi-stellar objects (LLQSOs) at $z\\leq 0.06$ base the Hamburg/ESO QSO survey (HES). The LLQSOs presented here offer the possibility of studying the faint end of the QSO population at smaller cosmological distances and, therefore, in greater detail. A small number of our LLQSO present no broad component. Two sources show double broad components, whereas six comply with the classic NLS1 requirements. As expected in NLR of broad line AGNs, the [S{\\sc{ii}}]$-$based electron density values range between 100 and 1000 N$_{e}$/cm$^{3}$. Using the optical characteristics of Populations A and B, we find that 50\\% of our sources with H$\\beta$ broad emission are consistent with the radio-quiet sources definition. The remaining sources could be interpreted as low-luminosity radio-loud quasar. The BPT-based classification renders an AGN/Seyfert activity between 50 to 60\\%. For the remaining sources, the possible star burst contribution might...

  1. Development of a new catalase activity assay for biological samples using optical CUPRAC sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Alkan, Fulya Üstün; Apak, Reşat

    2014-11-01

    A novel catalase activity assay was developed for biological samples (liver and kidney tissue homogenates) using a rapid and low-cost optical sensor-based ‘cupric reducing antioxidant capacity' (CUPRAC) method. The reagent, copper(II)-neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) complex, was immobilized onto a cation-exchanger film of Nafion, and the absorbance changes associated with the formation of the highly-colored Cu(I)-Nc chelate as a result of reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was measured at 450 nm. When catalase was absent, H2O2 produced the CUPRAC chromophore, whereas catalase, being an effective H2O2 scavenger, completely annihilated the CUPRAC signal due to H2O2. Thus, the CUPRAC absorbance due to H2O2 oxidation concomitant with Cu(I)-Nc formation decreased proportionally with catalase. The developed sensor gave a linear response over a wide concentration range of H2O2 (0.68-78.6 μM). This optical sensor-based method applicable to tissue homogenates proved to be efficient for low hydrogen peroxide concentrations (physiological and nontoxic levels) to which the widely used UV method is not accurately responsive. Thus, conventional problems of the UV method arising from relatively low sensitivity and selectivity, and absorbance disturbance due to gaseous oxygen evolution were overcome. The catalase findings of the proposed method for tissue homogenates were statistically alike with those of HPLC.

  2. Growth of Optically Active Chiral Inorganic Films through DNA Self-Assembly and Silica Mineralisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ben; Han, Lu; Duan, Yingying; Cao, Yunayuan; Feng, Ji; Yao, Yuan; Che, Shunai

    2014-05-01

    The circularly polarized reflection of nature is due to their distinct azimuthally twisted or helical character in the nanostructure of the surface films. Although many chiral inorganic powders have been successfully synthesised, the artificial synthesis of chiral inorganic films is rare. Herein, we reported a facile synthetic route for the growth of monolayered chiral film on the quaternary ammonium-modified silicon substrate. The films grew on the substrate surface because of the strong electrostatic interaction between positively charged quaternary ammonium groups and negatively charged phosphate groups of DNA, with subsequent growth to right-handed, vertically aligned, impeller-like helical architectures with left-handed two-dimensional square p4mm-structured DNA chiral packing. The DNA-silica composite films exhibited strong optical activity at 295 nm and in the range of 400-800 nm, corresponding to DNA chiral packing (absorption) and to the helical blade in the impeller (scattering), respectively. Upon removal of DNA templates, the pure inorganic impeller-like helical morphology was maintained; consequently, the scattering-based optical response was blue-shifted approximately 200 nm as a result of a decrease in the effective average refractive index. The hierarchical structures were reflected from the surfaces by cross-polarised light, which confirmed that the films were strongly birefringent, with long-range anisotropy.

  3. Development of Biological Movement Recognition by Interaction between Active Basis Model and Fuzzy Optical Flow Division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bardia Yousefi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Following the study on computational neuroscience through functional magnetic resonance imaging claimed that human action recognition in the brain of mammalian pursues two separated streams, that is, dorsal and ventral streams. It follows up by two pathways in the bioinspired model, which are specialized for motion and form information analysis (Giese and Poggio 2003. Active basis model is used to form information which is different from orientations and scales of Gabor wavelets to form a dictionary regarding object recognition (human. Also biologically movement optic-flow patterns utilized. As motion information guides share sketch algorithm in form pathway for adjustment plus it helps to prevent wrong recognition. A synergetic neural network is utilized to generate prototype templates, representing general characteristic form of every class. Having predefined templates, classifying performs based on multitemplate matching. As every human action has one action prototype, there are some overlapping and consistency among these templates. Using fuzzy optical flow division scoring can prevent motivation for misrecognition. We successfully apply proposed model on the human action video obtained from KTH human action database. Proposed approach follows the interaction between dorsal and ventral processing streams in the original model of the biological movement recognition. The attained results indicate promising outcome and improvement in robustness using proposed approach.

  4. Active Optical Sensors for Tree Stem Detection and Classification in Nurseries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Garrido

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Active optical sensing (LIDAR and light curtain transmission devices mounted on a mobile platform can correctly detect, localize, and classify trees. To conduct an evaluation and comparison of the different sensors, an optical encoder wheel was used for vehicle odometry and provided a measurement of the linear displacement of the prototype vehicle along a row of tree seedlings as a reference for each recorded sensor measurement. The field trials were conducted in a juvenile tree nursery with one-year-old grafted almond trees at Sierra Gold Nurseries, Yuba City, CA, United States. Through these tests and subsequent data processing, each sensor was individually evaluated to characterize their reliability, as well as their advantages and disadvantages for the proposed task. Test results indicated that 95.7% and 99.48% of the trees were successfully detected with the LIDAR and light curtain sensors, respectively. LIDAR correctly classified, between alive or dead tree states at a 93.75% success rate compared to 94.16% for the light curtain sensor. These results can help system designers select the most reliable sensor for the accurate detection and localization of each tree in a nursery, which might allow labor-intensive tasks, such as weeding, to be automated without damaging crops.

  5. Preparation of optical active polydiacetylene through gelating and the control of supramolecular chirality

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Achiral diacetylene 10,12-pentacosadinoic acid (PCDA) and a chiral low-molecular-weight organogelator could form co-gel in organic solvent and it could be polymerized in the presence of Zn(II) ion or in the corresponding xerogel under UV-irradiation. Optically active polydiacetylene (PDA) were subsequently obtained. Supramolecular chirality of PDA could be controlled by the chirality of gelators. Left-handed and right-handed helical fibers were obtained by using Land D-gelators in xerogels respectively, and CD spectra exhibited mirror-image circular dichroism. The PDA in xerogel exhibited typical blue-to-red transition responsive to the temperature and pH, while the supramolecular chirality of PDA showed a corresponding change.

  6. Flexible chiral metamaterials with dynamically optical activity and high negative refractive index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincer, Furkan; Karaaslan, Muharrem; Unal, Emin; Akgol, Oguzhan; Sabah, Cumali

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate numerically and experimentally chiral metamaterials (MTMs) based on gammadion-bilayer cross-wires that uniaxially create giant optical activity and tunable circular dichroism as a result of the dynamic design. In addition, the suggested structure gives high negative refractive index due to the large chirality in order to obtain an efficient polarization converter. We also present a numerical analysis in order to show the additional features of the proposed chiral MTM in detail. Therefore, a MTM sensor application of the proposed chiral MTM is introduced and discussed. The presented chiral designs offer a much simpler geometry and more efficient outlines. The experimental results are in a good agreement with the numerical simulation. It can be seen from the results that, the suggested chiral MTM can be used as a polarization converter, sensor, etc. for several frequency regimes.

  7. Method and apparatus for active tamper indicating device using optical time-domain reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D. Barton; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Pickett, Chris A.; Earl, D. Duncan

    1999-01-01

    An optical time-domain reflectometer (OTDR) launches pulses of light into a link or a system of multiplexed links and records the waveform of pulses reflected by the seals in the link(s). If a seal is opened, the link of cables will become a discontinuous transmitter of the light pulses and the OTDR can immediately detect that a seal has been opened. By analyzing the waveform, the OTDR can also quickly determine which seal(s) were opened. In this way the invention functions as a system of active seals. The invention is intended for applications that require long-term surveillance of a large number of closures. It provides immediate tamper detection, allows for periodic access to secured closures, and can be configured for many different distributions of closures. It can monitor closures in indoor and outdoor locations and it can monitor containers or groups of containers located many kilometers apart.

  8. Confined cooperative self-assembly and synthesis of optically and electrically active nanostructures : final LDRD report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coker, Eric Nicholas; Haddad, Raid Edward (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Fan, Hongyou; Ta, Anh (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Bai, Feng (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Rodriguez, Mark Andrew; Huang, Jian Yu

    2011-10-01

    In this project, we developed a confined cooperative self-assembly process to synthesize one-dimensional (1D) j-aggregates including nanowires and nanorods with controlled diameters and aspect ratios. The facile and versatile aqueous solution process assimilates photo-active macrocyclic building blocks inside surfactant micelles, forming stable single-crystalline high surface area nanoporous frameworks with well-defined external morphology defined by the building block packing. Characterizations using TEM, SEM, XRD, N{sub 2} and NO sorption isotherms, TGA, UV-vis spectroscopy, and fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy indicate that the j-aggregate nanostructures are monodisperse and may further assemble into hierarchical arrays with multi-modal functional pores. The nanostructures exhibit enhanced and collective optical properties over the individual chromophores. This project was a small footprint research effort which, nonetheless, produced significant progress towards both the stated goal as well as unanticipated research directions.

  9. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms

  10. Natural optical activity and some peculiarities of electron energy spectrum of tellurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The natural optical activity (NOA) of Te at 10,80 and 300 K in the concentration range of 4x1014-6x1016 cm-3 near the self-absorption edge was investigated. It was found that at approaching the absorption edge the rotational power of tellurium sharply increases and achieves 278 deg mm at 10 K (lambda=3.76 μm). It is shown that NOA dispersion and concentration and temperature dependence can be described on the basis of the already developed theory of NOA semiconductors. A quantitative analysis of NOA suggested the conclusion that the coefficient of the linear term in the law of electron dispersion in Te is very small -at least 30 times less than the similar coefficient in the dispersion law for the valency zone. This assumption enables quantitative agreement of theoretical calculation and experimental data

  11. An investigation of the influence of reconceptualization of demonstrative experimental activities of optics in high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jair Lúcio Prados Ribeiro

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we analyze the influence that the use of demonstrative experiments can bring to the learning of optics. It is assumed that the development of experimental activities, when reconceptualized according to Hodson proposal, tends to contribute to the generation of cognitive conflicts when compared to traditional didactic experience. Justifications are given for an analysis of changes under a Piagetian bias, reconciled with Hodson proposal. The methodology used to structure the topics presentations was quasi-experimental, contrasting an experimental group with a control group. The measuring of the effectiveness of the suggested working method was made from a quantitative analysis, which identified some of the topics discussed had better results in learning, being more tied to the experiments carried out.

  12. Method and apparatus for active tamper indicating device using optical time-domain reflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optical time-domain reflectometer (OTDR) launches pulses of light into a link or a system of multiplexed links and records the waveform of pulses reflected by the seals in the link(s). If a seal is opened, the link of cables will become a discontinuous transmitter of the light pulses and the OTDR can immediately detect that a seal has been opened. By analyzing the waveform, the OTDR can also quickly determine which seal(s) were opened. In this way the invention functions as a system of active seals. The invention is intended for applications that require long-term surveillance of a large number of closures. It provides immediate tamper detection, allows for periodic access to secured closures, and can be configured for many different distributions of closures. It can monitor closures in indoor and outdoor locations and it can monitor containers or groups of containers located many kilometers apart

  13. Optical behavior and sensor activity of Pb ions incorporated ZnO nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannadasan, N.; Shanmugam, N.; Sathishkumar, K.; Cholan, S.; Ponnguzhali, R.; Viruthagiri, G.

    2015-05-01

    We present the synthesis and characterization of nanocrystalline ZnO doped with Pb in different concentrations. The structural and chemical compositions of the products are characterized by XRD, XPS, EDS and FT-IR spectroscopy. The observed results suggest that Pb ions (Pb2+ and Pb4+) are successfully incorporated into the lattice position of Zn2+ ions in ZnO. The optical properties of the products are studied by UV-Vis and room temperature PL measurements. The PL emission spectra of ZnO:Pb, show the intensity quenching for both the UV and visible emissions. The influence of Pb on controlling the size and morphology of ZnO is studied by FESEM and confirmed by HRTEM. Amperometric response shows that ZnO incorporated with 0.075 M of Pb ions has enhanced sensor activity for H2O2 than the undoped product.

  14. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang-Hwan Kim

    2003-12-12

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms.

  15. Symmetry Breaking in Chiral Ionic Liquids Evidenced by Vibrational Optical Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oulevey, Patric; Luber, Sandra; Varnholt, Birte; Bürgi, Thomas

    2016-09-19

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are receiving increasing interest for their use in synthetic laboratories and industry. Being composed of charged entities, they show a complex and widely unexplored dynamic behavior. Chiral ionic liquids (CILs) have a high potential as solvents for use in asymmetric synthesis. Chiroptical methods, owing to their sensitivity towards molecular conformation, offer unique possibilities to study the structure of these chiral ionic liquids. Raman optical activity proved particularly useful to study ionic liquids composed of amino acids and the achiral 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium counterion. We could substantiate, supported by selected theoretical methods, that the achiral counterion adopts an overall chiral conformation in the presence of chiral amino acid ions. These findings suggest that in the design of chiral ionic liquids for asymmetric synthesis, the structure of the achiral counter ion also has to be carefully considered.

  16. Transverse Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect in Active Magneto-Plasmonic Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Borovkova, Olga; Belotelov, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel method to enhance the transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect (TMOKE) in the magneto-plasmonic (MP) nanostructures by means of the active dielectric layer. We report the theoretical analysis of the magnetoplasmonic structure with a ferromagnetic dielectric doped with rear-earth ions (Nd3+) as the example of a gain layer. The enhancement takes place near the surface plasmon polariton (SPP) resonances of the nanostructures. The stimulated emission of the dopants in the field of SPP wave partially compensates its losses. It is shown that due to a decrease of SPP damping a Q-factor of the MP resonance increases and the TMOKE is increased in comparison with the passive nanostructure.

  17. PHOTOINDUCED ALIGNMENT OF OPTICALLY ACTIVE POLYMER CONTAINING A TEMPO RADICAL END GROUP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Chen Dong; Yong Zhang; Ze-da Xu; Xing-he Fan; Xiao-fang Chen; Xin-hua Wan; Qi-feng Zhou

    2003-01-01

    A new azobenzene side-chain polymer (TEMPO-PAZ) containing TEMPO (4-hydroxy-2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidinooxy) radical end group was synthesized by free radical copolymerization. Photoinduced alignment was studied on the polymer films at room temperature with linearly polarized light of 514.5 nm. The experimental results showed that the magnetic response intensity of the TEMPO-PAZ could be easily controlled by choosing the appropriate polarized light irradiating times, presumably due to the nitroxide radical in the TEMPO-PAZ molecular structure. For the polymer investigated here, the photoinduced alignment technique was introduced to increase the magnetic response intensity of polymer under irradiation, aiming originally at searching for a new photo-active organic magnetic multifunctionai materials.On the other hand, experimental results also showed that the TEMPO-PAZ can be used as a material for optical image storage.

  18. How to control optical activity in organic-silver hybrid nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hidalgo, Francisco; Noguez, Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    The mechanisms that originate and control optical activity in organic-metal hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) are identified using a time-perturbed density functional theory. Electronic circular dichroism (CD) is studied in terms of the intrinsic chirality of the ligands, the number of ligands and the induced chirality by the arrangement of the ligands on the NP. Left-handed cysteine and achiral methylthio ligands adsorbed on an icosahedral silver NP are investigated. The analysis of CD allows the identification of the spectral regions when the induced chirality by the ligand array dominates over the intrinsic chirality of the ligands, determining conditions for CD control and enlargement. These results would be significant in the discussion of experimental CD spectra of organic-metal hybrid NPs, which might allow the development of new strategies to improve the sensitivity of chiroptical spectroscopies for the identification of bio and organic molecules.The mechanisms that originate and control optical activity in organic-metal hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) are identified using a time-perturbed density functional theory. Electronic circular dichroism (CD) is studied in terms of the intrinsic chirality of the ligands, the number of ligands and the induced chirality by the arrangement of the ligands on the NP. Left-handed cysteine and achiral methylthio ligands adsorbed on an icosahedral silver NP are investigated. The analysis of CD allows the identification of the spectral regions when the induced chirality by the ligand array dominates over the intrinsic chirality of the ligands, determining conditions for CD control and enlargement. These results would be significant in the discussion of experimental CD spectra of organic-metal hybrid NPs, which might allow the development of new strategies to improve the sensitivity of chiroptical spectroscopies for the identification of bio and organic molecules. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/C6

  19. Giant optical activity from the radiative electromagnetic interactions in plasmonic nanoantennas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Chen, Li; Wang, Rongyao; Ji, Yinglu; Zhai, Dawei; Wu, Xiaochun; Liu, Yu; Chen, Keqiu; Xu, Hongxing

    2013-04-01

    We fabricate the linear chains of twisted gold nanorods by a facile chiral molecular templating method. In such a chiral plasmonic system, particle-particle separation distances are in the order of the light wavelength and are much larger than the sizes of individual particles. As a result, the inter-particle interactions in this chiral system are mediated mainly by a relatively weak far-field plasmonic coupling, rather than a strong near-field coupling. However, such a chiral system of twisted gold nanorods show a huge surface plasmon based circular dichroism response, with the highest anisotropy factor around 0.027. This is in contrast to the previous studies in which near-field plasmonic coupling is an indispensable prerequisite to obtain strong optical activity from a chiral plasmonic nanostructure. Our study demonstrates here an alternative strategy for achieving huge chiroptical response of a chiral plasmonic nanostructure based on far-field, radiative electromagnetic interactions of metallic nanoparticles. Theoretical simulations show a satisfactory agreement with the experimental results. This study may provide more flexible ways to design chiral plasmon nanostructures with strong CD responses for various applications.We fabricate the linear chains of twisted gold nanorods by a facile chiral molecular templating method. In such a chiral plasmonic system, particle-particle separation distances are in the order of the light wavelength and are much larger than the sizes of individual particles. As a result, the inter-particle interactions in this chiral system are mediated mainly by a relatively weak far-field plasmonic coupling, rather than a strong near-field coupling. However, such a chiral system of twisted gold nanorods show a huge surface plasmon based circular dichroism response, with the highest anisotropy factor around 0.027. This is in contrast to the previous studies in which near-field plasmonic coupling is an indispensable prerequisite to obtain

  20. HYPATIA and STOIC: an active optics system for a large space telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaney, Nicholas; Reinlein, Claudia; Lange, Nicolas; Goy, Matthias; Goncharov, Alexander; Hallibert, Pascal

    2016-07-01

    The next generation of UVOIR space telescopes will be required to provide excellent wavefront control despite perturbations due to thermal changes, gravity release and vibrations. The STOIC project is a response to an ESA Invitation to Tender to develop an active optics correction chain for future space telescopes. The baseline space telescope being considered is a two-mirror, 4m telescope with a monolithic primary mirror - we refer to this concept as Hypatia. The primary mirror diameter could be extended, but is limited in the near future by launch vehicle dimensions. A deformable mirror (pupil diameter 110mm) will be an integral part of the telescope design; it is being designed for high precision and the ability to maintain a stable form over long periods of time. The secondary mirror of the telescope will be activated to control tip-tilt, defocus and alignment with the primary. Wavefront sensing will be based on phase diversity and a dedicated Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. The project will develop a laboratory prototype to demonstrate key aspects of the active correction chain. We present the current state of the preliminary design for both the Hypatia space telescope and the laboratory breadboard.

  1. Combining an Optical Resonance Biosensor with Enzyme Activity Kinetics to Understand Protein Adsorption and Denaturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Kerry A.; Finch, Craig A.; Anderson, Phillip; Vollmer, Frank; Hickman, James J.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding protein adsorption and resultant conformation changes on modified and unmodified silicon dioxide surfaces is a subject of keen interest in biosensors, microfluidic systems and for medical diagnostics. However, it has been proven difficult to investigate the kinetics of the adsorption process on these surfaces as well as understand the topic of the denaturation of proteins and its effect on enzyme activity. A highly sensitive optical whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator was used to study a catalytic enzyme’s adsorption processes on different silane modified glass substrates (plain glass control, DETA, 13F, and SiPEG). The WGM sensor was able to obtain high resolution kinetic data of glucose oxidase (GO) adsorption with sensitivity of adsorption better than that possible with SPR. The kinetic data, in combination with a functional assay of the enzyme activity, was used to test hypotheses on adsorption mechanisms. By fitting numerical models to the WGM sensograms for protein adsorption, and by confirming numerical predictions of enzyme activity in a separate assay, we were able to identify mechanisms for GO adsorption on different alkylsilanes and infer information about the adsorption of protein on nanostructured surfaces. PMID:25453976

  2. Generation of unipolar pulses in a circular Raman-active medium excited by few-cycle optical pulses

    CERN Document Server

    Arkhipov, R M; Babushkin, I; Pakhomov, A V; Tolmachev, Yu A; Rosanov, N N

    2016-01-01

    We study theoretically a new possibility of unipolar pulses generation in Raman-active medium excited by a series of few-cycle optical pulses. We consider the case when the Raman-active particles are uniformly distributed along the circle, and demonstrate a possibility to obtain a unipolar rectangular video pulses with an arbitrarily long duration, ranging from a minimum value equal to the natural period of the low frequency vibrations in the Raman-active medium.

  3. Design, synthesis, and self-assembly of optically active perylenetetracarboxylic diimide bearing two peripheral chiral binaphthyl moieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An optically active perylenetetracarboxylic diimide (PTCDI) bearing two optically active binaphthyl moieties has been designed and synthesized. The self-assembly properties of these novel PTCDI derivatives in DMF/H2O were systematically investigated by electronic absorption, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, IR spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) technique. Observation of CD signal in the whole absorption region of PTCDI chromophore, indicates effective chiral information transfer from the chiral binaphthyl units to the central PTCDI chromophore at molecular level. The intermolecular π–π interaction between PTCDI rings together with the additionally formed hydrogen bonds between the crown ether moieties of (S)-1 and additional water molecules and the chiral discrimination of periphery chiral side chains induces further intensified asymmetrical perturbation of the chiral binaphthyl units to the central PTCDI chromophore during the self-assembly process, resulting in the formation of right-handed helical arrangement of corresponding molecules in a stack of PTCDI chromophores in aggregates. In addition, the formed nanostructures were revealed to show good semiconducting properties. - Graphical abstract: An optically active perylenetetracarboxylic diimide bearing two optically active binaphthyl moieties has been prepared. Self-assembly properties of this novel PTCDI derivative in DMF/H2O were systematically investigated. Experimental results indicate the effective chiral information transfer and expression at molecular and intermolecular level. Highlights: ► An optically active perylenetetracarboxylic diimide bearing two optically active binaphthyl moieties has been prepared. ► Self-assembly properties of this novel PTCDI derivative in DMF/H2O were systematically investigated. ► Experimental results indicate the effective chiral information transfer and expression at molecular

  4. Quantification of Natural Gradient Flow Using Active Fiber Optic DTS in Sealed Boreholes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, T. I.; Parker, B. L.; Munn, J. D.; Chalari, A.; Mondanos, M.

    2014-12-01

    Temperature has been used for many years to characterize flow in fractured rock systems. Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) was adopted by the oil/gas industry over two decades ago for monitoring processes in deep fractured rock environments. Improvements in DTS system resolutions, methodology advancements, and improved data processing techniques have caused recent popularity for shallow fractured rock hydrogeologic applications. A powerful advance in DTS methodology is the use of response data collected during active cable heating. When applied to borehole applications active heating creates a thermal disequilibrium in the aquifer system that enhances the detection of groundwater flow. Active DTS has been applied to open borehole environments; however, characterization methods based on open borehole measurements are limited in that only the effects of unnatural flow (i.e. vertical cross-connection and redistribution of flow creating local, induced flows) can be observed. To characterize natural gradient flow processes borehole effects need to be minimized.The literature shows borehole sealing using flexible impervious fabric liners creates a static water column in the well that eliminates the negative effects of cross-connection. Measurements in this sealed environment have been shown by others to be representative of natural gradient flow conditions, rather than the conditions created by the borehole short circuiting units or fractures with varying hydraulic head. A new method for flow system characterization using active DTS in sealed boreholes has been developed with excellent prospects for quantitation of natural gradient groundwater fluxes and related hydraulic properties. This project demonstrates the utility of using an analytical solution for calculating apparent thermal conductivities and natural gradient groundwater fluxes at depth-discrete intervals observed continuously along a borehole using active DTS. Groundwater flux data can then be

  5. Experimental evidence of giant pure optical activity in a metasurface based on a complementary twisted cross configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Díaz-Rubio, Ana; Carbonell, Jorge; Sánchez-Dehesa, José; Hibbins, Alastair

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an experimental study of giant and pure optical activity in a periodic structure consisting of twisted crosses and complementary crosses patterned on the sides of a copper coated dielectric board. Additionally, a multilayer system is proposed and numerically studied to broaden the transmission bandwidth. Our results show that a dual band behavior can be obtained due to coupling effects between the layers whilst maintaining the dispersionless giant optical activity and negligible circular dichroism. We theoretically study the effect of the separation between layers and its influence on the transmission spectra.

  6. Non Destructive Testing by active infrared thermography coupled with shearography under same optical heat excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theroux, Louis-Daniel; Dumoulin, Jean; Maldague, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    As infrastructures are aging, the evaluation of their health is becoming crucial. To do so, numerous Non Destructive Testing (NDT) methods are available. Among them, thermal shearography and active infrared thermography represent two full field and contactless methods for surface inspection. The synchronized use of both methods presents multiples advantages. Most importantly, both NDT are based on different material properties. Thermography depend on the thermal properties and shearography on the mechanical properties. The cross-correlation of both methods result in a more accurate and exact detection of the defects. For real site application, the simultaneous use of both methods is simplified due to the fact that the excitation method (thermal) is the same. Active infrared thermography is the measure of the temperature by an infrared camera of a surface subjected to heat flux. Observation of the variation of temperature in function of time reveal the presence of defects. On the other hand, shearography is a measure of out-of-plane surface displacement. This displacement is caused by the application of a strain on the surface which (in our case) take the form of a temperature gradient inducing a thermal stress To measure the resulting out-of-plane displacement, shearography exploit the relation between the phase difference and the optical path length. The phase difference is measured by the observation of the interference between two coherent light beam projected on the surface. This interference is due to change in optical path length as the surface is deformed [1]. A series of experimentation have been conducted in laboratory with various sample of concrete reinforced with CFRP materials. Results obtained reveal that with both methods it was possible to detect defects in the gluing. An infrared lamp radiating was used as the active heat source. This is necessary if measurements with shearography are to be made during the heating process. A heating lamp in the

  7. Applied optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1988 progress report, of the Applied Optics laboratory, of the (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The optical fiber activities are focused on the development of an optical gyrometer, containing a resonance cavity. The following domains are included, in the research program: the infrared laser physics, the laser sources, the semiconductor physics, the multiple-photon ionization and the nonlinear optics. Investigations on the biomedical, the biological and biophysical domains are carried out. The published papers and the congress communications are listed

  8. Diffuse optical tomography activation in the somatosensory cortex: specific activation by painful vs. non-painful thermal stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lino Becerra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pain is difficult to assess due to the subjective nature of self-reporting. The lack of objective measures of pain has hampered the development of new treatments as well as the evaluation of current ones. Functional MRI studies of pain have begun to delineate potential brain response signatures that could be used as objective read-outs of pain. Using Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT, we have shown in the past a distinct DOT signal over the somatosensory cortex to a noxious heat stimulus that could be distinguished from the signal elicited by innocuous mechanical stimuli. Here we further our findings by studying the response to thermal innocuous and noxious stimuli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Innocuous and noxious thermal stimuli were applied to the skin of the face of the first division (ophthalmic of the trigeminal nerve in healthy volunteers (N = 6. Stimuli temperatures were adjusted for each subject to evoke warm (equivalent to a 3/10 and painful hot (7/10 sensations in a verbal rating scale (0/10 = no/max pain. A set of 26 stimuli (5 sec each was applied for each temperature with inter-stimulus intervals varied between 8 and 15 sec using a Peltier thermode. A DOT system was used to capture cortical responses on both sides of the head over the primary somatosensory cortical region (S1. For the innocuous stimuli, group results indicated mainly activation on the contralateral side with a weak ipsilateral response. For the noxious stimuli, bilateral activation was observed with comparable amplitudes on both sides. Furthermore, noxious stimuli produced a temporal biphasic response while innocuous stimuli produced a monophasic response. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results are in accordance with fMRI and our other DOT studies of innocuous mechanical and noxious heat stimuli. The data indicate the differentiation of DOT cortical responses for pain vs. innocuous stimuli that may be useful in assessing objectively acute pain.

  9. Alkaline-earth oxide network modifier on optical properties of Ce3+-activated borogermanate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xin-Yuan; Xiao, Zhuo-Hao; Zhong, Jiu-Ping

    2015-12-01

    Transparent and colorless CeO2-activated borogermanate glasses, with the nominal composition of 25B2O3-40GeO2-14Gd2O3-1CeO2-20MO (M = Ba, Sr, Ca and Mg), were synthesized by a melt-quenching method in air. Their optical properties including the transmittance, photoluminescence (excitation and emission spectra), the luminescence decay curves, as well as the temperature-dependent emission spectra were studied in detail. The room temperature photoluminescence spectra reveal that the emission intensity of the MgO glass is about two times stronger than that of the BaO glass. The blue shift of the cut-off edge, excitation and emission spectra of Ce3+-activated borogermanate glass were clearly observed in the order of BaO, SrO, CaO and MgO. And the emission intensity of Ce3+ ions as a function of temperature range in 325-475 K was also investigated.

  10. Single-molecule kinetics under force: probing protein folding and enzymatic activity with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wesley

    2010-03-01

    Weak non-covalent bonds between and within single molecules govern many aspects of biological structure and function (e.g. DNA base-paring, receptor-ligand binding, protein folding, etc.) In living systems, these interactions are often subject to mechanical forces, which can greatly alter their kinetics and activity. My group develops and applies novel single-molecule manipulation techniques to explore and quantify these force-dependent kinetics. Using optical tweezers, we have quantified the force-dependent unfolding and refolding kinetics of different proteins, including the cytoskeletal protein spectrin in collaboration with E. Evans's group [1], and the A2 domain of the von Willebrand factor blood clotting protein in collaboration with T. Springer's group [2]. Furthermore, we have studied the kinetics of the ADAMTS13 enzyme acting on a single A2 domain, and have shown that physiolgical forces in the circulation can act as a cofactor for enzymatic cleavage, regulating hemostatic activity [2]. References: 1. E. Evans, K. Halvorsen, K. Kinoshita, and W.P. Wong, Handbook of Single Molecule Biophysics, P. Hinterdorfer, ed., Springer (2009). 2. X. Zhang, K. Halvorsen, C.-Z. Zhang, W.P. Wong, and T.A. Springer, Science 324 (5932), 1330-1334 (2009).

  11. Applicability of light-emitting diodes as light sources for active differential optical absorption spectroscopy measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Christoph; Trick, Sebastian; Rippel, Bernhard; Platt, Ulrich

    2006-03-20

    We present what is to our knowledge the first use of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as light sources for long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) measurements of trace gases in the open atmosphere. Modern LEDs represent a potentially advantageous alternative to thermal light sources, in particular to xenon arc lamps, which are the most common active DOAS light sources. The radiative properties of a variety of LEDs were characterized, and parameters such as spectral shape, spectral range, spectral stability, and ways in which they can be influenced by environmental factors were analyzed. The spectra of several LEDs were found to contain Fabry-Perot etalon-induced spectral structures that interfered with the DOAS evaluation, in particular when a constant temperature was not maintained. It was shown that LEDs can be used successfully as light sources in active DOAS experiments that measure NO2 and NO3 near 450 and 630 nm, respectively. Average detection limits of 0.3 parts in 10(9) and 16 parts in 10(12) respectively, were obtained by use of a 6 km light path in the open atmosphere. PMID:16579579

  12. An optical luminescence chronology for late Pleistocene aeolian activity in the Colombian and Venezuelan Llanos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Andrew S.; Armitage, Simon J.; Berrío, Juan-Carlos; Bilbao, Bibiana A.; Boom, Arnoud

    2016-03-01

    The lowland savannas (Llanos) of Colombia and Venezuela are covered by extensive aeolian landforms for which little chronological information exists. We present the first optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) age constraints for dunes in the Llanos Orientales of lowland Colombia and new ages for dunes in the Venezuelan Llanos. The sampled dunes are fully vegetated and show evidence of post-depositional erosion. Ages range from 4.5 ± 0.4 to 66 ± 4 ka, with the majority dating to 27-10 ka (Marine Isotope Stage 2). Some dunes accumulated quickly during the last glacial maximum, although most were active 16-10 ka. Accretion largely ceased after 10 ka. All dunes are elongated downwind from rivers, parallel with dry season winds, and are interpreted as source-bordering features. As they are presently isolated from fluvial sediments by gallery forest it is proposed that activity was associated with a more prolonged dry season, which restricted gallery forest, leading to greater sediment availability on river shorelines. Such variability in dry season duration was potentially mediated by the mean latitude of the ITCZ. The cessation of most dune accretion after ca. 10 ka suggests reduced seasonality and a more northerly ITCZ position, consistent with evidence from the Cariaco Basin.

  13. Optical Counterparts of Undetermined Type -Ray Active Galactic Nuclei with Blazar-Like Spectral Energy Distributions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Giovanni La Mura; Graziano Chiaro; Stefano Ciroi; Piero Rafanelli; David Salvetti; Marco Berton; Valentina Cracco; Fermi-LAT collaboration

    2015-12-01

    During its first four years of scientific observations, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) detected 3033 -ray sources above a 4 significance level. Although most of the extra-galactic sources are active galactic nuclei (AGN) of the blazar class, other families of AGNs are observed too, while a still high fraction of detections (∼30%) remains with uncertain association or classification. According to the currently accepted interpretation, the AGN -ray emission arises from inverse Compton (IC) scattering of low energy photons by relativistic particles confined in a jet, which, in the case of blazars, is oriented very close to our line-of-sight. Taking advantage of data from radio and X-ray wavelengths, which we expect to be produced together with -rays, providing a much better source localization potential, we focused our attention on a sample of -ray Blazar Candidates of Undetermined type (BCUs), starting a campaign of optical spectroscopic observations. The main aims of our investigation include a census of the AGN families that contribute to -ray emission and a study of their redshift distribution, with the subsequent implications on the intrinsic source power. We furthermore analyze which -ray properties can better constrain the nature of the source, thus helping in the study of objects not yet associated with a reliable low frequency counterpart. Here we report on the instruments and techniques used to identify the optical counterparts of -ray sources, we give an overview on the status of our work, and we discuss the implications of a large scale study of -ray emitting AGNs.

  14. Mixed mono- and multilayers of poly(isocyanide)s with non-linear optically active side chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teerenstra, M.N.; Hagting, J.G.; Oostergetel, G.T.; Schouten, A.J.; Devillers, M.A.C.; Nolte, R.J.M.

    1994-01-01

    The properties and structure of Langmuir-Blodgett mono- and multilayers of several poly(isocyanide)s with non-linear optically active side-chains were studied. These polymers formed very rigid layers or layers which appeared to be unstable. To circumvent this problem they were mixed with other poly(

  15. General Method for Calculating the Response and Noise Spectra of Active Fabry-Perot Semiconductor Waveguides With External Optical Injection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaaberg, Søren; Mørk, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    We present a theoretical method for calculating small-signal modulation responses and noise spectra of active Fabry-Perot semiconductor waveguides with external light injection. Small-signal responses due to either a modulation of the pump current or due to an optical amplitude or phase modulation...

  16. All-optical flip-flop operation based on asymmetric active-multimode interferometer bi-stable laser diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, H.; Chaen, Y.; Hagio, T.;

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate fast and low energy all optical flip-flop devices based on asymmetric active-multimode interferometer using high-mesa waveguide structure. The implemented devices showed high speed alloptical flip-flop operation with 25ps long pulses. The rising and falling times of the output sign...

  17. All-optical transistor action by off-resonant activation at laser threshold

    CERN Document Server

    Andrews, David L

    2009-01-01

    The development of viable all-optical data processing systems has immense importance for both the computing and telecommunication industries, but device realization remains elusive. In this Letter, we propose an innovative mechanism deployed as a basis for all optical transistor action. In detail, it is determined that an optically pumped system, operating just below laser threshold, can exhibit a greatly enhanced output on application of an off-resonant beam of sufficient intensity. The electrodynamics of the underlying, nonlinear optical mechanism is analyzed, model calculations are performed, and the results are illustrated graphically.

  18. Estuarine morphometry governs optically active substances, Kd(PAR) and beam attenuation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund-Hansen, L. C.; Nielsen, J. M.; Blüthgen, J.;

    2013-01-01

    this spatial distribution. Partition and multiple regression analyses showed that Chl-a governed Kd(PAR) and beam attenuation coefficient in both estuaries. Significant, high correlations were obtained by multiple regression analyses in the estimation of Kd(PAR) and beam attenuation coefficients in the two......Data on optical properties such as diffuse attenuation coefficient Kd(PAR), beam attenuation coefficient (cp) and the optically active constituents (OACs) CDOM, Chl-a and suspended particulate matter were obtained in a Danish temperate coastal plain estuary (56°N) and a Vietnamese tropical ria (12...

  19. High-resolution wind speed measurements using actively heated fiber optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayde, Chadi; Thomas, Christoph K.; Wagner, James; Selker, John

    2015-11-01

    We present a novel technique to simultaneously measure wind speed (U) at thousands of locations continuously in time based on measurement of velocity-dependent heat transfer from a heated surface. Measuring temperature differences between paired passive and actively heated fiber-optic (AHFO) cables with a distributed temperature sensing system allowed estimation of U at over 2000 sections along the 230 m transect (resolution of 0.375 m and 5.5 s). The underlying concept is similar to that of a hot wire anemometer extended in space. The correlation coefficient between U measured by two colocated sonic anemometers and the AHFO were 0.91 during the day and 0.87 at night. The combination of classical passive and novel AHFO provides unprecedented dynamic observations of both air temperature and wind speed spanning 4 orders of magnitude in spatial scale (0.1-1000 m) while resolving individual turbulent motions, opening new opportunities for testing basic theories for near-surface geophysical flows.

  20. Magnetic Field Measurements in Wire-Array Z-Pinches using Magneto-Optically Active Waveguides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Wasif; Blesener, Isaac; Hammer, David A.; Lipson, Michal

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the magnetic field topology in wire-array Z-pinches as a function of time is of great significance to understanding these high-energy density plasmas especially for their ultimate application to stockpile stewardship and inertial confinement fusion. We are developing techniques to measure magnetic fields as a function of space and time using Faraday rotation of a single longitudinal mode (SLM) laser through a magneto-optically active bulk waveguide (multicomponent terbium borate glass) placed adjacent to, or within, the wire array in 1 MA experiments. We have measured fields >10 T with 100 ns rise times outside of a wire-array for the entire duration of the current pulse and as much as ˜2 T inside a wire-array for ˜40 ns from the start of current. This is the first time that such rapidly varying and large fields have been measured using these materials. In a dense Z-pinch, these sensing devices may not survive for long but may provide the magnetic field at the position of the sensor that can be used to corroborate magnetic probes, with which we compare our results.

  1. Long-Term Optical Continuum Color Variability of Nearby Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Sakata, Yu; Yoshii, Yuzuru; Kobayashi, Yukiyasu; Koshida, Shintaro; Aoki, Tsutomu; Enya, Keigo; Tomita, Hiroyuki; Suganuma, Masahiro; Uchimoto, Yuka Katsuno; Sugawara, Shota

    2010-01-01

    We examine whether the spectral energy distribution of optical continuum emission of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) changes during flux variation, based on accurate and frequent monitoring observations of 11 nearby Seyfert galaxies and QSOs carried out in the B, V, and I bands for seven years by the MAGNUM telescope. The multi-epoch flux data in any two different bands obtained on the same night show a very tight linear flux to flux relationship for all target AGNs. The flux of the host galaxy within the photometric aperture is carefully estimated by surface brightness fitting to available high-resolution HST images and MAGNUM images. The flux of narrow emission lines in the photometric bands is also estimated from available spectroscopic data. We find that the non-variable component of the host galaxy plus narrow emission lines for all target AGNs is located on the fainter extension of the linear regression line of multi-epoch flux data in the flux to flux diagram. This result strongly indicates that the spec...

  2. Design of active disturbance rejection controller for space optical communication coarse tracking system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jian; Ai, Yong

    2015-10-01

    In order to improve the dynamic tracking performance of coarse tracking system in space optical communication, a new control method based on active disturbance rejection controller (ADRC) is proposed. Firstly, based on the structure analysis of coarse tracking system, the simplified system model was obtained, and then the extended state observer was designed to calculate state variables and spot disturbance from the input and output signals. Finally, the ADRC controller of coarse tracking system is realized with the combination of nonlinear PID controller. The simulation experimental results show that compared with the PID method, this method can significantly reduce the step response overshoot and settling time. When the target angular velocity is120mrad/s, tracking error with ADRC method is 30μrad, which decreases 85% compared with the PID method. Meanwhile the disturbance rejection bandwidth is increased by 3 times with ADRC. This method can effectively improve the dynamic tracking performance of coarse tracking and disturbance rejection degree, with no need of hardware upgrade, and is of certain reference value to the wide range and high dynamic precision photoelectric tracking system.

  3. Optically active conjugated polymer from solvent chirality transfer polymerization in monoterpenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyojin; Lee, Daehoon; Lee, Seul; Suzuki, Nozomu; Fujiki, Michiya; Lee, Chang-Lyoul; Kwak, Giseop

    2013-09-01

    Disubstituted acetylene monomers [1,2-diphenylacetylenes (DPAs: DPA-pC1, DPA-mC1, DPA-pC8); 1-phenyl-2-hexylacetylene (PHA-pC1)] are tested for asymmetric polymerization in chiral monoterpenes used as solvents and compared with the corresponding monosubstituted acetylene monomer [1-phenylacetylene (PA-pC1)]. DPA-pC1 containing a trimethylsilyl group in the para-position of the phenyl ring produces an optically active polymer with a large Cotton effect, despite the absence of a stereogenic center. The polymer sample obtained by polymerization in 87% ee (-)-α-pinene shows the strongest CD signal (gCD value at 385 nm: ∼3.2 × 10⁻³). The Cotton bands of the polymers obtained in (-)- and (+)-α-pinenes show the opposite sign in the CD signals. Theoretical calculations show that only the cis-cisoid model adopts a helical conformation. A time-correlated single photon counting experiment shows that the emission of the chiral polymer originates from a virtually single excited species with a 98% component fraction. This polymer solution does not show any significant decrease in gCD value over a wide temperature range of 20 to 80 °C. No noticeable decrease in the gCD value is detected when the polymer solution is kept at relatively low temperatures for a prolonged period (35 d). In contrast, the other polymers show no CD signal.

  4. High-speed linear optics quantum computing using active feed-forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevedel, Robert; Walther, Philip; Tiefenbacher, Felix; Böhi, Pascal; Kaltenbaek, Rainer; Jennewein, Thomas; Zeilinger, Anton

    2007-01-01

    As information carriers in quantum computing, photonic qubits have the advantage of undergoing negligible decoherence. However, the absence of any significant photon-photon interaction is problematic for the realization of non-trivial two-qubit gates. One solution is to introduce an effective nonlinearity by measurements resulting in probabilistic gate operations. In one-way quantum computation, the random quantum measurement error can be overcome by applying a feed-forward technique, such that the future measurement basis depends on earlier measurement results. This technique is crucial for achieving deterministic quantum computation once a cluster state (the highly entangled multiparticle state on which one-way quantum computation is based) is prepared. Here we realize a concatenated scheme of measurement and active feed-forward in a one-way quantum computing experiment. We demonstrate that, for a perfect cluster state and no photon loss, our quantum computation scheme would operate with good fidelity and that our feed-forward components function with very high speed and low error for detected photons. With present technology, the individual computational step (in our case the individual feed-forward cycle) can be operated in less than 150 ns using electro-optical modulators. This is an important result for the future development of one-way quantum computers, whose large-scale implementation will depend on advances in the production and detection of the required highly entangled cluster states.

  5. Highly selective anti-Prelog synthesis of optically active aryl alcohols by recombinant Escherichia coli expressing stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Nie, Yao; Mu, Xiao Qing; Zhang, Rongzhen; Xu, Yan

    2016-07-01

    Biocatalytic asymmetric synthesis has been widely used for preparation of optically active chiral alcohols as the important intermediates and precursors of active pharmaceutical ingredients. However, the available whole-cell system involving anti-Prelog specific alcohol dehydrogenase is yet limited. A recombinant Escherichia coli system expressing anti-Prelog stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase from Candida parapsilosis was established as a whole-cell system for catalyzing asymmetric reduction of aryl ketones to anti-Prelog configured alcohols. Using 2-hydroxyacetophenone as the substrate, reaction factors including pH, cell status, and substrate concentration had obvious impacts on the outcome of whole-cell biocatalysis, and xylose was found to be an available auxiliary substrate for intracellular cofactor regeneration, by which (S)-1-phenyl-1,2-ethanediol was achieved with an optical purity of 97%e.e. and yield of 89% under the substrate concentration of 5 g/L. Additionally, the feasibility of the recombinant cells toward different aryl ketones was investigated, and most of the corresponding chiral alcohol products were obtained with an optical purity over 95%e.e. Therefore, the whole-cell system involving recombinant stereospecific alcohol dehydrogenase was constructed as an efficient biocatalyst for highly enantioselective anti-Prelog synthesis of optically active aryl alcohols and would be promising in the pharmaceutical industry.

  6. Compact All-optical Parity calculator based on a single all-active Mach-Zehnder Interferometer with an all-SOA amplified feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Lønstrup; Petersen, Martin Nordal; Nord, Martin

    2003-01-01

    An all-optical signal processing circuit capable of parity calculations is demonstrated using a single integrated all-active SOA-based MZI, exploiting the integrated SOAs for feedback amplification.......An all-optical signal processing circuit capable of parity calculations is demonstrated using a single integrated all-active SOA-based MZI, exploiting the integrated SOAs for feedback amplification....

  7. Titanocene(III) chloride mediated radical induced addition-elimination route to the synthesis of racemic and optically active trisubstituted tetrahydrofurans: Formal synthesis of magnofargesin and 7'-epimagnofargesin

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P CHAKRABORTY; S K MANDAL; S C ROY

    2016-07-01

    Titanocene(III) Chloride mediated radical induced synthesis of 4-benzylidene substituted tetrahydrofuran, a typical lignan skeleton, has been accomplished in good yield through addition-elimination route in racemic as well as in optically active forms. The method has been applied to the synthesis of furano lignans, magnofargesin (1) and 7'-epimagnofargesin (2) in optically active forms.

  8. Asymmetric nitrogen. Communications 38. Optically active 1-hydroxyl-, 1-alkoxycarbonyloxy-, and 1-tosyloxy-2, 2-bis(trifluoromethyl)-aziridines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostyanovskii, R.G.; Chervin, I.I.; Kadorkina, G.K.; Maldonado, I.K.A.; Nasibov, S.S.

    1985-08-20

    The authors accomplish the separation of diastereomers Xa,b and KIa,b obtained from chiral alkoxycarbonyl derivatives of hexafluoracetone oxime by reaction with CH/sub 2/N/sub 2/ through the corresponding triazolines, which were decomposed to the aziridines by photolysis or by the action of Et/sub 2/O.BF/sub 3/ at 20 C. Diasteromeric 1-alkoxycarbonyloxy-2,2-bis(trifluormethyl)ariridines, which were speated by crystallization and chromatography, under the influence of phenylhydrazine acylates give optically active 1-hydroxy-2,2-bis(trifluoromethyl)aziridine, on the basis of which optically active 1-tosyloxy-2,2-bis(trifluoromethyl)aziridine was obtained. The activation parameters of the epimerization of diasteromeric 1-alkoxycarbonyloxy-2,2-bis(trifluoromethyl)aziridine were found.

  9. Broadly Tunable SOA-Based Active Mode-Locked Fibre Ring Laser by Forward Injection Optical Pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a broadly tunable active mode-locked fibre ring laser based on a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA), with forward injection optical pulses. The laser can generate pulse sequence with pulsewidth about 12ps and high output power up to 8.56dBm at 2.5 GHz stably. Incorporated with a wavelength-tunable optical bandpass filter, the pulse laser can operate with a broad wavelength tunable span up to 37nm with almost constant pulsewidth. A detailed experimental analysis is also carried out to investigate the relationship between the power of the internal cavity and the pulsewidth of the output pulse sequence. The experimental configuration of the pulse laser is very simple and easy to setup with no polarization-sensitive components. (fundamental areas of phenomenology (including applications))

  10. The theoretical study of passive and active optical devices via planewave based transfer (scattering) matrix method and other approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuo, Ye [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we theoretically study the electromagnetic wave propagation in several passive and active optical components and devices including 2-D photonic crystals, straight and curved waveguides, organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), and etc. Several optical designs are also presented like organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells and solar concentrators. The first part of the thesis focuses on theoretical investigation. First, the plane-wave-based transfer (scattering) matrix method (TMM) is briefly described with a short review of photonic crystals and other numerical methods to study them (Chapter 1 and 2). Next TMM, the numerical method itself is investigated in details and developed in advance to deal with more complex optical systems. In chapter 3, TMM is extended in curvilinear coordinates to study curved nanoribbon waveguides. The problem of a curved structure is transformed into an equivalent one of a straight structure with spatially dependent tensors of dielectric constant and magnetic permeability. In chapter 4, a new set of localized basis orbitals are introduced to locally represent electromagnetic field in photonic crystals as alternative to planewave basis. The second part of the thesis focuses on the design of optical devices. First, two examples of TMM applications are given. The first example is the design of metal grating structures as replacements of ITO to enhance the optical absorption in OPV cells (chapter 6). The second one is the design of the same structure as above to enhance the light extraction of OLEDs (chapter 7). Next, two design examples by ray tracing method are given, including applying a microlens array to enhance the light extraction of OLEDs (chapter 5) and an all-angle wide-wavelength design of solar concentrator (chapter 8). In summary, this dissertation has extended TMM which makes it capable of treating complex optical systems. Several optical designs by TMM and ray tracing method are also given as a full complement of this

  11. Time-resolved phase-change recording mark formation with zinc oxide near-field optical active layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Tsung Sheng; Chen, Mu-Ku; Chen, Jia-Wern; Chen, Yi-Hao; Wu, Pei Ru; Tsai, Din Ping

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, an optical active thin film of zinc oxide (ZnOx) nano-composites exploited for the enhancement of optical signals in an ultra-high density recording scheme has been demonstrated. Via the electron microscope investigation, the results display randomly distributed crystalline nanograins in the ZnOx thin films. Optical disks with the ZnOx nanostructured thin films show that the carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR) above 25 dB can be obtained at the mark trains of 100 nm, while the optimal writing power is reduced as a function of the increasing thickness of the ZnOx films. Furthermore, by conducting a series of the optical pump-probe experiments, the optical responses of recording marks on as-deposited phase-change Ge2Sb2Te5 (as-GST) recording layers present that the highly contrast bright recording bits can be acquired with the existence of the ZnOx nanostructured thin films, providing prospective potentials in future data storage and optoelectronic devices.

  12. Fast Optical Variability of a Naked-eye Burst—Manifestation of the Periodic Activity of an Internal Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beskin, G.; Karpov, S.; Bondar, S.; Greco, G.; Guarnieri, A.; Bartolini, C.; Piccioni, A.

    2010-08-01

    We imaged the position of the naked-eye burst, GRB080319B, before, during, and after its gamma-ray activity with sub-second temporal resolution using the TORTORA wide-field camera. The burst optical prompt emission, which reached 5.3 mag, has been detected, and its periodic optical variability has been discovered in the form of four equidistant flashes with a duration of several seconds. We also detected a strong correlation (r ≈ 0.82) between optical and gamma-ray light curves with a 2 s delay of the optical emission with respect to the gamma-ray emission. The revealed temporal structure of the optical light curve in comparison with the gamma-ray light curve can be interpreted in the framework of the model of shell collisions in the ejecta containing a significant neutron component. All observed emission features reflect the non-stationary behavior of the burst internal engine—supposedly, a hyperaccreting solar-mass black hole formed in the collapse of a massive stellar core.

  13. Effects of preterm birth on intrinsic fluctuations in neonatal cerebral activity examined using optical imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Fuchino

    Full Text Available Medical advancements in neonatology have significantly increased the number of high-risk preterm survivors. However, recent long-term follow-up studies have suggested that preterm infants are at risk for behavioral, educational, and emotional problems. Although clear relationships have been demonstrated between preterm infants and developmental problems during childhood and adolescence, less is known about the early indications of these problems. Recently, numerous studies on resting-state functional connectivity (RSFC have demonstrated temporal correlations of activity between spatially remote cortical regions not only in healthy adults but also in neuropathological disorders and early childhood development. In order to compare RSFC of the cerebral cortex between preterm infants at term-equivalent ages and full-term neonates without any anatomical abnormality risk during natural sleep, we used an optical topography system, which is a recently developed extension of near-infrared spectroscopy. We clarified the presence of RSFC in both preterm infants and full-term neonates and showed differences between these groups. The principal differences were that on comparison of RSFC between the bilateral temporal regions, and bilateral parietal regions, RSFC was enhanced in preterm infants compared with full-term neonates; whereas on comparison of RSFC between the left temporal and left parietal regions, RSFC was enhanced in full-term neonates compared with preterm infants. We also demonstrated a difference between the groups in developmental changes of RSFC related to postmenstrual age. Most importantly, these findings suggested that preterm infants and full-term neonates follow different developmental trajectories during the perinatal period because of differences in perinatal experiences and physiological and structural development.

  14. An optical and near-infrared color-magnitude diagram for type I Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Robert J.; Gibbs, John; Gorjian, Varoujan; Pruett, Lee; Young, Diedre; Boyd, Robert; Byrd, Joy; Cheshier, Jaicie; Chung, Stephanie; Clark, Ruby; Fernandez, Joseph; Gonzales, Elyse; Kumar, Anika; McGinnis, Gillian; Palmer, John; Perrine, Luke; Phelps, Brittney; Reginio, Margaret; Richter, Kristi; Sanchez, Elias; Washburn, Claire

    2016-01-01

    This project is seeking another standard candle for measuring cosmic distances by trying to establish a color-magnitude diagram for active galactic nuclei (AGN). Type I AGN selected from the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED) were used to establish a correlation between the color and the luminosity of AGN. This work builds on previous NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program team attempts to establish such a relationship. This is novel in that it uses both optical and 1-2 micron near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths as a better color discriminator of the transition between accretion-dominated and dust/torus-dominated emission.Photometric data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) and the Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) was extracted and analyzed for type I AGN with redshifts z diagram for the area where the dust vaporizes is analogous to a stellar Hertzsprung-Russell (HR) diagram. Data from SDSS and 2MASS were specifically selected to focus on the sublimation boundary between the coolest part of the accretion disk and the hottest region of the inner edge of the dusty torus surrounding the accretion disk to find the greatest ratio for the color. The more luminous the AGN, the more extended the dust sublimation radius, causing a larger hot dust emitting surface area, which corresponds to a greater NIR luminosity.Our findings suggest that the best correlations correspond to colors associated with the Sloan z band and any of the 2MASS bands with slight variations dependent on redshift. This may result in a tool for using AGN as a standard for cosmic distances. This research was made possible through the NASA/IPAC Teacher Archive Research Program (NITARP) and was funded by NASA Astrophysics Data Program.

  15. Estimation of operators’ fatigue using optical methods for determination of pupil activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Różanowski

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The purpose of this study was to develop and initially validate an objective, yet quick, method for assessment of human fatigue. This aim can be achieved by the use of an optical, non-contact method of analysis of pupil activity. The study involved 2 phenomena typical for the behavior of the human pupil: pupillary reflex and pupillary movements. The 1st phenomenon is related to the pupillary light reflex (PLR, which presents the results of physiological adaptation mechanisms of the human eye. The pupillary unrest index (PUI is an additional parameter referring to the tendency for instability of the pupil. Material and methods Indicators of these 2 mechanisms were assessed under the same experimental laboratory conditions. Assessment was conducted on a group of volunteers (N = 10 during 4 controlled series of measurements performed at night. Pupillary reflex parameters associated with PLR and pupillary unrest index (PUI were recorded using F²D Fit-For-Duty, a commercially available system made by AMTech Pupilknowlogy GmbH. Baseline pupil diameter, oscillations, reflex latency, maximum reaction time, pupil constriction time, pupil dilation time, and constriction amplitude were recorded. Results As a result of the study, we were able to demonstrate correlation and confirm the usefulness of PLR and PST methods in the assessment of sleep deprivation. Parameters of PLR that may indicate human fatigue were identified. The effect of light impulse sequences on the dynamics of pupillary reflex and the relationship between PUI (pupillary unrest index measurement duration and sleepiness assessment validity, were assessed. Conclusions The results of the pilot studies were sufficient to develop minimum requirements for a PLR sensor that would be capable of estimating the level of fatigue with accuracy of a PUI method, but at a 5 times faster rate.

  16. Few layers graphene as thermally activated optical modulator in the visible-near IR spectral range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, J L; Hernández-Cordero, Juan; Muhl, S; Mendoza, D

    2016-01-01

    We report the temperature modulation of the optical transmittance of a few layers of graphene (FLG). The FLG was heated either by the Joule effect of the current flowing between coplanar electrodes or by the absorption of a continuous-wave 532 nm laser. The optical signals used to evaluate the modulation of the FLG were at 633, 975, and 1550 nm; the last wavelengths are commonly used in optical communications. We also evaluated the effect of the substrate on the modulation effect by comparing the performance of a freely suspended FLG sample with one mounted on a glass substrate. Our results show that the modulation of the optical transmittance of FLG can be from millihertz to kilohertz. PMID:26696185

  17. New Light on Optical Activity: Interaction of Electromagnetic Waves with Chiral Photonic Metamaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Decker, Manuel

    2010-01-01

    Chiral metamaterials allow for obtaining very large chiral optical effects which result specifically from the interplay of electric/magnetic dipoles of the ''artificial atoms'' and the magnetic/electric component of the incident light field. We investigate double-layered chiral metamaterial designs with respect to their circular dichroism and optical rotatory power that is orders of magnitude larger than in, e.g., a solution of chiral sugar molecules.

  18. Scintillating glass, fiber-optic plate detectors for active target and tracking applications in high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have studied the performance of scintillating glass fiber-optic plates using 10 GeV/c particles at the SLAC test beam. The plates were composed of: Terbium activated cladded-glass cores in a matrix of 15 μm spacing; and Cerium activated cladded-glass cores in a matrix of variable spacing 6-10 μm. The target plates were viewed with a three-stage, gatable image intensifier. Particle tracks and nuclear interactions were recorded on film for both materials. We observe 5 detected hits/mm for minimum ionizing particles for the Tb glass, and 1-2 hits/mm for the Ce glass. The test results indicate that scintillating glass fiber-optic plates can be used as high spatial resolution tracking detectors for both fixed target and colliding beam experiments

  19. A tunnel regenerated coupled multi-active-region large optical cavity laser with a high quality beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Bi-Feng; Guo Wei-Ling; Du Xiao-Dong; Li Jian-Jun; Zou De-Shu; Shen Guang-Di

    2012-01-01

    A novel coupled multi-active-region large optical cavity structure cascaded by a tunnel junction is proposed to solve the problems of facet catastrophic optical damage (COD) and the large vertical divergence caused by the thin emitting area in conventional laser diodes.For a laser with three active regions,a slope efficiency as high as 1.49 W/A,a vertical divergence angle of 17.4°,and a threshold current density of 271 A/cm2 are achieved.By optimizing the structural parameters,the beam quality is greatly improved,and the level of the COD power increases by more than two times compared with that of the conventional laser.

  20. Structural, vibrational spectroscopic and nonlinear optical activity studies on 2-hydroxy- 3, 5-dinitropyridine: A DFT approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conformational analysis was carried out for 2-Hydroxy- 3, 5-dinitropyridine molecule using potential energy surface scan and the most stable optimized conformer was predicted. The vibrational frequencies and Mulliken atomic charge distribution were calculated for the optimized geometry of the molecule using DFT/B3LYP cc-pVQZ basis set by Gaussian 09 Program. The vibrational frequencies were assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation using VEDA 4.0 program. In the Frontier molecular orbitals analysis, the molecular reactivity, kinetic stability, intramolecular charge transfer studies and the calculation of ionization energy, electron affinity, global hardness, chemical potential, electrophilicity index and softness values of the title molecule were carried out. The nonlinear optical activity of the molecule was studied by means of first order hyperpolarizability, which was computed as 7.64 times greater than urea. The natural bond orbital analysis was performed to confirm the nonlinear optical activity of the molecule

  1. Development of a portable active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy system for volcanic gas measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Vita, F.; C. Kern; Inguaggiato, S

    2014-01-01

    Active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) has been an effective tool for measuring atmospheric trace gases for several decades. However, instruments were large, heavy and power-inefficient, making their application to remote environments extremely challenging. Recent developments in fibre-coupling telescope technology and the availability of ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDS) have now allowed us to design and construct a lightweight, po...

  2. Supramolecular Structure, Physical Properties, and Langmuir-Blodgett Film Formation of an Optically Active Liquid-Crystalline Phthalocyanine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nostrum, Cornelus F. van; Bosman, Anton W.; Gelinck, Gerwin H.; Schouten, Pieter G.; Warman, John M.; Devillers, Marinus A.C.; Meijerink, Andries; Picken, Stephen J.; Sohling, Ulrich; Schouten, Arend-Jan; Nolte, Roeland J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The structure and physical properties of optically active, metal-free 2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octa(S-3,7-dimethyloctoxy)phthalocyanine ((S)-Pc(8,2)) are reported and compared with those of the phthalocyanine with (R,S) side chains (mixture of 43 stereoisomers). Unlike the latter compound, (S)-Pc(8,2) l

  3. Preparation, characterization, and infrared emissivity property of optically active polyurethane/TiO2/SiO2 multilayered microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optically active polyurethane/titania/silica (LPU/TiO2/SiO2) multilayered core-shell composite microspheres were prepared by the combination of titania deposition on the surface of silica spheres and subsequent polymer grafting. LPU/TiO2/SiO2 was characterized by FT-IR, UV-vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), SEM and TEM, and the infrared emissivity value (8-14 μm) was investigated in addition. The results indicated that titania and polyurethane had been successfully coated onto the surfaces of silica microspheres. LPU/TiO2/SiO2 exhibited clearly multilayered core-shell construction. The infrared emissivity values reduced along with the increase of covering layers thus proved that the interfacial interactions had direct influence on the infrared emissivity. Besides, LPU/TiO2/SiO2 multilayered microspheres based on the optically active polyurethane took advantages of the orderly secondary structure and strengthened interfacial synergistic actions. Consequently, it possessed the lowest infrared emissivity value. - Graphical Abstract: Optically active polyurethane/titania/silica (LPU/TiO2/SiO2) multilayered core-shell composite microspheres were prepared by the combination of titania deposition on the surface of silica spheres and subsequent polymer grafting. Highlights: → Optically active polyurethane based on tyrosine was used for the modification of nanoparticles. → LPU/TiO2/SiO2 multilayered core-shell microspheres were prepared and characterized. → Interfacial interactions and secondary structure affected the infrared emissivity of composite.

  4. Active tremor cancellation by a “Smart” handheld vitreoretinal microsurgical tool using swept source optical coherence tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Cheol; Gehlbach, Peter L.; Kang, Jin U.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Microsurgeons require dexterity to make precise and stable maneuvers to achieve surgical objectives and to minimize surgical risks during freehand procedures. This work presents a novel, common path, swept source optical coherence tomography-based “smart” micromanipulation aided robotic-surgical tool (SMART) that actively suppresses surgeon hand tremor. The tool allows enhanced tool tip stabilization, more accurate targeting and the potential to lower surgical risk. Freehand perform...

  5. Optical Modeling Activities for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). 4; Overview and Introduction of Matlab Based Toolkits used to Interface with Optical Design Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    This is part four of a series on the ongoing optical modeling activities for James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The first two discussed modeling JWST on-orbit performance using wavefront sensitivities to predict line of sight motion induced blur, and stability during thermal transients. The third investigates the aberrations resulting from alignment and figure compensation of the controllable degrees of freedom (primary and secondary mirrors), which may be encountered during ground alignment and on-orbit commissioning of the observatory. The work here introduces some of the math software tools used to perform the work of the previous three papers of this series. NASA has recently approved these in-house tools for public release as open source, so this presentation also serves as a quick tutorial on their use. The tools are collections of functions written in Matlab, which interface with optical design software (CodeV, OSLO, and Zemax) using either COM or DDE communication protocol. The functions are discussed, and examples are given.

  6. Progress in Synthesis of Optically Active Polyamide%旋光性聚酰胺研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张玲丽; 付鹏; 崔喆; 刘民英; 赵清香

    2015-01-01

    按化学结构对旋光性聚酰胺进行了分类,包括用非手性单体制备的旋光性酰胺、侧链含手性原子及主链含手性原子的旋光性聚酰胺。对旋光性聚酰胺的合成方法进行了总结,介绍了链增长缩聚法、溶液聚合法和界面缩聚法在合成旋光性聚酰胺方面的应用。%The category of optically active polyamide was introduced according to chemical structure,which was constructed by monomers bearing chiral side groups,monomers having chiral atoms in main chain and achiral monomers respectively. The synthesis methods of optically active polyamides were reviewed. Chain-grown condensation polymerization,solution polymerization and interfacial polymerization that were used to achieve optically active polyamides were introduced in detail.

  7. Magnetic liquid deformable mirrors for astronomical applications:Active correction of optical aberrations from lower-grade optics and support system

    CERN Document Server

    Borra, E F

    2012-01-01

    Deformable mirrors are increasingly used in astronomy. However, they still are limited in stroke for active correction of high amplitude optical aberrations. Magnetic Liquid deformable mirrors (MLDMs) are a new technology that has advantages of high-amplitude deformations and low costs. In this paper we demonstrate extremely high strokes and inter-actuator strokes achievable by MLDMs which can be used in astronomical instrumentation. In particular, we consider the use of such a mirror to suggest an interesting application for the next generation of large telescopes. We present a prototype 91-actuator deformable mirror made of a magnetic liquid (ferrofluid). This mirror uses a technique that linearizes the response of such mirrors by superimposing a large and uniform magnetic field to the magnetic field produced by an array of small coils. We discuss experimental results that illustrate the performance of MLDMs. A most interesting application of MLDMs comes from the fact they could be used to correct the aberr...

  8. Active optical system for advanced 3D surface structuring by laser remelting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pütsch, O.; Temmler, A.; Stollenwerk, J.; Willenborg, E.; Loosen, P.

    2015-03-01

    Structuring by laser remelting enables completely new possibilities for designing surfaces since material is redistributed but not wasted. In addition to technological advantages, cost and time benefits yield from shortened process times, the avoidance of harmful chemicals and the elimination of subsequent finishing steps such as cleaning and polishing. The functional principle requires a completely new optical machine technology that maintains the spatial and temporal superposition and manipulation of three different laser beams emitted from two laser sources of different wavelength. The optical system has already been developed and demonstrated for the processing of flat samples of hot and cold working steel. However, since particularly the structuring of 3D-injection molds represents an application example of high innovation potential, the optical system has to take into account the elliptical beam geometry that occurs when the laser beams irradiate a curved surface. To take full advantage of structuring by remelting for the processing of 3D surfaces, additional optical functionality, called EPS (elliptical pre-shaping) has to be integrated into the existing set-up. The development of the beam shaping devices not only requires the analysis of the mechanisms of the beam projection but also a suitable optical design. Both aspects are discussed in this paper.

  9. Active X-ray Optics for Generation-X, the Next High Resolution X-ray Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Elvis, M; Fabbiano, G; Schwartz, D A; Reid, P; Podgorski, W; Eisenhower, M; Juda, M; Phillips, J; Cohen, L; Wolk, S; Elvis, Martin

    2006-01-01

    X-rays provide one of the few bands through which we can study the epoch of reionization, when the first galaxies, black holes and stars were born. To reach the sensitivity required to image these first discrete objects in the universe needs a major advance in X-ray optics. Generation-X (Gen-X) is currently the only X-ray astronomy mission concept that addresses this goal. Gen-X aims to improve substantially on the Chandra angular resolution and to do so with substantially larger effective area. These two goals can only be met if a mirror technology can be developed that yields high angular resolution at much lower mass/unit area than the Chandra optics, matching that of Constellation-X (Con-X). We describe an approach to this goal based on active X-ray optics that correct the mid-frequency departures from an ideal Wolter optic on-orbit. We concentrate on the problems of sensing figure errors, calculating the corrections required, and applying those corrections. The time needed to make this in-flight calibrat...

  10. [The active search for occupational diseases in the engineering industries. Diseases associated with exposure to welding activities in optical radiation: dry eye syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messineo, A; Leone, M; Sanna, S; Arrigoni, E; Teodori, C; Pecorella, I; Imperatore, A; Villarini, S; Macchiaroli, S

    2011-01-01

    In the project of active research of occupational diseases was conducted a study on 45 welders in the engineering companies, with particular attention to the hazards of exposure to the optical radiation. The protocol used involved the execution of Breack Up test, Schirmer test, corneal staining and scraping cytology. It revealed that more than half of the welders had ocular lesions referable to their work activity as well as some permanent functional damages with the characters of dry eye syndrome. None of these diseases, which could alert for medical-legal and insurance, was highlighted by the occupational health physician.

  11. Tomographic active optical trapping of arbitrarily shaped objects by exploiting 3-D refractive index maps

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kyoohyun

    2016-01-01

    Optical trapping can be used to manipulate the three-dimensional (3-D) motion of spherical particles based on the simple prediction of optical forces and the responding motion of samples. However, controlling the 3-D behaviour of non-spherical particles with arbitrary orientations is extremely challenging, due to experimental difficulties and the extensive computations. Here, we achieved the real-time optical control of arbitrarily shaped particles by combining the wavefront shaping of a trapping beam and measurements of the 3-D refractive index (RI) distribution of samples. Engineering the 3-D light field distribution of a trapping beam based on the measured 3-D RI map of samples generates a light mould, which can be used to manipulate colloidal and biological samples which have arbitrary orientations and/or shapes. The present method provides stable control of the orientation and assembly of arbitrarily shaped particles without knowing a priori information about the sample geometry. The proposed method can ...

  12. Optical Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabbert, Bernd; Goushcha, Alexander

    Optical detectors are applied in all fields of human activities from basic research to commercial applications in communication, automotive, medical imaging, homeland security, and other fields. The processes of light interaction with matter described in other chapters of this handbook form the basis for understanding the optical detectors physics and device properties.

  13. 40 Gbit/s all-optical wavelength conversion in an SOA-based all-active Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolfson, David; Hansen, Peter Bukhave; Fjelde, Tina;

    1999-01-01

    40 Gbit/s all-optical wavelength conversion is demonstarted in an all-active Mach-Zehnder interferometer Conversion is achieved with an optical-signsl-to noise ratio of 40 db and a record high input power dynamic range og 5.5 db....

  14. Impact of slow-light enhancement on optical propagation in active semiconductor photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui; de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Gregersen, Niels;

    2015-01-01

    , the realization of short optical amplifiers compatible with photonic integration. The coupled wave analysis is compared to numerical approaches based on the Fourier modal method and a frequency domain finite element technique. The presence of material gain leads to the build-up of a backscattered field, which...

  15. Synthesis, spectral, optical and anti-inflammatory activity of complexes derived from 2-aminobenzohydrazide with some rare earths

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasser Mohammed Hosny; El Sayed A El Morsy; Yousery E Sherif

    2015-01-01

    Three new metal complexes derived from Er(III), Dy(III) and Zr(IV) with 2-aminobenzohydrazide (ABH) were synthe-sized and characterized by elemental analyses, IR,1H-NMR, ES-MS and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The morphology and the particle size were determined by TEM. The results showed that the ligand acted as neutral bi-dentate coordinating to the metal ions through the carbonyl oxygen and amidic amino nitrogen. The aromatic amine group remained inert towards coordination. The optical band gap was measured and found to be 3.3, 3.5 and 4.3 eV for Er(III), Dy(III) and Zr(IV), respectively. The optical band gap values indicated a semi-conducting nature of the investigated complexes. Theanti-inflammatory and analgesic activities of the tested compounds were determined and compared with standard meloxicam.

  16. Modal demultiplexing properties of tapered and nanostructured optical fibers for in vivo optogenetic control of neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanello, Marco; Della Patria, Andrea; Sileo, Leonardo; Sabatini, Bernardo L; De Vittorio, Massimo; Pisanello, Ferruccio

    2015-10-01

    Optogenetic approaches to manipulate neural activity have revolutionized the ability of neuroscientists to uncover the functional connectivity underlying brain function. At the same time, the increasing complexity of in vivo optogenetic experiments has increased the demand for new techniques to precisely deliver light into the brain, in particular to illuminate selected portions of the neural tissue. Tapered and nanopatterned gold-coated optical fibers were recently proposed as minimally invasive multipoint light delivery devices, allowing for site-selective optogenetic stimulation in the mammalian brain [Pisanello , Neuron82, 1245 (2014)]. Here we demonstrate that the working principle behind these devices is based on the mode-selective photonic properties of the fiber taper. Using analytical and ray tracing models we model the finite conductance of the metal coating, and show that single or multiple optical windows located at specific taper sections can outcouple only specific subsets of guided modes injected into the fiber.

  17. A planar chiral nanostructure with asymmetric transmission of linearly polarized wave and huge optical activity in near-infrared band

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just like an electronic diode that allows the electrical current to flow in one direction only, a kind of chiral metamaterial structure with a similar functionality for the electromagnetic wave is proposed. The designed nanostructure that consists of twisted metallic split-ring resonators on both sides of a dielectric substrate achieves asymmetric transmission for a forward and backward propagating linearly polarized wave by numerical simulation in near-infrared band. Difference in transmission efficiency of the optimized structure between the same polarized waves incident from opposite directions can reach a maximum at the communication wavelength (1.55 μm). Moreover, the simulation results of this structure also exhibit strong optical activity and circular dichroism. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  18. Effect of atmospheric interference and sensor noise in retrieval of optically active materials in the ocean by hyperspectral remote sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Iosif M; Levina, Elizaveta

    2007-10-01

    We present a method to construct the best linear estimate of optically active material concentration from ocean radiance spectra measured through an arbitrary atmosphere layer by a hyperspectral sensor. The algorithm accounts for sensor noise. Optical models of seawater and maritime atmosphere were used to obtain the joint distribution of spectra and concentrations required for the algorithm. The accuracy of phytoplankton retrieval is shown to be substantially lower than that of sediment and dissolved matter. In all cases, the sensor noise noticeably reduces the retrieval accuracy. Additional errors due to atmospheric interference are analyzed, and possible ways to increase the accuracy of retrieval are suggested, such as changing sensor parameters and including a priori information about observation conditions.

  19. Modal demultiplexing properties of tapered and nanostructured optical fibers for in vivo optogenetic control of neural activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisanello, Marco; Della Patria, Andrea; Sileo, Leonardo; Sabatini, Bernardo L; De Vittorio, Massimo; Pisanello, Ferruccio

    2015-10-01

    Optogenetic approaches to manipulate neural activity have revolutionized the ability of neuroscientists to uncover the functional connectivity underlying brain function. At the same time, the increasing complexity of in vivo optogenetic experiments has increased the demand for new techniques to precisely deliver light into the brain, in particular to illuminate selected portions of the neural tissue. Tapered and nanopatterned gold-coated optical fibers were recently proposed as minimally invasive multipoint light delivery devices, allowing for site-selective optogenetic stimulation in the mammalian brain [Pisanello , Neuron82, 1245 (2014)]. Here we demonstrate that the working principle behind these devices is based on the mode-selective photonic properties of the fiber taper. Using analytical and ray tracing models we model the finite conductance of the metal coating, and show that single or multiple optical windows located at specific taper sections can outcouple only specific subsets of guided modes injected into the fiber. PMID:26504650

  20. Simultaneous measurement of DNA motor protein conformation and activity with combined optical trap and single-molecule fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemla, Yann

    2013-03-01

    We present single-molecule measurements of Superfamily 1 UvrD helicase DNA unwinding that reveal directly how helicase stoichiometry and conformation regulate motor activity. Using a new instrument that combines high resolution optical tweezers with single-molecule fluorescence microscopy, we record DNA unwinding activity with base pair-scale resolution (via optical tweezers) simultaneously with helicase stoichiometry and conformation (via fluorescence). Quantifying the fluorescence signal from labeled UvrD, we observe that pairs of UvrD molecules are required for long distance unwinding but that individual molecules exhibit limited, non-processive unwinding activity. UvrD is also known to exhibit two different conformations, `closed' and `open', based on the orientation of its 2B regulatory domain. The function of these conformations has remained elusive. Measuring the fluorescence of FRET labeled proteins, we detect directly the conformation of the 2B domain of individual UvrD molecules during unwinding activity. We observe that UvrD is in the `closed' conformation during DNA unwinding but surprisingly switches to the `open' conformation upon reversal of helicase direction, i.e. when UvrD switches strands and translocates on the opposing strand with the DNA junction rezipping behind it. We hypothesize that the 2B domain acts as a conformational switch that controls DNA unwinding vs. re-annealing. Work supported by NSF (PHY-082261, Center for the Physics of Living Cells) and NIH (R21 RR025341A)

  1. Optics/Optical Diagnostics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optics/Optical Diagnostics Laboratory supports graduate instruction in optics, optical and laser diagnostics and electro-optics. The optics laboratory provides...

  2. Optical Continuum Variability of the Active Galaxy Mrk 279 - Implications for Different Accretion Regimes

    CERN Document Server

    Bachev, R; Bachev, Rumen; Strigachev, Anton

    2003-01-01

    We present results from a recent broad-band monitoring in optics of the Seyfert 1 type galaxy Mrk 279. We build and analyse the BVRI light curve covering a period of seven years (1995 - 2002). We also show some evidence for the existence of two different states in brightness and suggest, based on a modelling of the optical continuum, that these states may result from transition between a thin disk and an ADAF accretion modes. We assume that the short-term variability is due to a reprocessing of a variable X-ray emission from an inner ADAF part of the flow, while the long-term one may be a result from a change of the transition radius. Our tests show a good match with the observations for a reasonable set of accretion parameters, rather close to the ones, expected for Mrk 279.

  3. RoboPol: optical polarization-plane rotations and flaring activity in blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Blinov, D; Papadakis, I E; Hovatta, T; Pearson, T J; Liodakis, I; Panopoulou, G V; Angelakis, E; Baloković, M; Das, H; Khodade, P; Kiehlmann, S; King, O G; Kus, A; Kylafis, N; Mahabal, A; Marecki, A; Modi, D; Myserlis, I; Paleologou, E; Papamastorakis, I; Pazderska, B; Pazderski, E; Rajarshi, C; Ramaprakash, A; Readhead, A C S; Reig, P; Tassis, K; Zensus, J A

    2016-01-01

    We present measurements of rotations of the optical polarization of blazars during the second year of operation of RoboPol, a monitoring programme of an unbiased sample of gamma-ray bright blazars specially designed for effective detection of such events, and we analyse the large set of rotation events discovered in two years of observation. We investigate patterns of variability in the polarization parameters and total flux density during the rotation events and compare them to the behaviour in a non-rotating state. We have searched for possible correlations between average parameters of the polarization-plane rotations and average parameters of polarization, with the following results: (1) there is no statistical association of the rotations with contemporaneous optical flares; (2) the average fractional polarization during the rotations tends to be lower than that in a non-rotating state; (3) the average fractional polarization during rotations is correlated with the rotation rate of the polarization plane...

  4. Direct optical activation of skeletal muscle fibres efficiently controls muscle contraction and attenuates denervation atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magown, Philippe; Shettar, Basavaraj; Zhang, Ying; Rafuse, Victor F

    2015-10-13

    Neural prostheses can restore meaningful function to paralysed muscles by electrically stimulating innervating motor axons, but fail when muscles are completely denervated, as seen in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or after a peripheral nerve or spinal cord injury. Here we show that channelrhodopsin-2 is expressed within the sarcolemma and T-tubules of skeletal muscle fibres in transgenic mice. This expression pattern allows for optical control of muscle contraction with comparable forces to nerve stimulation. Force can be controlled by varying light pulse intensity, duration or frequency. Light-stimulated muscle fibres depolarize proportionally to light intensity and duration. Denervated triceps surae muscles transcutaneously stimulated optically on a daily basis for 10 days show a significant attenuation in atrophy resulting in significantly greater contractile forces compared with chronically denervated muscles. Together, this study shows that channelrhodopsin-2/H134R can be used to restore function to permanently denervated muscles and reduce pathophysiological changes associated with denervation pathologies.

  5. High-resolution non-contact measurement of the electrical activity of plants in situ using optical recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dong-Jie; Chen, Yang; Wang, Zi-Yang; Xue, Lin; Mao, Tong-Lin; Liu, Yi-Min; Wang, Zhong-Yi; Huang, Lan

    2015-01-01

    The limitations of conventional extracellular recording and intracellular recording make high-resolution multisite recording of plant bioelectrical activity in situ challenging. By combining a cooled charge-coupled device camera with a voltage-sensitive dye, we recorded the action potentials in the stem of Helianthus annuus and variation potentials at multiple sites simultaneously with high spatial resolution. The method of signal processing using coherence analysis was used to determine the synchronization of the selected signals. Our results provide direct visualization of the phloem, which is the distribution region of the electrical activities in the stem and leaf of H. annuus, and verify that the phloem is the main action potential transmission route in the stems of higher plants. Finally, the method of optical recording offers a unique opportunity to map the dynamic bioelectrical activity and provides an insight into the mechanisms of long-distance electrical signal transmission in higher plants. PMID:26333536

  6. Resonance amplification of left-handed transmission at optical frequencies by stimulated emission of radiation in active metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zheng-Gao; Liu, Hui; Li, Tao; Zhu, Zhi-Hong; Wang, Shu-Ming; Cao, Jing-Xiao; Zhu, Shi-Ning; Zhang, X

    2008-12-01

    We demonstrate that left-handed resonance transmission from metallic metamaterial, composed of periodically arranged double rings, can be extended to visible spectrum by introducing an active medium layer as the substrate. The severe ohmic loss inside metals at optical frequencies is compensated by stimulated emission of radiation in this active system. Due to the resonance amplification mechanism of recently proposed lasing spaser, the left-handed transmission band can be restored up to 610 nm wavelength, in dependence on the gain coefficient of the active layer. Additionally, threshold gains for different scaling levels of the double-ring unit are investigated to evaluate the gain requirement of left-handed transmission restoration at different frequency ranges.

  7. Fiber-optic sensor active networking with distributed erbium-doped fiber and Raman amplification

    OpenAIRE

    Díaz, Silvia; Abad Valtierra, Silvia; López-Amo, Manuel

    2008-01-01

    This work is meant to provide a review of different multiplexing topologies employing distributed erbium-doped fiber and Raman amplification to solve the problem of power-loss compensation in fiber-optic sensor (FOS) networks. This is a key parameter in large multiplexing networks, particularly when employing intensity-modulated sensors. These topologies are studied both theoretically and experimentally, and a comparative analysis is carried out between them. The main parameters considered in...

  8. Optical Waveguide Lightmode Spectroscopic Techniques for Investigating Membrane-Bound Ion Channel Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Székács, Inna; Kaszás, Nóra; Gróf, Pál; Erdélyi, Katalin; Szendrő, István; Mihalik, Balázs; Pataki, Ágnes; Antoni, Ferenc A.; Madarász, Emilia

    2013-01-01

    Optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopic (OWLS) techniques were probed for monitoring ion permeation through channels incorporated into artificial lipid environment. A novel sensor set-up was developed by depositing liposomes or cell-derived membrane fragments onto hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane. The fibrous material of PTFE membrane could entrap lipoid vesicles and the water-filled pores provided environment for the hydrophilic domains of lipid-embedded proteins. The se...

  9. Magneto-optical cellular chip model for intracellular orientational-dynamic-activity detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashita, Y.; Iwasaka, M.; Kurita, S.; Owada, N.

    2012-04-01

    In the present study, a magneto-optical cellular chip model (MoCCM) was developed to detect intracellular dynamics in macromolecules by using magneto-optical effects. For the purpose of cell-measurement under strong static magnetic fields of up to 10 T, we constructed a cellular chip model, which was a thin glass plate with a well for a cell culture. A cell line of osteoblast MC3T3-E1 was incubated in the glass well, and the well, 0.3 mm in depth, was sealed by a cover glass when the MoCCM was set in a fiber optic system. An initial intensity change of the polarized light transmission, which dispersed perpendicular to the cell's attaching surface, was collected for 10 to 60 min, and then magnetic fields were applied parallel and perpendicular to the surface and light direction, respectively. The magnetic birefringence signals that originated from the magnetic orientation of intracellular molecules such as cytoskeletons apparently appeared when the magnetic fields were constant at 10 T. A statistical analysis with 15 experiments confirmed that the cellular components under 10 T magnetic fields caused a stronger alignment, which was transferred into polarizing light intensity that increased more than the case before exposure. Cellular conditions such as generation and cell density affected the magnetic birefringence signals.

  10. Temporal Correlations Between Optical and Gamma-ray Activity in Blazars

    CERN Document Server

    Cohen, Daniel P; Filippenko, Alexei V; Cenko, S Bradley; Lott, Benoit; Zheng, WeiKang; Li, Weidong

    2014-01-01

    We have been using the 0.76-m Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT) at Lick Observatory to optically monitor a sample of 157 blazars that are bright in $\\gamma$-rays, being detected with high significance (test-statistic TS $> 100$, i.e., $\\ge 10\\sigma$) in one year by the Large Area Telescope (LAT) on the {\\it Fermi} Gamma-ray Space Telescope. We attempt to observe each source on a 3-day cadence with KAIT, subject to weather and seasonal visibility. The $\\gamma$-ray coverage is essentially continuous. KAIT observations extend over much of the 5-year Fermi mission for several objects, and most have $>$100 optical measurements spanning the last three years. These blazars (flat-spectrum radio quasars and BL Lac objects) exhibit a wide range of flaring behavior. Using the discrete correlation function (DCF), here we search for temporal relationships between optical and $\\gamma$-ray light curves in the 40 brightest sources in hopes of placing constraints on blazar acceleration and emission zones. We find str...

  11. Module greenhouse with high efficiency of transformation of solar energy, utilizing active and passive glass optical rasters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korecko, J.; Jirka, V. [ENKI, o.p.s., Dukelska 145, 379 01 Trebon (Czech Republic); Sourek, B. [ENKI, o.p.s., Dukelska 145, 379 01 Trebon (Czech Republic); Czech Technical University of Prague, Technicka 4, 166 07 Prague (Czech Republic); Cerveny, J. [ENKI, o.p.s., Dukelska 145, 379 01 Trebon (Czech Republic); Institute of Physical Biology, Zamek 136, 373 33 Nove Hrady (Czech Republic)

    2010-10-15

    Since the eighties of the 20th century, various types of linear glass rasters for architectural usage have been developed in the Czech Republic made by the continuous melting technology. The development was focused on two main groups of rasters - active rasters with linear Fresnel lenses in fixed installation and with movable photo-thermal and/or photo-thermal/photo-voltaic absorbers. The second group are passive rasters based on total reflection of rays on an optical prism. During the last years we have been working on their standardization, exact measuring of their optical and thermal-technical characteristics and on creation of a final product that could be applied in solar architecture. With the project supported by the Ministry of Environment of the Czech Republic we were able to build an experimental greenhouse using these active and passive optical glass rasters. The project followed the growing number of technical objectives. The concept of the greenhouse consisted of interdependence construction - structural design of the greenhouse with its technological equipment securing the required temperature and humidity conditions in the interior of the greenhouse. This article aims to show the merits of the proposed scheme and presents the results of the mathematical model in the TRNSYS environment through which we could predict the future energy balance carried out similar works, thus optimizing the investment and operating costs. In this article description of various technology applications for passive and active utilization of solar radiation is presented, as well as some results of short-term and long-term experiments, including evaluation of 1-year operation of the greenhouse from the energy and interior temperature viewpoints. A comparison of the calculated energy flows in the greenhouse to real measured values, for verification of the installed model is also involved. (author)

  12. Optical recording of neuronal activity with a genetically-encoded calcium indicator in anesthetized and freely moving mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Lütcke

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescent calcium (Ca2+ indicator proteins (FCIPs are promising tools for functional imaging of cellular activity in living animals. However, they have still not reached their full potential for in vivo imaging of neuronal activity due to limitations in expression levels, dynamic range, and sensitivity for reporting action potentials. Here, we report that viral expression of the ratiometric Ca2+ sensor yellow cameleon 3.60 (YC3.60 in pyramidal neurons of mouse barrel cortex enables in vivo measurement of neuronal activity with high dynamic range and sensitivity across multiple spatial scales. By combining juxtacellular recordings and two-photon imaging in vitro and in vivo, we demonstrate that YC3.60 can resolve single action potential (AP-evoked Ca2+ transients and reliably reports bursts of APs with negligible saturation. Spontaneous and whisker-evoked Ca2+ transients were detected in individual apical dendrites and somata as well as in local neuronal populations. Moreover, bulk measurements using wide-field imaging or fiber-optics revealed sensory-evoked YC3.60 signals in large areas of the barrel field. Fiber-optic recordings in particular enabled measurements in awake, freely moving mice and revealed complex Ca2+ dynamics, possibly reflecting different behavior-related brain states. Viral expression of YC3.60 - in combination with various optical techniques - thus opens a multitude of opportunities for functional studies of the neural basis of animal behavior, from dendrites to the levels of local and large-scale neuronal populations.

  13. Scintillating glass, fiber-optic plate detectors for active target and tracking applications in high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have been developing a scintillating glass fiber-optic imaging system for active target and tracking applications in high energy physics experiments. Extensive measurements have been performed on several scintillating-glass compositions, one of which is a silicate-glass containing 0.6 mole % of Ce2O3 known commercially as NRL glass. For this material, fabricated into coherent fiber-optic plates of 10 μm and 25 μm diameter cladded-glass fibers, have observed clear particle tracks and interactions and a yield of about 2 photoelectrons per millimeter of path length for minimum ionizing particles. Additionally, for the bulk NRL glass formed in disks of 1'' diameter and 4 mm thickness, we have observed a about 80% retention of optical transmission through 4 mm of material at 395 mm (the peak of the fluorescence spectrum) for a radiation dose in excess of 107 rads acquired over several days. Results of these tests and others suggest that Ce2O3 based scintillating glasses constitute very promising materials for the fabrication of high resolution tracking detectors for fixed target and colliding beam applications

  14. Structural, morphological, optical and antibacterial activity of rod-shaped zinc oxide and manganese-doped zinc oxide nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A DHANALAKSHMI; B NATARAJAN; V RAMADAS; A PALANIMURUGAN; S THANIKAIKARASAN

    2016-10-01

    Pure ZnO and Mn-doped ZnO nanoparticles were synthesized by Co-precipitate method. The structural characterizations of the nanoparticles were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. UV–Vis, FTIR and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy were used for analysingthe optical properties of the nanoparticles. XRD results revealed the formation of ZnO and Mn-doped ZnO nanoparticles with wurtzite crystal structure having average crystalline size of 39 and 20 nm. From UV–Vis studies, the optical band-gap energy of 3.20 and 3.25 eV was obtained for ZnO and Mn-doped ZnO nanoparticles, respectively. FTIR spectra confirm the presence of ZnO and Mn-doped ZnO nanoparticles. Photoluminescence analysis of all samples showed four main emission bands: a strong UV emission band, a weak blue band, a weak blue–green band and a weak green band indicating their high structural and optical qualities. The antibacterial efficiency of ZnO and Mn-doped ZnO nanoparticles were studied using disc diffusion method. The Mn-dopedZnO nanoparticles show better antibacterial activity when higher doping level is 10 at% and has longer duration of time.

  15. The search for active black holes in nearby low-mass galaxies using optical and mid-IR data

    CERN Document Server

    Sartori, Lia F; Treister, Ezequiel; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Koss, Michael; Shirazi, Maryam; Oh, Kyuseok

    2015-01-01

    We investigated AGN activity in low-mass galaxies, an important regime that can shed light onto BH formation and evolution, and their interaction with their host galaxies. We identified 336 AGN candidates from a parent sample of $\\sim 48,000$ nearby low-mass galaxies ($M_{\\rm \\star} \\leq 10^{9.5}M_\\odot$, $z < 0.1$) in the SDSS. We selected the AGN using the classical BPT diagram, a similar optical emission line diagnostic based on the HeII$\\lambda$4686 line, and mid-IR color cuts. Different criteria select host galaxies with different physical properties such as stellar mass and optical color, and only 3 out of 336 sources fulfill all three criteria. This could be in part due to selection biases. The resulting AGN fraction of $\\sim 0.7 \\%$ is at least one order of magnitude below the one estimated for more massive galaxies. At optical wavelengths, the HeII-based AGN selection appears to be more sensitive to AGN hosted in star-forming galaxies than the classical BPT diagram, at least in the low-mass regime...

  16. Correlation between prefrontal cortex activity during working memory tasks and natural mood independent of personality effects: an optical topography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Ryuta; Sato, Hiroki; Katura, Takusige; Matsuda, Ryoichi; Koizumi, Hideaki

    2013-04-30

    Interactions between mood and cognition have drawn much attention in the fields of psychology and neuroscience. Recent neuroimaging studies have examined a neural basis of the mood-cognition interaction that which emphasize the role of the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Although these studies have shown that natural mood variations among participants are correlated with PFC activity during cognitive tasks, they did not control for personality differences. Our aim in this study was to clarify the relationship between natural mood and PFC activity by partialling out the effects of personality. Forty healthy adults completed self-report questionnaires assessing natural mood (the Profile of Mood States) and personality (the NEO Five-Factor Inventory and the Behavioral Inhibition/Activation Systems scales). They performed verbal and spatial working memory (WM) tasks while their PFC activity was measured using optical topography, a non-invasive, low-constraint neuroimaging tool. Correlation analysis showed that the level of negative mood was inversely associated with PFC activity during the verbal WM task, which replicated our previous findings. Furthermore, the negative correlation between negative mood and PFC activity remained significant after controlling for participants' personality traits, suggesting that natural mood is an independent contributing factor of PFC activity during verbal WM tasks.

  17. An all-optical switch of Mach-Zehnder interferometer type using an active fibre ring resonator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Jun-Qing; Alireza Bananej; Li Qiang-Hua; Chen Qiang; Li Chun-Fei

    2004-01-01

    We propose an all-optical switch of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer type using an active nonlinear ring resonatorand analyse the significance of the parameter A, a product of gain and total loss, for performing an ideal 1 by 2switch. We found that in the range of 1 - κ≤ A ≤√/1 - k, the increment of A can compensate the losses insidethe ring, therefore increase the finesse of the ring and enhance the nonlinearity contribution to reduce the switchingpower threshold effectively. We also emphasize the importance of the initial switching point and discuss the feasibilityof utilizing a high-nonlinear fibre in the ring.

  18. A scintillating glass fiber-optic active target for vertex detection and tracking applications in high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high resolution, fast gateable active target has been developed for Fermilab experiment E687 in order to study charm and beauty particle production and decay in high energy photon and hadron induced processes. The detector consists of a GS1 Cerium scintillating glass fiber-optic target, a multi-stage image intensifier and CCD camera system used in conjunction with a custom-built video data acquisition system. We currently detect ≤ 4 photoelectrons per mm with a resolution per photoelectron of σ/sub pe/ < 25 μm

  19. A scintillating glass fiber-optic active target for vertex detection and tracking applications in high energy physics experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high resolution, fast gateable active target has been developed for Fermilab experiment E687 in order to study charm and beauty particle production and decay in high energy photon and hadron induced processes. The detector consists of a GS1 Cerium scintillating glass fiber-optic target, a multi-stage image intensifier and CCD camera system used in conjunction with a custom-built video data acquisition system. The authors currently detect ≤ 4 photoelectrons per mm with a resolution per photoelectron of σ/sub pe/ < 25μm

  20. Coherent combining of fiber-laser-pumped frequency converters using all fiber electro-optic modulator for active phase control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourdon, P.; Durécu, A.; Canat, G.; Le Gouët, J.; Goular, D.; Lombard, L.

    2015-03-01

    Coherent beam combining (CBC) by active phase control could be useful for power scaling fiber-laser-pumped optical frequency converters like OPOs. However, a phase modulator operating at the frequency-converted wavelength is needed, which is non standard component. Fortunately, nonlinear conversion processes rely on a phase-matching condition correlating, not only the wave vectors of the coupled waves, but also their phases. This paper demonstrates that, using this phase correlation for indirect control of the phase, coherent combining of optical frequency converters is feasible using standard all-fibered electro-optic modulators. For the sake of demonstration, this new technique is experimentally applied twice for continuous wave second-harmonic-generator (SHG) combination: i) combining 2 SHG of 1.55-μm erbium-doped fiber amplifiers in PPLN crystals generating 775-nm beams; ii) combining 2 SHG of 1.064-μm ytterbium-doped fiber amplifiers in LBO crystals generating 532-nm beams. Excellent CBC efficiency is achieved on the harmonic waves in both these experiments, with λ/20 and λ/30 residual phase error respectively. In the second experiment, I/Q phase detection is added on fundamental and harmonic waves to measure their phase variations simultaneously. These measurements confirm the theoretical expectations and formulae of correlation between the phases of the fundamental and harmonic waves. Unexpectedly, in both experiments, when harmonic waves are phase-locked, a residual phase difference remains between the fundamen tal waves. Measurements of the spectrum of these residual phase differences locate them above 50 Hz, revealing that they most probably originate in fast-varying optical path differences induced by turbulence and acoustic-waves on the experimental breadboard.

  1. Optical imaging of neuronal activity and visualization of fine neural structures in non-desheathed nervous systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher John Goldsmith

    Full Text Available Locating circuit neurons and recording from them with single-cell resolution is a prerequisite for studying neural circuits. Determining neuron location can be challenging even in small nervous systems because neurons are densely packed, found in different layers, and are often covered by ganglion and nerve sheaths that impede access for recording electrodes and neuronal markers. We revisited the voltage-sensitive dye RH795 for its ability to stain and record neurons through the ganglion sheath. Bath-application of RH795 stained neuronal membranes in cricket, earthworm and crab ganglia without removing the ganglion sheath, revealing neuron cell body locations in different ganglion layers. Using the pyloric and gastric mill central pattern generating neurons in the stomatogastric ganglion (STG of the crab, Cancer borealis, we found that RH795 permeated the ganglion without major residue in the sheath and brightly stained somatic, axonal and dendritic membranes. Visibility improved significantly in comparison to unstained ganglia, allowing the identification of somata location and number of most STG neurons. RH795 also stained axons and varicosities in non-desheathed nerves, and it revealed the location of sensory cell bodies in peripheral nerves. Importantly, the spike activity of the sensory neuron AGR, which influences the STG motor patterns, remained unaffected by RH795, while desheathing caused significant changes in AGR activity. With respect to recording neural activity, RH795 allowed us to optically record membrane potential changes of sub-sheath neuronal membranes without impairing sensory activity. The signal-to-noise ratio was comparable with that previously observed in desheathed preparations and sufficiently high to identify neurons in single-sweep recordings and synaptic events after spike-triggered averaging. In conclusion, RH795 enabled staining and optical recording of neurons through the ganglion sheath and is therefore both a

  2. Optical Imaging of Neuronal Activity and Visualization of Fine Neural Structures in Non-Desheathed Nervous Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Locating circuit neurons and recording from them with single-cell resolution is a prerequisite for studying neural circuits. Determining neuron location can be challenging even in small nervous systems because neurons are densely packed, found in different layers, and are often covered by ganglion and nerve sheaths that impede access for recording electrodes and neuronal markers. We revisited the voltage-sensitive dye RH795 for its ability to stain and record neurons through the ganglion sheath. Bath-application of RH795 stained neuronal membranes in cricket, earthworm and crab ganglia without removing the ganglion sheath, revealing neuron cell body locations in different ganglion layers. Using the pyloric and gastric mill central pattern generating neurons in the stomatogastric ganglion (STG) of the crab, Cancer borealis, we found that RH795 permeated the ganglion without major residue in the sheath and brightly stained somatic, axonal and dendritic membranes. Visibility improved significantly in comparison to unstained ganglia, allowing the identification of somata location and number of most STG neurons. RH795 also stained axons and varicosities in non-desheathed nerves, and it revealed the location of sensory cell bodies in peripheral nerves. Importantly, the spike activity of the sensory neuron AGR, which influences the STG motor patterns, remained unaffected by RH795, while desheathing caused significant changes in AGR activity. With respect to recording neural activity, RH795 allowed us to optically record membrane potential changes of sub-sheath neuronal membranes without impairing sensory activity. The signal-to-noise ratio was comparable with that previously observed in desheathed preparations and sufficiently high to identify neurons in single-sweep recordings and synaptic events after spike-triggered averaging. In conclusion, RH795 enabled staining and optical recording of neurons through the ganglion sheath and is therefore both a good anatomical

  3. Optically readout write once read many memory with single active organic layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Viet Cuong; Lee, Pooi See, E-mail: pslee@ntu.edu.sg [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, Singapore, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2016-01-18

    An optically readable write once read many memory (WORM) in Ag/Poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH PPV)/ITO is demonstrated in this work. Utilising characteristics of the organic light emitting diode structure of Ag/MEH PPV/ITO and electrochemical metallization of Ag, a WORM with light emitting capability can be realised. The simple fabrication process and multifunction capability of the device can be useful for future wearable optoelectronics and photomemory applications, where fast and parallel readout can be achieved by photons.

  4. Plasmonic Vesicles of Amphiphilic Nanocrystals: Optically Active Multifunctional Platform for Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jibin; Huang, Peng; Duan, Hongwei; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-09-15

    Vesicular structures with compartmentalized, water-filled cavities, such as liposomes of natural and synthetic amphiphiles, have tremendous potential applications in nanomedicine. When block copolymers self-assemble, the result is polymersomes with tailored structural properties and built-in releasing mechanisms, controlled by stimuli-responsive polymer building blocks. More recently, chemists are becoming interested in multifunctional hybrid vesicles containing inorganic nanocrystals with unique optical, electronic, and magnetic properties. In this Account, we review our recent progress in assembling amphiphilic plasmonic nanostructures to create a new class of multifunctional hybrid vesicles and applying them towards cancer diagnosis and therapy. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) gives plasmonic nanomaterials a unique set of optical properties that are potentially useful for both biosensing and nanomedicine. For instance, the strong light scattering at their LSPR wavelength opens up the applications of plasmonic nanostructures in single particle plasmonic imaging. Their superior photothermal conversion properties, on the other hand, make them excellent transducers for photothermal ablation and contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging. Of particular note for ultrasensitive detection is that the confined electromagnetic field resulting from excitation of LSPR can give rise to highly efficient surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for molecules in close proximity. We have explored several ways to combine well-defined plasmonic nanocrystals with amphiphilic polymer brushes of diverse chemical functionalities. In multiple systems, we have shown that the polymer grafts impart amphiphilicity-driven self-assembly to the hybrid nanoparticles. This has allowed us to synthesize well-defined vesicles in which we have embedded plasmonic nanocrystals in the shell of collapsed hydrophobic polymers. The hydrophilic brushes extend into external and interior aqueous

  5. Plasmonic Vesicles of Amphiphilic Nanocrystals: Optically Active Multifunctional Platform for Cancer Diagnosis and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jibin; Huang, Peng; Duan, Hongwei; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-09-15

    Vesicular structures with compartmentalized, water-filled cavities, such as liposomes of natural and synthetic amphiphiles, have tremendous potential applications in nanomedicine. When block copolymers self-assemble, the result is polymersomes with tailored structural properties and built-in releasing mechanisms, controlled by stimuli-responsive polymer building blocks. More recently, chemists are becoming interested in multifunctional hybrid vesicles containing inorganic nanocrystals with unique optical, electronic, and magnetic properties. In this Account, we review our recent progress in assembling amphiphilic plasmonic nanostructures to create a new class of multifunctional hybrid vesicles and applying them towards cancer diagnosis and therapy. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) gives plasmonic nanomaterials a unique set of optical properties that are potentially useful for both biosensing and nanomedicine. For instance, the strong light scattering at their LSPR wavelength opens up the applications of plasmonic nanostructures in single particle plasmonic imaging. Their superior photothermal conversion properties, on the other hand, make them excellent transducers for photothermal ablation and contrast agents for photoacoustic imaging. Of particular note for ultrasensitive detection is that the confined electromagnetic field resulting from excitation of LSPR can give rise to highly efficient surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for molecules in close proximity. We have explored several ways to combine well-defined plasmonic nanocrystals with amphiphilic polymer brushes of diverse chemical functionalities. In multiple systems, we have shown that the polymer grafts impart amphiphilicity-driven self-assembly to the hybrid nanoparticles. This has allowed us to synthesize well-defined vesicles in which we have embedded plasmonic nanocrystals in the shell of collapsed hydrophobic polymers. The hydrophilic brushes extend into external and interior aqueous

  6. Research on the structure in solution of optically active synthetic polymers (propylene polysulphide, propylene polyoxide, tertio-butyl polysulphide)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was proposed to study the structure of sulphur-containing synthetic polymers, stereo-regular, optically active in solution and able to adopt a spiral conformation, with special reference to propylene polysulphide. Two methods were used, the first mathematical (conformational energy calculations) and the second physico-chemical, essentially spectroscopic. By conformational analysis it is possible to choose the most probable structures liable to be adopted by a given polymer in solution while the spectro-polarimetric study should, in principle, invalidate or confirm certain of these hypotheses. The conformational energy calculations showed that in fact there is no energy conformation low enough to be stable in solution. Strictly speaking however we can refer to a region of stability in which steric hindrance is low and many energy minima exist. These minima are indistinguishable both by their energy values and by their spatial localizations and are all enclosed in the region bounded by the barriers due to steric hindrance. This uncertainty does not arise from approximations made in the calculations, but from the multitude of stereochemical structure possible. Investigations into the variation of the optical rotary dispersion and the circular dichroism as a function of temperature indicated the existence of three or more equilibrium states in the dioxane. The spectra appear to be the summation of the optical activities of the numerous simultaneously possible conformations. It appears that polymers, such as propylene polysulphide or propylene polyoxide do not have stable structures in solution. These are molecules of great flexibility possessing a large number of degrees of freedom. These properties distinguish them from the natural polymers, carrying precise information, such as DNA which must consequently have stable conformations. (author)

  7. RoboPol: optical polarization-plane rotations and flaring activity in blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinov, D.; Pavlidou, V.; Papadakis, I. E.; Hovatta, T.; Pearson, T. J.; Liodakis, I.; Panopoulou, G. V.; Angelakis, E.; Baloković, M.; Das, H.; Khodade, P.; Kiehlmann, S.; King, O. G.; Kus, A.; Kylafis, N.; Mahabal, A.; Marecki, A.; Modi, D.; Myserlis, I.; Paleologou, E.; Papamastorakis, I.; Pazderska, B.; Pazderski, E.; Rajarshi, C.; Ramaprakash, A.; Readhead, A. C. S.; Reig, P.; Tassis, K.; Zensus, J. A.

    2016-04-01

    We present measurements of rotations of the optical polarization of blazars during the second year of operation of RoboPol, a monitoring programme of an unbiased sample of gamma-ray bright blazars specially designed for effective detection of such events, and we analyse the large set of rotation events discovered in two years of observation. We investigate patterns of variability in the polarization parameters and total flux density during the rotation events and compare them to the behaviour in a non-rotating state. We have searched for possible correlations between average parameters of the polarization-plane rotations and average parameters of polarization, with the following results: (1) there is no statistical association of the rotations with contemporaneous optical flares; (2) the average fractional polarization during the rotations tends to be lower than that in a non-rotating state; (3) the average fractional polarization during rotations is correlated with the rotation rate of the polarization plane in the jet rest frame; (4) it is likely that distributions of amplitudes and durations of the rotations have physical upper bounds, so arbitrarily long rotations are not realized in nature.

  8. Enhanced magneto-optic activity of magnetite-based ferrofluids subjected to gamma irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devi, Manasi; Das, Rupali; Mohanta, Dambarudhar; Baruah, Kishor Kumar [Tezpur University, Nanoscience and Soft Matter Laboratory, Department of Physics, PO Napaam, Assam (India); Saha, Abhijit [UGC-DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, Kolkata Centre, Kolkata (India)

    2012-03-15

    We report here the effect of {gamma}-irradiation on the particle size and size distribution dependent spectroscopic and magneto-optic properties of ferrofluids, synthesized by a co-precipitation method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) study exhibits magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) phase of the particles while electron microscopic and dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies have predicted particle growth upon {gamma}-irradiation. Further, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy studies ensured that no dissociation has occurred due to irradiation effect. As a consequence of magneto-optic behavior reflected in the Faraday rotation (FR) measurement, the Verdet constant increased from a value of 0.64 x 10{sup -2} for the pristine sample to 5.6 x 10{sup -2} deg/Gauss-cm for the sample irradiated with the highest dose (2.635 kGy). The substantial enhancement in the FR is assigned to the improvement in associated chaining effect owing to adequate particle growth where an increased stoichiometry variation of Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} is assured. (orig.)

  9. Identification of Active Galactic Nuclei through HST optical variability in the GOODS South field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliasis, Ektoras; Georgantopoulos; Bonanos, A.; HCV Team

    2016-08-01

    This work aims to identify AGN in the GOODS South deep field through optical variability. This method can easily identify low-luminosity AGN. In particular, we use images in the z-band obtained from the Hubble Space Telescope with the ACS/WFC camera over 5 epochs separated by ~45 days. Aperture photometry has been performed using SExtractor to extract the lightcurves. Several variability indices, such as the median absolute deviation, excess variance, and sigma were applied to automatically identify the variable sources. After removing artifacts, stars and supernovae from the variable selected sample and keeping only those sources with known photometric or spectroscopic redshift, the optical variability was compared to variability in other wavelengths (X-rays, mid-IR, radio). This multi-wavelength study provides important constraints on the structure and the properties of the AGN and their relation to their hosts. This work is a part of the validation of the Hubble Catalog of Variables (HCV) project, which has been launched at the National Observatory of Athens by ESA, and aims to identify all sources (pointlike and extended) showing variability, based on the Hubble Source Catalog (HSC, Whitmore et al. 2015). The HSC version 1 was released in February 2015 and includes 80 million sources imaged with the WFPC2, ACS/WFC, WFC3/UVIS and WFC3/IR cameras.

  10. In-vivo imaging of stimulus-evoked intrinsic optical signals correlated with retinal activation in anesthetized frog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xin-Cheng; Zhang, Qiu-Xiang; Li, Yang-Guo

    2011-09-01

    Intrinsic optical signal imaging (IOS) promises a noninvasive method for high resolution examination of retinal function. Using freshly isolated animal retinas, we have conducted a series of experiments to test fast IOSs which have time courses comparable to electrophysiological kinetics. In this article, we demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo imaging of fast IOSs correlated with retinal activation in anesthetized frog (Rana Pipiens). A rapid (68,000 lines/s) line-scan confocal ophthalmoscope was constructed to achieve high-speed (200 frames/s) near infared (NIR) recording of fast IOSs. By rejecting out-of-focus background light, the line-scan confocal imager provided enough resolution to differentiate individual photoreceptors in vivo. With visible light stimulation, NIR confocal images disclosed transient IOSs with time courses comparable to retinal ERG kinetics. High-resolution IOS images revealed both positive (increasing) and negative (decreasing) light responses, with sub-cellular complexity, in the activated retina.

  11. Simultaneous production of l-lactic acid with high optical activity and a soil amendment with food waste that demonstrates plant growth promoting activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitpreechavanich, Vichien; Hayami, Arisa; Talek, Anfal; Chin, Clament Fui Seung; Tashiro, Yukihiro; Sakai, Kenji

    2016-07-01

    A unique method to produce highly optically-active l-lactic acid and soil amendments that promote plant growth from food waste was proposed. Three Bacillus strains Bacillus subtilis KBKU21, B. subtilis N3-9 and Bacillus coagulans T27, were used. Strain KBKU21 accumulated 36.9 g/L l-lactic acid with 95.7% optical activity and 98.2% l-lactic acid selectivity when fermented at 43°C for 84 h in a model kitchen refuse (MKR) medium. Residual precipitate fraction (anaerobically-fermented MKR (AFM) compost) analysis revealed 4.60%, 0.70% and 0.75% of nitrogen (as N), phosphorous (as P2O5), and potassium (as K2O), respectively. Additionally, the carbon to nitrogen ratio decreased from 13.3 to 10.6. AFM compost with KBKU21 promoted plant growth parameters, including leaf length, plant height and fresh weight of Brassica rapa (Komatsuna), than that by chemical fertilizers or commercial compost. The concept provides an incentive for the complete recycling of food waste, contributing towards a sustainable production system. PMID:26819060

  12. Optical identification of radio-loud active galactic nuclei in the ROSAT-Green-Bank sample with SDSS spectroscopy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-Liang Wang; Jian-Guo Wang; Xiao-Bo Dong

    2009-01-01

    Results of extended and refined optical identification of 181 radio/X-ray sources in the RASS-Green Bank (RGB) catalog are presented (Brinkmann et al.1997)which have been spectroscopically observed in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)DR5.The SDSS spectra of the optical counterparts are modeled in a careful and selfconsistent way by incorporating the host galaxy's starlight.Optical emission line parameters are presented,which are derived accurately and reliably,along with the radio 1.4-5 GHz spectral indices estimated using (non-simultaneous) archival data.For 72 sources,the identifications are presented for the first time.It is confirmed that the majority of strong radio/X-ray emitters are radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGNs),particularly blazars.Taking advantage of the high spectral quality and resolution and our refined spectral modeling,we are able to disentangle narrow line radio galaxies (NLRGs),as vaguely termed in most previous identification work,into SeyfertⅡgalaxies and LINERs (low-ionization nuclear emission regions),based on the standard emission line diagnostics.The NLRGs in the RGB sample,mostly belonging to'weak line radio galaxies',are found to have optical spectra consistent predominantly with LINERs,and only a small fraction with SeyfertⅡgalaxies.A small number of LINERs have radio power as high as 1023-1026W Hz-1 at 5 GHz,being among the strongest radio emitting LINERs known so far.Two sources are identified with radio-loud narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLSIs),a class of rare objects.The presence is also confirmed of fiat-spectrum radio quasars whose radio-optical-X-ray effective spectral indices are similar to those of High-energy peaked BL Lacs (HBLs),as suggested by Padovani et al.,although it is still a debate as to whether this is the case for their actual spectral energy distributions.

  13. Analysis of originating ultra-short optical dissipative solitary pulses in the actively mode-locked semiconductor heterolasers with an external fiber cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, Alexandre S.; Campos Acosta, Joaquin; Pons Aglio, Alicia; Moreno Zarate, Pedro; Mansurova, Svetlana

    2010-06-01

    We present an advanced approach to describing low-power trains of bright picosecond optical dissipative solitary pulses with an internal frequency modulation in practically important case of exploiting semiconductor heterolaser operating in near-infrared range in the active mode-locking regime. In the chosen schematic arrangement, process of the active mode-locking is caused by a hybrid nonlinear cavity consisting of this heterolaser and an external rather long single-mode optical fiber exhibiting square-law dispersion, cubic Kerr nonlinearity, and small linear optical losses. Our analysis of shaping dissipative solitary pulses includes three principal contributions associated with the modulated gain, total optical losses, as well as with linear and nonlinear phase shifts. In fact, various trains of the non-interacting to one another optical dissipative solitons appear within simultaneous balance between the second-order dispersion and cubic-law Kerr nonlinearity as well as between active medium gain and linear optical losses in a hybrid cavity. Our specific approach makes possible taking the modulating signals providing non-conventional composite regimes of a multi-pulse active mode-locking. Within our model, a contribution of the appearing nonlinear Ginzburg-Landau operator to the parameters of dissipative solitary pulses is described via exploiting an approximate variational procedure involving the technique of trial functions.

  14. Qualitative analysis of ultra-short optical dissipative solitary pulses in the actively mode-locked semiconductor heterolasers with an external fiber cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, Alexandre S.; Campos Acosta, Joaquin; Moreno Zarate, Pedro; Pons Aglio, Alicia

    2011-02-01

    An advanced qualitative characterization of simultaneously existing various low-power trains of ultra-short optical pulses with an internal frequency modulation in a distributed laser system based on semiconductor heterostructure is presented. The scheme represents a hybrid cavity consisting of a single-mode heterolaser operating in the active mode-locking regime and an external long single-mode optical fiber exhibiting square-law dispersion, cubic Kerr nonlinearity, and linear optical losses. In fact, we consider the trains of optical dissipative solitons, which appear within double balance between the second-order dispersion and cubic-law nonlinearity as well as between the active-medium gain and linear optical losses in a hybrid cavity. Moreover, we operate on specially designed modulating signals providing non-conventional composite regimes of simultaneous multi-pulse active mode-locking. As a result, the mode-locking process allows shaping regular trains of picosecond optical pulses excited by multi-pulse independent on each other sequences of periodic modulations. In so doing, we consider the arranged hybrid cavity as a combination of a quasi-linear part responsible for the active mode-locking by itself and a nonlinear part determining the regime of dissipative soliton propagation. Initially, these parts are analyzed individually, and then the primarily obtained data are coordinated with each other. Within this approach, a contribution of the appeared cubically nonlinear Ginzburg-Landau operator is analyzed via exploiting an approximate variational procedure involving the technique of trial functions.

  15. Fibre-optic communications

    CERN Document Server

    Lecoy, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    This book describes in a comprehensive manner the components and systems of fiber optic communications and networks. The first section explains the theory of multimode and single-mode fibers, then the technological features, including manufacturing, cabling, and connecting. The second section describes the various components (passive and active optical components, integrated optics, opto-electronic transmitters and receivers, and optical amplifiers) used in fiber optic systems. Finally, the optical transmission system design is explained, and applications to optical networks and fiber optic se

  16. Mechanics of Magnetostrictive Thin Film Deformation and its Application in Active X-ray Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoli

    High quality imaging system of telescopes in astronomy requires innovations to remove or correct the mid-spatial frequency (MSF) ripples on the mirror surface of lightweight optics. When the telescope is sent to the space, its launch mass is the key point to limit its collecting area. Therefore, the lightweight optics (100-150 mum thick electroplated nickel/cobalt, or 200-400 mum thick glass) is considered to be employed. However, the surface profile of the thin optical surface can't be polished to extremely high accuracy. Instead, the profile is expected to be corrected by applying voltage or magnetic field to drive the coating of smart materials (piezo or magnetostrictive materials) on the back side of the mirrors. During the process, the surface profile correction by the local stress on the 2-d surface is challenging. Both the measurements and the theoretical prediction of the surface profiles after correction are investigated. As a first step in the development of tools to predict the deformation of the coated glass strip samples (20x5x0.1 mm), one commercial magnetically smart material (MSM) was deposited on the samples by the magnetron sputtering method. One experimental setup was established to measure the deflections of these coated samples under an external magnetic field by Zygo NewView white light interferometry (WLI). These deflections agreed well with the results from the developed analytical and numerical analysis under various magnetic field strengths. In the further research, more efforts were made to analyze the full three-dimensional deformation behavior of MSM thin films on a square glass sample (50x50x0.2 mm). With the magnetic field applied, the 2-d surface profile of the coated glass sample was measured by WLI. To better study the deformation of the sample coated with MSMs, a finite element method (FEM) and a theoretical model were developed to predict the deformation of the sample with local misfit strains. The results calculated form the FEM

  17. Optical Topography of Evoked Brain Activity during Mental Tasks Involving Whole Number Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Students start to memorize arithmetic facts from early elementary school mathematics activities. Their fluency or lack of fluency with these facts could affect their efforts as they carry out mental calculations as adults. This study investigated participants' levels of brain activation and possible reasons for these levels as they solved…

  18. Photonic crystal rod fibers: Understanding a new class of active optical waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurila, Marko

    of the rod fiber is evaluated in high power laser and laser amplifier configurations. The high power rod amplifier setup including the seed source is developed and characterized. Results obtained from the rod fiber showed simultaneously SM, near diffraction limited output beam quality with high average power...... which can accurately resolve propagation modes and their weights in optical waveguides to examine guiding properties and single-mode (SM) operation of different PCFs. A spatially and spectrally resolved (S2) imaging setup is developed to evaluate the SM properties of flexible PCF with a 40 μm core...... and pulse energy generation using both laser and laser amplifier configurations. Modal instabilities (MIs) in high power fiber amplifiers are discussed, and a memory effect of the MI threshold level together with a recovery method and evidence of improved performance while suppressing MIs are reported...

  19. Synthesis and Characterization of Optically Active Fractal Seed Mediated Silver Nickel Bimetallic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Adeyemi Adekoya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of new seed mediated AgNi allied bimetallic nanocomposites was successfully carried out by the successive reduction of the metal ions in diethylene glycol, ethylene glycol, glycerol, and pentaerythritol solutions, with concomitant precipitation of Ag/Ni bimetal sols. The optical measurement revealed the existence of distinct band edge with surface plasmon resonance (SPR in the region of 400–425 nm and excitonic emission with maximum peak at 382 nm which were reminiscent of cluster-in-cluster surface enriched bimetallic silver-nickel sols. The morphological characterization by transmission electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction analyses complimented by surface scan using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy strongly supported the formation of intimately alloyed face-centered silver/nickel nanoclusters.

  20. High-quality MOVPE butt-joint integration of InP/AlGaInAs/InGaAsP-based all-active optical components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulkova, Irina; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; Kuznetsova, Nadezda;

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the applicability of MOVPE butt-joint regrowth for integration of all-active InP/AlGaAs/InGaAsP optical components and the realization of high-functionality compact photonic devices. Planar high-quality integration of semiconductor optical amplifiers of various epi......-structures with a multi-quantum well electro-absorption modulator has been successfully performed and their optical and crystalline quality was experimentally investigated. The regrown multi-quantum well material exhibits a slight bandgap blue-shift of less than 20 meV, when moving away from the regrowth interface...

  1. Enantioselective S - H and C - H insertions with optically active Rh(II) and Cu(II) catalysts. Asymmetric catalysis, 58

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The substrates for the S - H insertion reaction were azibutanone 2 and thiophenol 3. Methyl 2-diazo-3-oxo-heptane-carboxylate 26 was used as the substrate in an intramolecular C - H insertion. Both reactions were carried out enantioselectively in the presence of optically active rhodium(II) and copper(II) catalysts. For the S - H insertion optical inductions up to 13,8 %ee and for the C - H insertion up to 14 %ee were achieved. (Authors)

  2. Synthesis, structural and optical properties, ferromagnetic behaviour, cytotoxicity and NLO activity of lithium sulphate doped L-threonine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theras, J. Elberin Mary; Kalaivani, D.; Mani, J. Arul Martin; Jayaraman, D.; Joseph, V.

    2016-09-01

    Lithium Sulphate doped L-threonine (Li2SO4-LT), a semi-organic crystal, has been synthesised and grown by slow evaporation technique at room temperature. The grown crystal was subjected to single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis in order to establish their crystalline nature. Li2SO4-LT crystal belongs to the orthorhombic crystal system (a=7.66 Å, b=5.11 Å, c=13.60 Å) with space group P212121. Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES) study was carried out to quantify the concentration of lithium element in the grown crystal. The results show that 0.07 mol of lithium sulphate has been incorporated into the parent system. The grown material has been found to possess wide transparency in the range 240-1100 nm with lower cut-off wavelength at 240 nm. The optical band gap was calculated as 4.92 eV using optical absorption spectrum and Tauc's relation. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic study was performed to identify the functional groups present in the grown crystal. The surface features of the grown crystal were analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) analysis. The magnetic property was studied with the help of Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM). The coercivity and retentivity of the material were measured from the hysteresis curve as 550.06 G and 79.50×10-6 emu respectively. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay method was performed to understand the cytotoxicity or anticancer activity of the sample. The cell viability and cytotoxicity of the sample against MCF-7 cells were estimated as 49.41% and 50.59% respectively at a concentration of 250 μg. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency was measured by the Kurtz powder technique using Nd:YAG laser and was found to be 1.46 times that of standard potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP).

  3. SYNTHESIS, LSD1 INHIBITORY ACTIVITY, AND LSD1 BINDING MODEL OF OPTICALLY PURE LYSINE-PCPA CONJUGATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Itoh

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Compounds that inhibit the catalytic function of lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1 are interesting as therapeutic agents. Recently, we identified three lysine-phenylcyclopropylamine conjugates, NCD18, NCD25, and NCD41, which are potent LSD1 inactivators. However, in our previous study, because we tested those compounds as mixtures of (1S,2R- and (1R,2S-disubstituted cyclopropane rings, the relationship between the stereochemistry of the cyclopropane ring and their biological activity remained unknown. In this work, we synthesized optically active compounds of NCD18, NCD25, and NCD41 and evaluated their LSD1 inhibitory activities. In enzyme assays, the LSD1 inhibitory activities of (1R,2S-NCD18 and (1R,2S-NCD25 were approximately eleven and four times more potent than those of the corresponding (1S,2R-isomers, respectively. On the other hand, (1S,2R-NCD41 was four times more potent than (1R,2S-NCD41. Binding simulation with LSD1 indicated that the aromatic rings of the compounds and the amino group of the cyclopropylamine were important for the interaction with LSD1, and that the stereochemistry of the 1,2-disubstituted cyclopropane ring affected the position of the aromatic rings and the hydrogen bond formation of the amino group in the LSD1 catalytic site. These findings are expected to contribute to the further development of LSD1 inactivators.

  4. Actively Cooled Silicon Lightweight Mirrors for Far Infrared and Submillimeter Optical Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Schafer proposes to demonstrate 2 different methods for actively cooling our 5-7.5 kg/m2 areal density Silicon Lightweight Mirrors (SLMS?) technology for future...

  5. Evaluation and application of passive and active optical remote sensing methods for the measurement of atmospheric aerosol properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mielonen, T.

    2010-07-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles affect the atmosphere's radiation balance by scattering and absorbing sunlight. Moreover, the particles act as condensation nuclei for clouds and affect their reflectivity. In addition, aerosols have negative health effects and they reduce visibility. Aerosols are emitted into the atmosphere from both natural and anthropogenic sources. Different types of aerosols have different effects on the radiation balance, thus global monitoring and typing of aerosols is of vital importance. In this thesis, several remote sensing methods used in the measurement of atmospheric aerosols are evaluated. Remote sensing of aerosols can be done with active and passive instruments. Passive instruments measure radiation emitted by the sun and the Earth while active instruments have their own radiation source, for example a black body radiator or laser. The instruments utilized in these studies were sun photometers (PFR, Cimel), lidars (POLLYXT, CALIOP), transmissiometer (OLAF) and a spectroradiometer (MODIS). Retrieval results from spaceborne instruments (MODIS, CALIOP) were evaluated with ground based measurements (PFR, Cimel). In addition, effects of indicative aerosol model assumptions on the calculated radiative transfer were studied. Finally, aerosol particle mass at the ground level was approximated from satellite measurements and vertical profiles of aerosols measured with a lidar were analyzed. For the evaluation part, these studies show that the calculation of aerosol induced attenuation of radiation based on aerosol size distribution measurements is not a trivial task. In addition to dry aerosol size distribution, the effect of ambient relative humidity on the size distribution and the optical properties of the aerosols need to be known in order to achieve correct results from the calculations. Furthermore, the results suggest that aerosol size parameters retrieved from passive spaceborne measurements depend heavily on surgace reflectance

  6. Radiation-induced polymerization of {beta}(+)-pinene and synthesis of optically active {beta}(+)/{beta}(-)pinene polymers and copolymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cataldo, Franco, E-mail: franco.cataldo@fastwebnet.i [Lupi Chemical Research, Via Casilina 1626/A, 00133 Rome (Italy); Lilla, Edo; Ursini, Ornella [Institute of Chemical Methodologies, CNR, Via Salaria Km. 29300, Monterotondo Stazione 00016, Rome (Italy)

    2011-06-15

    Poly-{beta}(+)-pinene (pB(+)p) was synthesized with {gamma} irradiation of the monomer {beta}(+)-pinene in bulk under vacuum at 1181 kGy. Also scalemic mixtures of {beta}(+)-pinene and {beta}(-)-pinene were irradiated at 1181 kGy to obtain synthetic copolymers of pB(+)/B(-)p. For comparison also {beta}(-)-pinene was converted into poly-{beta}(-)-pinene (pB(-)p) under the identical conditions adopted for its enantiomer. Furthermore pB(+)p and pB(-)p were also synthesized by thermal processing under the action of a chemical free radical initiator. The optical rotatory dispersion (ORD) of all pBp resins synthesized were accurately studied in the spectral range comprised between 375 and 625 nm and a curious asymmetry in the ORD of pB(+)p versus the ORD of pB(-)p is reported. Furthermore, it is shown that (+)-p-menth-1-ene and (-)-p-menth-1-ene are useful as a model compounds for the pBp resins and for the explanation of the amplification of the optical activity of the {beta}(+)-pinene and {beta}(-)-pinene after their ring-opening polymerization to pB(+)p and pB(-)p. The pBp resins were studied also by FT-IR spectroscopy and by thermal analysis (TGA and DTG).

  7. Complementary optical and nuclear imaging of caspase-3 activity using combined activatable and radio-labeled multimodality molecular probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyeran; Akers, Walter J.; Cheney, Philip P.; Edwards, W. Barry; Liang, Kexian; Culver, Joseph P.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2009-07-01

    Based on the capability of modulating fluorescence intensity by specific molecular events, we report a new multimodal optical-nuclear molecular probe with complementary reporting strategies. The molecular probe (LS498) consists of tetraazacyclododecanetetraacetic acid (DOTA) for chelating a radionuclide, a near-infrared fluorescent dye, and an efficient quencher dye. The two dyes are separated by a cleavable peptide substrate for caspase-3, a diagnostic enzyme that is upregulated in dying cells. LS498 is radiolabeled with 64Cu, a radionuclide used in positron emission tomography. In the native form, LS498 fluorescence is quenched until caspase-3 cleavage of the peptide substrate. Enzyme kinetics assay shows that LS498 is readily cleaved by caspase-3, with excellent enzyme kinetic parameters kcat and KM of 0.55+/-0.01 s-1 and 1.12+/-0.06 μM, respectively. In mice, the initial fluorescence of LS498 is ten-fold less than control. Using radiolabeled 64Cu-LS498 in a controlled and localized in-vivo model of caspase-3 activation, a time-dependent five-fold NIR fluorescence enhancement is observed, but radioactivity remains identical in caspase-3 positive and negative controls. These results demonstrate the feasibility of using radionuclide imaging for localizing and quantifying the distribution of molecular probes and optical imaging for reporting the functional status of diagnostic enzymes.

  8. Lactones 42. Stereoselective enzymatic/microbial synthesis of optically active isomers of whisky lactone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boratyński, Filip; Smuga, Małgorzata; Wawrzeńczyk, Czesław

    2013-11-01

    Two different methods, enzyme-mediated reactions and biotrasformations with microorganisms, were applied to obtain optically pure cis- and trans-isomers of whisky lactone 4a and 4b. In the first method, eight alcohol dehydrogenases were investigated as biocatalysts to enantioselective oxidation of racemic erythro- and threo-3-methyloctane-1,4-diols (1a and 1b). Oxidation processes with three of them, alcohol dehydrogenases isolated from horse liver (HLADH) as well as recombinant from Escherichia coli and primary alcohol dehydrogenase (PADH I), were characterized by the highest degree of conversion with moderate enantioselectivity (ee=27-82%) of the reaction. In all enzymatic reactions enantiomerically enriched not naturally occurring isomers of trans-(-)-(4R,5S)-4b or cis-(+)-(4R,5R)-4a were formed preferentially. In the second strategy, based on microbial lactonization of γ-oxoacids, naturally occurring opposite isomers of whisky lactones were obtained. Trans-(+)-(4S,5R)-isomer (ee=99%) of whisky lactone 4b was stereoselectively formed as the only product of biotransformations of 3-methyl-4-oxooctanoic acid (5) catalyzed by Didimospheria igniaria KCH6651, Laetiporus sulphurens AM525, Chaetomium sp.1 KCH6670 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae AM464. Biotransformation of γ-oxoacid 5, in the culture of Beauveria bassiana AM278 and Pycnidiella resinae KCH50 afforded a mixtures of trans-(+)-(4S,5R)-4b with enantiomeric excess ee=99% and cis-(-)-(4S,5S)-4a with enantiomeric excesses ee=77% and ee=45% respectively.

  9. Electronic, optical, and computational studies of a redox-active napthalenediimide-based coordination polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Chanel F; Chan, Bun; Faust, Thomas B; Turner, Peter; D'Alessandro, Deanna M

    2013-12-16

    The new one-dimensional coordination framework (Zn(DMF)NO3)2(NDC)(DPMNI), where NDC = 2,6-naphthalenedicarboxylate and DPMNI = N,N'-bis(4-pyridylmethyl)-1,4,5,8-naphthalenetetracarboxydiimide, which has been crystallographically characterized, exhibits two redox-accessible states due to the successive reduction of the naphthalenediimide (NDI) ligand core. Solid-state electrochemical and vis-near-IR spectroelectrochemical measurements coupled with density functional theory (DFT) calculations enabled the origins of the optical transitions in the spectra of the monoradical anion and dianion states of the material to be assigned. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy revealed that the paramagnetic radical anion state of the DPMNI core could be accessed upon broad-spectrum white light irradiation of the material, revealing a long-lived excited state, possibly stabilized by charge delocalization which arises from extensive π-π* stacking interactions between alternating NDC and NDI aromatic cores which are separated by a distance of 3.580(2) Å. PMID:24283401

  10. Optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopic techniques for investigating membrane-bound ion channel activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Székács, Inna; Kaszás, Nóra; Gróf, Pál; Erdélyi, Katalin; Szendrő, István; Mihalik, Balázs; Pataki, Agnes; Antoni, Ferenc A; Madarász, Emilia

    2013-01-01

    Optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopic (OWLS) techniques were probed for monitoring ion permeation through channels incorporated into artificial lipid environment. A novel sensor set-up was developed by depositing liposomes or cell-derived membrane fragments onto hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane. The fibrous material of PTFE membrane could entrap lipoid vesicles and the water-filled pores provided environment for the hydrophilic domains of lipid-embedded proteins. The sensor surface was kept clean from the lipid holder PTFE membrane by a water- and ion-permeable polyethylene terephthalate (PET) mesh. The sensor set-up was tested with egg yolk lecithin liposomes containing gramicidin ion channels and with cell-derived membrane fragments enriched in GABA-gated anion channels. The method allowed monitoring the move of Na(+) and organic cations through gramicidin channels and detecting the Cl(-)-channel functions of the (α5β2γ2) GABAA receptor in the presence or absence of GABA and the competitive GABA-blocker bicuculline. PMID:24339925

  11. Mapping fluxes of radicals from the combination of electrochemical activation and optical microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munteanu, Sorin; Roger, Jean Paul; Fedala, Yasmina; Amiot, Fabien; Combellas, Catherine; Tessier, Gilles; Kanoufi, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    The coating of gold (Au) electrode surfaces with nitrophenyl (NP) layers is studied by combination of electrochemical actuation and optical detection. The electrochemical actuation of the reduction of the nitrobenzenediazonium (NBD) precursor is used to generate NP radicals and therefore initiate the electrografting. The electrografting process is followed in situ and in real time by light reflectivity microscopy imaging, allowing for spatio-temporal imaging with sub-micrometer lateral resolution and sub-nanometer thickness sensitivity of the local growth of a transparent organic coating onto a reflecting Au electrode. The interest of the electrochemical actuation resides in its ability to finely control the grafting rate of the NP layer through the electrode potential. Coupling the electrochemical actuation with microscopic imaging of the electrode surface allows quantitative estimates of the local grafting rates and subsequently a real time and in situ mapping of the reacting fluxes of NP radicals on the surface. Over the 2 orders of magnitude range of grafting rates (from 0.04 to 4 nm s(-1)), it is demonstrated that the edge of Au electrodes are grafted -1.3 times more quickly than their centre, illustrating the manifestation of edge-effects on flux distribution at an electrode. A model is proposed to explain the observed edge-effect, it relies on the short lifetime of the intermediate NP radical species. PMID:24466667

  12. Optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopic techniques for investigating membrane-bound ion channel activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inna Székács

    Full Text Available Optical waveguide lightmode spectroscopic (OWLS techniques were probed for monitoring ion permeation through channels incorporated into artificial lipid environment. A novel sensor set-up was developed by depositing liposomes or cell-derived membrane fragments onto hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE membrane. The fibrous material of PTFE membrane could entrap lipoid vesicles and the water-filled pores provided environment for the hydrophilic domains of lipid-embedded proteins. The sensor surface was kept clean from the lipid holder PTFE membrane by a water- and ion-permeable polyethylene terephthalate (PET mesh. The sensor set-up was tested with egg yolk lecithin liposomes containing gramicidin ion channels and with cell-derived membrane fragments enriched in GABA-gated anion channels. The method allowed monitoring the move of Na(+ and organic cations through gramicidin channels and detecting the Cl(--channel functions of the (α5β2γ2 GABAA receptor in the presence or absence of GABA and the competitive GABA-blocker bicuculline.

  13. Rare-earth-ion-doped Al IIO 3 waveguides for active integrated optical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Jonathan D. B.; Ay, Feridun; Blauwendraat, Tom; Wörhoff, Kerstin; Pollnau, Markus

    2007-06-01

    Reactively co-sputtered amorphous Al IIO 3 waveguide layers with low propagation losses have been deposited. In order to define channel waveguides in such Al IIO 3 films, the etching behaviour of Al IIO 3 has been investigated using an inductively coupled reactive ion etch system. The etch rate of Al IIO 3 and possible mask materials was studied by applying various common process gases and combinations of these gases, including CF 4/O II, BCl 3, BCl 3/HBr and Cl II. Based on a comparison of the etch rates and patterning feasibility of the different mask materials, a BCl 3/HBr plasma and and standard resist mask were used to fabricate channel waveguide structures. The etched structures exhibit straight sidewalls with minimal roughness and etch depths of up to 530 nm, sufficient for defining waveguides with strong optical confinement and low bending losses. Low additional propagation losses were measured in single-mode Al IIO 3 ridge waveguides defined using the developed etch process. In initial investigations, Al IIO 3:Er layers fabricated using the same deposition method applied for the undoped layers show typical emission cross-sections, low green upconversion luminescence and lifetimes up to 7 ms.

  14. Assessment of Atmospheric heavy metal deposition in North Egypt aerosols using neutron activation analysis and optical emission inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present study is to assess the current level of atmospheric heavy metal pollution of aerosols in different cities of North Egypt using the neutron activation analysis and optical emission inductively coupled plasma techniques. The results revealed that the highest concentrations of particulate matter PM10 and total suspended particulate matter were close to industrial areas. From the results of the enrichment factor calculations, the most significant elements of anthropogenic origin are Ba, Sb, Ce and Zn. - Highlights: → Average concentration of Cd using OE-ICP is below detection limit for all the samples. → Maximum average concentration of Pb in PM10 and TSP is 5425 and 570.3, respectively. → Concentration of 20 elements in PM10 and TSP aerosols are determined using the NAA. → EF revealed that Pb, Ba, Br, Ce, Hf, La Sb and Zn are of anthropogenic origin.

  15. Resonance surface enhanced Raman optical activity of myoglobin as a result of optimized resonance surface enhanced Raman scattering conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, Salim; Johannessen, Christian; Nygaard, Jesper;

    2007-01-01

    Using Surface enhanced ROA (SEROA), novel results are achieved by combining Raman Optical Activity (ROA) and resonance Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERRS), applied on myoglobin. The novelty of this work is ascribed the first time reporting on chiral results of a study performed on a protein...... has shown that the SERS effect behaves consequently, depending on the concentration ratio of each component, i.e., myoglobin, Ag colloids and NaCl. Accordingly, it is shown here that SERS intensity has its maximum at certain concentration of these components, whereas below or above this value......, the intensity decreases. The optimization results can be considered as a completion of the hitherto known phenomenon "dilution effect", which takes only account for higher concentrations. Furthermore, the optimization of the parameters seems to be necessary for a successful SEROA measurement, which enables...

  16. Assessment of Atmospheric heavy metal deposition in North Egypt aerosols using neutron activation analysis and optical emission inductively coupled plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Araby, E.H., E-mail: elaraby_20032000@yahoo.com [Faculty of Science, Physics Department, Jezan University, KSA (Saudi Arabia); Abd El-Wahab, M., E-mail: wahab_magda@yahoo.com [Faculty of women for Arts, Science and Education, Physics Department, Ain Shams University, PO11757 Cairo (Egypt); Diab, H.M., E-mail: hnndiab@yahoo.co.uk [National Center of Nuclear Safety and Radiation Control, Atomic Energy Authority Cairo (Egypt); El-Desouky, T.M., E-mail: trkhegazy@yahoo.com [Faculty of women for Arts, Science and Education, Physics Department, Ain Shams University, PO11757 Cairo (Egypt); Mohsen, M., E-mail: m1mohsen@yahoo.com [Faculty of Science. Physics Department, Ain-Shams University, PO 11566 Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-10-15

    The aim of the present study is to assess the current level of atmospheric heavy metal pollution of aerosols in different cities of North Egypt using the neutron activation analysis and optical emission inductively coupled plasma techniques. The results revealed that the highest concentrations of particulate matter PM{sub 10} and total suspended particulate matter were close to industrial areas. From the results of the enrichment factor calculations, the most significant elements of anthropogenic origin are Ba, Sb, Ce and Zn. - Highlights: > Average concentration of Cd using OE-ICP is below detection limit for all the samples. > Maximum average concentration of Pb in PM10 and TSP is 5425 and 570.3, respectively. > Concentration of 20 elements in PM{sub 10} and TSP aerosols are determined using the NAA. > EF revealed that Pb, Ba, Br, Ce, Hf, La Sb and Zn are of anthropogenic origin.

  17. Active figure maintenance control using an optical truss laser metrology system for a space-based far-IR segmented telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Kenneth; Breckenridge, Bill; Nerheim, Noble; Redding, David

    1992-01-01

    A two-stage active control approach was developed addressing the figure control problem for a spaceborne FIR telescope, the Precision Segmented Reflectors Focus Moderate Mission Telescope (FMMT). The first active control stage aligns the optical segments based on images; attention is here given to the second stage, active figure maintenance control system, which maintains the alignment of the optical elements between initializations to hold the mirror figure steady while obtaining data and fixes translational and rotational changes of the optical segments induced by long-term thermal drifts of the support structure. Errors are expected to be 10-100 microns at the nodes of the primary backup structure over the course of an orbit. An rms performance of 0.8 microns of wavefront error can be expected during the maintenance function based on specified nominal sensor noises, actuator accuracies, and system environments. A performance of less than 0.3 microns rms can be expected, based on advanced components.

  18. Cytotoxic activity of new racemic and optically active N-phosphonoalkyl bicyclic β-amino acids against human malignant cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Petar T; Wesselinova, Diana W; Pavlov, Nikola D; Martinez, Jean; Calmes, Monique; Naydenova, Emilia D

    2012-10-01

    The cytotoxic effects of novel racemic and optically active constrained N-phosphonoalkyl bicyclic β-amino acids were tested against a panel of human tumor cell lines. All of the compounds investigated exhibited different concentration-dependent antiproliferative effects against the HT-29, MDA-MB-231, HepG2 and HeLa cell lines after 24 h treatment. The most sensitive cells were the HeLa cells at various concentrations of the four compounds tested. The aminophosphonate 3 exerted the most pronounced antiproliferative effect against the HeLa cells (inhibition of the cell vitality up to 70% at 0.5 mg/ml) and was not toxic to the normal Lep3 cells at lower concentration. Furthermore, the N-phosphonophenyl derivatives 1 and 2 displayed antiproliferative effect against mainly the MDA-MB-231 tumour cells at higher concentration.

  19. Wide-range controllable n-doping of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) through thermal and optical activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung-Youl; Lim, Myung-Hoon; Jeon, Jeaho; Yoo, Gwangwe; Kang, Dong-Ho; Jang, Sung Kyu; Jeon, Min Hwan; Lee, Youngbin; Cho, Jeong Ho; Yeom, Geun Young; Jung, Woo-Shik; Lee, Jaeho; Park, Seongjun; Lee, Sungjoo; Park, Jin-Hong

    2015-03-24

    Despite growing interest in doping two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) for future layered semiconductor devices, controllability is currently limited to only heavy doping (degenerate regime). This causes 2D materials to act as metallic layers, and an ion implantation technique with precise doping controllability is not available for these materials (e.g., MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, WSe2, graphene). Since adjustment of the electrical and optical properties of 2D materials is possible within a light (nondegenerate) doping regime, a wide-range doping capability including nondegenerate and degenerate regimes is a critical aspect of the design and fabrication of 2D TMD-based electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we demonstrate a wide-range controllable n-doping method on a 2D TMD material (exfoliated trilayer and bulk MoS2) with the assistance of a phosphorus silicate glass (PSG) insulating layer, which has the broadest doping range among the results reported to date (between 3.6 × 10(10) and 8.3 × 10(12) cm(-2)) and is also applicable to other 2D semiconductors. This is achieved through (1) a three-step process consisting of, first, dopant out-diffusion between 700 and 900 °C, second, thermal activation at 500 °C, and, third, optical activation above 5 μW steps and (2) weight percentage adjustment of P atoms in PSG (2 and 5 wt %). We anticipate our widely controllable n-doping method to be a starting point for the successful integration of future layered semiconductor devices.

  20. Wide-range controllable n-doping of molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) through thermal and optical activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyung-Youl; Lim, Myung-Hoon; Jeon, Jeaho; Yoo, Gwangwe; Kang, Dong-Ho; Jang, Sung Kyu; Jeon, Min Hwan; Lee, Youngbin; Cho, Jeong Ho; Yeom, Geun Young; Jung, Woo-Shik; Lee, Jaeho; Park, Seongjun; Lee, Sungjoo; Park, Jin-Hong

    2015-03-24

    Despite growing interest in doping two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) for future layered semiconductor devices, controllability is currently limited to only heavy doping (degenerate regime). This causes 2D materials to act as metallic layers, and an ion implantation technique with precise doping controllability is not available for these materials (e.g., MoS2, MoSe2, WS2, WSe2, graphene). Since adjustment of the electrical and optical properties of 2D materials is possible within a light (nondegenerate) doping regime, a wide-range doping capability including nondegenerate and degenerate regimes is a critical aspect of the design and fabrication of 2D TMD-based electronic and optoelectronic devices. Here, we demonstrate a wide-range controllable n-doping method on a 2D TMD material (exfoliated trilayer and bulk MoS2) with the assistance of a phosphorus silicate glass (PSG) insulating layer, which has the broadest doping range among the results reported to date (between 3.6 × 10(10) and 8.3 × 10(12) cm(-2)) and is also applicable to other 2D semiconductors. This is achieved through (1) a three-step process consisting of, first, dopant out-diffusion between 700 and 900 °C, second, thermal activation at 500 °C, and, third, optical activation above 5 μW steps and (2) weight percentage adjustment of P atoms in PSG (2 and 5 wt %). We anticipate our widely controllable n-doping method to be a starting point for the successful integration of future layered semiconductor devices. PMID:25692499

  1. The optical and radio properties of a low-redshift sample of broad-lined active galactic nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafter, Stephen E.

    2010-11-01

    The question as to whether the distribution of radio loudness in active galactic nuclei (AGN) is actually bimodal has been discussed extensively in the literature. Furthermore, there have been claims that radio loudness depends on black hole mass (MBH) and Eddington ratio (Lbol/L Edd). We investigate these claims using the low redshift broad line AGN sample of Greene & Ho (2007), which consists of 8434 objects at z search for extended emission in FIRST that can be positively associated with the optical counterparts and find 51 out of the 846 previously detected core sources have extended emission that must be taken into account when calculating the total radio luminosity. Further, we find an additional 12 objects that have extended radio emission but no detectable radio core and have classic FR II type morphologies. Using these data, the question of radio bimodality and the dependence of radio-loudness on physical parameters are investigated for different subsets of the total sample. We find modest trends in the radio-loud fraction as a function of MBH and Lbol/LEdd, where the fraction of RL AGN increases for the largest MBH group and decreases with increasing Lbol/LEdd. With extended emission taken into account, we find strong evidence for a bimodal distribution in R, where the lower radio luminosity core-only sources appear as a population separate from the extended sources with a dividing line at log(R) ≈ 1.75. This dividing line is interesting in that it requires the radio luminosity to be 50 times the optical luminosity, ensuring that these are indeed the most RL AGN, which may have different or extreme physical conditions in their central engines when compared to the more numerous radio quiet AGN in this sample. Index words. Active galaxies, Radio galaxies.

  2. Synthesis, characterization, optical band gap, in vitro antimicrobial activity and DNA cleavage studies of some metal complexes of pyridyl thiosemicarbazone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, T. A.; Abu El-Reash, G. M.; El-Gammal, O. A.; Bedier, R. A.

    2013-03-01

    A new series of Cr(III), Mn(II), Ni(II), Zn(II) and Hg(II) complexes of Schiff-bases derived from the condensation of 4-(2-pyridyl)-3-thiosemicarbazide and pyruvic acid (H2PTP) have been synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic studies. Schiff-base exhibit thiol-thione tautomerism wherein sulfur plays an important role in the coordination. The coordination possibility of the Schiff-bases towards metal ions have been proposed in the light of elemental analysis, spectral (IR, UV-vis, 1H NMR and 13C NMR), magnetic and thermal studies. IR spectra show that H2PTP is coordinated to the metal ions in a mononegative tridentate manner except in Cr(III) complex in which the ligand exhibits mononegative bidentate manner. The parameters total energy, binding energy, isolated atomic energy, electronic energy, heat of formation, dipole moment, HOMO and LUMO were calculated for the ligand and its complexes. Furthermore, the kinetic and thermodynamic parameters for the different decomposition steps were calculated using the Coats-Redfern and Horowitz-Metzger methods. Also, the optical band gap (Eg) of the metal complexes has been calculated. The optical transition energy (Eg) is direct and equals 3.20, 3.27 and 3.26 eV for Cr, Mn and Ni complexes, respectively. The synthesized ligand, in comparison to its metal complexes is screened for its antibacterial activity against the bacterial species, Bacillus thuringiensis, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeuroginosa and Escherichia coli. The results show that the metal complexes be more potent in activity antibacterial than the parent Shciff base ligand towards one or more bacterial species. Finally, the biochemical studies showed that, Mn complex have powerful and complete degradation effect on DNA.

  3. Optical switching in bistable active cavity containing nonlinear absorber on bacteriorhodopsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazhenov, Vladimir Y.; Taranenko, Victor B.; Vasnetsov, Mikhail V.

    1993-04-01

    The transverse nonlinear dynamics of switchings in an active system (laser with nonlinear saturable absorber on bacteriorhodopsin in a self-imaging cavity) is studied both experimentally and theoretically. The soliton-like light field structure formation and continuously cycled self-switching process are investigated.

  4. Carbon nanotube-assisted optical activation of TGF-β signalling by near-infrared light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Liang; Liu, Ling; Zhao, Bing; Xie, Ran; Lin, Wei; Li, He; Li, Yaya; Shi, Minlong; Chen, Ye-Guang; Springer, Timothy A.; Chen, Xing

    2015-05-01

    Receptor-mediated signal transduction modulates complex cellular behaviours such as cell growth, migration and differentiation. Although photoactivatable proteins have emerged as a powerful tool for controlling molecular interactions and signalling cascades at precise times and spaces using light, many of these light-sensitive proteins are activated by ultraviolent or visible light, which has limited tissue penetration. Here, we report a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)-assisted approach that enables near-infrared light-triggered activation of transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) signal transduction, an important signalling pathway in embryonic development and cancer progression. The protein complex of TGF-β and its latency-associated peptide is conjugated onto SWCNTs, where TGF-β is inactive. Upon near-infrared irradiation, TGF-β is released through the photothermal effect of SWCNTs and becomes active. The released TGF-β activates downstream signal transduction in live cells and modulates cellular behaviours. Furthermore, preliminary studies show that the method can be used to mediate TGF-β signalling in living mice.

  5. Mueller-matrix ellipsometry studies of optically active structures in scarab beetles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arwin H.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of multilayers, photonic crystals, metamaterials and other artificial materials has promoted the use of spectroscopic, variable angle, generalized and Mueller-matrix ellipsometry. Naturally occurring structures may show even higher complexity than artificial structures but with a more narrow range of constituent materials. Fascinating reflection properties result from intricate photonic structures in, for instance, the wing scales and cuticles of insects. Currently there is a large interest to explore such functional supramolecular architectures for exploitation in nanotechnology. In this study, Mueller-matrix spectroscopic ellipsometry is applied in the spectral range of 250 to 1000 nm to investigate optical response and structures of the cuticle of Scarab beetles of the Cetoniinae subfamily. The cuticle of Cetonia aurata (the rose chafer, la cétoine dorée is green with a metallic appearance and reflects left-handed circular/elliptically polarized light. It has been suggested that the polarization of this metallic gloss is caused by a helical structure in the chitinous cuticle. We find that the polarization effect is limited to the narrow spectral range 470-550 nm whereas for shorter or longer wavelengths the reflection properties are similar to those from a near-dielectric material. Model calculations and parameterization of the nanostructure employing a heliocoidal structure are discussed. As a comparison the polarization effects from light reflected from two other beetles will be presented. Coptomia laevis has a similar appearance as Cetonia aurata but has very different polarization properties. The golden Plusiotis argentiola has very interesting properties showing both left and right-handed polarization depending on incidence angle and wavelength.

  6. TH-A-9A-01: Active Optical Flow Model: Predicting Voxel-Level Dose Prediction in Spine SBRT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, J; Wu, Q.J.; Yin, F; Kirkpatrick, J; Cabrera, A [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Ge, Y [University of North Carolina at Charlotte, Charlotte, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To predict voxel-level dose distribution and enable effective evaluation of cord dose sparing in spine SBRT. Methods: We present an active optical flow model (AOFM) to statistically describe cord dose variations and train a predictive model to represent correlations between AOFM and PTV contours. Thirty clinically accepted spine SBRT plans are evenly divided into training and testing datasets. The development of predictive model consists of 1) collecting a sequence of dose maps including PTV and OAR (spinal cord) as well as a set of associated PTV contours adjacent to OAR from the training dataset, 2) classifying data into five groups based on PTV's locations relative to OAR, two “Top”s, “Left”, “Right”, and “Bottom”, 3) randomly selecting a dose map as the reference in each group and applying rigid registration and optical flow deformation to match all other maps to the reference, 4) building AOFM by importing optical flow vectors and dose values into the principal component analysis (PCA), 5) applying another PCA to features of PTV and OAR contours to generate an active shape model (ASM), and 6) computing a linear regression model of correlations between AOFM and ASM.When predicting dose distribution of a new case in the testing dataset, the PTV is first assigned to a group based on its contour characteristics. Contour features are then transformed into ASM's principal coordinates of the selected group. Finally, voxel-level dose distribution is determined by mapping from the ASM space to the AOFM space using the predictive model. Results: The DVHs predicted by the AOFM-based model and those in clinical plans are comparable in training and testing datasets. At 2% volume the dose difference between predicted and clinical plans is 4.2±4.4% and 3.3±3.5% in the training and testing datasets, respectively. Conclusion: The AOFM is effective in predicting voxel-level dose distribution for spine SBRT. Partially supported by NIH

  7. The origin of enhanced optical absorption in solar cells with metal nanoparticles embedded in the active layer

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Jung-Yong

    2010-04-29

    We analyze the enhancement in optical absorption of an absorbing medium when spherical metal nanoparticles are embedded in it. Our analysis uses generalized Mie theory to calculate the absorbed optical power as a function of the distance from the metal nanoparticle. This analysis is used to evaluate the potential of enhancing optical absorption in thin-film solar cells by embedding spherical metal nanoparticles. We consider the trade-off between maximizing overall optical absorption and ensuring that a large fraction of the incident optical power is dissipated in the absorbing host medium rather than in the metal nanoparticle. We show that enhanced optical absorption results from strong scattering by the metal nanoparticle which locally enhances the optical electric fields. We also discuss the effect of a thin dielectric encapsulation of the metal nanoparticles. ©2010 Optical Society of America.

  8. Optic glioma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glioma - optic; Optic nerve glioma; Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma; Brain cancer - optic glioma ... Optic gliomas are rare. The cause of optic gliomas is unknown. Most optic gliomas are slow-growing ...

  9. Effects of algal-produced neurotoxins on metabolic activity in telencephalon, optic tectum and cerebellum of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakke, Marit Jorgensen [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, PO Box 8146 Dep., N-0033 Oslo (Norway); Horsberg, Tor Einar [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, PO Box 8146 Dep., N-0033 Oslo (Norway)], E-mail: tor.e.horsberg@veths.no

    2007-11-30

    Neurotoxins from algal blooms have been reported to cause mortality in a variety of species, including sea birds, sea mammals and fish. Farmed fish cannot escape harmful algal blooms and their potential toxins, thus they are more vulnerable for exposure than wild stocks. Sublethal doses of the toxins are likely to affect fish behaviour and may impair cognitive abilities. In the present study, changes in the metabolic activity in different parts of the Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) brain involved in central integration and cognition were investigated after exposure to sublethal doses of three algal-produced neurotoxins; saxitoxin (STX), brevetoxin (BTX) and domoic acid (DA). Fish were randomly selected to four groups for i.p. injection of saline (control) or one of the neurotoxins STX (10 {mu}g STX/kg bw), BTX (68 {mu}g BTX/kg bw) or DA (6 mg DA/kg bw). In addition, {sup 14}C-2-deoxyglucose was i.m. injected to measure brain metabolic activity by autoradiography. The three regions investigated were telencephalon (Tel), optic tectum (OT) and cerebellum (Ce). There were no differences in the metabolic activity after STX and BTX exposure compared to the control in these regions. However, a clear increase was observed after DA exposure. When the subregions with the highest metabolic rate were pseudocoloured in the three brain regions, the three toxins caused distinct differences in the respective patterns of metabolic activation. Fish exposed to STX displayed similar patterns as the control fish, whereas fish exposed to BTX and DA showed highest metabolic activity in subregions different from the control group. All three neurotoxins affected subregions that are believed to be involved in cognitive abilities in fish.

  10. Some activities on educational technology innovation in Physics, optics and telecommunications

    OpenAIRE

    Arribas Garde, Enrique; Nájera López, Alberto; Villalba Montoya, José Manuel; Beléndez Vázquez, Augusto; Ortuño Sánchez, Manuel; Francés Monllor, Jorge; Neipp López, Cristian; Márquez Ruiz, Andrés; Álvarez López, Mariela Lázara; Pascual Villalobos, Inmaculada; Gallego Rico, Sergi

    2011-01-01

    The use of innovative technologies in education offers new possibilities that complement classroom teaching and may also help to improve the quality of education, enabling students to actively participate in the learning process. With this in mind, in 2009 the University of Alicante (UA) created a program to promote technological and educational innovation among its lecturers and students, whose strategic axis was the creation of Technological and Educational Innovation Groups (GITEs). The ce...

  11. Singular value decomposition of optically-mapped cardiac rotors and fibrillatory activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinovitch, A.; Biton, Y.; Braunstein, D.; Friedman, M.; Aviram, I.; Yandrapalli, S.; Pandit, S. V.; Berenfeld, O.

    2015-03-01

    Our progress of understanding how cellular and structural factors contribute to arrhythmia is hampered in part because of controversies as to whether a fibrillating heart is driven by a single, several, or multiple number of sources, whether they are focal or reentrant and how to localize them. Here we demonstrate how a novel usage of the neutral singular value decomposition (SVD) method enables the extraction of the governing spatial and temporal modes of excitation from a rotor and fibrillatory waves. Those modes highlight patterns and regions of organization in the midst of the otherwise seemingly random propagating excitation waves. We apply the method to experimental models of cardiac fibrillation in rabbit hearts. We show that SVD analysis is able to enhance the classification of the heart electrical patterns into regions harboring drivers in the form of fast reentrant activity and other regions of by-standing activity. This enhancement is accomplished without any prior assumptions regarding the spatial, temporal or spectral properties of those drivers. The analysis corroborates that the dominant mode has the highest activation rate and further reveals a new feature: a transfer of modes from the driving to passive regions resulting in a partial reaction of the passive region to the driving region.

  12. The Study of Active Atoms in High-Voltage Pulsed Coronal Discharge by Optical Diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Feng; Wang Wenchun; Wang Su; Ren Chunsheng; Wang Younian

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the emission spectra of active atoms O (3p5P → 3s5S20 777.4 nm),Ha (3P → 2S 656.3 nm) and N (3p4P → 3s4S0 742.3 nm, 744.2 nm, 746.8 nm) produced by thepositive high-voltage pulsed corona discharge (HVPCD) of N2 and H2O mixture in a needle-platereactor have successfully been recorded against a severe electromagnetic interference coming fromthe HVPCD at one atmosphere. The effects of the peak voltage, the repetition rate of pulseddischarge and the flow rate of oxygen on the production of those active atoms are investigated. Itis found that when the peak voltage and the repetition rate of the pulsed discharge are increased,the emission intensities of those active atoms rise correspondingly. And the emission intensities ofO (3p5P → 3s5S20 777.4 nm), Ha (3P → 2S 656.3 nm) and N (3p4P → 3s4S0 742.3 nm, 744.2 nm,746.8 nm) increase with the flow rate of oxygen (from 0 to 25 ml/min) and achieve a maximumvalue at a flow rate of 25 ml/min. When the flow rate of oxygen is increased further, the emissionintensities of those atoms visibly decrease correspondingly. The main physicochemical processesof interaction involved between electrons, neutrals and ions are also discussed.

  13. UNESCO active learning approach in optics and photonics leads to significant change in Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrada, K.; Channa, R.; Outzourhit, A.; Azizan, M.; Oueriagli, A.

    2014-07-01

    There are many difficulties in teaching science and technology in developing countries. Several different teaching strategies have to be applied in these cases. More specifically, for developing countries competencies in teaching science in the introductory classroom has attracted much attention. As a specific example we will consider the Moroccan system. In most developing countries everything is moving so slowly that the progress stays static for development. Also, any change needs time, effort and engagement. In our case we discovered that many teachers feel uncomfortable when introducing new teaching methods and evaluation in classes at introductory physics. However, the introduction of an Active Learning in our curricula showed difficulties that students have in understanding physics and especially concepts. Students were interested in having Active Learning courses much more than passive and traditional ones. Changing believes on physical phenomena and reality of the world students become more attractive and their way of thinking Science changed. The main philosophy of fostering modern hands-on learning techniques -adapted to local needs and availability of teaching resources- is elaborated. The Active Learning program provides the teachers with a conceptual evaluation instrument, drawn from relevant physics education research, giving teachers an important tool to measure student learning. We will try to describe the UNESCO Chair project in physics created in 2010 at Cadi Ayyad University since our first experience with UNESCO ALOP program. Many efforts have been done so far and the project helps now to develop more national and international collaborations between universities and Regional Academies of Education and Training. As a new result of these actions and according to our local needs, the translation of the ALOP program into Arabic is now available under the auspice of UNESCO and encouragement of international partners SPIE, ICTP, ICO and OSA.

  14. Optical Pulse Dynamics in Active Metamaterials with Positive and Negative Refractive Index

    CERN Document Server

    Korotkevich, Alexander O; Kovacic, Gregor; Roytburd, Victor; Maimistov, Andrei I; Gabitov, Ildar R; .,

    2013-01-01

    We study numerically the propagation of two-color light pulses through a metamaterial doped with active atoms such that the carrier frequencies of the pulses are in resonance with two atomic transitions in the $\\Lambda$ configuration and that one color propagates in the regime of positive refraction and the other in the regime of negative refraction. In such a metamaterial, one resonant color of light propagates with positive and the other with negative group velocity. We investigate nonlinear interaction of these forward- and backward-propagating waves, and find self-trapped waves, counter-propagating radiation waves, and hot spots of medium excitation.

  15. Optically active helical polyurethane-attapulgite composites: Effect of optical purity of S-1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-diol on infrared emissivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Zhiqiang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Zhou Yuming, E-mail: ymzhou@seu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Sun Yanqing; Mei Zhenyu; Miao Yuee [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China)

    2009-05-15

    Helical polyurethane-attapulgite (HPU-ATT) composites were prepared after the surface modification of the rod-like attapulgite (ATT). HPU-ATT composites based on S-1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-diol (S-BINOL) with different optical purity (O.P.) were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results indicate that the helical polyurethane has been successfully grafted onto the surfaces of the modified ATT without destroying the original crystalline structure of ATT. The rod-like nanoparticles were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Infrared emissivity values of HPU-ATT composites have been investigated, and the results indicate that the optical purity of monomer plays a very important role in the infrared emissivity for HPU-ATT owing to the effect of helical conformation and interchain hydrogen bonds. Along with the increased optical purity of S-BINOL, the infrared emissivity of HPU-ATT is reduced evidently. Infrared emissivity value of HPU-ATT based on S-BINOL with 100% optical purity is the lowest one (0.431).

  16. Optically active helical polyurethane-attapulgite composites: Effect of optical purity of S-1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-diol on infrared emissivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helical polyurethane-attapulgite (HPU-ATT) composites were prepared after the surface modification of the rod-like attapulgite (ATT). HPU-ATT composites based on S-1,1'-binaphthyl-2,2'-diol (S-BINOL) with different optical purity (O.P.) were characterized by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The results indicate that the helical polyurethane has been successfully grafted onto the surfaces of the modified ATT without destroying the original crystalline structure of ATT. The rod-like nanoparticles were confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Infrared emissivity values of HPU-ATT composites have been investigated, and the results indicate that the optical purity of monomer plays a very important role in the infrared emissivity for HPU-ATT owing to the effect of helical conformation and interchain hydrogen bonds. Along with the increased optical purity of S-BINOL, the infrared emissivity of HPU-ATT is reduced evidently. Infrared emissivity value of HPU-ATT based on S-BINOL with 100% optical purity is the lowest one (0.431).

  17. Parallel optical control of spatiotemporal neuronal spike activity using high-frequency digital light processingtechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason eJerome

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurons in the mammalian neocortex receive inputs from and communicate back to thousands of other neurons, creating complex spatiotemporal activity patterns. The experimental investigation of these parallel dynamic interactions has been limited due to the technical challenges of monitoring or manipulating neuronal activity at that level of complexity. Here we describe a new massively parallel photostimulation system that can be used to control action potential firing in in vitro brain slices with high spatial and temporal resolution while performing extracellular or intracellular electrophysiological measurements. The system uses Digital-Light-Processing (DLP technology to generate 2-dimensional (2D stimulus patterns with >780,000 independently controlled photostimulation sites that operate at high spatial (5.4 µm and temporal (>13kHz resolution. Light is projected through the quartz-glass bottom of the perfusion chamber providing access to a large area (2.76 x 2.07 mm2 of the slice preparation. This system has the unique capability to induce temporally precise action potential firing in large groups of neurons distributed over a wide area covering several cortical columns. Parallel photostimulation opens up new opportunities for the in vitro experimental investigation of spatiotemporal neuronal interactions at a broad range of anatomical scales.

  18. Active optics null test system based on a liquid crystal programmable spatial light modulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ares, Miguel; Royo, Santiago; Sergievskaya, Irina; Riu, Jordi

    2010-11-10

    We present an active null test system adapted to test lenses and wavefronts with complex shapes and strong local deformations. This system provides greater flexibility than conventional static null tests that match only a precisely positioned, individual wavefront. The system is based on a cylindrical Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, a commercial liquid crystal programmable phase modulator (PPM), which acts as the active null corrector, enabling the compensation of large strokes with high fidelity in a single iteration, and a spatial filter to remove unmodulated light when steep phase changes are compensated. We have evaluated the PPM's phase response at 635 nm and checked its performance by measuring its capability to generate different amounts of defocus aberration, finding root mean squared errors below λ/18 for spherical wavefronts with peak-to-valley heights of up to 78.7λ, which stands as the limit from which diffractive artifacts created by the PPM have been found to be critical under no spatial filtering. Results of a null test for a complex lens (an ophthalmic customized progressive addition lens) are presented and discussed. PMID:21068848

  19. Optically pure, water-stable metallo-helical ‘flexicate’ assemblies with antibiotic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howson, Suzanne E.; Bolhuis, Albert; Brabec, Viktor; Clarkson, Guy J.; Malina, Jaroslav; Rodger, Alison; Scott, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The helicates—chiral assemblies of two or more metal atoms linked by short or relatively rigid multidentate organic ligands—may be regarded as non-peptide mimetics of α-helices because they are of comparable size and have shown some relevant biological activity. Unfortunately, these beautiful helical compounds have remained difficult to use in the medicinal arena because they contain mixtures of isomers, cannot be optimized for specific purposes, are insoluble, or are too difficult to synthesize. Instead, we have now prepared thermodynamically stable single enantiomers of monometallic units connected by organic linkers. Our highly adaptable self-assembly approach enables the rapid preparation of ranges of water-stable, helicate-like compounds with high stereochemical purity. One such iron(II) ‘flexicate’ system exhibits specific interactions with DNA, promising antimicrobial activity against a Gram-positive bacterium (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA252), but also, unusually, a Gram-negative bacterium (Escherichia coli, MC4100), as well as low toxicity towards a non-mammalian model organism (Caenorhabditis elegans).

  20. Active optics null test system based on a liquid crystal programmable spatial light modulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ares, Miguel; Royo, Santiago; Sergievskaya, Irina; Riu, Jordi

    2010-11-10

    We present an active null test system adapted to test lenses and wavefronts with complex shapes and strong local deformations. This system provides greater flexibility than conventional static null tests that match only a precisely positioned, individual wavefront. The system is based on a cylindrical Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor, a commercial liquid crystal programmable phase modulator (PPM), which acts as the active null corrector, enabling the compensation of large strokes with high fidelity in a single iteration, and a spatial filter to remove unmodulated light when steep phase changes are compensated. We have evaluated the PPM's phase response at 635 nm and checked its performance by measuring its capability to generate different amounts of defocus aberration, finding root mean squared errors below {lambda}/18 for spherical wavefronts with peak-to-valley heights of up to 78.7{lambda}, which stands as the limit from which diffractive artifacts created by the PPM have been found to be critical under no spatial filtering. Results of a null test for a complex lens (an ophthalmic customized progressive addition lens) are presented and discussed.

  1. Exploring the active galactic nuclei population with extreme X-ray-to-optical flux ratios (fx/fo > 50)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Della Ceca, R.; Carrera, F. J.; Caccianiga, A.; Severgnini, P.; Ballo, L.; Braito, V.; Corral, A.; Del Moro, A.; Mateos, S.; Ruiz, A.; Watson, M. G.

    2015-03-01

    The cosmic history of the growth of supermassive black holes in galactic centres parallels that of star formation in the Universe. However, an important fraction of this growth occurs inconspicuously in obscured objects, where ultraviolet/optical/near-infrared emission is heavily obscured by dust. Since the X-ray flux is less attenuated, a high X-ray-to-optical flux ratio (fx/fo) is expected to be an efficient tool to find out these obscured accreting sources. We explore here via optical spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and infrared photometry the most extreme cases of this population (those with fx/fo > 50, EXO50 sources hereafter), using a well-defined sample of seven X-ray sources extracted from the 2XMM catalogue. Five EXO50 sources (˜70 per cent of the sample) in the bright flux regime explored by our survey (f(2-10 keV) ≥ 1.5 × 10-13 erg cm-2 s-1) are associated with obscured AGN (NH > 1022 cm-2), spanning a redshift range between 0.75 and 1 and characterized by 2-10 keV intrinsic luminosities in the QSO regime (e.g. well in excess to 1044 erg s-1). We did not find compelling evidence of Compton thick active galacic nuclei (AGN). Overall, the EXO50 type 2 QSOs do not seem to be different from standard X-ray-selected type 2 QSOs in terms of nuclear absorption; a very high AGN/host galaxy ratio seems to play a major role in explaining their extreme properties. Interestingly, three out of five EXO50 type 2 QSO objects can be classified as extreme dust-obscured galaxies (EDOGs, f24 μm/fR ≥ 2000), suggesting that a very high AGN/host ratios (along with the large amount of dust absorption) could be the natural explanation also for a part of the EDOG population. The remaining two EXO50 sources are classified as BL Lac objects, having rather extreme properties, and which are good candidates for TeV emission.

  2. Synthesis, Optical Properties, and Photocatalytic Activity of One-Dimensional CdS@ZnS Core-Shell Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Le; Wei, Hongwei; Fan, Yingju; Liu, Xinzheng; Zhan, Jinhua

    2009-06-01

    One-dimensional (1D) CdS@ZnS core-shell nanocomposites were successfully synthesized via a two-step solvothermal method. Preformed CdS nanowires with a diameter of ca. 45 nm and a length up to several tens of micrometers were coated with a layer of ZnS shell by the reaction of zinc acetate and thiourea at 180 °C for 10 h. It was found that uniform ZnS shell was composed of ZnS nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. 4 nm, which anchored on the nanowires without any surface pretreatment. The 1D CdS@ZnS core-shell nanocomposites were confirmed by XRD, SEM, TEM, HR-TEM, ED, and EDS techniques. The optical properties and photocatalytic activities of the 1D CdS@ZnS core-shell nanocomposites towards methylene blue (MB) and 4-chlorophenol (4CP) under visible light (λ > 420 nm) were separately investigated. The results show that the ZnS shell can effectively passivate the surface electronic states of the CdS cores, which accounts for the enhanced photocatalytic activities of the 1D CdS@ZnS core-shell nanocomposites compared to that of the uncoated CdS nanowires.

  3. Synthesis, Optical Properties, and Photocatalytic Activity of One-Dimensional CdS@ZnS Core-Shell Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Le

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract One-dimensional (1D CdS@ZnS core-shell nanocomposites were successfully synthesized via a two-step solvothermal method. Preformed CdS nanowires with a diameter of ca. 45 nm and a length up to several tens of micrometers were coated with a layer of ZnS shell by the reaction of zinc acetate and thiourea at 180 °C for 10 h. It was found that uniform ZnS shell was composed of ZnS nanoparticles with a diameter of ca. 4 nm, which anchored on the nanowires without any surface pretreatment. The 1D CdS@ZnS core-shell nanocomposites were confirmed by XRD, SEM, TEM, HR-TEM, ED, and EDS techniques. The optical properties and photocatalytic activities of the 1D CdS@ZnS core-shell nanocomposites towards methylene blue (MB and 4-chlorophenol (4CP under visible light (λ > 420 nm were separately investigated. The results show that the ZnS shell can effectively passivate the surface electronic states of the CdS cores, which accounts for the enhanced photocatalytic activities of the 1D CdS@ZnS core-shell nanocomposites compared to that of the uncoated CdS nanowires.

  4. Electron-transfer-mediated binding of optically active cobalt(III) complexes to horse heart cytochrome c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, Ulrich; Merchán, Alejandro Castillejo; Bernauer, Klaus

    2005-03-22

    Optically active cobalt(II) complexes are used as reducing agents in the electron-transfer reaction involving horse heart cytochrome c. Analysis of the circular dichroism (CD) spectra of reaction products indicates that the corresponding cobalt(III) species of both enantiomers of [CoII(alamp)] (H2alamp=N,N'-[(pyridine-2,6-diyl)bis(methylene)]-bis[alanine]) are partly attached to the protein during electron transfer by coordination to an imidazole unit of one of the histidine residues. His-26 and His-33 are both solvent exposed, and the results suggest that one of these histidine residues acts as a bridge in the electron transfer to and from the haem iron of cytochrome c. The reaction is enantioselective: the ratio of the relative reactivity at 15 degrees C is 2.9 in favour of the R,R-enantiomer. A small induced CD activity in the haem chromophore reveals that some structural changes in the protein occur consecutively with the binding of the cobalt(III) complex.

  5. Selective optical control of synaptic transmission in the subcortical visual pathway by activation of viral vector-expressed halorhodopsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuyuki Kaneda

    Full Text Available The superficial layer of the superior colliculus (sSC receives visual inputs via two different pathways: from the retina and the primary visual cortex. However, the functional significance of each input for the operation of the sSC circuit remains to be identified. As a first step toward understanding the functional role of each of these inputs, we developed an optogenetic method to specifically suppress the synaptic transmission in the retino-tectal pathway. We introduced enhanced halorhodopsin (eNpHR, a yellow light-sensitive, membrane-targeting chloride pump, into mouse retinal ganglion cells (RGCs by intravitreously injecting an adeno-associated virus serotype-2 vector carrying the CMV-eNpHR-EYFP construct. Several weeks after the injection, whole-cell recordings made from sSC neurons in slice preparations revealed that yellow laser illumination of the eNpHR-expressing retino-tectal axons, putatively synapsing onto the recorded cells, effectively inhibited EPSCs evoked by electrical stimulation of the optic nerve layer. We also showed that sSC spike activities elicited by visual stimulation were significantly reduced by laser illumination of the sSC in anesthetized mice. These results indicate that photo-activation of eNpHR expressed in RGC axons enables selective blockade of retino-tectal synaptic transmission. The method established here can most likely be applied to a variety of brain regions for studying the function of individual inputs to these regions.

  6. Photochemically modified myeloperoxidase, with optical spectral properties analogous to those of lactoperoxidase, retains its original catalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hori, H.; Ikeda-Saito, M. (Osaka Univ. (Japan))

    1990-07-31

    During the course of a reducing reaction using ketyl radicals generated from ketone photoreduction with ultraviolet light, a photoinduced chemical modification of the chromophore group in myeloperoxidase has been found. Light absorption and resonance Raman spectra for this modified enzyme indicated an iron porphyrin chromophore group. The alkaline pyridine hemochrome of the modified enzyme exhibited an optical spectrum closely related to that of iron protoporphyrin IX. The chromophore group of the modified myeloperoxidase was cleaved from the protein by methoxide. Proton magnetic resonance of the diamagnetic bis(cyanide) compound of the extracted heme group showed the presence of two vinyl and three methyl side chains associated with a porphyrin macrocycle. These data provide further insight into the structure of the active site in myeloperoxidase. The EPR spectral properties and enzymatic activities of the native myeloperoxidase are essentially conserved in the modified enzyme. Our present results indicate that the heme peripheral substituent is modified while the stereochemical structure surrounding the chromophore group is not altered by the photochemical modification.

  7. Optical Sensing Circuit Using Low-Temperature Polycrystalline Silicon p-Type Thin-Film Transistors and p-Intrinsic-Metal Diode for Active Matrix Displays with Optical Input Functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Han-Sin; Kwon, Oh-Kyong

    2009-03-01

    An optical sensing circuit composed of low-temperature polycrystalline silicon (LTPS) p-type thin-film transistors (TFTs) and a p-intrinsic-metal (p-i-m) diode is proposed for image scanning and touch sensing functions. Because it is a very difficult challenge to integrate both display pixels and optical sensing circuits into the restricted pixel area, the number of additional devices and control signal lines must be minimized. Therefore, two p-type TFTs, one p-i-m diode, one capacitor, and one signal line are added to display pixel for the proposed optical sensing circuit. Active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) and active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED) pixels with the proposed optical sensing circuit have image scanning and touch sensing functions, respectively. Through the measurement of the proposed circuit under the condition of incident light varying from 0 to 10,000 lx, we verified that the dynamic and output ranges of the proposed circuit are 30 dB and 1.5 V, respectively.

  8. Third harmonic frequency generation by type-I critically phase-matched LiB3O5 crystal by means of optically active quartz crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gapontsev, Valentin P; Tyrtyshnyy, Valentin A; Vershinin, Oleg I; Davydov, Boris L; Oulianov, Dmitri A

    2013-02-11

    We present a method of third harmonic generation at 355 nm by frequency mixing of fundamental and second harmonic radiation of an ytterbium nanosecond pulsed all-fiber laser in a type-I phase-matched LiB(3)O(5) (LBO) crystal where originally orthogonal polarization planes of the fundamental and second harmonic beams are aligned by an optically active quartz crystal. 8 W of ultraviolet light at 355 nm were achieved with 40% conversion efficiency from 1064 nm radiation. The conversion efficiency obtained in a type-I phase-matched LBO THG crystal was 1.6 times higher than the one achieved in a type-II LBO crystal at similar experimental conditions. In comparison to half-wave plates traditionally used for polarization alignment the optically active quartz crystal has much lower temperature dependence and requires simpler optical alignment. PMID:23481827

  9. Optical properties and Judd–Ofelt analysis of Eu3+ activated calcium silicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eu3+ activated calcium silicate was synthesized in stoichiometric ratio using the co-precipitation technique. The phosphors were characterized using X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence technique. Based on Judd–Ofelt (J–O) analysis, the intensity parameters Ω2 and Ω4 were calculated from the emission spectra for various Europium concentrations. The determined values indicate higher hypersensitive behavior of the 5D0→7F2 transition of Eu3+ ions in the host matrix and a stronger covalency. Different radiative properties have been discussed as the function of Eu3+ concentration. The lifetime decay pattern recorded for these samples indicated single exponential behavior. The quantum efficiency has been calculated to be 62% from the emission spectrum and the fluorescence lifetime was found to be 2.9 ms

  10. Optical properties and Judd–Ofelt analysis of Eu{sup 3+} activated calcium silicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barve, R.A., E-mail: rujuta_barve2003@yahoo.com; Suriyamurthy, N.; Panigrahi, B.S.; Venkatraman, B.

    2015-10-15

    Eu{sup 3+} activated calcium silicate was synthesized in stoichiometric ratio using the co-precipitation technique. The phosphors were characterized using X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence technique. Based on Judd–Ofelt (J–O) analysis, the intensity parameters Ω{sub 2} and Ω{sub 4} were calculated from the emission spectra for various Europium concentrations. The determined values indicate higher hypersensitive behavior of the {sup 5}D{sub 0}→{sup 7}F{sub 2} transition of Eu{sup 3+} ions in the host matrix and a stronger covalency. Different radiative properties have been discussed as the function of Eu{sup 3+} concentration. The lifetime decay pattern recorded for these samples indicated single exponential behavior. The quantum efficiency has been calculated to be 62% from the emission spectrum and the fluorescence lifetime was found to be 2.9 ms.

  11. The optical polarization signatures of fragmented equatorial dusty structures in Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Marin, F

    2015-01-01

    If the existence of an obscuring circumnuclear region around the innermost regions of active galactic nuclei (AGN) has been observationally proven, its geometry remains highly uncertain. The morphology usually adopted for this region is a toroidal structure, but other alternatives, such as flared disks, can be a good representative of equatorial outflows. Those two geometries usually provide very similar spectroscopic signatures, even when they are modeled under the assumption of fragmentation. In this lecture note, we show that the resulting polarization signatures of the two models, either a torus or a flared disk, are quite different from each other. We use a radiative transfer code that computes the 2000 - 8000 angstrom polarization of the two morphologies in a clumpy environment, and show that varying the sizes of a toroidal region has deep impacts onto the resulting polarization, while the polarization of flared disks is independent of the outer radius. Clumpy flared disks also produce higher polarizati...

  12. 40-Gb/s all-optical wavelength conversion, regeneration, and demultiplexing in an SOA-based all-active Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolfson, David; Kloch, Allan; Fjelde, Tina;

    2000-01-01

    All-optical 2R and 3R regeneration techniques are investigated at 40 Gb/s, It is shown that an all-active SOA-based Mach-Zehnder device, employed as a,wavelength converter, is capable of improving the OSNR by more than 20 dB at this bit rate, thereby resulting in penalty reduction. Furthermore...

  13. Cinchona alkaloid squaramide catalyzed enantioselective hydrazination/cyclization cascade reaction of α-isocyanoacetates and azodicarboxylates: synthesis of optically active 1,2,4-triazolines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mei-Xin; Bi, Hong-Lei; Zhou, Hao; Yang, Hui; Shi, Min

    2013-09-20

    An efficient enantioselective hydrazination/cyclization cascade reaction of α-substituted isocyanoacetates to azodicarboxylates catalyzed by Cinchona alkaloid derived squaramide catalysts has been investigated, affording the optically active 1,2,4-triazolines in excellent yields (up to 99%) and good to excellent enantioselectivities (up to 97% ee) under mild conditions. PMID:23984761

  14. Preliminary clinical results: an analyzing tool for 2D optical imaging in detection of active inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adi Aizudin Bin Radin Nasirudin, Radin; Meier, Reinhard; Ahari, Carmen; Sievert, Matti; Fiebich, Martin; Rummeny, Ernst J.; No"l, Peter B.

    2011-03-01

    Optical imaging (OI) is a relatively new method in detecting active inflammation of hand joints of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA). With the high number of people affected by this disease especially in western countries, the availability of OI as an early diagnostic imaging method is clinically highly relevant. In this paper, we present a newly in-house developed OI analyzing tool and a clinical evaluation study. Our analyzing tool extends the capability of existing OI tools. We include many features in the tool, such as region-based image analysis, hyper perfusion curve analysis, and multi-modality image fusion to aid clinicians in localizing and determining the intensity of inflammation in joints. Additionally, image data management options, such as the full integration of PACS/RIS, are included. In our clinical study we demonstrate how OI facilitates the detection of active inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis. The preliminary clinical results indicate a sensitivity of 43.5%, a specificity of 80.3%, an accuracy of 65.7%, a positive predictive value of 76.6%, and a negative predictive value of 64.9% in relation to clinical results from MRI. The accuracy of inflammation detection serves as evidence to the potential of OI as a useful imaging modality for early detection of active inflammation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. With our in-house developed tool we extend the usefulness of OI imaging in the clinical arena. Overall, we show that OI is a fast, inexpensive, non-invasive and nonionizing yet highly sensitive and accurate imaging modality.-

  15. Neovibsanin B increases extracellular matrix proteins in optic nerve head cells via activation of Smad signalling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Xu, Wei; Rong, Ao; Lin, Yan; Qiu, Xu-Ling; Qu, Shen; Lan, Xian-Hai

    2015-01-01

    The present study demonstrates the effect of neovibsanin B on the synthesis and deposition of ECM proteins and the signalling pathways used in optic nerve head (ONH) astrocytes and lamina cribrosa (LC) cells. For investigation of the signalling pathway used by neovibsanin B, ONH cells were treated with neovibsanin B. Western blot and immunostaining analyses were used to examine the phosphorylation of proteins involved in Smad and non-Smad signalling pathway. The results revealed that ONH cells on treatment with neovibsanin B showed enhanced synthesis of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Neovibsanin B induced phosphorylation of canonical signalling proteins, Smad2/3. However phosphorylation of non-canonical signalling proteins, extracellular signal-regulated kinases, p38, and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK) 1/2 remained unaffected. There was also increase in co-localization of pSmad2/3 with Co-Smad4 in the nucleus of ONH astrocytes and LC cells indicating activation of the canonical Smad signalling pathway. Treatment of ONH cells with SIS3, inhibitor of Smad3 phosphorylation reversed the neovibsanin B stimulated ECM expression as well as activation of canonical pathway signalling molecules. In addition, inhibition of Smad2 or Smad3 using small interfering RNA (siRNA) also suppressed neovibsanin B stimulated ECM protein synthesis in ONH astrocytes and LC cells. Thus neovibsanin B utilizes the canonical Smad signalling pathway to stimulate ECM synthesis in human ONH cells. The neovibsanin B induced ECM synthesis and activation of the canonical Smad signalling pathway may be due to its effect on transforming growth factor-β2 (TGF-β2). However, further studies are under process to understand the mechanism.

  16. Comprehensive investigation of optical and electronic properties of tunable InAs QDs optically active at O-band telecommunication window with (In)GaAs surrounding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report on the impact of InAs quantum dots' (QDs) position within InGaAs strain reducing layer on their structural and optical properties. Morphological investigation revealed that the QD' size and density are strongly dependent on the InGaAs underlying layer's thickness. Additionally, comprehensive spectroscopic study by room temperature photoreflectance spectroscopy (PR) and temperature dependent photoluminescence (PL) showed that indium segregation and strain driven alloy phase separation alter both the QDs and their surrounding materials. Embedding or covering the InAs QDs by InGaAs has been found to improve their overall properties including an extended emission wavelength up to 1.3 μm. However a pronounced degradation has been observed when growing them on the top of the strain reducing layer, resulting in a broadened size distribution and atypical temperature dependent emission energy and linewidth. -- Highlights: • InAs quantum dots on different Ga(In)As surrounding material were grown by molecular beam epitaxy. • Optical investigation was used to study the impact of InAs QDs' position within InGaAs strain reducing layer with lower indium concentration. • Atomic force microscope images have been employed for the analyses of the optical results. • Indium segregation and strain driven alloy phase separation have been observed to affect both the QDs and their surrounding material. • QDs' emission wavelengths in the International Telecommunication Union O-band at room temperature have been obtained

  17. Photocatalytic Activity and Optical Properties of Blue Persistent Phosphors under UV and Solar Irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. García

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Blue phosphorescent strontium aluminosilicate powders were prepared by combustion synthesis route and a postannealing treatments at different temperatures. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that phosphors are composed of two main hexagonal phases: SrAl2O4 and Sr3Al32O51. The morphology of the phosphors changed from micrograins (1000°C to a mixture of bars and hexagons (1200°C and finally to only hexagons (1300°C as the annealing temperature is increased. Photoluminescence spectra showed a strong blue-green phosphorescent emission centered at λem=455 nm, which is associated with 4f65d1→4f6  (8S7/2 transition of the Eu2+. The sample annealed at 1200°C presents the highest luminance value (40 Cd/m2 with CIE coordinates (0.1589, 0.1972. Also, the photocatalytic degradation of methylene blue (MB under UV light (at 365 nm was monitored. Samples annealed at 1000°C and 1300°C presented the highest percentage of degradation (32% and 38.5%, resp. after 360 min. In the case of photocatalytic activity under solar irradiation, the samples annealed at 1000°C, 1150°C, and 1200°C produced total degradation of MB after only 300 min. Hence, the results obtained with solar photocatalysis suggest that our powders could be useful for water cleaning in water treatment plants.

  18. MBiO{sub 2}Cl (M=Sr, Ba) as novel photocatalysts: Synthesis, optical property and photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Hongwei, E-mail: hhw@cugb.edu.cn; Wang, Shuobo; Zhang, Yihe, E-mail: zyh@cugb.edu.cn; Han, Xu

    2015-02-15

    Novel quaternary photocatalysts MBiO{sub 2}Cl (M=Sr, Ba) have been successfully developed for efficient photodecomposition of RhB. Their photocatalytic mechanism was also investigated. - Highlights: • Two Bi-based compounds SrBiO{sub 2}Cl and BaBiO{sub 2}Cl were explored as photocatalysts. • They were successfully synthesized by a solid-state reaction. • RhB can be effectively photodecomposed by SrBiO{sub 2}Cl and BaBiO{sub 2}Cl under UV light. • ·OH radicals serving as active species play important roles in degradation process. - Abstract: Two Bi-based compounds SrBiO{sub 2}Cl and BaBiO{sub 2}Cl were successfully synthesized by a solid-state reaction and investigated as new photocatalysts for the first time. Their microstructures and optical properties were characterized by XRD, SEM and DRS. The band gaps of SrBiO{sub 2}Cl and BaBiO{sub 2}Cl were separately determined to be 3.52 and 3.71 eV, and their E{sub CB} and E{sub VB} were also estimated. The photocatalytic activities of the as-prepared samples were evaluated by photodecomposition of rhodamine B (RhB) in aqueous solution. The results revealed that both SrBiO{sub 2}Cl and BaBiO{sub 2}Cl can be used as effective photocatalysts under UV irradiation, and SrBiO{sub 2}Cl exhibits a higher photocatalytic activity than BaBiO{sub 2}Cl, which was also verified by the PL spectra. Terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing technique (TA-PL) demonstrated that ·OH radicals serving as active species play an important role in photooxidative degradation of RhB over SrBiO{sub 2}Cl and BaBiO{sub 2}Cl. Moreover, a larger amount of ·OH radicals generation was observed over SrBiO{sub 2}Cl, which is in agreement with its higher photocatalytic activity.

  19. Volcanic and Tectonic Activity in the Red Sea Region (2004-2013): Insights from Satellite Radar Interferometry and Optical Imagery

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Wenbin

    2015-04-01

    Studying recent volcanic and tectonic events in the Red Sea region is important for improving our knowledge of the Red Sea plate boundary and for regional geohazard assessments. However, limited information has been available about the past activity due to insufficient in-situ data and remoteness of some of the activity. In this dissertation, I have used satellite remote sensing to derive new information about several recent volcanic and tectonic events in the Red Sea region. I first report on three volcanic eruptions in the southern Red Sea, the 2007-8 Jebel at Tair eruption and the 2011-12 & 2013 Zubair eruptions, which resulted in formation of two new islands. Series of high- resolution optical images were used to map the extent of lava flows and to observe and analyze the growth and destructive processes of the new islands. I used Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data to study the evolution of lava flows, to estimate their volumes, as well as to generate ground displacements maps, which were used to model the dikes that fed the eruptions. I then report on my work of the 2009 Harrat Lunayyir dike intrusion and the 2004 Tabuk earthquake sequence in western Saudi Arabia. I used InSAR observations and stress calculations to study the intruding dike at Harrat Lunayyir, while I combined InSAR data and Bayesian estimation to study the Tabuk earthquake activity. The key findings of the thesis are: 1) The recent volcanic eruptions in the southern Red Sea indicate that the area is magmatically more active than previously acknowledged and that a rifting episode has been taken place in the southern Red Sea; 2) Stress interactions between an ascending dike intrusion and normal faulting on graben-bounding faults above the dike can inhibit vertical propagation of magma towards the surface; 3) InSAR observations can improve locations of shallow earthquakes and fault model uncertainties are useful to associate earthquake activity with mapped faults; 4). The

  20. Optic neuritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retro-bulbar neuritis; Multiple sclerosis - optic neuritis; Optic nerve - optic neuritis ... The exact cause of optic neuritis is unknown. The optic nerve carries visual information from your eye to the brain. The nerve can swell when ...

  1. Quantum optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1988 progress report of the Quantum Optics laboratory (Polytechnic School, France) is presented. The research program is focused on the behavior of dense and dilute materials submitted to short and high-intensity light radiation fields. Nonlinear optics techniques, with time and spatial resolution, are developed. An important research activity concerns the investigations on the interactions between the photon beams and the inhomogeneous or composite materials, as well as the artificial microstructures. In the processes involving molecular beams and surfaces, the research works on the photophysics of surfaces and the molecule-surface interactions, are included

  2. Adaptive optical zoom sensor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sweatt, William C.; Bagwell, Brett E.; Wick, David Victor

    2005-11-01

    In order to optically vary the magnification of an imaging system, continuous mechanical zoom lenses require multiple optical elements and use fine mechanical motion to precisely adjust the separations between individual or groups of lenses. By incorporating active elements into the optical design, we have designed and demonstrated imaging systems that are capable of variable optical magnification with no macroscopic moving parts. Changing the effective focal length and magnification of an imaging system can be accomplished by adeptly positioning two or more active optics in the optical design and appropriately adjusting the optical power of those elements. In this application, the active optics (e.g. liquid crystal spatial light modulators or deformable mirrors) serve as variable focal-length lenses. Unfortunately, the range over which currently available devices can operate (i.e. their dynamic range) is relatively small. Therefore, the key to this concept is to create large changes in the effective focal length of the system with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual elements by leveraging the optical power of conventional optical elements surrounding the active optics. By appropriately designing the optical system, these variable focal-length lenses can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length, and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses.

  3. Investigation of optically-induced DFB lasing in organic scintillators in order to achieve active ionizing radiation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Transducers used for nuclear measurements are divided into two groups. The first one is made of detectors based on the movement of charged carriers created during the interaction of ionizing radiation with materials (ionization chambers, semiconductors, etc.). The second comprises scintillating materials which emit light following such interaction. The present work aims at shifting the current paradigm in order to achieve an active measurement of the interactions between particles and sensor. The aim of this thesis is to investigate the response of nano-structured scintillators when excited by a primary laser beam while in the presence of ionizing radiations. It consists more precisely in optically inducing a laser emission in scintillators so as to benefit from the inherent sensitivity of this kind of wave to any kind of change in its environment. This study is at first focused on controlling the propagation of the electromagnetic waves in nano-structured media. This nano-structuration allows the channeling of the electromagnetic energy in a particular direction and at a precise wavelength and thus to amplify the transduction signal. The second part of this study is dedicated to the attempts at observing any change in the emission in an amplified regime while exposed to ionizing radiations (alpha, beta). The limitation of these sources requires the use of an electron accelerator. The conclusion of this part lays the foundation for future work and provides hypotheses regarding the effects that could be expected from the irradiation with high electron fluxes. (author)

  4. Thermally activated conversion of a silicate gel to an oxyfluoride glass ceramic: Optical study using Eu3+ probe ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sol–gel route using metal alkoxides precursor and trifluoroacetic acid as in situ fluorination reagent has been used to prepare Eu3+-doped silicate xerogel, followed by thermal annealing to obtain oxyfluoride glass ceramic containing Eu3+-doped BaF2 nanocrystals. We have used Eu3+ as probe ion and we analyzed its characteristic features (photoluminescence, optical absorption and magnetic circular dichroism) to get information about the local environment around the ion during thermally activated evolution of the sol to xerogel and then glass ceramic. As the drying and annealing proceeds silica network is formed accompanied by precipitation of the nanofluoride crystalline phase; Eu3+ coordination changes gradually from a random and assymetric CF3COO- one (in the sol) to a symmetric one (in the BaF2 nanocrystals) given by the fluorine ions. Glass ceramization is based on a homogenous crystallization mechanism with BaF2 nucleation centres resulted from thermal decomposition of Ba-trifluoacetate at around 300 °C followed by subsequent growth into BaF2 nanocrystals above 600 °C; Eu3+-ions are incorporated during the nanocrystals growth. -- Highlights: • Glass ceramization is the result of a homogenous crystallization with BaF2 nucleation centres. • Eu3+-ions are incorporated during nanocrystals growth, above 600 °C. • Eu3+-ions are embedded dominantly in the BaF2 nanocrystals in high symmetry sites

  5. Efficient modulation of optical and electrical properties of X-shaped thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitters by substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianzhong; Wang, Xin; Lin, Lili; Wang, Chuankui

    2016-08-01

    A series of X-shaped thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitters are systematically studied by first-principles calculations. Effects of the cyano group adding to the acceptor unit and the hydroxyl group adding to the donor part on the optical and electrical properties are analyzed. It is found that both kinds of groups can efficiently increase the emission wavelength to realize full-color emission. Although they play different roles in modulating the energy level of frontier orbitals, the S-T energy gap, the reorganization energy and transfer integral for different molecules, they can efficiently increase the charge transfer rate and reduce the difference of electron transfer rate and hole transfer rate. These results indicate that these designed strategies are efficient to achieve balanced charge transfer rates and modulate emission colors. By analyzing the energy matching between the TADF emitters and three kinds of hosts, the emission spectra of the 3,5-bis(N-carbazolyl)benzene (mcp) and the absorption spectra of most TADF emitters have a large overlap, which provides helpful information in application of these TADF molecules. PMID:27383609

  6. Optically-Selected BLR-less Active Galactic Nuclei from the SDSS Stripe82 Database I: The Sample

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xue Guang

    2013-01-01

    This is the first paper in a dedicated series to study the properties of the optically selected BLR-less AGNs (Active Galactic Nuclei with no-hidden central broad emission line regions). We carried out a systematic search for the BLR-less AGNs through the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Legacy Survey (SDSS Stripe82 Database). Based on the spectral decomposition results for all the 136676 spectroscopic objects (galaxies and QSOs) with redshift less than 0.35 covered by the SDSS Stripe82 region, our spectroscopic sample for the BLR-less AGNs includes 22693 pure narrow line objects without broad emission lines but with apparent AGN continuum emission $R_{AGN}>0.3$ and apparent stellar lights $R_{ssp}>0.3$. Then, using the properties of the photometry magnitude RMS ($RMS$) and the Pearson's coefficients ($R_{1, 2}$) between two different SDSS band light curves: $RMS_k>3\\times RMS_{M_k}$ and $R_{1, 2}>\\sim0.8$, the final 281 pure narrow objects with true photometry variabilities are our selected reliable candidates for t...

  7. Chiral sensing of amino acids and proteins chelating with Eu(III) complexes by Raman optical activity spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tao; Kessler, Jiří; Bouř, Petr

    2016-09-14

    Chiroptical spectroscopy of lanthanides sensitively reflects their environment and finds various applications including probing protein structures. However, the measurement is often hampered by instrumental detection limits. In the present study circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) of a europium complex induced by amino acids is monitored by Raman optical activity (ROA) spectroscopy, which enables us to detect weak CPL bands invisible to conventional CPL spectrometers. In detail, the spectroscopic response to the protonation state could be studied, e.g. histidine at pH = 2 showed an opposite sign of the strongest CPL band in contrast to that at pH = 7. The spectra were interpreted qualitatively on the basis of the ligand-field theory and related to CPL induced by an external magnetic field. Free energy profiles obtained by molecular dynamic simulations for differently charged alanine and histidine forms are in qualitative agreement with the spectroscopic data. The sensitivity and specificity of the detection promise future applications in probing peptide and protein side chains, chemical imaging and medical diagnosis. This potential is observed for human milk and hen egg-white lysozymes; these proteins have a similar structure, but very different induced CPL spectra. PMID:27523964

  8. Optical counterparts of undetermined type $\\gamma$-ray Active Galactic Nuclei with blazar-like Spectral Energy Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    La Mura, G; Ciroi, S; Rafanelli, P; Salvetti, D; Berton, M; Cracco, V

    2015-01-01

    During its first four years of scientific observations, the Fermi Large Area Telescope (Fermi-LAT) detected 3033 $\\gamma$-ray sources above a 4$\\sigma$ significance level. Although most of the extra-Galactic sources are active galactic nuclei (AGN) of the blazar class, other families of AGNs are observed too, while a still high fraction of detections ($\\sim 30\\%$) remains with uncertain association or classification. According to the currently accepted interpretation, the AGN $\\gamma$-ray emission arises from inverse Compton (IC) scattering of low energy photons by relativistic particles confined in a jet that, in the case of blazars, is oriented very close to our line of sight. Taking advantage of data from radio and X-ray wavelengths, which we expect to be produced together with $\\gamma$-rays, providing a much better source localization potential, we focused our attention on a sample of $\\gamma$-ray Blazar Candidates of Undetermined Type (BCUs), starting a campaign of optical spectroscopic observations. The...

  9. Fast-light Enhanced Brillouin Laser Based Active Fiber Optics Sensor for Simultaneous Measurement of Rotation and Acceleration

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Minchuan; Fouda, Mohamed; Condon, Nicholas; Scheuer, Jacob; Shahriar, Selim M

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a conceptual design for an Active Fast Light Fiber Optic Sensor (AFLIFOS) that can perform simultaneously or separately as a gyroscope (differential mode effect) and a sensor for acceleration, strain, and other common mode effects. Two Brillouin lasers in opposite directions and separated in frequency by several free spectral ranges are used for this sensor. By coupling two auxiliary resonators to the primary fiber resonator, we produce superluminal effects for two laser modes. We develop a detailed theoretical model for optimizing the design of the AFLIFOS, and show that the enhancement factor of the sensitivity is $\\sim{187}$ and $\\sim{-187}$, respectively for the two Brillouin lasers under the optimized condition, when the effective change in perimeter of the primary fiber resonator is 0.1nm, corresponding to a rotation rate of 0.4 deg/sec for a ring resonator with radius 1m. It may be possible to get much higher enhancement by adjusting the parameters such as the perimeters and the coupl...

  10. Development of a portable active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy system for volcanic gas measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vita, Fabio; Kern, Christoph; Inguaggiato, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) has been an effective tool for measuring atmospheric trace gases for several decades. However, instruments were large, heavy and power-inefficient, making their application to remote environments extremely challenging. Recent developments in fibre-coupling telescope technology and the availability of ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDS) have now allowed us to design and construct a lightweight, portable, low-power LP-DOAS instrument for use at remote locations and specifically for measuring degassing from active volcanic systems. The LP-DOAS was used to measure sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from La Fossa crater, Vulcano, Italy, where column densities of up to 1.2 × 1018 molec cm−2 (~ 500 ppmm) were detected along open paths of up to 400 m in total length. The instrument's SO2 detection limit was determined to be 2 × 1016 molec cm−2 (~ 8 ppmm), thereby making quantitative detection of even trace amounts of SO2 possible. The instrument is capable of measuring other volcanic volatile species as well. Though the spectral evaluation of the recorded data showed that chlorine monoxide (ClO) and carbon disulfide (CS2) were both below the instrument's detection limits during the experiment, the upper limits for the X / SO2 ratio (X = ClO, CS2) could be derived, and yielded 2 × 10−3 and 0.1, respectively. The robust design and versatility of the instrument make it a promising tool for monitoring of volcanic degassing and understanding processes in a range of volcanic systems.

  11. Retrieval of the photochemical reflectance index for assessing xanthophyll cycle activity: a comparison of near-surface optical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, A.; Gamon, J. A.; Pastorello, G. Z.; Wong, C. Y. S.

    2014-11-01

    Unattended optical sensors are increasingly being deployed on eddy covariance flux towers and are often used to complement existing vegetation and micrometeorological measurements to enable assessment of biophysical states and biogeochemical processes over a range of spatial scales. Of particular interest are sensors that can measure the photochemical reflectance index (PRI), which can provide information pertaining to leaf pigments and photosynthetic activity. This interest has facilitated the production of a new range of lower-cost multispectral sensors specifically designed to measure temporal changes in the PRI signal. However, little is known about the characteristics (spectral, radiometric and temporal) of many of these PRI sensors, making it difficult to compare data obtained from these sensors across time, geographical locations and instruments. Furthermore, direct testing of the capability of these sensors to actually detect the conversion of the xanthophyll cycle, which is the original biological basis of the PRI diurnal signal, is largely absent, often resulting in an unclear interpretation of the signal, particularly given the wide range of factors now known to influence PRI. Through a series of experiments, we assess the sensitivity of one of the leading brands of PRI sensor (Skye SKR 1800) to changes in vegetation photosynthetic activity in response to changing irradiance. We compare the results with those obtained using a more expensive industry-standard visible to near-infrared hyperspectral spectrometer (PP Systems UniSpec) and determine the radiometric compatibility of measurements made by the different instruments. Results suggest that the SKR 1800 instrument is able to track rapid (seconds to minutes) and more gradual diurnal changes in photosynthetic activity associated with xanthophyll cycle pigment conversion. Measurements obtained from both the high and lower cost instrument were significantly linearly correlated but were subject to a large

  12. The effect of chromophores concentration on the nonlinear optical activity of methacrylic copolymers with azochromophores in the side chain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadratic nonlinear-optical characteristics of thin films based on methacrylic copolymers with of chromophore-containing monomers incorporated at various concentrations are measured by Second Harmonic Generation technique. Optimal chromophores content is obtained to be about 17 mol%, rather high values of nonlinear-optical coefficient, d33, up to 60 pm/V, are determined

  13. Multiwavelength optical observations of chromospherically active binary systems V. FF UMa (2RE J0933+624): a system with orbital period variation

    CERN Document Server

    Gálvez, M C; Fernández-Figueroa, M J; De Castro, E; Cornide, M

    2007-01-01

    This is the fifth paper in a series aimed at studying the chromospheres of active binary systems using several optical spectroscopic indicators to obtain or improve orbital solution and fundamental stellar parameters. We present here the study of FF UMa (2RE J0933+624), a recently discovered, X-ray/EUV selected, active binary with strong H_alpha emission. The objectives of this work are, to find orbital solutions and define stellar parameters from precise radial velocities and carry out an extensive study of the optical indicators of chromospheric activity. We obtained high resolution echelle spectroscopic observations during five observing runs from 1998 to 2004. We found radial velocities by cross correlation with radial velocity standard stars to achieve the best orbital solution. We also measured rotational velocity by cross-correlation techniques and have studied the kinematic by galactic space- velocity components (U, V, W) and Eggen criteria. Finally, we have determined the chromospheric contribution i...

  14. An Efficient Synthesis of Highly Optically Active 4-Substituted-2(5H)-furanones from Chiral 3-Bromo-2(5H)-furanone

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN, Xue-E(范雪娥); HUANG, Min(黄敏); HUANG, Hui(黄慧); CHEN, Qing-Hua(陈庆华)

    2004-01-01

    Highly optically active 4-substituted-2(5H)-furanones 6a-6j were obtained in good yields with de≥98% by the tandem Michael addition/elimination reaction of chiral 3-bromo-2(5H)-furanone (4a), which was conveniently prepared starting from 2-furaldehyde under mild conditions. The products were identified on the basis of their satisfactory elemental analysis and spectroscopic data of IR, UV, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and mass spectra. The stereochemistry and absolute configuration of this type of compounds were established by the X-ray crystallographic study. The reaction provided a short and efficient synthesis of the interesting highly optically active 4-substituted-2(5H)-furanones containing an active pyrimidine and a purine base group.

  15. The connection between radio loudness and central surface brightness profiles in optically selected low-luminosity active galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richings, A. J.; Uttley, P.; Körding, E.

    2011-08-01

    Recent results indicate a correlation between nuclear radio loudness of active galaxies and their central stellar surface-brightness profiles, in that 'core' galaxies (with inner logarithmic slope γ≤ 0.3) are significantly more radio loud than 'power-law' galaxies (γ≥ 0.5). This connection, which indicates possible links between radio loudness and galaxy formation history (e.g. through black hole spin), has so far only been confirmed for a radio-selected sample of galaxies. Furthermore, it has since been shown that the Nuker law, which was used to parametrize the brightness profiles in these studies, gives a poor description of the brightness profile, with its parameters varying systematically with the radial fitted extent of the profile. Here, we present an analysis of the central surface brightness profiles of the active galaxies of Hubble type T≤ 3, that were identified by the optically selected Palomar spectroscopic survey of nearby galaxies. We fit the brightness profiles using Sérsic, Core-Sérsic and, where necessary, Double-Sérsic models, which we fit to the semimajor axis brightness profiles extracted from high-resolution images of the galaxies from the Hubble Space Telescope. We use these fits to classify the galaxies as 'Core', 'Sérsic' or 'Double-Sérsic'. We compare the properties of the active galactic nuclei (AGN) and their host galaxies with this classification, and we recover the already established trend for Core galaxies to be more luminous and contain a higher mass supermassive black hole. Defining the radio loudness of an AGN as the ratio of the nuclear radio luminosity to [O III] line luminosity, which allows us to include most of the AGN in our sample and prevents a bias against dim nuclei that are harder to extract from the brightness profiles, we find that AGN hosted in Core galaxies are generally more radio loud than those hosted in Sérsic galaxies, although there is a large overlap between the two subsamples. The correlation

  16. Optically active red-emitting Cu nanoclusters originating from complexation and redox reaction between copper(ii) and d/l-penicillamine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Tengfei; Guo, Yanjia; Lin, Min; Yuan, Mengke; Liu, Zhongde; Huang, Chengzhi

    2016-05-01

    Despite a significant surge in the number of investigations into both optically active Au and Ag nanostructures, there is currently only limited knowledge about optically active Cu nanoclusters (CuNCs) and their potential applications. Here, we have succeeded in preparing a pair of optically active red-emitting CuNCs on the basis of complexation and redox reaction between copper(ii) and penicillamine (Pen) enantiomers, in which Pen serves as both a reducing agent and a stabilizing ligand. Significantly, the CuNCs feature unique aggregation induced emission (AIE) characteristics and therefore can serve as pH stimuli-responsive functional materials. Impressively, the ligand chirality plays a dramatic role for the creation of brightly emissive CuNCs, attributed to the conformation of racemic Pen being unfavorable for the electrostatic interaction, and thus suppressing the formation of cluster aggregates. In addition, the clusters display potential toward cytoplasmic staining and labelling due to the high photoluminescence (PL) quantum yields (QYs) and remarkable cellular uptake, in spite that no chirality-dependent effects in autophagy and subcellular localization are observed in the application of chiral cluster enantiomer-based cell imaging.Despite a significant surge in the number of investigations into both optically active Au and Ag nanostructures, there is currently only limited knowledge about optically active Cu nanoclusters (CuNCs) and their potential applications. Here, we have succeeded in preparing a pair of optically active red-emitting CuNCs on the basis of complexation and redox reaction between copper(ii) and penicillamine (Pen) enantiomers, in which Pen serves as both a reducing agent and a stabilizing ligand. Significantly, the CuNCs feature unique aggregation induced emission (AIE) characteristics and therefore can serve as pH stimuli-responsive functional materials. Impressively, the ligand chirality plays a dramatic role for the creation of

  17. An LD-pumped Q-switched Nd:YAG laser using La 3 Ga 5 SiO 14 for the electro-optic modulator and optical activity compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, H.; Huang, J. H.; Zhao, X.; Wang, J. Y.; Shi, F.; Li, J. H.; Deng, J.; Liu, H. G.; Weng, W.; Ge, Y.; Dai, S. T.; Ruan, K. M.; Wu, H. C.; Lin, W. X.

    2014-04-01

    La3Ga5SiO14 (LGS) has been designed and used successfully not only as an electro-optical (EO) Q-switch but also as the optically active crystal in an Nd:YAG (yttrium aluminum garnet) pulse-off laser cavity with two-rod birefringence compensation in this paper. A maximum average output power of 15.8 W with a pulse width of 21 ns was obtained at the maximum repetition rate of 1 kHz, and the dynamic-static ratio was 75%. Experimental results revealed that the spatial distribution of the laser intensity with the two LGS crystals inserted between two identical Nd:YAG rods was significantly better than the spatial distribution with no birefringence compensation or a KD ∗ P EO Q-switcher.

  18. Photometric activity of UX orionis stars and related objects in the near infrared and optical: CO Ori, RR Tau, UX Ori, and VV Ser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenavrin, V. I.; Rostopchina-Shakhovskaya, A. N.; Grinin, V. P.; Demidova, T. V.; Shakhovskoi, D. N.; Belan, S. P.

    2016-08-01

    This paper continues a study of the photometric activity of UX Ori stars in the optical and near-infrared ( JHKLM bands) initiated in 2000. For comparison, the list of program stars contains two Herbig Ae stars that are photometrically quiet in the optical: MWC480 andHD179218. Fadings ofUXOri stars in the optical ( V band) due to sporadic increases of the circumstellar extinction are also observed in the infrared (IR), but with decreasing amplitude. Two stars, RR Tau and UX Ori, displayed photometric events when V -band fadings were accompanied by an increase in IR fluxes. Among the two Herbig Ae stars that are photometrically quiet in the optical, MWC 480 proved to be fairly active in the IR. Unlike the UX Ori stars, the variation amplitude of MWC 480 increases from the J band to the M band. In the course of the observations, no deep fadings in the IR bands were detected. This indicates that eclipses of the program stars have a local nature, and are due to extinction variations in the innermost regions of the circumstellar disks. The results presented testify to an important role of the alignment of the circumstellar disks relative to the direction towards the observer in determining the observed IR variability of young stars.

  19. Structural and optical characterization of pure and starch-capped ZnO quantum dots and their photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidhya, K.; Saravanan, M.; Bhoopathi, G.; Devarajan, V. P.; Subanya, S.

    2015-02-01

    Among the different types of metal oxides, zinc oxide (ZnO) is a most commonly used metal oxide in a broad variety of applications. In the present investigation, a modified green synthesis route was used to synthesize pure and starch-capped ZnO (ZnO/starch) quantum dots (QDs) and studied their structural and optical characteristics. In this study, hexagonal crystal structure was observed in both pure and ZnO/starch QDs using X-ray diffraction technique. A spherical-shaped surface morphology was found with the size of 5-10 nm using transmission electron microscope technique. The interaction between ZnO QDs and starch molecules was proved via Fourier infra-red spectrometer technique. On the other hand, their fluorescence behaviors were investigated using photoluminescence technique, in that the ZnO/starch QDs showed an enhanced emission behavior when compared to the pure ZnO QDs. Further, the solar photocatalytic activity of both the ZnO QDs was examined with the dye Rhodamine B (RhB) at the end of 30, 60, 90, and 120 min. In this, ZnO/starch QDs show a good and more decomposition of RhB than pure ZnO QDs. Collectively, in the present study, green synthesis route produced an efficient QDs (pure and ZnO/starch) and it will be very useful for many other QDs. The ZnO/starch QDs are suitable for decomposing the RhB and other toxic organic dyes.

  20. Impacts of microbial activity on the optical and copper-binding properties of leaf-litter leachate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad eCuss

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Dissolved organic matter (DOM is a universal part of all aquatic systems that largely originates with the decay of plant and animal tissue. Its polyelectrolytic and heterogeneous characters make it an effective metal-complexing agent with highly diverse characteristics. Microbes utilize DOM as a source of nutrients and energy and their enzymatic activity may change its composition, thereby altering the bioavailability and toxicity of metals. This study investigated the impacts of microbial inoculation upon the optical and copper-binding properties of freshly-produced leaf-litter leachate over 168 hours. Copper speciation was measured using voltammetry, and using fluorescence quenching analysis of independent fluorophores determined using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC. Four distinct components were detected. Thirty-five percent of total protein/polyphenol-like fluorescence was removed after 168-hr of exposure to riverine microbes. Using voltammetry, a 6-fold increase in copper-complexing (CC capacity (130 - 770 μmol Cu/g C was observed over the exposure period, while the conditional binding constant (log K decreased from 7.2 to 5.8. Binding parameters were significantly different for all four PARAFAC components and were generally in agreement with voltammetric results in the microbially-degraded samples, but they were significantly different in leachate. These results suggest that non-fluorescent moieties may exert a significant influence upon binding characteristics. Three of four binding sites corresponding to independent PARAFAC components, which had distinct characteristics in the leachate, retained significantly different log K values (p<0.05 after 168 hours of incubation, while their complexing capacities became similar. It was concluded that the microbial metabolization of maple leaf leachate has a significant impact upon DOM composition and its copper-binding characteristics.

  1. Multi-Purpose Anthropomorphic Robotic Hand Design for Extra-Vehicular Activity Manipulation Tasks using Embedded Fiber Optic Sensors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — IFOS proposes to design and build fiber-optically sensorized robotic fingers that can sense force and, objects using only tactile feedback, similar to the skin on a...

  2. A new experiment to investigate the origin of optical activity using a low energy positron beam of controlled helicity. [molecular biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidley, D. W.; Rich, A.; Van House, J. C.; Zitzewitz, P. W.

    1981-01-01

    Previous experiments undertaken in search of a correlation between the origin of optical activity in biological molecules and the helicity of beta particles emitted in nuclear beta decay have not provided any useful results. A description is presented of an experiment in which a low energy polarized positron beam of controlled helicity interacts with an optically active material to form positronium in vacuum. Advantages of the current study compared to the previous experiments are mainly related to a much greater sensitivity. Initially, it will be possible to detect a helicity-dependent asymmetry in triplet positronium formation of 1 part in 10,000. Improvements to better than 1 part in 100,000 should be attainable.

  3. 激光半主动制导导引头光学系统的设计%Laser semi-active seeking guided seeker optical system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡博; 常伟军; 孙婷; 何玉兰

    2012-01-01

    According to principles of quadrant detector, light spots of laser semi-active seeking guided seeker optical systems should be formed on the target surface of quadrant detector uniformly. This paper firstly analyzed the aberration characteristics of these optical systems and presented a method for correcting the aberrations, then designed an optical system by CODE V, evaluated the spots quality of the optical system qualitatively by the footprint and the encircled energy. 1×106 rays were traced by LightTools to obtain the distribute of the rays on the quadrant detector for various fields of view. The target angle-output response curve which could evaluate the performance of light spots precisely was plotted by Matlab. The article provides reference for the optical system design of laser semi-active seeking guided seeker.%根据四象限探测器的工作原理,激光半主动导引头光学系统所成光斑需均匀分布在探测器靶面上.首先分析此类光学系统像差特点,提出像差的设计方案,然后通过使用CODE V设计一套光学系统,利用痕迹图、包围能量等定性评价系统光斑质量.在不同视场时,通过LightTools光机分析软件追迹1×106根光线,得到探测器靶面的光线分布,利用Matlab处理数据并绘制角度-输出响应曲线,利用该曲线可精确评价探测器靶面的光斑性能.

  4. Correlation of within-individual fluctuation of depressed mood with prefrontal cortex activity during verbal working memory task: optical topography study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroki; Aoki, Ryuta; Katura, Takusige; Matsuda, Ryoichi; Koizumi, Hideaki

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies showed that interindividual variations in mood state are associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity. In this study, we focused on the depressed-mood state under natural circumstances and examined the relationship between within-individual changes over time in this mood state and PFC activity. We used optical topography (OT), a functional imaging technique based on near-infrared spectroscopy, to measure PFC activity for each participant in three experimental sessions repeated at 2-week intervals. In each session, the participants completed a self-report questionnaire of mood state and underwent OT measurement while performing verbal and spatial working memory (WM) tasks. The results showed that changes in the depressed-mood score between successive sessions were negatively correlated with those in the left PFC activation for the verbal WM task (ρ = -0.56, p mood changes. We thus demonstrated that PFC activity during a verbal WM task varies depending on the participant's depressed mood state, independent of trait factors. This suggests that using optical topography to measure PFC activity during a verbal WM task can be used as a potential state marker for an individual's depressed mood state.

  5. Correlation of within-individual fluctuation of depressed mood with prefrontal cortex activity during verbal working memory task: optical topography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroki; Aoki, Ryuta; Katura, Takusige; Matsuda, Ryoichi; Koizumi, Hideaki

    2011-12-01

    Previous studies showed that interindividual variations in mood state are associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC) activity. In this study, we focused on the depressed-mood state under natural circumstances and examined the relationship between within-individual changes over time in this mood state and PFC activity. We used optical topography (OT), a functional imaging technique based on near-infrared spectroscopy, to measure PFC activity for each participant in three experimental sessions repeated at 2-week intervals. In each session, the participants completed a self-report questionnaire of mood state and underwent OT measurement while performing verbal and spatial working memory (WM) tasks. The results showed that changes in the depressed-mood score between successive sessions were negatively correlated with those in the left PFC activation for the verbal WM task (ρ = -0.56, p mood changes. We thus demonstrated that PFC activity during a verbal WM task varies depending on the participant's depressed mood state, independent of trait factors. This suggests that using optical topography to measure PFC activity during a verbal WM task can be used as a potential state marker for an individual's depressed mood state.

  6. Optically active SiO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2}/polyacetylene multilayered nanospheres: Preparation, characterization, and application for low infrared emissivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bu, Xiaohai; Zhou, Yuming, E-mail: ymzhou@seu.edu.cn; He, Man; Chen, Zhenjie; Zhang, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Optically active silica/titania/substituted polyacetylene (SiO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2}/SPA) multilayered core–shell nanocomposite was successfully prepared by the combination of subsequent surface titania deposition and polymer grafting on the bare silica nanosphere. The chiral amino acid-based SPA copolymer serving as the organic shell was optically active and adopted a predominately single-handed helical conformation. The SiO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2}/SPA nanospheres were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to record the formation of the multilayered architecture and the results clearly showed that the inorganic/organic hybrid nanoparticles exhibited hierarchical multilayered core–shell construction. The SPA outer shell experienced an enhancement in thermal stability and still remained considerable optical activity after grafting to the SiO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} nanosphere. The SiO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2}/SPA nanocomposite had an infrared emissivity value (ε = 0.548) at the wavelength of 8–14 μm which was much lower than each of its components. The reduced infrared emissivity values proved that the strengthened interfacial interactions originating from the coating SPA had an effective synergistic effect with the semiconductive anatase TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles on silica sphere in lowering the infrared emissivity value.

  7. Optically active SiO2/TiO2/polyacetylene multilayered nanospheres: Preparation, characterization, and application for low infrared emissivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optically active silica/titania/substituted polyacetylene (SiO2/TiO2/SPA) multilayered core–shell nanocomposite was successfully prepared by the combination of subsequent surface titania deposition and polymer grafting on the bare silica nanosphere. The chiral amino acid-based SPA copolymer serving as the organic shell was optically active and adopted a predominately single-handed helical conformation. The SiO2/TiO2/SPA nanospheres were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopies (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to record the formation of the multilayered architecture and the results clearly showed that the inorganic/organic hybrid nanoparticles exhibited hierarchical multilayered core–shell construction. The SPA outer shell experienced an enhancement in thermal stability and still remained considerable optical activity after grafting to the SiO2/TiO2 nanosphere. The SiO2/TiO2/SPA nanocomposite had an infrared emissivity value (ε = 0.548) at the wavelength of 8–14 μm which was much lower than each of its components. The reduced infrared emissivity values proved that the strengthened interfacial interactions originating from the coating SPA had an effective synergistic effect with the semiconductive anatase TiO2 nanoparticles on silica sphere in lowering the infrared emissivity value.

  8. Diophantine Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouan, D.

    2016-09-01

    What I call Diophantine optics is the exploitation in optics of some remarkable algebraic relations between powers of integers. The name comes from Diophantus of Alexandria, a greek mathematician, known as the father of algebra. He studied polynomial equations with integer coefficients and integer solutions, called diophantine equations. Since constructive or destructive interferences are playing with optical path differences which are multiple integer (odd or even) of λ/2 and that the complex amplitude is a highly non-linear function of the optical path difference (or equivalently of the phase), one can understand that any Taylor development of this amplitude implies powers of integers. This is the link with Diophantine equations. We show how, especially in the field of interferometry, remarkable relations between powers of integers can help to solve several problems, such as achromatization of a phase shifter or deep nulling efficiency. It appears that all the research that was conducted in this frame of thinking, relates to the field of detection of exoplanets, a very active domain of astrophysics today.

  9. Optical modulator including grapene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ming; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-06-07

    The present invention provides for a one or more layer graphene optical modulator. In a first exemplary embodiment the optical modulator includes an optical waveguide, a nanoscale oxide spacer adjacent to a working region of the waveguide, and a monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to the spacer. In a second exemplary embodiment, the optical modulator includes at least one pair of active media, where the pair includes an oxide spacer, a first monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a first side of the spacer, and a second monolayer graphene sheet adjacent to a second side of the spacer, and at least one optical waveguide adjacent to the pair.

  10. Active Optical Sensing of Spring Maize for In-Season Diagnosis of Nitrogen Status Based on Nitrogen Nutrition Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Xia

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The nitrogen (N nutrition index (NNI is a reliable indicator of crop N status and there is an urgent need to develop efficient technologies for non-destructive estimation of NNI to support the practical applications of precision N management strategies. The objectives of this study were to: (i validate a newly established critical N dilution curve for spring maize in Northeast China; (ii determine the potential of using the GreenSeeker active optical sensor to non-destructively estimate NNI; and (iii evaluate the performance of different N status diagnostic approaches based on estimated NNI via the GreenSeeker sensor measurements. Four field experiments involving six N rates (0, 60, 120,180, 240, and 300 kg·ha−1 were conducted in 2014 and 2015 in Lishu County, Jilin Province in Northeast China. The results indicated that the newly established critical N dilution curve was suitable for spring maize N status diagnosis in the study region. Across site-years and growth stages (V5–V10, GreenSeeker sensor-based vegetation indices (VIs explained 87%–90%, 87%–89% and 83%–84% variability of leaf area index (LAI, aboveground biomass (AGB and plant N uptake (PNU, respectively. However, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI became saturated when LAI > 2 m2·m−2, AGB > 3 t·ha−1 or PNU > 80 kg·ha−1. The GreenSeeker-based VIs performed better for estimating LAI, AGB and PNU at V5–V6 and V7–V8 than the V9–V10 growth stages, but were very weakly related to plant N concentration. The response index calculated with GreenSeeker NDVI (RI–NDVI and ratio vegetation index (R2 = 0.56–0.68 performed consistently better than the original VIs (R2 = 0.33–0.55 for estimating NNI. The N status diagnosis accuracy rate using RI–NDVI was 81% and 71% at V7–V8 and V9–V10 growth stages, respectively. We conclude that the response indices calculated with the GreenSeeker-based vegetation indices can be used to estimate spring maize NNI non

  11. EFFECTS OF GEOMETRICAL STRUCTURE ON MICROWAVE AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF TRAVELING WAVE ELECTROABSORPTION MODULATORS BASED ON ASYMMETRIC COUPLED STRAINED QUANTUM WELLS ACTIVE LAYER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KAMBIZ ABEDI

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the effects of geometrical structure on microwave and optical properties of traveling wave electroabsorption modulators (TWEAMs based on asymmetric intra-step-barrier coupled double strained quantum wells (AICD-SQW active layer. The AICD-SQW active layer structure has advantages such as very low insertion loss, zero chirp, large Stark shift and high extinction ratio in comparison with the intra-step quantum well (IQW structure. Firstly, the influences of the intrinsic (active layer thickness and width on effective optical index and confinement factor are analyzed. Furthermore, the effect of the intrinsic layer thickness on their transmission line microwave properties such as microwave index, microwave loss, andcharacteristic impedance are evaluated. The thickness and width of active layer are changed from 0 μm to 1.4 μm and 1 μm to 3 μm, respectively. Finally, the frequency response of TWEAM based on AICD-SQW active layer is calculated using circuit model.

  12. STUDY ON THE POLING PROPERTIES OF NONLINEAR OPTICAL ACTIVE DERIVATIVE OF POLY (p-HYDROXYSTYRENE):(PS)O-DCV

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YE Cheng; WANG Jiafu; FENG Zhiming

    1993-01-01

    In this paper,the poling properties of (PS)O-DCV,a derivative of poly (p-hydroxystyrene),was reported.The investigations showed that the thermochromism correction,which was neglected in the literatures,should be considered in the measurements of order parameter of poled films with electrochromism technique Here,another linear optical method,IR and polarized IR spectra for characterizing of poled films was suggested first time.The bulk second nonlinear optical coefficient d33 of poled films could be estimated by measured order parameter semi-qualitatively.

  13. Stereoselective Synthesis of Optically Active Hydrobenzoins via Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Benzils with Ru(OTf)(TsDPEN)(η6-cymene) as the Pre-catalyst%Stereoselective Synthesis of Optically Active Hydrobenzoins via Asymmetric Hydrogenation of Benzils with Ru(OTf)(TsDPEN)(η6-cymene) as the Pre-catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄晓飞; 李乃凯; 耿志聪; 潘锋锋; 王兴旺

    2012-01-01

    Optically active hydrobenzoins are very important building blocks for further derivation of biologically active complexes, natural products, and pharmaceutical compounds. In this paper, A practical approach has been devel- oped for asymmetric hydrogenation of benzils with Ru(OTf)(TsDPEN)(rl6-cymene) as a pre-catalyst in methanol. Therefore, a series of chiral hydrobenzoins was synthesized in good yields with good to moderate diastereoselectiv- ities and good to excellent enantioselectivities.

  14. Microfocusing of the FERMI@Elettra FEL beam with a K–B active optics system: Spot size predictions by application of the WISE code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FERMI@Elettra, the first seeded EUV-SXR free electron laser (FEL) facility located at Elettra Sincrotrone Trieste has been conceived to provide very short (10–100 fs) pulses with ultrahigh peak brightness and wavelengths from 100 nm to 4 nm. A section fully dedicated to the photon transport and analysis diagnostics, named PADReS, has already been installed and commissioned. Three of the beamlines, EIS-TIMEX, DiProI and LDM, installed after the PADReS section, are in advanced commissioning state and will accept the first users in December 2012. These beam lines employ active X-ray optics in order to focus the FEL beam as well as to perform a controlled beam-shaping at focus. Starting from mirror surface metrology characterization, it is difficult to predict the focal spot shape applying only methods based on geometrical optics such as the ray tracing. Within the geometrical optics approach one cannot take into account the diffraction effect from the optics edges, i.e. the aperture diffraction, and the impact of different surface spatial wavelengths to the spot size degradation. Both these effects are strongly dependent on the photon beam energy and mirror incident angles. We employed a method based on physical optics, which applies the Huygens–Fresnel principle to reflection (on which the WISE code is based). In this work we report the results of the first measurements of the focal spot in the DiProI beamline end-station and compare them to the predictions computed with Shadow code and WISE code, starting from the mirror surface profile characterization

  15. Active Optics for high contrast imaging:Super smooth off-axis parabolas for ELTs XAO instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugot, Emmanuel; Laslandes, Marie; Ferrari, Marc; Dohlen, Kjetil; El hadi, Kacem

    2011-09-01

    In the context of direct imaging of exoplanets using XAO, the main limitations in images are due to residual quasi-static speckles induced by atmospheric phase residuals and instrumental static and quasi-static aberrations not corrected by AO: the post-coronagraphic image quality is directly linked to the power spectral density (PSD) of the optical train before the coronagraph. In this context, the potential of Stress Polishing has been demonstrated at LAM after the delivery of the three toric mirrors (TMs) for the VLT-SPHERE instrument. The extreme optical quality of such aspherical optics is obtained thanks to the spherical polishing of warped mirrors using full sized tools, avoiding the generation of high spatial frequency ripples due to classical sub-aperture tool marks. Furthermore, sub-nanometric roughnesses have been obtained thanks to a super smoothing method. Work is ongoing at LAM in order to improve this manufacturing method to cover a wide range of off-axis aspherics, with a reduction of the manufacturing time and cost. Smart warping structures are designed in order to bend the mirrors with a combination of focus, astigmatism and coma. This development will allow the stress polishing of supersmooth OAP for XAO optical relays improving the wavefront quality and in this way the high contrast level of future exoplanet imagers.

  16. Behavioural modification of the optic tentacle of Helix pom atia; effect of puromycin, activity of S-100

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Gert Rene Juul; Frederiksen, K; Johansen, Jørgen;

    1981-01-01

    1. 1. A long-term learning phenomenon in the tentacle of Helix pomatia has been observed.   2. 2. Repeated mechanical stimulation of the optic tentacle led to habituation of the associated withdrawal-extension action pattern whereas repeated combined mechanical and electrical stimulation potentia...

  17. Determining Central Black Hole Masses in Distant Active Galaxies and Quasars. II. Improved Optical and UV Scaling Relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Marianne; Peterson, B. M.

    2006-01-01

    We present four improved empirical relationships useful for estimating the central black hole mass in nearby AGNs and distant luminous quasars alike using either optical or UV single-epoch spectroscopy. These mass-scaling relationships between line widths and luminosity are based on recently...

  18. Coexistence of superparamagnetism and optical activity in Ni{sub x}Pt{sub 1-x}/CdSe hybrid nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, Ole; Menke, Torben; Nielsch, Kornelius; Goerlitz, Detlef [Institut fuer Angewandte Physik und Zentrum fuer Mikrostrukturforschung, Universitaet Hamburg, Jungiusstrasse 11, 20355 Hamburg (Germany); Niehaus, Jan; Ahrenstorf, Kirsten; Weller, Horst [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Universitaet Hamburg, Grindelallee 117, 20146 Hamburg (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    NiPt-nanoparticles, the synthesis of which have been described previously together with their magnetical properties, where used as starting point for the synthesis of new complex hybrid nanoparticles. Covering Ni{sub x}Pt{sub 1-x}-particles with CdSe, an optically active semiconductor, a core-shell hybrid particle is formed featuring magnetic and, moreover, optical properties: the particles luminesce between 680 nm and 695 nm, detected by ensemble photoluminescence spectroscopy. The pure Ni{sub x}Pt{sub 1-x}-particles exhibit a superparamagnetic behavior with a blocking temperature T{sub b}{approx}4 K shown by SQUID-magnetometry. In the hybrid particles, T{sub b} is shifted to lower temperatures. Possible reasons for this are discussed.

  19. Optical fiber technology 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Wójcik, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    The Conference on Optical Fibers and Their Applications, Nał˛eczów 2012, in its 14th edition, which has been organized since more than 35 years, has summarized the achievements of the local optical fiber technology community, for the last year and a half. The conference specializes in developments of optical fiber technology, glass and polymer, classical and microstructured, passive and active. The event gathered around 100 participants. There were shown 60 presentations ...

  20. Advanced Adaptive Optics Technology Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, S

    2001-09-18

    The NSF Center for Adaptive Optics (CfAO) is supporting research on advanced adaptive optics technologies. CfAO research activities include development and characterization of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror (DM) technology, as well as development and characterization of high-resolution adaptive optics systems using liquid crystal (LC) spatial light modulator (SLM) technology. This paper presents an overview of the CfAO advanced adaptive optics technology development activities including current status and future plans.

  1. Thermal, optical, mechanical and electrical properties of a novel NLO active L-phenylalanine L-phenylalaninium perchlorate single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single crystals of L-phenylalanine L-phenylalaninium perchlorate (LPAPCl), a semiorganic nonlinear (NLO) material have been successfully grown up to a size of 14 mmx5 mmx3 mm. The lattice parameters of the grown crystals are determined by single crystal XRD. The UV-Vis-NIR spectrum of LPAPCl show less optical absorption in the entire visible region. Nonlinear optical study reveals that the SHG efficiency of LPAPCl is nearly 1.4 times that of KDP. The laser damage density is found to be 7.4 GW/cm2. The crystals are subjected to microhardness studies and the variation of the microhardness with the applied load is studied. The response of dielectric constant in the frequency region of 50 Hz to 5 MHz has been investigated. AC and DC conductivity and photoconductivity experiments are also carried out and the results are discussed.

  2. One-wave optical time-reversal mirror by actively coupling arbitrary light fields into a single-mode reflector

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, KyeoReh; Park, Jung-Hoon; Park, Ji-Ho; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    Rewinding the arrow of time via phase conjugation is an intriguing phenomena made possible by the wave property of light. To exploit this phenomenon, many diverse research fields have pursed the realization of an ideal phase conjugation mirror, but the ideal phase conjugation mirror - an optical system that requires a single-input and a single-output beam, like natural conventional mirrors - has never been demonstrated. Here, we demonstrate the realization of a one-wave optical time-reversal mirror using a spatial light modulator and a single-mode reflector. Our method is simple, alignment free, and fast while allowing unlimited power throughput in the time reversed wave, which have not been simultaneously demonstrated before. Using our method, we demonstrate high throughput time-reversal full-field light delivery through highly scattering biological tissue and multimode fibers, even for quantum dot fluorescence.

  3. A stereo-compound hybrid microscope for combined intracellular and optical recording of invertebrate neural network activity

    OpenAIRE

    Frost, William N.; Wang, Jean; Brandon, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    Optical recording studies of invertebrate neural networks with voltage-sensitive dyes seldom employ conventional intracellular electrodes. This may in part be due to the traditional reliance on compound microscopes for such work. While such microscopes have high light-gathering power, they do not provide depth of field, making working with sharp electrodes difficult. Here we describe a hybrid microscope design, with switchable compound and stereo objectives, that eases the use of conventional...

  4. Exploring the Active Galactic Nuclei population with extreme X-ray to optical flux ratios (Fx/Fo >50)

    CERN Document Server

    Della Ceca, R; Caccianiga, A; Severgnini, P; Ballo, L; Braito, V; Corral, A; Del Moro, A; Mateos, S; Ruiz, A; Watson, M G

    2015-01-01

    The cosmic history of the growth of supermassive black holes in galactic centers parallels that of star-formation in the Universe. However, an important fraction of this growth occurs inconspicuously in obscured objects, where ultraviolet/optical/near-infrared emission is heavily obscured by dust. Since the X-ray flux is less attenuated, a high X-ray-to-optical flux ratio (Fx/Fo) is expected to be an efficient tool to find out these obscured accreting sources. We explore here via optical spectroscopy, X-ray spectroscopy and infrared photometry the most extreme cases of this population (those with Fx/Fo >50, EXO50 sources hereafter), using a well defined sample of seven X-ray sources extracted from the 2XMM catalogue. Five EXO50 sources (about 70 percent of the sample) in the bright flux regime explored by our survey (f(2-10 keV) > 1.5E-13 cgs) are associated with obscured AGN (Nh > 1.0E22 cm-2), spanning a redshift range between 0.75 and 1 and characterised by 2-10 keV intrinsic luminosities in the QSO regime...

  5. Magnetic field effects on mitochondrion-activity-related optical properties in slime mold and bone forming cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukawa, Yuri; Iwasaka, Masakazu

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, a cellular level response of Cyto-aa3 oxidation was investigated in real time under both time-varying and strong static magnetic fields of 5 T. Two kinds of cells, a slime mold, Physarum polycephalum, and bone forming cells, MC-3T3-E1, were used for the experiments. The oxidation level of the Cyto-aa3 was calculated by optical absorptions at 690 nm, 780 nm and 830 nm. The sample, fiber-optics and an additional optical fiber for light stimulation were set in a solenoidal coil or the bore of a 5-T superconducting magnet. The solenoidal coil for time-varying magnetic fields produced sinusoidal magnetic fields of 6 mT. The slime mold showed a periodic change in Cyto-aa3 oxidation, and the oxidation-reduction cycle of Cyto-aa3 was apparently changed when visible-light irradiated the slime mold. Similarly to the case with light, time-varying magnetic stimulations changed the oxidation-reduction cycle during and after the stimulation for 10 minutes. The same phenomena were observed in the MC-3T3-E1 cell assembly, although their cycle rhythm was comparatively random. Finally, magnetic field exposure of up to 5 T exhibited a distinct suppression of Cyto-aa3 oscillation in the bone forming cells. Exposure up to 5 T was repeated five times, and the change in Cyto-aa3 oxidation reproducibly occurred. PMID:24109969

  6. Optical Alignment of the Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha SpectroPolarimeter using Sophisticated Methods to Minimize Activities under Vacuum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giono, G.; Katsukawa, Y.; Ishikawa, R.; Narukage, N.; Kano, R.; Kubo, M.; Ishikawa, S.; Bando, T.; Hara, H.; Suematsu, Y.; Winebarger, A.; Kobayashi, K.

    2016-01-01

    The Chromospheric Lyman-Alpha Spectro-Polarimeter (CLASP) is a sounding-rocket instrument developed at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) as a part of an international collaboration. The in- strument main scientific goal is to achieve polarization measurement of the Lyman-alpha line at 121.56 nm emitted from the solar upper-chromosphere and transition region with an unprecedented 0.1% accuracy. For this purpose, the optics are composed of a Cassegrain telescope coated with a "cold mirror" coating optimized for UV reflection and a dual-channel spectrograph allowing for simultaneous observation of the two orthogonal states of polarization. Although the polarization sensitivity is the most important aspect of the instrument, the spatial and spectral resolutions of the instrument are also crucial to observe the chromospheric features and resolve the Ly- pro les. A precise alignment of the optics is required to ensure the resolutions, but experiments under vacuum conditions are needed since Ly-alpha is absorbed by air, making the alignment experiments difficult. To bypass this issue, we developed methods to align the telescope and the spectrograph separately in visible light. We will explain these methods and present the results for the optical alignment of the CLASP telescope and spectrograph. We will then discuss the combined performances of both parts to derive the expected resolutions of the instrument, and compare them with the flight observations performed on September 3rd 2015.

  7. Novel optical oxy/deoxy hemoglobin monitoring as a modality for non-invasive real-time monitoring of cognitive activity and beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies-Shaw, Dana; Huser, Thomas R.

    2008-02-01

    We report on the successful development of a custom in vitro system that provides a physiologically relevant means of demonstrating optical methodologies for the calibration and validation of oxygen delivery and hemoglobin oxygen binding dynamics in the brain. While measured optical signals have generally been equated to heme absorbance values that are, in turn, presumed to correspond to oxygen delivery, there has been little specific study of the sigmoidal oxygen binding dynamics of hemoglobin, a tetrameric protein, within physiologically relevant parameters. Our development of this novel analytical device addresses this issue, and is a significant step towards the minimally invasive and real-time monitoring of spatially resolved cognitive processes. As such, it is of particular interest for the detection of autistic brain activity in infants and young children. Moreover, our device and approach bring with them the ability to quantify and spatially resolve oxygen delivery down to volumes relevant to individual cell oxygen uptake, without any oxygen consumption, and with a temporal resolution that is physically unachievable by any oxygen tracking modality such as fMRI etc. Such a capability opens up myriad possibilities for further investigation, such as real-time tumor biopsy and resection; the tracking and quantification of cellular proliferation, as well as metabolic measures of tissue viability, to name but a few. Our system has also been engineered to be synergistic with virtually all imaging techniques, optical and otherwise.

  8. Empirical electro-optical and x-ray performance evaluation of CMOS active pixels sensor for low dose, high resolution x-ray medical imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvanitis, C D; Bohndiek, S E; Royle, G; Blue, A; Liang, H X; Clark, A; Prydderch, M; Turchetta, R; Speller, R

    2007-12-01

    Monolithic complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors with high performance have gained attention in the last few years in many scientific and space applications. In order to evaluate the increasing capabilities of this technology, in particular where low dose high resolution x-ray medical imaging is required, critical electro-optical and physical x-ray performance evaluation was determined. The electro-optical performance includes read noise, full well capacity, interacting quantum efficiency, and pixels cross talk. The x-ray performance, including x-ray sensitivity, modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, and detection quantum efficiency, has been evaluated in the mammographic energy range. The sensor is a 525 x 525 standard three transistor CMOS active pixel sensor array with more than 75% fill factor and 25 x 25 microm pixel pitch. Reading at 10 f/s, it is found that the sensor has 114 electrons total additive noise, 10(5) electrons full well capacity with shot noise limited operation, and 34% interacting quantum efficiency at 530 nm. Two different structured CsI:Tl phosphors with thickness 95 and 115 microm, respectively, have been optically coupled via a fiber optic plate to the array resulting in two different system configurations. The sensitivity of the two different system configurations was 43 and 47 electrons per x-ray incident on the sensor. The MTF at 10% of the two different system configurations was 9.5 and 9 cycles/mm with detective quantum efficiency of 0.45 and 0.48, respectively, close to zero frequency at approximately 0.44 microC/kg (1.72 mR) detector entrance exposure. The detector was quantum limited at low spatial frequencies and its performance was comparable with high resolution a: Si and charge coupled device based x-ray imagers. The detector also demonstrates almost an order of magnitude lower noise than active matrix flat panel imagers. The results suggest that CMOS active pixel sensors when coupled

  9. Synthesis and characterization of new optically active copoly(amid-imide)s based on N-phthalimido-L-aspartic acid and aromatic diamines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khalil; Faghihi; Hamidreza; Alimohammadi

    2010-01-01

    In this article,six new optically active copoly(amide-imide)s(10a-f) were synthesized through the direct polycondensation reaction of N-phthalimido-L-aspartic acid(4) with 1,5-diamino naphthalene(8),3,4-diamino benzophenone(9) in the presence of therphthahc acid(7),fumaric acid(6) and adipic acid(5) as a second diacid in a medium consisting of N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone,triphenyl phosphite, calcium chloride and pyridine.The resulting copolymers were fully characterized by means of FT-IR spectroscopy,elementa...

  10. A new approach to determine the stereospecificity in lipase catalysed hydrolysis using circular dichroism (CD): lipases produce optically active diglycerides from achiral triglycerides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzawa, H; Nishida, Y; Ohrui, H; Meguro, H

    1990-04-30

    We describe a sensitive CD method for determining the stereospecificity in lipase (E.C.3.1.1.3) catalysed hydrolysis of triacyl glycerols into diacyl glycerols. The diglycerols were converted to chiral tert-butyldimethylsilylated 1,2- or 2,3-di-O-benzoyl-sn-glycerol (5 or 5'), and their CD was measured. This approach showed for the first time that lipases produce optically active diacyl glycerides from achiral tripalmitin and tribenzoyl glyceride with a variable extent of enantioselectivity depending on the acyl groups and the enzymes.

  11. The Athena Optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bavdaz, Marcos; Wille, Eric; Shortt, Brian;

    2015-01-01

    studies and in parallel a comprehensive series of technology preparation activities. [1-3].The core enabling technology for the high performance mirror is the Silicon Pore Optics (SPO), a modular X-ray optics technology, which utilises processes and equipment developed for the semiconductor industry [4...

  12. Theoretical study of optical activity of 1:1 hydrogen bond complexes of water with S-warfarin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadsetani, Mehrdad; Abdolmaleki, Ahmad; Zabardasti, Abedin

    2016-11-01

    The molecular interaction between S-warfarin (SW) and a single water molecule was investigated using the B3LYP method at 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. The vibrational spectra of the optimized complexes have been investigated for stabilization checking. Quantum theories of atoms in molecules, natural bond orbitals, molecular electrostatic potentials and energy decomposition analysis methods have been applied to analyze the intermolecular interactions. The intermolecular charge transfer in the most stable complex is in the opposite direction from those in the other complexes. The optical spectra and the hyperpolarizabilities of SW-water hydrogen bond complexes have been computed. PMID:27294546

  13. Theoretical study of optical activity of 1:1 hydrogen bond complexes of water with S-warfarin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadsetani, Mehrdad; Abdolmaleki, Ahmad; Zabardasti, Abedin

    2016-11-01

    The molecular interaction between S-warfarin (SW) and a single water molecule was investigated using the B3LYP method at 6-311 ++G(d,p) basis set. The vibrational spectra of the optimized complexes have been investigated for stabilization checking. Quantum theories of atoms in molecules, natural bond orbitals, molecular electrostatic potentials and energy decomposition analysis methods have been applied to analyze the intermolecular interactions. The intermolecular charge transfer in the most stable complex is in the opposite direction from those in the other complexes. The optical spectra and the hyperpolarizabilities of SW-water hydrogen bond complexes have been computed.

  14. Production of high optical purity l-lactic acid from waste activated sludge by supplementing carbohydrate: effect of temperature and pretreatment time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Qiwei; Li, Xiang; Chen, Yinguang; Liu, Yanan; Pan, Yin

    2016-10-01

    It has been widely accepted that the most environmentally beneficial way to treat waste activated sludge (WAS), the byproduct of municipal wastewater treatment plant, is to recover the valuable organic acid. However, the bio-conversion of lactic acid, one of the high added-value chemical, is seldom reported from WAS fermentation. In this paper, l-lactic acid was observed dominant in the WAS fermentation liquid with carbohydrate addition at ambient temperature. Furthermore, the effect of temperature on l-lactic acid and d-lactic acid production was fully discussed: two isomers were rapidly produced and consumed up in one day at mesophilic condition; and almost optically pure l-lactic acid was generated at thermophilic condition, yet time-consuming with yield of l-lactic acid enhancing by 52.9% compared to that at ambient temperature. The study mechanism showed that mesophilic condition was optimal for both production and consumption of l-lactic acid and d-lactic acid, while consumption of l-lactic acid and production of d-lactic acid were severely inhibited at thermophilic condition. Therefore, by maintaining thermophilic for 4 h in advance and subsequently fermenting mesophilic for 34 h, the concentration of l-lactic acid with optical activity of 98.3% was improved to 16.6 ± 0.5 g COD/L at a high specific efficiency of 0.6097/d.

  15. Magnetic and natural optical activity of f- f transitions in multiferroic Nd0.5Gd0.5Fe3(BO3)4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malakhovskii, A. V.; Sukhachev, A. L.; Leont'ev, A. A.; Temerov, V. L.

    2016-05-01

    Spectra of absorption, magnetic circular dichroism, and natural circular dichroism of the f-f transitions 4 I 9/2 → 4 F 3/2, 2 H 9/2 + 4 F 5/2, 4 S 3/2 + 4 F 7/2, 2 G 7/2 + 4 G 5/2, 2 K 13/2 + 4 G 7/2, and 4 G 9/2 in the Nd3+ ions in the Nd0.5Gd0.5Fe3(BO3)4 crystal have been measured as a function of the temperature in the interval of 90-300 K. Temperature dependences of the magneto-optical activity (MOA) and natural optical activity (NOA) of the transitions have been obtained. It has been found that, in contrast to allowed transitions, the temperature dependence of the MOA of the f-f transitions does not obey the Curie-Weiss law and the NOA depends on temperature. The NOA of some transitions changes the sign with variation in temperature. These phenomena have been explained by the presence of three contributions to the allowance of the f-f transitions, which lead to three contributions of different signs to the MOA and NOA. The range of the MOA of the f-f transitions in the Nd3+ ion has been predicted theoretically and confirmed experimentally.

  16. Production of high optical purity l-lactic acid from waste activated sludge by supplementing carbohydrate: effect of temperature and pretreatment time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Qiwei; Li, Xiang; Chen, Yinguang; Liu, Yanan; Pan, Yin

    2016-10-01

    It has been widely accepted that the most environmentally beneficial way to treat waste activated sludge (WAS), the byproduct of municipal wastewater treatment plant, is to recover the valuable organic acid. However, the bio-conversion of lactic acid, one of the high added-value chemical, is seldom reported from WAS fermentation. In this paper, l-lactic acid was observed dominant in the WAS fermentation liquid with carbohydrate addition at ambient temperature. Furthermore, the effect of temperature on l-lactic acid and d-lactic acid production was fully discussed: two isomers were rapidly produced and consumed up in one day at mesophilic condition; and almost optically pure l-lactic acid was generated at thermophilic condition, yet time-consuming with yield of l-lactic acid enhancing by 52.9% compared to that at ambient temperature. The study mechanism showed that mesophilic condition was optimal for both production and consumption of l-lactic acid and d-lactic acid, while consumption of l-lactic acid and production of d-lactic acid were severely inhibited at thermophilic condition. Therefore, by maintaining thermophilic for 4 h in advance and subsequently fermenting mesophilic for 34 h, the concentration of l-lactic acid with optical activity of 98.3% was improved to 16.6 ± 0.5 g COD/L at a high specific efficiency of 0.6097/d. PMID:26878176

  17. Power optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apollonov, V V [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-28

    By using the theory we developed in the early 1970s, a broad range of phenomena is considered for an optical surface of a solid body that is exposed to radiation arbitrarily varying in time and producing temperature fields, thermoelastic stresses and thermal deformations on the surface layer. The examination is based on the relations (which are similar to Duhamel's integral formula from the theory of heat conduction) between the quantities characterising the thermal stress state in any nonstationary regimes of energy input into a solid. A peculiar feature of the analysis of the thermal stress state in this case consists in the fact that this relation comprises time as a parameter, which in turn is a consequence of incoherence of the quasi-stationary problem of thermoelasticity. This phenomenon is particularly important for the optics of high-power, high-pulse repetition rate lasers, which are being actively developed. In the review, we have recently published in Laser Physics, the thermal stress state of a solid is analysed. In this state, time is treated as an independent variable used in differentiation. Such an approach greatly reduces the applicability of the method. The review published contains data on the use of capillary porous structures made of various materials with different degrees of the surface development. Moreover, such structures can be efficiently employed to increase the heat exchange at a temperature below the boiling point of the coolant. In the present review we discuss the dependences of the limiting laser intensities on the duration of a pulse or a pulse train, corresponding to the three stages of the state of the reflecting surface and leading to unacceptable elastic deformations of the surface, to the plastic yield of the material accompanied by the formation of residual stresses and to the melting of the surface layer. We also analyse the problem of heat exchange in the surface layer with a liquid metal coolant pumped through it

  18. Power optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apollonov, V. V.

    2014-02-01

    By using the theory we developed in the early 1970s, a broad range of phenomena is considered for an optical surface of a solid body that is exposed to radiation arbitrarily varying in time and producing temperature fields, thermoelastic stresses and thermal deformations on the surface layer. The examination is based on the relations (which are similar to Duhamel's integral formula from the theory of heat conduction) between the quantities characterising the thermal stress state in any nonstationary regimes of energy input into a solid. A peculiar feature of the analysis of the thermal stress state in this case consists in the fact that this relation comprises time as a parameter, which in turn is a consequence of incoherence of the quasi-stationary problem of thermoelasticity. This phenomenon is particularly important for the optics of high-power, high-pulse repetition rate lasers, which are being actively developed. In the review, we have recently published in Laser Physics, the thermal stress state of a solid is analysed. In this state, time is treated as an independent variable used in differentiation. Such an approach greatly reduces the applicability of the method. The review published contains data on the use of capillary porous structures made of various materials with different degrees of the surface development. Moreover, such structures can be efficiently employed to increase the heat exchange at a temperature below the boiling point of the coolant. In the present review we discuss the dependences of the limiting laser intensities on the duration of a pulse or a pulse train, corresponding to the three stages of the state of the reflecting surface and leading to unacceptable elastic deformations of the surface, to the plastic yield of the material accompanied by the formation of residual stresses and to the melting of the surface layer. We also analyse the problem of heat exchange in the surface layer with a liquid metal coolant pumped through it. The

  19. Thermal, mechanical, optical and conductivity studies of a novel NLO active L-phenylalanine L-phenylalaninium dihydrogenphosphate single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An efficient, novel, semi-organic, nonlinear optical (NLO) material L-phenylalanine L-phenylalaninium dihydrogenphosphate (LPADHP), single crystal of dimension 11x5x2 mm3, has been grown by the slow evaporation solution growth technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies confirm that the grown crystal belongs to monoclinic system with the space group P21. The functional groups present in the crystal were confirmed by the Fourier transform infrared technique. Optical absorption spectrum shows that the material possesses very low absorption in the entire visible region. Thermal analysis confirmed that the crystal is thermally stable up to 161 oC. The frequency dependent dielectric properties of the grown crystal were studied for various temperatures. The second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of the grown crystal is 1.2 times greater than that of the potassium dihydrogenphosphate (KDP) single crystal. The laser induced surface damage threshold for the grown crystal was found to be 6.3 GW cm-2 with Nd:YAG laser assembly AC and DC conductivity and photoconductivity experiments are also carried out and the results are discussed.

  20. An experimental indoor phasing system based on active optics using dispersed Hartmann sensing technology in the visible waveband

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A telescope with a larger primary mirror can collect much more light and resolve objects much better than one with a smaller mirror, and so the larger version is always pursued by astronomers and astronomical technicians. Instead of using a monolithic primary mirror, more and more large telescopes, which are currently being planned or in construction, have adopted a segmented primary mirror design. Therefore, how to sense and phase such a primary mirror is a key issue for the future of extremely large optical/infrared telescopes. The Dispersed Fringe Sensor (DFS), or Dispersed Hartmann Sensor (DHS), is a non-contact method using broadband point light sources and it can estimate the piston by the two-directional spectrum formed by the transmissive grating's dispersion and lenslet array. Thus it can implement the combination of co-focusing by Shack-Hartmann technology and phasing by dispersed fringe sensing technologies such as the template-mapping method and the Hartmann method. We introduce the successful design, construction and alignment of our dispersed Hartmann sensor together with its design principles and simulations. We also conduct many successful real phasing tests and phasing corrections in the visible waveband using our existing indoor segmented mirror optics platform. Finally, some conclusions are reached based on the test and correction of experimental results.

  1. Hierarchical active factors to band gap and nonlinear optical response in Ag-containing quaternary-chalcogenide compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jun-ben; Mamat, Mamatrishat; Pan, Shilie; Yang, Zhihua

    2016-07-01

    In this research work, Ag-containing quaternary-chalcogenide compounds KAg2TS4 (T=P, Sb) (I-II) and RbAg2SbS4 (III) have been studied by means of Density Functional Theory as potential IR nonlinear optical materials. The origin of wide band gap, different optical anisotropy and large SHG response is explained via a combination of density of states, electronic density difference and bond population analysis. It is indicated that the different covalent interaction behavior of P-S and Sb-S bonds dominates the band gap and birefringence. Specifically, the Ag-containing chalcogenide compound KAg2PS4 possesses wide band gap and SHG response comparable with that of AgGaS2. By exploring the origin of the band gap and NLO response for compounds KAg2TS4 (T=P, Sb), we found the determination factor to the properties is different, especially the roles of Ag-d orbitals and bonding behavior of P-S or Sb-S. Thus, the compounds KAg2TS4 (T=P, Sb) and RbAg2SbS4 can be used in infrared (IR) region.

  2. An experimental indoor phasing system based on active optics using dispersed Hartmann sensing technology in the visible waveband

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Zhang; Gen-Rong Liu; Yue-Fei Wang; Ye-Ping Li; Ya-Jun Zhang; Liang Zhang; Yi-Zhong Zeng; Jie Zhang

    2011-01-01

    A telescope with a larger primary mirror can collect much more light and resolve objects much better than one with a smaller mirror,and so the larger version is always pursued by astronomers and astronomical technicians.Instead of using a monolithic primary mirror,more and more large telescopes,which are currently being planned or in construction,have adopted a segmented primary mirror design.Therefore,how to sense and phase such a primary mirror is a key issue for the future of extremely large optical/infrared telescopes.The Dispersed Fringe Sensor (DFS),or Dispersed Hartmann Sensor (DHS),is a non-contact method using broadband point light sources and it can estimate the piston by the two-directional spectrum formed by the transmissive grating's dispersion and lenslet array.Thus it can implement the combination of co-focusing by Shack-Hartmann technology and phasing by dispersed fringe sensing technologies such as the template-mapping method and the Hartmann method.We introduce the successful design,construction and alignment of our dispersed Hartmann sensor together with its design principles and simulations.We also conduct many successful real phasing tests and phasing corrections in the visible waveband using our existing indoor segmented mirror optics platform.Finally,some conclusions are reached based on the test and correction of experimental results.

  3. Comparison of Small-Scale Actively and Passively Q-Switched Eye-Safe Intracavity Optical Parametric Oscillators at 1.57 μm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first experimental comparison between the actively and passively Q-switched intracavity optical parametric oscillators (IOPOs) at 1.57 μm driven by a small-scale diode-pumped Nd:YVO4 laser are thoroughly presented. It is found that the performances of the two types of IOPOs are complementary. The actively Q-switched IOPO features a shorter pulse duration, a higher peak power, and a superior power and pulse stability. However, in terms of compactness, operation threshold and conversion efficiency, passively Q-switched IOPOs are more attractive. It is further indicated that the passively Q-switched IOPO at 1.57μm is a promising and cost-effective eye-safe laser source, especially at the low and moderate output levels. In addition, instructional improvement measures for the two types of IOPOs are also summarized. (fundamental areas of phenomenology(including applications))

  4. Modern optics

    CERN Document Server

    Guenther, B D

    2015-01-01

    Modern Optics is a fundamental study of the principles of optics using a rigorous physical approach based on Maxwell's Equations. The treatment provides the mathematical foundations needed to understand a number of applications such as laser optics, fiber optics and medical imaging covered in an engineering curriculum as well as the traditional topics covered in a physics based course in optics. In addition to treating the fundamentals in optical science, the student is given an exposure to actual optics engineering problems such as paraxial matrix optics, aberrations with experimental examples, Fourier transform optics (Fresnel-Kirchhoff formulation), Gaussian waves, thin films, photonic crystals, surface plasmons, and fiber optics. Through its many pictures, figures, and diagrams, the text provides a good physical insight into the topics covered. The course content can be modified to reflect the interests of the instructor as well as the student, through the selection of optional material provided in append...

  5. Improved Optical Fiber Chemical Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egalon, Claudio O.; Rogowski, Robert S.

    1994-01-01

    Calculations, based on exact theory of optical fiber, have shown how to increase optical efficiency sensitivity of active-core, step-index-profile optical-fiber fluorosensor. Calculations result of efforts to improve efficiency of optical-fiber chemical sensor of previous concept described in "Making Optical-Fiber Chemical Sensors More Sensitive" (LAR-14525). Optical fiber chemical detector of enhanced sensitivity made in several configurations. Portion of fluorescence or chemiluminescence generated in core, and launched directly into bound electromagnetic modes that propagate along core to photodetector.

  6. Optimized geometry, vibration (IR and Raman spectra and nonlinear optical activity of p-nitroanilinium perchlorate molecule: A theoretical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Ömer

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The molecular modeling of p-nitroanilinium perchlorate molecule was carried out by using B3LYP and HSEH1PBE levels of density functional theory (DFT. The IR and Raman spectra were simulated and the assignments of vibrational modes were performed on the basis of relative contribution of various internal co-ordinates. NBO analysis was performed to demonstrate charge transfer, conjugative interactions and the formation of intramolecular hydrogen bonding interactions within PNAPC. Obtained large dipole moment values showed that PNAPC is a highly polarizable complex, and the charge transfer occurs within PNAPC. Hydrogen bonding and charge transfer interactions were also displayed by small HOMO-LUMO gap and molecular electrostatic potential (MEP surface. The strong evidences that the material can be used as an efficient nonlinear optical (NLO material of PNAPC were demonstrated by considerable polarizability and hyperpolarizability values obtained at DFT levels.

  7. ALOP-active learning in optics and photonics: a UNESCO's program spreading in Colombia through the National University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez-Gómez, Catalina; Monroy-Ramírez, Freddy A.

    2014-07-01

    The National University of Colombia is committed to the spreading of the UNESCO's ALOP program throughout the country by programming a series of workshops (ALOP-NPH) to be held in each of its eight campuses. This huge effort is intended to contribute at a national scale to the training of high school teachers in new pedagogic methodologies. Furthermore, the ALOP Workshop has had large impact in the recently established Master's program on pedagogy of Sciences, a degree program addressed to middle and high school teachers, which has a current enrollment of more than 400 teachers from all over the country. In this paper we also describe the contributions of the team also ALOP-Colombia to the material and electronic devices used in optical transmission modules and data division multiplexing wavelength.

  8. Thiophene-fluorene derivatives with high three-photon absorption activities and their applicatlon to optical power limiting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ma Wen-Bo; Wu Yi-Qun; Han Jun-He; Liu Jun-Hui; Gu Dong-Hong; Gan Fu-Xi

    2006-01-01

    The three-photon absorption (3PA) properties of two thiophene-fluorene derivatives (abbreviated as MOTFTBr and ATFTBr) have been determined by using a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser pumped with 38ps pulses at 1064nm in DMF.The measured 3PA cross-sections are 152×10-78cm6s2 and 139×10-78cm6S2,respectively.The optimized structures were obtained by AM1 calculations and the results indicate that these two molecules show nonplanar structures,and attaching different donors has different effects on the molecular structure.The charge density distributions during the excitation were also systematically studied by using AM1 method.In addition,an obvious optical power limiting effect induced by 3PA has been demonstrated for both derivatives.

  9. THE SPITZER MID-INFRARED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS SURVEY. I. OPTICAL AND NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF OBSCURED CANDIDATES AND NORMAL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI SELECTED IN THE MID-INFRARED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacy, M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Ridgway, S. E. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Gates, E. L. [UCO/Lick Observatory, P.O. Box 85, Mount Hamilton, CA 95140 (United States); Nielsen, D. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Petric, A. O. [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Sajina, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Tuffs University, 212 College Avenue, Medford, MA 02155 (United States); Urrutia, T. [Leibniz-Institut für Astrophysik Potsdam, An der Sternwarte 16, D-14482 Potsdam (Germany); Cox Drews, S. [946 Mangrove Avenue 102, Sunnyvale, CA 94086 (United States); Harrison, C. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Seymour, N. [CSIRO, P.O. Box 76, Epping, NSW 1710 (Australia); Storrie-Lombardi, L. J. [Spitzer Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-10-01

    We present the results of a program of optical and near-infrared spectroscopic follow-up of candidate active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected in the mid-infrared. This survey selects both normal and obscured AGNs closely matched in luminosity across a wide range, from Seyfert galaxies with bolometric luminosities L {sub bol} ∼ 10{sup 10} L {sub ☉} to highly luminous quasars (L {sub bol} ∼ 10{sup 14} L {sub ☉}), all with redshifts ranging from 0 to 4.3. Samples of candidate AGNs were selected with mid-infrared color cuts at several different 24 μm flux density limits to ensure a range of luminosities at a given redshift. The survey consists of 786 candidate AGNs and quasars, of which 672 have spectroscopic redshifts and classifications. Of these, 137 (20%) are type 1 AGNs with blue continua, 294 (44%) are type 2 objects with extinctions A{sub V} ∼> 5 toward their AGNs, 96 (14%) are AGNs with lower extinctions (A{sub V} ∼ 1), and 145 (22%) have redshifts, but no clear signs of AGN activity in their spectra. Of the survey objects 50% have L {sub bol} > 10{sup 12} L {sub ☉}, in the quasar regime. We present composite spectra for type 2 quasars and objects with no signs of AGN activity in their spectra. We also discuss the mid-infrared—emission-line luminosity correlation and present the results of cross correlations with serendipitous X-ray and radio sources. The results show that: (1) obscured objects dominate the overall AGN population, (2) mid-infrared selected AGN candidates exist which lack AGN signatures in their optical spectra but have AGN-like X-ray or radio counterparts, and (3) X-ray and optical classifications of obscured and unobscured AGNs often differ.

  10. Imidase catalyzing desymmetric imide hydrolysis forming optically active 3-substituted glutaric acid monoamides for the synthesis of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nojiri, Masutoshi; Hibi, Makoto; Shizawa, Hiroaki; Horinouchi, Nobuyuki; Yasohara, Yoshihiko; Takahashi, Satomi; Ogawa, Jun

    2015-12-01

    The recent use of optically active 3-substituted gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) analogs in human therapeutics has identified a need for an efficient, stereoselective method of their synthesis. Here, bacterial strains were screened for enzymes capable of stereospecific hydrolysis of 3-substituted glutarimides to generate (R)-3-substituted glutaric acid monoamides. The bacteria Alcaligenes faecalis NBRC13111 and Burkholderia phytofirmans DSM17436 were discovered to hydrolyze 3-(4-chlorophenyl) glutarimide (CGI) to (R)-3-(4-chlorophenyl) glutaric acid monoamide (CGM) with 98.1% enantiomeric excess (e.e.) and 97.5% e.e., respectively. B. phytofirmans DSM17436 could also hydrolyze 3-isobutyl glutarimide (IBI) to produce (R)-3-isobutyl glutaric acid monoamide (IBM) with 94.9% e.e. BpIH, an imidase, was purified from B. phytofirmans DSM17436 and found to generate (R)-CGM from CGI with specific activity of 0.95 U/mg. The amino acid sequence of BpIH had a 75% sequence identity to that of allantoinase from A. faecalis NBRC13111 (AfIH). The purified recombinant BpIH and AfIH catalyzed (R)-selective hydrolysis of CGI and IBI. In addition, a preliminary investigation of the enzymatic properties of BpIH and AfIH revealed that both enzymes were stable in the range of pH 6-10, with an optimal pH of 9.0, stable at temperatures below 40 °C, and were not metalloproteins. These results indicate that the use of this class of hydrolase to generate optically active 3-substituted glutaric acid monoamide could simplify the production of specific chiral GABA analogs for drug therapeutics.

  11. Engineering Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Iizuka, Keigo

    2008-01-01

    Engineering Optics is a book for students who want to apply their knowledge of optics to engineering problems, as well as for engineering students who want to acquire the basic principles of optics. It covers such important topics as optical signal processing, holography, tomography, holographic radars, fiber optical communication, electro- and acousto-optic devices, and integrated optics (including optical bistability). As a basis for understanding these topics, the first few chapters give easy-to-follow explanations of diffraction theory, Fourier transforms, and geometrical optics. Practical examples, such as the video disk, the Fresnel zone plate, and many more, appear throughout the text, together with numerous solved exercises. There is an entirely new section in this updated edition on 3-D imaging.

  12. Biologically active Schiff bases containing thiophene/furan ring and their copper(II) complexes: Synthesis, spectral, nonlinear optical and density functional studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüzalp, Ayla Balaban; Özsen, İffet; Alyar, Hamit; Alyar, Saliha; Özbek, Neslihan

    2016-09-01

    Schiff bases; 1,8-bis(thiophene-2-carboxaldimine)-p-menthane (L1) and 1,8-bis(furan-2-carboxaldimine)-p-menthane (L2) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, 1Hsbnd 13C NMR, UV-vis, FT-IR and LC-MS methods. 1H and 13C shielding tensors for L1 and L2 were calculated with GIAO/DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) methods in CDCl3. The vibrational band assignments, nonlinear optical (NLO) activities, frontier molecular orbitals (FMOs) and absorption spectrum have been investigated by the same basis set. Schiff base-copper(II) complexes have been synthesized and structurally characterized with spectroscopic methods, magnetic and conductivity measurements. The spectroscopic data suggest that Schiff base ligands coordinate through azomethine-N and thiophene-S/furan-O donors (as SNNS and ONNO chelating systems) to give a tetragonal geometry around the copper(II) ions. Schiff bases and Cu(II) complexes have been screened for their biological activities on different species of pathogenic bacteria, those are, Gram positive bacteria: Bacillus subtitilus, Yersinia enterotica, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes, Micrococcus luteus and Gram negative bacteria: Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeroginosa, Shigella dysenteriae, Salmonella typhi, Klebsiella pseudomonas by using microdilution technique (MIC values in mM). Biological activity results show that Cu(II) complexes have higher activities than parent ligands and metal chelation may affect significantly the antibacterial behavior of the organic ligands.

  13. Comportamento do NDVI obtido por sensor ótico ativo em cereais Behavior of NDVI obtained from an active optical sensor in cereals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Pinheiro Povh

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar, com um sensor ótico ativo, o comportamento do índice de vegetação por diferença normalizada (NDVI - "normalized difference vegetation index", nas culturas de trigo, triticale, cevada e milho. Cinco experimentos foram conduzidos no Paraná e São Paulo, com variação de classes de solo, doses e fontes de N, e variedades de trigo. As seguintes variáveis foram avaliadas: NDVI, teor de N foliar, matéria seca e produtividade das culturas. Análises de regressões foram realizadas entre as doses de N aplicadas e NDVI, teor de N foliar, matéria seca e produtividade. Análises de correlação entre as variáveis foram realizadas. O trigo, triticale e cevada apresentaram resposta às aplicações de doses crescentes de N, pelo aumento nas leituras do NDVI, no teor de N foliar e na produtividade. Medido pelo sensor ótico ativo utilizado, o NDVI apresenta alto potencial para manejo do N nas culturas do trigo, triticale e cevada, e baixo potencial para a cultura do milho. Há interferência das variedades de trigo nas leituras do sensor ótico ativo.The objective of this work was to evaluate the behavior of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, with an active optical sensor, in wheat, triticale, barley and corn crops. Experiments were conducted in Paraná and São Paulo, comparing different soil classes, N rates and sources, and wheat varieties. The following variables were determined: NDVI, N foliar content, dry mass and crop yield. Regression analyses were performed between NDVI and applied N rates, N foliar content, dry mass and yield. Correlation analyses among the variables were performed. Wheat, triticale and barley crops showed response to increasing N rates by the increase in the NDVI readings, to N foliar content and to yield. Measured by the used active optical sensor the NDVI shows high potential for N management wheat, triticale and barley crops, and low potential for corn crops. There

  14. Electron optics

    CERN Document Server

    Grivet, Pierre; Bertein, F; Castaing, R; Gauzit, M; Septier, Albert L

    1972-01-01

    Electron Optics, Second English Edition, Part I: Optics is a 10-chapter book that begins by elucidating the fundamental features and basic techniques of electron optics, as well as the distribution of potential and field in electrostatic lenses. This book then explains the field distribution in magnetic lenses; the optical properties of electrostatic and magnetic lenses; and the similarities and differences between glass optics and electron optics. Subsequent chapters focus on lens defects; some electrostatic lenses and triode guns; and magnetic lens models. The strong focusing lenses and pris

  15. A new multicomponent salt of imidazole and tetrabromoterepthalic acid: Structural, optical, thermal, electrical transport properties and antibacterial activity along with Hirshfeld surface analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Sanjoy Kumar; Saha, Rajat; Singha, Soumen; Biswas, Susobhan; Layek, Animesh; Middya, Somnath; Ray, Partha Pratim; Bandhyopadhyay, Debasis; Kumar, Sanjay

    2015-06-01

    Herein, we report the structural, optical, thermal and electrical transport properties of a new multicomponent salt (TBTA2-)·2(IM+)·(water) [TBTA-IM] of tetrabromoterepthalic acid (TBTA) with imidazole (IM). The crystal structure of TBTA-IM is determined by both the single crystal and powder X-ray diffraction techniques. The structural analysis has revealed that the supramolecular charge assisted O-⋯Hsbnd N+ hydrogen bonding and Br⋯π interactions play the most vital role in formation of this multicomponent supramolecular assembly. The Hirshfeld surface analysis has been carried out to investigate supramolecular interactions and associated 2D fingerprint plots reveal the relative contribution of these interactions in the crystal structure quantitatively. According to theoretical analysis the HOMO-LUMO energy gap of the salt is 2.92 eV. The salt has been characterized by IR, UV-vis and photoluminescence spectroscopic studies. It shows direct optical transition with band gaps of 4.1 eV, which indicates that the salt is insulating in nature. The photoluminescence spectrum of the salt is significantly different from that of TBTA. Further, a comparative study on the antibacterial activity of the salt with respect to imidazole, Gatifloxacin and Ciprofloxacin has been performed. Moreover, the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic of ITO/TBTA-IM/Al sandwich structure exhibits good rectifying property and the electron tunneling process governs the electrical transport mechanism of the device.

  16. RAPID SYNTHESIS OF NOVEL OPTICALLY ACTIVE POLY(AMIDE-IMIDE)S DERIVED FROM N,N'-(PYROMELLITOYL)-BIS-L-ALANINE DIACID CHLORIDE AND HYDANTOIN DERIVATIVES UNDER MICROWAVE IRRADIATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Khalil Faghihi; Azizollah Mirsamie

    2005-01-01

    Eight novel poly(amide-imide)s were synthesized under microwave irradiation by using a domestic microwave oven from the polycondensation reactions of N,N'-(pyromellitoyl)-bis-L-alanine diacid chloride (1) with eight different derivatives of hydantoin compounds (2a-h) in the presence of a small amount of a polar organic medium such as o-cresol.The polycondensation proceeded rapidly, compared with the conventional solution polycondensation and was completed within 8-10 min, producing a series of new poly(amide-imide)s (3a-h) with inherent viscosities about 0.35-0.68 dL/g in high yields. The obtained PAIs (3a-h) were fully characterized by means of FT-IR spectroscopy, elemental analyses, inherent viscosity (ηinh), solubility and specific rotation measurements. All of the resulting polymers show optical rotation and are optically active. Thermal properties of the poly(amide-imide)s were investigated by using thermal gravimetric analysis(TGA).

  17. Thermally activated cation ordering in ZnGa2Se4 single crystals studied by Raman scattering, optical absorption, and ab initio calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Order–disorder phase transitions induced by thermal annealing have been studied in the ordered-vacancy compound ZnGa2Se4 by means of Raman scattering and optical absorption measurements. The partially disordered as-grown sample with tetragonal defect stannite (DS) structure and I 4-bar 2 m space group has been subjected to controlled heating and cooling cycles. In situ Raman scattering measurements carried out during the whole annealing cycle show that annealing the sample to 400 °C results in a cation ordering in the sample, leading to the crystallization of the ordered tetragonal defect chalcopyrite (DC) structure with I 4-bar space group. On decreasing temperature the ordered cation scheme of the DC phase can be retained at ambient conditions. The symmetry of the Raman-active modes in both DS and DC phases is discussed and the similarities and differences between the Raman spectra of the two phases emphasized. The ordered structure of annealed samples is confirmed by optical absorption measurements and ab initio calculations, that show that the direct bandgap of DC-ZnGa2Se4 is larger than that of DS-ZnGa2Se4. (paper)

  18. Preparation of Optically Active Alkoxy-serines from Amino-amide Racemate Catalyzed by Escherichia coil Cells with Peptidase B Activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhi-yuan; LIU Jun-zhong; XU Li-sheng; ZHANG Hong-juan; LIU Qian; JIAO Qing-cai

    2013-01-01

    Alkoxy-L-serines are useful for peptide syntheses.The demand for alkoxy-L-serines in the pharmaceutical industries continues to increase because of their multiple physiological effects.In this research,an improved method for alkoxy-L-serines synthesis is reported.A series of substrates,DL-β-alkoxy-α-amino propionamides,was used for the synthesis of alkoxy-serines catalyzed by Escherichia coli cells with peptidase B(PepB) activity.The results show that PepB has a high resolution activity with DL-β-alkoxy-α-amino propionamides as substrate.Reaction conditions were optimized,i.e.,DL-β-methoxy-α-amino propionamide as substrate at pH=9.0,40 ℃ and 14 h,and the optimal reaction concentration is 400 mmol/L.The results also show that divalent metal cations exhibit different effects on the PepB activity,for example,Zn2+ and Cu2+ can obviously inhibit the activity of PepB,whereas Co2+,Ca2+,Mn2+ and Mg2+ at low concentrations can activate PepB.This research provides access to enantiomerically enriched and valuable alkoxy-L-serines from a simple amino-amide racemate.

  19. Towards simultaneous achievement of carrier activation and crystallinity in Ge and GeSn with heated phosphorus ion implantation: An optical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Costa, Vijay Richard; Wang, Lanxiang; Wang, Wei; Lim, Sin Leng; Chan, Taw Kuei; Chua, Lye Hing; Henry, Todd; Zou, Wei; Hatem, Christopher; Osipowicz, Thomas; Tok, Eng Soon; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2014-09-01

    We have investigated the optical properties of Ge and GeSn alloys implanted with phosphorus ions at 400 °C by spectroscopic ellipsometry from far-infrared to ultraviolet. The dielectric response of heated GeSn implants displays structural and transport properties similar to those of heated Ge implants. The far-infrared dielectric function of as-implanted Ge and GeSn shows the typical free carrier response which can be described by a single Drude oscillator. Bulk Ge-like critical points E1, E1 + Δ1, E0', and E2 are observed in the visible-UV dielectric function of heated Ge and GeSn indicating single crystalline quality of the as-implanted layers. Although the implantation at 400 °C recovers crystallinity in both Ge and GeSn, an annealing step is necessary to enhance the carrier activation.

  20. Investigation of the steric structure of optically active 2-(x-benzylidene)-p-menthan-3-ones by dipole-moment, PMR-spectral, and IR-spectral methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutulya, L.A.; Pivnenko, N.S.; Nemchenok, I.B.; Khandrimailova, T.V.; Semenkova, G.P.; Biba, V.I.; Tishchenko, V.G.

    1987-08-10

    On the basis of dipole-moment and PMR-spectral data the E configuration of the cinnamoyl fragment of molecules of optically active 2-benzylidene-p-menthan-3-ones was established. By means of PMR and IR spectroscopy experimental proofs were obtained of deviation from coplanarity of the separate parts of the cinnamoyl system in the molecules investigated. It was shown that the cinnamoyl fragment of the molecules of 2-benzylidene-p-menthan-3-ones is more aplanar than in the case of the model ..pi..-isoelectronic 2-benzylidenecyclo-hexanone systems. By means of PMR the preferential axial orientation of the methyl group and equatorial orientation of the isopropyl group in the cyclohexanone system of molecules of 2-benzylidene-p-methan-3-ones was established.