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Sample records for activity hydrogen peroxide

  1. Concentration of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Methods for concentrating hydrogen peroxide solutions have been described. The methods utilize a polymeric membrane separating a hydrogen peroxide solution from a sweep gas or permeate. The membrane is selective to the permeability of water over the permeability of hydrogen peroxide, thereby facilitating the concentration of the hydrogen peroxide solution through the transport of water through the membrane to the permeate. By utilizing methods in accordance with the invention, hydrogen peroxide solutions of up to 85% by volume or higher may be generated at a point of use without storing substantial quantities of the highly concentrated solutions and without requiring temperatures that would produce explosive mixtures of hydrogen peroxide vapors.

  2. Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennakoon, Charles L. K.; Singh, Waheguru; Anderson, Kelvin C.

    2010-01-01

    needed are water and oxygen or air. 2. The product is pure and can therefore be used in disinfection applications directly or after proper dilution with water. 3. Oxygen generated in the anode compartment is used in the electrochemical reduction process; in addition, external oxygen is used to establish a high flow rate in the cathode compartment to remove the desired product efficiently. Exiting oxygen can be recycled after separation of liquid hydrogen peroxide product, if so desired. 4. The process can be designed for peroxide generation under microgravity conditions. 5. High concentrations of the order of 6-7 wt% can be generated by this method. This method at the time of this reporting is superior to what other researchers have reported. 6. The cell design allows for stacking of cells to increase the hydrogen peroxide production. 7. The catalyst mix containing a diquaternary ammonium compound enabled not only higher concentration of hydrogen peroxide but also higher current efficiency, improved energy efficiency, and catalyst stability. 8. The activity of the catalyst is maintained even after repeated periods of system shutdown. 9. The catalyst system can be extended for fuel-cell cathodes with suitable modifications.

  3. Overoxidation of chloroplast 2-Cys peroxiredoxins: balancing toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide

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    Leonor ePuerto-Galán

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Photosynthesis, the primary source of biomass and oxygen into the biosphere, involves the transport of electrons in the presence of oxygen and, therefore, chloroplasts constitute an important source of reactive oxygen species (ROS, including hydrogen peroxide. If accumulated at high level, hydrogen peroxide may exert a toxic effect; however, it is as well an important second messenger. In order to balance the toxic and signaling activities of hydrogen peroxide its level has to be tightly controlled. To this end, chloroplasts are equipped with different antioxidant systems such as 2-Cys peroxiredoxins (2-Cys Prxs, thiol-based peroxidases able to reduce hydrogen- and organic peroxides. At high peroxide concentrations the peroxidase function of 2-Cys Prxs may become inactivated through a process of overoxidation. This inactivation has been proposed to explain the signaling function of hydrogen peroxide in eukaryotes, whereas in prokaryotes, the 2-Cys Prxs of which were considered to be insensitive to overoxidation, the signaling activity of hydrogen peroxide is less relevant. Here we discuss the current knowledge about the mechanisms controlling 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in chloroplasts, organelles with an important signaling function in plants. Given the prokaryotic origin of chloroplasts, we discuss the occurrence of 2-Cys Prx overoxidation in cyanobacteria with the aim of identifying similarities between chloroplasts and their ancestors regarding their response to hydrogen peroxide.

  4. Hydrogen Peroxide Concentrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F.

    2007-01-01

    A relatively simple and economical process and apparatus for concentrating hydrogen peroxide from aqueous solution at the point of use have been invented. The heart of the apparatus is a vessel comprising an outer shell containing tubular membranes made of a polymer that is significantly more permeable by water than by hydrogen peroxide. The aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide to be concentrated is fed through the interstitial spaces between the tubular membranes. An initially dry sweep gas is pumped through the interiors of the tubular membranes. Water diffuses through the membranes and is carried away as water vapor mixed into the sweep gas. Because of the removal of water, the hydrogen peroxide solution flowing from the vessel at the outlet end is more concentrated than that fed into the vessel at the inlet end. The sweep gas can be air, nitrogen, or any other gas that can be conveniently supplied in dry form and does not react chemically with hydrogen peroxide.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Okimoto, Souta; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Fukushima, Nobuyuki [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi, E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motility of WB-F344 cells. •LPA{sub 3} is induced by hydrogen peroxide in WB-F344 cells. •Cell motility by hydrogen peroxide is inhibited in LPA{sub 3} knockdown cells. •LPA signaling is involved in cell migration by hydrogen peroxide. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA{sub 3} on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA{sub 3} may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates cell motile activity through LPA receptor-3 in liver epithelial WB-F344 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Ayano; Tanabe, Eriko; Inoue, Serina; Kitayoshi, Misaho; Okimoto, Souta; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2013-04-12

    Hydrogen peroxide which is one of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediates a variety of biological responses, including cell proliferation and migration. In the present study, we investigated whether lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling is involved in cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. The rat liver epithelial WB-F344 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide at 0.1 or 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays, hydrogen peroxide treated cells showed significantly high cell motile activity, compared with untreated cells. To measure the expression levels of LPA receptor genes, quantitative real time RT-PCR analysis was performed. The expressions of LPA receptor-3 (Lpar3) in hydrogen peroxide treated cells were significantly higher than those in control cells, but not Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. Next, to assess the effect of LPA3 on cell motile activity, the Lpar3 knockdown cells from WB-F344 cells were also treated with hydrogen peroxide. The cell motile activity of the knockdown cells was not stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. Moreover, in liver cancer cells, hydrogen peroxide significantly activated cell motility of Lpar3-expressing cells, but not Lpar3-unexpressing cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA3 may be mainly involved in cell motile activity of WB-F344 cells stimulated by hydrogen peroxide.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide catalytic decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated through the use of concentrated hydrogen peroxide fed as a monopropellant into a catalyzed thruster assembly. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50%-70% by volume, and may be increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding decomposition in the thruster assembly. The exhaust of the thruster assembly, rich in hydroxyl and/or hydroperoxy radicals, may be fed into a stream containing oxidizable components, such as nitric oxide, to facilitate their oxidation.

  8. Efficient Method for the Determination of the Activation Energy of the Iodide-Catalyzed Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, William; Lee, James; Abid, Nauman; DeMeo, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    An experiment is described that determines the activation energy (E[subscript a]) of the iodide-catalyzed decomposition reaction of hydrogen peroxide in a much more efficient manner than previously reported in the literature. Hydrogen peroxide, spontaneously or with a catalyst, decomposes to oxygen and water. Because the decomposition reaction is…

  9. Antibacterial Properties and Mechanism of Activity of a Novel Silver-Stabilized Hydrogen Peroxide.

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    Nancy L Martin

    Full Text Available Huwa-San peroxide (hydrogen peroxide; HSP is a NSF Standard 60 (maximum 8 mg/L(-1 new generation peroxide stabilized with ionic silver suitable for continuous disinfection of potable water. Experiments were undertaken to examine the mechanism of HSP against planktonic and biofilm cultures of indicator bacterial strains. Contact/kill time (CT relationships that achieve effective control were explored to determine the potential utility in primary disinfection. Inhibitory assays were conducted using both nutrient rich media and a medium based on synthetic wastewater. Assays were compared for exposures to three disinfectants (HSP, laboratory grade hydrogen peroxide (HP and sodium hypochlorite at concentrations of 20 ppm (therefore at 2.5 and 5 times the NSF limit for HP and sodium hypochlorite, respectively and at pH 7.0 and 8.5 in dechlorinated tap water. HSP was found to be more or equally effective as hypochlorite or HP. Results from CT assays comparing HSP and HP at different bacterial concentrations with neutralization of residual peroxide with catalase suggested that at a high bacterial concentration HSP, but not HP, was protected from catalase degradation possibly through sequestration by bacterial cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, at a low bacterial cell density residual HSP was more effectively neutralized as less HSP was associated with bacteria and therefore accessible to catalase. Silver in HSP may facilitate this association through electrostatic interactions at the cell surface. This was supported by experiments where the addition of mono (K(+ and divalent (Ca(+2 cations (0.005-0.05M reduced the killing efficacy of HSP but not HP. Experiments designed to distinguish any inhibitory effect of silver from that of peroxide in HSP were carried out by monitoring the metabolic activity of established P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms. Concentrations of 70-500 ppm HSP had a pronounced effect on metabolic activity while the equivalent

  10. Sulfite oxidase activity of cytochrome c: Role of hydrogen peroxide

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    Murugesan Velayutham

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In humans, sulfite is generated endogenously by the metabolism of sulfur containing amino acids such as methionine and cysteine. Sulfite is also formed from exposure to sulfur dioxide, one of the major environmental pollutants. Sulfite is used as an antioxidant and preservative in dried fruits, vegetables, and beverages such as wine. Sulfite is also used as a stabilizer in many drugs. Sulfite toxicity has been associated with allergic reactions characterized by sulfite sensitivity, asthma, and anaphylactic shock. Sulfite is also toxic to neurons and cardiovascular cells. Recent studies suggest that the cytotoxicity of sulfite is mediated by free radicals; however, molecular mechanisms involved in sulfite toxicity are not fully understood. Cytochrome c (cyt c is known to participate in mitochondrial respiration and has antioxidant and peroxidase activities. Studies were performed to understand the related mechanism of oxidation of sulfite and radical generation by ferric cytochrome c (Fe3+cyt c in the absence and presence of H2O2. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spin trapping studies using 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide (DMPO were performed with sulfite, Fe3+cyt c, and H2O2. An EPR spectrum corresponding to the sulfite radical adducts of DMPO (DMPO-SO3- was obtained. The amount of DMPO-SO3- formed from the oxidation of sulfite by the Fe3+cyt c increased with sulfite concentration. In addition, the amount of DMPO-SO3- formed by the peroxidase activity of Fe3+cyt c also increased with sulfite and H2O2 concentration. From these results, we propose a mechanism in which the Fe3+cyt c and its peroxidase activity oxidizes sulfite to sulfite radical. Our results suggest that Fe3+cyt c could have a novel role in the deleterious effects of sulfite in biological systems due to increased production of sulfite radical. It also shows that the increased production of sulfite radical may be responsible for neurotoxicity and some of the injuries which

  11. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF PEROXYDISUCCINIC ACID, HYDROGEN PEROXIDE AND THEIR MIXTURE

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    Blazheyevskiy M.Ye.,

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. It is known that reactive oxygen species (ROS generated in vivo by cell aerobic metabolism cause multiple damage in different cell organelles and kill not only obligate anaerobes and microaerophilles, but also aerobes. ROS generated by phagocytes and representatives of normal microflora are an important component of macroorganism defense from most pathogens, which is explained by their ability to damage different biological structures. ROS have high reactivity and let us use them in vitro as effective biocides. Hydrogen peroxide is widely used in many industries, in particular, in medicine and veterinary as antiseptic and disinfectant agent due to its safety for environment and broad spectrum of antimicrobial activity including spore-forming bacteria. However, in the recent years certain decrease of background sensitivity of microorganisms to hydrogen peroxide and occurrence of resistant strains of pathogenic microorganisms to this agent has been noted. The aim of this work is to carry out a comparative study of antimicrobial activity of hydrogen peroxide, peroxydisuccinic acid (PDSA, monoperoxysuccinic acid (MPSA, and mixture of PDSA and hydrogen peroxide (Н2О2. Materials and methods. The substances of peroxydisuccinic acid (PDSA and monoperoxysuccinic acid (MPSA were prepared by well known methods. The following test-strains were used to assess antimicrobial activity of the agents: Staphylococcus aureus АТСС 25923, Escherichia coli АТСС 25922, Pseudomonas aeruginosa АТСС 27853, Pseudomonas aeruginosa АТСС 9027, Basillus сereus АТСС 10702, Basillus сereus АТСС 96, Basillus subtilis АТСС 6633, Proteus vulgaris ATCC 4636, Candida albicans АТСС 885/653, and Candida albicans АТСС 10231. All disinfectant agents were diluted in distilled water at 40 ºС and stirred. The microbial burden was 2∙109 CFU/ml of the medium, and for kinetic studies 105 CFU/ml of the medium, it was standardizing

  12. Activation of NF-κB and apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells induced by hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李建明; 周红; 蔡黔; 肖光夏

    2002-01-01

    In vitro model of hydrogen peroxide induced apoptosis of SW-480 cells was used to investigate the role of NF-κB in the pathogenesis of reactive oxygen species induced apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells. Methods: Ultra-structural changes were observed.Apoptosis of SW-480 cell line was determined by Annexin-V and PI double-stained flow cytometry. Nuclear translocation of NF-κB was determined by anti-NF-κB polyclonal antibody and EB double-staining. NF-κB activity was studied by electrophoretic mobility shift assays. RTPCR was performed to study expression of NF-κB mRNA. Results: Hydrogen peroxide led to apoptosis of SW-480 cells, condensed or semilunar chromatin even apoptotic bodies could be observed. Nuclear translocation of NF-κB,increase of NF-κB activity and expression of NF-κB mRNA were found simultaneously. Conclusions: Early activation of NF-κ B may be one of the mechanisms of apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells by reactive oxygen species.

  13. Influence of Concentration and Activation on Hydrogen Peroxide Diffusion through Dental Tissues In Vitro

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    Carlos R. G. Torres

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of physical and chemical activation on the diffusion time of different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (HP bleaching agents through enamel and dentin. One hundred and twenty bovine cylindrical specimens were divided into six groups (n=20: 20% HP ; 20% HP with light activation; 20% HP with manganese gluconate; 35% HP; 35% HP with light activation; and 35% HP with manganese gluconate. The specimens were fixed over transparent epoxy wells with internal cavities to simulate a pulpal chamber. This chamber was filled with an enzymatic reagent to simulate pulpal fluid. The bleaching gels were applied on enamel surface and the image of the pulpal fluid was captured by a video camera to monitor the time of peroxide penetration in each specimen. ANOVA analysis showed that concentration and type of activation of bleaching gel significantly influenced the diffusion time of HP (P<0.05. 35% HP showed the lowest diffusion times compared to the groups with 20% HP gel. The light activation of HP decreased significantly the diffusion time compared to chemical activation. The highest diffusion time was obtained with 20% HP chemically activated. The diffusion time of HP was dependent on activation and concentration of HP. The higher concentration of HP diffused through dental tissues more quickly.

  14. Decontamination of adsorbed chemical warfare agents on activated carbon using hydrogen peroxide solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osovsky, Ruth; Kaplan, Doron; Nir, Ido; Rotter, Hadar; Elisha, Shmuel; Columbus, Ishay

    2014-09-16

    Mild treatment with hydrogen peroxide solutions (3-30%) efficiently decomposes adsorbed chemical warfare agents (CWAs) on microporous activated carbons used in protective garments and air filters. Better than 95% decomposition of adsorbed sulfur mustard (HD), sarin, and VX was achieved at ambient temperatures within 1-24 h, depending on the H2O2 concentration. HD was oxidized to the nontoxic HD-sulfoxide. The nerve agents were perhydrolyzed to the respective nontoxic methylphosphonic acids. The relative rapidity of the oxidation and perhydrolysis under these conditions is attributed to the microenvironment of the micropores. Apparently, the reactions are favored due to basic sites on the carbon surface. Our findings suggest a potential environmentally friendly route for decontamination of adsorbed CWAs, using H2O2 without the need of cosolvents or activators.

  15. Energy Efficient Catalytic Activation of Hydrogen peroxide for Green Chemical Processes: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Terrence J.; Horwitz, Colin

    2004-11-12

    A new, highly energy efficient approach for using catalytic oxidation chemistry in multiple fields of technology has been pursued. The new catalysts, called TAML® activators, catalyze the reactions of hydrogen peroxide and other oxidants for the exceptionally rapid decontamination of noninfectious simulants (B. atrophaeus) of anthrax spores, for the energy efficient decontamination of thiophosphate pesticides, for the facile, low temperature removal of color and organochlorines from pulp and paper mill effluent, for the bleaching of dyes from textile mill effluents, and for the removal of recalcitrant dibenzothiophene compounds from diesel and gasoline fuels. Highlights include the following: 1) A 7-log kill of Bacillus atrophaeus spores has been achieved unambiguously in water under ambient conditions within 15 minutes. 2) The rapid total degradation under ambient conditions of four thiophosphate pesticides and phosphonate degradation intermediates has been achieved on treatment with TAML/peroxide, opening up potential applications of the decontamination system for phosphonate structured chemical warfare agents, for inexpensive, easy to perform degradation of stored and aged pesticide stocks (especially in Africa and Asia), for remediation of polluted sites and water bodies, and for the destruction of chemical warfare agent stockpiles. 3) A mill trial conducted in a Pennsylvanian bleached kraft pulp mill has established that TAML catalyst injected into an alkaline peroxide bleach tower can significantly lower color from the effluent stream promising a new, more cost effective, energy-saving approach for color remediation adding further evidence of the value and diverse engineering capacity of the approach to other field trials conducted on effluent streams as they exit the bleach plant. 4) Dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), including 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, the most recalcitrant sulfur compounds in diesel and gasoline, can be completely removed from model gasoline

  16. Modulation of Na+/K+ ATPase Activity by Hydrogen Peroxide Generated through Heme in L. amazonensis.

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    Nathália Rocco-Machado

    Full Text Available Leishmania amazonensis is a protozoan parasite that occurs in many areas of Brazil and causes skin lesions. Using this parasite, our group showed the activation of Na+/K+ ATPase through a signaling cascade that involves the presence of heme and protein kinase C (PKC activity. Heme is an important biomolecule that has pro-oxidant activity and signaling capacity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS can act as second messengers, which are required in various signaling cascades. Our goal in this work is to investigate the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 generated in the presence of heme in the Na+/K+ ATPase activity of L. amazonensis. Our results show that increasing concentrations of heme stimulates the production of H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner until a concentration of 2.5 μM heme. To confirm that the effect of heme on the Na+/K+ ATPase is through the generation of H2O2, we measured enzyme activity using increasing concentrations of H2O2 and, as expected, the activity increased in a dose-dependent manner until a concentration of 0.1 μM H2O2. To investigate the role of PKC in this signaling pathway, we observed the production of H2O2 in the presence of its activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA and its inhibitor calphostin C. Both showed no effect on the generation of H2O2. Furthermore, we found that PKC activity is increased in the presence of H2O2, and that in the presence of calphostin C, H2O2 is unable to activate the Na+/K+ ATPase. 100 μM of Mito-TEMPO was capable of abolishing the stimulatory effect of heme on Na+/K+ ATPase activity, indicating that mitochondria might be the source of the hydrogen peroxide production induced by heme. The modulation of L. amazonensis Na+/K+ ATPase by H2O2 opens new possibilities for understanding the signaling pathways of this parasite.

  17. 21 CFR 529.1150 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 529.1150 Section 529.1150 Food... peroxide. (a) Specifications. Each milliliter of solution contains 396.1 milligrams (mg) hydrogen peroxide... group. Eggs: Some strains of rainbow trout eggs are sensitive to hydrogen peroxide treatment at a...

  18. Using a Hands-On Hydrogen Peroxide Decomposition Activity to Teach Catalysis Concepts to K-12 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulskis, Viktor J.; Ribeiro, Fabio H.; Gounder, Rajamani

    2016-01-01

    A versatile and transportable laboratory apparatus was developed for middle and high school (6th-12th grade) students as part of a hands-on outreach activity to estimate catalytic rates of hydrogen peroxide decomposition from oxygen evolution rates measured by using a volumetric displacement method. The apparatus was constructed with inherent…

  19. Inhibitory effects of LPA1 on cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide and 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone in fibroblast 3T3 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi; Dong, Yan; Honoki, Kanya; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2013-11-08

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to mediate a variety of biological responses, including cell motility. Recently, we indicated that lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) receptor-3 (LPA3) increased cell motile activity stimulated by hydrogen peroxide. In the present study, we assessed the role of LPA1 in the cell motile activity mediated by ROS in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. 3T3 cells were treated with hydrogen peroxide and 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone (DMNQ) at concentrations of 0.1 and 1 μM for 48 h. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3 cells treated with hydrogen peroxide and DMNQ were significantly higher than those of untreated cells. 3T3 cells treated with hydrogen peroxide and DMNQ showed elevated expression levels of the Lpar3 gene, but not the Lpar1 and Lpar2 genes. To investigate the effects of LPA1 on the cell motile activity induced by hydrogen peroxide and DMNQ, Lpar1-overexpressing (3T3-a1) cells were generated from 3T3 cells and treated with hydrogen peroxide and DMNQ. The cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide and DMNQ were markedly suppressed in 3T3-a1 cells. These results suggest that LPA signaling via LPA1 inhibits the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide and DMNQ in 3T3 cells.

  20. Efficient degradation of organic pollutants in aqueous solution with bicarbonate-activated hydrogen peroxide.

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    Xu, Aihua; Li, Xiaoxia; Xiong, Hui; Yin, Guochuan

    2011-02-01

    Bicarbonate anion is an efficient activator for hydrogen peroxide to generate many active oxygen species including peroxymonocarbonate (HCO(4)(-)), superoxide ion (O(2)(-)) and singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)). This study aims to understand the oxidative degradation of organic pollutants including methyl blue, methyl orange, rhodamine B, and 4-chlorophenol, with H(2)O(2) activated by sodium bicarbonate at room temperature. The obtained results indicate that such a method is apparently efficient in versatile pollutant degradation. Compared with using H(2)O(2) alone under similar pH conditions, the degradation rates of the pollutants were greatly enhanced through adding NaHCO(3). Through LC-MS, FT-IR and the TOC analysis, the degradation of methylene blue was revealed to proceed by the transformation of dimethylamino group in methylene blue to methylamino, aldehyde and nitro group, and the opening of phenyl ring into small molecular compounds and CO(2). The studies using the (1)O(2) scavenger sodium azide and the O(2)(-) indicator nitro blue tetrazolium suggest that the active O(2)(-) intermediate, generated from HCO(4)(-) decomposition, rather than (1)O(2) was involved in the pollutant degradation.

  1. Mechanism of Sporicidal Activity for the Synergistic Combination of Peracetic Acid and Hydrogen Peroxide.

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    Leggett, Mark J; Schwarz, J Spencer; Burke, Peter A; McDonnell, Gerald; Denyer, Stephen P; Maillard, Jean-Yves

    2015-12-04

    There is still great interest in controlling bacterial endospores. The use of chemical disinfectants and, notably, oxidizing agents to sterilize medical devices is increasing. With this in mind, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and peracetic acid (PAA) have been used in combination, but until now there has been no explanation for the observed increase in sporicidal activity. This study provides information on the mechanism of synergistic interaction of PAA and H2O2 against bacterial spores. We performed investigations of the efficacies of different combinations, including pretreatments with the two oxidizers, against wild-type spores and a range of spore mutants deficient in the spore coat or small acid-soluble spore proteins. The concentrations of the two biocides were also measured in the reaction vessels, enabling the assessment of any shift from H2O2 to PAA formation. This study confirmed the synergistic activity of the combination of H2O2 and PAA. However, we observed that the sporicidal activity of the combination is largely due to PAA and not H2O2. Furthermore, we observed that the synergistic combination was based on H2O2 compromising the spore coat, which was the main spore resistance factor, likely allowing better penetration of PAA and resulting in the increased sporicidal activity.

  2. Progress toward hydrogen peroxide micropulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, J C; Dittman, M D; Ledebuhr, A G

    1999-07-08

    A new self-pressurizing propulsion system has liquid thrusters and gas jet attitude control without heavy gas storage vessels. A pump boosts the pressure of a small fraction of the hydrogen peroxide, so that reacted propellant can controllably pressurize its own source tank. The warm decomposition gas also powers the pump and is supplied to the attitude control jets. The system has been incorporated into a prototype microsatellite for terrestrial maneuvering tests. Additional progress includes preliminary testing of a bipropellant thruster, and storage of unstabilized hydrogen peroxide in small sealed tanks.

  3. Species and Organ Diversity in the Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Superoxide Dismutase Activity In Vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Yan Cheng; Song-Quan Song

    2006-01-01

    Superoxide dismutase (SOD) is ubiquitous in aerobic organisms and constitutes the first link in the enzyme scavenging system of reactive oxygen species. In the present study, species and organ diversity of SOD activity in a solution and in an in-gel assay system, as well as the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on SOD activity, were investigated. In a solution assay system, SOD activity of jackfruit root, shoot, leaves, axes, and cotyledons, of maize embryos and endosperms, of mung bean leaves and seeds, of sacred lotus axes and cotyledons, and of rice and wheat leaves was increased by 1-15 mmol/L H2O2. However, SOD activity in rice root and seeds, maize roots and leaves, mung bean roots and shoots, and wheat seeds was decreased by 1-15 mmol/L H2O2. The SOD activity of wheat root and soybean roots, leaves, axes, and cotyledons was increased by 1-4 mmol/L H2O2, but was decreased by concentrations of H2O2 >4 mmol/L. The SOD activity of soybean shoots was not affected by 1-15 mmol/L H2O2. The SOD activity in crude mitochondria of jackfruit,maize, and upas seeds, as well as in purified mitochondria of jackfruit, was also increased by 1-15 mmol/L H2O2. In the in-gel assay system, the SOD in jackfruit cotyledons was comprised of Mn-SOD, Cu/Zn-SOD, and Fe-SOD, the crude mitochondria of jackfruit seeds and maizes embryo was comprised of Mn-SOD and Cu/Zn-SOD, and the crude mitochondria of maize seeds was comprised of Mn-SOD only. In the present study,H2O2 markedly inhibited Cu/Zn-SOD and Fe-SOD activity.

  4. Hydrogen peroxide sensing and cytotoxicity activity of Acacia lignin stabilized silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aadil, Keshaw Ram; Barapatre, Anand; Meena, Avtar Singh; Jha, Harit

    2016-01-01

    The study is aimed at detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) using Acacia lignin mediated silver nanoparticles (AGNPs). The synthesis of AGNPs was achieved at conditions optimized as, 3 ml of 0.02% lignin and 1mM silver nitrate incubated for 30 min at 80°C and pH 9. Initial screening of AGNPs was performed by measuring the surface plasmon resonance peak at 410-430 nm using UV-vis spectrophotometer. Transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction and particle size analysis confirmed the spherical shaped face centered cubic structure and 10-50 nm size of AGNPs. The infrared spectroscopy study further revealed that the active functional groups present in lignin were responsible for the reduction of silver ions (Ag(+)) to metallic silver (Ag(0)). Lignin stabilized silver nanoparticles showed good sensitivity and a linear response over wide concentrations of H2O2 (10(-1) to 10(-6)M). Further, the in vitrocytotoxicity activity of the lignin mediated AGNPs (5-500 μg/ml) demonstrated toxicity effects in MCF-7 and A375 cell lines. Thus, lignin stabilized silver nanoparticles based optical sensor for H2O2 could be potentially applied in the determination of reactive oxygen species and toxic chemicals which further expands the importance of lignin stabilized silver nanoparticles.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide stimulates the active transport of serotonin into human platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosin, T.R. (Indiana Univ., Bloomington (United States))

    1991-03-11

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide on the active transport of serotonin (5-HT) by human platelets was investigated. Platelets were exposed to either a single dose of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated by the glucose/glucose oxidase or xanthine/xanthine oxidase enzyme systems. H{sub 2}{sub 2} produced a rapid, dose-dependent and time-dependent increase in 5-HT transport which was maximal after a 2 min incubation and decreased with continued incubation. Catalase completely prevented H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced stimulation and fluoxetine totally blocked 5-HT uptake into stimulated platelets. The glucose/glucose oxidase and the xanthine/xanthine oxidase generating systems produced a similar response to that of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. In the xanthine/xanthine oxidase system, superoxide dismutase failed to alter the stimulation, while catalase effectively prevented the response. The kinetics of 5-HT transport indicated that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} treatment did not alter the K{sub m} of 5-HT transport but significantly increased the maximal rate of 5-HT transport. These data demonstrated that exposure of human platelets to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} resulted in a stimulation of the active transport of 5-HT and suggested that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} may function to regulate this process.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide homeostasis: activation of plant catalase by calcium/calmodulin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, T.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    2002-01-01

    Environmental stimuli such as UV, pathogen attack, and gravity can induce rapid changes in hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) levels, leading to a variety of physiological responses in plants. Catalase, which is involved in the degradation of H(2)O(2) into water and oxygen, is the major H(2)O(2)-scavenging enzyme in all aerobic organisms. A close interaction exists between intracellular H(2)O(2) and cytosolic calcium in response to biotic and abiotic stresses. Studies indicate that an increase in cytosolic calcium boosts the generation of H(2)O(2). Here we report that calmodulin (CaM), a ubiquitous calcium-binding protein, binds to and activates some plant catalases in the presence of calcium, but calcium/CaM does not have any effect on bacterial, fungal, bovine, or human catalase. These results document that calcium/CaM can down-regulate H(2)O(2) levels in plants by stimulating the catalytic activity of plant catalase. Furthermore, these results provide evidence indicating that calcium has dual functions in regulating H(2)O(2) homeostasis, which in turn influences redox signaling in response to environmental signals in plants.

  7. Anti-tumor Effects of Plasma Activated Media and Correlation with Hydrogen Peroxide Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroussi, Mounir; Mohades, Soheila; Barekzi, Nazir; Maruthamuthu, Venkat; Razavi, Hamid

    2016-09-01

    Plasma activated media (PAM) can induce death in cancer cells. In our research, PAM is produced by exposing liquid culture medium to a helium plasma pencil. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the aqueous state are known factors in anti-tumor effects of PAM. The duration of plasma exposure determines the concentrations of reactive species produced in PAM. Stability of the plasma generated reactive species and their lifetime depend on parameters such as the chemical composition of the medium. Here, a complete cell culture medium was employed to make PAM. Later, PAM was used to treat SCaBER cancer cells either as an immediate PAM (right after exposure) or as an aged-PAM (after storage). SCaBER (ATCC®HTB-3™) is an epithelial cell line from a human bladder with the squamous carcinoma disease. A normal epithelial cell line from a kidney tissue of a dog - MDCK (ATCC®CCL-34™) - was used to analyze the selective effect of PAM. Correspondingly, we measured the concentration of hydrogen peroxide- as a stable species with biological impact on cell viability- in both immediate PAM and aged-PAM. In addition, we report on the effect of serum supplemented in PAM on the H2O2 concentration measured by Amplex red assay kit. Finally, we evaluate the effects of PAM on growth and morphological changes in MDCK cells using fluorescence microscopy.

  8. 21 CFR 582.1366 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 582.1366 Section 582.1366 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1366 Hydrogen peroxide. (a) Product. Hydrogen peroxide. (b) (c) Limitations,...

  9. Hydrogen peroxide down-regulates inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor content through proteasome activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Garrido, A; Boyano-Adánez, M C; Alique, M; Calleros, L; Serrano, I; Griera, M; Rodríguez-Puyol, D; Griendling, K K; Rodríguez-Puyol, M

    2009-11-15

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is implicated in the regulation of signaling pathways leading to changes in vascular smooth muscle function. Contractile effects produced by H(2)O(2) are due to the phosphorylation of myosin light chain kinase triggered by increases in intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) from intracellular stores or influx of extracellular Ca(2+). One mechanism for mobilizing such stores involves the phosphoinositide pathway. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) mobilizes intracellular Ca(2+) by binding to a family of receptors (IP(3)Rs) on the endoplasmic-sarcoplasmic reticulum that act as ligand-gated Ca(2+) channels. IP(3)Rs can be rapidly ubiquitinated and degraded by the proteasome, causing a decrease in cellular IP(3)R content. In this study we show that IP(3)R(1) and IP(3)R(3) are down-regulated when vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) are stimulated by H(2)O(2), through an increase in proteasome activity. Moreover, we demonstrate that the decrease in IP(3)R by H(2)O(2) is accompanied by a reduction in calcium efflux induced by IP(3) in VSMC. Also, we observed that angiotensin II (ANGII) induces a decrease in IP(3)R by activation of NADPH oxidase and that preincubation with H(2)O(2) decreases ANGII-mediated calcium efflux and planar cell surface area in VSMC. The decreased IP(3) receptor content observed in cells was also found in aortic rings, which exhibited a decreased ANGII-dependent contraction after treatment with H(2)O(2). Altogether, these results suggest that H(2)O(2) mediates IP(3)R down-regulation via proteasome activity.

  10. Effect of hydrogen peroxide on rabbit urinary bladder citrate synthase activity in the presence and absence of a grape suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Venugopal

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The etiology of obstructive bladder dysfunction includes free radical damage to mitochondria. Feeding rabbits a standardized grape suspension protects the ability of the bladder to contract and empty in part by preventing mitochondrial damage, thus maintaining smooth muscle and mucosal metabolism. The objective of the current study is to determine the direct effect of this grape suspension on the response of mitochondria to the oxidative effects of hydrogen peroxide. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six male rabbits were anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital and the bladders excised. Four full thickness strips were obtained for contractile studies and the balance separated into smooth muscle and mucosa compartments by blunt dissection. The effect of hydrogen peroxide on the contractile response to field stimulation was quantitated. Each tissue was homogenized and the effects of increasing concentrations of hydrogen peroxide in the presence and absence of grape suspension on citrate synthase activity was determined. RESULTS: Citrate synthase activity was significantly higher in the mucosa than in the muscle. The grape suspension had no effect on control citrate synthase activity. However, the grape suspension provided significant protection of both smooth muscle and mucosal citrate synthase activity. CONCLUSIONS: These studies support the conclusion that the grape suspension provides direct protection of mitochondrial function.

  11. Diffused Intra-Oocyte Hydrogen Peroxide Activates Myeloperoxidase and Deteriorates Oocyte Quality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana N Khan

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is a relatively long-lived signaling molecule that plays an essential role in oocyte maturation, implantation, as well as early embryonic development. Exposure to relatively high levels of H2O2 functions efficiently to accelerate oocyte aging and deteriorate oocyte quality. However, little precise information exists regarding intra-oocyte H2O2 concentrations, and its diffusion to the oocyte milieu. In this work, we utilized an L-shaped amperometric integrated H2O2-selective probe to directly and quantitatively measure the real-time intra-oocyte H2O2 concentration. This investigation provides an exact measurement of H2O2 in situ by reducing the possible loss of H2O2 caused by diffusion or reactivity with other biological systems. This experiment suggests that the intra-oocyte H2O2 levels of oocytes obtained from young animals are reasonably high and remained constant during the procedure measurements. However, the intra-oocyte H2O2 concentration dropped significantly (40-50% reduction in response to catalase pre-incubation, suggesting that the measurements are truly H2O2 based. To further confirm the extracellular diffusion of H2O2, oocytes were incubated with myeloperoxidase (MPO, and the diffused H2O2 triggered MPO chlorinating activity. Our results show that the generated hypochlorous acid (HOCl facilitated the deterioration in oocyte quality, a process that could be prevented by pre-incubating the oocytes with melatonin, which was experimentally proven to be oxidized utilizing HPLC methods. This study is the first to demonstrate direct quantitative measurement of intracellular H2O2, and its extracellular diffusion and activation of MPO as well as its impact on oocyte quality. These results may help in designing more accurate treatment plans in assisted reproduction under inflammatory conditions.

  12. Coating for components requiring hydrogen peroxide compatibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefiani, Ali (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a heretofore-unknown use for zirconium nitride as a hydrogen peroxide compatible protective coating that was discovered to be useful to protect components that catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide or corrode when exposed to hydrogen peroxide. A zirconium nitride coating of the invention may be applied to a variety of substrates (e.g., metals) using art-recognized techniques, such as plasma vapor deposition. The present invention further provides components and articles of manufacture having hydrogen peroxide compatibility, particularly components for use in aerospace and industrial manufacturing applications. The zirconium nitride barrier coating of the invention provides protection from corrosion by reaction with hydrogen peroxide, as well as prevention of hydrogen peroxide decomposition.

  13. Hydrogen peroxide on the surface of Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, R.W.; Anderson, M.S.; Johnson, R.E.; Smythe, W.D.; Hendrix, A.R.; Barth, C.A.; Soderblom, L.A.; Hansen, G.B.; McCord, T.B.; Dalton, J.B.; Clark, R.N.; Shirley, J.H.; Ocampo, A.C.; Matson, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    Spatially resolved infrared and ultraviolet wavelength spectra of Europa's leading, anti-jovian quadrant observed from the Galileo spacecraft show absorption features resulting from hydrogen peroxide. Comparisons with laboratory measurements indicate surface hydrogen peroxide concentrations of about 0.13 percent, by number, relative to water ice. The inferred abundance is consistent with radiolytic production of hydrogen peroxide by intense energetic particle bombardment and demonstrates that Europa's surface chemistry is dominated by radiolysis.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide induces activation of insulin signaling pathway via AMP-dependent kinase in podocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piwkowska, Agnieszka, E-mail: apiwkowska@cmdik.pan.pl [Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Nephrology, Gdansk (Poland); Rogacka, Dorota; Angielski, Stefan [Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Nephrology, Gdansk (Poland); Jankowski, Maciej [Mossakowski Medical Research Centre, Polish Academy of Sciences, Laboratory of Molecular and Cellular Nephrology, Gdansk (Poland); Medical University of Gdansk, Department of Therapy Monitoring and Pharmacogenetics (Poland)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activates the insulin signaling pathway and glucose uptake in podocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces time-dependent changes in AMPK phosphorylation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} enhances insulin signaling pathways via AMPK activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} stimulation of glucose uptake is AMPK-dependent. -- Abstract: Podocytes are cells that form the glomerular filtration barrier in the kidney. Insulin signaling in podocytes is critical for normal kidney function. Insulin signaling is regulated by oxidative stress and intracellular energy levels. We cultured rat podocytes to investigate the effects of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) on the phosphorylation of proximal and distal elements of insulin signaling. We also investigated H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-induced intracellular changes in the distribution of protein kinase B (Akt). Western blots showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (100 {mu}M) induced rapid, transient phosphorylation of the insulin receptor (IR), the IR substrate-1 (IRS1), and Akt with peak activities at 5 min ({Delta} 183%, P < 0.05), 3 min ({Delta} 414%, P < 0.05), and 10 min ({Delta} 35%, P < 0.05), respectively. Immunostaining cells with an Akt-specific antibody showed increased intensity at the plasma membrane after treatment with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}>. Furthermore, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibited phosphorylation of the phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN; peak activity at 10 min; {Delta} -32%, P < 0.05) and stimulated phosphorylation of the AMP-dependent kinase alpha subunit (AMPK{alpha}; 78% at 3 min and 244% at 10 min). The stimulation of AMPK was abolished with an AMPK inhibitor, Compound C (100 {mu}M, 2 h). Moreover, Compound C significantly reduced the effect of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on IR phosphorylation by about 40% (from 2.07 {+-} 0.28 to 1.28 {+-} 0.12, P < 0.05). In addition, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increased glucose uptake in podocytes

  15. Functionalized Palladium Nanoparticles for Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Baccar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparison between two biosensors for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 detection. The first biosensor was developed by the immobilization of Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP enzyme on thiol-modified gold electrode. The second biosensor was developed by the immobilization of cysteamine functionalizing palladium nanoparticles on modified gold surface. The amino groups can be activated with glutaraldehyde for horseradish peroxidase immobilization. The detection of hydrogen peroxide was successfully observed in PBS for both biosensors using the cyclic voltammetry and the chronoamperometry techniques. The results show that the limit detection depends on the large surface-to-volume ratio attained with palladium nanoparticles. The second biosensor presents a better detection limit of 7.5 μM in comparison with the first one which is equal to 75 μM.

  16. Unusual hydrogen peroxide decomposition on stoichiometric insulating oxide ultrathin films

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Zhenjun

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen peroxide dissociation on MgO(001) films deposited on Mo(001) surface is investigated by employing periodic density-functional theory methods. The pristine MgO(001) surface showing chemical inertness prefers the weak adsorbing molecular configuration and is extremely difficult to react with hydrogen peroxide. As far as we know, energetically favorable decomposition state of hydrogen peroxide has never been obtained on MgO(001) surface. In this work the hydrogen peroxide is successfully dissociated on perfect stoichiometric MgO(001) films by depositing on transition metal substrate, without any activation barrier. The spontaneous dissociation of hydrogen peroxide on metal supported oxide films is rationalized by characterizing the geometric structures and electronic structures.

  17. Hydrogen peroxide enteritis: the "snow white" sign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilotta, J J; Waye, J D

    1989-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is a useful disinfectant that has achieved widespread utility in varied clinical settings. We report an epidemic of hydrogen peroxide enteritis that developed in seven patients in our gastrointestinal endoscopy unit during a 2-week period in early 1988. During endoscopy, using recently sterilized endoscopes that were flushed with 3% hydrogen peroxide after the glutaraldehyde cycle, instantaneous blanching (the "snow white" sign) and effervescence were noted on the mucosal surfaces when the water button was depressed. No patient subsequently suffered morbidity or mortality associated with this peroxide enteritis, and the biopsy specimens revealed nonspecific inflammation. The toxicity of hydrogen peroxide when used in enema form is reviewed, as well as the pathogenesis of peroxide enteritis.

  18. Effect of the Ascorbic Acid, Pyridoxine and Hydrogen Peroxide Treatments on Germination, Catalase Activity, Protein and Malondialdehyde Content of Three Oil Seeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aria DOLATABADIAN

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Oil seed production has an important role in human nutrition and industry. Success in oil plant cultivation is related to seed production with high viability and rapid germination, because these seeds rapidly loose their viability by fats oxidation. Thus, in this work we studied the effects of ascorbic acid, pyridoxine and hydrogen peroxide solutions on germination quantitative traits, catalase activity, protein and malondialdehyde content of three old oil seeds (sunflower, rape seed and safflower. The results showed that ascorbic acid and pyridoxine stimulated significantly the sunflower and rape seed germination. These vitamins, however, didn't have any effect on safflower germination. Hydrogen peroxide strongly increased safflower germination. Ascorbic acid and pyridoxine decreased catalase activity in sunflower and rape seed, whereas hydrogen peroxide increased it. Ascorbic acid and pyridoxine prevented protein degradation and lipid peroxidation in germinated seeds. Consequently, we understand that ascorbic acid and pyridoxine can increase sunflower and rape seed germination and stimulate rate of growth. Also safflower germination increased due to germination inhibitor oxidation by hydrogen peroxide. In conclusion, this report shows that oil seeds treated with ascorbic acid, pyridoxine and hydrogen peroxide remarkably increase the capacity of germination. We suggest that treatments with such substances can improve the old oil seed germination during storage.

  19. 7 CFR 58.431 - Hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Hydrogen peroxide. 58.431 Section 58.431 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards... Material § 58.431 Hydrogen peroxide. The solution shall comply with the specification of the...

  20. Vapor Hydrogen Peroxide Sterilization Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fei; Chung, Shirley; Barengoltz, Jack

    For interplanetary missions landing on a planet of potential biological interest, United States NASA planetary protection currently requires that the flight system must be assembled, tested and ultimately launched with the intent of minimizing the bioload taken to and deposited on the planet. Currently the only NASA approved microbial reduction method is dry heat sterilization process. However, with utilization of such elements as highly sophisticated electronics and sensors in modern spacecraft, this process presents significant materials challenges and is thus an undesirable bioburden reduction method to design engineers. The objective of this work is to introduce vapor hydrogen peroxide (VHP) as an alternative to dry heat microbial reduction to meet planetary protection requirements. The VHP sterilization technology is widely used by the medical industry, but high doses of VHP may degrade the performance of flight hardware, or compromise material compatibility. The goal of our study is determine the minimum VHP process conditions for PP acceptable microbial reduction levels. A series of experiments were conducted using Geobacillus stearothermophilus to determine VHP process parameters that provided significant reductions in spore viability while allowing survival of sufficient spores for statistically significant enumeration. In addition to the obvious process parameters -hydrogen peroxide concentration, number of pulses, and exposure duration -the investigation also considered the possible effect of environmental pa-rameters. Temperature, relative humidity, and material substrate effects on lethality were also studied. Based on the results, a most conservative D value was recommended. This recom-mended D value was also validated using VHP "hardy" strains that were isolated from clean-rooms and environmental populations collected from spacecraft relevant areas. The efficiency of VHP at ambient condition as well as VHP material compatibility will also be

  1. Inactivation of human myeloperoxidase by hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paumann-Page, Martina; Furtmüller, Paul G; Hofbauer, Stefan; Paton, Louise N; Obinger, Christian; Kettle, Anthony J

    2013-11-01

    Human myeloperoxidase (MPO) uses hydrogen peroxide generated by the oxidative burst of neutrophils to produce an array of antimicrobial oxidants. During this process MPO is irreversibly inactivated. This study focused on the unknown role of hydrogen peroxide in this process. When treated with low concentrations of H2O2 in the absence of reducing substrates, there was a rapid loss of up to 35% of its peroxidase activity. Inactivation is proposed to occur via oxidation reactions of Compound I with the prosthetic group or amino acid residues. At higher concentrations hydrogen peroxide acts as a suicide substrate with a rate constant of inactivation of 3.9 × 10(-3) s(-1). Treatment of MPO with high H2O2 concentrations resulted in complete inactivation, Compound III formation, destruction of the heme groups, release of their iron, and detachment of the small polypeptide chain of MPO. Ten of the protein's methionine residues were oxidized and the thermal stability of the protein decreased. Inactivation by high concentrations of H2O2 is proposed to occur via the generation of reactive oxidants when H2O2 reacts with Compound III. These mechanisms of inactivation may occur inside neutrophil phagosomes when reducing substrates for MPO become limiting and could be exploited when designing pharmacological inhibitors.

  2. Evaluation of anti-apoptotic activity of different dietary antioxidants in renal cell carcinoma against hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Garg Neeraj K; Mangal Sharad; Sahu Tejram; Mehta Abhinav; Vyas Suresh P; Tyagi Rajeev K

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the anti-apoptotic and radical scavenging activities of dietary phenolics, namely ascorbic acid, -tocopherol acetate, citric acid, salicylic acid, and estimate H2O2-induced apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma cells. Methods: The intracellular antioxidant potency of antioxidants was investigated. H2O2-induced apoptosis in RCC-26 was assayed with the following parameters: cell viability (% apoptosis), nucleosomal damage and DNA fragmentation, bcl-2 levels and flow cytometery analysis (ROS production evaluation). Results: The anticancer properties of antioxidants such as ascorbic acid, - tocopherol acetate, citric acid, salicylic acid with perdurable responses were investigated. It was observed that these antioxidants had protective effect (anti-apoptotic activity) against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in renal cell carcinoma (RCC-26) cell line. Conclusions: This study reveals and proves the anticancer properties. However, in cancer cell lines anti-apoptotic activity can indirectly reflect the cancer promoter activity through radicals scavenging, and significantly protect nucleus and bcl-2.

  3. Photocatalytic activity and reusability of ZnO layer synthesised by electrolysis, hydrogen peroxide and heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhmal Saadon, Syaiful; Sathishkumar, Palanivel; Mohd Yusoff, Abdull Rahim; Hakim Wirzal, Mohd Dzul; Rahmalan, Muhammad Taufiq; Nur, Hadi

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the zinc oxide (ZnO) layer was synthesised on the surface of Zn plates by three different techniques, i.e. electrolysis, hydrogen peroxide and heat treatment. The synthesised ZnO layers were characterised using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-visible diffuse reflectance and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity of the ZnO layer was further assessed against methylene blue (MB) degradation under UV irradiation. The photocatalytic degradation of MB was achieved up to 84%, 79% and 65% within 1 h for ZnO layers synthesised by electrolysis, heat and hydrogen peroxide treatment, respectively. The reusability results show that electrolysis and heat-treated ZnO layers have considerable photocatalytic stability. Furthermore, the results confirmed that the photocatalytic efficiency of ZnO was directly associated with the thickness and enlarged surface area of the layer. Finally, this study proved that the ZnO layers synthesised by electrolysis and heat treatment had shown better operational stability and reusability.

  4. The effect of water deficit on the activity of hydrogen peroxide-scavenging enzymes in two barley genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Bandurska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Two barley (Hordeum vulgare L. genotypes, the cv. Aramir and line R567, were subjected to water deficit by immersing their root systems in polyethylene glycol solution of osmotic potential -1.0 MPa. The stress caused a decline in the leaf-relative-water content (RWC and affected membrane damage in both the genotypes. A higher decline in RWC and a higher membrane injury index was observed in R567 in comparison to 'Aramir'. Water deficit induced an increase in the activity of guaiacol peroxidase (GPO and catalse (CAT. A higher increase of CAT than GPO peroxidase activity has been noted in both the genotypes. The results. together with our earlier reports (Bandurska et al. 1997 show that detoxification of hydrogen peroxide under water stress conditions in those two barley genotypes was associated with the action of GPO and CAT, and that the latter was more involved in that process.

  5. High temperature decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is oxidized into nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2) by the high temperature decomposition of a hydrogen peroxide solution to produce the oxidative free radicals, hydroxyl and hydroperoxyl. The hydrogen peroxide solution is impinged upon a heated surface in a stream of nitric oxide where it decomposes to produce the oxidative free radicals. Because the decomposition of the hydrogen peroxide solution occurs within the stream of the nitric oxide, rapid gas-phase oxidation of nitric oxide into nitrogen dioxide occurs.

  6. Membrane transport of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Gerd P; Schjoerring, Jan K; Jahn, Thomas P

    2006-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) belongs to the reactive oxygen species (ROS), known as oxidants that can react with various cellular targets thereby causing cell damage or even cell death. On the other hand, recent work has demonstrated that H2O2 also functions as a signalling molecule controlling different essential processes in plants and mammals. Because of these opposing functions the cellular level of H2O2 is likely to be subjected to tight regulation via processes involved in production, distribution and removal. Substantial progress has been made exploring the formation and scavenging of H2O2, whereas little is known about how this signal molecule is transported from its site of origin to the place of action or detoxification. From work in yeast and bacteria it is clear that the diffusion of H2O2 across membranes is limited. We have now obtained direct evidence that selected aquaporin homologues from plants and mammals have the capacity to channel H2O2 across membranes. The main focus of this review is (i) to summarize the most recent evidence for a signalling role of H2O2 in various pathways in plants and mammals and (ii) to discuss the relevance of specific transport of H2O2.

  7. Detection of interstellar hydrogen peroxide

    CERN Document Server

    Bergman, P; Liseau, R; Larsson, B; Olofsson, H; Menten, K M; Güsten, R

    2011-01-01

    The molecular species hydrogen peroxide, HOOH, is likely to be a key ingredient in the oxygen and water chemistry in the interstellar medium. Our aim with this investigation is to determine how abundant HOOH is in the cloud core {\\rho} Oph A. By observing several transitions of HOOH in the (sub)millimeter regime we seek to identify the molecule and also to determine the excitation conditions through a multilevel excitation analysis. We have detected three spectral lines toward the SM1 position of {\\rho} Oph A at velocity-corrected frequencies that coincide very closely with those measured from laboratory spectroscopy of HOOH. A fourth line was detected at the 4{\\sigma} level. We also found through mapping observations that the HOOH emission extends (about 0.05 pc) over the densest part of the {\\rho} Oph A cloud core. We derive an abundance of HOOH relative to that of H_2 in the SM1 core of about 1\\times10^(-10). To our knowledge, this is the first reported detection of HOOH in the interstellar medium.

  8. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O2-reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O2, which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells. PMID:23457415

  9. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2012-11-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O2-reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O2, which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells.

  10. Isothermal Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide Dihydrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new method of growing pure solid hydrogen peroxide in an ultra high vacuum environment and apply it to determine thermal stability of the dihydrate compound that forms when water and hydrogen peroxide are mixed at low temperatures. Using infrared spectroscopy and thermogravimetric analysis, we quantified the isothermal decomposition of the metastable dihydrate at 151.6 K. This decomposition occurs by fractional distillation through the preferential sublimation of water, which leads to the formation of pure hydrogen peroxide. The results imply that in an astronomical environment where condensed mixtures of H2O2 and H2O are shielded from radiolytic decomposition and warmed to temperatures where sublimation is significant, highly concentrated or even pure hydrogen peroxide may form.

  11. Wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation of phenol with FeAC (iron-embedded activated carbon) catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Rey-May; Chen, Shih-Hsiung; Huang, Cheng-Hsien; Hung, Mu-Ya; Chang, Jing-Song; Lai, Cheng-Lee

    2010-01-01

    This investigation aims at exploring the catalytic oxidation activity of iron-embedded activated carbon (FeAC) and the application for the degradation of phenol in the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO). FeAC catalysts were prepared by pre-impregnating iron in coconut shell with various iron loadings in the range of 27.5 to 46.5% before they were activated. The FeAC catalysts were characterised by measuring their surface area, pore distribution, functional groups on the surface, and X-ray diffraction patterns. The effects of iron loading strongly inhibited the pore development of the catalyst but benefited the oxidation activity in WHPCO. It was found that the complete conversion of phenol was observed with all FeAC catalysts in oxidation. High level of chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement can be achieved within the first 30 minutes of oxidation. The iron embedded in the activated carbon showed good performance in the degradation and mineralisation of phenol during the oxidation due to the active sites as iron oxides formed on the surface of the activated carbon. It was found that the embedding irons were presented in gamma-Fe(2)O(3), alpha-Fe(2)O(3), and alpha-FeCOOH forms on the activated carbon. The aging tests on FeAC catalysts showed less activity loss, and less iron leaching was found after four oxidation runs.

  12. [Risks of hydrogen peroxide irrigation in military surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saïssy, J M; Guignard, B; Pats, B; Lenoir, B; Rouvier, B

    1994-01-01

    Two cases of severe complications due to injection of hydrogen peroxide under pressure into areas of muscular attrition in war wounds are reported. In both cases the administration of hydrogen peroxide was associated with tachypnoea, with major arterial desaturation and a precordial "mill-wheel" murmur was heard. In one case, these symptoms were followed by hemiplegia caused by paradoxical arterial gas embolism, and in the other case by a pulmonary oedema confirmed by computerized tomography. Both patients recovered under hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The release of gaseous oxygen under the effect of tissue catalase and the membrane peroxydasic activity of hydrogen peroxide initiate such complications. The injection of hydrogen peroxide under pressure into a closed or partially closed cavity should therefore be strictly prohibited.

  13. Green biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Calliandra haematocephala leaf extract, their antibacterial activity and hydrogen peroxide sensing capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selvaraj Raja

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent times, plant-mediated synthesis of nanoparticles has garnered wide interest owing to its inherent features such as rapidity, simplicity, eco-friendliness and cheaper costs. For the first time, silver nanoparticles were successfully synthesized using Calliandra haematocephala leaf extract in the current investigation. The as-formed silver nanoparticles were characterized by UV–Vis spectrophotometer and the characteristic surface plasmon resonance peak was identified to be 414 nm. The morphology of the silver nanoparticles was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS was used to detect the presence of elemental silver. X-ray diffraction (XRD was employed to ascertain the crystalline nature and purity of the silver nanoparticles which implied the presence of (111 and (220 lattice planes of the face centered cubic (fcc structure of metallic silver. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR was used to key out the specific functional groups responsible for the reduction of silver nitrate to form silver nanoparticles and the capping agents present in the leaf extract. The stability of the silver nanoparticles was analyzed by zeta potential measurements. A negative zeta potential value of −17.2 mV proved the stability of the silver nanoparticles. The antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli – pathogenic bacteria – and the capacity to detect hydrogen peroxide by the silver nanoparticles were demonstrated which would find applications in the development of new antibacterial drugs and new biosensors to detect the presence of hydrogen peroxide in various samples respectively.

  14. Activation of aqueous hydrogen peroxide for non-catalyzed dihydroperoxidation of ketones by azeotropic removal of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkl Renar, K; Pečar, S; Iskra, J

    2015-09-28

    Cyclic and acyclic ketones were selectively converted to gem-dihydroperoxides in 72-99% yield with 30% aq. hydrogen peroxide by azeotropic distillation of water from the reaction mixture without any catalyst. The reactions were more selective than with 100% H2O2 and due to neutral conditions also less stable products could be obtained.

  15. Peroxidase-like activity of water-soluble cupric oxide nanoparticles and its analytical application for detection of hydrogen peroxide and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Chen, Juan; Feng, Ye-Bin; Hong, Lei; Chen, Qi-Ying; Wu, Ling-Feng; Lin, Xin-Hua; Xia, Xing-Hua

    2012-04-07

    Water-soluble cupric oxide nanoparticles are fabricated via a quick-precipitation method and used as peroxidase mimetics for ultrasensitive detection of hydrogen peroxide and glucose. The water-soluble CuO nanoparticles show much higher catalytic activity than that of commercial CuO nanoparticles due to their higher affinity to hydrogen peroxide. In addition, the as-prepared CuO nanoparticles are stable over a wide range of pH and temperature. This excellent stability in the form of aqueous colloidal suspensions makes the application of the water-soluble CuO nanoparticles easier in aqueous systems. A colorimetric assay for hydrogen peroxide and glucose has been established based on the catalytic oxidation of phenol coupled with 4-amino-atipyrine by the action of hydrogen peroxide. This analytical platform not only confirms the intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of the water-soluble cupric oxide nanoparticles, but also shows its great potential applications in environmental chemistry, biotechnology and medicine.

  16. Activation and involvement of JNK1 / 2 in hydrogen peroxide- induced neurotoxicity in cultured rat cortical neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei WANG; Can GAO; Xiao-yu HOU; Yong LIU; Yan-yan ZONG; Guang-yi ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase 1 and 2 (JNK1/2) and the main signal pathway for its activation in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) induced apoptotic-like cortical cell death. METHODS: Using the model of oxidative stress induced by H2O2, the expression and diphosphorylation of JNK1/2 was examined by immunoblotting analysis, and neuronal apoptotic like cell death was determined by 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining.RESULTS: The elevation in diphosphorylation level of JNK1/2 (4.40-/5.61-fold vs sham control) was associated with the concentration of H2O2 (0-100 μmol/L) and the development of apoptotic-like cell death (11.04 %-81.01%).There was no alteration of JNK1/2 protein expression following H2O2 treatment and recovery at different time points. Administration with JNK1/2 antisense oligonucleotides not only significantly decreased JNK1/2 protein expression and activation level, but also significantly reduced cortical cell death induced by H2O2 exposure.Furthermore, both JNK1/2 diphosphorylation and apoptotic-like cell death were largely prevented by pretreatment with (5S, l0R)-(-)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclohepten-5,10-imine hydrogen maleate (MK-801)or omission of Ca2+ in incubation medium with ethylene glycol-bis(2-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N-tetraacetic acid (EGTA). CONCLUSION: JNK1/2 is activated and participates in H2O2-induced apoptotic-like death in cultured rat cortical neurons mainly via N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-mediated influx of extracellular Ca2+.

  17. Locating bomb factories by detecting hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romolo, Francesco Saverio; Connell, Samantha; Ferrari, Carlotta; Suarez, Guillaume; Sauvain, Jean-Jacques; Hopf, Nancy B

    2016-11-01

    The analytical capability to detect hydrogen peroxide vapour can play a key role in localizing a site where a H2O2 based Improvised Explosive (IE) is manufactured. In security activities it is very important to obtain information in a short time. For this reason, an analytical method to be used in security activity needs portable devices. The authors have developed the first analytical method based on a portable luminometer, specifically designed and validated to locate IE manufacturing sites using quantitative on-site vapour analysis for H2O2. The method was tested both indoor and outdoor. The results demonstrate that the detection of H2O2 vapours could allow police forces to locate the site, while terrorists are preparing an attack. The collected data are also very important in developing new sensors, able to give an early alarm if located at a proper distance from a site where an H2O2 based IE is prepared.

  18. Titanium corrosion in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Been, Jantje

    1998-12-01

    The corrosion of Grade 2 titanium in alkaline hydrogen peroxide environments has been studied by weight loss corrosion tests, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), linear polarization resistance (LPR) measurements and potentiodynamic polarography. Calcium ions and wood pulp were investigated as corrosion inhibitors. In alkaline peroxide, the titanium corrosion rate increased with increasing pH, temperature, and hydrogen peroxide concentration. The corrosion controlling mechanism is thought to be the reaction of the oxide with the perhydroxyl ion. No evidence of thermodynamically stable calcium titanate was found in the surface film of test coupons exposed to calcium-inhibited alkaline peroxide solutions. Calcium inhibition is probably the result of low local alkali and peroxide concentrations at the metal surface produced by reaction of adsorbed calcium with hydrogen peroxide. It has been shown that the inhibiting effect of calcium is temporary, possibly through an effect of calcium on the chemical and/or physical stability of the surface oxide. Pulp is an effective and stable corrosion inhibitor. Raising the pulp concentration decreased the corrosion rate. The inhibiting effect of pulp may be related to the adsorption and interaction of the pulp fibers with H 2O2, thereby decreasing the peroxide concentration and rendering the solution less corrosive. The presence of both pulp and calcium led to higher corrosion rates than obtained by either one inhibitor alone. Replacement of hydrofluoric acid with alkaline peroxide for pickling of titanium was investigated. Titanium corrosion rates in alkaline peroxide exceeded those obtained in the conventional hydrofluoric acid bath. General corrosion was observed with extensive roughening of the surface giving a dull gray appearance. Preferred dissolution of certain crystallographic planes was investigated through the corrosion of a titanium single crystal. Whereas the overall effect on the corrosion rate was small

  19. Catalytic activity of iron hexacyanoosmate(II) towards hydrogen peroxide and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and its use in amperometric biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotzian, Petr; Janku, Tereza [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Pardubice, Nam. Cs. Legii 565, CZ-532 10 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Kalcher, Kurt [Institute of Chemistry - Analytical Chemistry, Karl-Franzens University, Universitaetsplatz 1, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Vytras, Karel [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Pardubice, Nam. Cs. Legii 565, CZ-532 10 Pardubice (Czech Republic)], E-mail: karel.vytras@upce.cz

    2007-09-19

    Hydrogen peroxide and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) may be determined amperometrically using screen-printed electrodes chemically modified with iron(III) hexacyanoosmate(II) (Osmium purple) in flow injection analysis (FIA). The determination is based on the exploitation of catalytic currents resulting from the oxidation/reduction of the modifier. The performance of the sensor was characterized and optimized by controlling several operational parameters (applied potential, pH and flow rate of the phosphate buffer). Comparison has been made with analogous complexes of ruthenium (Ruthenium purple) and iron (Prussian blue). Taking into account the sensitivity and stability of corresponding sensors, the best results were obtained with the use of Osmium purple. The sensor exhibited a linear increase of the amperometric signal with the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the range of 0.1-100 mg L{sup -1} with a detection limit (evaluated as 3{sigma}) of 0.024 mg L{sup -1} with a R.S.D. 1.5% for 10 mg L{sup -1} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} under optimized flow rate of 0.4 mL min{sup -1} in 0.1 M phosphate buffer carrier (pH 6) and a working potential of +0.15 V versus Ag/AgCl. Afterwards, a biological recognition element - either glucose oxidase or ethanol dehydrogenase - was incorporated to achieve a sensor facilitating the determination of glucose or ethanol, respectively. The glucose sensor gave linearity between current and concentration in the range from 1 to 250 mg L{sup -1} with a R.S.D. 2.4% for 100 mg L{sup -1} glucose, detection limit 0.02 mg L{sup -1} (3{sigma}) and retained its original activity after 3 weeks when stored at 6 deg. C. Optimal parameters in the determination of ethanol were selected as: applied potential +0.45 V versus Ag/AgCl, flow rate 0.2 mL min{sup -1} in 0.1 M phosphate buffer carrier (pH 7). Different structural designs of the ethanol sensor were tested and linearity obtained was up to 1000 mg L{sup -1} with a maximum R.S.D. of 5

  20. Inhibition of Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells Aging by Allicin Depends on Sirtuin1 Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiao-Long; Liu, Yuanbo; Liu, Mihua; Hu, Huijun; Pan, Yongquan; Fan, Xiao-Juan; Hu, Xue-Mei; Zou, Wei-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Background The abnormal activity of Sirtuin 1 (Sirt1) is closely related to the aging of vascular endothelial cells. As a bioactive molecule, allicin has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and lipid-regulating mechanisms. However, few reports about the relationship of allicin and Sirt1 have been published. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the effect of allicin on Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs) aging induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the role of Sirt1 in this phenomenon. Material/Methods HUVEC were exposed to H2O2 to establish the aging model. The expression of protein and RNA were detected by Western blot and Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to assess cell viability. Sirt1 enzyme activity assay was used to analyze enzymatic activity. Reactive oxygen species was detected by dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). Cell aging was detected by Senescence β-Galactosidase (SA-β-gal) staining. Results Results of this study revealed that pretreating HUVECs with 5 ng/mL allicin before exposure to H2O2 resulted in increased cell viability and reduced reactive oxygen species generation. Western blot and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) analysis showed that H2O2 attenuated the phosphorylation and activation of Sirt1 and increased the expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1(PAI-1) protein. Moreover, H2O2 also promoted HUVEC aging. These effects were significantly alleviated by 5 ng/mL allicin co-treatment. Furthermore, the anti-aging effects of allicin were abolished by the Sirt1 inhibitor nicotinamide (NAM). Conclusions Overall, the results demonstrated that allicin protects HUVECs from H2O2-induced oxidative stress and aging via the activation of Sirt1. PMID:28139552

  1. Key role of persistent free radicals in hydrogen peroxide activation by biochar: implications to organic contaminant degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Guodong; Gao, Juan; Liu, Cun; Dionysiou, Dionysios D; Wang, Yu; Zhou, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the activation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) by biochars (produced from pine needles, wheat, and maize straw) for 2-chlorobiphenyl (2-CB) degradation in the present study. It was found that H2O2 can be effectively activated by biochar, which produces hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) to degrade 2-CB. Furthermore, the activation mechanism was elucidated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and salicylic acid (SA) trapping techniques. The results showed that biochar contains persistent free radicals (PFRs), typically ∼ 10(18) unpaired spins/gram. Higher trapped [(•)OH] concentrations were observed with larger decreases in PFRs concentration, when H2O2 was added to biochar, indicating that PFRs were the main contributor to the formation of (•)OH. This hypothesis was supported by the linear correlations between PFRs concentration and trapped [(•)OH], as well as kobs of 2-CB degradation. The correlation coefficients (R(2)) were 0.723 and 0.668 for PFRs concentration vs trapped [(•)OH], and PFRs concentration vs kobs, respectively, when all biochars pyrolyzed at different temperatures were included. For the same biochar washed by different organic solvents (methanol, hexane, dichloromethane, and toluene), the correlation coefficients markedly increased to 0.818-0.907. Single-electron transfer from PFRs to H2O2 was a possible mechanism for H2O2 activation by biochars, which was supported by free radical quenching studies. The findings of this study provide a new pathway for biochar implication and insight into the mechanism of H2O2 activation by carbonaceous materials (e.g., activated carbon and graphite).

  2. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition kinetics in aquaculture water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arvin, Erik; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (HP) is used in aquaculture systems where preventive or curative water treatments occasionally are required. Use of chemical agents can be challenging in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS) due to extended water retention time and because the agents must not damage the fish...... reared or the nitrifying bacteria in the biofilters at concentrations required to eliminating pathogens. This calls for quantitative insight into the fate of the disinfectant residuals during water treatment. This paper presents a kinetic model that describes the HP decomposition in aquaculture water...... the enzyme activity. This was, however, not measured. The model developed successfully described the removal of HP in aquaculture water from three types of RAS and model parameters are estimated. The model and the model parameters provide new information and are valuable tools to improve HP application...

  3. Degradation kinetics and mechanism of trace nitrobenzene by granular activated carbon enhanced microwave/hydrogen peroxide system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dina; Zeng, Honghu; Liu, Jie; Yu, Xiaozhang; Liang, Yanpeng; Lu, Lanjing

    2013-07-01

    The kinetics of the degradation of trace nitrobenzene (NB) by a granular activated carbon (GAC) enhanced microwave (MW)/hydrogen peroxide (H202) system was studied. Effects of pH, NB initial concentration and tert-butyl alcohol on the removal efficiency were examined. It was found that the reaction rate fits well to first-order reaction kinetics in the MW/GAC/H202 process. Moreover, GAC greatly enhanced the degradation rate of NB in water. Under a given condition (MW power 300 W, H202 dosage 10 mg/L, pH 6.85 and temperature (60 +/- 5)degrees C), the degradation rate of NB was 0.05214 min-1when 4 g/L GAC was added. In general, alkaline pH was better for NB degradation; however, the optimum pH was 8.0 in the tested pH value range of 4.0-12.0. At H202 dosage of 10 mg/L and GAC dosage of 4 g/L, the removal of NB was decreased with increasing initial concentrations of NB, indicating that a low initial concentration was beneficial for the degradation of NB. These results indicated that the MW/GAC/H202 process was effective for trace NB degradation in water. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis indicated that a hydroxyl radical addition reaction and dehydrogenation reaction enhanced NB degradation.

  4. Antimicrobial activity of apple, hibiscus, olive, and hydrogen peroxide formulations against Salmonella enterica on organic leafy greens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Katherine L; Patel, Jitendra; Jaroni, Divya; Friedman, Mendel; Ravishankar, Sadhana

    2011-10-01

    Salmonella enterica is one of the most common bacterial pathogens implicated in foodborne outbreaks involving fresh produce in the last decade. In an effort to discover natural antimicrobials for use on fresh produce, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of different antimicrobial plant extract-concentrate formulations on four types of organic leafy greens inoculated with S. enterica serovar Newport. The leafy greens tested included organic romaine and iceberg lettuce, and organic adult and baby spinach. Each leaf sample was washed, dip inoculated with Salmonella Newport (10(6) CFU/ml), and dried. Apple and olive extract formulations were prepared at 1, 3, and 5% concentrations, and hibiscus concentrates were prepared at 10, 20, and 30%. Inoculated leaves were immersed in the treatment solution for 2 min and individually incubated at 4°C. After incubation, samples were taken on days 0, 1, and 3 for enumeration of survivors. Our results showed that the antimicrobial activity was both concentration and time dependent. Olive extract exhibited the greatest antimicrobial activity, resulting in 2- to 3-log CFU/g reductions for each concentration and type of leafy green by day 3. Apple extract showed 1- to 2-log CFU/g reductions by day 3 on various leafy greens. Hibiscus concentrate showed an overall reduction of 1 log CFU/g for all leafy greens. The maximum reduction by hydrogen peroxide (3%) was about 1 log CFU/g. The antimicrobial activity was also tested on the background microflora of organic leafy greens, and reductions ranged from 0 to 2.8 log. This study demonstrates the potential of natural plant extract formulations to inactivate Salmonella Newport on organic leafy greens.

  5. Virucidal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour disinfection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuladhar, E.; Terpstra, P.; Koopmans, M.; Duizer, E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Viral contamination of surfaces is thought to be important in transmission. Chemical disinfection can be an effective means of intervention, but little is known about the virucidal efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour (HPV) against enteric and respiratory viruses. Aim: To measure the vir

  6. Systems and methods for generation of hydrogen peroxide vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Adam H; Eckels, Joel Del; Vu, Alexander K; Alcaraz, Armando; Reynolds, John G

    2014-12-02

    A system according to one embodiment includes a moisture trap for drying air; at least one of a first container and a second container; and a mechanism for at least one of: bubbling dried air from the moisture trap through a hydrogen peroxide solution in the first container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above a hydrogen peroxide solution in the second container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor. A method according one embodiment includes at least one of bubbling dried air through a hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a first hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above the hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a second hydrogen peroxide vapor. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  7. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O2-reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the ...

  8. 21 CFR 178.1005 - Hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Hydrogen peroxide solution. 178.1005 Section 178... SANITIZERS Substances Utilized To Control the Growth of Microorganisms § 178.1005 Hydrogen peroxide solution. Hydrogen peroxide solution identified in this section may be safely used to sterilize polymeric...

  9. Selective electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide from water oxidation

    CERN Document Server

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Nørskov, Jens K

    2015-01-01

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet, over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. Present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH$^*$ can be used as a descriptor to screen for selectivity trends between the 2e$^-$ water oxidation to H$_2$O$_2$ and the 4e$^-$ oxidation to O$_2$. We show that materials that bind oxygen intermediates sufficiently weakly, such as SnO$_2$, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. We present a rati...

  10. Selective Electrochemical Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide from Water Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine A; Nørskov, Jens K

    2015-11-01

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. The present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e(-) water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e(-) oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. We present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively.

  11. Oxidative status imbalance in patients with metabolic syndrome: role of the myeloperoxidase/hydrogen peroxide axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Fonseca, Lucas José Sá; Nunes-Souza, Valéria; Guedes, Glaucevane da Silva; Schettino-Silva, Glauber; Mota-Gomes, Marco Antônio; Rabelo, Luíza Antas

    2014-01-01

    The present study evaluated the cardiometabolic and redox balance profiles in patients with Metabolic Syndrome compared to apparently healthy individuals, and the participation of the myeloperoxidase/hydrogen peroxide axis in systemic lipid peroxidation. Twenty-four patients with Metabolic Syndrome and eighteen controls underwent a full clinical assessment. Venous blood samples were collected for general biochemical dosages, as well as for the oxidative stress analyses (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and arginase activities; and lipid peroxidation, myeloperoxidase activity, nitrite, and hydrogen peroxide concentrations in plasma). Arterial stiffness was assessed by radial artery applanation tonometry. Plasma lipid peroxidation, erythrocyte superoxide dismutase activity, myeloperoxidase activity, and hydrogen peroxide concentrations were shown to be increased in Metabolic Syndrome patients, without significant differences for the other enzymes, plasma nitrite concentrations, and arterial stiffness. Linear regression analysis revealed a positive and significant correlation between lipid peroxidation and myeloperoxidase and also between this enzyme and hydrogen peroxide. In contrast, such correlation was not observed between lipid peroxidation and hydrogen peroxide. In summary, Metabolic Syndrome patients exhibited evident systemic redox imbalance compared to controls, with the possible participation of the myeloperoxidase/hydrogen peroxide axis as a contributor in lipid peroxidation.

  12. Ozone inhibits endothelial cell cyclooxygenase activity through formation of hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madden, M.C.; Eling, T.E.; Friedman, M.

    1987-09-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a 2H exposure of cultured pulmonary endothelial cells to ozone (0.0-1.0 ppm) in-vitro resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction of endothelial prostacyclin production (90% decrease at the 1.0 ppm level). Ozone-exposed endothelial cells, incubated with 20 uM arachidonate, also demonstrated a significant inhibition of prostacyclin synthesis. To further examine the mechanisms of the inhibition of prostacyclin synthesis, bovine pulmonary endothelial cells were exposed to 1.0 ppm ozone for 2H. A significant decrease in prostacyclin synthesis was found within 5 min of exposure (77 +/- 36% of air-exposed control values, p less than 0.05). Endothelial prostacyclin synthesis returned to baseline levels by 12H after ozone exposure, a time point which was similar to the recovery time of unexposed endothelium treated with 0.5 uM acetylsalicylic acid. Incubation of endothelial cells, previously exposed to 1.0 ppm ozone for 2 hours, with 4 uM PGH2 resulted in restoration of essentially normal prostacyclin synthesis. When endothelial cells were co-incubated with catalase (5 U/ml) during ozone exposure, no inhibition of prostacyclin synthesis was observed. Co-incubation with either heat-inactivated catalase or superoxide dismutase (10 U/ml) did not affect the ozone-induced inhibition of prostacyclin synthesis. These data suggest that H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is a major toxic species produced in endothelial cells during ozone exposure and responsible for the inhibition of endothelial cyclooxygenase activity.

  13. Hydrogen peroxide-induced astaxanthin biosynthesis and catalase activity in Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan Shuai; Wu, Jian Yong

    2006-12-01

    Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous (formerly Phaffia rhodozyma) in shake-flask cultures was exposed to 10-20 mmol/L H(2)O(2) at various culture stages, and the astaxanthin production was significantly increased by H(2)O(2) fed at 0 or 24 h (exponential phase), but only slightly at 48 h (near stationary phase). The astaxanthin production was enhanced most significantly with double feeding of 10 mmol/L H(2)O(2) at 0 and 24 h, reaching a cellular content of 1.30 mg/g cell and a volumetric yield of 10.4 mg/L, which were 83 and 65% higher, respectively, than those of the control (0.71 mg/g cell and 6.3 mg/L). The intracellular catalase (CAT) activity was also increased after H(2)O(2) treatment. The increases in CAT and astaxanthin of cells could be detected within 4 h of H(2)O(2) treatment. The increase in the astaxanthin content of cells was concomitant with a notable decrease in the beta-carotene content. The older yeast cells at late culture stage (120 h), due perhaps in part to their higher astaxanthin contents, were more tolerant to H(2)O(2) toxicity than the younger cells (24 h). No enhancement of the astaxanthin biosynthesis was attained when H(2)O(2) was added to the yeast culture together with a sufficient amount of exogenous CAT. The results suggest that astaxanthin biosynthesis in X. dendrorhous can be stimulated by H(2)O(2) as an antioxidative response.

  14. Materials Compatibility in High Test Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostowski, Rudy

    1999-01-01

    Previous ratings of the compatibility of high test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) with materials are not adequate for current needs. The goal of this work was to develop a new scheme of evaluation of compatibility of HTP with various materials. Procedures were developed to enrich commercially available hydrogen peroxide to 90% concentration and to assay the product. Reactivity testing, accelerated aging of materials and calorimetry studies were done on HTP with representative metallic and non-metallic materials. It was found that accelerated aging followed by concentration determination using refractive index effectively discriminated between different Class 2 metallic materials. Preliminary experiments using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) suggest that a calorimetry experiment is the most sensitive means to assay the compatibility of HTP with materials.

  15. Hydrogen Peroxide Propulsion for Smaller Satellites

    OpenAIRE

    Whitehead, John

    1998-01-01

    As satellite designs shrink, providing maneuvering and control capability falls outside the realm of available propulsion technology. While cold gas has been used on the smallest satellites, hydrogen peroxide propellant is suggested as the next step in performance and cost before hydrazine. Minimal toxicity and a small scale enable bench top propellant preparation and development testing. Progress toward low-cost thrusters and self-pressurizing tank systems is described.

  16. Infusing sodium bicarbonate suppresses hydrogen peroxide accumulation and superoxide dismutase activity in hypoxic-reoxygenated newborn piglets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang-Qin Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effectiveness of sodium bicarbonate (SB has recently been questioned although it is often used to correct metabolic acidosis of neonates. The aim of the present study was to examine its effect on hemodynamic changes and hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 generation in the resuscitation of hypoxic newborn animals with severe acidosis. METHODS: Newborn piglets were block-randomized into a sham-operated control group without hypoxia (n = 6 and two hypoxia-reoxygenation groups (2 h normocapnic alveolar hypoxia followed by 4 h room-air reoxygenation, n = 8/group. At 10 min after reoxygenation, piglets were given either i.v. SB (2 mEq/kg, or saline (hypoxia-reoxygenation controls in a blinded, randomized fashion. Hemodynamic data and blood gas were collected at specific time points and cerebral cortical H(2O(2 production was continuously monitored throughout experimental period. Plasma superoxide dismutase and catalase and brain tissue glutathione, superoxide dismutase, catalase, nitrotyrosine and lactate levels were assayed. RESULTS: Two hours of normocapnic alveolar hypoxia caused cardiogenic shock with metabolic acidosis (PH: 6.99 ± 0.07, HCO(3(-: 8.5 ± 1.6 mmol/L. Upon resuscitation, systemic hemodynamics immediately recovered and then gradually deteriorated with normalization of acid-base imbalance over 4 h of reoxygenation. SB administration significantly enhanced the recovery of both pH and HCO(3- recovery within the first hour of reoxygenation but did not cause any significant effect in the acid-base at 4 h of reoxygenation and the temporal hemodynamic changes. SB administration significantly suppressed the increase in H(2O(2 accumulation in the brain with inhibition of superoxide dismutase, but not catalase, activity during hypoxia-reoxygenation as compared to those of saline-treated controls. CONCLUSIONS: Despite enhancing the normalization of acid-base imbalance, SB administration during resuscitation did not provide any beneficial

  17. Effects of resveratrol on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in embryonic neural stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sibel Konyalioglu; Guliz Armagan; Ayfer Yalcin; Cigdem Atalayin; Taner Dagci

    2013-01-01

    Resveratrol, a natural phenolic compound, has been shown to prevent cardiovascular diseases and cancer and exhibit neuroprotective effects. In this study, we examined the neuroprotective and antioxidant effects of resveratrol against hydrogen peroxide in embryonic neural stem cells. Hydrogen peroxide treatment alone increased catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities but did not change superoxide dismutase levels compared with hydrogen peroxide + resveratrol treatment. Nitric oxide synthase activity and concomitant nitric oxide levels increased in response to hydrogen peroxide treatment. Conversely, resveratrol treatment decreased nitric oxide synthase activity and nitric oxide levels. Resveratrol also attenuated hydrogen peroxide-induced nuclear or mitochondrial DNA damage. We propose that resveratrol may be a promising agent for protecting embryonic neural stem cells because of its potential to decrease oxidative stress by inducing higher activity of antioxidant enzymes, decreasing nitric oxide production and nitric oxide synthase activity, and alleviating both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA damage.

  18. Hydrogen peroxide stabilization in one-dimensional flow columns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jeremy T.; Ahmad, Mushtaque; Teel, Amy L.; Watts, Richard J.

    2011-09-01

    Rapid hydrogen peroxide decomposition is the primary limitation of catalyzed H 2O 2 propagations in situ chemical oxidation (CHP ISCO) remediation of the subsurface. Two stabilizers of hydrogen peroxide, citrate and phytate, were investigated for their effectiveness in one-dimensional columns of iron oxide-coated and manganese oxide-coated sand. Hydrogen peroxide (5%) with and without 25 mM citrate or phytate was applied to the columns and samples were collected at 8 ports spaced 13 cm apart. Citrate was not an effective stabilizer for hydrogen peroxide in iron-coated sand; however, phytate was highly effective, increasing hydrogen peroxide residuals two orders of magnitude over unstabilized hydrogen peroxide. Both citrate and phytate were effective stabilizers for manganese-coated sand, increasing hydrogen peroxide residuals by four-fold over unstabilized hydrogen peroxide. Phytate and citrate did not degrade and were not retarded in the sand columns; furthermore, the addition of the stabilizers increased column flow rates relative to unstabilized columns. These results demonstrate that citrate and phytate are effective stabilizers of hydrogen peroxide under the dynamic conditions of one-dimensional columns, and suggest that citrate and phytate can be added to hydrogen peroxide before injection to the subsurface as an effective means for increasing the radius of influence of CHP ISCO.

  19. Activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase and apoptosis in endothelial cells mediated by endogenous generation of hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, Anup; Moellering, Douglas; Go, Young-Mi; Shiva, Sruti; Levonen, Anna-Liisa; Jo, Hanjoong; Patel, Rakesh P.; Parthasarathy, Sampath; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2002-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species have been implicated in the activation of signal transduction pathways. However, extracellular addition of oxidants such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) often requires concentrations that cannot be readily achieved under physiological conditions to activate biological responses such as apoptosis. Explanations for this discrepancy have included increased metabolism of H2O2 in the extracellular environment and compartmentalization within the cell. We have addressed this issue experimentally by examining the induction of apoptosis of endothelial cells induced by exogenous addition of H2O2 and by a redox cycling agent, 2,3-dimethoxy-1,4-naphthoquinone, that generates H2O2 in cells. Here we show that low nanomolar steady-state concentrations (0.1-0.5 nmol x min(-1) x 10(6) cells) of H2O2 generated intracellularly activate c-Jun N terminal kinase and initiate apoptosis in endothelial cells. A comparison with bolus hydrogen peroxide suggests that the low rate of intracellular formation of this reactive oxygen species results in a similar profile of activation for both c-Jun N terminal kinase and the initiation of apoptosis. However, a detailed analysis reveals important differences in both the duration and profile for activation of these signaling pathways.

  20. Hydrogen sulfide prevents hydrogen peroxide-induced activation of epithelial sodium channel through a PTEN/PI(3,4,5)P3 dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianing; Chen, Shuo; Liu, Huibin; Zhang, Bingkun; Zhao, Ying; Ma, Ke; Zhao, Dan; Wang, Qiushi; Ma, Heping; Zhang, Zhiren

    2013-01-01

    Sodium reabsorption through the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) at the distal segment of the kidney plays an important role in salt-sensitive hypertension. We reported previously that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) stimulates ENaC in A6 distal nephron cells via elevation of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5)P3) in the apical membrane. Here we report that H2S can antagonize H2O2-induced activation of ENaC in A6 cells. Our cell-attached patch-clamp data show that ENaC open probability (PO ) was significantly increased by exogenous H2O2, which is consistent with our previous finding. The aberrant activation of ENaC induced by exogenous H2O2 was completely abolished by H2S (0.1 mM NaHS). Pre-treatment of A6 cells with H2S slightly decreased ENaC P(O); however, in these cells H2O2 failed to elevate ENaC PO . Confocal microscopy data show that application of exogenous H2O2 to A6 cells significantly increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and induced accumulation of PI(3,4,5)P3 in the apical compartment of the cell membrane. These effects of exogenous H2O2 on intracellular ROS levels and on apical PI(3,4,5)P3 levels were almost completely abolished by treatment of A6 cells with H2S. In addition, H2S significantly inhibited H2O2-induced oxidative inactivation of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) which is a negative regulator of PI(3,4,5)P3. Moreover, BPV(pic), a specific inhibitor of PTEN, elevated PI(3,4,5)P3 and ENaC activity in a manner similar to that of H2O2 in A6 cells. Our data show, for the first time, that H2S prevents H2O2-induced activation of ENaC through a PTEN-PI(3,4,5)P3 dependent pathway.

  1. Hydrogen sulfide prevents hydrogen peroxide-induced activation of epithelial sodium channel through a PTEN/PI(3,4,5P3 dependent pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianing Zhang

    Full Text Available Sodium reabsorption through the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC at the distal segment of the kidney plays an important role in salt-sensitive hypertension. We reported previously that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 stimulates ENaC in A6 distal nephron cells via elevation of phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PI(3,4,5P3 in the apical membrane. Here we report that H2S can antagonize H2O2-induced activation of ENaC in A6 cells. Our cell-attached patch-clamp data show that ENaC open probability (PO was significantly increased by exogenous H2O2, which is consistent with our previous finding. The aberrant activation of ENaC induced by exogenous H2O2 was completely abolished by H2S (0.1 mM NaHS. Pre-treatment of A6 cells with H2S slightly decreased ENaC P(O; however, in these cells H2O2 failed to elevate ENaC PO . Confocal microscopy data show that application of exogenous H2O2 to A6 cells significantly increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level and induced accumulation of PI(3,4,5P3 in the apical compartment of the cell membrane. These effects of exogenous H2O2 on intracellular ROS levels and on apical PI(3,4,5P3 levels were almost completely abolished by treatment of A6 cells with H2S. In addition, H2S significantly inhibited H2O2-induced oxidative inactivation of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN which is a negative regulator of PI(3,4,5P3. Moreover, BPV(pic, a specific inhibitor of PTEN, elevated PI(3,4,5P3 and ENaC activity in a manner similar to that of H2O2 in A6 cells. Our data show, for the first time, that H2S prevents H2O2-induced activation of ENaC through a PTEN-PI(3,4,5P3 dependent pathway.

  2. Effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement

    OpenAIRE

    Pyun, Jung-Hoon; Shin, Tae-Bong; Lee, Joo-Hee; Ahn, Kang-Min; Kim, Tae-Hyung; Cha, Hyun-Suk

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and heat activation of silane on the shear bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite posts to resin cement. MATERIALS AND METHODS The specimens were prepared to evaluate the bond strength of epoxy resin-based fiber posts (D.T. Light-Post) to dual-curing resin cement (RelyX U200). The specimens were divided into four groups (n=18) according to different surface treatments: group 1, no treatment; group 2, silanization; group 3,...

  3. Reactive extraction for preparation of hydrogen peroxide under pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongxi CHENG; Hongtao LI; Shuxiang L(U); Li WANG

    2008-01-01

    The preparation of hydrogen peroxide from anthrahydroquinone by reactive extraction was investi-gated.The integration process of oxidation of anthrahydro-quinone by air and extraction of hydrogen peroxide from the organic phase with water was carried out in a sieve plate column under'pressure.The conversion of anthrahydroqui-none increased with increasing pressure resulting in an increase of hydrogen peroxide concentration in the aqueous phase.However,no change in extraction efficiency of hydrogen peroxide was observed.A mathematical model for gas-liquid-liquid reactive extraction was established.In the model,the effects of pressure and gas superficial velocity on reaction were considered.With increasing gas superficial velocity,the conversion of anthrahydroquinone increased,and the fraction of hydrogen peroxide extracted reached a plateau with a maximum of 72.94%.However,both the conversion of anthrahydroquinone and the traction of hydrogen peroxide extracted decreased with increasing organic phase superficial velocity.

  4. Use of Hydrogen Peroxide to Disinfect Hydroponic Plant Growth Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Daniel J.; Henderson, Keith

    2000-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide was studied as an alternative to conventional bleach and rinsing methods to disinfect hydroponic plant growth systems. A concentration of 0.5% hydrogen peroxide was found to be effective. Residual hydrogen peroxide can be removed from the system by repeated rinsing or by flowing the solution through a platinum on aluminum catalyst. Microbial populations were reduced to near zero immediately after treatment but returned to pre-disinfection levels 2 days after treatment. Treating nutrient solution with hydrogen peroxide and planting directly into trays being watered with the nutrient solution without replenishment, was found to be detrimental to lettuce germination and growth.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide potentiates organophosphate toxicosis in chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banan K. Al-Baggou

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of hydrogen peroxide(H2O2 on the acute toxicity of organophosphate insecticides dichlorvos and diazinon and their inhibitoryactions on plasma, brain and liver cholinesterase activities. Material and Methods: H2O2 was given indrinking water (0.5% v/v for 2 weeks in unsexed day old chicks, a regimen known to induce oxidativestress in this species. A control group received drinking tap water. All experiments were conducted onthe chicks at the age of 15 days after exposure to H2O2. The acute (24 h oral LD50 values of dichlorvosand diazinon in the insecticidal preparations as determined by the up-and-down method in the controlchicks were 9.4 and 15.6 mg/kg, respectively. Results: The poisoned chicks manifested signs ofcholinergic toxicosis within one hour after the dosing including salivation, lacrimation, gasping, frequentdefecation, drooping of wings, tremors, convulsions and recumbency. The acute (24 h oral LD50 valuesof dichlorvos and diazinon in chicks provided with H2O2 were reduced to 3.5 and 6.5 mg/kg, by 63 and58%, respectively when compared to respective control LD50 values. The intoxicated chicks also showedcholinergic signs of toxicosis as described above. Plasma, brain and liver cholinesterase activities of thechicks exposed to H2O2 were significantly lower than their respective control (H2O values by 25, 28 and27%, respectively. Oral dosing of chicks with dichlorvos at 3 mg/kg significantly inhibited cholinesteraseactivities in the plasma, brain and liver of both control (42-67% and H2O2-treated (15-59% chicks.Diazinon at 5 mg/kg, orally also inhibited cholinesterase activities in the plasma, brain and liver of bothcontrol (36-66% and H2O2-treated (15-30% chicks. In the H2O2 groups, dichlorvos inhibition of livercholinesterase activity and diazinon inhibition of liver and brain cholinesterase activities weresignificantly lesser than those of the respective values of

  6. Estudio cinético de la descomposición catalizada de peróxido de hidrógeno sobre carbón activado Kinetic study of the catalyzed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide on activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elihu Paternina

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The kinetic study of decomposition of hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by activated carbon was carried out. The effect of concentrations of reactants and temperature were experimentally studied. Kinetic data were evaluated using differential method of initial rates of reaction. When a typical kinetic law for reactions in homogeneous phase is used, first order of reaction is obtained for hydrogen peroxide and activated carbon, and activation energy of 27 kJ mol-1 for the reaction was estimated. Experimentally was observed that surface of activated carbon is chemically modified during decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, based on this result a scheme of reaction was proposed and evaluated. Experimental data fits very well to a Langmuir- Hinshelwood kinetic model and activation energy of 40 kJ mol-1 was estimated for reaction in heterogeneous phase.

  7. Increased activator protein 1 activity as well as resistance to heat-induced radiosensitization, hydrogen peroxide, and cisplatin are inhibited by indomethacin in oxidative stress-resistant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury, C M; Locke, J E; Wei, S J; Rene, L M; Karimpour, S; Hunt, C; Spitz, D R; Gius, D

    2001-04-15

    It has been established that tumor cells develop resistance to a variety of therapeutic agents after multiple exposures to these agents/drugs. Many of these therapeutic agents also appear to increase the activity of transcription factors, such as activator protein 1 (AP-1), believed to be involved in cellular responses to oxidative stress. Therefore, we hypothesized that cellular resistance to cancer therapeutic agents may involve the increased activity of transcription factors that govern resistance to oxidative stress, such as AP-1. To investigate this hypothesis, a previously characterized cisplatin, hyperthermia, and oxidative stress-resistant Chinese hamster fibroblast cell line, OC-14, was compared to the parental HA-1 cell line. Electrophoretic mobility shift and Western blot assays performed on extracts isolated from OC-14 cells demonstrated a 10-fold increase in constitutive AP-1 DNA-binding activity as well as increased constitutive c-Fos and c-Jun immunoreactive protein relative to HA-1 cells. Treatment of OC-14 cells with indomethacin inhibited constitutive increases in AP-1 DNA-binding activity and c-Fos/c-Jun-immunoreactive protein levels. Clonogenic survival assays demonstrated that pretreatment with indomethacin, at concentrations that inhibited AP-1 activity, significantly reduced the resistance of OC-14 cells to heat-induced radiosensitization, hydrogen peroxide, and cisplatin. These results demonstrate a relationship between increases in AP-1 DNA-binding activity and increased cellular resistance to cancer therapeutic agents and oxidative stress that is inhibited by indomethacin. These results support the hypothesis that inhibition of AP-1 activity with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, such as indomethacin, may represent a useful adjuvant to cancer therapy.

  8. Simple, field portable colorimetric detection device for organic peroxides and hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagoria, Philip F.; Mitchell, Alexander R.; Whipple, Richard E.; Carman, M. Leslie; Reynolds, John G.; Nunes, Peter; Shields, Sharon J.

    2010-11-09

    A simple and effective system for the colorimetric determination of organic peroxides and hydrogen peroxide. A peroxide pen utilizing a swipe material attached to a polyethylene tube contains two crushable vials. The two crushable vials contain a colorimetric reagent separated into dry ingredients and liquid ingredients. After swiping a suspected substance or surface the vials are broken, the reagent is mixed thoroughly and the reagent is allowed to wick into the swipe material. The presence of organic peroxides or hydrogen peroxide is confirmed by a deep blue color.

  9. Hydrogen peroxide-mediated inactivation of two chloroplastic peroxidases, ascorbate peroxidase and 2-cys peroxiredoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Sakihito

    2008-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as the superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide, are generated by the photosystems because photoexcited electrons are often generated in excess of requirements for CO2 fixation and used for reducing molecular oxygen, even under normal environmental conditions. Moreover, ROS generation is increased in chloroplasts if plants are subjected to stresses, such as drought, high salinity and chilling. Chloroplast-localized isoforms of ascorbate peroxidase and possibly peroxiredoxins assume the principal role of scavenging hydrogen peroxide. However, in vitro studies revealed that both types of peroxidases are easily damaged by hydrogen peroxide and lose their catalytic activities. This is one contributing factor for cellular damage that occurs under severe oxidative stress. In this review, I describe mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide-mediated inactivation of these two enzymes and discuss a reason why they became susceptible to damage by hydrogen peroxide.

  10. Modification of Coal Char-loaded TiO2 by Sulfonation and Alkylsilylation to Enhance Catalytic Activity in Styrene Oxidation with Hydrogen Peroxide as Oxidant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhamad Nurhadi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The modified coal char from low-rank coal by sulfonation, titanium impregnation and followed by alkyl silylation possesses high catalytic activity in styrene oxidation. The surface of coal char was undergone several steps as such: modification using concentrated sulfuric acid in the sulfonation process, impregnation of 500 mmol titanium(IV isopropoxide and followed by alkyl silylation of n-octadecyltriclorosilane (OTS. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, IR spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, and hydrophobicity. The catalytic activity of the catalysts has been examined in the liquid phase styrene oxidation by using aqueous hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. The catalytic study showed the alkyl silylation could enhance the catalytic activity of Ti-SO3H/CC-600(2.0. High catalytic activity and reusability of the o-Ti-SO3H/CC-600(2.0 were related to the modification of local environment of titanium active sites and the enhancement the hydrophobicity of catalyst particle by alkyl silylation. Copyright © 2017 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 24th May 2016; Revised: 11st October 2016; Accepted: 18th October 2016 How to Cite: Nurhadi, M. (2017. Modification of Coal Char-loaded TiO2 by Sulfonation and Alkylsilylation to Enhance Catalytic Activity in Styrene Oxidation with Hydrogen Peroxide as Oxidant. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (1: 55-61 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.1.501.55-61 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.12.1.501.55-61

  11. A hydrogen peroxide sensor for exhaled breath measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anh, Dam T.V.; Olthuis, W.; Bergveld, P.; Berg, van den A.

    2004-01-01

    An increase in produced hydrogen peroxide concentration in exhaled breath (EB) of patients, who suffer from some diseases related to lung function, has been observed and considered as a reliable indicator of lung diseases. In the EB of these patients, hydrogen peroxide is present in the vapour phase

  12. A hydrogen peroxide sensor for exhaled breath measurement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anh, Dam Thi Van; Olthuis, W.; Bergveld, P.

    2005-01-01

    An increase in hydrogen peroxide concentration in exhaled breath (EB) of patients, who suffer from some diseases related to the lung function, has been observed and considered as a reliable indicator of lung diseases. In the EB of these patients, hydrogen peroxide is present in the vapour phase toge

  13. Hydrogen Peroxide Storage in Small Sealed Tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, J.

    1999-10-20

    Unstabilized hydrogen peroxide of 85% concentration has been prepared in laboratory quantities for testing material compatibility and long term storage on a small scale. Vessels made of candidate tank and liner materials ranged in volume from 1 cc to 2540 cc. Numerous metals and plastics were tried at the smallest scales, while promising ones were used to fabricate larger vessels and liners. An aluminum alloy (6061-T6) performed poorly, including increasing homogeneous decay due to alloying elements entering solution. The decay rate in this high strength aluminum was greatly reduced by anodizing. Better results were obtained with polymers, particularly polyvinylidene fluoride. Data reported herein include ullage pressures as a function of time with changing decay rates, and contamination analysis results.

  14. Detection of hydrogen peroxide by lactoperoxidase-mediated dityrosine formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donkó, Agnes; Orient, Anna; Szabó, Pál T; Németh, Gábor; Vántus, Tibor; Kéri, György; Orfi, László; Hunyady, László; Buday, László; Geiszt, Miklós

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the dityrosine-forming activity of lactoperoxidase (LPO) and its potential application for measuring hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). It was observed that LPO was able to form dityrosine at low H2O2 concentrations. Since dityrosine concentration could be measured in a simple fluorimetric reaction, this activity of the enzyme was utilized for the measurement of H2O2 production in different systems. These experiments successfully measured the activity of NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) by this method. It was concluded that LPO-mediated dityrosine formation offers a simple way for H2O2 measurement.

  15. Piceatannol and resveratrol share inhibitory effects on hydrogen peroxide release, monoamine oxidase and lipogenic activities in adipose tissue, but differ in their antilipolytic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Les, Francisco; Deleruyelle, Simon; Cassagnes, Laure-Estelle; Boutin, Jean A; Balogh, Balázs; Arbones-Mainar, José M; Biron, Simon; Marceau, Picard; Richard, Denis; Nepveu, Françoise; Mauriège, Pascale; Carpéné, Christian

    2016-10-25

    Piceatannol is a hydroxylated derivative of resveratrol. While both dietary polyphenols coexist in edible plants and fruits, and share equivalent concentrations in several wines, the influence of piceatannol on adiposity has been less studied than that of resveratrol. Though resveratrol is now recognized to limit fat deposition in various obesity models, the benefit of its dietary supplementation remains under debate regarding human obesity treatment or prevention. The research for more potent resveratrol analogs is therefore still undergoing. This prompted us to compare various effects of piceatannol and resveratrol directly on human adipose tissue (hAT). Hydrogen peroxide release was measured by Amplex Red-based fluorescence in subcutaneous hAT samples from obese patients. Interactions of stilbenes with human amine oxidases and quinone reductase were assessed by radiometric methods, computational docking and electron paramagnetic resonance. Influences on lipogenic and lipolytic activities were compared in mouse adipocytes. Resveratrol and piceatannol inhibited monoamine oxidase (MAO) with respective IC50 of 18.5 and 133.7 μM, but not semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) in hAT. For both stilbenes, the docking scores were better for MAO than for SSAO. Piceatannol and resveratrol similarly hampered hydrogen peroxide detection in assays with and without hAT, while they shared pro-oxidant activities when incubated with purified quinone reductase. They exhibited similar dose-dependent inhibition of adipocyte lipogenic activity. Only piceatannol inhibited basal and stimulated lipolysis when incubated at a dose ≥100 μM. Thus, piceatannol exerted on fat cells dose-dependent effects similar to those of resveratrol, except for a stronger antilipolytic action. In this regard, piceatannol should be useful in limiting the lipotoxicity related to obesity when ingested or administered alone - or might hamper the fat mobilization induced by resveratrol when

  16. pH dependent catalytic activities of platinum nanoparticles with respect to the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and scavenging of superoxide and singlet oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Wu, Haohao; Li, Meng; Yin, Jun-Jie; Nie, Zhihong

    2014-09-01

    Recently, platinum (Pt) nanoparticles (NPs) have received increasing attention in the field of catalysis and medicine due to their excellent catalytic activity. To rationally design Pt NPs for these applications, it is crucial to understand the mechanisms underlying their catalytic and biological activities. This article describes a systematic study on the Pt NP-catalyzed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and scavenging of superoxide (O2&z.rad;-) and singlet oxygen (1O2) over a physiologically relevant pH range of 1.12-10.96. We demonstrated that the catalytic activities of Pt NPs can be modulated by the pH value of the environment. Our results suggest that Pt NPs possess peroxidase-like activity of decomposing H2O2 into &z.rad;OH under acidic conditions, but catalase-like activity of producing H2O and O2 under neutral and alkaline conditions. In addition, Pt NPs exhibit significant superoxide dismutase-like activity of scavenging O2&z.rad;- under neutral conditions, but not under acidic conditions. The 1O2 scavenging ability of Pt NPs increases with the increase in the pH of the environment. The study will provide useful guidance for designing Pt NPs with desired catalytic and biological properties.Recently, platinum (Pt) nanoparticles (NPs) have received increasing attention in the field of catalysis and medicine due to their excellent catalytic activity. To rationally design Pt NPs for these applications, it is crucial to understand the mechanisms underlying their catalytic and biological activities. This article describes a systematic study on the Pt NP-catalyzed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and scavenging of superoxide (O2&z.rad;-) and singlet oxygen (1O2) over a physiologically relevant pH range of 1.12-10.96. We demonstrated that the catalytic activities of Pt NPs can be modulated by the pH value of the environment. Our results suggest that Pt NPs possess peroxidase-like activity of decomposing H2O2 into &z.rad;OH under acidic conditions

  17. THE EFFECT OF TRANSITION METAL IONS-MANGANESE ON HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShuhuiYang; YumengZhao; BaokuWen; YonghaoNi

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation, the catalytic activities of Mn(II),Mn(III) and Mn(IV) towards decomposing hydrogenperoxide were compared. Among Mn (II), Mn (III)and Mn (IV), Mn (II) is not catalytically active indecomposing hydrogen peroxide. However, both Mn(113) and Mn (IV) are, and Mn (III) has a strongereffect than Mn(IV).In addition, we also studied the practical methods todecrease the Mn-induced decomposition of hydrogenperoxide. The results showed that sodium silicate andmagnesium sulfite in combination can effectivelydecrease the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide.The optimum dosage of sodium silicate was about0.5% (on solution). Adding chelants such as DTPAor EDTA simultaneously with stabilizers candecrease hydrogen peroxide decomposition. For Mn(IV), the EDTA is more effective than DTPA.Adding sodium thiosulfate simultaneously withmagnesium sulfate, sodium silicate and DTPA toalkaline peroxide solution can result in more residualhydrogen peroxide, and a higher pulp brightness.

  18. Alkaline hydrogen peroxide treatment for TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles with superior water-dispersibility and visible-light photocatalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Chung-Yi; Tu, Kuan-Ju; Lo, Yu-Shiu [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, College of Nuclear Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Pang, Yean Ling [Department of Chemical Engineering, Lee Kong Chian Faculty of Engineering and Science, Universiti Tunku Abdul Rahman, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Wu, Chien-Hou, E-mail: chwu@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, College of Nuclear Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2016-09-15

    Alkaline hydrogen peroxide treatment was proposed as a simple and green way to improve the performance of commercial TiO{sub 2} powder for water-dispersibility and visible-light photocatalytic activity on the degradation of dye pollutants. The performance of treated TiO{sub 2} was evaluated as a function of NaOH concentration, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, and treatment time. The optimal conditions were determined to be 24 h in 100 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and 8 M NaOH. The treated samples were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), dynamic light scattering (DLS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and ultraviolet–visible spectrophotometry. The analysis revealed that the crystal structure, morphology, and absorption band gap were retained, but the surface of the treated TiO{sub 2} was dramatically changed. The treated TiO{sub 2} was highly dispersible with a uniform hydrodynamic size of 41 ± 12 nm and stable over months in water at pH 3 without any stabilizing ligand and could significantly enhance the visible-light photodegradation of dye pollutants. The superior performance might be attributed to the formation of abundant surface hydroxyl groups. This treatment paves the way for developing water-dispersible TiO{sub 2} with superior visible-light induced photocatalytic degradation of dye pollutants without any complicated and expensive surface modification. - Highlights: • Alkaline hydrogen peroxide is proposed to treat commercial TiO{sub 2} powder. • The treated TiO{sub 2} powder exhibits superior water-dispersibility with a uniform size distribution. • The treated TiO{sub 2} powder can significantly enhance the visible-light photodegradation of dyes.

  19. Cold Plasma-activated hydrogen peroxide aerosol inactivates Escherichia coli 0157:H7, Salmonella Typhimurium, and Listeria innocua and maintains quality of grape tomato, spinach and cantaloupe

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of aerosolized hydrogen peroxide in inactivating bacteria and maintaining quality of grape tomato, baby spinach leaves and cantaloupe. Stem scar and smooth surfaces of tomatoes, spinach leaves, and cantaloupe rinds, inoculated with Escherich...

  20. Evaluation of anti-apoptotic activity of different dietary antioxidants in renal cell carcinoma against hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Garg; Neeraj; K; Mangal; Sharad; Sahu; Tejram; Mehta; Abhinav; Vyas; Suresh; P; Tyagi; Rajeev; K

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To evaluate the anti-apoptotic and radical scavenging activities of dietary phenolics, namely ascorbic acid,a-tocopherol acetate,citric acid,salicylic acid,and estimate H2O2induced apoptosis in renal cell carcinoma cells.Methods:The intracellular antioxidant potency of antioxidants was investigated.H2O-2-induced apoptosis in RCC-26 was assayed with the following parameters:cell viability(%apoptosis),nucleosomal damage and DNA fragmentation, bcl-2 levels and flow cytometery analysis(ROS production evaluation).Results:Ine anticancer properties of antioxidants such as ascorbic acid,a- tocopherol acetate,citric acid,salicylic acid with perdurable responses were investigated.It was observed that these antioxidants had protective effect(anti-apoptotic activity) against hydrogen peroxide(H2O2) in renal cell carcinoma(RCC-26) cell line.Conclusions:This study reveals and proves the anticancer properties.However,in cancer cell lines anti-apoptotic activity can indirectly reflect the cancer promoter activity through radicals scavenging,and significantly protect nucleus and bcl-2.

  1. THE EFFECT OF TRANSITION METAL IONS-MANGANESE ON HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuhui Yang; Yumeng Zhao; Baoku Wen; Yonghao Ni

    2004-01-01

    In this investigation, the catalytic activities of Mn(Ⅱ),Mn(Ⅲ) and Mn(Ⅳ) towards decomposing hydrogen peroxide were compared. Among Mn (Ⅱ), Mn (Ⅲ)and Mn (Ⅳ), Mn (Ⅱ) is not catalytically active in decomposing hydrogen peroxide. However, both Mn (Ⅲ) and Mn (Ⅳ) are, and Mn (Ⅲ) has a stronger effect than Mn(Ⅳ).In addition, we also studied the practical methods to decrease the Mn-induced decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The results showed that sodium silicate and magnesium sulfite in combination can effectively decrease the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide.The optimum dosage of sodium silicate was about 0.5% (on solution). Adding chelants such as DTPA or EDTA simultaneously with stabilizers can decrease hydrogen peroxide decomposition. For Mn (Ⅳ), the EDTA is more effective than DTPA.Adding sodium thiosulfate simultaneously with magnesium sulfate, sodium silicate and DTPA to alkaline peroxide solution can result in more residual hydrogen peroxide, and a higher pulp brightness.

  2. Lab-scale hydrogen peroxide data from ECBC

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data from small lab scale tests conducted at ECBC. It contains efficacy data as well as data on env conditions such as temperature, RH, and hydrogen peroxide vapor...

  3. Hydrogen peroxide in breath condensate during a common cold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rijn Q. Jöbsis

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in exhaled air condensate is elevated in inflammatory disorders of the lower respiratory tract. It is unknown whether viral colds contribute to exhaled H2O2.

  4. A Novel Fluorescent Reagent for Analysis of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董素英; 苏美红; 聂丽华; 马会民

    2003-01-01

    8-(4,6-Dichloro-1,3,5-trazinoxy)quinoline(DTQ) was evaluated as a new fluorescent reagent for determining hydrogen peroxide.It was found that the fluorescence intensity of DTQ in alkaline medium could be dramatically enhanced upon addition of H2O2.Based on this effect,a simple and selective method for the spectrofluorimetric determination of hydrogen peroxide was estabhlished.The relative standard deviation of the method was found to be 1.1?for 9 replicate determinations of a 4.6×10-6mol/L hydrogen peroxide solution.The linear range was 2.3×10-7-2.3×10-5mol/L with a detection limit of 2.2×10-8mol/L(S/N=3).The ,method was attempted to determine hydrogen peroxide in synthetic human serum samples with satisfactory results.

  5. Efficient Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generation in Water Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An electrochemical cell is proposed for the efficient generation of 3% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in pure water using only power, oxygen and water. H2O2 is an...

  6. Impact of hydrogen peroxide activated by lighting-emitting diode/laser system on enamel color and microhardness: An in situ design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiola, Ana Bárbara Araújo; Souza-Gabriel, Aline Evangelista; Scatolin, Renata Siqueira; Corona, Silmara Aparecida Milori

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hydrogen peroxide (HP) at lower concentration can provide less alteration on enamel surface and when combined with laser therapy, could decrease tooth sensitivity. This in situ study evaluated the influence of 15% and 35% HP gel activated by lighting-emitting diode (LED)/laser light for in-office tooth bleaching. Materials and Methods: Forty-four bovine enamel slabs were polished and subjected to surface microhardness (load of 25 g for 5 s). The specimens were placed in intraoral palatal devices of 11 volunteers (n = 11). Sample was randomly distributed into four groups according to the bleaching protocol: 15% HP, 15% HP activated by LED/laser, 35% HP, and 35% HP activated by LED/laser. The experimental phase comprised 15 days and bleaching protocols were performed on the 2nd and 9th days. Surface microhardness (KHN) and color changes were measured and data were analyzed by ANOVA (α = 0.05). Results: There were no significant differences in microhardness values neither in color alteration of enamel treated with 15% HP and 35% HP activated or not by LED/laser system (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Both concentrations of HP (15 or 35%), regardless of activated by an LED/laser light, did not affect the surface microhardness and had the same effectiveness in enamel bleaching. PMID:27630493

  7. Impact of hydrogen peroxide activated by lighting-emitting diode/laser system on enamel color and microhardness: An in situ design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Barbara Araujo Loiola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hydrogen peroxide (HP at lower concentration can provide less alteration on enamel surface and when combined with laser therapy, could decrease tooth sensitivity. This in situ study evaluated the influence of 15% and 35% HP gel activated by lighting-emitting diode (LED/laser light for in-office tooth bleaching. Materials and Methods: Forty-four bovine enamel slabs were polished and subjected to surface microhardness (load of 25 g for 5 s. The specimens were placed in intraoral palatal devices of 11 volunteers (n = 11. Sample was randomly distributed into four groups according to the bleaching protocol: 15% HP, 15% HP activated by LED/laser, 35% HP, and 35% HP activated by LED/laser. The experimental phase comprised 15 days and bleaching protocols were performed on the 2 nd and 9 th days. Surface microhardness (KHN and color changes were measured and data were analyzed by ANOVA (α = 0.05. Results: There were no significant differences in microhardness values neither in color alteration of enamel treated with 15% HP and 35% HP activated or not by LED/laser system (P > 0.05. Conclusions: Both concentrations of HP (15 or 35%, regardless of activated by an LED/laser light, did not affect the surface microhardness and had the same effectiveness in enamel bleaching.

  8. HE EFFECT OF TRANSITION METAL IONS-IRON ON HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yumeng Zhao; Shuhui Yang; Liang Sheng; Yonghao Ni

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide bleaching has been extensively used in high-yield pulp bleaching. Unfortunately,hydrogen peroxide can be decomposed under alkaline condition, especially when transition metal ions exit. Experiments show that the valence of transition metal ion is also responsible for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide.Iron ions are present in two oxidation states, Fe2+ and Fe3+. They are both catalytically active to hydrogen peroxide decomposition. Because Fe3+ is brown, it can affect the brightness of pulp directly, it can also combine with phenol, forming complexes which not only are stable structures and are difficult to be removed from pulp, but also significantly affect the brightness of pulp because of their color.Sodium silicate and magnesium sulfate, when used together, can greatly decrease hydrogen peroxide decomposition. The optimum dosage of sodium silicate is about 0.1% (on solution) for Fe2+ and 0.25% (on solution) for Fe3+. Adding chelants such as DTPA or EDTA with stabilizers simultaneously can obviously improve pulp brightness. For iron ions, the chelate effect of DTPA is better than that of EDTA.Under acidic conditions, sodium hyposulfite and cellulose can reduce Fe3+ to Fe2+ effectively, and pulp brightness is improved greatly. Adding sodium thiosulfate simultaneously with magnesium sulfate,sodium silicate, and DTPA to alkaline peroxide solution can result in higher brightness of pulp.pH is a key parameter during hydrogen peroxide bleaching, the optimum pH value should be 10.5-12.

  9. Hydrogen peroxide deposition and decomposition in rain and dew waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Vicky; Angélica Rubio, M.; Lissi, Eduardo A.

    Peroxides and hydrogen peroxide were determined by a fluorometric method in dew and rain collected in the atmosphere of Santiago of Chile city. The measured peroxides comprise hydrogen peroxide (the main component) and peroxides not decomposed by catalase. The collected natural peroxides readily decompose in the natural matrix, rendering difficult an estimation of the values present in real-time. In order to establish the kinetics of the process and the factors that condition their decomposition, the kinetics of the decay at several pHs and/or the presence of metal chelators were followed. The kinetics of hydrogen peroxide decomposition in the water matrix was evaluated employing the natural peroxides or hydrogen peroxide externally added. First-order kinetics was followed, with half decay times ranging from 80 to 2300 min. The addition of Fe(II) in the micromolar range increases the decomposition rate, while lowering the pH (<3) notably reduces the rate of the process. The contribution of metals to the decomposition of the peroxides in the natural waters was confirmed by the reduction in decomposition rate elicited by its treatment with Chelex-100. Dew and rain waters were collected in pre-acidified collectors, rendering values considerably higher than those measured in non-treated collectors. This indicates that acidification can be proposed as an easy procedure to stabilize the samples, reducing its decomposition during collection time and the time elapsed between collection and analysis. The weighted average concentration for total peroxides measured in pre-treated collectors was 5.4 μM in rains and 2.2 μM in dews.

  10. Antioxidant Activity/Capacity Measurement. 2. Hydrogen Atom Transfer (HAT)-Based, Mixed-Mode (Electron Transfer (ET)/HAT), and Lipid Peroxidation Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apak, Reşat; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Çapanoğlu, Esra

    2016-02-10

    Measuring the antioxidant activity/capacity levels of food extracts and biological fluids is useful for determining the nutritional value of foodstuffs and for the diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up of numerous oxidative stress-related diseases. Biologically, antioxidants play their health-beneficial roles via transferring a hydrogen (H) atom or an electron (e(-)) to reactive species, thereby deactivating them. Antioxidant activity assays imitate this action; that is, antioxidants are measured by their H atom transfer (HAT) or e(-) transfer (ET) to probe molecules. Antioxidant activity/capacity can be monitored by a wide variety of assays with different mechanisms, including HAT, ET, and mixed-mode (ET/HAT) assays, generally without distinct boundaries between them. Understanding the principal mechanisms, advantages, and disadvantages of the measurement assays is important for proper selection of method for valid evaluation of antioxidant properties in desired applications. This work provides a general and up-to-date overview of HAT-based, mixed-mode (ET/HAT), and lipid peroxidation assays available for measuring antioxidant activity/capacity and the chemistry behind them, including a critical evaluation of their advantages and drawbacks.

  11. Effects of hydrogen peroxide on mitochondrial gene expression of intestinal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Ming Li; Qian Cai; Hong Zhou; Guang-Xia Xiao

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To study the effects of hydrogen peroxide on mitochondrial gene expression of intestinal epithelial cells in in vitro model of hydrogen peroxide-stimulated SW-480 cells.METHODS: RNA of hydrogen peroxide-induced SW-480 cells was isolated, and reverse-transcriptional polymerase chain reaction was performed to study gene expression of ATPase subunit 6, ATPase subunit 8, cytochrome c oxidase subunit Ⅰ (COⅠ), cytochrome coxidase subuit Ⅱ (COⅡ) and cytochrome c oxidase subunit Ⅲ (COⅢ). Mitochondria were isolated and activities of mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase and ATPase were also measured simultaneously.RESULTS: Hydrogen peroxide led to differential expression of mitochondrial genes with some genes up-regulated or down-regulated in a dose dependent manner. Differences were very obvious in expressions of mitochondrial genes of cells treated with hydrogen peroxide in a concentration of 400 μmol/L or 4 mmol/L. In general, differential expression of mitochondrial genes was characterized by up-regulation of mitochondrial genes in the concentration of 400 μmol/L and down-regulation in the concentration of 4 mmol/L. In consistence with changes in mitochondrial gene expressions, hydrogen peroxide resulted in decreased activities of cytochrome c oxidase and ATPase.CONCLUSIONS: The differential expression of mitochondrial genes encoding cytochrome c oxidase and ATPase is involved in apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells by affecting activities of cytochorme c oxidase and ATPase.

  12. Molecular nature of sulfhydryl modification by hydrogen peroxide on type 1 ryanodine receptor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-mei HAN; Ri-sheng WEI; Anthony F LAI; Chang-cheng YIN

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To elucidate the molecular nature of sulfhydryl modification by hydrogen peroxide on type 1 ryanodine receptor (RyRl). Methods: Rabbit skeletal muscle sarcoplasmic reticulum was treated with hydrogen peroxide, then RyRl complex was isolated. The proteins in the complex were analysed by electrophoresis, Western blot and electron microscopy. Results: (1) Hydrogen peroxide induces inter-subunit cross-linking within the tetrameric RyR1 molecule; (2) in parallel to inter-subunit cross-linking, the RyR1 molecule changes morphology; (3) the chemical and morphological changes are reversible: upon reduction by reducing agents, the RyR1 molecule regains its original state. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the molecular mechanism of RyR1 channe1 activity in sarcoplasmic reticulum regulated by hydrogen peroxide is through inter-subunit cross-linking within the tetrameric RyR1 molecule, which in turn induces structural changes of RyR1.

  13. Recent Development in Hydrogen Peroxide Pumped Propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledebuhr, A G; Antelman, D R; Dobie, D W; Gorman, T S; Jones, M S; Kordas, J F; McMahon, D H; Ng, L C; Nielsen, D P; Ormsby, A E; Pittenger, L C; Robinson, J A; Skulina, K M; Taylor, W G; Urone, D A; Wilson, B A

    2004-03-22

    This paper describes the development of a lightweight high performance pump-fed divert and attitude control system (DACS). Increased kinetic Kill Vehicles (KV) capabilities (higher .v and acceleration capability) will especially be needed for boost phase engagements where a lower mass KV DACS enables smaller overall interceptors. To increase KV performance while reducing the total DACS dry mass (<10 kg), requires a design approach that more closely emulates those found in large launch vehicles, where pump-fed propulsion enables high propellant-mass-fraction systems. Miniaturized reciprocating pumps, on a scale compatible with KV applications, offer the potential of a lightweight DACS with both high {Delta}v and acceleration capability, while still enabling the rapid pulsing of the divert thrusters needed in the end-game fly-in. Pumped propulsion uses lightweight low-pressure propellant tanks, as the main vehicle structure and eliminates the need for high-pressure gas bottles, reducing mass and increasing the relative propellant load. Prior work used hydrazine and demonstrated a propellant mass fraction >0.8 and a vehicle propulsion dry mass of {approx}3 kg. Our current approach uses the non-toxic propellants 90% hydrogen peroxide and kerosene. This approach enables faster development at lower costs due to the ease of handling. In operational systems these non-toxic propellants can simplify the logistics for manned environments including shipboard applications. This DACS design configuration is expected to achieve sufficient mass flows to support divert thrusters in the 1200 N to 1330 N (270 lbf to 300 lbf) range. The DACS design incorporates two pairs of reciprocating differential piston pumps (oxidizer and fuel), a warm-gas drive system, compatible bi-propellant thrusters, lightweight valves, and lightweight low-pressure propellant tanks. This paper summarizes the current development status and plans.

  14. Reduction of hydrogen peroxide-induced erythrocyte damage by Carica papaya leaf extract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tebekeme Okoko; Diepreye Ere

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the in vitro antioxidant potential of Carica papaya (C. papaya) leaf extract and its effect on hydrogen peroxide-induced erythrocyte damage assessed by haemolysis and lipid peroxidation. Methods: Hydroxyl radical scavenging activities, hydrogen ion scavenging activity, metal chelating activity, and the ferrous ion reducing ability were assessed as antioxidant indices. In the other experiment, human erythrocytes were treated with hydrogen peroxide to induce erythrocyte damage. The extract (at various concentrations) was subsequently incubated with the erythrocytes and later analysed for haemolysis and lipid peroxidation as indices for erythrocyte damage. Results:Preliminary investigation of the extract showed that the leaf possessed significant antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities using in vitro models in a concentration dependent manner (P<0.05). The extract also reduced hydrogen peroxide induced erythrocyte haemolysis and lipid peroxidation significantly when compared with ascorbic acid (P<0.05). The IC50 values were 7.33 mg/mL and 1.58 mg/mL for inhibition of haemolysis and lipid peroxidation, respectively. In all cases, ascorbic acid (the reference antioxidant) possessed higher activity than the extract. Conclusions:The findings show that C. papaya leaves possess significant bioactive potential which is attributed to the phytochemicals which act in synergy. Thus, the leaves can be exploited for pharmaceutical and nutritional purposes.

  15. Selective Electrochemical Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide from Water Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine Anton; Nørskov, Jens K.

    2015-01-01

    device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen......Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. The present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized...... evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e(-) water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e(-) oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates...

  16. Reactions of the class II peroxidases, lignin peroxidase and Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase, with hydrogen peroxide. Catalase-like activity, compound III formation, and enzyme inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiner, Alexander N P; Hernández-Ruiz, Josefa; Rodríguez-López, José Neptuno; García-Cánovas, Francisco; Brisset, Nigel C; Smith, Andrew T; Arnao, Marino B; Acosta, Manuel

    2002-07-26

    The reactions of the fungal enzymes Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase (ARP) and Phanerochaete chrysosporium lignin peroxidase (LiP) with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) have been studied. Both enzymes exhibited catalase activity with hyperbolic H(2)O(2) concentration dependence (K(m) approximately 8-10 mm, k(cat) approximately 1-3 s(-1)). The catalase and peroxidase activities of LiP were inhibited within 10 min and those of ARP in 1 h. The inactivation constants were calculated using two independent methods; LiP, k(i) approximately 19 x 10(-3) s(-1); ARP, k(i) approximately 1.6 x 10(-3) s(-1). Compound III (oxyperoxidase) was detected as the majority species after the addition of H(2)O(2) to LiP or ARP, and its formation was accompanied by loss of enzyme activity. A reaction scheme is presented which rationalizes the turnover and inactivation of LiP and ARP with H(2)O(2). A similar model is applicable to horseradish peroxidase. The scheme links catalase and compound III forming catalytic pathways and inactivation at the level of the [compound I.H(2)O(2)] complex. Inactivation does not occur from compound III. All peroxidases studied to date are sensitive to inactivation by H(2)O(2), and it is suggested that the model will be generally applicable to peroxidases of the plant, fungal, and prokaryotic superfamily.

  17. Effects of hydrogen peroxide on MAPK activation, IL-8 production and cell viability in primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelaia, Girolamo; Cuda, Giovanni; Vatrella, Alessandro; Gallelli, Luca; Fratto, Donatella; Gioffrè, Vincenza; D'Agostino, Bruno; Caputi, Mario; Maselli, Rosario; Rossi, Francesco; Costanzo, Francesco S; Marsico, Serafino A

    2004-09-01

    The airway epithelium is continuously exposed to inhaled oxidants, including airborne pollutants and cigarette smoke, which can exert harmful proinflammatory and cytotoxic effects. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate, in primary cultures of human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC), the signal transduction pathways activated by increasing concentrations (0.25, 0.5, and 1 mM) of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), as well as their effects on IL-8 production and cell viability. The reported results show that H(2)O(2) elicited, in a concentration-dependent fashion, a remarkable increase in phosphorylation-dependent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), associated with a significant induction of IL-8 synthesis and a dramatically enhanced cell death. Pre-treatment of HBEC with MAPK inhibitors was able to significantly inhibit the effects of H(2)O(2) on IL-8 secretion, and to effectively prevent cell death. Therefore, these findings suggest that MAPKs play a key role as molecular transducers of the airway epithelial injury triggered by oxidative stress, as well as potential pharmacologic targets for indirect antioxidant intervention.

  18. Enhanced stability of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of subsurface solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Richard J.; Finn, Dennis D.; Cutler, Lynn M.; Schmidt, Jeremy T.; Teel, Amy L.

    2007-05-01

    The stabilization of hydrogen peroxide was investigated as a basis for enhancing its downgradient transport and contact with contaminants during catalyzed H 2O 2 propagations (CHP) in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO). Stabilization of hydrogen peroxide was investigated in slurries containing four characterized subsurface solids using phytate, citrate, and malonate as stabilizing agents after screening ten potential stabilizers. The extent of hydrogen peroxide stabilization and the most effective stabilizer were solid-specific; however, phytate was usually the most effective stabilizer, increasing the hydrogen peroxide half-life to as much as 50 times. The degree of stabilization was nearly as effective at 10 mM concentrations as at 250 mM or 1 M concentrations. The effect of stabilization on relative rates of hydroxyl radical activity varied between the subsurface solids, but citrate and malonate generally had a greater positive effect than phytate. The effect of phytate, citrate, and malonate on the relative rates of superoxide generation was minimal to somewhat negative, depending on the solid. The results of this research demonstrate that the stabilizers phytate, citrate, and malonate can significantly increase the half-life of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of subsurface solids during CHP reactions while maintaining a significant portion of the reactive oxygen species activity. Use of these stabilizers in the field will likely improve the delivery of hydrogen peroxide and downgradient treatment during CHP ISCO.

  19. Hydrogen Peroxide and Sodium Transport in the Lung and Kidney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Shlyonsky

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Renal and lung epithelial cells are exposed to some significant concentrations of H2O2. In urine it may reach 100 μM, while in the epithelial lining fluid in the lung it is estimated to be in micromolar to tens-micromolar range. Hydrogen peroxide has a stimulatory action on the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC single-channel activity. It also increases stability of the channel at the membrane and slows down the transcription of the ENaC subunits. The expression and the activity of the channel may be inhibited in some other, likely higher, oxidative states of the cell. This review discusses the role and the origin of H2O2 in the lung and kidney. Concentration-dependent effects of hydrogen peroxide on ENaC and the mechanisms of its action have been summarized. This review also describes outlooks for future investigations linking oxidative stress, epithelial sodium transport, and lung and kidney function.

  20. Activation of AMPK protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced osteoblast apoptosis through autophagy induction and NADPH maintenance: new implications for osteonecrosis treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Chang; Zhu, Lun-qing; Zhen, Yun-fang; Wang, Xiao-dong; Dong, Qi-rong

    2014-01-01

    Elevated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) causes osteoblast dysfunction and apoptosis, serving as an important contributor to the development of osteonecrosis. Here we aimed to understand the role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in the process. We observed a high level of AMPK activation in surgery isolated patients' osteonecrosis tissues. In cultured osteoblastoma MG63 cells, H2O2 stimulation induced significant AMPK activation, oxidative stress, cell death and apoptosis. Inhibition of AMPK by its inhibitor (compound C) or by shRNA-mediated knockdown dramatically enhanced H2O2-induced MG63 cell apoptosis, while over-expression of AMPK in HEK-293 cells alleviated H2O2-induced cell damage. These results confirmed that H2O2-activated AMPK is pro-cell survival. We observed that H2O2 induced protective autophagy in MG63 cells, and AMPK-dependent Ulk1 activation and mTORC1 (mTOR complex 1) inactivation might involve autophagy activation. Further, AMPK activation inhibited H2O2-induced oxidative stress, probably through inhibiting NADPH (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate) depletion, since more NADPH depletion and oxidative stress were induced by H2O2 in AMPK deficient MG63 cells. Finally, we observed a significant AMPK activation in H2O2-treated primary cultured and transformed (MC3T3-E1) osteoblasts, and AMPK inhibitor compound C enhanced death by H2O2 in these cells. Based on these results, we concluded that H2O2-induced AMPK activation is pro-survival and anti-apoptosis in osteoblasts. Autophagy induction and NADPH maintenance are involved in AMPK-mediated pro-survival effects. AMPK might represent a novel molecular target for osteonecrosis treatment.

  1. β-Carotene and lutein inhibit hydrogen peroxide-induced activation of NF-κB and IL-8 expression in gastric epithelial AGS cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngha; Seo, Ji Hye; Kim, Hyeyoung

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) including hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) are involved in the pathogenesis of gastric inflammation. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) is a potent mediator of the inflammatory response by activating and recruiting neutrophils to the site of infection. Oxidant-sensitive transcription factor NF-κB regulates the expression of IL-8 in the immune and inflammatory events. Carotenoids (carotenes and oxygenated carotenoids) show antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. Low intake of β-carotene leads to high risk of gastric cancer. Oxygenated carotenoid lutein inhibited NF-κB activation in experimental uveitis. The present study aims to investigate whether β-carotene and lutein inhibit H(2)O(2)-induced activation of NF-κB and expression of IL-8 in gastric epithelial AGS cells. The cells were treated with carotenoids 2 h prior to the treatment of H(2)O(2). mRNA expression was analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real time RT-PCR analyses. IL-8 level in the medium was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. NF-κB activation was assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. ROS levels of the cells were detected by confocal microscopic analysis for fluorescent dichlorofluorescein. As a result, H(2)O(2 )induced the activation of NF-κB and expression of IL-8 in AGS cells time-dependently. β-Carotene and lutein showed inhibitory effects on H(2)O(2)-induced increase in intracellular ROS levels, activation of NF-κB, and IL-8 expression in AGS cells. In conclusion, supplementation of carotenoids such as β-carotene and lutein may be beneficial for the treatment of oxidative stress-mediated gastric inflammation.

  2. [Determination of hydrogen peroxide in rainwater by fluorometry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yan-Fen; Huang, Ying-Ping; Luo, Guang-Fu; Li, Rui-Ping

    2008-04-01

    The present paper introduces a new method using spectrofluorimetric analysis to determine the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in rainwater. In this method, an oxidation reaction is conducted between o-phenylenediamine (OPDA) and hydrogen peroxide in the buffer medium of NaAc-HAc at pH 4. 48 to form a new product 2,3-diaminophenazine (DAPN). Then the fluorescence intensity of DAPN is measured and 426 and 554 nm are chosen as the excitation and emission wavelengths. Therefore, with the foreknown concentration of input hydrogen peroxide, a series of fluorescence intensities of DAPN are acquired according to a series of different concentration of hydrogen peroxide as input, greatly improving the selectivity and sensibility of the system. A relationship between the input concentration of hydrogen peroxide and the fluorescence intensity of DAPN is then obtained using a linear regression. Results show that fluorescence intensity of DAPN is in proportion to the increase in the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the range of 9.0 x 10(-7) -3.56 x 10(-5) mol x L(-1) almost linearly. The linear equation is F = 1.15c (micromol x L(-1))+398.6 (r = 0.999 1) and the detection limit is 2.7 x10(-7) mol x L(-1) (n = 11). The relative standard deviation of 11 parallel measurements with the concentration of H2O2 at 7.5 x 10(-6) and 3.0 x 10(-5) mol x L(-1), is 2.2 and 1.0%, respectively. Results from DPD method was used to verify this method. The interference of foreign iron was studied. Compared to the traditional methods, this binary system has a simplified operation and high sensitivity. The proposed method has been successfully applied to determine the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in rainwater.

  3. Photodecomposition of hydrogen peroxide in highly saline aqueous medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Luna

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The photodecomposition of hydrogen peroxide was performed in highly saline aqueous medium (60 g.L-1 of NaCl. The Fe3+/H2O2/NaCl/UV system was tested at temperatures from 20 to 50 ºC, while the intervals of concentration of Fe3+ and H2O2 were 1 to 2.5 mM and 230 to 630 mM, respectively. It is known from the literature that chloride is an inhibitor of the oxidation of organic compound in aqueous medium, but this effect has not been observed to be expressive for hydrogen peroxide. Despite this result, experiments were conducted in presence of high concentration of salt (60 g.L-1, emulating the agrochemical process condition. The series of measurements has been evaluated and correlated. Thermal and photochemical dependencies were described satisfactorily by a simplified kinetic model. The apparent activation energy was estimated to be 27.6 kJ.mol-1.

  4. Effect of Hydrogen Peroxide on the Antibacterial Substantivity of Chlorhexidine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriar Shahriari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the effect of hydrogen peroxide on the antibacterial substantivity of chlorhexidine (CHX. Seventy-five dentine tubes prepared from human maxillary central and lateral incisor teeth were used. After contamination with Enterococcus faecalis for 14 days, the specimens were divided into five groups as follows: CHX, H2O2, CHX + H2O2, infected dentine tubes (positive control, and sterile dentine tubes (negative control. Dentine chips were collected with round burs into tryptic soy broth, and after culturing, the number of colony-forming units (CFU was counted. The number of CFU was minimum in the first cultures in all experimental groups, and the results obtained were significantly different from each other at any time period (<.05. At the first culture, the number of CFU in the CHX + H2O2 group was lower than other two groups. At the other experimental periods, the CHX group showed the most effective antibacterial action (<.05. Hydrogen peroxide group showed the worst result at all periods. In each group, the number of CFU increased significantly by time lapse (<.05. In conclusion, H2O2 had no additive effect on the residual antibacterial activity of CHX.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide is produced by E. coli challenged haemocytes and regulates phagocytosis, in the medfly Ceratitis capitata. The active role of superoxide dismutase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbi, Marina; Pouliliou, Stamatia; Lampropoulou, Maria; Marmaras, Vassilis J; Tsakas, Sotiris

    2011-08-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) participates as a second messenger in cell signaling. In this paper, the role of H(2)O(2) was investigated, in Escherichia coli phagocytosis by the haemocytes of the medfly Ceratitis capitata. Block of H(2)O(2) synthesis by specific enzymic inhibitors, namely N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) for NADPH oxidase and diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) for SOD, resulted in the increase of E. coli phagocytosis. Immunoblot analysis, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy, revealed the constitutive expression of SOD, in the medfly haemocytes. Phagocytosis increased by small interfering RNA (siRNA) for SOD, revealing the active involvement of SOD and H(2)O(2). Immunoblot analysis showed an increase of the ERK1/2 phosphorylation, in the presence of the above H(2)O(2) synthesis enzymic inhibitors. In addition, confocal microscopy showed no co-localization of SOD with β integrin subunit. It appears that SOD participates in the regulation of bacterial phagocytosis, due to involvement of the produced H(2)O(2) in the differential phosphorylation of MAP kinases.

  6. Copper(II) coordination polymers: tunable structures and a different activation effect of hydrogen peroxide for the degradation of methyl orange under visible light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu; Wu, Dongqing; Zhao, Bei; Han, Xiao; Wu, Jie; Hou, Hongwei; Fan, Yaoting

    2015-01-21

    By tuning the synthesis conditions, based on a conformation-sensitive ligand, 1,4-bis(1,2,4-triazole-1-methylene)-2,3,5,6-tetramethyl benzene (btmx) and Cu(NO3)2·3H2O/CuCl2·2H2O, we have obtained three Cu(ii) coordination polymers with diverse structures, namely, {[Cu(btmx)2(H2O)]·2NO3}n (), {[Cu(btmx)2(Cl)2]·5H2O}n () and [Cu(btmx)(Cl)2]n (). Complex exhibits a novel 2D → 3D interpenetrating structure with a point symbol of 6(3). Complex features an irregular 2D grid with (4(4)·6(2)) topology. The structure of complex is a 1D double chain structure. The ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra and TG curves of these complexes are also presented and discussed. Moreover, under visible light, the coordination polymers , , and display a different activation effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) for the photocatalytic decomposition of methyl orange (MO), which indicates that the coordination polymers may have bright prospects in the field of photocatalytic degradation of dyes.

  7. Oregano Essential Oil Induces SOD1 and GSH Expression through Nrf2 Activation and Alleviates Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Damage in IPEC-J2 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yi; Wang, Jun; Peng, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Oregano essential oil (OEO) has long been used to improve the health of animals, particularly their intestinal health. The health benefits of OEO are generally attributed to antioxidative actions, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigate the antioxidative effects of OEO and their underlying molecular mechanisms in porcine small intestinal epithelial (IPEC-J2) cells. We found that OEO treatment prior to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) exposure increased cell viability and prevented lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release into the medium. H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were remarkably suppressed by OEO. OEO dose-dependently increased mRNA and protein levels of the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2 (Nrf2) target genes Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (SOD1) and g-glutamylcysteine ligase (GCLC, GLCM), as well as intracellular concentrations of SOD1 and glutathione. OEO also increased intranuclear expression of Nrf2 and the activity of an antioxidant response element reporter plasmid in IPEC-J2 cells. The OEO-induced expression of Nrf2-regulated genes and increased SOD1 and glutathione concentrations in IPEC-J2 cells were reduced by Nrf2 small interfering (si) RNAs, counteracting the protective effects of OEO against oxidative stress in IPEC-J2 cells. Our results suggest that OEO protects against H2O2-induced IPEC-J2 cell damage by inducing Nrf2 and related antioxidant enzymes. PMID:28105249

  8. Probing skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonios, George; Dimou, Aikaterini; Galaris, Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidizing agent in biological systems. In dermatology, it is frequently used as topical antiseptic, it has a haemostatic function, it can cause skin blanching, and it can facilitate skin tanning. In this work, we investigated skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide, non-invasively, using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. We observed transient changes in the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin concentrations as a result of topical application of dilute H2O2 solutions to the skin, with changes in deoxyhaemoglobin concentration being more pronounced. Furthermore, we did not observe any appreciable changes in melanin absorption properties as well as in the skin scattering properties. We also found no evidence for production of oxidized haemoglobin forms. Our observations are consistent with an at least partial decomposition of hydrogen peroxide within the stratum corneum and epidermis, with the resulting oxygen and/or remaining hydrogen peroxide inducing vasoconstriction to dermal blood vessels and increasing haemoglobin oxygen saturation. An assessment of the effects of topical application of hydrogen peroxide to the skin may serve as the basis for the development of non-invasive techniques to measure skin antioxidant capacity and also may shed light onto skin related disorders such as vitiligo.

  9. Multistage Extractive Reaction for Hydrogen Peroxide Production by Anthraquinone Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li; L(U) Shuxiang; WANG Yaquan; MI Zhentao

    2005-01-01

    The extractive reaction process of oxygen-working solution-water three-phase system for the production of hydrogen peroxide by the anthraquinone method was investigated in a sieve plate column of 50 mm in internal diameter. The oxidation reaction of anthrahydroquinone in the working solution with oxygen and the extraction of hydrogen peroxide from the working solution into aqueous phase occurred simultaneously in the countercurrent mode. The agitating effect caused by gaseous phase made the droplets of the dispersed phase become smaller, thus, increasing the liquid-liquid interfacial contact areas and resulting in the improvement of the mass transfer velocity. Results showed that the gas-agitation had a beneficial effect on the extraction of hydrogen peroxide from the working solution into the aqueous phase; the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the raffinate decreased with the increase of the gaseous superficial velocities; and the concentration of H2O2 in the raffinate increased with the increase of the dispersed phase superficial velocity at the same superficial velocity of the gaseous phase. In the G-L-L extractive reaction process, with the increase of the gaseous superficial velocities, both the conversion of the anthrahydroquinone oxidation and the extraction efficiency of hydrogen peroxide first increased significantly, then increased gradually.

  10. Probing skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zonios, George [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Dimou, Aikaterini [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece); Galaris, Dimitrios [Laboratory of Biological Chemistry, School of Medicine, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina (Greece)

    2008-01-07

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important oxidizing agent in biological systems. In dermatology, it is frequently used as topical antiseptic, it has a haemostatic function, it can cause skin blanching, and it can facilitate skin tanning. In this work, we investigated skin interaction with hydrogen peroxide, non-invasively, using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy. We observed transient changes in the oxyhaemoglobin and deoxyhaemoglobin concentrations as a result of topical application of dilute H{sub 2}O{sub 2} solutions to the skin, with changes in deoxyhaemoglobin concentration being more pronounced. Furthermore, we did not observe any appreciable changes in melanin absorption properties as well as in the skin scattering properties. We also found no evidence for production of oxidized haemoglobin forms. Our observations are consistent with an at least partial decomposition of hydrogen peroxide within the stratum corneum and epidermis, with the resulting oxygen and/or remaining hydrogen peroxide inducing vasoconstriction to dermal blood vessels and increasing haemoglobin oxygen saturation. An assessment of the effects of topical application of hydrogen peroxide to the skin may serve as the basis for the development of non-invasive techniques to measure skin antioxidant capacity and also may shed light onto skin related disorders such as vitiligo.

  11. Resolvin-D1 inhibits interleukin-8 and hydrogen peroxide production induced by cigarette smoke extract in 16HBE cells via attenuating NF-κB activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Jiajia; Zhang Mingke; Liao Zenglin; Wu Wei; Wang Tao; Chen Lei; Yang Ting

    2014-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoke induced airway inflammation plays a role in pathogenesis of airway inflammation.Resolvin-D1 derived from omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids is an endogenous anti-inflammatory and proresolving lipid mediator.Resolvin-D1 ameliorated inflammatory responses in lung injury,asthma,peritonitis and atherosclerosis.We investigated whether resolvin-D1 suppressed the productions of chemokines and oxidative stress induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) in vitro and its possible mechanism.Methods We examined the proinfiammatory chemokine interleukin-8 and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)productions induced by CSE in 16 human bronchial epithelial (16HBE)cells after resolvin-D1 treatment and their mechanisms.16HBE cells were treated with resolvin-D1 at up to 10 nmol/L,for 30 minutes before CSE up to 16% (v/v) exposure.Release of interlukin-8 proteins was assessed by enzyme linked immunosort assay (ELISA) and its mRNA level by RT-PCR.We evaluated extracellular H2O2 expression in the supematant.Phosphorylation of NF-KB/p65 and degradation of Ⅰ-KB in 16HBE cells were determined by Westem blotting analysis and NF-KB DNA binding activity by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA).Results 16HBE cells treated with 8% CSE showed significantly higher interlukin-8 production.Resolvin-D1 pretreatment inhibited CSE induced intedukin-8 production (mRNA and protein) in a dose and time dependent manner.Extracellular H2O2 level decreased after resolvin-D1 treatment.Resolvin-D1 attenuated CSE triggered Ⅰ-KB degradation and NF-KB/p65 activation dose dependently and inhibited NF-KB DNA binding activity.Conclusion Resolvin-D1 inhibits CSE induced interlukin-8 and H2O2 production in 16HBE cells by modulating NF-KB activation and has therapeutic potential for pulmonary inflammation.

  12. Baicalein Decreases Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Damage to NG108-15 Cells via Upregulation of Nrf2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chao-Hung; Ma, Kuo-Hsing; Liu, Pei-Shan; Kuo, Jung-Kuei; Chueh, Sheau-Huei

    2015-08-01

    Baicalein is a flavonoid inhibitor of 12-lipoxygenase. Here, we investigated its effect on hydrogen peroxide-induced damage to NG108-15 cells. Hydrogen peroxide activated the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway, decreased Nrf2 expression, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, reduced viability, and increased cell death after 2-24 h treatment of NG108-15 cells. Co-treatment with hydrogen peroxide and baicalein completely suppressed the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathway by upregulating Nrf2 expression and reducing ROS stress and partially inhibited the effects on cell viability and cell death. Silencing of 12-lipoxygenase had a similar protective effect to baicalein on hydrogen peroxide-induced damage by blocking the hydrogen peroxide-induced decrease in Nrf2 expression and increase in ROS levels. Neither protective effect was altered by addition of 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid, the product of 12-lipoxygenase, suggesting that hydrogen peroxide induced damage via 12-lipoxygenase by another, as yet unknown, mechanism, rather than activating it. Co-treatment of cells with hydrogen peroxide and N-acetylcysteine or the Nrf2 inducer sulforaphane reduced hydrogen peroxide-induced damage in a similar fashion to baicalein, while the Nrf2 inhibitor retinoic acid blocked the protective effect of baicalein. Silencing Nrf2 also inhibited the protective effects of baicalein, sulforaphane, and N-acetylcysteine and resulted in high ROS levels, suggesting ROS elimination was mediated by Nrf2. Taken together our results suggest that baicalein protects cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced activation of the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway by upregulating Nrf2 and inhibiting 12-lipoxygenase to block the increase in ROS levels. Hydrogen peroxide also activates a second mitochondrial dysfunction independent death pathway which is resistant to baicalein.

  13. Hydrogen peroxide induces the activation of the phospholipase C-γ1 survival pathway in PC12 cells: protective role in apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenli Yuan; Jiazhi Guo; Xingguo Li; Zhirong Zou; Guangxue Chen; Jun Sun; Tinghua Wang; Di Lu

    2009-01-01

    It has been reported that phospholipase C-γ1 (PLC-γ1) plays an important protective role in hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced pheochromocytoma (PC) 12 cells death. However, most studies have used high doses of H2O2 and the downstream targets of PLC-γ1 activation remain to be identified. The present study was designed to examine the roles of PLC-γ1 signaling pathway in the apoptosis of PC12 cells induced by low dose of H2O2, as well as the downstream factors involved in this pathway. Low-dose treatment of H2O2 resulted in PLC-γ1 tyrosine phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner and H2O2 killed the PC12 cells by inducing necrosis. In contrast, pretreatment of PC12 cells with U73122, a specific inhibitor of PLC, markedly increased the percentage of dead cells. The mode of cell death was converted to apoptosis as determined by Hoechst/PI nuclear staining and fluorescence microscopy. Western blot analysis demonstrated that the expression of Bcl-2 protein and the activation of pro-caspase-3 were not significantly affected by low dose of H2O2 alone. However, after pretreatment with U73122, Bcl-2 protein expression was dramatically decreased and the activation of pro-caspase-3 was sig-nificantly increased. We concluded that PLC-γ1 plays an important protective role in H2O2-induced PC12 cells death. Bcl-2 and caspase-3 probably participate in the signaling pathway as downstream factors.

  14. Catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation of a petrochemical wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariente, M I; Melero, J A; Martínez, F; Botas, J A; Gallego, A I

    2010-01-01

    Continuous Catalytic Wet Hydrogen Peroxide Oxidation (CWHPO) for the treatment of a petrochemical industry wastewater has been studied on a pilot plant scale process. The installation, based on a catalytic fixed bed reactor (FBR) coupled with a stirred tank reactor (STR), shows an interesting alternative for the intensification of a continuous CWHPO treatment. Agglomerated SBA-15 silica-supported iron oxide (Fe(2)O(3)/SBA-15) was used as Fenton-like catalyst. Several variables such as the temperature and hydrogen peroxide concentration, as well as the capacity of the pilot plant for the treatment of inlet polluted streams with different dilution degrees were studied. Remarkable results in terms of TOC reduction and increased biodegradability were achieved using 160 degrees C and moderate hydrogen peroxide initial concentration. Additionally, a good stability of the catalyst was evidenced for 8 hours of treatment with low iron leaching (less than 1 mg/L) under the best operating conditions.

  15. Cathodic electrocatalyst layer for electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christopher P. (Inventor); Tennakoon, Charles L. K. (Inventor); Singh, Waheguru Pal (Inventor); Anderson, Kelvin C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cathodic gas diffusion electrode for the electrochemical production of aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions. The cathodic gas diffusion electrode comprises an electrically conductive gas diffusion substrate and a cathodic electrocatalyst layer supported on the gas diffusion substrate. A novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer comprises a cathodic electrocatalyst, a substantially water-insoluble quaternary ammonium compound, a fluorocarbon polymer hydrophobic agent and binder, and a perfluoronated sulphonic acid polymer. An electrochemical cell using the novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer has been shown to produce an aqueous solution having between 8 and 14 weight percent hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, such electrochemical cells have shown stable production of hydrogen peroxide solutions over 1000 hours of operation including numerous system shutdowns.

  16. Myeloperoxidase associated with neutrophil extracellular traps is active and mediates bacterial killing in the presence of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Heather; Albrett, Amelia M; Kettle, Anthony J; Winterbourn, Christine C

    2012-03-01

    A variety of inflammatory stimuli induces NETs. These structures consist of a network of chromatin strands associated with predominately granule proteins, including MPO. NETs exhibit antimicrobial activity, which is proposed to augment the more-established mechanism of phagosomal killing. They may also be detrimental to the host in situations such as chronic inflammation or severe sepsis. The objective of this study was to establish whether MPO associated with NETs is active and able to kill bacteria. Neutrophils were stimulated with PMA to release NETs. Peroxidase activity measurements were performed and showed that enzymatically active MPO was released from the neutrophils, 2-4 h after stimulation, concomitant with NET formation. Approximately 30% of the total cellular MPO was released, with the majority bound to the NETs. The bound enzyme retained its activity. Staphylococcus aureus were not killed when added to preformed NETs under our assay conditions. However, addition of H(2)O(2) to the bacteria in the presence of NETs resulted in MPO-dependent killing, which was observed with NETs in situ and with NETs when they were removed from the neutrophils by limited DNase digestion. Our results show that the enzymatic activity of MPO on NETs could contribute to antimicrobial activity or tissue injury when NETs are released from neutrophils at sites of infection or inflammation.

  17. Salinity-gradient energy driven microbial electrosynthesis of hydrogen peroxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaohu; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a strong oxidant, is widely used in various chemical industries and environmental remediation processes. In this study, we developed an innovative method for cost-effective production of H2O2 by using a microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell (MREC). In the......Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a strong oxidant, is widely used in various chemical industries and environmental remediation processes. In this study, we developed an innovative method for cost-effective production of H2O2 by using a microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell (MREC...

  18. Erythrocyte membrane stability to hydrogen peroxide is decreased in Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilca, Marilena; Lixandru, Daniela; Gaman, Laura; Vîrgolici, Bogdana; Atanasiu, Valeriu; Stoian, Irina

    2014-01-01

    The brain and erythrocytes have similar susceptibility toward free radicals. Therefore, erythrocyte abnormalities might indicate the progression of the oxidative damage in Alzheimer disease (AD). The aim of this study was to investigate erythrocyte membrane stability and plasma antioxidant status in AD. Fasting blood samples (from 17 patients with AD and 14 healthy controls) were obtained and erythrocyte membrane stability against hydrogen peroxide and 2,2'-azobis-(2-amidinopropane) dihydrochloride (AAPH), serum Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), residual antioxidant activity or gap (GAP), erythrocyte catalase activity (CAT), erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, erythrocyte nonproteic thiols, and total plasma thiols were determined. A significant decrease in erythrocyte membrane stability to hydrogen peroxide was found in AD patients when compared with controls (Perythrocyte membrane stability to hydrogen peroxide. Reduced erythrocyte membrane stability may be further evaluated as a potential peripheral marker for oxidative damage in AD.

  19. Exercise training restores coronary arteriolar dilation to NOS activation distal to coronary artery occlusion - Role of hydrogen peroxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thengchaisri, Naris; Shipley, Robert; Ren, Yi; Parker, Janet; Kuo, Lih

    2007-01-01

    Objective - Exercise training has been shown to restore vasodilation to nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation in arterioles distal to coronary artery occlusion. Because reactive oxygen species are generated during NOS uncoupling and the production of vasodilator H2O2 is increased during exercise in

  20. Glutathione and antioxidant enzymes serve complementary roles in protecting activated hepatic stellate cells against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dunning, Sandra; Rehman, Atta Ur; Tiebosch, Marjolein H.; Hannivoort, Rebekka A.; Haijer, Floris W.; Woudenberg, Jannes; van den Heuvel, Fiona A. J.; Buist-Homan, Manon; Faber, Klaas Nico; Moshage, Han

    2013-01-01

    Background: In chronic liver disease, hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are activated, highly proliferative and produce excessive amounts of extracellular matrix, leading to liver fibrosis. Elevated levels of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced during chronic liver injury have been implicated i

  1. Mucoid conversion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by hydrogen peroxide: a mechanism for virulence activation in the cystic fibrosis lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathee, K; Ciofu, O; Sternberg, C

    1999-01-01

    The leading cause of mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is respiratory failure due in large part to chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains that undergo mucoid conversion, display a biofilm mode of growth in vivo and resist the infiltration of polymorphonuclear...... of alginate, (ii) exhibited no detectable differences in growth rate, (iii) showed an unaltered LPS profile, (iv) were approximately 72% reduced in the amount of inducible-beta-lactamase and (v) secreted little or no LasA protease and only showed 44% elastase activity. A characteristic approximately 54 k....... These findings indicate that gene activation in bacteria by toxic oxygen radicals, similar to that found in plants and mammalian cells, may serve as a defence mechanism for the bacteria. This suggests that mucoid conversion is a response to oxygen radical exposure and that this response is a mechanism of defence...

  2. Mucoid conversion of Pseudomonas aeruginosa by hydrogen peroxide: a mechanism for virulence activation in the cystic fibrosis lung

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathee, Kalai; Ciofu, Oana; Sternberg, Claus

    1999-01-01

    The leading cause of mortality in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) is respiratory failure due in large part to chronic lung infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains that undergo mucoid conversion, display a biofilm mode of growth in vivo and resist the infiltration of polymorphonuclear......) exhibited no detectable differences in growth rate, (iii) showed an unaltered LPS profile, (iv) were similar to 72% reduced in the amount of inducible-beta-lactamase and (v) secreted little or Department of Clinical no LasA protease and only showed 44% elastase activity. A characteristic similar to 54 k....... These findings indicate that gene activation in bacteria by toxic oxygen radicals, similar to that found in plants and mammalian cells, may serve as a defence mechanism for the bacteria. This suggests that mucoid conversion is a response to oxygen radical exposure and that this response is a mechanism of defence...

  3. Hydrogen peroxide modulates Ca2+-activation of single permeabilized fibres from fast- and slow-twitch skeletal muscles of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, D R; Lynch, G S; Williams, D A

    2000-01-01

    We examined the effects of redox modulation on single membrane-permeabilized fibre segments from the fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and slow-twitch soleus muscles of adult rats to determine whether the contractile apparatus was the redox target responsible for the increased contractility of muscles exposed to low concentrations of H2O2. The effects of H2O2 on maximum Ca2+-activated force were dose-dependent with 30 min exposure to 5 mM H2O2 causing a progressive decrease by 22+/-3 and 13+/-2% in soleus and EDL permeabilized muscle fibres, respectively. Lower concentrations of exogenous H2O2 (100 microM and 1 mM) had no effect on maximum Ca2+-activated force. Subsequent exposure to the reductant dithiothreitol (DTT, 10 mM, 10 min) fully reversed the H2O2-induced depression of force in EDL, but not in soleus muscle fibres. Incubation with DTT alone for 10 min did not alter Ca2+-activated force in either soleus or EDL muscle fibres. The sensitivity of the contractile filaments to Ca2+ (pCa50) was not altered by exposure to any concentration of exogenous H2O2. However, all concentrations of H2O2 diminished the Hill coefficient in permeabilized fibres from the EDL muscle, indicating that the cooperativity of Ca2+ binding to troponin is altered. H2O2 (5 mM) did not affect rigor force, which indicates that the number of crossbridges participating in contraction was not reduced. In conclusion, H2O2 may reduce the maximum Ca2+ activated force production in skinned muscle fibres by decreasing the force per crossbridge.

  4. Applications of hydrogen peroxide in electrochemical technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez Gallegos, Alberto Armando

    1998-12-01

    It is demonstrated that hydrogen peroxide can be produced with a current efficiency of 40-70% by the cathodic reduction of oxygen at a reticulated vitreous carbon electrode in a divided flow-cell using catholytes consisting of aqueous chloride or sulphate media, pH >>{sub 2}. The supporting electrolyte does not influence either the current efficiency for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} or its rate of production. The current efficiency for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is not a strong function of the potential and this suggests that 2e- and 4e- reduction of oxygen occurs in parallel at different sites on the carbon surface. Voltammetry experiments showed that (a) the I-E response for oxygen reduction at pH >>{sub 2} is a function of the electrode surface and/or the supporting electrolyte; (b) both H{sub 2} evolution and oxygen reduction are retarded on carbon with increasing ionic strength; (c) the presence of ferrous ions lead to the homogeneous decomposition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} away from the cathode surface but their effectiveness as a catalyst for this decomposition depends on their speciation in solution which changes during an electrolysis. The use of a three-dimensional electrode fabricated from reticulated vitreous carbon allows Fenton`s reagent to be electroproduced at a practical rate which makes possible the removal of organics in slightly acidic aqueous media. A wide range of highly toxic organic molecules (phenol, catechol, hydroquinone, p-benzoquinone, oxalic acid, aniline, cresol and amaranth) have been oxidised in mild conditions and a significant fraction of the organic carbon is evolved as CO{sub 2}. In all cases studied the initial chemical oxygen demand (COD) was depleted to levels higher than 85%, indicating a complete mineralisation of the organic pollutants. The life-time of the reticulated vitreous carbon cathode was demonstrated to be over 1000 hours during two and a half years of experiments. During this time the cathode performance was very good, leading to

  5. Protection against hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative damage in rat erythrocytes by Mangifera indica L. peel extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajila, C M; Prasada Rao, U J S

    2008-01-01

    Phytochemicals such as polyphenols and carotenoids are gaining importance because of their contribution to human health and their multiple biological effects such as antioxidant, antimutagenic, anticarcinogenic and cytoprotective activities and other therapeutic properties. Mango peel is a major by-product in pulp industry and it contains various bioactive compounds like polyphenols, carotenoids and others. In the present study, the protective effect of peel extracts of unripe and ripe mango fruits of two varieties namely, Raspuri and Badami on hydrogen peroxide induced hemolysis, lipid peroxidation, degradation of membrane proteins and its morphological changes are reported. The oxidative hemolysis of rat erythrocytes by hydrogen peroxide was inhibited by mango peel extract in a dose dependent manner. The IC(50) value for lipid peroxidation inhibition on erythrocyte ghost membrane was found to be in the range of 4.5-19.3 microg gallic acid equivalents. The mango peel extract showed protection against membrane protein degradation caused by hydrogen peroxide. Morphological changes to erythrocyte membrane caused by hydrogen peroxide were protected by mango peel extract. The results demonstrated that mango peel extracts protected erythrocytes against oxidative stress and may impart health benefits and it could be used as a valuable food ingredient or a nutraceutical product.

  6. Thermally stable and hydrogen peroxide tolerant manganese peroxidase (MnP) from Lenzites betulinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, Fumihiko; Kajino, Tsutomu; Sugiyama, Hidehiko; Asami, Osamu; Takahashi, Haruo

    2002-10-23

    A thermally stable and hydrogen peroxide tolerant manganese peroxidase (MnP) was purified from the culture medium of Lenzites betulinus by ion exchange chromatography, gel filtration and isoelectric focusing chromatography. The MnP purified from L. betulinus (L-MnP) has a molecular mass of 40 kDa and its isoelectric point was determined to be 6.2. The first 19 amino acids at the N-terminal end of the L-MnP sequence were found to exhibit 74% identity with those of a Phlebia radiata MnP. L-MnP was proved to have the highest hydrogen peroxide tolerance among MnPs reported so far. It retained more than 60% of the initial activity after thermal treatment at 60 degrees C for 60 min, and also retained more than 60% of the initial activity after exposure to 10 mM hydrogen peroxide for 5 min at 37 degrees C.

  7. Natural manganese deposits as catalyst for decomposing hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Knol

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Drinking water companies more and more implement Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOP in their treatment schemes to increase the barrier against organic micropollutants (OMPs. It is necessary to decompose the excessive hydrogen peroxide after applying AOP to avoid negative effects in the following, often biological, treatment steps. A drinking water company in the western part of the Netherlands investigated decomposition of about 5.75 mg L−1 hydrogen peroxide in pre-treated Meuse river water with different catalysts on pilot scale. In down flow operation, the necessary reactor Empty Bed Contact Time (EBCT with the commonly used Granulated Activated Carbon (GAC and waste ground water filter gravel (MCFgw were the same with 149 s, corresponding with a conversion rate constant r of 0.021 s−1. The EBCT of the fine coating of ground water filter gravel (MC was significantly shorter with a little more than 10 s (r = 0.30 s−1. In up flow operation, with a flow rate of 20 m h−1, the EBCT of coating MC increased till about 100 s (r = 0.031 s−1, from which can be concluded, that the performance of this waste material is better compared with GAC, in both up and down flow operation. The necessary EBCT at average filtration rate of full scale dual layer filter material (MCFsw amounted to 209 s (r = 0.015 s−1. Regarding the average residence time in the full scale filters of 700 s, applying AOP in front of the filters could be an interesting alternative which makes a separate decomposition installation superfluous, on the condition that the primary functions of the filters are not affected.

  8. Hydrogen peroxide in breath condensate during a common cold

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.Q. Jöbsis (Rijn); S.L. Schellekens; A. Fakkel-Kroesbergen (Anoeska); R.H. Raatgeep (Rolien); J.C. de Jongste (Johan)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in exhaled air condensate is elevated in inflammatory disorders of the lower respiratory tract. It is unknown whether viral colds contribute to exhaled H2O2. Aim: To assess exhaled H2O2during and after a common cold. Methods: We examined H2O2in the br

  9. Hydrogen peroxide evolution during V-UV photolysis of water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azrague, Kamal; Bonnefille, Eric; Pradines, Vincent; Pimienta, Véronique; Oliveros, Esther; Maurette, Marie-Thérèse; Benoit-Marquié, Florence

    2005-05-01

    Hydrogen peroxide evolution during the vacuum-ultraviolet (V-UV, 172 nm) photolysis of water is considerably affected by the presence of oxalic acid (employed as a model water pollutant) and striking differences are observed in the absence and in the presence of dioxygen.

  10. The design of organic catalysis for epoxidation by hydrogen peroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Alder, Roger W.; Davis, Anthony P

    2005-01-01

    The potential of various organic species to catalyze epoxidation of ethene by hydrogen peroxide is explored with B3LYP/6-31G* DFT calculations. Electronic Supplementary Materials Supplementary material is available for this article at http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00894-005-0044-4.

  11. Computer Data Processing of the Hydrogen Peroxide Decomposition Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余逸男; 胡良剑

    2003-01-01

    Two methods of computer data processing, linear fitting and nonlinear fitting, are applied to compute the rate constant for hydrogen peroxide decomposition reaction. The results indicate that not only the new methods work with no necessity to measure the final oxygen volume, but also the fitting errors decrease evidently.

  12. Enzymatic generation of hydrogen peroxide shows promising antifouling effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, J.B.; Olsen, Stefan Møller; Laursen, B.S.;

    2010-01-01

    The antifouling (AF) potential of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced enzymatically in a coating containing starch, glucoamylase, and hexose oxidase was evaluated in a series of laboratory tests and in-sea field trials. Dissolved H2O2 inhibited bacterial biofilm formation by eight of nine marine...

  13. The basic chemistry and photochemistry behind hydrogen peroxide tooth whitening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Young, N.D.; Fairley, P.D.; Mohan, V.; Jumeaux, C.

    2013-01-01

    Tooth whitening using hydrogen peroxide gel formulation is a complexprocess which involves both chemistry and physics, and there is still some controversy about the efficiency of whitening processes, particularly with respect to the roles of temperature and irradiation with light. In this work we av

  14. Solvothermal synthesis of size-tunable ZnFe2O4 colloidal nanocrystal assemblies and their electrocatalytic activity towards hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruirui; Lv, Meng; Wang, Qianbin; Li, Hongliang; Guo, Peizhi; Zhao, X. S.

    2017-02-01

    Three ZnFe2O4 colloidal nanocrystal assemblies (CNAs), namely CNA1, CNA2 and CNA3, have been synthesized solvothermally with the size of 560 nm, 460 nm and 330 nm and are formed by the self-assembly of primary nanocrystals with the crystallite sizes of 19.2 nm, 15.5 nm and 21.8 nm, respectively. It was found that CNA2 performed superparamagnetic behavior with a saturation magnetization value of 36.9 emu g-1 while either CNA1 or CNA3 exhibited weak ferromagnetic with a small hysteresis loop and large saturation magnetization. Electrochemical sensing measurements toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide showed that the peak currents of the CNAs in cyclic voltammograms showed a linear relationship with the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the experimental conditions and the peak potentials were increased with the order of CNA3, CNA2 and CNA1. The formation mechanism of ZnFe2O4 CNAs had been discussed based on the experimental data. The magnetism and electrocatalysis of the ZnFe2O4 CNAs were supposed to be dependent on the size of primary nanoparticles and the structure of the CNAs.

  15. Hydrogen peroxide oxidant fuel cell systems for ultra-portable applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will address the issues of using hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant fuel in a miniature DMFC system. Cell performance for DMFC based fuel cells operating on hydrogen peroxide will be presented and discussed.

  16. 78 FR 73697 - New Animal Drugs; Hyaluronate Sodium; Hydrogen Peroxide; Imidacloprid and Moxidectin; Change of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-09

    ...; Hyaluronate Sodium; Hydrogen Peroxide; Imidacloprid and Moxidectin; Change of Sponsor AGENCY: Food and Drug... interest in, NADA 141-255 for PEROX-AID (hydrogen peroxide) 35% Solution to Western Chemical, Inc.,...

  17. Enhanced survival effect of pyruvate correlates MAPK and NF-kappaB activation in hydrogen peroxide-treated human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yong-Jin; Kang, Il-Jun; Bünger, Rolf; Kang, Young-Hee

    2004-02-01

    We recently reported that pyruvate inhibited translocation and activation of p53 caused by DNA damage due to oxidant injury (Lee YJ, Kang IJ, Bünger R, and Kang YH. Microvasc Res 66: 91-101, 2003); this was associated with increased expression of apoptosis-related bcl-2 and decreased expression of bax gene. This study attempted to delineate possible regulatory sites and mechanisms of antiapoptotic pyruvate, focusing on reactive oxygen species-mediated signaling in a human umbilical vein endothelial cell model. We compared the effects of the cytosolic reductant l-lactate and malate-aspartate shuttle blocker aminooxyacetate, both of which increase cytosolic NADH, on the downstream signaling pathway. Hydrogen peroxide (0.5 mM H2O2) depleted intracellular total glutathione that was prevented by pyruvate but not by l-lactate or aminooxyacetate. Activation of caspase-3 and the cleavage of procaspase-6 and procaspase-7 were strongly inhibited by pyruvate but markedly enhanced by l-lactate and aminooxyacetate, implicating redox-related antiapoptotic mechanisms of pyruvate. Western blot analysis and immunochemical data revealed that H2O2-induced transactivation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) was also inhibited by pyruvate but not by l-lactate or aminooxyacetate. In addition, H2O2 downregulated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) and phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), effects that were fully reversed by pyruvate within 2 h. Collectively, these findings indicate that pyruvate can protect cellular glutathione, thus enhancing cellular antioxidant potential, and that enhanced antioxidant potential can desensitize NF-kappaB transactivation due to reactive oxygen species, suggesting possible metabolic redox relations to NF-kappaB. Furthermore, pyruvate blocked the p38 MAPK pathway and activated the ERK pathway in an apparently redox-sensitive manner, which may regulate expression of genes believed to prevent apoptosis and promote cell

  18. Hispidin produced from Phellinus linteus protects pancreatic beta-cells from damage by hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jae Soon; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Jung Hyun; Kwon, Duck Soo; Lee, Keun Eok; Lee, Shin Young; Hong, Eock Kee

    2010-06-01

    Phellinus linteus, which is a traditional medicinal mushroom used in Asian countries for the treatment of various diseases, has attracted a lot of attention due to its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anti-mutagenicity, and cell-mediated immunity properties in addition to its ability to inhibit tumor growth and metastasis. However, the antidiabetic efficacy of P. linteus has not yet been examined. In this study, hispidin from P. linteus exhibited quenching effects against DPPH radicals, superoxide radicals, and hydrogen peroxide in a dose-dependent manner. Intracellular reactive oxygen species scavenging activity of hispidin was approximately 55% at a concentration of 30 microM. In addition, hispidin was shown to inhibit hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis and increased insulin secretion in hydrogen peroxide-treated cells. These combined results indicate that hispidin may act as an antidiabetic and that this property occurs through preventing beta-cells from the toxic action of reactive oxygen species in diabetes.

  19. Hydrogen Peroxide: A Key Chemical for Today's Sustainable Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciriminna, Rosaria; Albanese, Lorenzo; Meneguzzo, Francesco; Pagliaro, Mario

    2016-12-20

    The global utilization of hydrogen peroxide, a green oxidant that decomposes in water and oxygen, has gone from 0.5 million tonnes per year three decades ago to 4.5 million tonnes per year in 2014, and is still climbing. With the aim of expanding the utilization of this eminent green chemical across different industrial and civil sectors, the production and use of hydrogen peroxide as a green industrial oxidant is reviewed herein to provide an overview of the explosive growth of its industrial use over the last three decades and of the state of the art in its industrial manufacture, with important details of what determines the viability of the direct production from oxygen and hydrogen compared with the traditional auto-oxidation process.

  20. Catalytic hydrogen peroxide decomposition on La1-xSrxCo03-d perovskite oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, Van-Ahn. T.; Olthuis, W.; Bergveld, P.; Berg, van den A.

    2005-01-01

    Lanthanide perovskite oxides are mentioned as material for hydrogen peroxide sensor because they can catalytically decompose hydrogen peroxide in an aqueous medium. The catalytic properties of these perovskite oxides to hydrogen peroxide are suggested due to their oxygen vacancies influenced by the

  1. 21 CFR 172.167 - Silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide solution. 172... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Food Preservatives § 172.167 Silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide solution. An aqueous solution containing a mixture of silver nitrate and hydrogen peroxide may be safely...

  2. 40 CFR 415.90 - Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. 415.90 Section 415.90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... SOURCE CATEGORY Hydrogen Peroxide Production Subcategory § 415.90 Applicability; description of the hydrogen peroxide production subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  3. 40 CFR 180.1197 - Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1197 Hydrogen peroxide; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of hydrogen peroxide in or on...

  4. Manganese rescues adverse effects on lifespan and development in Podospora anserina challenged by excess hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Carolin; Osiewacz, Heinz D

    2015-03-01

    For biological systems, balancing cellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is of great importance because ROS are both, essential for cellular signaling and dangerous in causing molecular damage. Cellular ROS abundance is controlled by a delicate network of molecular pathways. Within this network, superoxide dismutases (SODs) are active in disproportion of the superoxide anion leading to the formation of hydrogen peroxide. The fungal aging model Podospora anserina encodes at least three SODs. One of these is the mitochondrial PaSOD3 isoform containing manganese as a cofactor. Previous work resulted in the selection of strains in which PaSod3 is strongly overexpressed. These strains display impairments in growth and lifespan. A computational model suggests a series of events to occur in Sod3 overexpressing strains leading to adverse effects due to elevated hydrogen peroxide levels. In an attempt to validate this model and to obtain more detailed information about the cellular responses involved in ROS balancing, we further investigated the PaSod3 overexpressing strains. Here we show that hydrogen peroxide levels are indeed strongly increased in the mutant strain. Surprisingly, this phenotype can be rescued by the addition of manganese to the growth medium. Strikingly, while we obtained no evidence for an antioxidant effect of manganese, we found that the metal is required for induction of components of the ROS scavenging network and lowers the hydrogen peroxide level of the mutant. A similar effect of manganese on lifespan reversion was obtained in wild-type strains challenged with exogenous hydrogen peroxide. It appears that manganese is limited under high hydrogen peroxide and suggests that a manganese-dependent activity leads to the induction of ROS scavenging components.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide modified sodium titanates with improved sorption capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyman, May D.; Hobbs, David T.

    2009-02-24

    The sorption capabilities (e.g., kinetics, selectivity, capacity) of the baseline monosodium titanate (MST) sorbent material currently being used to sequester Sr-90 and alpha-emitting radioisotopes at the Savannah River Site are significantly improved when treated with hydrogen peroxide; either during the original synthesis of MST, or, as a post-treatment step after the MST has been synthesized. It is expected that these peroxide-modified MST sorbent materials will have significantly improved sorption capabilities for non-radioactive cations found in industrial processes and waste streams.

  6. Effect of carbamide peroxide and hydrogen peroxide on enamel surface: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abouassi, Thaer; Wolkewitz, Martin; Hahn, Petra

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate changes in the micromorphologyl and microhardness of the enamel surface after bleaching with two different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (HP) and carbamide peroxide (CP). Bovine enamel samples were embedded in resin blocks, and polished. Specimens in the experimental groups (n = 10) were treated with bleaching gels containing 10% CP, 35% CP, 3.6% HP, and 10% HP, respectively, for 2 h every second day over a period of 2 weeks. The gels had the identical composition and pH and differed only in their HP or CP content. The roughness and morphology of the enamel surface were analyzed using laser profilometry and SEM. Microhardness was measured using a Knoop hardness tester. The data were evaluated statistically. Specimens in the 10% HP group showed significantly higher roughness after bleaching compared to the control group (ΔRa, p = 0.01). Bleaching with 35% CP showed only a tendency to increase roughness (ΔRa, p = 0.06). Application of 10% CP or 3.6% HP had no significant influence on Ra. Enamel microhardness was significantly higher after application of 10% HP compared to the control (ΔMic = 8 KHN, p = 0.0002) and 35% CP (ΔMic = 20KHN, p = 0.01) groups. In summary, application of CP and HP showed only small quantitative and qualitative differences. In addition, the influence of bleaching procedure on the morphology and hardness of the enamel surface depended on the concentration of the active ingredients.

  7. Catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide on anthraquinonecyanine and phthalocyanine metal complexes in acid and alkaline electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pobedinskiy, S.N.; Trofimenko, A.A.; Zharnikova, M.A.

    1985-12-01

    A study of octaoxyanthraquinonecyanines (OOATsM) and phthalocyanines (FTs) of cobalt, iron, and manganese determined their catalytic activity in the hydrogen peroxide decomposition reaction. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition on OOATsM and FTs of the metals studied follows the kinetic mechanisms of a reaction of the first order regardless of the central ion of the metal. Complexes with a central atom of iron are most active in decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. Catalytic activity of FTsFe exceeds that of FTsCo more than 10-fold. FTs are 10-fold greater than OOATsM in catalytic activity. Change from an acid to an alkali medium did not affect the kinetic mechanisms of the decomposition reaction but the reaction rate on both a carrier and on metal complexes is higher in an alkaline medium than in an acid medium. The affect of an alkaline medium on the hydrogen peroxide decomposition rate is greater for FTS complexes than for anthraquinone-cyanines. 5 references, 2 figures.

  8. Fisetin attenuates hydrogen peroxide-induced cell damage by scavenging reactive oxygen species and activating protective functions of cellular glutathione system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Kyoung Ah; Piao, Mei Jing; Kim, Ki Cheon; Cha, Ji Won; Zheng, Jian; Yao, Cheng Wen; Chae, Sungwook; Hyun, Jin Won

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) can induce cell damage by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in DNA damage and cell death. The aim of this study is to elucidate the protective effects of fisetin (3,7,3',4',-tetrahydroxy flavone) against H2O2-induced cell damage. Fisetin reduced the level of superoxide anion, hydroxyl radical in cell free system, and intracellular ROS generated by H2O2. Moreover, fisetin protected against H2O2-induced membrane lipid peroxidation, cellular DNA damage, and protein carbonylation, which are the primary cellular outcomes of H2O2 treatment. Furthermore, fisetin increased the level of reduced glutathione (GSH) and expression of glutamate-cysteine ligase catalytic subunit, which is decreased by H2O2. Conversely, a GSH inhibitor abolished the cytoprotective effect of fisetin against H2O2-induced cells damage. Taken together, our results suggest that fisetin protects against H2O2-induced cell damage by inhibiting ROS generation, thereby maintaining the protective role of the cellular GSH system.

  9. Antioxidant activity of wine pigments derived from anthocyanins: hydrogen transfer reactions to the dpph radical and inhibition of the heme-induced peroxidation of linoleic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goupy, Pascale; Bautista-Ortin, Ana-Belen; Fulcrand, Helene; Dangles, Olivier

    2009-07-08

    The consumption of red wine can provide substantial concentrations of antioxidant polyphenols, in particular grape anthocyanins (e.g., malvidin-3-O-beta-d-glucoside (1)) and specific red wine pigments formed by reaction between anthocyanins and other wine components such as catechin (3), ethanol, and hydroxycinnamic acids. In this work, the antioxidant properties of red wine pigments (RWPs) are evaluated by the DPPH assay and by inhibition of the heme-induced peroxidation of linoleic acid in acidic conditions (a model of antioxidant action in the gastric compartment). RWPs having a 1 and 3 moieties linked via a CH(3)-CH bridge appear more potent than the pigment with a direct 1-3 linkage. Pyranoanthocyanins derived from 1 reduce more DPPH radicals than 1 irrespective of the substitution of their additional aromatic ring. Pyranoanthocyanins are also efficient inhibitors of the heme-induced lipid peroxidation, although the highly hydrophilic pigment derived from pyruvic acid appears less active.

  10. Tetranuclear iron(III) complexes of an octadentate pyridine-carboxylate ligand and their catalytic activity in alkane oxidation by hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutkina, Elena A; Trukhan, Vladimir M; Pierpont, Cortlandt G; Mkoyan, Shaen; Strelets, Vladimir V; Nordlander, Ebbe; Shteinman, Albert A

    2006-01-21

    Reaction of the octadentate ligand 2,6-bis{3-[N,N-di(2-pyridylmethyl)amino]propoxy}benzoic acid (LH) with Fe(ClO4)3 leads to the formation of the tetranuclear complexes [Fe4(mu-O)2(LH)2(ClCH2-CO2)4](ClO4)4 (1), [{Fe2(mu-O)L(R-CO2)}2](ClO4)4 (2 R = C6H5-, 3 R = CH3-, 4, R = ClCH2-). The crystal structures of complexes 1 and 2 reveal that they consist of two Fe(III)2(mu-O)(mu-RCO2)2 cores that are linked via the two LH/L ligands to give a "dimer of dimers" structure. Complex assumes a helical shape, with protonated carboxylic acid moieties of the two ligands forming a hydrogen-bonded pair at the center of the cation. In complexes 2, 3 and 4, central carboxylates of the two ligands bridge the iron ions in each of the two Fe2O units, with an interdimer iron-iron separation of approximately 10 A and an intradimer separation of approximately 3.1 A. The second carboxylate bridge within the Fe2O units is defined by exogenous benzoate (2), acetate (3) or chloroacetate (4) ligands. The aqua complex [{Fe2(mu-O)L(H2O)2}2](ClO4)6 (5) is proposed to have a similar structure, but with the exogenous bridging carboxylates replaced by two terminal water ligands. These complexes exhibit electronic and Mössbauer spectral features that are similar to those of (mu-oxo)diiron(III) proteins as well as other related (mu-oxo)bis(mu-carboxylato)diiron(III) complexes. This similarity shows that these properties are not significantly affected by the nature of the bridging exogenous carboxylate, and that the octadentate framework ligand is essential in stabilizing the "dimer of dimers" structure. This structural feature remains in highly diluted solution (10(-5) M) as evidenced by electrospray ionization mass-spectroscopy (ES MS). Cyclic voltammetric studies of complexes 2 and 5 showed two irreversible two-electron reductions, indicating that the two Fe2O units of the tetranuclear complexes behave as distinct redox entities. Complexes 2, 3 and, especially, the aqua complex 5 are active alkane

  11. Selective production of hydrogen peroxide and oxidation of hydrogen sulfide in an unbiased solar photoelectrochemical cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zong, Xu; Chen, Hongjun; Seger, Brian;

    2014-01-01

    A solar-to-chemical conversion process is demonstrated using a photoelectrochemical cell without external bias for selective oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) to produce hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and sulfur (S). The process integrates two redox couples anthraquinone/anthrahydroquinone and I−/I3...

  12. Chemiluminometric hydrogen peroxide sensor for flow injection analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Preuschoff, F. (Inst. fuer Biotechnologie, Halle Univ. (Germany)); Spohn, U. (Inst. fuer Biotechnologie, Halle Univ. (Germany)); Blankenstein, G. (Inst. fuer Enzymtechnologie am Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Duesseldorf Univ., Juelich (Germany)); Mohr, K.H. (Inst. fuer Biotechnologie, Halle Univ. (Germany)); Kula, M.R. (Inst. fuer Enzymtechnologie am Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Duesseldorf Univ., Juelich (Germany))

    1993-08-01

    A chemiluminometric hydrogen peroxide sensor was developed for fast flow injection analysis. Different peroxidases were covalently immobilized on affinity membranes and compared with respect to the catalytic luminol oxidation. A photomultiplier tube is connected with a fibre bundle to the flow cell. The small cell volume of 5-10 [mu]l allows sampling rates between 90 and 200/h, depending on the flow rate. The highest sensitivity and the best longterm stability can be achieved with microbial peroxidase. Hydrogen peroxide can be determined in the range between 10[sup -3] and 10[sup -8] mol/l with a precision of < 3% (n=6, [alpha] = 0.05). The operational stability of the sensor is longer than 10 weeks. (orig.)

  13. Preparation of water soluble chitosan by hydrolysis using hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Zhenqiang; Wu, Shengjun; Chen, Jinhua

    2013-08-01

    Chitosan is not soluble in water, which limits its wide application particularly in the medicine and food industry. In the present study, water soluble chitosan (WSC) was prepared by hydrolyzing chitosan using hydrogen peroxide under the catalysis of phosphotungstic acid in homogeneous phase. Factors affecting hydrolysis were investigated and the optimal hydrolysis conditions were determined. The WSC structure was characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The resulting products were composed of chitooligosaccharides of DP 2-9. The WSC content of the product and the yield were 94.7% and 92.3% (w/w), respectively. The results indicate that WSC can be effectively prepared by hydrolysis of chitosan using hydrogen peroxide under the catalysis of phosphotungstic acid.

  14. Effect of carbamide peroxide and hydrogen peroxide on the surface morphology and zinc oxide levels of IRM fillings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostein, I; Cohenca, N; Mor, C; Moshonov, J; Stabholz, A

    1995-12-01

    The effect of 10% carbamide peroxide or 10% hydrogen peroxide on the surface morphology and zinc oxide levels of IRM fillings was tested. Ninety IRM samples were treated with either 10% carbamide peroxide, 10% hydrogen peroxide or phosphate buffer which served as control. Treatment consisted of placing the samples in a dry incubator at 37 degrees C for 1, 3 or 7 days. At each time point, the samples were removed from the test solutions, dried and prepared for surface scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectrometric analysis. After 3 days, 10% carbamide peroxide significantly reduced the zinc oxide levels as compared to the 10% hydrogen peroxide group (IRM fillings, but their modes of action differed.

  15. Ultrasonic degradation of Rhodamine B in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and some metal oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrdad, Abbas; Hashemzadeh, Robab

    2010-01-01

    In this research, degradation of Rodamine B in the presence of (hydrogen peroxide), (hydrogen peroxide+ultrasound), (hydrogen peroxide+aluminum oxide), (hydrogen peroxide+aluminum oxide+ultrasound with different ultrasound power), (hydrogen peroxide+iron oxide) and (hydrogen peroxide+iron oxide+ultrasound with different ultrasound power) were investigated at 25 degrees C. The apparent rate constants for the examined systems were calculated by pseudo-first-order kinetics. The results indicate that the rate of degradation was accelerated by ultrasound. The rate of degradation was increased by increasing power ultrasound. The efficiency of the (hydrogen peroxide+iron oxide+ultrasound) system for degradation of Rodamine B was higher than the others examined.

  16. Efficiency of hydrogen peroxide in improving disinfection of ICU rooms

    OpenAIRE

    Blazejewski, Caroline; Wallet, Frédéric; Rouzé, Anahita; Le Guern, Rémi; Ponthieux, Sylvie; Salleron, Julia; Nseir, Saad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The primary objective of this study was to determine the efficiency of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) techniques in disinfection of ICU rooms contaminated with multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO) after patient discharge. Secondary objectives included comparison of the efficiency of a vaporizator (HPV, Bioquell®) and an aerosolizer using H2O2, and peracetic acid (aHPP, Anios®) in MDRO environmental disinfection, and assessment of toxicity of these techniques. Methods This prospective c...

  17. Hydrogen peroxide propulsion for smaller satellites (SSC98-VIII-1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitehead, J C

    1998-07-13

    As satellite designs shrink, providing maneuvering and control capability falls outside the realm of available propulsion technology. While cold gas has been used on the smallest satellites, hydrogen peroxide propellant is suggested as the next step in performance and cost before hydrazine. Minimal toxicity and a small scale enable benchtop propellant preparation and development testing. Progress toward low-cost thrusters and self-pressurizing tank systems is described.

  18. Determination of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the mixture

    OpenAIRE

    Bodiroga Milanka; Ognjanović Jasminka

    2002-01-01

    Iodometric and permanganometric titrations were used for determination of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the mixture. Two procedures were described and compared. Titrations could be done in only one vessel, in the same reaction mixture, when iodometric titration of peracetic acid was continued after the permanganometric titration of H2O2, (procedure A). Peracetic acid and H2O2, as oxidizing agents, reacted with potassium iodide in an acid medium, evolving iodine. This reaction...

  19. Heterogeneous Uptake of Hydrogen Peroxide on Mineral Oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-gang Wang; Mao-fa Ge; Qiao Sun

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of mineral oxides (α-Al2O3,MgO,Fe2O3,and SiO2) with hydrogen peroxide was investigated using the Knudsen cell reactor.The initial reactive uptake coefficients for the commercially available powders are measured as (1.00+0.11)×l0-4 for α-Al2O3,(1.66+0.23) ×10-4 for MgO,(9.70+1.95)×10-5 for Fe2O3,and (5.22+0.9)×10-5 for SiO2.These metal oxide powders exhibit some catalytic behavior toward the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide excluding SiO2.H2O2 can be destroyed on Fe2O3 surface and O2 is formed.The experimental results suggest that the heterogeneous loss on mineral surface can represent an important sink of hydrogen peroxide.

  20. Salidroside inhibits endogenous hydrogen peroxide induced cytotoxicity of endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingyu; Jin, Lianhai; Shen, Nan; Xu, Bin; Zhang, Wei; Zhu, Hongli; Luo, Zhengli

    2013-01-01

    Salidroside, a phenylpropanoid glycoside isolated from Rhodiola rosea L., shows potent antioxidant property. Herein, we investigated the protective effects of salidroside against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative damage in human endothelial cells (EVC-304). EVC-304 cells were incubated in the presence or absence of low steady states of H2O2 (3-4 µM) generated by glucose oxidase (GOX) with or without salidroside. 3(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), malondialdehyde (MDA), and glutathione (GSH) assays were performed, together with Hoechst 33258 staining and flow cytometric analysis using Annexin-V and propidium iodide (PI) label. The results indicated that salidroside pretreatment attenuated endogenous H2O2 induced apoptotic cell death in EVC-304 cells in a dose-dependent pattern. Furthermore, Western blot data revealed that salidroside inhibited activation of caspase-3, 9 and cleavage of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) induced by endogenous H2O2. It also decreased the expression of Bax and rescued the balance of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins. All these results demonstrated that salidroside may present a potential therapy for oxidative stress in cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases.

  1. Ternary Composite of Hemin, Gold Nanoparticles and Graphene for Highly Efficient Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xincong; Weng, Jian

    2013-11-01

    A ternary composite of hemin, gold nanoparticles and graphene is prepared by a two-step process. Firstly, graphene-hemin composite is synthesized through π-π interaction and then hydrogen tetracholoroauric acid is reduced in situ by ascorbic acid. This ternary composite shows a higher catalytic activity for decomposition of hydrogen peroxide than that of three components alone or the mixture of three components. The Michaelis constant of this composite is 5.82 times lower and the maximal reaction velocity is 1.81 times higher than those of horseradish peroxidase, respectively. This composite also shows lower apparent activation energy than that of other catalysts. The excellently catalytic performance could be attributed to the fast electron transfer on the surface of graphene and the synergistic interaction of three components, which is further confirmed by electrochemical characterization. The ternary composite has been used to determine hydrogen peroxide in three real water samples with satisfactory results.

  2. The kinetic study of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrel, L. [Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, IPNS, CEN Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Chopin, J. [Laboratoire d`Electrochimie Inorganique, ENSSPICAM, Marseille (France)

    1996-12-01

    Iodine chemistry is one of the most important subjects of research in the field of reactor safety because this element can form volatile species which represent a biological hazard for environment. As the iodine and the peroxide are both present in the sump of the containment in the event of a severe accident on a light water nuclear reactor, it can be important to improve the knowledge on the reaction of oxidation of iodine by hydrogen peroxide. The kinetics of iodine by hydrogen peroxide has been studied in acid solution using two different analytical methods. The first is a UV/Vis spectrophotometer which records the transmitted intensity at 460 nm as a function of time to follow the decrease of iodine concentration, the second is an amperometric method which permits to record the increase of iodine+1 with time thanks to the current of reduction of iodine+1 to molecular iodine. The iodine was generated by Dushman reaction and the series of investigations were made at 40{sup o}C in a continuous stirring tank reactor. The influence of the initial concentrations of iodine, iodate, hydrogen peroxide, H{sup +} ions has been determined. The kinetics curves comprise two distinct chemical phases both for molecular iodine and for iodine+1. The relative importance of the two processes is connected to the initial concentrations of [I{sub 2}], [IO{sub 3}{sup -}], [H{sub 2}O{sub 2}] and [H{sup +}]. A rate law has been determined for the two steps for molecular iodine. (author) figs., tabs., 22 refs.

  3. Hydrogen peroxide regulated photosynthesis in C4-pepc transgenic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, C G; Li, X; Liu, X L; Wei, X D; Dai, C C

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the photosynthetic physiological basis in 'PC' transgenic rice (Oryza sativa L.), showing high-level expression of the gene encoding C4 phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (pepc), by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The C4-PEPC gene (pepc) from maize in the transgenic rice plants was checked by PCR. Comparison of yield components and photosynthetic indices between PC and untransformed wild-type (WT) plants indicated that increased yield in PC was associated with higher net photosynthetic rate and higher activities of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC). Both PC and WT plants were treated with 1 mmol L(-1) abscisic acid (ABA), 0.04% 1-butanol (BA), 2 mmol L(-1) neomycin (NS), or 2 mmol L(-1) diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI) to investigate the relationship between photosynthesis and levels of H2O2 and phosphatidic acid. In both PC and WT, ABA induced H2O2 generation and simultaneous decrease in stomatal conductance (g(s)). PC plants treated with BA showed decreased H2O2 content and strongly increased g(s) within 2 h of treatment. Similar results were observed in response to DPI treatment in PC. However, WT did not observe the decrease of H2O2 during the treatments of BA and DPI. The reduced H2O2 content in PC caused by BA treatment differed to that induced by DPI because BA did not inhibit NADPH oxidase activities. While BA induced a larger PEPC activity in PC, and higher catalase activity as well. These results indicated that the regulation of endogenous H2O2 metabolism of PC could be helpful for enhancing photosynthetic capability.

  4. Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes with Gold Nanoparticles to Fabricate a Sensor for Hydrogen Peroxide Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halimeh Rajabzade

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A highly sensitive electrode was prepared based on gold nanoparticles/nanotubes/ionic liquid for measurement of Hydrogen peroxide. Gold nanoparticles of 20–25 nm were synthesized on a nanotube carbon paste electrode by cyclic voltammetry technique while the coverage was controlled by applied potential and time. The gold nanoparticles were modified to form a monolayer on CNT, followed by decoration with ionic liquid for determination of hydrogen peroxide. The experimental conditions, applied potential and pH, for hydrogen peroxide monitoring were optimized, and hydrogen peroxide was determined amperometrically at 0.3 V vs. SCE at pH 7.0. Electrocatalytic effects of gold deposited CNT were observed with respect to unmodified one. The sensitivity obtained was 5 times higher for modified one. The presence of Au particles in the matrix of CNTs provides an environment for the enhanced electrocatalytic activities. The sensor has a high sensitivity, quickly response to H2O2 and good stability. The synergistic influence of MWNT, Au particles and IL contributes to the excellent performance for the sensor. The sensor responds to H2O2 in the linear range from 0.02 µM to 0.3 mM. The detection limit was down to 0.4 µM when the signal to noise ratio is 3.

  5. Stabilization of hydrogen peroxide using tartaric acids in Fenton and fenton-like oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Hyung Suk; Kim, Jeong-Jin; Kim, Young-Hun [Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    The stabilization of hydrogen peroxide is a key factor in the efficiency of a Fenton reaction. The stability of hydrogen peroxide was evaluated in a Fenton reaction and Fenton-like reactions in the presence of tartaric acid as a stabilizer. The interactions between ferrous or ferric iron and tartaric acid were observed through spectroscopic monitoring at variable pH around pKa{sub 1} and pKa{sub 2} of the stabilizer. Ferric iron had a strong interaction with the stabilizer, and the strong interaction was dominant above pKa{sub 2}. At a low pH, below pKa{sub 1}, the stabilizing effect was at its maximum and the prolonged life-time of hydrogen peroxide gave a higher efficiency to the oxidative degradation of nitrobenzene. In Fenton-like reactions with hematite, the acidic conditions caused dissolution of iron from an iron oxide, and an increase in iron species was the result. Tartaric acid showed a stabilizing effect on hydrogen peroxide in the Fentonlike system. The stabilization by tartaric acid might be due to an inhibition of catalytic activity of dissolved iron, and the stabilization strongly depends on the ionization state of the stabilizer.

  6. Lens Endogenous Peptide αA66-80 Generates Hydrogen Peroxide and Induces Cell Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Murugesan; Santhoshkumar, Puttur; Sharma, K Krishna

    2017-02-01

    In previous studies, we reported the presence of a large number of low-molecular-weight (LMW) peptides in aged and cataract human lens tissues. Among the LMW peptides, a peptide derived from αA-crystallin, αA66-80, was found in higher concentration in aged and cataract lenses. Additional characterization of the αA66-80 peptide showed beta sheet signature, and it formed well-defined unbranched fibrils. Further experimental data showed that αA66-80 peptide binds α-crystallin, impairs its chaperone function, and attracts additional crystallin proteins to the peptide α-crystallin complex, leading to the formation of larger light scattering aggregates. It is well established that Aβ peptide exhibits cell toxicity by the generation of hydrogen peroxide. The αA66-80 peptide shares the principal properties of Aβ peptide. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to determine whether the fibril-forming peptide αA66-80 has the ability to generate hydrogen peroxide. The results show that the αA66-80 peptide generates hydrogen peroxide, in the amount of 1.2 nM H2O2 per µg of αA66-80 peptide by incubation at 37°C for 4h. We also observed cytotoxicity and apoptotic cell death in αA66-80 peptide-transduced Cos7 cells. As evident, we found more TUNEL-positive cells in αA66-80 peptide transduced Cos7 cells than in control cells, suggesting peptide-mediated cell apoptosis. Additional immunohistochemistry analysis showed the active form of caspase-3, suggesting activation of the caspase-dependent pathway during peptide-induced cell apoptosis. These results confirm that the αA66-80 peptide generates hydrogen peroxide and promotes hydrogen peroxide-mediated cell apoptosis.

  7. Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Coral Photosynthesis and Calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, T.; Fujimura, H.; Arakaki, T.; Oomori, T.

    2007-12-01

    The widely-observed decline of coral reefs is considered to be caused by changes in the environment by natural and anthropogenic activities. As one important factor, the run-off of various matters from human activities to the coastal seawater poses stresses to the corals by degrading the quality of the seawater. In Okinawa, Japan, red- soil running off from the developed land has been a major environmental issue since 1980s. Hydrogen peroxide (HOOH), a strong active oxygen species, is one of the photochemically formed chemicals in the red-soil-polluted seawater. Recent photochemical studies of seawater showed that HOOH photo-formation was faster in the red- soil-polluted seawater than clean seawater. We studied the effects of HOOH on corals by studying the changes in coral carbon metabolisms such as photosynthesis and calcification, which are indicators of the physiological state of a coral colony. The corals were exposed to various concentrations of HOOH (0, 0.3, 3 μM). Two massive coral species of Porites sp. and Goniastrea aspera and one branch coral of Galaxea facicularis were used for the exposure experiments. The control experiments showed that when no HOOH was added, metabolisms of each coral colony were relatively stable. On the other hand, when HOOH was added to the seawater, we observed obvious changes in the coral metabolisms in all the coral species. When 0.3 μM HOOH was added, photosynthesis decreased by 14% and calcification decreased by 17% within 3 days, compared with the control. When 3 μM HOOH was added, photosynthesis decreased by 21% and calcification decreased by 41% within 3 days, compared with the control. Our study showed that higher concentrations of HOOH posed more stress to the coral colonies.

  8. Chloroplastic NADPH oxidase-like activity-mediated perpetual hydrogen peroxide generation in the chloroplast induces apoptotic-like death of Brassica napus leaf protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Rajesh Kumar; Watanabe, Daisuke; Watanabe, Masami

    2012-01-01

    Despite extensive research over the past years, regeneration from protoplasts has been observed in only a limited number of plant species. Protoplasts undergo complex metabolic modification during their isolation. The isolation of protoplasts induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in Brassica napus leaf protoplasts. The present study was conducted to provide new insight into the mechanism of ROS generation in B. napus leaf protoplasts. In vivo localization of H(2)O(2) and enzymes involved in H(2)O(2) generation and detoxification, molecular antioxidant-ascorbate and its redox state and lipid peroxidation were investigated in the leaf and isolated protoplasts. Incubating leaf strips in the macerating enzyme (ME) for different duration (3, 6, and 12 h) induced accumulation of H(2)O(2) and malondialdehyde (lipid peroxidation, an index of membrane damage) in protoplasts. The level of H(2)O(2) was highest just after protoplast isolation and subsequently decreased during culture. Superoxide generating NADPH oxidase (NOX)-like activity was enhanced, whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) decreased in the protoplasts compared to leaves. Diaminobenzidine peroxidase (DAB-POD) activity was also lower in the protoplasts compared to leaves. Total ascorbate content, ascorbate to dehydroascorbate ratio (redox state), were enhanced in the protoplasts compared to leaves. Higher activity of NOX-like enzyme and weakening in the activity of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, APX, and DAB-POD) in protoplasts resulted in excessive accumulation of H(2)O(2) in chloroplasts of protoplasts. Chloroplastic NADPH oxidase-like activity mediated perpetual H(2)O(2) generation probably induced apoptotic-like cell death of B. napus leaf protoplasts as indicated by parallel DNA laddering and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential.

  9. Combined free nitrous acid and hydrogen peroxide pre-treatment of waste activated sludge enhances methane production via organic molecule breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Qilin; Ye, Liu; Batstone, Damien; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2015-11-01

    This study presents a novel pre-treatment strategy using combined free nitrous acid (FNA i.e. HNO2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to enhance methane production from WAS, with the mechanisms investigated bio-molecularly. WAS from a full-scale plant was treated with FNA alone (1.54 mg N/L), H2O2 alone (10-80 mg/g TS), and their combinations followed by biochemical methane potential tests. Combined FNA and H2O2 pre-treatment substantially enhanced methane potential of WAS by 59-83%, compared to 13-23% and 56% with H2O2 pre-treatment alone and FNA pre-treatment alone respectively. Model-based analysis indicated the increased methane potential was mainly associated with up to 163% increase in rapidly biodegradable fraction with combined pre-treatment. The molecular weight distribution and chemical structure analyses revealed the breakdown of soluble macromolecules with the combined pre-treatment caused by the deamination and oxidation of the typical functional groups in proteins, polysaccharides and phosphodiesters. These changes likely improved the biodegradability of WAS.

  10. Durability of bleaching results achieved with 15% carbamide peroxide and 38% hydrogen peroxide in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knösel, Michael; Reus, Monika; Rosenberger, Albert; Attin, Thomas; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the durability of bleaching results achieved with (1) 15% carbamide peroxide home bleaching and (2) 38% hydrogen peroxide in-office bleaching. A total of 231 extracted anterior teeth were randomly divided into three groups (n = 77 in each group) with comparable mean baseline L*-values (68.24 ± 0.8): a non-bleached control group A, a 15% carbamide peroxide group B (5 bleaching intervals of 8 hours), and a 38% hydrogen peroxide group C (3 intervals of 15 minutes). Durability of bleaching was assessed by comparing CIE-L*a*b* data after intervals of 2, 4, 12, and 26 weeks from baseline. Both bleaching regimes initially produced a highly significant increase in lightness parameter L*, with no significant difference between the respective bleaching regimes (B: 68.23 / 72.48; C: 68.32 / 73.25). Six months after starting the trial, L*-values for group B yielded no significant differences compared to baseline (69.55), whereas L*-values for group C were still significantly raised (69.91), despite a highly significant decrease when compared to initial bleaching results. In both treatment groups, there was a lasting response to bleaching in terms of CIE-a* and -b* value decreases. Results for both home- and in-practice regimes were found to be similar for about 12 weeks. However, in-office results were longer lasting, despite the shorter treatment intervals. Summarized bleaching effects, in terms of delta E values, revealed no significant differences between treatment groups and the control group after 6 months, indicating an abatement of the bleaching results achieved.

  11. Presence of hydrogen peroxide, a source of hydroxyl radicals, in acid electrolyzed water.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Mokudai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acid electrolyzed water (AEW, which is produced through the electrolysis of dilute sodium chloride (NaCl or potassium chloride solution, is used as a disinfectant in various fields because of its potent antimicrobial activity. The hydroxyl radical, an oxygen radical species, is often suggested as a putative active ingredient for AEW antimicrobial activity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The aim of the present study is to detect hydroxyl radicals in AEW. The hydroxyl radicals in AEW prepared under different conditions were determined using an electron spin resonance (ESR technique. A signal from 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO-OH, an adduct of DMPO and the hydroxyl radical, was detected in AEW prepared by double or triple electrolyses of 1% NaCl but not of 0.1% NaCl solution. Then the presence of hydrogen peroxide as a proposed source of hydroxyl radicals was examined using a combination of ESR and a Fenton reaction. The DMPO-OH signal was clearly detected, even in AEW prepared by single electrolysis of 0.1% NaCl solution, when ferrous sulfate was added to induce a Fenton reaction, indicating the presence of hydrogen peroxide in the AEW. Since sodium formate, a hydroxyl radical scavenger, did not affect the bactericidal activity of AEW, it is concluded that the radical is unlikely to contribute to the antimicrobial activity of AEW, although a small amount of the radical is produced from hydrogen peroxide. Dimethyl sulfoxide, the other hydroxyl radical scavenger used in the present study, canceled the bactericidal activity of AEW, accompanied by complete depletion of free available chlorine, suggesting that hypochlorous acid is probably a major contributor to the antimicrobial activity. CONCLUSIONS: It is strongly suggested that although hydrogen peroxide is present in AEW as a source of hydroxyl radicals, the antimicrobial activity of AEW does not depend on these radicals.

  12. Upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor by hydrogen peroxide in human colon cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Wei Zhu; Bao-Ming Yu; Yu-Bao Ji; Ming-Hua Zheng; Dong-Hua Li

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the effect of reactive oxygen species suchas hydrogen peroxide on the progression of human coloncancer.METHODS: Human colon carcinoma cell lines, LS174T andHCT8, were treated respectively with 10- 5,10- 7 or 10- 9 mol@L- 1 hydrogen peroxide for 24h, and co-cultured with humanendothelial cell line ECV-304. The migration of ECV-304induced by cancer cells was calculated and the expressionlevel of vascular endothelial growth factor in cancer cellswas determined by RT-PCR analysis and ELISA.Dactinomycin of 1.5mg@ L-1 which could block transcriptionof cancer cells was applied to observe the effects of H2O2 ontranscriptional activity and the relative half-life of VEGFmRNA. Finally, to evaluate the effect H2O2 on NF-κB activityin colon cancer cells, NF-κB in cytoplasm and nucleus of thecells were detected with FITC-tagged antibody and itspresence in the nucleus (Fn ) Vs cytoplasm ( Fc ) wasmonitored by measuring the green fluorescence integratedover the nucleus by laser scanning cytometry(LSC).RESULTS: Exogenouse hydrogen peroxide of lowconcentration increased the migration of endothelial cellsinduced by colon cancer cells. When cancer cells weretreated with 10-5 mol@ L-1 H2O2, the migration number ofendothelial cells induced by LS174T cells was 203 ± 70, andthe number induced by HCT8 cells was 145 ± 65. The twovalues were significantly higher than those treated with otherconcentrations of h2O2 ( P < 0.01 ). The expression ofvascular endothelial growth factor in cancer cells, whichcould be blocked by dactinomycin, were increased to acertain degree, while the relative half-life of VEGF mRNAwas not prolonged after treatment with hydrogen peroxide.The activity of NF-κB in colon cells rose after the cells wereexposed to hydrogen peroxide for 24h. The Fn values inHCT8 cells were 91 ± 13 (0 mol@ L- 1 h2O2) and 149 ± 40( 10-5mol@L-1 h2O2) ( P< 0.05), in LS174T cells were 127 ± 35(0mol@L-1 H2O2) and 192± 11(10-5 mol@L-1 h2O2) (P< 0.05).lt is similar

  13. The Inhibitory Effect of PIK-75 on Inflammatory Mediator Response Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide in Feline Esophageal Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Yeong Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Isoform-selective inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K activation have an anti-inflammatory effect by reducing proinflammatory cytokines. Cultured feline esophageal epithelial cells (EEC of passages 3~4 were treated with hydrogen peroxide and PIK-75. The cell viability was measured by a MTT incorporation assay. The distribution of PI3K isoforms, p-Akt, IL-1β, and IL-8 was inferred from Western blots. The release of IL-6 was determined by ELISA. The cell morphology was not considerably different from nontreated cells if the cells were pretreated with PIK-75 and treated with 300 μM hydrogen peroxide. The density of p110α of PI3K was increased, but that of other types was not affected after the treatment with hydrogen peroxide. The density of p-Akt, when the cells were exposed to PIK-75 and hydrogen peroxide, was diminished dose dependently more than that of hydrogen peroxide treatment only. The decrease of p-Akt showed an inhibition of PI3K by PIK-75. PIK-75 dose dependently reduced the expression of IL-1β, IL-8, and the level of IL-6 compared with hydrogen peroxide treatment only. These results suggest evidence that p110α mediates esophageal inflammation and that PIK-75 has an anti-inflammatory effect by reducing proinflammatory cytokines on feline esophageal epithelial cultured cells.

  14. Hydrogenation of liquid natural rubber via diimide reduction in hydrazine hydrate/hydrogen peroxide system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusof, Muhammad Jefri Mohd; Jamaluddin, Naharullah; Abdullah, Ibrahim; Yusoff, Siti Fairus M. [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-09-25

    Liquid natural rubber (LNR) with molecular weight of lower than 10{sup 5} and shorter polymeric chain than natural rubber was prepared. LNR was then hydrogenated via diimide reduction by oxidation of hydrazine hydrate with hydrogen peroxide. The unsaturated units of the rubber were converted into saturated hydrocarbon to strengthen the backbone of the polymer so it was able to resist thermal degradation. The results indicated that hydrogenation degree of the product (HLNR) could be extended to 91.2% conversion under appropriate conditions. The hydrogenated LNR (HLNR) was characterized using Fourier-Transform Infrared (FTIR) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The physical characteristics of HLNR were analyzed with Termogravimetric Analysis (TGA)

  15. THE EFFECT OF TRANSITION METAL IONS-IRON ON HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YumengZhao; ShuhuiYang; LiangSheng; YonghaoNi

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide bleaching has been extensivelyused in high-yield pulp bleaching. Unfortunately,hydrogen peroxide can be decomposed underalkaline condition, especially when transition metalions exit. Experiments show that the valence oftransition metal ion is also responsible for thedecomposition of hydrogen peroxide.Iron ions are present in two oxidation states, Fe2+ andFe3+. They are both catalytically active to hydrogenperoxide decomposition. Because Fe3+ is brown, itcan affect the brightness of pulp directly, it can alsocombine with phenol, forming complexes which notonly are stable structures and are difficult to beremoved from pulp, but also significantly affect thebrightness of pulp because of their color.Sodium silicate and magnesium sulfate, when usedtogether, can greatly decrease hydrogen peroxidedecomposition. The optimum dosage of sodiumsilicate is about 0.1% (on solution) for Fe2~ and0.25% (on solution) for Fe3~. Adding chelants such asDTPA or EDTA with stabilizers simultaneously canobviously improve pulp brightness. For iron ions, thechelate effect of DTPA is better than that of EDTA.Under acidic conditions, sodium hyposulfite andcellulose can reduce Fe3+ to Fez+ effectively, and pulpbrightness is improved greatly. Adding sodiumthiosulfate simultaneously with magnesium sulfate,sodium silicate, and DTPA to alkaline peroxidesolution can result in higher brightness of pulp.pH is a key parameter during hydrogen peroxidebleaching, the optimum pH value should be 10.5-12.

  16. Oxidative Stress and Modulatory effects of the root extract of Phlogacanthus tubiflorus on the activity of Glutathione-S-Transferase in Hydrogen Peroxide treated Lymphocyte

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramteke A

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Glutathione-S-transferase is one of the important enzyme systems that plays vital role in decomposition of lipid hydro-peroxides formed due to oxidative stress. In the present study GST activity increased in the lymphocytes treated with increasing concentration of H2O2, and decrease in the levels of GSH was observed. For similar treatment conditions LDH activity and MDA levels increased significantly leading to decrease in the cell viability. Treatment of lymphocytes with the root extract of Phlogacanthus tubiflorus (PTE resulted in dose dependent decline in the GST activity and rise in GSH levels. LDH activity and MDA levels also declined that led to the increase of cell viability. Lymphocytes pre-treated with the PTE followed by H2O2 (0.1 and 1% treatment, decline in the activity of GST and increase in GSH levels was observed. Also we have observed decline in the activity of LDH and MDA levels in the lymphocytes for both 0.1 and 1% of H2O2 though the magnitude of change was higher in the lymphocytes pre-treated with the PTE followed with 1% of H2O2 treatment. Significant increase in the cell viability for similar conditions was also observed. These findings suggest protective function of the root extracts might be through modulation of GST activity and levels of GSH and might find application in Chemomodulation in future.

  17. Evaluation of vaporized hydrogen peroxide, Citrox and pH neutral Ecasol for decontamination of an enclosed area: a pilot study.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Galvin, S

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide, Ecasol and Citrox aerosols were each tested for their ability to kill a range of nosocomial pathogens. Hydrogen peroxide had the broadest microbicidal activity but operational issues limit its use. Ecasol was effective against all micro-organisms, except Clostridium difficile, while Citrox aerosols were not effective against Gram-negative bacilli.

  18. BIOSORPTION OF CONGO RED BY HYDROGEN PEROXIDE TREATED TENDU WASTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. K. Nagda ، V. S. Ghole

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Solid wastes from agro-industrial operations can be recycled as non-conventional adsorbents if they are inert and harmless and reduce the cost of wastewater treatment. Tendu leaf Diospyros melanoxylon is the second largest forest product in India after timber and is exclusively used in making local cigarette called Bidi. Waste leaf cutting remaining after making cigarette was used in present study as a biosorbent for the removal of Congo red dye from aqueous solution. It was treated with hydrogen peroxide to obtain biosorbent with increased adsorption capacity. Batch type experiments were conducted to study the influence of different parameters such as pH, initial dye concentration and dosage of adsorbent on biosorption evaluated. The adsorption occured very fast initially and attains equilibrium within 60 min at pH= 6.2 and the equilibrium attained faster after hydrogen peroxide modification. Kinetic studies showed that the biosorption of Congo red on tendu waste followed pseudo-second-order rate equation. The data fitted well to Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm models. Comparison was done on the extent of biosorption between untreated and treated forms of the tendu waste. The maximum adsorption capacity for untreated tendu waste was found to be 46.95 mg/g, which was enhanced by 2.8 times after hydrogen peroxide treatment and was found to be 134.4 mg/g. The adsorption process was in conformity with Freundlich and Langmuir isotherms for Congo red adsorption from aqueous solution. The study demonstrated use of milder chemical treatment of tendu waste to obtain a biosorbent with enhanced dye removal capacity.

  19. Efficacy of hydrogen peroxide for treating saprolegniasis in channel catfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, G.E.; Gingerich, W.H.; Dawson, V.K.; Olson, J.J.

    1999-01-01

    Hatchery-reared fish and their eggs are commonly afflicted with saprolegniasis, a fungal disease that can cause significant losses in production. Fish culturists need safe and effective fungicides to minimize losses and meet production demands. The efficacy of hydrogen peroxide was evaluated for preventing or controlling mortality associated with saprolegniasis in channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus. Saprolegniasis was systematically induced in channel catfish so various therapies could be evaluated in a controlled laboratory environment. Both prophylactic and therapeutic hydrogen peroxide bath treatments of 50, 100, and 150 ??L/L for 1 h were administered every other day for seven total treatments. All untreated positive control fish died of saprolegniasis during the prophylactic and therapeutic tests. Hydrogen peroxide treatments of 150 ??L/L were harmful (relative to lower concentrations) to test fish and resulted in 73-95% mortality. Mortality was attributed to a combination of abrasion, temperature, chemical treatment, and disease stressors. Treatments of 100 ??L/L were less harmful (relatively) but also appeared to contribute to mortality (60-79%). These treatments, however, significantly reduced the incidence of mortality and infection compared with those observed for fish of the positive control or 150-??L/L treatment groups. Overall, treatments of 50 ??L/L were found to be the most safe and effective of those tested. Mortality with this concentration ranged from 16% in therapeutic tests to 41% in prophylactic tests. The statistical model employed estimated that the optimum treatment concentration for preventing or controlling mortality, reducing the incidence of infections, and enhancing the recovery of infected fish was 75 ??L H2O2/L.

  20. Vapor hydrogen peroxide as alternative to dry heat microbial reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, S.; Kern, R.; Koukol, R.; Barengoltz, J.; Cash, H.

    2008-09-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), in conjunction with the NASA Planetary Protection Officer, has selected vapor phase hydrogen peroxide (VHP) sterilization process for continued development as a NASA approved sterilization technique for spacecraft subsystems and systems. The goal was to include this technique, with an appropriate specification, in NASA Procedural Requirements 8020.12 as a low-temperature complementary technique to the dry heat sterilization process. The VHP process is widely used by the medical industry to sterilize surgical instruments and biomedical devices, but high doses of VHP may degrade the performance of flight hardware, or compromise material compatibility. The goal for this study was to determine the minimum VHP process conditions for planetary protection acceptable microbial reduction levels. Experiments were conducted by the STERIS Corporation, under contract to JPL, to evaluate the effectiveness of vapor hydrogen peroxide for the inactivation of the standard spore challenge, Geobacillus stearothermophilus. VHP process parameters were determined that provide significant reductions in spore viability while allowing survival of sufficient spores for statistically significant enumeration. In addition to the obvious process parameters of interest: hydrogen peroxide concentration, number of injection cycles, and exposure duration, the investigation also considered the possible effect on lethality of environmental parameters: temperature, absolute humidity, and material substrate. This study delineated a range of test sterilizer process conditions: VHP concentration, process duration, a process temperature range for which the worst case D-value may be imposed, a process humidity range for which the worst case D-value may be imposed, and the dependence on selected spacecraft material substrates. The derivation of D-values from the lethality data permitted conservative planetary protection recommendations.

  1. Direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from plasma-water interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Jiandi Liu; Bangbang He; Qiang Chen; Junshuai Li; Qing Xiong; Guanghui Yue; Xianhui Zhang; Size Yang; Hai Liu; Qing Huo Liu

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is usually considered to be an important reagent in green chemistry since water is the only by-product in H2O2 involved oxidation reactions. Early studies show that direct synthesis of H2O2 by plasma-water interactions is possible, while the factors affecting the H2O2 production in this method remain unclear. Herein, we present a study on the H2O2 synthesis by atmospheric pressure plasma-water interactions. The results indicate that the most important factors for the ...

  2. Hydrogen peroxide-based propulsion and power systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melof, Brian Matthew; Keese, David L.; Ingram, Brian V.; Grubelich, Mark Charles; Ruffner, Judith Alison; Escapule, William Rusty

    2004-04-01

    Less toxic, storable, hypergolic propellants are desired to replace nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) and hydrazine in certain applications. Hydrogen peroxide is a very attractive replacement oxidizer, but finding acceptable replacement fuels is more challenging. The focus of this investigation is to find fuels that have short hypergolic ignition delays, high specific impulse, and desirable storage properties. The resulting hypergolic fuel/oxidizer combination would be highly desirable for virtually any high energy-density applications such as small but powerful gas generating systems, attitude control motors, or main propulsion. These systems would be implemented on platforms ranging from guided bombs to replacement of environmentally unfriendly existing systems to manned space vehicles.

  3. Petroleum Contaminated Soil Treatment Using Surfactant and Hydrogen Peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilza Lobo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The process of washing soil with surfactants, sodium lauryl ether sulphate (LESS and sodium lauryl sulphate (SDS was combined with chemical oxidation using hydrogen peroxide, with a view to in situ remediation of clay soil contaminated with hydrocarbons oil. The evaluation of the efficiency of the procedure was the removal of polyaromatic hydrocarbons and the comparison of physical and chemical characteristics of contaminated soil and uncontaminated from the same region. The combination of these two techniques, soil washing and application of an oxidizing agent, presented as a process of effective remediation for soils contaminated with petroleum products in subtropical regions.

  4. Hydrogen sulfide protects HUVECs against hydrogen peroxide induced mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Dan Wen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Hydrogen sulfide (H₂S has been shown to have cytoprotective effects in models of hypertension, ischemia/reperfusion and Alzheimer's disease. However, little is known about its effects or mechanisms of action in atherosclerosis. Therefore, in the current study we evaluated the pharmacological effects of H₂S on antioxidant defenses and mitochondria protection against hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂ induced endothelial cells damage. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: H₂S, at non-cytotoxic levels, exerts a concentration dependent protective effect in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs exposed to H₂O₂. Analysis of ATP synthesis, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm and cytochrome c release from mitochondria indicated that mitochondrial function was preserved by pretreatment with H₂S. In contrast, in H₂O₂ exposed endothelial cells mitochondria appeared swollen or ruptured. In additional experiments, H₂S was also found to preserve the activities and protein expressions levels of the antioxidants enzymes, superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione-S-transferase in H₂O₂ exposed cells. ROS and lipid peroxidation, as assessed by measuring H₂DCFDA, dihydroethidium (DHE, diphenyl-l-pyrenylphosphine (DPPP and malonaldehyde (MDA levels, were also inhibited by H₂S treatment. Interestingly, in the current model, D, L-propargylglycine (PAG, a selective inhibitor of cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE, abolished the protective effects of H₂S donors. INNOVATION: This study is the first to show that H₂S can inhibit H₂O₂ mediated mitochondrial dysfunction in human endothelial cells by preserving antioxidant defences. SIGNIFICANCE: H₂S may protect against atherosclerosis by preventing H₂O₂ induced injury to endothelial cells. These effects appear to be mediated via the preservation of mitochondrial function and by reducing the deleterious effects of oxidative stress.

  5. Protective effects of Rheum tanguticum polysaccharide against hydrogen peroxide-induced intestinal epithelial cell injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin-Na Liu; Qi-Bing Mei; Li Liu; Feng Zhang; Zhen-Guo Liu; Zhi-Peng Wang; Ru-Tao Wang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To describe the effect of Rheum tanguticum polysaccharide (RTP) on hydrogen peroxide-induced human intestinal epithelial cell injury.METHODS: Hydrogen peroxide (100 μmol/L) was introduced to induce human intestinal epithelial cell injury.Cells were pretreated with RTP (30,100,300 μg/mL) for 24 h before exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Cell viability was detected by MTr assay and morphological observation.Acridine orange staining and flow cytometry were performed to assess cell apoptosis. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, production of malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity were measured by spectrophotometry with corresponding assay kits.RESULTS: Following exposure to H2O2, a marked decrease in cell survival and SOD activity, increased production of MDA, LDH leakage and cell apoptosis were found.Pretreatment of the cells with RTP could significantly elevate cell survival, SOD activity and decrease the level of MDA, LDH activity and cell apoptosis.CONCLUSION: RTP may have cytoprotective and antioxidant effects against H2O2-induced intestinal epithelial cell injury by inhibiting cell apoptosis and necrosis. This might be one of the possible mechanisms of RTP for the treatment of ulcerative colitis in rats.

  6. A high-throughput microtiter plate based method for the determination of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karson S Putt

    Full Text Available Peracetic acid is gaining usage in numerous industries who have found a myriad of uses for its antimicrobial activity. However, rapid high throughput quantitation methods for peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide are lacking. Herein, we describe the development of a high-throughput microtiter plate based assay based upon the well known and trusted titration chemical reactions. The adaptation of these titration chemistries to rapid plate based absorbance methods for the sequential determination of hydrogen peroxide specifically and the total amount of peroxides present in solution are described. The results of these methods were compared to those of a standard titration and found to be in good agreement. Additionally, the utility of the developed method is demonstrated through the generation of degradation curves of both peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide in a mixed solution.

  7. A high-throughput microtiter plate based method for the determination of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putt, Karson S; Pugh, Randall B

    2013-01-01

    Peracetic acid is gaining usage in numerous industries who have found a myriad of uses for its antimicrobial activity. However, rapid high throughput quantitation methods for peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide are lacking. Herein, we describe the development of a high-throughput microtiter plate based assay based upon the well known and trusted titration chemical reactions. The adaptation of these titration chemistries to rapid plate based absorbance methods for the sequential determination of hydrogen peroxide specifically and the total amount of peroxides present in solution are described. The results of these methods were compared to those of a standard titration and found to be in good agreement. Additionally, the utility of the developed method is demonstrated through the generation of degradation curves of both peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide in a mixed solution.

  8. Quantification of peroxide ion passage in dentin, enamel, and cementum after internal bleaching with hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palo, R M; Bonetti-Filho, I; Valera, M C; Camargo, C H R; Camargo, Sea; Moura-Netto, C; Pameijer, C

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount of peroxide passage from the pulp chamber to the external enamel surface during the internal bleaching technique. Fifty bovine teeth were sectioned transversally 5 mm below the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ), and the remaining part of the root was sealed with a 2-mm layer of glass ionomer cement. The external surface of the samples was coated with nail varnish, with the exception of standardized circular areas (6-mm diameter) located on the enamel, exposed dentin, or cementum surface of the tooth. The teeth were divided into three experimental groups according to exposed areas close to the CEJ and into two control groups (n=10/group), as follows: GE, enamel exposure area; GC, cementum exposed area; GD, dentin exposed area; Negative control, no presence of internal bleaching agent and uncoated surface; and Positive control, pulp chamber filled with bleaching agent and external surface totally coated with nail varnish. The pulp chamber was filled with 35% hydrogen peroxide (Opalescence Endo, Ultradent). Each sample was placed inside of individual flasks with 1000 μL of acetate buffer solution, 2 M (pH 4.5). After seven days, the buffer solution was transferred to a glass tube, in which 100 μL of leuco-crystal violet and 50 μL of horseradish peroxidase were added, producing a blue solution. The optical density of the blue solution was determined by spectrophotometer and converted into microgram equivalents of hydrogen peroxide. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn-Bonferroni tests (α=0.05). All experimental groups presented passage of peroxide to the external surface that was statistically different from that observed in the control groups. It was verified that the passage of peroxide was higher in GD than in GE (pperoxide passage than did GD and GE (pperoxide placed into the pulp chamber passed through the dental hard tissues, reaching the external surface and the periodontal tissue. The cementum surface

  9. STUDY OF AZOSPIRILLUM LECTINS INFLUENCE ON HYDROGEN PEROXIDE PRODUCTION IN WHEAT-ROOTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alen’kina S.A.

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available It was found that two cell-surface lectins isolated from the nitrogen-fixing soil bacterium Azospirillum brasilense Sp7 and from its mutant defective in lectin activity, A. brasilense Sp7.2.3 can stimulate rapid formation of hydrogen peroxide, associated with an increase in the activities of oxalate oxidase and peroxidase in the roots of wheat seedlings. The most advantageous and most rapidly induced pathway of hydrogen peroxide formation was the oxidation of oxalic acid by oxalate oxidase because in this case, a 10-min treatment of the roots with the lectins at 10 µg ml-1 was sufficient. The data from this study attest that the Azospirillum lectins can act as inducers of adaptation processes in the roots of wheat seedlings.

  10. An Investigation into the Effect of Stabiliser Content on the Minimum Characteristic Chamber Length for Homogeneously-Catalysed Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    rate. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Hydrogen peroxide, high test peroxide, HTP , rocket grade hydrogen peroxide, RGHP, stabilized hydrogen...homogeneous catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (often referred to as ’high test peroxide’, or HTP - here used in a general sense to...207< Tc < 516 deg C, depending on the HTP concentration. 3. THE TEST RIG DELTACAT Ltd runs a small test -site in Hampshire, England. Recently

  11. Differential regulation of epidermal growth factor receptor by hydrogen peroxide and flagellin in cultured lung alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishi, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Noriko; Izumi, Shunsuke; Higa-Nakamine, Sayomi; Toku, Seikichi; Kakinohana, Manabu; Sugahara, Kazuhiro; Yamamoto, Hideyuki

    2015-02-05

    In previous studies, we found that stimulation of Toll-like receptor 5 (TLR5) by flagellin induced the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-activated protein kinase-2 (MAPKAPK-2) through activation of the p38 MAPK pathway in cultured alveolar epithelial A549 cells. Our studies strongly suggested that MAPKAPK-2 phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) at Ser1047. It has been reported that phosphorylation of Ser1047 after treatment with tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) induced the internalization of EGFR. In the present study, we first found that treatment of A549 cells with hydrogen peroxide induced the activation of MAPKAPK-2 and phosphorylation of EGFR at Ser1047 within 30 min. This was different from flagellin treatment because hydrogen peroxide treatment induced the phosphorylation of EGFR at Tyr1173 as well as Ser1047, indicating the activation of EGFR. We also found that KN93, an inhibitor of CaM kinase II, inhibited the hydrogen peroxide-induced phosphorylation of EGFR at Ser1047 through inhibition of the activation of the p38 MAPK pathway. Furthermore, we examined the internalization of EGFR by three different methods. Flow cytometry with an antibody against the extracellular domain of EGFR and biotinylation of cell surface proteins revealed that flagellin, but not hydrogen peroxide, decreased the amount of cell-surface EGFR. In addition, activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase by EGF treatment was reduced by flagellin pre-treatment. These results strongly suggested that hydrogen peroxide activated the p38 MAPK pathway via activation of CaM kinase II and that flagellin and hydrogen peroxide regulate the functions of EGFR by different mechanisms.

  12. Hydrogen peroxide sensing, signaling and regulation of transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Susana Marinho

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The regulatory mechanisms by which hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 modulates the activity of transcription factors in bacteria (OxyR and PerR, lower eukaryotes (Yap1, Maf1, Hsf1 and Msn2/4 and mammalian cells (AP-1, NRF2, CREB, HSF1, HIF-1, TP53, NF-κB, NOTCH, SP1 and SCREB-1 are reviewed. The complexity of regulatory networks increases throughout the phylogenetic tree, reaching a high level of complexity in mammalians. Multiple H2O2 sensors and pathways are triggered converging in the regulation of transcription factors at several levels: (1 synthesis of the transcription factor by upregulating transcription or increasing both mRNA stability and translation; (ii stability of the transcription factor by decreasing its association with the ubiquitin E3 ligase complex or by inhibiting this complex; (iii cytoplasm–nuclear traffic by exposing/masking nuclear localization signals, or by releasing the transcription factor from partners or from membrane anchors; and (iv DNA binding and nuclear transactivation by modulating transcription factor affinity towards DNA, co-activators or repressors, and by targeting specific regions of chromatin to activate individual genes. We also discuss how H2O2 biological specificity results from diverse thiol protein sensors, with different reactivity of their sulfhydryl groups towards H2O2, being activated by different concentrations and times of exposure to H2O2. The specific regulation of local H2O2 concentrations is also crucial and results from H2O2 localized production and removal controlled by signals. Finally, we formulate equations to extract from typical experiments quantitative data concerning H2O2 reactivity with sensor molecules. Rate constants of 140 M−1 s−1 and ≥1.3 × 103 M−1 s−1 were estimated, respectively, for the reaction of H2O2 with KEAP1 and with an unknown target that mediates NRF2 protein synthesis. In conclusion, the multitude of H2O2 targets and mechanisms provides an opportunity for

  13. Using Isothermal Microcalorimetry to Determine Compatibility of Structural Materials with High Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostowski, Rudy; Villegas, Yvonne; Nwosisi, Genne

    2003-01-01

    High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) propellant (greater than or equal to 70%) offers many advantages in space launch applications; however, materials used in construction of propulsion systems must be shown to be compatible with HTP. Isothermal Microcalorimetry (IMC) was used to determine the compatibility of several metallic and non-metallic materials with 90% HTP. The results of these experiments agreed with those from immersion bath tests when the values were converted to %Active Oxygen Loss per week (%AOL/wk).

  14. Photoluminescence of MoS2 quantum dots quenched by hydrogen peroxide: A fluorescent sensor for hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Zhixing; Gui, Qingfeng; Shan, Yun; Pan, Pengfei; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Lifa

    2016-09-01

    By cutting MoS2 microcrystals to quantum dots (QDs) of sizes below 10 nm, the photoluminescence (PL) at ca. 450 nm can be detected easily due to the quantum confinement effects across the 2D planes. The PL is stable under continuous irradiation of UV light but gradually quenches when treated with an increasing concentration of hydrogen peroxide. Time-resolved PL and Raman spectra imply that H2O2 causes the partial oxidation of MoS2 QDs. First-principles calculations reveal that the MoS2 QDs with oxygen impurity are of indirect bandgap structures showing no notable PL. And absorption spectra verify that the PL of MoS2 QDs quenched by H2O2 is attributed to the oxidation. The integrated PL intensity and H2O2 concentration show an exponential relationship in the range of 2-20 μM, suggesting that MoS2 QDs are potential fluorescent probes for hydrogen peroxide sensing in a physiological environment.

  15. Uranium- and thorium-doped graphene for efficient oxygen and hydrogen peroxide reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofer, Zdeněk; Jankovský, Ondřej; Šimek, Petr; Klímová, Kateřina; Macková, Anna; Pumera, Martin

    2014-07-22

    Oxygen reduction and hydrogen peroxide reduction are technologically important reactions in the fields of energy generation and sensing. Metal-doped graphenes, where metal serves as the catalytic center and graphene as the high area conductor, have been used as electrocatalysts for such applications. In this paper, we investigated the use of uranium-graphene and thorium-graphene hybrids prepared by a simple and scalable method. The hybrids were synthesized by the thermal exfoliation of either uranium- or thorium-doped graphene oxide in various atmospheres. The synthesized graphene hybrids were characterized by high-resolution XPS, SEM, SEM-EDS, combustible elemental analysis, and Raman spectroscopy. The influence of dopant and exfoliation atmosphere on electrocatalytic activity was determined by electrochemical measurements. Both hybrids exhibited excellent electrocatalytic properties toward oxygen and hydrogen peroxide reduction, suggesting that actinide-based graphene hybrids have enormous potential for use in energy conversion and sensing devices.

  16. Electrocatalysis of hydrogen peroxide reactions on perovskite oxides: experiment versus kinetic modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poux, T; Bonnefont, A; Ryabova, A; Kéranguéven, G; Tsirlina, G A; Savinova, E R

    2014-07-21

    Hydrogen peroxide has been identified as a stable intermediate of the electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction on various electrodes including metal, metal oxide and carbon materials. In this article we study the hydrogen peroxide oxidation and reduction reactions in alkaline medium using a rotating disc electrode (RDE) method on oxides of the perovskite family (LaCoO3, LaMnO3 and La0.8Sr0.2MnO3) which are considered as promising electrocatalytic materials for the cathode of liquid and solid alkaline fuel cells. The experimental findings, such as the higher activity of Mn-compared to that of Co-perovskites, the shape of RDE curves, and the influence of the H2O2 concentration, are rationalized with the help of a microkinetic model.

  17. Non-enzymatic hydrogen peroxide sensor based on Co3O4 nanocubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guang Sheng Cao; Lei Wang; Pengfei Yuan; Chao Gao; Xiaojuan Liu; Tong Li; Tianmin Li

    2014-10-01

    The Co3O4 nanocubes were prepared by using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as oxidant, Co(NO3)2. 6H2O as a cobalt source. The products were characterized in detail by multiform techniques: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The prepared Co3O4 nanocubes were applied to study the electrocatalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in 0.01 M pH 7.0 phosphate buffer medium. The Co3O4 nanocubes exhibit remarkable electrocatalytic activity for H2O2 reduction. Furthermore, the obtained Co3O4 nanocubes have been employed as electrode materials for electrochemical sensing H2O2.

  18. Gardenia jasminoides extract-capped gold nanoparticles reverse hydrogen peroxide-induced premature senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Seon Yeong; Park, Sun Young; Park, Jin Oh; Lee, Kyu Jin; Park, Geuntae

    2016-11-01

    This study reports a green approach for synthesis of gold nanoparticles using Gardenia jasminoides extract, and specifically, can potentially enhance anti senescence activity. Biological synthesis of gold nanoparticles is ecofriendly and effective for the development of environmentally sustainable nanoparticles compared with existing methods. Here, we developed a simple, fast, efficient, and ecofriendly approach to the synthesis of gold nanoparticles by means of a Gardenia jasminoides extract. These G. jasminoides extract-capped gold nanoparticles (GJ-GNPs) were characterized by UV-vis, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Furrier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The synthesized GJ-GNPs turned red and showed maximal absorbance at 540nm. Thus, GJ-GNPs were synthesized successfully. We hypothesized that GJ-GNPs would protect ARPE19 cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced premature senescence. SA-β-gal activity was elevated in hydrogen peroxide-treated cells, however, this effect was attenuated by GJ-GNP treatment. Moreover, compared with the normal control, hydrogen peroxide treatment significantly increased lysosome content of the cells and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). GJ-GNPs effectively attenuated the increase in lysosome content and ROS production in these senescent cells. According to cell cycle analysis, G2/M arrest was promoted by hydrogen peroxide treatment in ARPE19 cells, however, this change was reversed by GJ-GNPs. Western blot analysis showed that treatment with GJ-GNPs increased the expression of p53, p21, SIRT3, HO-1, and NQO1 in senescent cells. Our findings should advance the understanding of premature senescence and may lead to therapeutic use of GJ-GNPs in retina-related regenerative medicine.

  19. How hydrogen peroxide is metabolized by oxidized cytochrome c oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jancura, Daniel; Stanicova, Jana; Palmer, Graham; Fabian, Marian

    2014-06-10

    In the absence of external electron donors, oxidized bovine cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) exhibits the ability to decompose excess H2O2. Depending on the concentration of peroxide, two mechanisms of degradation were identified. At submillimolar peroxide concentrations, decomposition proceeds with virtually no production of superoxide and oxygen. In contrast, in the millimolar H2O2 concentration range, CcO generates superoxide from peroxide. At submillimolar concentrations, the decomposition of H2O2 occurs at least at two sites. One is the catalytic heme a3-CuB center where H2O2 is reduced to water. During the interaction of the enzyme with H2O2, this center cycles back to oxidized CcO via the intermediate presence of two oxoferryl states. We show that at pH 8.0 two molecules of H2O2 react with the catalytic center accomplishing one cycle. In addition, the reactions at the heme a3-CuB center generate the surface-exposed lipid-based radical(s) that participates in the decomposition of peroxide. It is also found that the irreversible decline of the catalytic activity of the enzyme treated with submillimolar H2O2 concentrations results specifically from the decrease in the rate of electron transfer from heme a to the heme a3-CuB center during the reductive phase of the catalytic cycle. The rates of electron transfer from ferrocytochrome c to heme a and the kinetics of the oxidation of the fully reduced CcO with O2 were not affected in the peroxide-modified CcO.

  20. Contact Lens Solutions With Hydrogen Peroxide: To Avoid Injury, Follow All Instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... should never put hydrogen peroxide directly into your eyes or on your contact lenses,” Lepri says. That’s because this kind of solution ... for Solutions With Hydrogen Peroxide Talk to your eye-care provider ... for your contact lenses. Never change your lens-care system before consulting ...

  1. Role of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical in pyrite oxidation by molecular oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonen, Martin A. A.; Harrington, Andrea D.; Laffers, Richard; Strongin, Daniel R.

    2010-09-01

    Hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical are readily formed during the oxidation of pyrite with molecular oxygen over a wide range of pH conditions. However, pretreatment of the pyrite surface influences how much of the intermediates are formed and their fate. Acid-washed pyrite produces significant amounts of hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radical when suspended in air-saturated water. However, the hydrogen peroxide concentration shows an exponential decrease with time. Suspensions made with partially oxidized pyrite yield significantly lower amounts of hydrogen peroxide product. The presence of Fe(III)-oxide or Fe(III)-hydroxide patches facilitates the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to oxygen and water. Hence, the degree to which a pyrite surface is covered with patches of Fe(III)-oxide or Fe(III)-hydroxide patches is an important control on the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in solution. Hydrogen peroxide appears to be an important intermediate in the four-electron transfer from pyrite to molecular oxygen. Addition of catalase, an enzyme that decomposes hydrogen peroxide to water and molecular oxygen, to a pyrite suspension reduces the oxidation rate by 40%. By contrast, hydroxyl radical does not appear to play a significant role in the oxidation mechanism. It is estimated on the basis of a molecular oxygen and sulfate mass balance that 5-6% of the molecular oxygen is consumed without forming sulfate.

  2. Effectiveness of improved hydrogen peroxide in decontaminating privacy curtains contaminated with multidrug-resistant pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutala, William A; Gergen, Maria F; Sickbert-Bennett, Emily E; Williams, David A; Weber, David J

    2014-04-01

    We tested the ability of an improved hydrogen peroxide solution to decontaminate privacy curtains in inpatient and outpatient areas. The microbial contamination of the curtains was assessed before and after the curtains were sprayed with improved hydrogen peroxide. The disinfectant reduced the microbial load on the privacy curtains by 96.8% in 37 patient rooms.

  3. Epoxidation of olefins and allylic alcohols with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by heteropoly acids in the presence of cetylpyridinium chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okabayashi, Takuji; Yamawaki, Kazumasa; Nishihara, Hideki; Yamada, Hiroshi; Ura, Toshikazu; Ishii, Yasutaka; Ogawa, Masaya

    1987-11-01

    The epoxidation of olefins and allylic alcohols with aqueous hydrogen peroxide could be achieved in good yield when 12-tungustophosphoric acid(WPA) was used with two phase condition using chloroform as the solvent. From the epoxidation result by 12-molybdophosphoric acid(MPA) and WPA catalysts, epoxidation activity of WPA catalyst was found to be remarkably higher than that of MPA. The rate of epoxidation by heteropoly acids catalyst depended markedly upon the activity of the reaction medium. Epoxidation of allylic alcohols with hydrogen peroxide proceeded under mild conditions, resulting good yield of epoxi-alcohols. Epoxidation of olefins by WPA/cetylpyridium chloride was confirmed to be promoted selectively with cheap and pure hydrogen peroxide, resulting good yield. (3 figs, 2 tabs, 18 refs)

  4. Determination of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide in the mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodiroga Milanka

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Iodometric and permanganometric titrations were used for determination of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 in the mixture. Two procedures were described and compared. Titrations could be done in only one vessel, in the same reaction mixture, when iodometric titration of peracetic acid was continued after the permanganometric titration of H2O2, (procedure A. Peracetic acid and H2O2, as oxidizing agents, reacted with potassium iodide in an acid medium, evolving iodine. This reaction was used for the quantitative iodometric determination of total peroxide in procedure B. H2O2 reacted with potassium permanganate in acid medium, but peracetic acid did not react under the same conditions. That made possible the selective permanganometric determination of H2O2 in the presence of peracetic acid. The procedure B was performed in two titration vessels (KV=3.4% for peracetic acid, 0.6% for H2O2. The procedure A for iodometric determination of peracetic acid in one titration vessel after permanganometric titration of H2O2 was recommended (KV=2,5% for peracetic acid, 0,45% for H2O2.

  5. Degradation of ethyl xanthate in flotation residues by hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈兴华; 胡岳华; 彭宏; 曹学锋

    2015-01-01

    The degradation behavior of ethyl xanthate (EX) salt was the most widely used collector in sulfide mineral flotation and emission of flotation tailings with residual EX was harmful to environment. In this work, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was investigated by UV-visible spectroscopy (UV/Vis) at different pH values from 3 to 12. For pH value from 5 to 12, EX was oxidized into ethyl per xanthate (EPX) by H2O2. Then EPX was further oxidized into thiosulfate (TS) salt rather than ethyl thiocarbonate (ETC) and this step was the reaction-limited step. Then depending on pH values, TS was degraded into sulphate and carbonate salts (pH>7) or elemental sulfur (pH3.0 during test time.

  6. Direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from plasma-water interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiandi; He, Bangbang; Chen, Qiang; Li, Junshuai; Xiong, Qing; Yue, Guanghui; Zhang, Xianhui; Yang, Size; Liu, Hai; Liu, Qing Huo

    2016-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is usually considered to be an important reagent in green chemistry since water is the only by-product in H2O2 involved oxidation reactions. Early studies show that direct synthesis of H2O2 by plasma-water interactions is possible, while the factors affecting the H2O2 production in this method remain unclear. Herein, we present a study on the H2O2 synthesis by atmospheric pressure plasma-water interactions. The results indicate that the most important factors for the H2O2 production are the processes taking place at the plasma-water interface, including sputtering, electric field induced hydrated ion emission, and evaporation. The H2O2 production rate reaches ~1200 μmol/h when the liquid cathode is purified water or an aqueous solution of NaCl with an initial conductivity of 10500 μS cm‑1.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide room disinfection--ready for prime time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttner, Benedikt D; Harbarth, Stephan

    2015-05-08

    Non-manual techniques for terminal disinfection of hospital rooms have gained increasing interest in recent years as means to reduce transmission of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs). A prospective crossover study by Blazejewski and colleagues in five ICUs of a French academic hospital with a high prevalence of MDRO carriers showed that two different hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-based non-touch disinfection techniques reduced environmental contamination with MDROs after routine cleaning. This study provides further evidence of the 'in use' bioburden reduction offered by these techniques. Before H2O2-based non-touch disinfection can be recommended for routine clinical use outside specific outbreak situations, further studies need to show whether the environmental contamination reduction provided by these techniques is clinically relevant and results in reduced cross-infections with MDROs.

  8. Gold-catalyzed oxidation of substituted phenols by hydrogen peroxide

    KAUST Repository

    Cheneviere, Yohan

    2010-10-20

    Gold nanoparticles deposited on inorganic supports are efficient catalysts for the oxidation of various substituted phenols (2,6-di-tert-butyl phenol and 2,3,6-trimethyl phenol) with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. By contrast to more conventional catalysts such as Ti-containing mesoporous silicas, which convert phenols to the corresponding benzoquinones, gold nanoparticles are very selective to biaryl compounds (3,3′,5,5′-tetra-tert-butyl diphenoquinone and 2,2′,3,3′,5,5′-hexamethyl-4,4′- biphenol, respectively). Products yields and selectivities depend on the solvent used, the best results being obtained in methanol with yields >98%. Au offers the possibility to completely change the selectivity in the oxidation of substituted phenols and opens interesting perspectives in the clean synthesis of biaryl compounds for pharmaceutical applications. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Temperature-dependent absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicovich, J. M.; Wine, P. H.

    1988-03-01

    Relative absorption cross sections for hydrogen peroxide vapor were measured over the temperature ranges 285-381 K for lambda = 230 nm-295 nm and 300-381 K for lambda = 193 nm-350 nm. The well established 298 K cross sections at 202.6 and 228.8 nm were used as an absolute calibration. A significant temperature dependence was observed at the important tropospheric photolysis wavelengths lambda over 300 nm. Measured cross sections were extrapolated to lower temperatures, using a simple model which attributes the observed temperature dependence to enhanced absorption by molecules possessing one quantum of O-O stretch vibrational excitation. Upper tropospheric photodissociation rates calculated using the extrapolated cross sections are about 25 percent lower than those calculated using currently recommended 298 K cross sections.

  10. Chemiluminescent Nanomicelles for Imaging Hydrogen Peroxide and Self-Therapy in Photodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide is a signal molecule of the tumor, and its overproduction makes a higher concentration in tumor tissue compared to normal tissue. Based on the fact that peroxalates can make chemiluminescence with a high efficiency in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, we developed nanomicelles composed of peroxalate ester oligomers and fluorescent dyes, called peroxalate nanomicelles (POMs, which could image hydrogen peroxide with high sensitivity and stability. The potential application of the POMs in photodynamic therapy (PDT for cancer was also investigated. It was found that the PDT-drug-loaded POMs were sensitive to hydrogen peroxide, and the PDT drug could be stimulated by the chemiluminescence from the reaction between POMs and hydrogen peroxide, which carried on a self-therapy of the tumor without the additional laser light resource.

  11. Controlled leaching with prolonged activity for Co-LDH supported catalyst during treatment of organic dyes using bicarbonate activation of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jawad, Ali; Li, Yibing; Lu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Zhuqi; Liu, Weidong; Yin, Guochuan

    2015-05-30

    The effluents from industries are commonly non-biodegradable and produce various hazardous intermediate products by chemical reactions that have direct impact on environment. In the present investigation, a series of Co-Mg/AL ternary LDH catalysts with fixed Mg/Al ratio were prepared by co-precipitation method. The effect of Co on the activity of the catalyst was monitored on the degradation of methylene blue (MB) as model compound at batch level using bicarbonate activation of H2O2 (BAP) system. On bench level, the best CoMgAl-4 catalyst can completely decolorize both methylene blue (MB) and methylene orange (MO) in short time, while in fixed bed, the catalyst was found stable for over 300 h with nearly 100% decolorization and excellent chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal. No leaching of Co was detected for the entire fixed experiment which may be accounted for long life stability and good activity of the catalyst. The ternary LDH catalysts were characterized by AES, XRD, FTIR, BET, and SEM for its compositional, phase structure, optical properties, textural, and surface morphology respectively. The XRD analysis confirmed characteristic pattern of hydrotalcite like structures without impurity phases. The formation of superoxide and hydroxyl radical as ROS was proposed with CoMgAl-4 by radical's scavengers.

  12. Development of hydrogen peroxide technique for bioburden reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, N.; Schwartz, L.; Stabekis, P.; Barengoltz, J.

    In order to meet the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Planetary Protection microbial reduction requirements for Mars in-situ life detection and sample return missions, entire planetary spacecraft (including planetary entry probes and planetary landing capsules) may have to be exposed to a qualified sterilization process. Presently, dry heat is the only NASA approved sterilization technique available for spacecraft application. However, with the increasing use of various man-made materials, highly sophisticated electronic circuit boards, and sensors in a modern spacecraft, compatibility issues may render this process unacceptable to design engineers and thus impractical to achieve terminal sterilization of the entire spacecraft. An alternative vapor phase hydrogen peroxide sterilization process, which is currently used in various industries, has been selected for further development. Strategic Technology Enterprises, Incorporated (STE), a subsidiary of STERIS Corporation, under a contract from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is developing systems and methodologies to decontaminate spacecraft using vaporized hydrogen peroxide (VHP) technology. The VHP technology provides an effective, rapid and low temperature means for inactivation of spores, mycobacteria, fungi, viruses and other microorganisms. The VHP application is a dry process affording excellent material compatibility with many of the components found in spacecraft such as polymers, paints and electronic systems. Furthermore, the VHP process has innocuous residuals as it decomposes to water vapor and oxygen. This paper will discuss the approach that is being used to develop this technique and will present lethality data that have been collected to establish deep vacuum VHP sterilization cycles. In addition, the application of this technique to meet planetary protection requirements will be addressed.

  13. Electrodeposition of Silver Nanoparticles on MWCNT Film Electrodes for Hydrogen Peroxide Sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING,Yan-Feng; JIN,Guan-Ping; YIN,Jun-Guang

    2007-01-01

    Silver (Ag) nanoparticles were directly electrodeposited on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) in AgNO3/LiNO3 containing EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid). The structure and nature of the resulting Ag/MWNT composite were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the distribution shape of Ag nanoparticles was found to be dependent on the presence of EDTA. The modified electrode showed excellent electrocatalytic activity to redox reaction of hydrogen peroxide and the mechanism of hydrogen peroxide was partly reversible procession with oxidation and reduction peaks at 0.77 and -0.83 V, respectively. The oxidation and reduction peak currents were linearly related to hydrogen peroxide concentration in the range of 1×10-6-3×10-4 and 1×10-8-7×10-4 mol·L-1 with correlation coefficients of 0.996 and 0.986, and 3s-detection limit of 9 × 10-7 and 7 × 10-9 mol·L-1.

  14. Coordinate cis-[Cr(C2O4(pm(OH22]+ Cation as Molecular Biosensor of Pyruvate’s Protective Activity Against Hydrogen Peroxide Mediated Cytotoxity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lech Chmurzyński

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper instrumental methods of carbon dioxide (CO2 detection in biological material were compared. Using cis-[Cr(C2O4(pm(OH22]+ cation as a specific molecular biosensor and the stopped-flow technique the concentrations of CO2 released from the cell culture medium as one of final products of pyruvate decomposition caused by hydrogen peroxide were determined. To prove the usefulness of our method of CO2 assessment in the case of biological samples we investigated protective properties of exogenous pyruvate in cultured osteosarcoma 143B cells exposed to 1 mM hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 added directly to culture medium. Pyruvic acid is well known scavenger of H2O2 and, moreover, a molecule which is recognized as one of the major mediator of oxidative stress detected in many diseases and pathological situations like ischemiareperfusion states. The pyruvate's antioxidant activity is described as its rapid reaction with H2O2,which causes nonenzymatic decarboxylation of pyruvate and releases of CO2, water and acetate as final products. In this work for the first time we have correlated the concentration of CO2 dissolved in culture medium with pyruvate's oxidant-scavenging abilities. Moreover, the kinetics of the reaction between aqueous solution of CO2 and coordinate ion, cis-[Cr(C2O4(pm(OH22]+ was analysed. The results obtained enabled determination of the number of steps of the reaction studied. Based on the kinetic equations, rate constants were determined for each step.

  15. SIMULTANEOUS REACTION AND LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION IN THE HYDROGEN PEROXIDE PRODUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ShuxiangLǖ; LiWang; ZhentaoMi; YaquanWang

    2004-01-01

    The gas-liquid-liquid reactive extraction system for preparing hydrogen peroxide via anthraquinone was investigated. The oxidation reaction of hydrogenated working solution was combined with the extraction of hydrogen peroxide from working solution in a sieve plate column. The reaction of 2-ethylanthrahydroquionone with oxygen and the liquid-liquid extraction of hydrogen peroxide take place simultaneously. The oxygen was introduced with hydrogenated working solution through a nozzle in the bottom of the column, which worked as agitated air as well as oxidation reagent. The results showed the oxidation and extraction do not hamper each other, on the contrary, the presence of oxidation gas in the column can promote the transfer of hydrogen peroxide fi'om organic phase to aqueous phase, thus the reaction efficiency and extraction efficiency increased with increasing gas superficial velocity. Furthermore, the oxidation efficiency is almost 100% and the extraction efficiency is higher than 90% in this process.

  16. SIMULTANEOUS REACTION AND LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION IN THE HYDROGEN PEROXIDE PRODUCTION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuxiang L(u); Li Wang; Zhentao Mi; Yaquan Wang

    2004-01-01

    The gas-liquid-liquid reactive extraction system for preparing hydrogen peroxide via anthraquinone was investigated. The oxidation reaction of hydrogenated working solution was combined with the extraction of hydrogen peroxide from working solution in a sieve plate column. The reaction of 2-ethylanthrahydroquionone with oxygen and the liquid-liquid extraction of hydrogen peroxide take place simultaneously. The oxygen was introduced with hydrogenated working solution through a nozzle in the bottom of the column, which worked as agitated air as well as oxidation reagent. The results showed the oxidation and extraction do not hamper each other, on the contrary, the presence of oxidation gas in the column can promote the transfer of hydrogen peroxide from organic phase to aqueous phase, thus the reaction efficiency and extraction efficiency increased with increasing gas superficial velocity. Furthermore, the oxidation efficiency is almost 100% and the extraction efficiency is higher than 90% in this process.

  17. Core-shell Au/Ag nanoparticles embedded in silicate sol-gel network for sensor application towards hydrogen peroxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shanmugam Manivannan; Ramasamy Ramaraj

    2009-09-01

    The electrocatalytic activity of core-shell Au100-Ag ( = 15, 27, 46, and 60) bimetallic nanoparticles embedded in methyl functionalized silicate MTMOS network towards the reduction of hydrogen peroxide was investigated by using cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometric techniques. Core-shell Au/Ag bimetallic nanoparticles were characterized by absorption spectra and HRTEM. The MTMOS silicate sol-gel embedded Au73Ag27 core-shell nanoparticles modified electrode showed better synergistic electrocatalytic effect towards the reduction of hydrogen peroxide when compared to monometal MTMOS-Aunps and MTMOS-Agnps modified electrodes. These modified electrodes were studied without immobilizing any enzyme in the MTMOS sol-gel matrix. The present study highlights the influence of molar composition of Ag nanoparticles in the Au/Ag bimetallic composition towards the electrocatalytic reduction and sensing of hydrogen peroxide in comparison to monometal Au and Ag nanoparticles.

  18. Kinetics of the decomposition and the estimation of the stability of 10% aqueous and non-aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zun Maria

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the stability of 10% hydrogen peroxide aqueous and non-aqueous solutions with the addition of 6% (w/w of urea was evaluated. The solutions were stored at 20°C, 30°C and 40°C, and the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide proceeded according to first-order kinetics. With the addition of the urea in the solutions, the decomposition rate constant increased and the activation energy decreased. The temperature of storage also affected the decomposition of substance, however, 10% hydrogen peroxide solutions prepared in PEG-300, and stabilized with the addition of 6% (w/w of urea had the best constancy.

  19. Comparison of hydrogen peroxide contact lens disinfection systems and solutions against Acanthamoeba polyphaga.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, R; Kilvington, S

    2001-07-01

    Acanthamoeba is a free-living amoeba causing a potentially blinding infection of the cornea. Contact lens wearers are most at risk and account for some 95% of cases. Hydrogen peroxide is used for contact lens disinfection due to its broad antimicrobial activity. Lenses must be neutralized before use to avoid pronounced stinging and possible corneal damage. Neutralization is achieved by adding a catalyst during the disinfection process (one-step) or afterwards (two-step). Here, the activities of commercial peroxide systems and individual solutions against trophozoites and cysts of Acanthamoeba polyphaga were compared. All disinfection systems were active against trophozoites, giving a > or = 3-log (99.9%) kill within 1 h. Of the four one-step systems, only one showed some cysticidal activity, giving a 1.28 +/- 0.41-log reduction. Both two-step systems were cysticidal, giving a > or = 3-log kill at 4 h. All system peroxide solutions were cysticidal, giving a > or = 3-log kill by 4 to 6 h. Variation in the cysticidal rate was observed with two solutions that gave a 1.8- to 2.1-log kill at 4 h compared with 3.0 to 4.0 for the rest (P < 0.05). No cysticidal activity was found with the peroxigen sodium perborate or the contact lens protein remover subtilisin A. Two-step systems are cysticidal providing contact times of at least 4 h are employed. Variation in cyst killing occurs between peroxide solutions, possibly due to formulation differences. One-step systems are less effective against Acanthamoeba cysts due to rapid peroxide neutralization. The cysticidal activity of one-step systems could be improved if neutralization rates were retarded.

  20. Evaluation of Extraradicular Diffusion of Hydrogen Peroxide during Intracoronal Bleaching Using Different Bleaching Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad E. Rokaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide associated with intracoronal teeth bleaching was evaluated. Methods. 108 intact single rooted extracted mandibular first premolars teeth were selected. The teeth were instrumented with WaveOne system and obturated with gutta percha and divided into four groups (n=27 according to the bleaching materials used. Each main group was divided into three subgroups (n=9 according to the time of extra radicular hydrogen peroxide diffusion measurements at 1, 7, and 14 days: group 1 (35% hydrogen peroxide, group 2 (35% carbamide peroxide, group 3 (sodium perborate-30% hydrogen peroxide mixture, and group 4 (sodium perborate-water mixture. Four cemental dentinal defects were prepared just below the CEJ on each root surface. The amount of hydrogen peroxide that leached out was evaluated after 1, 7, and 14 days by spectrophotometer analysis. The results were analyzed using the ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results. Group 1 showed highest extra radicular diffusion, followed by group 3 and group 2, while group 4 showed the lowest mean extra radicular diffusion. Conclusion. Carbamide peroxide and sodium perborate-water mixture are the most suitable bleaching materials used for internal bleaching due to their low extra radicular diffusion of hydrogen peroxide.

  1. An ICT-based approach to ratiometric fluorescence imaging of hydrogen peroxide produced in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikun, Duangkhae; Miller, Evan W; Domaille, Dylan W; Chang, Christopher J

    2008-04-09

    We present the synthesis, properties, and biological applications of Peroxy Lucifer 1 (PL1), a new fluorescent probe for imaging hydrogen peroxide produced in living cells by a ratiometric response. PL1 utilizes a chemoselective boronate-based switch to detect hydrogen peroxide by modulation of internal charge transfer (ICT) within a 1,8-naphthalimide dye. PL1 features high selectivity for hydrogen peroxide over similar reactive oxygen species, including superoxide, and nitric oxide, and a 65 nm shift in emission from blue-colored fluorescence to green-colored fluorescence upon reaction with peroxide. Two-photon confocal microscopy experiments in live macrophages show that PL1 can ratiometrically visualize localized hydrogen peroxide bursts generated in living cells at immune response levels.

  2. Formation of studtite during the oxidative dissolution of UO2 by hydrogen peroxide: a SFM study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarens, F; de Pablo, J; Díez-Pérez, I; Casas, I; Giménez, J; Rovira, M

    2004-12-15

    Understanding the formation of alteration phases on the surface of spent nuclear fuel, such as those observed during leaching experiments, is necessary in order to predict the concentration of radionuclides in the near-field of a final repository. Hydrogen peroxide has been identified as one of the oxidants formed by the radiolysis of water in the presence of spent nuclear fuel; especially due to alpha activity. The presence of this species in solution can contribute to the formation of uranium peroxide secondary phases. In this work, we have studied the oxidative dissolution of synthetic UO2 disks in hydrogen peroxide solutions of two different concentrations (5 x 10(-4) and 5 x 10(-6) mol dm(-3)), both at pH 5.8 +/- 0.1. The solid surface evolution of the disks has been followed by means of ex-situ scanning force microscope (SFM) measurements, and uranium concentration in solution has been determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. During the first stage of the experiment, SFM images indicate that only UO2 dissolution is occurring. After 142 h, a secondary phase is observed on the surface of the solid at 5 x 10(-4) mol dm(-3) hydrogen peroxide concentration. This secondary phase has been identified by X-ray diffraction as studtite (UO4 x 4H2O). From the analysis of SFM topographic profiles at different elapsed times, a precipitation rate for the studtite has been estimated to be in the range of (8-32) x 10(-10) mol m(-2) s(-1).

  3. MODIFIED OPAL:A NOVEL STABILIZER FOR HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF PULPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xueren Qian; Xianhui An; Wenbo Liu; Gang Yu; Zhanqian Song

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of modified opal as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching was investigated. The results showed that the modified opal in place of sodium silicate as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching is feasible. At the same dosage, above 3% ISO can be increased for both wheat straw pulp and deinked pulp. The stabilizing ability of the modified opal to hydrogen peroxide bleaching of pulp is improved markedly. It is favorable for bleaching to increase temperature and time within a permissive extent. The suitable process conditions are 10% of pulp consistency, 3% of hydrogen peroxide, 1.5% of sodium hydroxide, 3% of the modified opal, 70℃ and 60 min when the modified opal is used as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching. At these conditions, the brightness gain can reach about 16% ISO for wheat straw pulp. In addition, it is favorable for bleaching to add a little magnesium sulfate when the modified opal is used as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching, the brightness of pulp can increase I%ISO if0.05% of magnesium sulfate is added. The cost analysis indicated that the modified opal is superior to sodium silicate as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching in economical aspect and has further the potential of market development.

  4. Hydrogen Peroxide Treatment and the Phenylpropanoid Pathway Precursors Feeding Improve Phenolics and Antioxidant Capacity of Quinoa Sprouts via an Induction of L-Tyrosine and L-Phenylalanine Ammonia-Lyases Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michał Świeca

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide treatment and the phenylpropanoid pathway precursors feeding affected the antioxidant capacity of quinoa sprouts. Compared to the control, total phenolics content was significantly increased by treatment of control sprouts with 50 mM and 200 mM H2O2—an elevation of about 24% and 28%, respectively. The highest increase of flavonoids content was found for the sprouts treated with 200 mM H2O2 obtained from seeds fed with shikimic acid. All the studied modifications increased the antioxidant potential of sprouts (at least by 50% compared to control. The highest reducing power was found for the sprouts treated with 200 mM H2O2 obtained by phenylalanine feeding (5.03 mg TE/g DW and those obtained from the seeds fed with tyrosine (5.26 mg TE/g DW. The activities of L-tyrosine (TAL and L-phenylalanine (PAL ammonia-lyases were strongly affected by germination time as well as the applied modification of sprouting. On the 3rd day the highest PAL activity was determined for both untreated and induced with 50 mM H2O2 sprouts obtained by phenylalanine feeding. H2O2 induced TAL activity; the highest TAL activity was determined for 3-day-old sprouts induced with 200 mM H2O2 obtained from seeds fed with phenylalanine.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide in exhaled breath condensate: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Nagaraja

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To study the ongoing inflammatory process of lung in healthy individuals with risk factors and comparing with that of a known diseased condition. To study the inflammatory response to treatment. Background: Morbidity and mortality of respiratory diseases are raising in trend due to increased smokers, urbanization and air pollution, the diagnosis of these conditions during early stage and management can improve patient′s lifestyle and morbidity. Materials and Methods: One hundred subjects were studied from July 2010 to September 2010; the level of hydrogen peroxide concentration in exhaled breath condensate was measured using Ecocheck. Results: Of the 100 subjects studied, 23 were healthy individuals with risk factors (smoking, exposure to air pollution, and urbanization; the values of hydrogen peroxide in smokers were 200-2220 nmol/l and in non-smokers 340-760 nmol/l. In people residing in rural areas values were 20-140 nmol/l in non-smokers and 180 nmol/l in smokers. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease cases, during acute exacerbations values were 540-3040 nmol/l and 240-480 nmol/l following treatment. In acute exacerbations of bronchial asthma, values were 400-1140 nmol/l and 100-320 nmol/l following treatment. In cases of bronchiectasis, values were 300-340 nmol/l and 200-280 nmol/l following treatment. In diagnosed pneumonia cases values were 1060-11800 nmol/l and 540-700 nmol/l following treatment. In interstitial lung diseases, values ranged from 220-720 nmol/l and 210-510 nmol/l following treatment. Conclusion: Exhaled breath condensate provides a non-invasive means of sampling the lower respiratory tract. Collection of exhaled breath condensate might be useful to detect the oxidative destruction of the lung as well as early inflammation of the airways in a healthy individual with risk factors and comparing the inflammatory response to treatment.

  6. SN-EXCHANGED HYDROTALCITES AS CATALYSTS FOR CLEAN AND SELECTIVE BAEYER-VILLIGER OXIDATION OF KETONES USING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Sn-doped hydrotalcite (Sn/HT) catalyst prepared by ion-exchange is found to be an active and selective catalyst for the liquid phase Baeyer-Villiger (BV) oxidation of cyclic ketones in acetonitrile using hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as oxidant. Different reaction perameters such as...

  7. Comparative Study on Oxidative Treatments of NAPL Containing Chlorinated Ethanes and Ethenes using Hydrogen Peroxide and Persulfate in Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this study was to assess the oxidation of NAPL in soil, 30% of which were composed of chlorinated ethanes and ethenes, using catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (CHP), activated persulfate (AP), and H2O2–persulfate (HP) co-amendment systems. Citrate, a buffer and iron ligand,...

  8. Hydrogen peroxide resistance of Acetobacter pasteurianus NBRC3283 and its relationship to acetic acid fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto-Kainuma, Akiko; Ehata, Yasunori; Ikeda, Manami; Osono, Takemasa; Ishikawa, Morio; Kaga, Takayuki; Koizumi, Yukimichi

    2008-10-01

    The bacterium Acetobacter pasteurianus can ferment acetic acid, a process that proceeds at the risk of oxidative stress. To understand the stress response, we investigated catalase and OxyR in A. pasteurianus NBRC3283. This strain expresses only a KatE homolog as catalase, which is monofunctional and growth dependent. Disruption of the oxyR gene increased KatE activity, but both the katE and oxyR mutant strains showed greater sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide as compared to the parental strain. These mutant strains showed growth similar to the parental strain in the ethanol oxidizing phase, but their growth was delayed when cultured in the presence of acetic acid and of glycerol and during the acetic acid peroxidation phase. The results suggest that A. pasteurianus cells show different oxidative stress responses between the metabolism via the membrane oxidizing pathway and that via the general aerobic pathway during acetic acid fermentation.

  9. Hydrogen peroxide induce modifications of human extracellular superoxide dismutase that results in enzyme inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi H. Gottfredsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD controls the level of superoxide in the extracellular space by catalyzing the dismutation of superoxide into hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen. In addition, the enzyme reacts with hydrogen peroxide in a peroxidase reaction which is known to disrupt enzymatic activity. Here, we show that the peroxidase reaction supports a site-specific bond cleavage. Analyses by peptide mapping and mass spectrometry shows that oxidation of Pro112 supports the cleavage of the Pro112–His113 peptide bond. Substitution of Ala for Pro112 did not inhibit fragmentation, indicating that the oxidative fragmentation at this position is dictated by spatial organization and not by side-chain specificity. The major part of EC-SOD inhibited by the peroxidase reaction was not fragmented but found to encompass oxidations of histidine residues involved in the coordination of copper (His98 and His163. These oxidations are likely to support the dissociation of copper from the active site and thus loss of enzymatic activity. Homologous modifications have also been described for the intracellular isozyme, Cu/Zn-SOD, reflecting the almost identical structures of the active site within these enzymes. We speculate that the inactivation of EC-SOD by peroxidase activity plays a role in regulating SOD activity in vivo, as even low levels of superoxide will allow for the peroxidase reaction to occur.

  10. Hydrogen peroxide thermochemical oscillator as driver for primordial RNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Rowena; Brindley, John

    2014-06-06

    This paper presents and tests a previously unrecognized mechanism for driving a replicating molecular system on the prebiotic earth. It is proposed that cell-free RNA replication in the primordial soup may have been driven by self-sustained oscillatory thermochemical reactions. To test this hypothesis, a well-characterized hydrogen peroxide oscillator was chosen as the driver and complementary RNA strands with known association and melting kinetics were used as the substrate. An open flow system model for the self-consistent, coupled evolution of the temperature and concentrations in a simple autocatalytic scheme is solved numerically, and it is shown that thermochemical cycling drives replication of the RNA strands. For the (justifiably realistic) values of parameters chosen for the simulated example system, the mean amount of replicant produced at steady state is 6.56 times the input amount, given a constant supply of substrate species. The spontaneous onset of sustained thermochemical oscillations via slowly drifting parameters is demonstrated, and a scheme is given for prebiotic production of complementary RNA strands on rock surfaces.

  11. Taro Tube Flour Modification via Hydrogen Peroxide Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Sri Budiyati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Colocasia esculentum (L Schott known as “Talas bogor” in Indonesian language is easily grown in every island in Indonesia. It proved to have high content of carbohydrate as it can be utilize for wheat flour replacement in addition to prior modification using hydrogen peroxide. The objective of this research was to improve the quality of taro flour by assessing the effect of several parameter such as ratio of slurry, oxidation agent concentration, oxidation time and temperature. The result shows that using ratio of slurry 20% with 2% of H2O2 concentration in temperature of oxidation process 30oC and 60 min operation time can produced good quality of modified taro tube flour in terms of swelling power and water solubility with 7.2 g/g and 6.93% respectively. This condition has chosen by taking the technical and economic feasibility as consideration. This result also can be used as proof of evidence that using H2O2 as an oxidizing agent in the process of taro tube flour modification can improve the functional properties of the flour. As the swelling power and water solubility of original taro tube flour were 3.7 g/g and 1.8% respectively.

  12. Hydrogen peroxide regulates cell adhesion through the redox sensor RPSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas-Boas, Filipe; Bagulho, Ana; Tenente, Rita; Teixeira, Vitor H; Martins, Gabriel; da Costa, Gonçalo; Jerónimo, Ana; Cordeiro, Carlos; Machuqueiro, Miguel; Real, Carla

    2016-01-01

    To become metastatic, a tumor cell must acquire new adhesion properties that allow migration into the surrounding connective tissue, transmigration across endothelial cells to reach the blood stream and, at the site of metastasis, adhesion to endothelial cells and transmigration to colonize a new tissue. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a redox signaling molecule produced in tumor cell microenvironment with high relevance for tumor development. However, the molecular mechanisms regulated by H2O2 in tumor cells are still poorly known. The identification of H2O2-target proteins in tumor cells and the understanding of their role in tumor cell adhesion are essential for the development of novel redox-based therapies for cancer. In this paper, we identified Ribosomal Protein SA (RPSA) as a target of H2O2 and showed that RPSA in the oxidized state accumulates in clusters that contain specific adhesion molecules. Furthermore, we showed that RPSA oxidation improves cell adhesion efficiency to laminin in vitro and promotes cell extravasation in vivo. Our results unravel a new mechanism for H2O2-dependent modulation of cell adhesion properties and identify RPSA as the H2O2 sensor in this process. This work indicates that high levels of RPSA expression might confer a selective advantage to tumor cells in an oxidative environment.

  13. Specific aquaporins facilitate the diffusion of hydrogen peroxide across membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienert, Gerd P; Møller, Anders L B; Kristiansen, Kim A; Schulz, Alexander; Møller, Ian M; Schjoerring, Jan K; Jahn, Thomas P

    2007-01-12

    The metabolism of aerobic organisms continuously produces reactive oxygen species. Although potentially toxic, these compounds also function in signaling. One important feature of signaling compounds is their ability to move between different compartments, e.g. to cross membranes. Here we present evidence that aquaporins can channel hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Twenty-four aquaporins from plants and mammals were screened in five yeast strains differing in sensitivity toward oxidative stress. Expression of human AQP8 and plant Arabidopsis TIP1;1 and TIP1;2 in yeast decreased growth and survival in the presence of H2O2. Further evidence for aquaporin-mediated H2O2 diffusion was obtained by a fluorescence assay with intact yeast cells using an intracellular reactive oxygen species-sensitive fluorescent dye. Application of silver ions (Ag+), which block aquaporin-mediated water diffusion in a fast kinetics swelling assay, also reversed both the aquaporin-dependent growth repression and the H2O2-induced fluorescence. Our results present the first molecular genetic evidence for the diffusion of H2O2 through specific members of the aquaporin family.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide sensing based on carbon quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Cheng-Shane

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, carbon quantum dots (CQDs have been synthesized by one step hydrothermal method to detect hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. The optical H2O2 sensors were based on the fluorescent quenching of the carbon quantum dots. The optical H2O2 sensors demonstrate capable of detecting H2O2 over the range of 0-88.2 mM and 0-60 mM. The H2O2 sensitivities of wavelength shift to changes in the H2O2 concentration were found to be 0.18 nm/mM and 0.26 nm/mM. These results of the optical sensors showed that the method can be used in practice detection of H2O2 and could offer a new approach for developing a new optical biosensor. The CQDs exhibit good emission property and high stability, as well as excitation-independent emission behavior. Moreover, it is attractive that CQDs can be used as an effective fluorescent probe for the detection of H2O2 with linear Stern-Volmer plot and wavelength shift in an aqueous solution.

  15. Mobile gene silencing in Arabidopsis is regulated by hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dacheng Liang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In plants and nematodes, RNAi can spread from cells from which it is initiated to other cells in the organism. The underlying mechanism controlling the mobility of RNAi signals is not known, especially in the case of plants. A genetic screen designed to recover plants impaired in the movement but not the production or effectiveness of the RNAi signal identified RCI3, which encodes a hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-producing type III peroxidase, as a key regulator of silencing mobility in Arabidopsis thaliana. Silencing initiated in the roots of rci3 plants failed to spread into leaf tissue or floral tissue. Application of exogenous H2O2 reinstated the spread in rci3 plants and accelerated it in wild-type plants. The addition of catalase or MnO2, which breaks down H2O2, slowed the spread of silencing in wild-type plants. We propose that endogenous H2O2, under the control of peroxidases, regulates the spread of gene silencing by altering plasmodesmata permeability through remodelling of local cell wall structure, and may play a role in regulating systemic viral defence.

  16. Solvothermal method to prepare graphene quantum dots by hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Renbing; Zhong, Suting; Wu, Juan; Jiang, Wei; Shen, Yewen; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Tianhe

    2016-10-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have been synthesized by different chemical methods in recent years. For conventional chemical methods, it is inevitable to introduce a large amount of impurities in the preparation process. Long time of dialysis process increases the time cost extremely. Herein, we report a one-step solvothermal method for synthesizing GQDs with the application of hydrogen peroxide in N, N-Dimethylformamide (DMF) environment, which completely avoids the use of concentrated sulphuric acid and nitric acid to treat raw material and introduces no impurity in whole preparation process simultaneously for the first time. Pure GQDs can be obtained after evaporation/redissolution and filtration process with a strong blue emission at 15% quantum yield. This solvothermal method, not requiring dialysis process and complicated equipments, exhibits simple, eco-friendly and low time-cost properties. Besides high quantum yields, the as-prepared GQDs also show good photoluminescence stability in different pH conditions. The optical properties, morphology and structure of GQDs were studied by various equipments, implying potential application in biomedical fields and electronic device.

  17. Electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide on stainless steel

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S Patra; N Munichandraiah

    2009-09-01

    Electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide is studied on a sand-blasted stainless steel (SSS) electrode in an aqueous solution of NaClO4. The cyclic voltammetric reduction of H2O2 at low concentrations is characterized by a cathodic peak at -0.40 V versus standard calomel electrode (SCE). Cyclic voltammetry is studied by varying the concentration of H2O2 in the range from 0.2 mM to 20 mM and the sweep rate in the range from 2 to 100 mV s-1. Voltammograms at concentrations of H2O2 higher than 2 mM or at high sweep rates consist of an additional current peak, which may be due to the reduction of adsorbed species formed during the reduction of H2O2. Amperometric determination of H2O2 at -0.50 V vs SCE provides the detection limit of 5 M H2O2. A plot of current density versus concentration has two segments suggesting a change in the mechanism of H2O2 reduction at concentrations of H2O2 ≥ 2 mM. From the rotating disc electrode study, diffusion co-efficient of H2O2 and rate constant for reduction of H2O2 are evaluated.

  18. Simultaneous electroanalysis of peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, M I; Harnoode, C; Tokuda, K; Ohsaka, T

    2001-04-15

    The electrochemical behavior of peroxyacetic acid (PAA) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has been investigated using cyclic voltammetry and hydrodynamic techniques [rotating disk electrode (RDE) voltammetry and rotating ring-disk electrode (RRDE) voltammetry]. The results have been analyzed aiming at simultaneous electroanalysis of both species. Glassy carbon and gold electrodes were used for this investigation. It was found that the reduction of PAA, as well as H2O2, is highly sensitive to the electrode material; for example, at 100 mV s-1, the reduction peak potentials of PAA were 0.2 and -1.1 V at gold and glassy carbon electrodes, respectively. The well-separated steady-state limiting currents were obtained using a gold electrode for the reduction of both PAA and H2O2 and also a well-defined one for the oxidation of H2O2. On the basis of the RDE experiments, good calibration curves were obtained for both species over a wide range of their concentrations, for PAA and H2O2 in the range of 0.36 to 110 and 0.11 to 34 mM, respectively. The simultaneous and selective electroanalysis of PAA and H2O2 in their coexistence is demonstrated for the first time.

  19. Toxic DNA Damage by Hydrogen Peroxide through the Fenton Reaction in vivo and in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imlay, James A.; Chin, Sherman M.; Linn, Stuart

    1988-04-01

    Exposure of Escherichia coli to low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide results in DNA damage that causes mutagenesis and kills the bacteria, whereas higher concentrations of peroxide reduce the amount of such damage. Earlier studies indicated that the direct DNA oxidant is a derivative of hydrogen peroxide whose formation is dependent on cell metabolism. The generation of this oxidant depends on the availability of both reducing equivalents and an iron species, which together mediate a Fenton reaction in which ferrous iron reduces hydrogen peroxide to a reactive radical. An in vitro Fenton system was established that generates DNA strand breaks and inactivates bacteriophage and that also reproduces the suppression of DNA damage by high concentrations of peroxide. The direct DNA oxidant both in vivo and in this in vitro system exhibits reactivity unlike that of a free hydroxyl radical and may instead be a ferryl radical.

  20. Green tea polyphenols protect spinal cord neurons against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianbo Zhao; Shiqiang Fang; Yajiang Yuan; Zhanpeng Guo; Jinhao Zeng; Yue Guo; Peifu Tang; Xifan Mei

    2014-01-01

    Green tea polyphenols are strong antioxidants and can reduce free radical damage. To investigate their neuroprotective potential, we induced oxidative damage in spinal cord neurons using hy-drogen peroxide, and applied different concentrations (50-200 µg/mL) of green tea polyphenol to the cell medium for 24 hours. Measurements of superoxide dismutase activity, malondial-dehyde content, and expression of apoptosis-related genes and proteins revealed that green tea polyphenol effectively alleviated oxidative stress. Our results indicate that green tea polyphenols play a protective role in spinal cord neurons under oxidative stress.

  1. Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor Based on the Direct Electrochemistry of Myoglobin Immobilized in Poly-3-Hydroxybutyrate Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Ma

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct electrochemistry of myoglobin (Mb was observed in a stable film composed of a natural lipid polymer (poly-3-hydroxybutyrate and Mb, the film of which was modified on a pyrolytic graphite electrode. The apparent formal potential of Mb was at about -260 mV in an acetate buffer solution with pH 5.0. Moreover, Mb in the polymer film exhibited catalytic activity towards the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2. Consequently, an unmediated biosensor for H2O2 was prepared with a linear range from 1.0×10-7 to 4.0×10-4 M.

  2. Low- and high-dose hydrogen peroxide regulation of transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NING Jiao-lin; MO Li-wen; LAI Xi-nan

    2010-01-01

    Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS) may play both physiological and pathophysiological roles. Transcription factor NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) regulates antioxidant response element (ARE)-mediated genes expression and coordinates induction of chemoprotective proteins in response to physical and chemical stresses. The exact role of Nrf2 in cellular responses to different levels of oxidative stresses remains unknown.Methods Rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells were cultured and treated with 0 mmol/L, 0.125 mmol/L, 0.25 mmol/L, 0.5 mmol/L, 1.0 mmol/L and 2.0 mmol/L hydrogen peroxide solution for 2 hours. Nrf2 gene expression was assayed by reverse transcription-PCR, Nrf2-ARE binding activity was assayed with electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), and localization of Nrf2 was detected with immunohistochemistry.Results Low and moderate (0.125 mmol/L, 0.25 mmol/L and 0.5 mmol/L) doses hydrogen peroxide exposure of rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells led to the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2, increased activity of transcription regulation and up-regulation of ARE-medicated gene expression. In contrast, high doses of hydrogen peroxide (1 mmol/L, 2 mmol/L) exposure of the cells led to the nuclear exclusion of Nrf2, decreased activity transcription regulation and down-regulation of ARE-mediated gene expression.Conclusion Low and moderate doses of hydrogen peroxide play protective roles by increasing transcription activity of Nrf2, whereas high- dose hydrogen peroxide plays a deleterious role by decreasing transcription activity of Nrf2.

  3. Enhancing activated-peroxide formulations for porous materials :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauter, Paula; Tucker, Mark D.; Tezak, Matthew S.; Boucher, Raymond

    2012-12-01

    During an urban wide-area incident involving the release of a biological warfare agent, the recovery/restoration effort will require extensive resources and will tax the current capabilities of the government and private contractors. In fact, resources may be so limited that decontamination by facility owners/occupants may become necessary and a simple decontamination process and material should be available for this use. One potential process for use by facility owners/occupants would be a liquid sporicidal decontaminant, such as pHamended bleach or activated-peroxide, and simple application devices. While pH-amended bleach is currently the recommended low-tech decontamination solution, a less corrosive and toxic decontaminant is desirable. The objective of this project is to provide an operational assessment of an alternative to chlorine bleach for low-tech decontamination applications activated hydrogen peroxide. This report provides the methods and results for activatedperoxide evaluation experiments. The results suggest that the efficacy of an activated-peroxide decontaminant is similar to pH-amended bleach on many common materials.

  4. Effect of hydrogen peroxide treatment on the properties of wool fabric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Shen, Xiaolin; Xu, Weilin

    2012-10-01

    In this study, hydrogen peroxide treatment was applied to improve the surface wettability, moisture transfer properties and other related properties of wool fabric. SEM images showed the tip of wool scale was smoothened and parts of the scale were peeled off after hydrogen peroxide treatment. The time for a water droplet to sink into the fabric could decrease to less than 1 s and the wicking properties of wool fabrics were dramatically improved after hydrogen peroxide treatment. Shrinkage and whiteness of the fabric were improved due to the modification of scale and the bleaching effect of hydrogen peroxide, respectively. The fabrics became weaker and ductile with less than 4% weight loss. This study would benefit further application of wool fiber in summer clothing in which the surface wettability and moisture transfer properties are essential and determinative.

  5. MICROWAVE-EXPEDITED OLEFIN EPOXIDATION OVER HYDROTALCITES USING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE AND ACETONITRILE

    Science.gov (United States)

    An efficient microwave-assisted expoxidation of olefins is described over hydrotalcite catalysts in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and acetonitrile. This general and selective protocol is extremely fast and is applicable to a wide variety of subtrates.

  6. SnFe2 O4 Nanocrystals as Highly Efficient Catalysts for Hydrogen-Peroxide Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kuan-Ting; Liu, Dai-Ming; Lu, Shih-Yuan

    2016-07-25

    SnFe2 O4 nanocrystals (NC), prepared with a simple one-step carrier-solvent-assisted interfacial reaction process, were developed as highly efficient catalysts for hydrogen peroxide sensing. These NCs, with a size of around 7 nm, served as the sensing catalyst and were decorated onto the pore surfaces of a porous fluorine-doped tin oxide (PFTO) host electrode, prepared from commercial FTO glass with a simple anodic treatment, to form the sensing electrode for hydrogen peroxide. The SnFe2 O4 NCs-loaded PFTO electrode exhibited an ultra-high sensitivity of 1027 mA m(-1)  cm(-2) toward hydrogen peroxide, outperforming Pt NCs-loaded PFTO electrodes. The SnFe2 O4 NCs-loaded PFTO electrode proved a promising relatively low cost, high performance sensing electrode for hydrogen peroxide.

  7. Baeyer-Villiger oxidation of ketones with hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by Sn-aniline complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Hua Zhang; Shou Feng Wang; Zi Qiang Lei

    2007-01-01

    Sn-aniline complex was prepared by a simple procedure. Cyclic and acyclic ketones were oxidized into lactones or esters with very high selectivity and yield with 30% hydrogen peroxide in the presence of Sn-aniline complex.

  8. Ground-based Infrared Observations of Water Vapor and Hydrogen Peroxide in the Atmosphere of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encrenaz, T.; Greathouse, T. K.; Bitner, M.; Kruger, A.; Richter, M. J.; Lacy, J. H.; Bézard, B.; Fouchet, T.; Lefevre, F.; Forget, F.; Atreya, S. K.

    2008-11-01

    Ground-based observations of water vapor and hydrogen peroxide have been obtained in the thermal infrared range, using the TEXES instrument at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility, for different times of the seasonal cycle.

  9. Oxidative aromatization of Hantzsch 1,4-dihydropyridines by aqueous hydrogen peroxide-acetic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A simple method for the oxidative aromatization of Hantzsch 1,4-dihydropyridines to the corresponding pyridines is achieved by using hydrogen peroxide as green oxidant and acetic acid as catalyst in aqueous solution.

  10. Protection of Salvianolic Acid B for Human Endothelial Cells Against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Damage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jungang; ZHAO Guangrong; LIU Jinling; JI Xiangwu

    2009-01-01

    Salvianolic acid B(Sal B) is an active component of traditional Chinese medicine Salvia miltiorrhiza and is used to treat vascular diseases. To better understand its mechanism, the antioxidant capacities of Sal B was evaluated with human endothelial cells under oxidative stress. Human endothelial cells were pretreated with Sal B for 12 h followed by hydrogen peroxide for another 12 h. Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and concentration of glu-tathione were measured: Protective effect of Sal B on the endothelial cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced damage ' was observed, and ROS production in the cells was found significantly inhibited. Sal B remarkably enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes SOD, CAT and GPX. Furthermore, Sal B up-regulated the intracellular glutathione concentration. The results indicate that Sal B protected endothelial cells from oxidative stress by improving the redox status of the cells through enhancing the antioxidant enzyme activities and increasing the reductive glutathione concentration after the oxidative challenge.

  11. Hydrogen sulfide decreases the plasma lipid peroxidation induced by homocysteine and its thiolactone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olas, Beata; Kontek, Bogdan

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been investigated widely in recent years. H2S plays a variety of roles in different biological systems, including cardiovascular system. It is the final product of amino acids metabolism, which contains sulfur-cysteine and homocysteine (Hcy). In human plasma, there are several various forms of homocysteine: free Hcy, protein-bound Hcy (S-linked, and N-linked), and homocysteine thiolactone (HTL). Our previous works have shown that both Hcy in the reduced form and its thiolactone may modify fibrinolysis, coagulation process, and biological activity of blood platelets. Moreover, we have observed that HTL, like its precursor-Hcy stimulated the generation of superoxide anion radicals (O 2 (-•) ) in blood platelets. The aim of our study in vitro was to establish the influence of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, as a fast-releasing H2S donor; at tested concentrations: 10-1000 µM) on the plasma lipid peroxidation induced by the reduced Hcy (at final concentrations of 0.01-1 mM) and HTL (at final concentrations of 0.1-1 µM). Our results indicate that 10 and 100 µM NaHS decreased the lipid peroxidation in plasma treated with 1 mM Hcy or 1 µM HTL (when NaHS and Hcy/HTL were added to plasma together). The protective effect of 10 and 100 µM NaHS against the lipid peroxidation in plasma preincubated with 1 mM Hcy or 1 µM HTL was also observed. Considering the data presented in this study, we suggest that the lipid peroxidation (induced by different forms of homocysteine) may be reduced by hydrogen sulfide.

  12. Effect of Exogenous Application of Hydrogen Peroxide on Drought Tolerance of Glob Amaranth (Gomphrena globosa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Goldani

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Drought is one of the important environmental stresses that reduce the crop growth. Oxidative stress is a secondary stress due to drought and other abiotic stresses. In order to study the effect of exogenous application of hydrogen peroxide on drought tolerance of glob amaranth (Gomphrena globosa L., an experiment was conducted in greenhouse conditions. This study was designed as factorial based on completely randomized design with 3 replications. Different concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (0, 2.5 and 5 mM and three levels of irrigation intervals (after 4, 7 and 10 days were treated in this study. The results showed that foliar application of hydrogen peroxide can improve shoot and root dry weight and alleviate adverse effects of drought stress. With increasing drought stress stomatal conductance, flower number, total chlorophyll and root volume decreased significantly. So that the lowest of these characterestics was in the irrigation after 10 days. Interaction effects of drought and hydrogen peroxide in shoot dry weight was significantly different in 5% level and in electrolyte leakage, relative water content, free proline and total root length was significantly different in 1% level. In control (4 day irrigation interval with increasing hydrogen peroxide of 2.5 mM, shoot dry weight and total root length increased 20% and 91%, respectively. In control, with increasing hydrogen peroxide to 5 mM total chlorophyll was increased 30.8% compared to 0 mM hydrogen peroxide application (control. The final result showed that foliar application of hydrogen peroxide decreased the adverse effects of drought stress.

  13. The application of catalase for the elimination of hydrogen peroxide residues after bleaching of cotton fabrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AMORIM ALEXANDRA M.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of dyeing of cotton fabrics with a bifunctional reactive dye were significantly improved when the fabric after bleaching with hydrogen peroxide was treated with catalase for the elimination of hydrogen peroxide residues from the fabrics. Compared to processes with a varying number of washing steps, with and without commercial reducing agents, the consumption of water could be significantly reduced, without altering the final color shade.

  14. Repetitive Peroxide Exposure Reveals Pleiotropic Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wayne Chadwick

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stressors such as hydrogen peroxide control the activation of many interconnected signaling systems and are implicated in neurodegenerative disease etiology. Application of hydrogen peroxide to PC12 cells activated multiple tyrosine kinases (c-Src, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR, and Pyk2 and the serine-threonine kinase ERK1/2. Peroxide-induced ERK1/2 activation was sensitive to intracellular calcium chelation and EGFR and c-Src kinase inhibition. Acute application and removal of peroxide allowed ERK1/2 activity levels to rapidly subside to basal serum-deprived levels. Using this protocol, we demonstrated that ERK1/2 activation tachyphylaxis developed upon repeated peroxide exposures. This tachyphylaxis was independent of c-Src/Pyk2 tyrosine phosphorylation but was associated with a progressive reduction of peroxide-induced EGFR tyrosine phosphorylation, EGFR interaction with growth factor receptor binding protein 2, and a redistribution of EGFR from the plasma membrane to the cytoplasm. Our data indicates that components of peroxide-induced ERK1/2 cascades are differentially affected by repeated exposures, indicating that oxidative signaling may be contextually variable.

  15. In situ oxidation remediation technologies: kinetic of hydrogen peroxide decomposition on soil organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Arturo; Santos, Aurora; Vicente, Fernando; Rodriguez, Sergio; Lafuente, A Lopez

    2009-10-30

    Rates of hydrogen peroxide decomposition were investigated in soils slurries. The interaction soil-hydrogen peroxide was studied using a slurry system at 20 degrees C and pH 7. To determine the role of soil organic matter (SOM) in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide, several experiments were carried out with two soils with different SOM content (S1=15.1%, S2=10%). The influence of the oxidant dosage ([H2O2](o) from 10 to 30 g L(-1) and soil weight to liquid phase volume ratio=500 g L(-1)) was investigated using the two calcareous loamy sand soil samples. The results showed a rate dependency on both SOM and hydrogen peroxide concentration being the H2O2 decomposition rate over soil surface described by a second-order kinetic expression r(H2O2) = -dn(H2O2) / W(SOM) dt = kC(H2O2) C(SOM). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to evaluate the effect caused by the application of this oxidant on the SOM content. It was found a slightly increase of SOM content after treatment with hydrogen peroxide, probably due to the incorporation of oxygen from the oxidant (hydrogen peroxide).

  16. Isothermal Microcalorimetric Evaluation of Compatibility of Proposed Injector Materials with High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostowski, Rudy

    2003-01-01

    High-test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) is receiving renewed interest as a monopropellant and as the oxidizer for bipropellant systems. HTP is hydrogen peroxide in concentrations ranging from 70 to 98%. All surfaces wetted by HTP must be evaluated for compatibility with the fluid. In the case of tanks, lines and valves compatibility is required to preserve the HTP oxygen and energy content and to avoid overpressurization due to decomposition. With injectors and regenerative cooling passages shorter exposure time reduces these concerns. However, phase changes from fluid to gas impact heat transfer and become the dominant compatibility concern. Isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC) provides a convenient and reproducible means to observe the decomposition of HTP when exposed to structural materials and therefore the compatibility of those materials'. The instrument provides heat flow values in terms of watts that may be converted to a reaction rate given the heat of reaction for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. These values are then converted to percent active oxygen loss per week (%AOL/wk) to preserve an earlier convention for quantifying HTP compatibility. Additionally, qualitative designations of compatibility have been assigned to these values. This scheme consists of four classes with Class 1 being the most compatible. While historical compatibility data is available its current applicability is in question due to subtle changes in the compositions of both HTP and structural materials. Trace levels of molecules can have significant influence on compatibility. Therefore representative samples of materials must be evaluated with current HTP formulations. In this work seven materials were selected for their strength characteristics at high temperature as expected in a HTP injector. The materials were then evaluated by IMC for HTP compatibility.

  17. Salinity-gradient energy driven microbial electrosynthesis of hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohu; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    2017-02-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as a strong oxidant, is widely used in various chemical industries and environmental remediation processes. In this study, we developed an innovative method for cost-effective production of H2O2 by using a microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cell (MREC). In the MREC, electrical potential generated by the exoelectrogens and the salinity-gradient between salt and fresh water were utilized to drive the high-rate H2O2 production. Operational parameters such as air flow rate, pH, cathodic potential, flow rate of salt and fresh water were investigated. The optimal H2O2 production was observed at salt and fresh water flow rate of 0.5 mL min-1, air flow rate of 12-20 mL min-1, cathode potential of -0.485 ± 0.025 V (vs Ag/AgCl). The maximum H2O2 accumulated concentration of 778 ± 11 mg L-1 was obtained at corresponding production rate of 11.5 ± 0.5 mg L-1 h-1. The overall energy input for the synthesis process was 0.45 ± 0.03 kWh kg-1 H2O2. Cathode potential was the key factor for H2O2 production, which was mainly affected by the air flow rate. This work for the first time proved the potential of MREC as an efficient platform technology for simultaneous electrosynthesis of valuable chemicals and utilization of salinity-gradient energy.

  18. Shock initiation studies on high concentration hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, Stephen A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dattelbaum, Dana M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stahl, David B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gibson, L. Lee [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bartram, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Concentrated hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) has been known to detonate for many years. However, because of its reactivity and the difficulty in handling and confining it, along with the large critical diameter, few studies providing basic information about the initiation and detonation properties have been published. We are conducting a study to understand and quantify the initiation and detonation properties of highly concentrated H{sub 2}O{sub 2} using a gas-driven two-stage gun to produce well defined shock inputs. Multiple magnetic gauges are used to make in-situ measurements of the growth of reaction and subsequent detonation in the liquid. These experiments are designed to be one-dimensional to eliminate any difficulties that might be encountered with large critical diameters. Because of the concern of the reactivity of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with the confining materials, a remote loading system has been developed. The gun is pressurized, then the cell is filled and the experiment shot within less than three minutes. TV cameras are attached to the target so the cell filling can be monitored. Several experiments have been completed on {approx}98 wt % H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O mixtures; initiation has been observed in some experiments that shows homogeneous shock initiation behavior. The initial shock pressurizes and heats the mixture. After an induction time, a thermal explosion type reaction produces an evolving reactive wave that strengthens and eventually overdrives the first wave producing a detonation. From these measurements, we have determined unreacted Hugoniot information, times (distances) to detonation (Pop-plot points) that indicate low sensitivity, and detonation velocities of high concentration H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O solutions that agree with earlier estimates.

  19. Synthesis of tremella-like CoS and its application in sensing of hydrogen peroxide and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wenqin; Yu, Beibei; Wu, Huimin; Wang, Shengfu; Xia, Qinghua; Ding, Yu

    2017-01-01

    Different phases of cobalt sulfides have been fabricated by one-pot hydrothermal method. Comparing all of the prepared materials, and the results revealed that CoS was the most conductive and could accelerate electron transfer. The CoS presented tremella-like and excellent catalytic activities towards hydrogen peroxide and glucose. The sensor based on CoS performed amperometric sensing of hydrogen peroxide in a linear range between 5.00μM and 14.82mM. Meanwhile, sensing of glucose with double-linear range, one is between 5.00μM and 1.10mM, the other is between 1.20mM and 10.20mM. These due to the fact that more and more intermediate species absorb onto electrode surface with increasing the concentration of glucose, which limit the following glucose oxidation. Furthermore, the hydrogen peroxide and glucose sensors based on tremella-like CoS also exhibited excellent selectivity, stability, and reproducibility. Thus, the sensor showed potential utilities in hydrogen peroxide and glucose detection.

  20. Considerations for Storage of High Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) Utilizing Non-Metal Containers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Robin E.; Scott, Joseph P.; Wise, Harry

    2005-01-01

    When working with high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide, it is critical that the storage container be constructed of the proper materials, those which will not degrade to the extent that container breakdown or dangerous decomposition occurs. It has been suggested that the only materials that will safely contain the peroxide for a significant period of time are metals of stainless steel construction or aluminum use as High Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) Containers. The stability and decomposition of HTP will be also discussed as well as various means suggested in the literature to minimize these problems. The dangers of excess oxygen generation are also touched upon.

  1. Resveratrol attenuated hydrogen peroxide-induced myocardial apoptosis by autophagic flux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Yang Huang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Resveratrol is a Sirt-1-specific activator, which also exerts cardioprotective effects that regulate redox signalling during oxidative stress and autophagy during cardiovascular disease (CVD. Objective: This study investigated the protective effects of resveratrol against hydrogen peroxide-induced damage in cardiomyocytes. Design: In this article, hydrogen peroxide-induced autophagy and apoptosis in H9c2 cardiomyoblasts were studied at an increasing concentration from 0 to 100 µM. Results: Resveratrol pretreatment with concentrations of 10, 20, and 50 µM inhibits autophagic apoptosis by increasing p-Akt and Bcl-2 protein levels in H9c2 cells. Interestingly, resveratrol treatment activates the Beclin-1, LC3, p62, and the lysosome-associated protein LAMP2a within 24 h of administration. Conclusions: These results suggest that resveratrol-regulated autophagy may play a role in degrading damaged organelles in H9c2 cells rather than causing apoptosis, and this may be a possible mechanism by which resveratrol protects the heart during CVD.

  2. Iron-mediated induction of sister-chromatid exchanges by hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larramendy, M; Mello-Filho, A C; Martins, E A; Meneghini, R

    1987-05-01

    When Chinese hamster fibroblasts were exposed to hydrogen peroxide or to a system consisting of xanthine oxidase and hypoxanthine, which generates superoxide anion plus hydrogen peroxide, sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) were formed in a dose-dependent manner. When the iron-complexing agent o-phenanthroline was present in the medium, however, the production of these SCEs was completely inhibited. This fact indicates that the Fenton reaction: Fe2+ + H2O2----OH0 + OH- + Fe3+ is responsible for the production of SCEs. When O2- and H2O2 were generated inside the cell by incubation with menadione, the production of SCE was prevented by co-incubation with copper diisopropylsalicylate, a superoxide dismutase mimetic agent. The most likely role of O2- is as a reducing agent of Fe3+: O2- + Fe3+----Fe2+ + O2, so that the sum of this and the Fenton reaction, i.e., the iron-catalyzed Haber-Weiss reaction, provides an explanation for the active oxygen species-induced SCE: H2O2 + O2(-)----OH- + OH0 + O2. According to this view, the OH radical thus produced is the agent which ultimately causes SCE. These results are discussed in comparison with other mechanisms previously proposed for induction of SCE by active oxygen species.

  3. Upregulation of glutathione peroxidase-1 expression and activity by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor promotes high-level protection of PC12 cells against 6-hydroxydopamine and hydrogen peroxide toxicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharib, Ehsan; Gardaneh, Mossa; Shojaei, Sahar

    2013-06-01

    We examined the impact of strong co-presence and function of glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPX-1) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) on protecting the rat dopaminergic pheochromocytoma cell line PC12 against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) and hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) toxicities. Primarily, GPX-1 over-expression by PC12 cells infected with pLV-GPX1 lentivirus vectors significantly increased cell survival against 6-OHDA toxicity (pcells with astro-CM of GDNF-over-secreting astrocytes (Test astro-CM) significantly induced GPX-1 expression, peroxidase enzymatic activity, and intra-cellular glutathione (GSH) levels. These changes paralleled with protection of 90% of GDNF⁺/GPX1⁺ PC12 cells against toxicity, a rate that was 37% up from their un-infected un-treated (GDNF⁻/GPX1⁻) controls (pcells that received only Control astro-CM (GPX⁺/GDNF⁻) (pcell groups, increased cell survival against either compound was further confirmed by increased live cell counts measured by double staining. Following depletion of intra-cellular GSH, only 46% of pLV-GPX1 cells survived 6-OHDA toxicity, whereas over 70% of them were saved upon GDNF treatment (pcells and maximized by addition of GDNF. Comparison analyses established correlations between GPX-1-GDNF co-presence and both enhanced cell protection and diminished levels of activated caspase-3. Our data collectively indicate that GDNF is capable of inducing anti-oxidant activities of intra-cellular GPX-1 and that growth-promoting potential of GDNF and anti-oxidant properties of GPX-1 can, in concert, maximize survival of dopaminergic neurons.

  4. Influence of cysteine and methionine availability on protein peroxide scavenging activity and phenolic stability in emulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lisa; Elias, Ryan J

    2014-03-01

    Plant phenolics are secondary metabolites that have been shown to confer beneficial health effects in humans. However, many of these compounds undergo metal-catalysed oxidation reactions, leading to the generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and other reactive oxygen species that may negatively impact product stability. In proteins, methionine (Met) and cysteine (Cys) are capable of reacting directly with peroxides. Thus, the dairy proteins, casein (CAS) and β-lactoglobulin (BLG), were examined for their ability to scavenge H2O2 (400μM) and influence (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) oxidation (400μM) in Tween- or sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS)-stabilised hexadecane emulsions. To examine the effect that the accessibility of these amino acids have on their peroxide scavenging activities, proteins were pre-treated with tert-butyl hydroperoxide (TBHP), a bulky peroxide, to oxidise only solvent accessible Met residues or H2O2, the smallest peroxide, to oxidise buried Met residues. In CAS treatments, higher Met content yielded greater peroxide scavenging activity and EGCG stability. CAS treatments also showed significantly higher peroxide scavenging activity compared to the corresponding BLG treatment. However, BLG peroxide scavenging activity was greatly enhanced in SDS-stabilised emulsions due to protein denaturation and subsequent exposure of previously buried Cys residues.

  5. Oxidative and Molecular Responses in Capsicum annuum L. after Hydrogen Peroxide, Salicylic Acid and Chitosan Foliar Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Guevara-González, Ramón G.; Rosalía V. Ocampo-Velázquez; Mario M González-Chavira; Andrés Cruz-Hernández; Irineo Torres-Pacheco; Angela María Chapa-Oliver; Flor de Dalia Durán-Flores; Laura Mejía-Teniente

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an important ROS molecule (Reactive oxygen species) that serves as a signal of oxidative stress and activation of signaling cascades as a result of the early response of the plant to biotic stress. This response can also be generated with the application of elicitors, stable molecules that induce the activation of transduction cascades and hormonal pathways, which trigger induced resistance to environmental stress. In this work, we evaluated the endogenous H2O2 pro...

  6. Prediction of severe neonatal hyperbilirubinemia using cord blood hydrogen peroxide: a prospective study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Chieh Chou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We hypothesized that cord blood hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 could be utilized to predict the severity of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. METHODS: We prospectively enrolled term or near-term healthy neonates. Cord blood and capillary blood at three days of age were measured for hydrogen peroxide and bilirubin concentrations. For newborns with hyperbilirubinemia, further blood samples were obtained at five and seven days of age. Newborns were divided into severe or less severe hyperbilirubinemic groups (peak bilirubin ≥17 mg/dL or not. The sensitivity, specificity, and negative predictive values were determined. RESULTS: There were 158 neonates enrolled. The incidence of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia was 30.5% for a concentration ≥15 mg/dl. The rising patterns were similar among bilirubin concentrations and hydrogen peroxide levels during the first few days of life. There was a strong positive correlation between bilirubin concentrations and hydrogen peroxide levels after correlation analysis. The rate of severe hyperbilirubinemia was 13.3%. It revealed that a cord blood hydrogen peroxide signal level of 2500 counts/10 seconds was an appropriate cut-off for predicting severe hyperbilirubinemia. Sensitivity and the negative predictive value were 76.2% and 93.3%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings confirm that hydrogen peroxide levels and bilirubin concentrations in cord and neonatal blood are closely related. A cord blood hydrogen peroxide level above 2500 counts/10 seconds associated with a high predictive value for severe hyperbilirubinemia. This method provides information about which neonate should be closely followed after discharge from the nursery.

  7. Bioelectrochemical systems with oleylamine-stabilized gold nanostructures and horseradish peroxidase for hydrogen peroxide sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koposova, Ekaterina; Liu, Xiao; Kisner, Alexandre; Ermolenko, Yury; Shumilova, Galina; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Mourzina, Yulia

    2014-07-15

    This paper describes ultrathin gold nanowires (NWs) and nanoparticles (NPs) prepared by oleylamine (OA) synthesis and their assembly with horseradish peroxidase enzyme (HRP) for bioelectrochemical sensing of hydrogen peroxide for the first time. The immobilization of oxidoreductase enzyme HRP on the electrodes modified with OA gold nanostructures (OANSs) is discussed. The HRP-sensor characteristics, namely sensitivity, working concentration range, sensor-to-sensor and measurement-to-measurement reproducibility as well as long-term stability, are improved significantly compared to the planar thin-film sensors by using OANSs. The thin-film gold electrodes modified with OANWs and OANPs exhibit a catalytic activity towards oxidation of hydrogen peroxide with a working concentration range from 20 µM to 500 µM, a sensitivity of 0.031 A M(-1) cm(-2) (RSD 0.046) and 0.027 A M(-1) cm(-2) (RSD 0.045), and a detection limit of 5 µM and 8 µM, respectively (RSD near the detection limits was 9-12%). Our study shows that ultrathin gold nanowires and nanoparticles prepared by oleylamine synthesis are prospective materials to assemble biomolecules into functional nanoarchitectures for enzyme-based bioelectrochemical sensors, metalloprotein bioelectronics, and energy research.

  8. DISY. The direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide, a bridge for innovative applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzzoni, R.; Perego, C. [Eni S.p.A., Novara (Italy). Research Center for Non-Conventional Energies

    2011-07-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is largely recognized as the green oxidant of choice for future sustainable processes. The current industrial production still goes through the old anthraquinone process, a complex, two-step process suffering from a low specific productivity. Following the development of TS-1/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} based selective oxidation processes e.g. propylene epoxidation, cyclohexanone ammoximation and the new benzene direct oxidation to phenol, there has been an incentive for the development of a new technology, simpler and with better economics. DISY process, based on direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from hydrogen and oxygen, is highly suitable to the design of integrated selective oxidation processes as well as for production of commercial-grade high concentration aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions. Catalyst and process development up to pilot scale are described. (orig.)

  9. Effects of retinoic acid and hydrogen peroxide on sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1a activation during adipogenic differentiation of 3T3-L1 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Eldaim, Mabrouk A. Abd; Okamatsu-Ogura, Yuko; Terao, Akira; Kimura, Kazuhiro

    2010-01-01

    Both retinoic acid (RA) and oxidative stress (H2O2) increased transcription and cleavage of membrane-bound sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP)-1, leading to enhanced transcription of fatty acid synthase (FAS) in hepatoma cells. On the other hand, RA and H2O2 decreased and increased lipogenesis in adipocytes, respectively, although roles of SREBP-1 activation in these effects remain to be elucidated. To elucidate its involvement, we examined the activation of SREBP...

  10. Characterization of hydrogen peroxide-resistant Acinetobacter species isolated during the Mars Phoenix spacecraft assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derecho, I; McCoy, K B; Vaishampayan, P; Venkateswaran, K; Mogul, R

    2014-10-01

    The microbiological inventory of spacecraft and the associated assembly facility surfaces represent the primary pool of forward contaminants that may impact the integrity of life-detection missions. Herein, we report on the characterization of several strains of hydrogen peroxide-resistant Acinetobacter, which were isolated during the Mars Phoenix lander assembly. All Phoenix-associated Acinetobacter strains possessed very high catalase specific activities, and the specific strain, A. gyllenbergii 2P01AA, displayed a survival against hydrogen peroxide (no loss in 100 mM H2O2 for 1 h) that is perhaps the highest known among Gram-negative and non-spore-forming bacteria. Proteomic characterizations reveal a survival mechanism inclusive of proteins coupled to peroxide degradation (catalase and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase), energy/redox management (dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase), protein synthesis/folding (EF-G, EF-Ts, peptidyl-tRNA hydrolase, DnaK), membrane functions (OmpA-like protein and ABC transporter-related protein), and nucleotide metabolism (HIT family hydrolase). Together, these survivability and biochemical parameters support the hypothesis that oxidative tolerance and the related biochemical features are the measurable phenotypes or outcomes for microbial survival in the spacecraft assembly facilities, where the low-humidity (desiccation) and clean (low-nutrient) conditions may serve as selective pressures. Hence, the spacecraft-associated Acinetobacter, due to the conferred oxidative tolerances, may ultimately hinder efforts to reduce spacecraft bioburden when using chemical sterilants, thus suggesting that non-spore-forming bacteria may need to be included in the bioburden accounting for future life-detection missions.

  11. MODIFIED OPAL: A NOVEL STABILIZER FOR HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF PULPS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XuerenQian; XianhuiAn; WenboLiu; GangYu; ZhanqianSong

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of modified opal as the stabilizer ofhydrogen peroxide bleaching was investigated. Theresults showed that the modified opal in place ofsodium silicate as the stabilizer of hydrogen peroxidebleaching is feasible. At the same dosage, above 3%ISO can be increased for both wheat straw pulp anddeinked pulp. The stabilizing ability of the modifiedopal to hydrogen peroxide bleaching of pulp isimproved markedly. It is favorable for bleaching toincrease temperature and time within a permissiveextent. The suitable process conditions are I0% ofpulp consistency, 3% of hydrogen peroxide, 1.5% ofsodium hydroxide, 3% of the modified opal, 70~"and 60 min when the modified opal is used as thestabilizer of hydrogen peroxide bleaching. At theseconditions, the brightness gain can reach about 16%ISO for wheat straw pulp. In addition, it is favorablefor bleaching to add a little magnesium sulfate whenthe modified opal is used as the stabilizer ofhydrogen peroxide bleaching, the brightness of pulpcan increase 1%ISO if0.05% of magnesium sulfate isadded. The cost analysis indicated that the modifiedopal is superior to sodium silicate as the stabilizer ofhydrogen peroxide bleaching in economical aspectand has further the potential of market development.

  12. Cytoplasmic expression of recombinant interleukin-2 and interleukin-4 proteins results in hydrogen peroxide accumulation and reduction in catalase activity in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S Hejazi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and the purpose of the study: The Reactive oxygen species (ROS is induced in the cells following various stresses but the effect of recombinant protein expression on ROS generation has not been studied yet. In this study, H2O2 concentration and catalase activity variations and their correlation with cell growth following cytoplasmic expression of human interleukin-2 (hIL-2 and mouse interleukin-4 (mIL-4 in Escherichia coli were investigated. Additionally, the effect of recombinant protein expression under different conditions was compared to the effect of foreign DNA introduction on these factors. Methods: Plasmids pEThIL-2 and pETmIL-4 were used for expression of human interleukin-2 (hIL-2 and mouse interleukin-4 (mIL-4 inside the cytoplasm of the cells. Having confirmed protein expression using SDS-PAGE analysis and ELISA assay, H2O2 concentration and catalase activity were measured at various ODs. Results and major conclusion: Empty vector introduction increased significantly H2O2 concentration of the cells. However, H2O2 concentration in hIL-2 and mIL-4 expressing cells was significantly higher than its concentration in empty vector transformed cells. Catalase activity was reduced in foreign DNA introduced cells. It was more lowered following expression of recombinant proteins. Results of this study revealed the relationship between foreign DNA introduction and protein expression with H2O2 elevation and catalase activity reduction. There was also correlation between H2O2 elevation and reduction in catalase activity with the cell growth depression.

  13. Evaluation of the biological efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour decontamination in wards of an Australian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, H-T; White, P; Sheorey, H; Cocks, J; Waters, M-J

    2011-10-01

    This study assessed the efficacy of a 'dry' hydrogen peroxide vapour decontamination in an Australian hospital via a two-armed study. The in vivo arm examined the baseline bacterial counts in high-touch zones within wards and evaluated the efficacy of cleaning with a neutral detergent followed by either hydrogen peroxide vapour decontamination, or a manual terminal clean with bleach or Det-Sol 500. The in vitro arm examined the efficacy of hydrogen peroxide vapour decontamination on a variety of different surfaces commonly found in the wards of an Australian hospital, deliberately seeded with a known concentration of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE). All bacterial counts were evaluated by a protocol of contact plate method. In the in vivo arm, 33.3% of the high-touch areas assessed had aerobic bacterial count below the detection limit (i.e. no bacteria recoverable) post hydrogen peroxide decontamination, and in all circumstances the highest microbial density was ≤3 cfu/cm(2), while in the in vitro arm there was at least a reduction in bacterial load by a factor of 10 at all surfaces investigated. These results showed that dry hydrogen peroxide vapour room decontamination is highly effective on a range of surfaces, although the cleanliness data obtained by these methods cannot be easily compared among the different surfaces as recovery of organisms is affected by the nature of the surface.

  14. Role of mitochondrial dysfunction in hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Ming Li; Hong Zhou; Qian Cai; Guang-Xia Xiao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells.METHODS: Hydrogen peroxide-induced apoptosis of human intestinal epithelial cell line SW-480 was established. Cell apoptosis was determined by Annexin-V and PI doublestained flow cytometry and DNA gel electrophoresis.Morphological changes were examined with light and electron microscopy. For other observations, mitochondrial function,cytochrome c release, mitochondrial translocation and membrane potential were determined simultaneously.RESULTS: Percentage of apoptotic cells induced with 400μ mol/L hydrogen peroxide increased significantly at I h or 3h after stimulation and recovered rapidly. Meanwhile percentage of apoptotic cells induced with 4 mmol/L hydrogen peroxide increased with time. In accordance with these changes, we observed decreased mitochondrial function in 400 μmol/L H2O2-stimualted cells at 1 h or 3 h and in 4 mmol/L H2O2-stimualted cells at times examined.Correspondingly, swelling cristae and vacuole-like mitochondria were noted. Release of cytochrome c,decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial translocation were also found to be the early signs of apoptosis.CONCLUSION: Dysfunctional mitochondria play a role in the apoptosis of SW-480 cell line induced by hydrogen peroxide.

  15. Hydrogen peroxide and polyamines act as double edged swords in plant abiotic stress responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamala Gupta

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The specific genetic changes through which plants adapt to the multitude of environmental stresses are possible because of the molecular regulations in the system. These intricate regulatory mechanisms once unveiled will surely raise interesting questions. Polyamines and hydrogen peroxide have been suggested to be important signalling molecules during biotic and abiotic stresses. Hydrogen peroxide plays a versatile role from orchestrating physiological processes to stress response. It helps to achieve acclimatization and tolerance to stress by coordinating intra-cellular and systemic signalling systems. Polyamines, on the other hand, are low molecular weight polycationic aliphatic amines, which have been implicated in various stress responses. It is quite interesting to note that both hydrogen peroxide and polyamines have a fine line of inter-relation between them since the catabolic pathways of the latter releases hydrogen peroxide. In this review we have tried to illustrate the roles and their multifaceted functions of these two important signalling molecules based on current literature. This review also highlights the fact that over accumulation of hydrogen peroxide and polyamines can be detrimental for plant cells leading to toxicity and pre-mature cell death.

  16. The hydrogen peroxide impact on larval settlement and metamorphosis of abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta is an important economic mollusk. The settlement and metamorphosis are two critical stages during its development period, which has direct influence on abalone survival and production. The influence of reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide) on abalone embryo and juvenile development were examined in this study. Larvae of Haliotis diversicolor supertexta were induced to settlement and metamorphose by exposure to seawater supplemented with hydrogen peroxide. They had the best performance at 800 μmol/L. The concentration of 1 000 μmol/L or higher was toxic to the larvae, as the larvae could settle down only at benthic diatom plates without complete metamorphosis. In addition, H2O2 adding time was critical to the larval performance. 24h after two-day post-fertilization was proved to be the optimal adding time. In this paper, two action mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide are discussed: (1) hydrogen peroxide has direct toxicity to ciliated cells, thus cause apoptosis; (2) hydrogen peroxide, as a product from catecholamines' autoxidation process in vivo, can reverse this process to produce neuro-transmitters to induce abalone metamorphosis.

  17. Activation of ENaC in collecting duct cells by prorenin and its receptor PRR: involvement of Nox4-derived hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaohan; Wang, Fei; Liu, Mi; Yang, Kevin T; Nau, Adam; Kohan, Donald E; Reese, Van; Richardson, Russell S; Yang, Tianxin

    2016-06-01

    The collecting duct (CD) has been recognized as an important source of prorenin/renin, and it also expresses (pro)renin receptor (PRR). The goal of this study was to examine the hypothesis that prorenin or renin via PRR regulates epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) activity in mpkCCD cells. Transepithelial Na(+) transport was measured by using a conventional epithelial volt-ohmmeter and was expressed as the calculated equivalent current (Ieq). Amiloride-inhibitable Ieq was used as a reflection of ENaC activity. Administration of prorenin in the nanomolar range induced a significant increase in Ieq that was detectable as early as 1 min, peaked at 5 min, and gradually returned to baseline within 15 min. These changes in Ieq were completely prevented by a newly developed PRR decoy inhibitor, PRO20. Prorenin-induced Ieq was inhibitable by amiloride. Compared with prorenin, renin was less effective in stimulating Ieq Prorenin-induced Ieq was attenuated by apocynin but enhanced by tempol, the latter effect being prevented by catalase. In response to prorenin treatment, the levels of total reactive oxygen species and H2O2 were both increased, as detected by spin-trap analysis and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-Glo H2O2 assay, respectively. Both siRNA-mediated Nox4 knockdown and the dual Nox1/4 inhibitor GKT137892 attenuated prorenin-induced Ieq Overall, our results demonstrate that activation of PRR by prorenin stimulates ENaC activity in CD cells via Nox4-derived H2O2.

  18. Dietary Phenolic Compounds Interfere with the Fate of Hydrogen Peroxide in Human Adipose Tissue but Do Not Directly Inhibit Primary Amine Oxidase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpéné, Christian; Hasnaoui, Mounia; Balogh, Balázs; Matyus, Peter; Fernández-Quintela, Alfredo; Rodríguez, Víctor; Mercader, Josep; Portillo, Maria P

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol has been reported to inhibit monoamine oxidases (MAO). Many substrates or inhibitors of neuronal MAO interact also with other amine oxidases (AO) in peripheral organs, such as semicarbazide-sensitive AO (SSAO), known as primary amine oxidase, absent in neurones, but abundant in adipocytes. We asked whether phenolic compounds (resveratrol, pterostilbene, quercetin, and caffeic acid) behave as MAO and SSAO inhibitors. AO activity was determined in human adipose tissue. Computational docking and glucose uptake assays were performed in 3D models of human AO proteins and in adipocytes, respectively. Phenolic compounds fully inhibited the fluorescent detection of H2O2 generated during MAO and SSAO activation by tyramine and benzylamine. They also quenched H2O2-induced fluorescence in absence of biological material and were unable to abolish the oxidation of radiolabelled tyramine and benzylamine. Thus, phenolic compounds hampered H2O2 detection but did not block AO activity. Only resveratrol and quercetin partially impaired MAO-dependent [(14)C]-tyramine oxidation and behaved as MAO inhibitors. Phenolic compounds counteracted the H2O2-dependent benzylamine-stimulated glucose transport. This indicates that various phenolic compounds block downstream effects of H2O2 produced by biogenic or exogenous amine oxidation without directly inhibiting AO. Phenolic compounds remain of interest regarding their capacity to limit oxidative stress rather than inhibiting AO.

  19. Dietary Phenolic Compounds Interfere with the Fate of Hydrogen Peroxide in Human Adipose Tissue but Do Not Directly Inhibit Primary Amine Oxidase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Carpéné

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol has been reported to inhibit monoamine oxidases (MAO. Many substrates or inhibitors of neuronal MAO interact also with other amine oxidases (AO in peripheral organs, such as semicarbazide-sensitive AO (SSAO, known as primary amine oxidase, absent in neurones, but abundant in adipocytes. We asked whether phenolic compounds (resveratrol, pterostilbene, quercetin, and caffeic acid behave as MAO and SSAO inhibitors. AO activity was determined in human adipose tissue. Computational docking and glucose uptake assays were performed in 3D models of human AO proteins and in adipocytes, respectively. Phenolic compounds fully inhibited the fluorescent detection of H2O2 generated during MAO and SSAO activation by tyramine and benzylamine. They also quenched H2O2-induced fluorescence in absence of biological material and were unable to abolish the oxidation of radiolabelled tyramine and benzylamine. Thus, phenolic compounds hampered H2O2 detection but did not block AO activity. Only resveratrol and quercetin partially impaired MAO-dependent [14C]-tyramine oxidation and behaved as MAO inhibitors. Phenolic compounds counteracted the H2O2-dependent benzylamine-stimulated glucose transport. This indicates that various phenolic compounds block downstream effects of H2O2 produced by biogenic or exogenous amine oxidation without directly inhibiting AO. Phenolic compounds remain of interest regarding their capacity to limit oxidative stress rather than inhibiting AO.

  20. Endogenous hydrogen peroxide is a key factor in the yeast extract-induced activation of biphenyl biosynthesis in cell cultures of Sorbus aucuparia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiaofang; Lei, Caiyan; Huang, Lili; Li, Xing; Hao, He; Du, Zhigao; Wang, Hong; Ye, Hechun; Beerhues, Ludger; Liu, Benye

    2012-01-01

    Biphenyls are unique phytoalexins produced by plants belonging to Pyrinae, a subtribe of the economically important Rosaceae family. The formation of aucuparin, a well-known biphenyl, is induced by yeast extract (YE) in cell cultures of Sorbus aucuparia. However, the molecular mechanism underlying YE-induced activation of biphenyl biosynthesis remains unknown. Here we demonstrate that the addition of YE to the cell cultures results in a burst of reactive oxygen species (ROS; H(2)O(2) and O(2) (-)), followed by transcriptional activation of the biphenyl synthase 1 gene (BIS1) encoding the key enzyme of the biphenyl biosynthetic pathway and aucuparin accumulation. Pretreatment of the cell cultures with ROS scavenger dihydrolipoic acid and NADPH oxidase-specific inhibitor diphenylene iodonium abolished all of the above YE-induced biological events. However, when the cell cultures was pretreated with superoxide dismutase specific inhibitor N,N-diethyldithiocarbamic acid, although O(2) (-) continued to be generated, the H(2)O(2) accumulation, BIS1 expression and aucuparin production were blocked. Interestingly, exogenous supply of H(2)O(2) in the range of 0.05-10 mM failed to induce aucuparin accumulation. These results indicate that endogenous generation of H(2)O(2) rather than that of O(2) (-) is a key factor in YE-induced accumulation of biphenyl phytoalexins in cell cultures of S. aucuparia.

  1. Electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide at a waxed graphite electrode modified with platinum-decorated carbon nanotubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Qiao-cui; ZENG Wen-fang; ZHU Yunu

    2009-01-01

    Platinum-decorated carbon nanotubes (CNT-Pt) were produced by the chemical reduction method. A novel modified electrode was fabricated by intercalated CNT-Pt in the surface of waxed graphite, which provided excellent electro-catalytic activity and selectivity for both oxidation and reduction of hydrogen peroxide. The current response of the modified electrode for hydrogen peroxide was very rapid and the detection limits in amperometry are 2.5×10-6 mol/L at reduction potential and 4.8×10-6 mol/L at oxidation potential. It was desmonstrated that the electrode with high electro-activity was a suitable basic electrode for preparing enzyme electrode.

  2. Roles of Catalase and Trehalose in the Protection from Hydrogen Peroxide Toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimoto, Takuto; Watanabe, Takeru; Furuta, Masakazu; Kataoka, Michihiko; Kishida, Masao

    2016-01-01

    The roles of catalase and trehalose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae subject to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) treatment were examined by measuring the catalase activity and intracellular trehalose levels in mutants lacking catalase or trehalose synthetase. Intracellular trehalose was elevated but the survival rate after H2O2 treatment remained low in mutants with deletion of the Catalase T gene. On the other hand, deletion of the trehalose synthetase gene increased the catalase activity in mutated yeast to levels higher than those in the wild-type strain, and these mutants exhibited some degree of tolerance to H2O2 treatment. These results suggest that Catalase T is critical in the yeast response to oxidative damage caused by H2O2 treatment, but trehalose also plays a role in protection against H2O2 treatment.

  3. Hydrogen peroxide inhibits transforming growth factor-β1-induced cell cycle arrest by promoting Smad3 linker phosphorylation through activation of Akt-ERK1/2-linked signaling pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jiyeon; Park, Seong Ji; Jo, Eun Ji [Department of Biochemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hui-Young [Department of Internal Medicine, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Suntaek [Laboratory of Cancer Cell Biology, Lee Gil Ya Cancer and Diabetes Institute, Gachon University, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong-Jin [CHA Cancer Institute, CHA University of Medicine and Science, Seoul 135-081 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Chul, E-mail: bckim@kangwon.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry, College of Natural Sciences, Kangwon National University, Chuncheon 200-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-06-14

    Highlights: •H{sub 2}O{sub 2} inhibits TGF-β1-induced cell cycle arrest. •H{sub 2}O{sub 2} induces Smad3 linker phosphorylation through Akt-ERK1/2 pathway. •H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated suppression of TGF-β signal requires Smad3 linker phosphorylation. •This is a first report about interplay between H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and growth inhibition pathway. -- Abstract: Hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) functions as a second messenger in growth factor receptor-mediated intracellular signaling cascade and is tumorigenic by virtue of its ability to promote cell proliferation; however, the mechanisms underlying the growth stimulatory action of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} are less understood. Here we report an important mechanism for antagonistic effects of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on growth inhibitory response to transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). In Mv1Lu and HepG2 cells, pretreatment of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (0.05–0.2 mM) completely blocked TGF-β1-mediated induction of p15{sup INK4B} expression and increase of its promoter activity. Interestingly, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} selectively suppressed the transcriptional activation potential of Smad3, not Smad2, in the absence of effects on TGF-β1-induced phosphorylation of the COOH-tail SSXS motif of Smad3 and its nuclear translocation. Mechanism studies showed that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} increases the phosphorylation of Smad3 at the middle linker region in a concentration- and time-dependent manner and this effect is mediated by activation of extracellular signal-activated kinase 1/2 through Akt. Furthermore, expression of a mutant Smad3 in which linker phosphorylation sites were ablated significantly abrogated the inhibitory effects of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} on TGF-β1-induced increase of p15{sup INK4B}-Luc reporter activity and blockade of cell cycle progression from G1 to S phase. These findings for the first time define H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as a signaling molecule that modulate Smad3 linker phosphorylation and its transcriptional activity, thus providing

  4. Improved activity and thermo-stability of the horse radish peroxidase with graphene quantum dots and its application in fluorometric detection of hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoyan, Zhou; Yuanyuan, Jiang; Zaijun, Li; Zhiguo, Gu; Guangli, Wang

    2016-08-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have received extensive concern in many fields such as optical probe, bioimaging and biosensor. However, few reports refer on the influence of GQDs on enzyme performance. The paper reports two kinds of graphene quantum dots (termed as GO-GQDs and N,S-GQDs) that were prepared by cutting of graphene oxide and pyrolysis of citric acid and L-cysteine, and their use for the horse radish peroxidase (HRP) modification. The study reveals that GO-GQDs and N,S-GQDs exhibit an opposite effect on the HRP performance. Only HRP modified with GO-GQDs offers an enhanced activity (more than 1.9 times of pristine enzyme) and thermo-stability. This is because GO-GQDs offer a larger conjugate rigid plane and fewer hydrophilic groups compared to N,S-GQDs. The characteristics can make GO-GQDs induce a proper conformational change in the HRP for the catalytic performance, improving the enzyme activity and thermo-stability. The HRP modified with green luminescent GO-GQDs was also employed as a biocatalyst for sensing of H2O2 by a fluorometric sensor. The colorless tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) is oxidized into blue oxidized TMB in the presence of H2O2 by the assistance of HRP/GO-GQDs, leading to an obvious fluorescence quenching. The fluorescence intensity linearly decreases with the increase of H2O2 concentration in the range from 2 × 10 - 9 to 2 × 10 - 4 M with the detection limit of 6.8 × 10 - 10 M. The analytical method provides the advantage of sensitivity, stability and accuracy compared with present H2O2 sensors based on the pristine HRP. It has been successfully applied in the determination of H2O2 in real water samples. The study also opens a new avenue for modification of enzyme activity and stability that offers great promise in applications such as biological catalysis, biosensing and enzyme engineering.

  5. Hydrogen peroxide (H/sub 2/O/sub 2/) stimulates the active transport of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) into platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosin, T.R.

    1986-03-01

    Platelets function in a variety of physiological and pathological processes which may be altered by oxidant injury. One such process is the active transport 5-HT, which is an important mechanism in the control of circulating 5-HT levels. Exposure of mouse platelets (10/sup 8//ml) to H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ caused a time-dependent and dose-dependent increase in 5-HT (10/sup -7/M) uptake. The uptake 4 and 10 min following H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ (50 ..mu..M) was 228% and 145% of control values, respectively. Fluoxetine (10/sup -6/M) blocked all 5-HT uptake and catalase (1500 U/ml) blocked the H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-stimulated uptake. Enzymatically produced H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ (glucose/glucose oxidase) and xanthine (X)/xanthine oxidase (XO) generated oxygen radicals produced quantitatively and qualitatively similar results. The stimulatory response of platelets to X/XO generated oxidants was unaffected by superoxide dismutase (250 U/ml) but, was inhibited using heat-denatured XO, allopurinol (0.5 mM) and catalase; fluoxetine inhibited all 5-HT uptake. Platelets exposed to X/XO in the presence of chelated (EDTA, 100 ..mu..M) or unchelated FeSO/sub 4/, FeNH/sub 4/(SO/sub 4/)/sub 2/ or CuCl (50 ..mu..M) did not have altered 5-HT uptake. These data indicate that brief exposure of platelets to physiological levels of H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ results in marked, reversible stimulation of active 5-HT uptake which may represent a homeostatic defense mechanism when H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ is elevated in the platelet microenvironment.

  6. Using Isothermal Microcalorimetry to Determine Compatibility of Structural Materials with High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostowski, Rudy; Villegas, Yvonne; Nwosisi, Genne; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) propellant (equal to or greater than 70%) offers many advantages in space launch applications. However, materials used in construction of propulsion systems must be shown to be compatible with HTP. Isothermal Microcalorimetry (IMC) was used to determine the compatibility of several metallic and non-metallic materials with 90% HTP. The results of these experiments agreed with those from immersion bath tests when the values were converted to % Active Oxygen Loss per week (%AOL/wk).

  7. Influence of sericin in alleviating the hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress in silkworm Bombyx mori: role of the amino acids

    OpenAIRE

    AS Micheal; Subramanyam, M.

    2014-01-01

    Sericin is an important peptide derived from silk fibre spun by the silkworm Bombyx mori and has various biological activities. The aim of the present study was to characterize the major constituents of sericin that are providing cytoprotective effect against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell damage in midgut epithelial cells and hemocytes of silkworm. Extracted sericin was subjected to LCMS analysis for amino acid composition. Isolated cells of midgut and hemocytes were incubated with sericin o...

  8. Chemiluminescence assay for catechin based on generation of hydrogen peroxide in basic solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, Hidetoshi; Kanemitsu, Mahina; Tajima, Noriko; Maeda, Masako

    2002-11-20

    We have determined that the catechin group in basic solution efficiently produces hydrogen peroxide; moreover, a highly sensitive analysis methodology was developed to measure catechin employing a peroxalate chemiluminescence detection system. Identification of hydrogen peroxide generated by catechin was determined by ESR as well as peroxalate chemiluminescence using catalase and SOD. As a result, catechin-generated superoxide by electron reduction to dissolved oxygen in basic solution, followed by production of hydrogen peroxide through dismutation reaction. This method could measure several tea catechins, (+)-catechin (CC), (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCg), (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG) and gallic acid, with measurement range from 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -3} mol/l and sensitivity of 10{sup -8} mol/l. This method was also applied to the determination of total catechin levels in green tea, black tea and roasted green tea.

  9. Effect of hydrogen peroxide topical application on the enamel and composite resin surfaces and interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutra Rodrigo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The objective of the present study was to analyze the superficial roughness and the interface between enamel and composite resin restorations after dental bleaching procedure. Materials and Methods: Black′s class V cavities were made and restored with composite resin, and the whole set, enamel-restorative material, was treated with 35% hydrogen peroxide. Seven procedures of 30 min each were performed. A profilometric assessment was carried out before and after the treatment of each sample, and roughness scores were obtained. Treated and untreated samples were analyzed under scanning electronic microscope and images of their surface were obtained. Results and Conclusion: The treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide caused no alteration in the interface between enamel and composite resin, Tetric Ceram, fillings and the topical application of 35% hydrogen peroxide on enamel and composite resin, Tetric Ceram, caused an alteration of their surface topography, featuring a predominance of depressions after the bleaching treatment.

  10. Polarographic Studies on Associations of Midecamycin and Chloroquine with Hydrogen Peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ning; SONG Jun-feng; XU Mao-tian; ZHANG Ya

    2005-01-01

    The associations of each of midecamycin and chloroquine phosphate to hydrogen peroxide were studied by using linear-potential scan polarography. In a 0.15 mol/L KH2PO4-NaOH(pH 7.4) buffer, the association ratio of the association complex of midecamycin to hydrogen peroxide is 1∶1, and the apparent association constant is 7.18. While in a 0.04 mol/L NH3·H2O-NH4Cl(pH 9.5) buffer, the association ratio and the apparent association constant of the association complex of chloroquine phosphate to hydrogen peroxide are 1∶1 and 45.4, respectively. The formation of the association complexes stabilizes H2O2 and results in the accumulation of H2O2, which is baneful to human body.

  11. Chemiluminescence behavior of sodium hydrogen carbonate in the potassium permanganate-hydrogen peroxide reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Chemiluminescence (CL) phenomenon of hydrogen peroxide with potassium permanganate in the presence of sodium hydrogen carbonate was reported.Effects of the surfactant on the CL system were investigated.Nonionic surfactants could effectively increase the CL signal.Radical scavengers and organic reagents such as nitro blue tetrazolium chloride (NBT),cytochrome c,sodium azide,ascorbic acid,thiourea,tert-butanol and dimethyl sulphoxide were used to study the emitting species.CL emission spectrum was recorded and the results showed that the maximal emission wavelengths of NaHCO3-H2O2-KMnO4 system were 440 and 634 nm.The mechanism was discussed based on electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra,fluorescence spectra and UV-vis absorption spectra.The addition of rhodamine B or uranine into this CL system enhanced the CL signal.It was due to part of the energy transfer from singlet oxygen and excited triplet dimers of two CO2 molecules to rhodamine B or uranine.The CL could be induced by excited rhodamine B or uranine.

  12. Formation of Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Hydrogen Peroxide in Electron Irradiated Crystalline Water Ice

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, W; Kaiser, R I; Zheng, Weijun; Jewitt, David; Kaiser, Ralf I.

    2006-01-01

    Water ice is abundant both astrophysically, for example in molecular clouds, and in planetary systems. The Kuiper belt objects, many satellites of the outer solar system, the nuclei of comets and some planetary rings are all known to be water-rich. Processing of water ice by energetic particles and ultraviolet photons plays an important role in astrochemistry. To explore the detailed nature of this processing, we have conducted a systematic laboratory study of the irradiation of crystalline water ice in an ultrahigh vacuum setup by energetic electrons holding a linear energy transfer of 4.3 +/- 0.1 keV mm-1. The irradiated samples were monitored during the experiment both on line and in situ via mass spectrometry (gas phase) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (solid state). We observed the production of hydrogen and oxygen, both molecular and atomic, and of hydrogen peroxide. The likely reaction mechanisms responsible for these species are discussed. Additional formation routes were derived from the ...

  13. Influence of sericin in alleviating the hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress in silkworm Bombyx mori: role of the amino acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AS Micheal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Sericin is an important peptide derived from silk fibre spun by the silkworm Bombyx mori and has various biological activities. The aim of the present study was to characterize the major constituents of sericin that are providing cytoprotective effect against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell damage in midgut epithelial cells and hemocytes of silkworm. Extracted sericin was subjected to LCMS analysis for amino acid composition. Isolated cells of midgut and hemocytes were incubated with sericin or with mixture of serine and aspartic acid prior to suboptimal concentration of hydrogen peroxide treatment. Sericin as well as amino acid mixture reduced the activity of antioxidant enzymes triggered by hydrogen peroxide, inhibited oxidative derivatives such as protein carbonyl and malondialdehyde and increased antioxidant capacity in both the cells studied. Furthermore, sericin and amino acid mixture significantly decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species as assessed by fluorescent detection. These results suggest that major constituent amino acids of sericin defend midgut epithelial cells and hemocytes against oxidative damage by scavenging reactive oxygen species rather than activating antioxidant enzyme system thereby inhibiting cell damage.

  14. Ferricytochrome c protects mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlák, Erik; Fabian, Marian; Robinson, Neal C; Musatov, Andrej

    2010-11-30

    An excess of ferricytochrome c protects purified mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase and bound cardiolipin from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative modification. All of the peroxide-induced changes within cytochrome c oxidase, such as oxidation of Trp(19,IV) and Trp(48,VIIc), partial dissociation of subunits VIa and VIIa, and generation of cardiolipin hydroperoxide, no longer take place in the presence of ferricytochrome c. Furthermore, ferricytochrome c suppresses the yield of H(2)O(2)-induced free radical detectable by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy within cytochrome c oxidase. These protective effects are based on two mechanisms. The first involves the peroxidase/catalase-like activity of ferricytochrome c, which results in the decomposition of H(2)O(2), with the apparent bimolecular rate constant of 5.1±1.0M(-1)s(-1). Although this value is lower than the rate constant of a specialized peroxidase, the activity is sufficient to eliminate H(2)O(2)-induced damage to cytochrome c oxidase in the presence of an excess of ferricytochrome c. The second mechanism involves ferricytochrome c-induced quenching of free radicals generated within cytochrome c oxidase. These results suggest that ferricytochrome c may have an important role in protection of cytochrome c oxidase and consequently the mitochondrion against oxidative damage.

  15. CuO impregnated activated carbon for catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Rey-May; Chen, Shih-Hsiung

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents an original approach to the removal of phenol in synthetic wastewater by catalytic wet peroxide oxidation with copper binding activated carbon (CuAC) catalysts. The characteristics and oxidation performance of CuAC in the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation of phenol were studied in a batch reactor at 80 degrees C. Complete conversion of the oxidant, hydrogen peroxide, was observed with CuAC catalyst in 20 min oxidation, and a highly efficient phenol removal and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement were achieved in the first 30 min. The good oxidation performance of CuAC catalyst was contributed to the activity enhancement of copper oxide, which was binding in the carbon matrix. It can be concluded that the efficiency of oxidation dominated by the residual H2O2 in this study. An over 90% COD removal was achieved by using the multiple-step addition in this catalytic oxidation.

  16. Protective Effect of Total Phenolic Compounds from Inula helenium on Hydrogen Peroxide-induced Oxidative Stress in SH-SY5Y Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J; Zhao, Y M; Zhang, B; Guo, C Y

    2015-01-01

    Inula helenium has been reported to contain a large amount of phenolic compounds, which have shown promise in scavenging free radicals and prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. This study is to investigate the neuroprotective effects of total phenolic compounds from I. helenium on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage in human SH-SY5Y cells. Antioxidant capacity of total phenolic compounds was determined by radical scavenging activity, the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species and superoxide dismutase activity. The cytotoxicity of total phenolic compounds was determined using a cell counting kit-8 assay. The effect of total phenolic compounds on cell apoptosis due to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage was detected by Hoechst 33258 and Annexin-V/PI staining using fluorescence microscope and flow cytometry, respectively. Mitochondrial function was evaluated using the mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial ATP synthesis by JC-1 dye and high performance liquid chromatography, respectively. It was shown that hydrogen peroxide significantly induced the loss of cell viability, increment of apoptosis, formation of reactive oxygen species, reduction of superoxide dismutase activity, decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential and a decrease in adenosine triphosphate production. On the other hand, total phenolic compounds dose-dependently reversed these effects. This study suggests that total phenolic compounds exert neuroprotective effects against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative damage via blocking reactive oxygen species production and improving mitochondrial function. The potential of total phenolic compounds and its neuroprotective mechanisms in attenuating hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress-related cytotoxicity is worth further exploration.

  17. The Hog1 MAP Kinase Promotes the Recovery from Cell Cycle Arrest Induced by Hydrogen Peroxide in Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, Inês; Alonso-Monge, Rebeca; Pla, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell cycle progression in response to environmental conditions is controlled via specific checkpoints. Signal transduction pathways mediated by MAPKs play a crucial role in sensing stress. For example, the canonical MAPKs Mkc1 (of the cell wall integrity pathway), and Hog1 (of the HOG pathway), are activated upon oxidative stress. In this work, we have analyzed the effect of oxidative stress induced by hydrogen peroxide on cell cycle progression in Candida albicans. Hydrogen peroxide was shown to induce a transient arrest at the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Specifically, a G1 arrest was observed, although phosphorylation of Mkc1 and Hog1 MAPKs can take place at all stages of the cell cycle. Interestingly, hog1 (but not mkc1) mutants required a longer time compared to wild type cells to resume growth after hydrogen peroxide challenge. Using GFP-labeled cells and mixed cultures of wild type and hog1 cells we were able to show that hog1 mutants progress faster through the cell cycle under standard growth conditions in the absence of stress (YPD at 37°C). Consequently, hog1 mutants exhibited a smaller cell size. The altered cell cycle progression correlates with altered expression of the G1 cyclins Cln3 and Pcl2 in hog1 cells compared to the wild type strain. In addition, Hgc1 (a hypha-specific G1 cyclin) as well as Cln3 displayed a different kinetics of expression in the presence of hydrogen peroxide in hog1 mutants. Collectively, these results indicate that Hog1 regulates the expression of G1 cyclins not only in response to oxidative stress, but also under standard growth conditions. Hydrogen peroxide treated cells did not show fluctuations in the mRNA levels for SOL1, which are observed in untreated cells during cell cycle progression. In addition, treatment with hydrogen peroxide prevented degradation of Sol1, an effect which was enhanced in hog1 mutants. Therefore, in C. albicans, the MAPK Hog1 mediates cell cycle progression in response to oxidative

  18. Power generation in fuel cells using liquid methanol and hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The invention is directed to an encapsulated fuel cell including a methanol source that feeds liquid methanol (CH.sub.3 OH) to an anode. The anode is electrical communication with a load that provides electrical power. The fuel cell also includes a hydrogen peroxide source that feeds liquid hydrogen peroxide (H.sub.2 O.sub.2) to the cathode. The cathode is also in communication with the electrical load. The anode and cathode are in contact with and separated by a proton-conducting polymer electrolyte membrane.

  19. Electrochemical synthesis of macroporous zinc oxide layers by employing hydrogen peroxide as oxygen precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez, Daniel [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et Chimie Analytique (UMR CNRS 7575), Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris (ENSCP) (France); Instituto de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile); Bartlett, Philip; Abdelsalam, Mamdouh [School of Chemistry, University of Southampton (United Kingdom); Gomez, Humberto [Instituto de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Valparaiso (Chile); Lincot, Daniel [Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et Chimie Analytique (UMR CNRS 7575), Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris (ENSCP) (France)

    2008-10-15

    Two- and three-dimensional ordered porous zinc oxide (ZnO) films were prepared by electrodeposition on Indium Tin Oxide coated glass, using two- and three-dimensional poly(styrene) opal templates. The oxide was formed by electrochemical reduction of hydrogen peroxide in aqueous zinc perchlorate solution. Scanning electron microscopy measurements showed well ordered inverse opal structures for macroporous ZnO. At high hydrogen peroxide concentration, dense inner conformal filling was achieved for 2D and 3D structures. The formation of nanocrystalline ZnO was checked by X-ray diffraction. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Hydroxylation of benzene with hydrogen peroxide under phase-transfer conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karakhanov, E.A.; Narin, S.Yu.; Filippova, T.Yu.; Dedov, A.G.

    1987-09-01

    The authors developed a method for the selective hydroxylation of benzene to phenol with hydrogen peroxide in a two-phase water-benzene system in the presence of ions of transition metals and phase-transfer catalysts. As phase-transfer catalysts they used cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, tetrabutyl-ammonium bromide, tetrabutylammonium chloride, tetrabutylammonium iodide, benzyltriethylammonium chloride, dibenzo-18-crown-6, benzo-15-crown-5, N-cetylpyridinium bromide, potassium didodecylsebacinate ..cap alpha..-sulfonate, and polyethylene glycols of various molecular weight. They were able to find the optimal conditions for the selective hydroxylation of benzene with hydrogen peroxide under phase-transfer catalysis conditions.

  1. Cell-death-mode switch from necrosis to apoptosis in hydrogen peroxide treated macrophages

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Cell death is typically defined either as apoptosis or necrosis. Because the consequences of apoptosis and necrosis are quite different for an entire organism, the investigation of the cell-death-mode switch has considerable clinical significance. The existence of a necrosis-to-apoptosis switch induced by hydrogen peroxide in macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 cells was confirmed by using flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy. With the help of computational simulations, this study predicted that negative feedbacks between NF-κB and MAPKs are implicated in converting necrosis into apoptosis in macrophages exposed to hydrogen peroxide, which has significant implications.

  2. A new process for preparing dialdehyde by catalytic oxidation of cyclic olefins with aqueous hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU, Hong-Kun; PANG, Zhen; HUANG, Zu-En; CAI, Rui-Fang

    2000-01-01

    A novel peroxo-nioboplosphate was synthesized for the first time and used as a catalyst in the oxidation reaction of cyclic olefins with aqueous hydrogen peroxide to prepare dialdehydes. The catalyst was characterized by elemental analysis,thermographic analyses, IR, UV/vis, 31P NMR and XPS ~ as [ π-C5H5N(CH2)i3CH3 ]2 [Nb406 (O2)2 (PO4)2] ·6H20 (PTNP). It showed high selectivity to glutaraldehyde in the catalytic oxidation of cyclopentene with aqueous hydrogen peroxide in ethanol.

  3. Process Development and Design of Chlorine Dioxide Production Based on Hydrogen Peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈赟; 江燕斌; 钱宇

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a process development and design of chlorine dioxide production based on hydrogen peroxide. The process is characterized by cleaner production, high efficiency, and waste minimization. Optimization of process conditions, selection of equipment, and experiment of recycle of waste acid are carried out. The process design is realized in consideration of several aspects such as operation, material, equipment design and safety. An industrialized process flowsheet is developed according to experiment. A pilot testing is carried out to confirm the lab results. Process design of chlorine dioxide production based on hydrogen peroxide is realized.

  4. Reduction of pollutants and disinfection of industrial wastewater by an integrated system of copper electrocoagulation and electrochemically generated hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Díaz, Carlos E; Frontana-Uribe, Bernardo A; Roa-Morales, Gabriela; Bilyeu, Bryan W

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of copper electrocoagulation and hydrogen peroxide on COD, color, turbidity, and bacterial activity in a mixed industry wastewater. The integrated system of copper electrocoagulation and hydrogen peroxide is effective at reducing the organic and bacterial content of industrial wastewater. The copper electrocoagulation alone reduces COD by 56% in 30 min at pH 2.8, but the combined system reduces COD by 78%, biochemical oxygen demand (BOD5) by 81%, and color by 97% under the same conditions. Colloidal particles are flocculated effectively, as shown by the reduction of zeta potential and the 84% reduction in turbidity and 99% reduction in total solids. Additionally, the total coliforms, fecal coliforms, and bacteria are all reduced by 99%. The integrated system is effective and practical for the reduction of both organic and bacterial content in industrial wastewater.

  5. In vivo targeting of hydrogen peroxide by activatable cell-penetrating peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstain, Roy; Savariar, Elamprakash N; Felsen, Csilla N; Tsien, Roger Y

    2014-01-22

    A hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-activated cell-penetrating peptide was developed through incorporation of a boronic acid-containing cleavable linker between polycationic cell-penetrating peptide and polyanionic fragments. Fluorescence labeling of the two ends of the molecule enabled monitoring its reaction with H2O2 through release of the highly adhesive cell-penetrating peptide and disruption of fluorescence resonance energy transfer. The H2O2 sensor selectively reacts with endogenous H2O2 in cell culture to monitor the oxidative burst of promyelocytes and in vivo to image lung inflammation. Targeting H2O2 has potential applications in imaging and therapy of diseases related to oxidative stress.

  6. Green synthesis of nanosilver as a sensor for detection of hydrogen peroxide in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Vineet K; Yadav, Raghvendra S; Yadav, Poonam; Pandey, Avinash C

    2012-04-30

    Present "green" synthesis is an efficient, easy-going, fast, renewable, inexpensive, eco-friendly and non-toxic approach for nanosilver formation, which offers numerous benefits over physiochemical approaches. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern suggests the formation and crystallinity of nanosilver. The average particle size of silver nanoparticles was 8.25±1.37 nm as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The UV-vis absorption spectrum shows a characteristic absorption peak of silver nanoparticles at 410 nm. FTIR confirms Azadirachtin as reducing and stabilizing agent for nanosilver formation. In addition, the nanosilver modified electrode (Ag/GC) exhibited an excellent electro-catalytic activity toward the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). The produced nanosilver is stable and comparable in size. These silver nanoparticles show potential applications in the field of sensors, catalysis, fuel cells and nanodevices.

  7. A hydrogen peroxide electrochemical sensor based on silver nanoparticles decorated three-dimensional graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan, Beibei; Liu, Changbing; Shi, Huaxia; Li, Chen; Wang, Lianhui [Key Laboratory for Organic Electronics and Information Displays (KLOEID), Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210023 (China); Huang, Wei, E-mail: iamxcdong@njtech.edu.cn, E-mail: iamwhuang@njtech.edu.cn; Dong, Xiaochen, E-mail: iamxcdong@njtech.edu.cn, E-mail: iamwhuang@njtech.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Organic Electronics and Information Displays (KLOEID), Nanjing University of Posts and Telecommunications, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu-Singapore Joint Research Center for Organic/Bio-Electronics and Information Displays and Institute of Advanced Materials (IAM), Nanjing Tech University, 30 South Puzhu Road, Nanjing 211816 (China)

    2014-06-16

    A facile strategy has been developed to synthesize sliver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) decorated three-dimensional graphene (3DG) through hydrothermal process. The AgNPs-3DG composites are directly fabricated into a free standing sensing electrode for electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in phosphate buffered solutions. Various techniques equipments including scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy are used to characterize the morphology and structure of the as-prepared composite. The electrochemical experiments reveal the AgNPs-3DG based biosensor exhibits fast amperometric sensing, low detection limitation, wide linear responding range, and perfect selectivity for non-enzyme H{sub 2}O{sub 2} detection, indicating the well synergistic effect of Ag NPs high electrocatalytic activity and 3DG high conductivity and large surface area.

  8. Artificial photosynthesis for production of hydrogen peroxide and its fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2016-05-01

    The reducing power released from photosystem I (PSI) via ferredoxin enables the reduction of NADP(+) to NADPH, which is essential in the Calvin-Benson cycle to make sugars in photosynthesis. Alternatively, PSI can reduce O2 to produce hydrogen peroxide as a fuel. This article describes the artificial version of the photocatalytic production of hydrogen peroxide from water and O2 using solar energy. Hydrogen peroxide is used as a fuel in hydrogen peroxide fuel cells to make electricity. The combination of the photocatalytic H2O2 production from water and O2 using solar energy with one-compartment H2O2 fuel cells provides on-site production and usage of H2O2 as a more useful and promising solar fuel than hydrogen. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Biodesign for Bioenergetics--The design and engineering of electronc transfer cofactors, proteins and protein networks, edited by Ronald L. Koder and J.L. Ross Anderson.

  9. Development of Pillared Clays for Wet Hydrogen Peroxide Oxidation of Phenol and Its Application in the Posttreatment of Coffee Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy R. Sanabria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the use of pillared clays as catalysts for the Fenton-like advanced oxidation, specifically wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO. This paper discusses the limitations on the application of a homogeneous Fenton system, development of solid catalysts for the oxidation of phenol, advances in the synthesis of pillared clays, and their potential application as catalysts for phenol oxidation. Finally, it analyzes the use of pillared clays as heterogeneous Fenton-like catalysts for a real wastewater treatment, emphasizing the oxidation of phenolic compounds present in coffee wastewater. Typically, the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation in a real effluent system is used as pretreatment, prior to biological treatment. In the specific case of coffee wet processing wastewater, catalytic oxidation with pillared bentonite with Al-Fe is performed to supplement the biological treatment, that is, as a posttreatment system. According to the results of catalytic activity of pillared bentonite with Al-Fe for oxidation of coffee processing wastewater (56% phenolic compounds conversion, 40% selectivity towards CO2, and high stability of active phase, catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation emerges as a viable alternative for management of this type of effluent.

  10. Effects of Hydrogen Peroxide on Common Aviation Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    peroxide has been used for years as a disinfectant in the medical community and is under consideration in the dilute vapor form as a decontaminant... disinfectant /sterilant for transportation vehicles like aircraft, buses, subway trains, ambulances, etc. Although the biological efficacy of STERIS...10-min dip in 35% liquid H2O2 . 13 (a) (b) Figure 15. (a) Vertical and (b) horizontal flammability test results for nylon. 14 (a) (b) Figure 16. (a

  11. Intermediate Tyrosyl Radical and Amyloid Structure in Peroxide-Activated Cytoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Juliana C; Marcondes, Marcelo F; Icimoto, Marcelo Y; Cardoso, Thyago H S; Tofanello, Aryane; Pessoto, Felipe S; Miranda, Erica G A; Prieto, Tatiana; Nascimento, Otaciro R; Oliveira, Vitor; Nantes, Iseli L

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the peroxidase mechanism of recombinant rat brain cytoglobin (Cygb) challenged by hydrogen peroxide, tert-butylhydroperoxide and by cumene hydroperoxide. The peroxidase mechanism of Cygb is similar to that of myoglobin. Cygb challenged by hydrogen peroxide is converted to a Fe4+ oxoferryl π cation, which is converted to Fe4+ oxoferryl and tyrosyl radical detected by direct continuous wave-electron paramagnetic resonance and by 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzene sulfonate spin trapping. When organic peroxides are used as substrates at initial reaction times, and given an excess of peroxide present, the EPR signals of the corresponding peroxyl radicals precede those of the direct tyrosyl radical. This result is consistent with the use of peroxide as a reducing agent for the recycling of Cygb high-valence species. Furthermore, we found that the Cygb oxidation by peroxides leads to the formation of amyloid fibrils. This result suggests that Cygb possibly participates in the development of degenerative diseases; our findings also support the possible biological role of Cygb related to peroxidase activity.

  12. Intermediate Tyrosyl Radical and Amyloid Structure in Peroxide-Activated Cytoglobin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana C Ferreira

    Full Text Available We characterized the peroxidase mechanism of recombinant rat brain cytoglobin (Cygb challenged by hydrogen peroxide, tert-butylhydroperoxide and by cumene hydroperoxide. The peroxidase mechanism of Cygb is similar to that of myoglobin. Cygb challenged by hydrogen peroxide is converted to a Fe4+ oxoferryl π cation, which is converted to Fe4+ oxoferryl and tyrosyl radical detected by direct continuous wave-electron paramagnetic resonance and by 3,5-dibromo-4-nitrosobenzene sulfonate spin trapping. When organic peroxides are used as substrates at initial reaction times, and given an excess of peroxide present, the EPR signals of the corresponding peroxyl radicals precede those of the direct tyrosyl radical. This result is consistent with the use of peroxide as a reducing agent for the recycling of Cygb high-valence species. Furthermore, we found that the Cygb oxidation by peroxides leads to the formation of amyloid fibrils. This result suggests that Cygb possibly participates in the development of degenerative diseases; our findings also support the possible biological role of Cygb related to peroxidase activity.

  13. Rational Design of an α-Ketoamide-Based Near-Infrared Fluorescent Probe Specific for Hydrogen Peroxide in Living Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Xilei; Yang, Xiu'e; Wu, Tianhong; Li, Yong; Li, Mengmeng; Tan, Qi; Wang, Xu; Tang, Bo

    2016-08-16

    Hydrogen peroxide, an important biomolecule, receives earnest attention because of its physiological and pathological functions. In this Article, we present the rational design, characterization, and biological application of a mitochondria-targetable NIR fluorescent sensor, Mito-NIRHP, for hydrogen peroxide visualization. Mito-NIRHP utilizes a unique reaction switch, α-ketoamide moiety, to turn on a highly specific, sensitive, and rapid fluorescence response toward hydrogen peroxide coupled with the intramolecular charge transfer strategy. Mito-NIRHP is competent to track endogenously produced hydrogen peroxide in both living cells and living animals. In addition, utilizing Mito-NIRHP, overgeneration of hydrogen peroxide during ischemia-reperfusion injury was directly visualized at both cell and organ levels.

  14. Use of hydrogen peroxide treatment and crystal violet agar plates for selective recovery of bacteriophages from natural environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asghari, A.; Farrah, S.R.; Bitton, G. (Univ. of Florida, Gainesville (United States))

    1992-04-01

    Hydrogen peroxide inactivated bacteriophages and bacteria at different rates. A concentration of 0.1% hydrogen peroxide reduced the numbers of several bacteria by an average of 94% but caused an average of 25% inactivation in the numbers of bacteriophages tested. Treating natural samples with hydrogen peroxide selectively reduced the indigenous bacterial flora and permitted better visualization of plaques of lawns of Escherichia coli C-3000. In some cases indigenous gram-positive bacteria were relatively resistant to hydrogen peroxide, but their growth could be limited by incorporation of crystal violet into the bottom agar used for plaque assays. The use of hydrogen peroxide treatment and crystal violet-containing plates permitted recovery of more phages from natural samples than did other procedures, such as chloroform pretreatment or the use of selective plating agar such as EC medium.

  15. Electrochemical Synthesis of Polypyrrole, Reduced Graphene Oxide, and Gold Nanoparticles Composite and Its Application to Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoyan Wu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we report a facile eco-friendly one-step electrochemical approach for the fabrication of a polypyrrole (PPy, reduced graphene oxide (RGO, and gold nanoparticles (nanoAu biocomposite on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE. The electrochemical behaviors of PPy–RGO–nanoAu and its application to electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide were investigated by cyclic voltammetry. Graphene oxide and pyrrole monomer were first mixed and casted on the surface of a cleaned GCE. After an electrochemical processing consisting of the electrooxidation of pyrrole monomer and simultaneous electroreduction of graphene oxide and auric ions (Au3+ in aqueous solution, a PPy–RGO–nanoAu biocomposite was synthesized on GCE. Each component of PPy–RGO–nanoAu is electroactive without non-electroactive substance. The obtained PPy–RGO–nanoAu/GCE exhibited high electrocatalytic activity toward hydrogen peroxide, which allows the detection of hydrogen peroxide at a negative potential of about −0.62 V vs. SCE. The amperometric responses of the biosensor displayed a sensitivity of 40 µA/mM, a linear range of 32 µM–2 mM, and a detection limit of 2.7 µM (signal-to-noise ratio = 3 with good stability and acceptable reproducibility and selectivity. The results clearly demonstrate the potential of the as-prepared PPy–RGO–nanoAu biocomposite for use as a highly electroactive matrix for an amperometric biosensor.

  16. HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF CMP PULP USING MAGNESIUM HYDROXIDE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Zeinaly

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Conventional bleaching of hardwood CMP pulp with magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH2 show significant benefits over bleaching with sodium hydroxide (NaOH under various conditions. Magnesium hydroxide bleaching generate higher optical properties, higher pulp yield and lower effluent COD at the same chemical charge, but the physical properties were found to be similar for both processes. The initial freeness of the bleached pulps and refining value to reach a target freeness (about 350 ml. CSF were more for the Mg(OH2-based process. The residual peroxide of filtrate from the Mg(OH2-based process was very high as compared to conventional bleaching.

  17. Combustion Characteristics of Nanoaluminum, Liquid Water, and Hydrogen Peroxide Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    test peroxide ( HTP , 85% H2O2) as the oxidizer [22– 26]. Problems with the use of H2O2 systems include its sensitivity to shock and its tendency to...reported that the mix- ture would not self-deflagrate without the addition of the thickening agent into the mixture. At their maximum test pressure, 7...A pycnometer test determined particle density to be 3.205 g/cm3, which is inclusive of the oxide passiva- tion layer (∼3.97 g/cm3), which explains

  18. Flow injection analysis of organic peroxide explosives using acid degradation and chemiluminescent detection of released hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahbub, Parvez; Zakaria, Philip; Guijt, Rosanne; Macka, Mirek; Dicinoski, Greg; Breadmore, Michael; Nesterenko, Pavel N

    2015-10-01

    The applicability of acid degradation of organic peroxides into hydrogen peroxide in a pneumatically driven flow injection system with chemiluminescence reaction with luminol and Cu(2+) as a catalyst (FIA-CL) was investigated for the fast and sensitive detection of organic peroxide explosives (OPEs). The target OPEs included hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD), triacetone triperoxide (TATP) and methylethyl ketone peroxide (MEKP). Under optimised conditions maximum degradations of 70% and 54% for TATP and HMTD, respectively were achieved at 162 µL min(-1), and 9% degradation for MEKP at 180 µL min(-1). Flow rates were precisely controlled in this single source pneumatic pressure driven multi-channel FIA system by model experiments on mixing of easily detectable component solutions. The linear range for detection of TATP, HMTD and H2O2 was 1-200 µM (r(2)=0.98-0.99) at both flow rates, while that for MEKP was 20-200 µM (r(2)=0.97) at 180 µL min(-1). The detection limits (LODs) obtained were 0.5 µM for TATP, HMTD and H2O2 and 10 µM for MEKP. The detection times varied from 1.5 to 3 min in this FIA-CL system. Whilst the LOD for H2O2 was comparable with those reported by other investigators, the LODs and analysis times for TATP and HMTD were superior, and significantly, this is the first time the detection of MEKP has been reported by FIA-CL.

  19. AC催化H2O2处理水中有机污染物的研究进展%Progress on Degradation of Organic Pollutants in Wastewater Through Activated Carbon-Hydrogen Peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张娜; 王磊; 丰娇; 吴耀国

    2013-01-01

    Activated carbon (AC) can catalyze hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to generate hydroxyl radicals (· OH).The physical and chemical properties of AC are not only in favor of the reactant molecule diffusion and adsorption but also the catalytic oxidation reaction.The synergistic effect of AC's adsorption and catalysis enhance the ability of organic contaminants removal by AC-H2O2.The AC-H2 O2 system in removal of organic in wastewater was reviewed in detail.The effects of AC-H2 O2,AC-Fe2+-H2 O2 (-microwave/UV) and the system which AC is used as the heterogeneous Fenton catalyst support were analyzed,meanwhile,their reaction mechanisms were discussed.Moreover,some problems which exist presently were put forward,and the prospect of AC-H2O2 system was made.%活性炭(AC)优良的物化性质不仅利于反应物分子的扩散与吸附,还利于过氧化氢(H2O2)催化分解产生羟基自由基(·OH),进而促进氧化反应的进行,在AC-H2O2体系中,二者甚至可以产生协同效应,增强难降解有机污染物的去除功效.综述了AC催化H2O2处理水中有机污染物的研究进展,分析了AC-H2 O2、AC-Fe2+-H2O2(-微波/UV),以及AC作为载体的非均相Fenton催化剂体系影响因素,探讨了它们的反应机制,并总结与展望了AC-H2 O2体系存在的问题及发展前景.

  20. Development of a sterilizing in-place application for a production machine using Vaporized Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, T; Hartmann, V; Burmeister, J; Langguth, P; Häusler, H

    2004-01-01

    The use of steam in sterilization processes is limited by the implementation of heat-sensitive components inside the machines to be sterilized. Alternative low-temperature sterilization methods need to be found and their suitability evaluated. Vaporized Hydrogen Peroxide (VHP) technology was adapted for a production machine consisting of highly sensitive pressure sensors and thermo-labile air tube systems. This new kind of "cold" surface sterilization, known from the Barrier Isolator Technology, is based on the controlled release of hydrogen peroxide vapour into sealed enclosures. A mobile VHP generator was used to generate the hydrogen peroxide vapour. The unit was combined with the air conduction system of the production machine. Terminal vacuum pumps were installed to distribute the gas within the production machine and for its elimination. In order to control the sterilization process, different physical process monitors were incorporated. The validation of the process was based on biological indicators (Geobacillus stearothermophilus). The Limited Spearman Karber Method (LSKM) was used to statistically evaluate the sterilization process. The results show that it is possible to sterilize surfaces in a complex tube system with the use of gaseous hydrogen peroxide. A total microbial reduction of 6 log units was reached.

  1. MINERALIZATION OF A SORBED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON IN TWO SOILS USING CATALYZED HYDROGEN PEROXIDE. (R826163)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) catalyzed by soluble iron or naturally occurring soil minerals, (i.e., modified Fenton's reagent) was investigated as a basis for mineralizing sorbed and NAPL-phase benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a hydrophobic and toxic polycyclic a...

  2. Low-level hydrogen peroxide generation by unbleached cotton nonwovens: implications for wound healing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greige cotton is an intact plant fiber. The cuticle and primary cell wall near the outer surface of the cotton fiber contains pectin, peroxidases, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and trace metals, which are associated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation during cotton fiber development. The compon...

  3. Hydrogen peroxide in exhaled air is increased in stable asthmatic children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Q. Jobsis (Quirijn); H.C. Raatgeep (Rolien); P.W.M. Hermans (Peter); J.C. de Jongste (Johan)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractExhaled air condensate provides a noninvasive means of obtaining samples from the lower respiratory tract. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in exhaled air has been proposed as a marker of airway inflammation. We hypothesized that in stable asthmatic children the H2O

  4. Epoxidation of Alkenes with Aqueous Hydrogen Peroxide and Quaternary Ammonium Bicarbonate Catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Kegnæs, Søren

    2013-01-01

    A range of solid and liquid catalysts containing bicarbonate anions were synthesised and tested for the epoxidation of alkenes with aqueous hydrogen peroxide. The combination of bicarbonate anions and quaternary ammonium cations opens up for new catalytic systems that can help to overcome challen...

  5. An efficient and reproducible method for measuring hydrogen peroxide in exhaled breath condensate.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurden, W.J.C van; Harff, G.A.; Dekhuijzen, P.N.R.; Bosch, M.J. van den; Creemers, J.P.H.M.; Smeenk, F.J.M.W.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the sensitivity and reproducibility of a test procedure for measuring hydrogen peroxide (H202) in exhaled breath condensate and the effect of storage of the condensate on the H2O2 concentration, and compared the results to previous studies.Twenty stable COPD patients breathed into ou

  6. Quantitative analysis of 8-isoprostane and hydrogen peroxide in exhaled breath condensate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoydonck, P.G.A.; Wuyts, W.A.; Vanaudenaerde, B.M.; Schouten, E.G.; Dupont, I.J.; Temme, E.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) provides a noninvasive means of sampling the lower respiratory tract. Collection of EBC might be useful in the assessment of airway oxidative stress in smokers. The aim of this study was to determine 8-isoprostane and hydrogen peroxide levels in EBC, and, in addition,

  7. Several pathways of hydrogen peroxide action that damage the E. coli genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser Ribeiro Asad

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide is an important reactive oxygen species (ROS that arises either during the aerobic respiration process or as a by-product of water radiolysis after exposure to ionizing radiation. The reaction of hydrogen peroxide with transition metals imposes on cells an oxidative stress condition that can result in damage to cell components such as proteins, lipids and principally to DNA, leading to mutagenesis and cell death. Escherichia coli cells are able to deal with these adverse events via DNA repair mechanisms, which enable them to recover their genome integrity. These include base excision repair (BER, nucleotide excision repair (NER and recombinational repair. Other important defense mechanisms present in Escherichia coli are OxyR and SosRS anti-oxidant inducible pathways, which are elicited by cells to avoid the introduction of oxidative lesions by hydrogen peroxide. This review summarizes the phenomena of lethal synergism between UV irradiation (254 nm and H2O2, the cross-adaptive response between different classes of genotoxic agents and hydrogen peroxide, and the role of copper ions in the lethal response to H2O2 under low-iron conditions.

  8. Explodability and detonability of mixtures of hydrogen peroxide and organic matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heemskerk, A.H.; Scholtes, J.H.G.

    1995-01-01

    The explosive properties of mixtures of hydrogen peroxide and isopropanol were determined The mixtures appear to detonate in a well-defined range of concentrations and show extremely fast reactions in an adjacent range of concentrations if initiated by shock wave stimuli. The upper boundary of organ

  9. Mouthwashes with hydrogen peroxide are carcinogenic, but are freely indicated on the internet: warn your patients!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Consolaro

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It all began in Ancient Egypt where people used to bleach their teeth with antiseptic mouthwashes made of urea from human urine. Teeth harmony is promoted by expression of feelings, communication, a real window of the brain and its content! Tooth bleaching products are medicines, not cosmetics! Mouth washing with hydrogen peroxide is an illogical and dangerous procedure! Hydrogen peroxide must be used in one's mouth only when employed by a dentist who has been properly instructed to protect the mucosa, preventing it from receiving these products. How and for how long these products are going to be used require caution in order to avoid or decrease any adverse effects on the tissues. Many websites instruct people on how to purchase and prepare hydrogen peroxide so that it is used as an antiseptic mouthwash and tooth bleaching agent. Some websites even refer to dentists as "exploiters", accusing them of not instructing patients properly. In this article, we aim at providing evidence and information upon which dentists and assistants may base their thinking as well as their opinion and procedures regarding "the indiscriminate and free use of hydrogen peroxide in the mouth, on teeth and oral mucosa". Those websites, blogs and social network profiles trespass the limits of public trust and should be immediately sued by the government for committing a crime against public health.

  10. Povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide mixture soaked gauze pack: a novel hemostatic technique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arakeri, G.; Brennan, P.A.

    2013-01-01

    Persistent oozing of blood is a common occurrence in maxillofacial surgery, and occasionally it hampers visibility and delays or even prevents continuation of the procedure. This report describes a novel method of controlling blood ooze using swabs soaked with povidone-iodine and hydrogen peroxide (

  11. A comparison of the bleaching effectiveness of chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide on dental composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnihotry, Anirudha; Gill, Karanjot S; Singhal, Deepak; Fedorowicz, Zbys; Dash, Sambit; Pedrazzi, Vinicius

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to verify if composites could be bleached using chlorine dioxide as compared with hydrogen peroxide. 3M ESPE Filtek Z350 Universal Restorative discs were prepared (n=40), with dimensions 5 mm diameter x 2 mm thickness. The discs were divided into 4 groups of 10 discs each. Color assessment was performed by CIEDE2000. The discs were stained with coffee, tea, wine and distilled water (control) solutions for 14 days, 5 hours daily. Color assessment was repeated on stained discs and followed by bleaching of 5 discs from each group using chlorine dioxide and hydrogen peroxide in-office systems. Finally, a last color assessment was performed and compared statistically. DE2000 after bleaching was very close to baseline for both the bleaching agents, although chlorine dioxide showed better results than hydrogen peroxide. After staining, there was a clinically significant discoloration (∆E2000≥3.43) for the tea, coffee and wine groups, and discoloration (∆E2000) was seen more in the wine group as compared to tea and coffee. Overall, the control group (distilled water) had the least color change in the three intervals. After bleaching, the color in all specimens returned close to the baseline. The color differences between bleaching and baseline were less than 3.43 for all groups. The obtained results show that chlorine dioxide is slightly superior to hydrogen peroxide in the bleaching of composites, while maintaining the shade of the composite close to the baseline.

  12. Efficacy of improved hydrogen peroxide against important healthcare-associated pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutala, William A; Gergen, Maria F; Weber, David J

    2012-11-01

    This study was designed to test in vitro efficacy of 2 improved hydrogen peroxide (HP) products against 3 standard HP products and 1 quaternary ammonium compound. Improved HP is significantly superior to standard HP at the same concentration and can be used for disinfection of environmental surfaces or noncritical patient care items.

  13. Oxygen dependency of one-electron reactions generating ascorbate radicals and hydrogen peroxide from ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatright, William L

    2016-04-01

    The effect of oxygen on the two separate one-electron reactions involved in the oxidation of ascorbic acid was investigated. The rate of ascorbate radical (Asc(-)) formation (and stability) was strongly dependent on the presence of oxygen. A product of ascorbic acid oxidation was measurable levels of hydrogen peroxide, as high as 32.5 μM from 100 μM ascorbic acid. Evidence for a feedback mechanism where hydrogen peroxide generated during the oxidation of ascorbic acid accelerates further oxidation of ascorbic acid is also presented. The second one-electron oxidation reaction of ascorbic acid leading to the disappearance of Asc(-) was also strongly inhibited in samples flushed with argon. In the range of 0.05-1.2 mM ascorbic acid, maximum levels of measurable hydrogen peroxide were achieved with an initial concentration of 0.2 mM ascorbic acid. Hydrogen peroxide generation was greatly diminished at ascorbic acid levels of 0.8 mM or above.

  14. Formation of water-soluble soybean polysaccharides from spent flakes by hydrogen peroxide treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pierce, Brian; Wichmann, Jesper; Tran, Tam H.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel chemical process for the generation of water-soluble polysaccharides from soy spent flake, a by-product of the soy food industry. This process entails treatment of spent flake with hydrogen peroxide at an elevated temperature, resulting in the release of more than...

  15. Electroactive gate materials for a hydrogen peroxide sensitive E-MOSFET

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anh, Dam T.V.; Olthuis, W.; Bergveld, P.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the detection principle of a hydrogen peroxide sensor based on the electrolyte metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (EMOSFET) and possibilities of using different types of redox materials as the gate material for the sensor with respect to the sensitivity and detection limit.

  16. FIELD STUDY: IN SITU OXIDATION OF 1,4-DIOXANE WITH OZONE AND HYDROGEN PEROXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    A pilot-scale field evaluation is underway to assess the effectiveness of in situ oxidation (using ozone with and without hydrogen peroxide) for remediation of 1,4-dioxane and chlorinated volatile organic compounds in groundwater at the Cooper Drum Company Superfund Site located ...

  17. Inorganic compounds and materials as catalysts for oxidations with aqueous hydrogen peroxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nardello, veronique; Aubry, Jean-Marie; Vos, De Dirk E.; Neumann, Ronny; Adam, Waldemar; Zhang, Rui; Elshof, ten Johan E.; Witte, Peter T.; Alsters, Paul L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews our work on oxidations with aqueous hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by inorganic catalysts devoid of organic ligands. In the first part of the review, the use of the [WZn3(ZnW9O34)2]12− “sandwich” polyoxometalate as a multi-purpose oxidation catalyst is described. Attention is paid to

  18. Simultaneous in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide and Fenton reaction over Pd-Fe catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Yalfani, Mohammad S.; Contreras, Sandra; Llorca Piqué, Jordi; Domínguez Escalante, Montserrat; Sueiras, Jesús; Medina, Francesc

    2010-01-01

    High mineralization degree of organic compounds can be achieved by a novel environmentally-friendly full heterogeneous Pd–Fe catalytic system, which involves in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide from formic acid and oxygen, and oxidation of organic compounds by Fenton process in a one-pot reaction.

  19. Major Effect of Hydrogen Peroxide on Bacterioplankton Metabolism in the Northeast Atlantic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baltar, F.; Reinthaler, T.; Herndl, G.J.; Pinhassi, J.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide have the potential to alter metabolic rates of marine prokaryotes, ultimately impacting the cycling and bioavailability of nutrients and carbon. We studied the influence of H2O2 on prokaryotic heterotrophic production (PHP) and extracellular enzymati

  20. A passive apparatus for controlled-flux delivery of biocides: hydrogen peroxide as an example

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Stefan Møller; Pedersen, L.T.; Dam-Johansen, Kim;

    2010-01-01

    A new test method has been developed to estimate the required release rate of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) to prevent marine biofouling. The technique exploits a well-defined concentration gradient of biocide across a cellulose acetate membrane. A controlled flux of H2O2, an environmentally friendly...

  1. Effect of Hydrogen Peroxide on Immersion Challenge of Rainbow Trout Fry with Flavobacterium psychrophilum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Maya Maria Mihályi; Madsen, Lone; Dalsgaard, Inger

    2013-01-01

    and produce high levels of mortality attempts to establish a reproducible immersion model have been less successful. Various concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were evaluated before being used as a pre-treatment stressor prior to immersion exposure to F. psychrophilum. H2O2 accelerated the onset...

  2. First Principles Modeling of the Performance of a Hydrogen-Peroxide-Driven Chem-E-Car

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadi, Maryam; Azadi, Pooya; Zarinpanjeh, Nima

    2009-01-01

    In this study, performance of a hydrogen-peroxide-driven car has been simulated using basic conservation laws and a few numbers of auxiliary equations. A numerical method was implemented to solve sets of highly non-linear ordinary differential equations. Transient pressure and the corresponding traveled distance for three different car weights are…

  3. Intracellular signaling by diffusion: can waves of hydrogen peroxide transmit intracellular information in plant cells?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Christian L.; Flyvbjerg, Henrik; Møller, Ian Max

    2012-01-01

    Amplitude- and frequency-modulated waves of Ca(2+) ions transmit information inside cells. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), specifically hydrogen peroxide, have been proposed to have a similar role in plant cells. We consider the feasibility of such an intracellular communication system in view...

  4. Salinity-Gradient Energy Driven Microbial Electrosynthesis of Hydrogen Peroxide from Oxygen Reduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaohu; Zhang, Yifeng; Angelidaki, Irini

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is widely used in various chemical industries and environmental remediation. Recently, bioelectrochemical systems (BES) have gained increasing attention for synthesizing H2O2 with simultaneous wastewater treatment[1]. However, in order to get high-yield H2O2 requires...

  5. THREE SHRUBS WOOD PULPS PREPARED BY HYDROGEN PEROXIDE -ALKALINE (PA) COOKING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xu; RunCang Sun; huaiyu Zhan

    2004-01-01

    The physical, chemical and fiber characteristics of Caragana Korshinskii, Salix psammophila and Hedysarum scoparium fischer Mey were assessed for their suitability for papermaking. Nonsulfur cooking of hydrogen peroxide-alkaline (PA) was carried out.It is shown from the results that all these three shrubs are good raw materials for pulping and papermaking.The unbleached pulps have high mechanical strengthes.

  6. THREE SHRUBS WOOD PULPS PREPARED BY HYDROGEN PEROXIDE -ALKALINE (PA) COOKING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FengXu; RunCangSun; huaiyuZhan

    2004-01-01

    The physical, chemical and fiber characteristics ofCaragana Korshinskii, Salix psammophila andHedysarum scoparium fischet Mey were assessed fortheir suitability for papermaking. Nonsulfur cookingof hydrogen peroxide-alkaline (PA) was carried out.It is shown from the results that all these three shrubsare good raw materials for pulping and papermaking.The unbleached pulps have high mechanicalstren~hes.

  7. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy for the prevention of arterial gas embolism in food grade hydrogen peroxide ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriksen, Stephen M; Menth, Nicholas L; Westgard, Bjorn C; Cole, Jon B; Walter, Joseph W; Masters, Thomas C; Logue, Christopher J

    2016-12-14

    Food grade hydrogen peroxide ingestion is a relatively rare presentation to the emergency department. There are no defined guidelines at this time regarding the treatment of such exposures, and providers may not be familiar with the potential complications associated with high concentration hydrogen peroxide ingestions. In this case series, we describe four patients who consumed 35% hydrogen peroxide, presented to the emergency department, and were treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Two of the four patients were critically ill requiring intubation. All four patients had evidence on CT or ultrasound of venous gas emboli and intubated patients were treated as if they had an arterial gas embolism since an exam could not be followed. After hyperbaric oxygen therapy each patient was discharged from the hospital neurologically intact with no other associated organ injuries related to vascular gas emboli. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is an effective treatment for patients with vascular gas emboli after high concentration hydrogen peroxide ingestion. It is the treatment of choice for any impending, suspected, or diagnosed arterial gas embolism. Further research is needed to determine which patients with portal venous gas emboli should be treated with hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

  8. Solvent-dependent regioselective oxidation of trans-chalcones using aqueous hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Wang; Jiabin, Yang; Lushen, Li, E-mail: jimin@seu.edu.cn [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering; Jin, Cai; Chunlong, Sun; Min, Ji [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

    2013-03-15

    A novel method for regioselective oxidation of trans-chalcones with hydrogen peroxide in acetonitrile to afford cinnamic acids is reported. Only trans-b-arylacrylic acids were observed. A wide range of functionalized products can be effectively produced from various chalcones in good to excellent yields. (author)

  9. Optimization study on the hydrogen peroxide pretreatment and production of bioethanol from seaweed Ulva prolifera biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinping; Cui, Jiefen; Zhang, Gaoli; Liu, Zhengkun; Guan, Huashi; Hwang, Hueymin; Aker, Winfred G; Wang, Peng

    2016-08-01

    The seaweed Ulva prolifera, distributed in inter-tidal zones worldwide, contains a large percentage of cellulosic materials. The technical feasibility of using U. prolifera residue (UPR) obtained after extraction of polysaccharides as a renewable energy resource was investigated. An environment-friendly and economical pretreatment process was conducted using hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide pretreatment improved the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis. The resulting yield of reducing sugar reached a maximum of 0.42g/g UPR under the optimal pretreatment condition (hydrogen peroxide 0.2%, 50°C, pH 4.0, 12h). The rate of conversion of reducing sugar in the concentrated hydrolysates to bioethanol reached 31.4% by Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation, which corresponds to 61.7% of the theoretical maximum yield. Compared with other reported traditional processes on Ulva biomass, the reducing sugar and bioethanol yield are substantially higher. Thus, hydrogen peroxide pretreatment is an effective enhancement of the process of bioethanol production from the seaweed U. prolifera.

  10. Evaluation of a sporicidal peracetic acid/hydrogen peroxide-based daily disinfectant cleaner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Abhishek; Mana, Thriveen S C; Cadnum, Jennifer L; Jencson, Annette C; Sitzlar, Brett; Fertelli, Dennis; Hurless, Kelly; Kundrapu, Sirisha; Sunkesula, Venkata C K; Donskey, Curtis J

    2014-11-01

    OxyCide Daily Disinfectant Cleaner, a novel peracetic acid/hydrogen peroxide-based sporicidal disinfectant, was as effective as sodium hypochlorite for in vitro killing of Clostridium difficile spores, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and vancomcyin-resistant enterococci. OxyCide was minimally affected by organic load and was effective in reducing pathogen contamination in isolation rooms.

  11. Efficient hydrogen peroxide decomposition to oxygen and water catalysed by a ruthenium pincer complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide decomposition is a major issue in medicine, energy, and environmental sciences. For example, findings could lead to the development of efficient H2O2 removal systems to clean wastewaters. Here I tested several homogeneous catalysts for H2O2 decomposition. I found that a dihydride...

  12. Role of hydrogen peroxide during the interaction between the hemibiotrophic fungal pathogen Septoria tritici and wheat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shetty, N.P.; Mehrabi, R.; Lütken, H.; Haldrup, A.; Kema, G.H.J.

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is reported to inhibit biotrophic but benefit necrotrophic pathogens. Infection by necrotrophs can result in a massive accumulation of H2O2 in hosts. Little is known of how pathogens with both growth types are affected (hemibiotrophs). The hemibiotroph, Septoria tritici, inf

  13. Solvent-dependent regioselective oxidation of trans-chalcones using aqueous hydrogen peroxide

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    A novel method for regioselective oxidation of trans-chalcones with hydrogen peroxide in acetonitrile to afford cinnamic acids is reported. Only trans-b-arylacrylic acids were observed. A wide range of functionalized products can be effectively produced from various chalcones in good to excellent yields.

  14. Antioxidant and anti-lipid peroxidation activities of Tamarindus indica seed coat in human fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakchat, Oranuch; Meksuriyen, Duangdeun; Pongsamart, Sunanta

    2014-02-01

    Antioxidant activity and total phenolic content of tamarind seed coat extracts (TSCEs) were compared between the two extracts using boiling-water (TSCE-W) and 70% ethanol (TSCE-E) for extraction. TSCE-W, consisting of the highest phenolic content, possessed 2,2-diphenyl-1 -picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging and anti-lipid peroxidation activities much higher than TSCE-E and Trolox. Additionally, both TSCEs also exhibited superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide scavenging activities higher than Trolox and BHA. Anti-lipid peroxidation and cytotoxicity of TSCE-W were also studied in human foreskin fibroblast CCD-1064Sk cells. Cytotoxic effect was not observed when exposed to TSCE-W up to 1 mg/mL for 12-48 h. However, TSCE-W significantly attenuated lipid peroxidation in H202-damaged cells. HPLC analysis showed the presence of (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, and procyanidin B2 in TSCE-W, which could be responsible for antioxidant and anti-lipid peroxidation activities. The results suggest that an inexpensive and simple boiling-water extraction of TSCE-W may provide a valuable natural antioxidant source having anti-lipid peroxidation for health food additives, nutraceuticals as well as cosmeceuticals.

  15. Reinvestigation of the Henry's law constant for hydrogen peroxide with temperature and acidity variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Daoming; Chen, Zhongming

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is not only an important oxidant in itself; it also serves as both sink and temporary reservoir for other important oxidants including HOx (OH and HO2) radicals and O3 in the atmosphere. Its partitioning between gas and aqueous phases in the atmosphere, usually described by its Henry's law constant (K(H)), significantly influences its role in atmospheric processes. Large discrepancies between the K(H) values reported in previous work, however, have created uncertainty for atmospheric modelers. Based on our newly developed online instrumentation, we have re-determined the temperature and acidity dependence of K(H) for hydrogen peroxide at an air pressure of (0.960 +/- 0.013) atm (1 atm = 1.01325 x 10(5) Pa). The results indicated that the temperature dependence of K(H) for hydrogen peroxide fits to the Van't Hoff equation form, expressed as lnK(H) = a/T - b, and a = -deltaH/R, where K(H) is in M/atm (M is mol/L), T is in degrees Kelvin, R is the ideal gas constant, and deltaH is the standard heat of solution. For acidity dependence, results demonstrated that the K(H) value of hydrogen peroxide appeared to have no obvious dependence on decreasing pH level (from pH 7 to pH 1). Combining the dependence of both temperature and acidity, the obtained a and b were 7024 +/- 138 and 11.97 +/- 0.48, respectively, deltaH was (58.40 +/- 1.15) kJ/(K x mol), and the uncertainties represent sigma. Our determined K(H) values for hydrogen peroxide will therefore be of great use in atmospheric models.

  16. Role of airway lactoperoxidase in scavenging of hydrogen peroxide damage in asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al Obaidi Amina Hamed

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 that is mainly generated by neutrophils and eosinophils in asthma is known to be damaging to the airway and to contribute to airway inflammation. The purpose of the present study was to determine the contribution and the role of lactoperoxidase in scavenging airway hydrogen peroxide, in order to propose a therapeutic approach for asthma. The study was an open clinical trial. Twenty-five nonsmoking asthmatic patients were included in the study. Of them, 16 patients (64% were male and 9 (36% were female, with age ranging from 29 to 48 years (45.13 ± 4.6. Of the 25 patients included in the study, only 16 patients completed the study; and they were eligible for analyses. Exhaled breath condensate was collected from all patients at the time of entering the study; and 2, 4 and 8 weeks later. All patients received dapson as a lactoperoxidase inhibitor at a dose of 50 mg daily for 8 weeks. The study was conducted during the period from January 2006 to end of October 2006. H 2 O 2 concentration was determined by an enzymatic assay. Determination of exhaled breath condensate for hydrogen peroxide concentration after 8 weeks of dapson usage indicated an increase (1.05 ± 0.36 µM; 95% CI, 0.89-1.21 as compared to that at baseline ( P < 0.0001, 2 weeks ( P < 0.001 and 4 weeks ( P > 0.05. The increase in hydrogen peroxide concentration in exhaled breath condensate after inhibition of lactoperoxidase by dapson advocates a potential role for lactoperoxidase in scavenging of hydrogen peroxide in asthmatic airway.

  17. Normal Platelet Integrin Function in Mice Lacking Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Clone-5 (Hic-5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Popp

    Full Text Available Integrin αIIbβ3 plays a central role in the adhesion and aggregation of platelets and thus is essential for hemostasis and thrombosis. Integrin activation requires the transmission of a signal from the small cytoplasmic tails of the α or β subunit to the large extracellular domains resulting in conformational changes of the extracellular domains to enable ligand binding. Hydrogen peroxide-inducible clone-5 (Hic-5, a member of the paxillin family, serves as a focal adhesion adaptor protein associated with αIIbβ3 at its cytoplasmic tails. Previous studies suggested Hic-5 as a novel regulator of integrin αIIbβ3 activation and platelet aggregation in mice. To assess this in more detail, we generated Hic-5-null mice and analyzed activation and aggregation of their platelets in vitro and in vivo. Surprisingly, lack of Hic-5 had no detectable effect on platelet integrin activation and function in vitro and in vivo under all tested conditions. These results indicate that Hic-5 is dispensable for integrin αIIbβ3 activation and consequently for arterial thrombosis and hemostasis in mice.

  18. Mechanisms involved in the modulation of astroglial resistance to oxidative stress induced by activated microglia: antioxidative systems, peroxide elimination, radical generation, lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röhl, Claudia; Armbrust, Elisabeth; Herbst, Eva; Jess, Anne; Gülden, Michael; Maser, Edmund; Rimbach, Gerald; Bösch-Saadatmandi, Christine

    2010-05-01

    Microglia and astrocytes are the cellular key players in many neurological disorders associated with oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. Previously, we have shown that microglia activated by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induce the expression of antioxidative enzymes in astrocytes and render them more resistant to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). In this study, we examined the mechanisms involved with respect to the cellular action of different peroxides, the ability to detoxify peroxides, and the status of further antioxidative systems. Astrocytes were treated for 3 days with medium conditioned by purified quiescent (microglia-conditioned medium, MCM[-]) or LPS-activated (MCM[+]) microglia. MCM[+] reduced the cytotoxicity of the organic cumene hydroperoxide in addition to that of H2O2. Increased peroxide resistance was not accompanied by an improved ability of astrocytes to remove H2O2 or an increased expression/activity of peroxide eliminating antioxidative enzymes. Neither peroxide-induced radical generation nor lipid peroxidation were selectively affected in MCM[+] treated astrocytes. The glutathione content of peroxide resistant astrocytes, however, was increased and superoxide dismutase and heme oxygenase were found to be upregulated. These changes are likely to contribute to the higher peroxide resistance of MCM[+] treated astrocytes by improving their ability to detoxify reactive oxygen radicals and oxidation products. For C6 astroglioma cells a protective effect of microglia-derived factors could not be observed, underlining the difference of primary cells and cell lines concerning their mechanisms of oxidative stress resistance. Our results indicate the importance of microglial-astroglial cell interactions during neuroinflammatory processes.

  19. Recognizing a limitation of the TBLC-activated peroxide system on low-temperature cotton bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenhua; Wang, Lun; Wang, Dong; Zhang, Jingjing; Sun, Chang; Xu, Changhai

    2016-04-20

    In this study, cotton was bleached at low temperatures with an activated peroxide system which was established by incorporating a bleach activator, namely, N-[4-(triethylammoniomethyl)benzoyl]caprolactam chloride (TBCC) into an aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Experimental results showed that the bleaching performance was unexpectedly diminished as the TBCC concentration was increased over the range of 25-100g/L. Kinetic adsorption experiment indicated that this was most likely ascribed to the adsorptive interactions of TBCC and the in situ-generated compounds with cotton fibers. Such a limitation was especially fatal to cold pad-batch bleaching process of cotton in which a high TBCC concentration was often required. The results of this study may stimulate further research to avoid or overcome the limitation of the TBCC-activated peroxide system on low-temperature cotton bleaching.

  20. Recent Advances in Hydrogen Peroxide Propulsion Test Capability at NASA's Stennis Space Center E-Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacks, Thomas E.; Beisler, Michele

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, the rocket propulsion test capability at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center's (SSC) E-Complex has been enhanced to include facilitization for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) based ground testing. In particular, the E-3 test stand has conducted numerous test projects that have been reported in the open literature. These include combustion devices as simple as small-scale catalyst beds, and larger devices such as ablative thrust chambers and a flight-type engine (AR2-3). Consequently, the NASA SSC test engineering and operations knowledge base and infrastructure have grown considerably in order to conduct safe H2O2 test operations with a variety of test articles at the component and engine level. Currently, the E-Complex has a test requirement for a hydrogen peroxide based stage test. This new development, with its unique set of requirements, has motivated the facilitization for hydrogen peroxide propellant use at the E-2 Cell 2 test position in addition to E-3. Since the E-2 Cell 2 test position was not originally designed as a hydrogen peroxide test stand, a facility modernization-improvement project was planned and implemented in FY 2002-03 to enable this vertical engine test stand to accomodate H2O2. This paper discusses the ongoing enhancement of E-Complex ground test capability, specifically at the E-3 stand (Cell 1 and Cell 2) and E-2 Cell 2 stand, that enable current and future customers considerable test flexibility and operability in conducting their peroxide based rocket R&D efforts.

  1. Expanding Hydrogen Peroxide Propulsion Test Capability at NASA's Stennis Space Center E-Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacks, Thomas E.; Beisler, Michele

    2003-01-01

    In recent years, the rocket propulsion test capability at NASA s John C. Stennis Space Center's (SSC) E-Complex has been enhanced to include facilitization for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) based ground testing. In particular, the E-3 test stand has conducted numerous test projects that have been reported in the open literature. These include combustion devices as simple at small-scale catalyst beds, and larger devices such as ablative thrust chambers and a flight-type engine (AR2-3). Consequently, the NASA SSC test engineering and operations knowledge base and infrastructure have grown considerably in order to conduct safe H2O2 test operations with a variety of test articles at the component and engine level. Currently, the E-Complex has a test requirement for a hydrogen peroxide based stage test. This new development, with its unique set of requirements, has motivated the facilitization for hydrogen peroxide propellant use at the E-2 Cell 2 test position in addition to E-3. Since the E-2 Cell 2 test position was not originally designed as a hydrogen peroxide test stand, a facility modernization- improvement project was planned and implemented in FY 2002-03 to enable this vertical engine test stand to accommodate H2O2. This paper discusses the ongoing enhancement of E-Complex ground test capability, specifically at the E-3 stand (Cell 1 and Cell 2) and E-2 Cell 2 stand, that enable current and future customers considerable test flexibility and operability in conducting their peroxide based rocket R&D efforts.

  2. Hispidin isolated from Phellinus linteus protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in pancreatic MIN6N β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung Hyun; Lee, Jong Seok; Kim, Young Rae; Jung, Woo Chul; Lee, Keun Eok; Lee, Shin Young; Hong, Eock Kee

    2011-11-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been shown to cause DNA damage, protein denaturation, loss of antioxidative enzyme activity, and lipid peroxidation. Thus, ROS are associated with tissue damage and are considered to be prime contributing factors in inflammation, diabetes, aging, and cancer. In this study, we investigated whether or not hispidin protects pancreatic MIN6N β-cells from oxidative stress caused by hydrogen peroxide. Treatment of MIN6N β-cells with 0.5 mM hydrogen peroxide for 4 hours caused significant loss of cell viability and an increase in the number of apoptotic cells. However, pretreatment of MIN6N β-cells with hispidin for 24 hours reduced loss of cell viability and decreased the number of apoptotic cells. In addition, 70 μM hispidin significantly scavenged intracellular ROS and inhibited apoptosis and caspase-3 induced by hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, the generation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances was inhibited in the presence of hispidin in a dose-dependent manner. Also, 70 μM hispidin significantly increased insulin secretion in hydrogen peroxide-treated MIN6N β-cells. These results suggest that hispidin may be effective for protecting MIN6N β-cells from ROS toxicity in diabetes.

  3. Exogenous low-dose hydrogen peroxide enhances drought tolerance of soybean (Glycine max L.) through inducing antioxidant system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, Neslihan Saruhan; Pehlivan, Necla

    2016-06-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) functions as a signal molecule in plants under abiotic and biotic stress. In this study, the role of exogenous H(2)O(2) in improving drought tolerance in two soybean cultivars (Glycine max L. Merrill) differing in their tolerance to drought was evaluated. Plants were grown in plastic pots with normal irrigation in a phytotron. Four weeks after radicle emergence, either 1 mM H(2)O(2) or distilled water was sprayed as foliar onto the leaves of each plant, after drought stress was applied. Leaf samples were harvested on the 4(th) and 7(th) days of the drought. Antioxidant-related enzyme activity, such as the superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and malondialdehyde (MDA) content was measured during the drought period. Drought stress decreased leaf water potential, relative water content and photosynthetic pigment content but enhanced lipid peroxidation and endogenous H(2)O(2) concentration. By contrast, exogenous low dose H(2)O(2) improved water status, pigment content and lipid peroxidation under drought stress. Endogenous H(2)O(2) concentration was reduced by exogenous H(2)O(2) as compared to drought treatment alone. H(2)O(2) pre-treatment induced all the antioxidant enzyme activities, to a greater extent than the control leaves, during drought. H(2)O(2) pretreatment further enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes in the tolerant cultivar compared to the sensitive cultivar. Results suggested that low dose H(2)O(2) pre-treatment alleviated water loss and H(2)O(2) content and increased drought stress tolerance by inducing the antioxidant system.

  4. Polyhydroxylated C60, fullerenol, a novel free-radical trapper, prevented hydrogen peroxide- and cumene hydroperoxide-elicited changes in rat hippocampus in-vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, M C; Chen, Y H; Chiang, L Y

    1997-04-01

    The role of polyhydroxylated C60 (fullerenol), a novel free-radical trapper, in prevention of hydrogen peroxide- and cumene hydroperoxide-elicited damage was studied in hippocampal slices from the rat in-vitro. The interactions of polyhydroxylated C60, adenosine and 6,7-dinitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione (DNQX) were also compared. Hydrogen peroxide (0.006-0.02%) and cumene hydroperoxide (0.5-1.0 mM) both reversibly reduced the amplitudes of CA1-evoked population spikes in the hippocampal slices. Deferoxamine (1 mM) had little effect on the population spikes. Deferoxamine (1 mM) significantly prevented the hydrogen peroxide (0.006%) elicited inhibition of the population spikes. Polyhydroxylated C60 (0.1 mM) significantly prevented hydrogen peroxide- or cumene hydroperoxide-elicited reduction of the population spikes and also prevented the effects of hydrogen peroxide and cumene hydroperoxide on paired-pulse facilitation in the hippocampal slice. Adenosine reduced the amplitude of population spikes and promoted paired-pulse facilitation in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. Polyhydroxylated C60 did not alter either of the effects of adenosine on the population spikes. DNQX reduced the amplitude of the population spikes in the CA1 region but did not affect the ratio of paired-pulse facilitation. Fullerenol did not alter either effect of DNQX on the population spikes. These results suggested that polyhydroxylated C60 prevented hydrogen peroxide- and cumene hydroperoxide-elicited damage in the hippocampuss slices. These effects might be associated with the free-radical scavenging activity of polyhydroxylated C60.

  5. Salt-induced hydrogen peroxide is involved in modulation of antioxidant enzymes in cotton

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Wang; Xiangqian Li; Jinyao Li; Qian Bao; Fuchun Zhang; Gulinuer Tulaxi; Zhicai Wang

    2016-01-01

    Salt severely restricts cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) growth and production. The present study was undertaken to study the effect of salt-induced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on antioxidant enzymes in cotton. NaCl treatment or exogenous H2O2 was used to investigate the relationship between H2O2 content and levels of antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), peroxidase (POD), and catalase (CAT), as well as the transcriptional levels of corresponding genes. H2O2 content increased within 24 h following 200 mmol L–1 NaCl treatment. Both NaCl-induced and exogenous H2O2 increased the activity of antioxidant enzymes including APX and SOD and upregulated the transcriptional levels of GhcAPX1, GhFeSOD, and GhchlCSD. These increased activities and upregulated transcriptional levels were inhibited when the salt-induced H2O2 was scavenged by NAC. These results indicate that salt-induced H2O2 as a second signaling messenger modulates APX and SOD activities by regulating the transcription levels of corresponding genes, alleviating oxidative stress, and increasing salt tolerance in cotton.

  6. Partial oxidation of n-hexadecane through decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in supercritical water

    KAUST Repository

    Alshammari, Y.M.

    2015-01-01

    © 2014 The Institution of Chemical Engineers. This work reports the experimental analysis of partial oxidation of n-hexadecane under supercritical water conditions. A novel reactor flow system was developed which allows for total decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in a separate reactor followed partial oxidation of n-hexadecane in a gasification reactor instead of having both reactions in one reactor. The kinetics of hydrothermal decomposition of hydrogen peroxide was studied in order to confirm its full conversion into water and oxygen under the desired partial oxidation conditions, and the kinetic data were found in a good agreement with previously reported literature. The gas yield and gasification efficiency were investigated under different operating parameters. Furthermore, the profile of C-C/C=C ratio was studied which showed the favourable conditions for maximising yields of n-alkanes via hydrogenation of their corresponding 1-alkenes. Enhanced hydrogenation of 1-alkenes was observed at higher O/C ratios and higher residence times, shown by the increase in the C-C/C=C ratio to more than unity, while increasing the temperature has shown much less effect on the C-C/C=C ratio at the current experimental conditions. In addition, GC-MS analysis of liquid samples revealed the formation of heavy oxygenated compounds which may suggest a new addition reaction to account for their formation under the current experimental conditions. Results show new promising routes for hydrogen production with in situ hydrogenation of heavy hydrocarbons in a supercritical water reactor.

  7. Sterilization of hydrogen peroxide resistant bacterial spores with stabilized chlorine dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedline, Anthony; Zachariah, Malcolm; Middaugh, Amy; Heiser, Matt; Khanna, Neeraj; Vaishampayan, Parag; Rice, Charles V

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus pumilus SAFR-032 spores isolated from a clean room environment are known to exhibit enhanced resistance to peroxide, desiccation, UV radiation and chemical disinfection than other spore-forming bacteria. The survival of B. pumilus SAFR-032 spores to standard clean room sterilization practices requires development of more stringent disinfection agents. Here, we report the effects of a stabilized chlorine dioxide-based biocidal agent against spores of B. pumilus SAFR-032 and Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6051. Viability was determined via CFU measurement after exposure. Chlorine dioxide demonstrated efficacy towards sterilization of spores of B. pumilus SAFR-032 equivalent or better than exposure to hydrogen peroxide. These results indicate efficacy of chlorine dioxide delivered through a stabilized chlorine dioxide product as a means of sterilization of peroxide- and UV-resistant spores.

  8. Skeletal muscle contractions induce acute changes in cytosolic superoxide, but slower responses in mitochondrial superoxide and cellular hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Timothy; Kabayo, Tabitha; Ng, Rainer; Chamberlain, Jeffrey; McArdle, Anne; Jackson, Malcolm J

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is increased following contractile activity and these species interact with multiple signaling pathways to mediate adaptations to contractions. The sources and time course of the increase in ROS during contractions remain undefined. Confocal microscopy with specific fluorescent probes was used to compare the activities of superoxide in mitochondria and cytosol and the hydrogen peroxide content of the cytosol in isolated single mature skeletal muscle (flexor digitorum brevis) fibers prior to, during, and after electrically stimulated contractions. Superoxide in mitochondria and cytoplasm were assessed using MitoSox red and dihydroethidium (DHE) respectively. The product of superoxide with DHE, 2-hydroxyethidium (2-HE) was acutely increased in the fiber cytosol by contractions, whereas hydroxy-MitoSox showed a slow cumulative increase. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthases increased the contraction-induced formation of hydroxy-MitoSox only with no effect on 2-HE formation. These data indicate that the acute increases in cytosolic superoxide induced by contractions are not derived from mitochondria. Data also indicate that, in muscle mitochondria, nitric oxide (NO) reduces the availability of superoxide, but no effect of NO on cytosolic superoxide availability was detected. To determine the relationship of changes in superoxide to hydrogen peroxide, an alternative specific approach was used where fibers were transduced using an adeno-associated viral vector to express the hydrogen peroxide probe, HyPer within the cytoplasmic compartment. HyPer fluorescence was significantly increased in fibers following contractions, but surprisingly followed a relatively slow time course that did not appear directly related to cytosolic superoxide. These data demonstrate for the first time temporal and site specific differences in specific ROS that occur in skeletal muscle fibers during and after contractile activity.

  9. Response of the antioxidant defense system to tert-butyl hydroperoxide and hydrogen peroxide in a human hepatoma cell line (HepG2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alía, Mario; Ramos, Sonia; Mateos, Raquel; Bravo, Laura; Goya, Luis

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the response of the antioxidant defense system to two oxidative stressors, hydrogen peroxide and tert-butyl hydroperoxide, in HepG2 cells in culture. The parameters evaluated included enzyme activity and gene expression of superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and activity of glutathione reductase. Besides, markers of the cell damage and oxidative stress evoked by the stressors such as cell viability, intracellular reactive oxygen species generation, malondialdehyde levels, and reduced glutathione concentration were evaluated. Both stressors, hydrogen peroxide and tert-butyl hydroperoxide, enhanced cell damage and reactive oxygen species generation at doses above 50 microM. The concentration of reduced glutathione decreased, and levels of malondialdehyde and activity of the antioxidant enzymes consistently increased only when HepG2 cells were treated with tert-butyl hydroperoxide but not when hydrogen peroxide was used. A slight increase in the gene expression of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase and catalase with 500 microM tert-butyl hydroperoxide and of catalase with 200 microM hydrogen peroxide was observed. The response of the components of the antioxidant defense system evaluated in this study indicates that tert-butyl hydroperoxide evokes a consistent cellular stress in HepG2.

  10. The Life Story of Hydrogen Peroxide III: Chirality and Physical Effects at the Dawn of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Rowena; Brindley, John

    2016-03-01

    It is a remarkable observed fact that all life on Earth is homochiral, its biology using exclusively the D-enantiomer of ribose, the sugar moiety of the ribonucleic acids, and the L-enantiomers of the chiral amino acids. Motivated by concurrent work that elaborates further the role of hydrogen peroxide in providing an oscillatory drive for the RNA world (Ball & Brindley 2015a, J. R. Soc. Interface 12, 20150366, and Ball & Brindley 2015b, this journal, in press), we reappraise the structure and physical properties of this small molecule within this context. Hydrogen peroxide is the smallest, simplest molecule to exist as a pair of non-superimposable mirror images, or enantiomers, a fact which leads us to develop the hypothesis that its enantiospecific interactions with ribonucleic acids led to enantioselective outcomes. We propose a mechanism by which these chiral interactions may have led to amplification of D-ribonucleic acids and extinction of L-ribonucleic acids.

  11. Methane formation by oxidation of ascorbic acid using iron minerals and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althoff, Frederik; Jugold, Alke; Keppler, Frank

    2010-06-01

    The possibility of methane formation in an oxidative environment has been intensely debated, especially since the discovery of methane generation by living plants. However, recent studies with animal tissue suggested that under specific conditions aerobic methane formation is also possible. Here, we investigated the generation of methane in an abiotic model system using bioavailable substances. We show formation of methane in a highly oxidative media, using ascorbic acid, ferrihydrite and hydrogen peroxide as reagents. Methane production was shown to be related to reagent ratio, reaction volume and pH. A 2:1 ratio of hydrogen peroxide to ascorbic acid, catalytic amounts of ferrihydrite and acidic conditions (pH 3) enhanced formation of methane. We further show that gaseous oxygen has a strong influence with higher levels found to inhibit methane formation. This study is a first step towards providing an insight for the reaction mechanism of methane formation that would be applicable to aerobic environments.

  12. Formation of water-soluble soybean polysaccharides from spent flakes by hydrogen peroxide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Brian C; Wichmann, Jesper; Tran, Tam H; Cheetamun, Roshan; Bacic, Antony; Meyer, Anne S

    2016-06-25

    In this paper we propose a novel chemical process for the generation of water-soluble polysaccharides from soy spent flake, a by-product of the soy food industry. This process entails treatment of spent flake with hydrogen peroxide at an elevated temperature, resulting in the release of more than 70% of the original insoluble material as high molar mass soluble polysaccharides. A design of experiment was used to quantify the effects of pH, reaction time, and hydrogen peroxide concentration on the reaction yield, average molar mass, and free monosaccharides generated. The resulting product is low in protein, fat, and minerals and contains predominantly water-soluble polysaccharides of high molar mass, including arabinan, type I arabinogalactan, homogalacturonan, xyloglucan, rhamnogalacturonan, and (glucurono)arabinoxylan. This treatment provides a straightforward approach for generation of soluble soy polysaccharides and opens a new range of opportunities for this abundant and underutilized material in future research and industrial applications.

  13. Kinetics study on photochemical oxidation of polyacrylamide by ozone combined with hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet radiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Guang-meng; SUN De-zhi; CHUNG Jong Shik

    2006-01-01

    An investigation on the process of ozone combined with hydrogen peroxide and ultraviolet radiation has been carried out in order to establish the kinetics for photochemical oxidation of polyacrylamide (PAM) in aqueous solution. Effects of operating parameters, including initial PAM concentration, dosages of ozone and hydrogen peroxide, UV radiation and pH value on the photochemical oxidation of PAM, have been studied. There was an increase in photochemical oxidation rate of PAM with increasing of dosages of O3, H2O2 and ultraviolet radiation. Upon increasing of the initial PAM concentration, the photochemical oxidation rate of PAM decreased. Slight effect of pH value on the photochemical oxidation rate of PAM was observed in the experiments. The kinetics equation for the photochemical oxidation of PAM by the system has been established.

  14. Hydrogen peroxide biosensor based on electrodeposition of zinc oxide nanoflowers onto carbon nanotubes film electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Ping Bai; Xu Xiao Lu; Guang Ming Yang; Yun Hui Yang

    2008-01-01

    A new amperometric biosensor for hydrogen peroxide was developed based on adsorption of horseradish peroxidase at the glassy carbon electrode modified with zinc oxide nanoflowers produced by electrodeposition onto multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) firm. The morphology of the MWNTs/nano-ZnO electrode has been investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the electrochemical performance of the electrode has also been studied by amperometric method. The resulting electrode offered an excellent detection for hydrogen peroxide at -0.11 V with a linear response range of 9.9 × 10(-7) to 2.9 × 10(-3) mol/L with a correlation coefficient of 0.991, and response time <5 s. The biosensor displays rapid response and expanded linear response range, and excellent stability.

  15. Bioconversion of paper mill sludge to bioethanol in the presence of accelerants or hydrogen peroxide pretreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurram, Raghu Nandan; Al-Shannag, Mohammad; Lecher, Nicholas Joshua; Duncan, Shona M; Singsaas, Eric Lawrence; Alkasrawi, Malek

    2015-09-01

    In this study we investigated the technical feasibility of convert paper mill sludge into fuel ethanol. This involved the removal of mineral fillers by using either chemical pretreatment or mechanical fractionation to determine their effects on cellulose hydrolysis and fermentation to ethanol. In addition, we studied the effect of cationic polyelectrolyte (as accelerant) addition and hydrogen peroxide pretreatment on enzymatic hydrolysis and fermentation. We present results showing that removing the fillers content (ash and calcium carbonate) from the paper mill sludge increases the enzymatic hydrolysis performance dramatically with higher cellulose conversion at faster rates. The addition of accelerant and hydrogen peroxide pretreatment further improved the hydrolysis yields by 16% and 25% (g glucose / g cellulose), respectively with the de-ashed sludge. The fermentation process of produced sugars achieved up to 95% of the maximum theoretical ethanol yield and higher ethanol productivities within 9h of fermentation.

  16. Electrochemiluminescent Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide via Some Luminol Imide Derivatives with Different Substituent Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tifeng Jiao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Some luminol imide derivatives with different substituent groups have been designed and synthesized. Their electrochemiluminescence properties have been measured with a view to developing new biosensors. The ECL response to hydrogen peroxide in the presence of these luminescent derivatives has been investigated taking into account crucial factors such as the applied potential value, injection volume of hydrogen peroxide, and the substituent groups in molecular structures. The experimental data demonstrated that the substituent groups in these imide derivatives can have a profound effect upon the ECL abilities of these studied compounds. The present research work affords new and useful exploration for the design and development of new soft matter for ECL biosensors with luminol functional groups.

  17. Enamel susceptibility to red wine staining after 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Bittencourt Berger

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Concern has been expressed regarding the staining of enamel surface by different beverages after bleaching. This study investigated the influence of 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents on enamel surface stained with wine after whitening treatments. Flat and polished bovine enamel surfaces were submitted to two commercially available 35% hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents or kept in 100% humidity, as a control group (n = 10. Specimens of all groups were immersed in red wine for 48 h at 37°C, immediately, 24 h or 1 week after treatments. All specimens were ground into powder and prepared for the spectrophotometric analysis. Data were subjected to two-way analysis of variance and Fisher's PLSD test at 5% significance level. The amount of wine pigments uptake by enamel submitted to bleaching treatments was statistically higher than that of control group, independently of the evaluation time. Results suggested that wine staining susceptibility was increased by bleaching treatments.

  18. Compatibility Studies of Hydrogen Peroxide and a New Hypergolic Fuel Blend

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldridge, Jennifer; Villegas, Yvonne

    2002-01-01

    Several preliminary materials compatibility studies have been conducted to determine the practicality of a new hypergolic fuel system. Hypergolic fuel ignites spontaneously as the oxidizer decomposes and releases energy in the presence of the fuel. The bipropellant system tested consists of high-test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) and a liquid fuel blend consisting of a hydrocarbon fuel, an ignition enhancer and a transition metal catalyst. In order for further testing of the new fuel blend to take place, some basic materials compatibility and HTP decomposition studies must be accomplished. The thermal decomposition rate of HTP was tested using gas evolution and isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC). Materials were analyzed for compatibility with hydrogen peroxide including a study of the affect welding has on stainless steel elemental composition and its relation to HTP decomposition. Compatibility studies of valve materials in the fuel blend were performed to determine the corrosion resistance of the materials.

  19. Methods and apparatus for the on-site production of hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buschmann, Wayne E. (Inventor); James, Patrick I. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Methods, apparatus, and applications for the on-site production of hydrogen peroxide are described. An embodiment of the apparatus comprises at least one anolyte chamber coupled to at least one anode, at least one catholyte chamber, wherein the at least one catholyte chamber is coupled to at least one cathode, at least one anode membrane and at least one cathode membrane, wherein the anode membrane is adjacent to the at least one anode, wherein the cathode membrane is adjacent to the at least one cathode, at least one central chamber disposed between the at least one anolyte chamber and the at least one catholyte chamber. Hydrogen peroxide is produced by reduction of an oxygen-containing gas at the cathode.

  20. Electrochemical behavior of hydrogen peroxide sensor based on new methylene blue as mediator

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Jie; WU Hai; ZHU Yaqi

    2007-01-01

    A novel amperometric hydrogen peroxide sensor was proposed by co-immobilizing new methylene blue (NMB) and Horseradish peroxidase (HRP) on glassy carbon electrode through covalent binding.The electrochemical behavior of the sensor was studied extensively in 0.1 mol/L phosphate buffering solution (pH = 7.0).The experiments showed NMB could effectively transfer electrons between hydrogen peroxide and glassy carbon electrode.The electron transfer coefficient and apparent reaction rate constant were determined to be 0.861 and 1.27 s-1.The kinetic characteristics and responses of sensor on HzO2 were investigated.The Michaelis constant is 8.27 mol/L and the linear dependence of current on H2O2 is in the range of 2.5-100 μmol/L.At the same time,the effects of solution pH,buffer capacity,and temperature on the sensor were examined.

  1. Influence of sodium dodecyl sulfate on the reaction between Nile Blue A and hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IVANA A. JANKOVIC

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate on the rate of the reaction between the cationic form of Nile Blue A and hydrogen peroxide was investigated in the pH range from 5 to 8.5. A retardation of the oxidation of Nile Blue A with hydrogen peroxide of three orders of magnitude was observed at pH 8.5 in the presence of anionic micelles compared to the kinetic data in water. The retardation effect was less pronounced at lower pH values. These effects were explained by the electrostatic interaction of the species involved in the reaction with the negatively charged micellar surface and their effective separation in the vicinity of the micellar surface.

  2. Styrene epoxidation with hydrogen peroxide over calcium oxide catalysts prepared from various precursors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qingming Gu; Dan Han; Lei Shi; Qi Sun

    2012-01-01

    A series of CaO samples were prepared by calcination of commercially available and synthesis of calcium salt precursors such as calcium acetate,carbonate,hydroxide and oxalate etc.CaO samples were found to be effective for the epoxidation of styrene using hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant in the presence of acetonitrile.To determine the influence of the physicochemical properties and surface basicity on the catalytic activity,the prepared CaO samples were characterized using thermogravimetry (TG),X-ray diffraction (XRD),scanning electron microscopy (SEM),N2-adsorption and temperature-programmed desorption of CO2 (CO2-TPD).The results indicate that the amounts of very strong basic sites and high basicity strength on CaO sample are key factors for its excellent catalytic performance.In contrast,the surface area,porosity and the surface structure of CaO sample have a relatively minor effect on the catalytic activity.CaO sample,obtained by the decomposition of Ca(OH)2,prepared by precipitating calcium nitrate with sodium hydroxide in ethylene glycol solution,exhibits the highest amount of very strong basic sites and stronger strength of basic sites,and therefore it catalyses the epoxidation of styrene with the highest rate among the tested CaO samples.Under the selected reaction conditions,the selectivity of 97.5% to styrene oxide at a conversion in excess of 99% could be obtained.

  3. EFFECT OF NATURAL IRON OXIDE, HYDROGEN PEROXIDE, AND OXALIC ACID ON PHOTOCHEMICAL DEGRADATION OF 2-CHLOROPHENOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W REMACHE

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The voluntary or accidental release of chemical compounds in the environment is a major cause of pollution of natural waters. Most of chlorophenols are toxic and hardly biodegradable and are difficult to remove from the environment. Therefore, it is important to find innovative and economical methods for the safe and complete destruction. The objective of this work is to test the activity photocatalytic of natural iron oxide (NIO in the photodegradation of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP. The analysis chromatographic with HPLC of solutions exposed under UV irradiation revealed that the degradation of 2-CP was negligible under the condition of using only natural iron oxide. The effect of wavelength on photoreactivity of NIO was also investigated in this process: at high wavelength thus at low energy the efficiency of degradation is important. We have also investigated the activation of NIO by hydrogen peroxide and oxalic acid, The results showed that the photodegradation of 2-CP under UVA irradiation could be enhanced greatly in the presence of oxalate. 2-CP was completly removed after 240 minutes of irradiation when the concentration of oxalic acid is equal to 2.10-3 M. The use of 2.0 % of isopropanol as a scavenger confirmed the intervention of hydroxyl radicals in the photodegradation of 2-CP.

  4. Major effect of hydrogen peroxide on bacterioplankton metabolism in the Northeast Atlantic.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Baltar

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide have the potential to alter metabolic rates of marine prokaryotes, ultimately impacting the cycling and bioavailability of nutrients and carbon. We studied the influence of H2O2 on prokaryotic heterotrophic production (PHP and extracellular enzymatic activities (i.e., β-glucosidase [BGase], leucine aminopeptidase [LAPase] and alkaline phosphatase [APase] in the subtropical Atlantic. With increasing concentrations of H2O2 in the range of 100-1000 nM, LAPase, APase and BGase were reduced by up to 11, 23 and 62%, respectively, in the different water layers. Incubation experiments with subsurface waters revealed a strong inhibition of all measured enzymatic activities upon H2O2 amendments in the range of 10-500 nM after 24 h. H2O2 additions also reduced prokaryotic heterotrophic production by 36-100% compared to the rapid increases in production rates occurring in the unamended controls. Our results indicate that oxidative stress caused by H2O2 affects prokaryotic growth and hydrolysis of specific components of the organic matter pool. Thus, we suggest that oxidative stress may have important consequences on marine carbon and energy fluxes.

  5. Semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase substrates potentiate hydralazine hypotension: possible role of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidrio, Horacio; Medina, Martha; González-Romo, Pilar; Lorenzana-Jiménez, Marte; Díaz-Arista, Patricia; Baeza, Alejandro

    2003-11-01

    The relation between inhibition of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) and vasodilation by hydralazine (HYD) was evaluated in chloralose/urethane-anesthetized rats pretreated with various substrates of the enzyme and subsequently administered a threshold hypotensive dose of the vasodilator. The SSAO substrates benzylamine, phenethylamine, and methylamine potentiate the hypotensive response to HYD. Methylamine, which was studied in greater detail because of its status as a possible endogenous SSAO substrate, does not influence the response to the reference vasodilator pinacidil; it does enhance HYD relaxation in aortic rings obtained from pretreated rats. Experiments designed to identify the product of SSAO activity responsible for potentiation by methylamine suggest involvement of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), as evidenced by the findings that such potentiation is abolished by additional pretreatment with the H2O2-metabolizing enzyme catalase, and that the plasma concentration of H2O2 is increased by methylamine and decreased by HYD. These results are interpreted as a substantiation of the relation between the known SSAO inhibitory effect of HYD and its vasodilator activity. Pretreatment with the SSAO substrates would increase production of H2O2 in vascular smooth muscle and thus magnify the influence of this vasoconstrictor agent on vascular tone. In these conditions, the decrease in H2O2 production and hence in vascular tone caused by SSAO inhibition by HYD would also be magnified. It is speculated that inhibition of vascular SSAO could represent a novel mechanism of vasodilation.

  6. Growth, photosynthesis, and antioxidant responses of Vigna unguiculata L. treated with hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Aiman Hasan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. is an important legume well grown in semiarid and arid environment. Hydrogen peroxide solutions (0.1, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mM have been used to optimize growth and photosynthetic performance of cowpea plant at two growth stages [30 and 45 DAS (days of sowing]. Foliar application of H2O2 at 0.5 > 1.0 mM solution at 29 DAS optimally promoted the photosynthetic attributes [leaf chlorophyll content, net photosynthetic rate (PN, water use efficiency, and maximum quantum yield of PSII (Fv/Fm] and growth performance [root and shoot length; fresh and dry weight] of plants where the responses were more significant at the later growth stage. It was favored by activity of enzymes as carbonic anhydrase [CA; E.C. 4.2.1.1] and nitrate reductase [NR, E.C. 1.6.6.1] and those of antioxidant enzymes viz. peroxidase [POX; EC 1.11.1.7], catalase [CAT; EC 1.11.1.6], and superoxide dismutase [SOD; EC 1.15.1.1] and leaf proline content. Strengthened root system and antioxidant activity, particularly leaf proline level appeared to be the key factor for efficient photosynthesis and growth responses.

  7. DNA-Templated Silver Nanoclusters Formation at Gold Electrode Surface and Its Application to Hydrogen Peroxide Detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许媛媛; 陈阳阳; 杨娜娜; 孙丽洲; 李根喜

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we have prepared Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) at gold electrode surface by using thiol-modified oligodeoxynucleotide consisting of eighteen cytosine deoxyribonucleotides (polyC18) as template and NaBH4 as reducing agent. Experimental results show that Ag nanoclusters (Ag NCs) can be formed around the template polyC18, while the formation can be characterized with electrochemical method. Further studies reveal that the fab- ricated Ag NCs may display high catalytic activity for the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which can be further used for the detection of H20〉

  8. A hydrogen peroxide sensor based on Ag nanoparticles electrodeposited on natural nano-structure attapulgite modified glassy carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huihui; Zhang, Zhe; Cai, Dongqing; Zhang, Shengyi; Zhang, Bailin; Tang, Jilin; Wu, Zhengyan

    2011-10-30

    A novel strategy to fabricate hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) sensor was developed by electrodepositing Ag nanoparticles (NPs) on a glassy carbon electrode modified with natural nano-structure attapulgite (ATP). The result of electrochemical experiments showed that such constructed sensor had a favorable catalytic ability to reduce H(2)O(2). The good catalytic activity of the sensor was ascribed to the ATP that facilitated the formation and homogenous distribution of small Ag NPs. The resulted sensor achieved 95% of the steady-state current within 2s and had a 2.4 μM detection limit of H(2)O(2).

  9. New Nanomaterials and Luminescent Optical Sensors for Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide

    OpenAIRE

    Natalia A. Burmistrova; Olga A. Kolontaeva; Axel Duerkop

    2015-01-01

    Accurate methods that can continuously detect low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) have a huge application potential in biological, pharmaceutical, clinical and environmental analysis. Luminescent probes and nanomaterials are used for fabrication of sensors for H2O2 that can be applied for these purposes. In contrast to previous reviews focusing on the chemical design of molecular probes for H2O2, this mini-review highlights the latest luminescent nanoparticular materials and new lu...

  10. Oat hulls treated with alkaline hydrogen peroxide associated with extrusion as fiber source in cookies

    OpenAIRE

    Galdeano,Melícia Cintia; Grossmann,Maria Victória Eiras

    2006-01-01

    Cookies were prepared with the replacement of 20% of wheat flour by chemically (alkaline hydrogen peroxide) and physically (extrusion) treated oat hulls, with the objective to investigate the possibility of use of this modified material. Cookies elaborated with the untreated hulls were used as control. Cookies were evaluated for their physical (spread ratio, specific volume and color) and sensory characteristics, and no difference was detected (p

  11. Oxidation of chlorophenols catalyzed by Coprinus cinereus peroxidase with in situ production of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pezzotti, Fabio; Okrasa, Krzysztof; Therisod, Michel

    2004-01-01

    Degradation of 2,6-dichlorophenol (2,6-DCP) was accomplished by oxidation catalyzed by Coprinus cinereus peroxidase. Immobilization of the enzyme in a polyacrylamide matrix enhanced DCP oxidation. Hydrogen peroxide, peroxidase's natural substrate, was produced enzymatically in situ to avoid peroxidase inactivation by its too high concentration. In the case of larger scale utilization, the method would also avoid direct handling of this hazardous reagent.

  12. Disinfection by hydrogen peroxide nebulization increases susceptibility to avian pathogenic Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Oosterik, Leon; Tuntufye, Huruma Nelwike; Janssens, Steven; Butaye, Patrick; Goddeeris, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Background: Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) are the major cause of economic losses in the poultry industry worldwide. Traditionally, antibiotics are used to treat and prevent colibacillosis in broilers. Due to resistance development other ways of preventing/treating the disease have to be found. Therefore during this study the nebulization of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was tested in the presence of chickens to lower pathogenicity of APEC. Results: Significantly...

  13. Cystine antagonism of the antibacterial action of lactoperoxidase-thiocyanate-hydrogen peroxide on Streptococcus agalactiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Mickelson, M. N.; Anderson, A J

    1984-01-01

    Cystine reduction in Streptococcus agalactiae, resulting in sulfhydryl formation, may account for antagonism of the antibacterial effect of lactoperoxidase-thiocyanate-hydrogen peroxide when cystine is present in excess of the amount needed for maximum growth. Accumulation of cystine by S. agalactiae and its reduction to form sulfhydryl compounds were demonstrated. The reduction of cystine appeared to occur by a couple reaction between glutathione reductase and glutathione-disulfide transhydr...

  14. Low-Temperature Decontamination with Hydrogen Peroxide or Chlorine Dioxide for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macken, S.; Giri, K.; Walker, J. T.; Bennett, A. M.

    2012-01-01

    The currently used microbial decontamination method for spacecraft and components uses dry-heat microbial reduction at temperatures of >110°C for extended periods to prevent the contamination of extraplanetary destinations. This process is effective and reproducible, but it is also long and costly and precludes the use of heat-labile materials. The need for an alternative to dry-heat microbial reduction has been identified by space agencies. Investigations assessing the biological efficacy of two gaseous decontamination technologies, vapor hydrogen peroxide (Steris) and chlorine dioxide (ClorDiSys), were undertaken in a 20-m3 exposure chamber. Five spore-forming Bacillus spp. were exposed on stainless steel coupons to vaporized hydrogen peroxide and chlorine dioxide gas. Exposure for 20 min to vapor hydrogen peroxide resulted in 6- and 5-log reductions in the recovery of Bacillus atrophaeus and Geobacillus stearothermophilus, respectively. However, in comparison, chlorine dioxide required an exposure period of 60 min to reduce both B. atrophaeus and G. stearothermophilus by 5 logs. Of the three other Bacillus spp. tested, Bacillus thuringiensis proved the most resistant to hydrogen peroxide and chlorine dioxide with D values of 175.4 s and 6.6 h, respectively. Both low-temperature decontamination technologies proved effective at reducing the Bacillus spp. tested within the exposure ranges by over 5 logs, with the exception of B. thuringiensis, which was more resistant to both technologies. These results indicate that a review of the indicator organism choice and loading could provide a more appropriate and realistic challenge for the sterilization procedures used in the space industry. PMID:22492450

  15. Assessment of The Compatibility of Composite Materials With High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostowski, Rudy; Griffin, Dennis E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The compatibility of composite materials with high-test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) was assessed using various chemical and mechanical techniques. Methods included classical schemes combining concentration assay with accelerated aging by means of a heated water bath. Exothermic reactivity was observed using Isothermal Microcalorimetry. Mechanical Properties testing determined degradation of the composite material. Photoacoustic Infrared Spectroscopy was used to monitor chemical alteration of the resin matrix. Other materials were examined including some polymers and metals.

  16. Hydrogen peroxide release and hydroxyl radical formation in mixtures containing mineral fibres and human neutrophils.

    OpenAIRE

    Leanderson, P; Tagesson, C

    1992-01-01

    The ability of different mineral fibres (rock wool, glass wool, ceramic fibres, chrysotile A, chrysotile B, amosite, crocidolite, antophyllite, erionite, and wollastonite) to stimulate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and hydroxyl radical (OH.) formation in mixtures containing human polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNLs) was investigated. In the presence of azide, all the fibres caused considerable H2O2 formation, and about twice as much H2O2 was found in mixtures with the natural fibres (asbestos, eri...

  17. Detection of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the Martian atmosphere with MEX / PFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, S.; Kasaba, Y.; Giuranna, M.; Geminale, A.; Sindoni, G.; Nakagawa, H.; Kasai, Y.; Murata, I.; Grassi, D.; Formisano, V.

    2011-10-01

    We first derived the long-term averaged abundance of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in the Martian atmosphere with data sets of Planetary Fourier Spectroscopy (PFS) onboard Mars Express (MEX). The total averaged amounts of H2O2 at three Martian years were 45 ± 21 ppb and 25 ± 18 ppb in the forward/reverse pendulum direction, respectively. It could not explain the observed short lifetime of CH4 in the Martian atmosphere.

  18. Inactivating Influenza Viruses on Surfaces Using Hydrogen Peroxide or Triethylene Glycol at Low Vapor Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Inactvaton of avan nfluenza vruses by chemcal agents and physcal condtons: a revew. Zoonoses - Public - Health , 54(2), 51-68. EPA (2005a...Research Harvard School of Public Health Boston, MA 02115 April 2009 Final Report Inactivating Influenza Viruses on Surfaces Using Hydrogen Peroxide or...Transportation Center of Excellence for Airliner Cabin Environment Research Harvard School of Public Health 665 Huntington Avenue Boston, MA 02115 12

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells restore frataxin expression and increase hydrogen peroxide scavenging enzymes in Friedreich ataxia fibroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Kemp

    Full Text Available Dramatic advances in recent decades in understanding the genetics of Friedreich ataxia (FRDA--a GAA triplet expansion causing greatly reduced expression of the mitochondrial protein frataxin--have thus far yielded no therapeutic dividend, since there remain no effective treatments that prevent or even slow the inevitable progressive disability in affected individuals. Clinical interventions that restore frataxin expression are attractive therapeutic approaches, as, in theory, it may be possible to re-establish normal function in frataxin deficient cells if frataxin levels are increased above a specific threshold. With this in mind several drugs and cytokines have been tested for their ability to increase frataxin levels. Cell transplantation strategies may provide an alternative approach to this therapeutic aim, and may also offer more widespread cellular protective roles in FRDA. Here we show a direct link between frataxin expression in fibroblasts derived from FRDA patients with both decreased expression of hydrogen peroxide scavenging enzymes and increased sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide-mediated toxicity. We demonstrate that normal human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs induce both an increase in frataxin gene and protein expression in FRDA fibroblasts via secretion of soluble factors. Finally, we show that exposure to factors produced by human MSCs increases resistance to hydrogen peroxide-mediated toxicity in FRDA fibroblasts through, at least in part, restoring the expression of the hydrogen peroxide scavenging enzymes catalase and glutathione peroxidase 1. These findings suggest, for the first time, that stem cells may increase frataxin levels in FRDA and transplantation of MSCs may offer an effective treatment for these patients.

  20. Novel Applications of the Methyltrioxorhenium/Hydrogen Peroxide Catalytic System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stankovic, Sasa [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2000-09-12

    Methylrhenium trioxide (MTO), CH3Re03, was first prepared in 1979. An improved synthetic route to MTO was devised from dirhenium heptoxide and tetramethyltin in the presence of hexafluoro glutaric anhydride was reported by Herrmann in 1992. During the course of research on this dissertation we uncovered other reactions where the presence or absence of pyridine can, in some cases dramatically, affect the reaction outcome. This dissertation consists of four chapters. The first two chapters deal with the ,oxidation of water sensitive olefinic compounds with the hydrogen perox’ide/MTO system. Chapters 111 and IV focus on the oxidation of hydrazones with the same catalytic system. Chapter I has been published in The Journal of Organic Chemistry and Chapter III in Chemical Communications. Chapters II and IV have been submitted for publication in The Journal of Organic Chemistry. Each section is selfcontained with its own equations, tables, figures and references. All of the work in this dissertation was performed by this author.

  1. Numerical and experimental analysis of heat transfer in injector plate of hydrogen peroxide hybrid rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guobiao; Li, Chengen; Tian, Hui

    2016-11-01

    This paper is aimed to analyze heat transfer in injector plate of hydrogen peroxide hybrid rocket motor by two-dimensional axisymmetric numerical simulations and full-scale firing tests. Long-time working, which is an advantage of hybrid rocket motor over conventional solid rocket motor, puts forward new challenges for thermal protection. Thermal environments of full-scale hybrid rocket motors designed for long-time firing tests are studied through steady-state coupled numerical simulations of flow field and heat transfer in chamber head. The motor adopts 98% hydrogen peroxide (98HP) oxidizer and hydroxyl-terminated poly-butadiene (HTPB) based fuel as the propellants. Simulation results reveal that flowing liquid 98HP in head oxidizer chamber could cool the injector plate of the motor. The cooling of 98HP is similar to the regenerative cooling in liquid rocket engines. However, the temperature of the 98HP in periphery portion of the head oxidizer chamber is higher than its boiling point. In order to prevent the liquid 98HP from unexpected decomposition, a thermal protection method for chamber head utilizing silica-phenolics annular insulating board is proposed. The simulation results show that the annular insulating board could effectively decrease the temperature of the 98HP in head oxidizer chamber. Besides, the thermal protection method for long-time working hydrogen peroxide hybrid rocket motor is verified through full-scale firing tests. The ablation of the insulating board in oxygen-rich environment is also analyzed.

  2. Hydrogen Peroxide Sensor Based on Carbon Nanotubes/β-Ni(OH)2 Nanocomposites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小俊; 黄燕; 顾爱侠; 王广凤; 方宾; 吴华强

    2012-01-01

    Ni(OH)2 nanoflowers were synthesized by a simple and energy-efficient wet chemistry method. The product was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). Then Ni(OH)2 nanoflowers attached multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) were proposed (MWCNTs/Ni(OH)2/GCE) to use as electrochemical sensor to detect hydrogen peroxide. The results showed that the synergistic effect was obtained on the MWCNTs/Ni(OH)2/GCE whose sensitivity was better than that of Ni(OH)2/GCE. The linear range is from 0.2 to 22 mmol/L, the detection limit is 0.066 mmol/L, and the re- sponse time is 〈5 s. Satisfyingly, the MWCNTs/Ni(OH)2/GCE was not only successfully employed to eliminate the interferences from uric acid (UA), acid ascorbic (AA), dopamine (DA), glucose (GO) but also NO2 during the detection. The MWCNTs/Ni(OH)z/GCE allows highly sensitive, excellently selective and fast amperometric sensing of hydrogen peroxide and thus is promising for the future development of hydrogen peroxide sensors.

  3. Superoxide-hydrogen peroxide imbalance interferes with colorectal cancer cells viability, proliferation and oxaliplatin response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzolin, Verônica Farina; Cadoná, Francine Carla; Machado, Alencar Kolinski; Berto, Maiquidieli Dal; Barbisan, Fernanda; Dornelles, Eduardo Bortoluzzi; Glanzner, Werner Giehl; Gonçalves, Paulo Bayard; Bica, Claudia Giugliano; da Cruz, Ivana Beatrice Mânica

    2016-04-01

    The role of superoxide dismutase manganese dependent enzyme (SOD2) in colorectal cancer is presently insufficiently understood. Some studies suggest that high SOD2 levels found in cancer tissues are associated with cancer progression. However, thus far, the role of colorectal cancer superoxide-hydrogen peroxide imbalance has not yet been studied. Thus, in order to address this gap in extant literature, we performed an in vitro analysis using HT-29 colorectal cell line exposed to paraquat, which generates high superoxide levels, and porphyrin, a SOD2 mimic molecule. The effect of these drugs on colorectal cancer cell response to oxaliplatin was evaluated. At 0.1 μM concentration, both drugs exhibited cytotoxic and antiproliferative effect on colorectal cancer cells. However, this effect was more pronounced in cells exposed to paraquat. Paraquat also augmented the oxaliplatin cytotoxic and antiproliferative effects by increasing the number of apoptosis events, thus causing the cell cycle arrest in the S and M/G2 phases. The treatments were also able to differentially modulate genes related to apoptosis, cell proliferation and antioxidant enzyme system. However, the effects were highly variable and the results obtained were inconclusive. Nonetheless, our findings support the hypothesis that imbalance caused by increased hydrogen peroxide levels could be beneficial to cancer cell biology. Therefore, the use of therapeutic strategies to decrease hydrogen peroxide levels mainly during oxaliplatin chemotherapy could be clinically important to the outcomes of colorectal cancer treatment.

  4. Toxicity of abiotic stressors to Fusarium species: differences in hydrogen peroxide and fungicide tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagygyörgy, Emese D; Kovács, Barbara; Leiter, Eva; Miskei, Márton; Pócsi, István; Hornok, László; Adám, Attila L

    2014-06-01

    Stress sensitivity of three related phytopathogenic Fusarium species (Fusarium graminearum, Fusarium oxysporum and Fusarium verticillioides) to different oxidative, osmotic, cell wall, membrane, fungicide stressors and an antifungal protein (PAF) were studied in vitro. The most prominent and significant differences were found in oxidative stress tolerance: all the three F. graminearum strains showed much higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide and, to a lesser extent, to menadione than the other two species. High sensitivity of F. verticillioides strains was also detectable to an azole drug, Ketoconazole. Surprisingly, no or limited differences were observed in response to other oxidative, osmotic and cell wall stressors. These results indicate that fungal oxidative stress response and especially the response to hydrogen peroxide (this compound is involved in a wide range of plant-fungus interactions) might be modified on niche-specific manner in these phylogenetically related Fusarium species depending on their pathogenic strategy. Supporting the increased hydrogen peroxide sensitivity of F. graminearum, genome-wide analysis of stress signal transduction pathways revealed the absence one CatC-type catalase gene in F. graminearum in comparison to the other two species.

  5. Effectiveness of ultraviolet devices and hydrogen peroxide systems for terminal room decontamination: Focus on clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, David J; Rutala, William A; Anderson, Deverick J; Chen, Luke F; Sickbert-Bennett, Emily E; Boyce, John M

    2016-05-02

    Over the last decade, substantial scientific evidence has accumulated that indicates contamination of environmental surfaces in hospital rooms plays an important role in the transmission of key health care-associated pathogens (eg, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, Clostridium difficile, Acinetobacter spp). For example, a patient admitted to a room previously occupied by a patient colonized or infected with one of these pathogens has a higher risk for acquiring one of these pathogens than a patient admitted to a room whose previous occupant was not colonized or infected. This risk is not surprising because multiple studies have demonstrated that surfaces in hospital rooms are poorly cleaned during terminal cleaning. To reduce surface contamination after terminal cleaning, no touch methods of room disinfection have been developed. This article will review the no touch methods, ultraviolet light devices, and hydrogen peroxide systems, with a focus on clinical trials which have used patient colonization or infection as an outcome. Multiple studies have demonstrated that ultraviolet light devices and hydrogen peroxide systems have been shown to inactivate microbes experimentally plated on carrier materials and placed in hospital rooms and to decontaminate surfaces in hospital rooms naturally contaminated with multidrug-resistant pathogens. A growing number of clinical studies have demonstrated that ultraviolet devices and hydrogen peroxide systems when used for terminal disinfection can reduce colonization or health care-associated infections in patients admitted to these hospital rooms.

  6. Sonochemical and hydrodynamic cavitation reactors for laccase/hydrogen peroxide cotton bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Idalina; Martins, Madalena; Loureiro, Ana; Gomes, Andreia; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur; Silva, Carla

    2014-03-01

    The main goal of this work is to develop a novel and environmental-friendly technology for cotton bleaching with reduced processing costs. This work exploits a combined laccase-hydrogen peroxide process assisted by ultrasound. For this purpose, specific reactors were studied, namely ultrasonic power generator type K8 (850 kHz) and ultrasonic bath equipment Ultrasonic cleaner USC600TH (45 kHz). The optimal operating conditions for bleaching were chosen considering the highest levels of hydroxyl radical production and the lowest energy input. The capacity to produce hydroxyl radicals by hydrodynamic cavitation was also assessed in two homogenizers, EmulsiFlex®-C3 and APV-2000. Laccase nanoemulsions were produced by high pressure homogenization using BSA (bovine serum albumin) as emulsifier. The bleaching efficiency of these formulations was tested and the results showed higher whiteness values when compared to free laccase. The combination of laccase-hydrogen peroxide process with ultrasound energy produced higher whiteness levels than those obtained by conventional methods. The amount of hydrogen peroxide was reduced 50% as well as the energy consumption in terms of temperature (reduction of 40 °C) and operating time (reduction of 90 min).

  7. Lactoperoxidase-catalyzed oxidation of thiocyanate by hydrogen peroxide: sup 15 N nuclear magnetic resonance and optical spectral studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modi, S.; Deodhar, S.S.; Behere, D.V.; Mitra, S. (Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay (India))

    1991-01-01

    To establish the agent(s) responsible for the activity of the lactoperoxidase (LPO)/SCN{sup {minus}}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system, the oxidation of thiocyanate with hydrogen peroxide, catalyzed by lactoperoxidase, has been studied by {sup 15}N NMR and optical spectroscopy at different concentrations of thiocyanate and hydrogen peroxide and at different pHs. The formation of hypothiocyanite ion (OSCN{sup {minus}}) as one of the oxidation products correlated well with activity of the LPO/SCN{sup {minus}}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system and was maximum when the concentrations of the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and SCN{sup {minus}} were nearly the same and the pH was <6.0. At (H{sub 2}O{sub 2})/(SCN{sup {minus}}) = 1, OSCN{sup {minus}} decomposed very slowly back to thiocyanate. When the ratio (H{sub 2}O{sub 2})/(SCN{sup {minus}}) was above 2, formation of CN{sup {minus}} was observed, which was confirmed by {sup 15}N NMR and also by changes in the optical spectrum of LPO. The oxidation of thiocyanate by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in the presence of LPO does not take place at pH >8.0. Since thiocyanate does not bind to LPO above this pH, the binding of thiocyanate to LPO is considered to be prerequisite for the oxidation of thiocyanate. Maximum inhibition of oxygen uptake by Streptococcus cremoris 972 bacteria was observed when hydrogen peroxide and thiocyanate were present in equimolar amounts and the pH was below 6.0.

  8. Antifouling effect of hydrogen peroxide release from enzymatic marine coatings: Exposure testing under equatorial and Mediterranean conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, S.M.; Kristensen, J.B.; Laursen, B.S.;

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) may be considered an environmentally friendly antifouling alternative to common biocides such as Cu2O and various organic compounds. In this work, the efficiency of antifouling coatings releasing hydrogen peroxide via enzyme-mediated conversion of starch, under...... Mediterranean and equatorial climatic conditions, is investigated. During seawater exposure of the coatings, starch is first converted to glucose by glucoamylase (rate-controlling step) and subsequently glucose is rapidly oxidised by hexose oxidase in a reaction producing hydrogen peroxide. The coatings...... laboratory assays, the transient hydrogen peroxide release rate from the coatings at different temperatures has been measured. The investigations are used to evaluate the ocean performance of the antifouling coatings. Coatings can be formulated with starch/enzyme 'pigments' in considerable amounts and yet...

  9. A new cathode using CeO2/MWNT for hydrogen peroxide synthesis through a fuel cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Fuyuan; SONG Tianshun; XU Yuan; CHEN Yingwen; ZHU Shemin; SHEN Shubao

    2009-01-01

    Catalyst using CeO2/MWNT (multi-walled carbon nanotube) was prepared by chemical deposition method and was applied to prepare the cathode of fuel cell for hydrogen peroxide synthesis. Effect of catalyst loading, flow rate of aqueous solution, and KOH concentration on hydrogen peroxide synthesis were investigated. Experimental results indicated that hydrogen peroxide concentration approached 275 mmol/L given 25% of CeO2/MWNT, 18 ml/h of aqueous solution, and 5 mol/L of KOH concentration. Moreover, the reaction mechanism was further discussed. The results indicated that MWNT and cerium oxide were the synergism to produce hydrogen peroxide. Increase of KOH concentration not only reduced the apparent cell resistance but also increased the open-circuit voltage.

  10. Human Umbilical Cord Wharton's Jelly Stem Cell Conditioned Medium Induces Tumoricidal Effects on Lymphoma Cells Through Hydrogen Peroxide Mediation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hao Daniel; Fong, Chui-Yee; Biswas, Arijit; Choolani, Mahesh; Bongso, Ariff

    2016-09-01

    Several groups have reported that human umbilical cord Wharton's jelly stem cells (hWJSCs) possess unique tumoricidal properties against many cancers. However, the exact mechanisms as to how hWJSCs inhibit tumor growth are not known. Recent evidence suggests that exposure of cancer cells to high hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) levels from H2 O2 -releasing drugs causes their death. We therefore explored whether the tumoricidal effect of hWJSCs on lymphoma cells was mediated via H2 O2 . We first exposed lymphoma cells to six different molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) concentrates of hWJSC-conditioned medium (hWJSC-CM) (3, 5, 10, 30, 50, 100 kDa) for 48 h. Since, the 3 kDa-MWCO concentrate showed the greatest cell inhibition we then investigated whether the tumoricidal effect of the specific 3 kDa-MWCO concentrate on two different lymphoma cell lines (Ramos and Toledo) was mediated via accumulation of H2 O2 . We used a battery of assays (MTT, propidium iodide, mitochondria membrane potential, apoptosis, cell cycle, oxidative stress enzymes, hydrogen peroxide, mitochondrial superoxide, hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrile anion, and lipid peroxidation) to test this mechanism. The hWJSC-CM-3 kDa MWCO concentrate significantly decreased cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential and increased cell death and apoptosis in both lymphoma cell lines. There were significant increases in superoxide dismutase with concomitant decreases in glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and thioredoxin peroxidase activities. H2 O2 levels, mitochondrial superoxide, hydroxyl radical, peroxynitrile anion, and lipid peroxidation were also significantly increased in both lymphoma cell lines. The results suggested that the hWJSC-CM-3 kDa MWCO concentrate regulates cellular H2 O2 leading to a tumoricidal effect and may thus be a promising anti-lymphoma agent. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2045-2055, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Controlled Hydrogen Peroxide Decomposition for a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Oxidant Source with a Microreactor Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    microchannel reactor for hydrogen peroxide decomposition is being developed for integration with fuel cell systems that can power undersea vehicles...the subunits of a microchemical reactor system. The basis of the present model is a microchannel reactor . The model description, governing equations...the 2007 COMSOL Users Conference Boston, 4-6 Oct, Newton. MA 14. ABSTRACT A microchannel reactor for hydrogen peroxide decomposition is being

  12. A Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor Combined HRP Doped Polypyrrole with Ferrocene Modified Sol-gel Derived Composite Carbon Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A novel amperometric biosensor for the detection of hydrogen peroxide is described.The biosensor was constructed by electrodepositing HRP/PPy membrane on the surface of ferrocenecarboxylic acid mediated sol-gel derived composite carbon electrode. The biosensor gives response to hydrogen peroxide in a few seconds with detection limit of 5×l0-7 mol · L-1(based on signal: noise=3). Linear range is up to 0.2 mmol · L-1.

  13. Effects of 15% carbamide peroxide and 40% hydrogen peroxide on the microhardness and color change of composite resins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedighe Sadat Hashemi Kamangar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effects of 40% hydrogen peroxide and 15% carbamide peroxide on microhardness and color change of a silorane-based composite resin in comparison with two methacrylate-based composites.Fifty-four disc-shaped specimens (A3 shade were fabricated of Filtek P90 (P90, Filtek Z350XT Enamel (Z350 and Filtek Z250 (Z250 (3MESPE (n=18. The samples of each composite were randomly divided into three subgroups of 6. The control subgroups were immersed in distilled water; the test groups were exposed to Opalescence Boost (OB once; and Opalescence PF (OP (Ultradent for two weeks. Vickers microhardness testing and a spectrophotometric analysis of the color of samples were performed before and after each intervention.The baseline microhardness of P90 was significantly lower than that of the other two composites (P=0.001, but no difference was found between Z250 and Z350 in this respect (P=0.293. Bleaching treatments significantly decreased the microhardness of Z250 and Z350 (P 0.05. No significant difference was detected between the two types of bleaching (P>0.05. After bleaching with OB, ΔE value was measured to be 3.12(1.97, 3.31(1.84 and 3.7(2.11 for P90, Z250 and Z350, respectively. These values were 5.98(2.42, 4.66(2.85 and 4.90(2.78 after bleaching with OP with no significant difference.Bleaching decreased the microhardness of methacrylate-based but not silorane-based composites. Although no significant differences were found in ΔE of composites, ΔE of all groups did not remain in the clinically acceptable range after bleaching except for P90 after bleaching with 40% H2O2 (ΔE < 3.3.

  14. Response of Cytokines and Hydrogen Peroxide to Sporothrix schenckii Exoantigen in Systemic Experimental Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maia, Danielle Cardoso Geraldo; Gonçalves, Amanda Costa; Ferreira, Lucas Souza; Manente, Francine Alessandra; Portuondo, Deivys Leandro; Vellosa, José Carlos Rebuglio; Polesi, Marisa Campos; Batista-Duharte, Alexander; Carlos, Iracilda Zeppone

    2016-04-01

    The response of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and cytokines during an experimental sporotrichosis in male Swiss mice was assessed over a period of 10 weeks by monitoring macrophage activation challenged with exoantigen (ExoAg) from the fungus Sporothrix schenckii. The studied endpoints were: H2O2 production, fungal burden at spleen, apoptosis in peritoneal macrophages, and IL-1β, IL-6, IL-2, IL-10 production. During the two first weeks of infection was observed low burden of yeast in spleen and high response of H2O2, IL-2, and IL-1β. The weeks of highest fungal burden (fourth-sixth) coincided with major apoptosis in peritoneal macrophages, normal production of IL-6 and lower production of H2O2, IL-2, and IL-1β, suggesting a role for these three last in the early control of infection. On the other hand, IL-1β (but not IL-6) was recovered since the sixth week, suggesting a possible role in the late phase of infection, contributing to the fungal clearance in conjunction with the specific mechanisms. The IL-10 was elevated until the sixth, principally in the second week. These results evidences that ExoAg is involved in the host immune modulation, influencing the S. Schenckii virulence, and its role is related with the time of the infection in the model used.

  15. Sunscreens as a source of hydrogen peroxide production in coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Quiles, David; Tovar-Sánchez, Antonio

    2014-08-19

    Sunscreens have been shown to give the most effective protection for human skin from ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Chemicals from sunscreens (i.e., UV filters) accumulate in the sea and have toxic effects on marine organisms. In this report, we demonstrate that photoexcitation of inorganic UV filters (i.e., TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles) under solar radiation produces significant amounts of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), a strong oxidizing agent that generates high levels of stress on marine phytoplankton. Our results indicate that the inorganic oxide nanoparticle content in 1 g of commercial sunscreen produces rates of H2O2 in seawater of up to 463 nM/h, directly affecting the growth of phytoplankton. Conservative estimates for a Mediterranean beach reveal that tourism activities during a summer day may release on the order of 4 kg of TiO2 nanoparticles to the water and produce an increment in the concentration of H2O2 of 270 nM/day. Our results, together with the data provided by tourism records in the Mediterranean, point to TiO2 nanoparticles as the major oxidizing agent entering coastal waters, with direct ecological consequences on the ecosystem.

  16. Protection of Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells from Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Oxidative Cell Damage by Resveratrol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaolu; Wang, Kai; Liu, Hongyun; Hu, Fuliang; Zhao, Fengqi; Liu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    The mammary epithelial cells (MECs) of high-producing dairy cows are likely to be subject to oxidative stress (OS) due to the intensive cell metabolism. The objectives of this study were to investigate the cytoprotective effects of resveratrol against hydrogen peroxide- (H2O2-) induced OS in cultured bovine MECs (MAC-T). Pretreatment of MAC-T cells with resveratrol could rescue the decrease in cell viability and resulted in lower intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation after H2O2 exposure. Resveratrol helped MAC-T cells to prevent H2O2-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and mitochondria-related cell apoptosis. Moreover, resveratrol induced mRNA expression of multiple antioxidant defense genes in MAC-T cells under normal/oxidative conditions. Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) was required for the cytoprotective effects on MAC-T cells by resveratrol, as knockdown of Nrf2 significantly abolished resveratrol-induced cytoprotective effects against OS. In addition, by using selective inhibitors, we further confirmed that the induction of Nrf2 by resveratrol was mediated through the prolonged activation of PI3K/Akt and ERK/MAPK pathways but negatively regulated by p38/MAPK pathway. Overall, resveratrol has beneficial effects on bovine MECs redox balance and may be potentially used as a therapeutic medicine against oxidative insult in lactating animals.

  17. Photoinduced green synthesis of silver nanoparticles with highly effective antibacterial and hydrogen peroxide sensing properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vijay; Gundampati, Ravi Kumar; Singh, Devendra K; Bano, Daraksha; Jagannadham, Medicherla V; Hasan, Syed Hadi

    2016-09-01

    In this study, an eco-friendly and sustainable green route was employed for the synthesis of stable silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) using aqueous leaf extract of Euphorbia hirta (AEE) as both reducing as well as a stabilizing agent. The synthesis of AgNPs was confirmed by UV-visible spectroscopy which produced a prominent SPR band at λmax 425nm after 25min of sunlight exposure. The AgNPs thus synthesized were optimized using one factor at a time approach, and these optimized conditions were 25min of sunlight exposure time, 5.0% (v/v) of AEE inoculum dose and 3.0mM of AgNO3 concentration. The Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FE-SEM) and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) analysis confirmed the presence of spherical AgNPs with average size 15.5nm. The crystallinity was determined by X-ray Diffractometer (XRD) and Selected Area Electron Diffraction (SAED) pattern. Chemical and elemental compositions were determined by Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX) respectively. The Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) images with average roughness 1.15nm represented the lateral and 3D topological characteristic of AgNPs. The AgNPs thus synthesized showed effective antibacterial activity against gram negative and gram positive bacteria as well as hydrogen peroxide sensing property with a minimum detection limit of 10(-7)M.

  18. Catalase-Based Modified Graphite Electrode for Hydrogen Peroxide Detection in Different Beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Fusco

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A catalase-based (NAF/MWCNTs nanocomposite film modified glassy carbon electrode for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 detection was developed. The developed biosensor was characterized in terms of its bioelectrochemical properties. Cyclic voltammetry (CV technique was employed to study the redox features of the enzyme in the absence and in the presence of nanomaterials dispersed in Nafion® polymeric solution. The electron transfer coefficient, α, and the electron transfer rate constant, ks, were found to be 0.42 and 1.71 s−1, at pH 7.0, respectively. Subsequently, the same modification steps were applied to mesoporous graphite screen-printed electrodes. Also, these electrodes were characterized in terms of their main electrochemical and kinetic parameters. The biosensor performances improved considerably after modification with nanomaterials. Moreover, the association of Nafion with carbon nanotubes retained the biological activity of the redox protein. The enzyme electrode response was linear in the range 2.5–1150 μmol L−1, with LOD of 0.83 μmol L−1. From the experimental data, we can assess the possibility of using the modified biosensor as a useful tool for H2O2 determination in packaged beverages.

  19. Removal of Polyvinyl Alcohol Using Photoelectrochemical Oxidation Processes Based on Hydrogen Peroxide Electrogeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Yu Huang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the removal efficiency of PVA from aqueous solutions using UV irradiation in combination with the production of electrogenerated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 at a polyacrylonitrile-based activated carbon fiber (ACF cathode. Three cathode materials (i.e., platinum, graphite, and ACF were fed with oxygen and used for the electrogeneration of H2O2. The amount of electrogenerated H2O2 produced using the ACF cathode was five times greater than that generated using the graphite cathode and nearly 24 times greater than that from platinum cathode. Several parameters were evaluated to characterize the H2O2 electrogeneration, such as current density, oxygen flow rate, solution pH, and the supporting electrolyte used. The optimum current density, oxygen flow rate, solution pH, and supporting electrolyte composition were found to be 10 mA cm−2, 500 cm3 min−1, pH 3, and Na2SO4, respectively. The PVA removal efficiencies were achieved under these conditions 3%, 16%, and 86% using UV, H2O2 electrogeneration, and UV/H2O2 electrogeneration, respectively. A UV light intensity of 0.6 mW cm−2 was found to produce optimal PVA removal efficiency in the present study. A simple kinetic model was proposed which confirmed pseudo-first-order reaction. Reaction rate constant (kap was found to depend on the UV light intensity.

  20. Fabrication of a novel electrochemical sensor for determination of hydrogen peroxide in different fruit juice samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navid Nasirizadeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 sensor is fabricated based on a multiwalled carbon nanotube-modified glassy carbon electrode (MWCNT-GCE and reactive blue 19 (RB. The charge transfer coefficient, α, and the charge transfer rate constant, ks, of RB adsorbed on MWCNT-GCE were calculated and found to be 0.44 ± 0.01 Hz and 1.9 ± 0.05 Hz, respectively. The catalysis of the electroreduction of H2O2 by RB-MWCNT-GCE is described. The RB-MWCNT-GCE shows a dramatic increase in the peak current and a decrease in the overvoltage of H2O2 electroreduction in comparison with that seen at an RB modified GCE, MWCNT modified GCE, and activated GCE. The kinetic parameters such as α and the heterogeneous rate constant, k', for the reduction of H2O2 at RB-MWCNT-GCE surface were determined using cyclic voltammetry. The detection limit of 0.27μM and three linear calibration ranges were obtained for H2O2 determination at the RB-MWCNT-GCE surface using an amperometry method. In addition, using the newly developed sensor, H2O2 was determined in real samples with satisfactory results.

  1. Catalase-Based Modified Graphite Electrode for Hydrogen Peroxide Detection in Different Beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Giovanni; Bollella, Paolo; Mazzei, Franco; Favero, Gabriele; Antiochia, Riccarda; Tortolini, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    A catalase-based (NAF/MWCNTs) nanocomposite film modified glassy carbon electrode for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection was developed. The developed biosensor was characterized in terms of its bioelectrochemical properties. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) technique was employed to study the redox features of the enzyme in the absence and in the presence of nanomaterials dispersed in Nafion® polymeric solution. The electron transfer coefficient, α, and the electron transfer rate constant, ks , were found to be 0.42 and 1.71 s(-1), at pH 7.0, respectively. Subsequently, the same modification steps were applied to mesoporous graphite screen-printed electrodes. Also, these electrodes were characterized in terms of their main electrochemical and kinetic parameters. The biosensor performances improved considerably after modification with nanomaterials. Moreover, the association of Nafion with carbon nanotubes retained the biological activity of the redox protein. The enzyme electrode response was linear in the range 2.5-1150 μmol L(-1), with LOD of 0.83 μmol L(-1). From the experimental data, we can assess the possibility of using the modified biosensor as a useful tool for H2O2 determination in packaged beverages.

  2. Killing of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans by the human neutrophil myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaki, K T; Wilson, M E; Genco, R J

    1986-07-01

    Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans is a facultative gram-negative coccobacillus associated with periodontal disease and nonoral infections. This organism is resistant to serum bactericidal mechanisms but is nevertheless killed by human neutrophils under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Most of the killing attributable to oxidative mechanisms is inhibited by sodium cyanide, which suggests that the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride (MPO-H2O2-Cl-) system may be a key factor in the oxidative killing process. In this report, we examine whether the isolated MPO-H2O2-Cl- system is bactericidal against A. actinomycetemcomitans. We found that three major chromatographic forms of MPO were capable of killing A. actinomycetemcomitans at sublethal concentrations of H2O2 and that both catalase-positive and catalase-negative strains of this organism were sensitive to killing by the MPO-H2O2-Cl- system. We conclude that the isolated MPO-H2O2-Cl- system is bactericidal for A. actinomycetemcomitans independent of other neutrophil granule constituents and may be an important component of the oxygen-dependent bactericidal activity of the neutrophil with respect to this periodontopathic organism.

  3. Protective Effects of Costunolide against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Injury in PC12 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chong-Un Cheong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress-mediated cellular injury has been considered as a major cause of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. The scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS mediated by antioxidants may be a potential strategy for retarding the diseases’ progression. Costunolide (CS is a well-known sesquiterpene lactone, used as a popular herbal remedy, which possesses anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. This study aimed to investigate the protective role of CS against the cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and to elucidate potential protective mechanisms in PC12 cells. The results showed that the treatment of PC12 cells with CS prior to H2O2 exposure effectively increased the cell viability. Furthermore, it decreased the intracellular ROS, stabilized the mitochondria membrane potential (MMP, and reduced apoptosis-related protein such as caspase 3. In addition, CS treatment attenuated the cell injury by H2O2 through the inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK. These results demonstrated that CS is promising as a potential therapeutic candidate for neurodegenerative diseases resulting from oxidative damage and further research on this topic should be encouraged.

  4. Pistacia lentiscus fruit oil reduces oxidative stress in human skin explants caused by hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Khedir, S; Moalla, D; Jardak, N; Mzid, M; Sahnoun, Z; Rebai, T

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the efficacy of Pistacia lentiscus fruit oil (PLFO) for protecting human skin from damage due to oxidative stress. PLFO contains natural antioxidants including polyphenols, sterols and tocopherols. We compared the antioxidant potential of PLFO with extra virgin olive oil (EVOO). Explants of healthy adult human skin were grown in culture with either PLFO or EVOO before adding hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). We also used cultured skin explants to investigate the effects of PLFO on lipid oxidation and depletion of endogenous antioxidant defense enzymes including glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) one day after 2 h exposure to H2O2. We found that PLFO scavenged radicals and protected skin against oxidative injury. PLFO exhibited greater antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity than EVOO. Skin explants treated with PLFO inhibited H2O2 induced MDA formation by inhibition of lipid oxidation. In addition, the oil inhibited H2O2 induced depletion of antioxidant defense enzymes including GPx, SOD and CAT. We found that treatment with PLFO repaired skin damage owing to its antioxidant properties.

  5. All-Weather Hydrogen Peroxide-Based Decontamination of CBRN Contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, George W. [U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC), Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States); Procell, Lawrence R. [U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC), Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States); Sorrick, David C. [U.S. Army Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (ECBC), Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States); Lawson, Glenn E. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Dahlgren, VA (United States); Wells, Claire M. [Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), Dahlgren, VA (United States); Reynolds, Charles M. [U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Lab. (CRREL), Hanover, NH (United States); Ringelberg, D. B. [U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Lab. (CRREL), Hanover, NH (United States); Foley, Karen L. [U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Lab. (CRREL), Hanover, NH (United States); Lumetta, Gregg J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Blanchard, David L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2010-03-11

    A hydrogen peroxide-based decontaminant, Decon Green, is efficacious for the decontamination of chemical agents VX (S-2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl O-ethyl methylphosphonothioate), GD (Soman, pinacolyl methylphosphonofluoridate), and HD (mustard, bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide); the biological agent anthrax (Bacillus anthracis); and radiological isotopes Cs-137 and Co-60; thus demonstrating the ability of this decontamination approach to ameliorate the aftermath of all three types of weapons of mass destruction (WMD). Reaction mechanisms afforded for the chemical agents are discussed as are rationales for the enhanced removal efficacy of recalcitrant 60Co on certain surfaces. Decontaminants of this nature can be deployed, and are effective, at very low temperatures (-32 °C), as shown for studies done with VX and HD simulants, without the need for external heat sources. Finally, the efficacy of a lower-logistics, dry decontaminant powder concentrate (utilizing the solid active-oxygen compounds peracetyl borate and Peroxydone) which can be reconstituted with water in the field prior to use, is presented.

  6. Modulatory effects of Moringa oleifera extracts against hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity and oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreelatha, S; Padma, P R

    2011-09-01

    Studies have demonstrated that the induction of oxidative stress may be involved in oxidative DNA damage. The present study examined and assessed the hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))-mediated DNA damage in human tumor KB cells and also assessed the ability of Moringa oleifera leaf extracts to inhibit the oxidative damage. H(2)O(2) imposed a stress on the membrane lipids which was quantified by the extent of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) formed. The leaf extracts caused a very significant inhibition of the extent of LPO formation and enhanced the activity of antioxidative enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) in KB cells. The comet assay was employed to study the DNA damage and its inhibition by the leaf extracts. H(2)O(2) caused a significant increase in the number of cells bearing comets, resulting in significant DNA damage. The leaf extracts significantly reduced the incidence of comets in the oxidant stressed cells. The extent of cytotoxicity of H(2)O(2) in the presence and the absence of leaf extracts studied in KB tumor cells by the MTT assay showed that H(2)O(2) caused a marked decrease in the viability of KB cells where as the leaf extracts effectively increased the viability of assaulted KB cells. The observed cytoprotective activity is probably due to the antioxidant properties of its constituents, mainly phenolics. Total phenolics showed higher correlation with antioxidant activity. The leaf extracts showed higher antioxidant activity than the reference compound. These results suggest that the inhibition by the leaf extracts on oxidative DNA damage could be attributed to their free radical scavenging activities and the effect evidenced in KB cells can be in part correlated to a modulation of redox-sensitive mechanisms.

  7. Shear Bond Strength of Resin Bonded to Bleached Enamel Using Different Modified 35% Hydrogen Peroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moosavi H

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: Bleaching systems with different concentrations and applications are widely used to improve the visual appearance of the teeth, but one of the complications of these materials is reduction of bond strength for immediately bonding to the bleached enamel. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of using different modified hydrogen peroxide bleaching agents on the shear bond strength of composite resin bonded to the bleached enamel. Materials and Methods: Forty-eight sound extracted premolar teeth were collected, sectioned 1 mm below the CEJ to detach the root. The proximal surfaces of the teeth were flattened using diamond disks and silicon carbide papers to achieve flat homogeneous enamel surfaces without exposure to the dentin. The teeth were randomly divided into four groups as follows (n = 12: group 1: bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel; group 2: bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel contained (casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP; group 3: bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel combined with fluoride; and group 4: bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide applying one week before resin restoration placement. Composite resin, Clearfil AP-X (Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan, was bonded on each tooth in the mould (4 mm diameter × 3 mm height using Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray, Tokyo, Japan. After 24 hours of storage and 1000 cycles of thermocycling, the shear bond strength of the specimens at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/min was measured in MPa. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc test. Results: The minimum and maximum mean shear bond strength values were observed in groups 2 (15.82 ± 4.41 and 4 (21.00 ± 3.90, respectively. Multiple comparisons of groups revealed no significant differences among the groups except between group 4 and all the other groups. The most common type of failure was adhesive. Conclusions: Using modified bleaching agents decreased the bond

  8. Simultaneous removal of nitrate, hydrogen peroxide and phosphate in semiconductor acidic wastewater by zero-valent iron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Hiroyuki; Tokumura, Masahiro; Kawase, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    The zero-valent iron (ZVI) wastewater treatment has been applied to simultaneous removal of nitrate, hydrogen peroxide and phosphate in semiconductor acidic wastewaters. The simultaneous removal occurs by the reactions performed due to the sequential transformation of ZVI under the acidic condition. Fortunately the solution pH of semiconductor acidic wastewaters is low which is effective for the sequential transformation of ZVI. Firstly the reduction of nitrate is taken place by electrons generated by the corrosion of ZVI under acidic conditions. Secondly the ferrous ion generated by the corrosion of ZVI reacts with hydrogen peroxide and generates ·OH radical (Fenton reaction). The Fenton reaction consists of the degradation of hydrogen peroxide and the generation of ferric ion. Finally phosphate precipitates out with iron ions. In the simultaneous removal process, 1.6 mM nitrate, 9.0 mM hydrogen peroxide and 1.0 mM phosphate were completely removed by ZVI within 100, 15 and 15 min, respectively. The synergy among the reactions for the removal of nitrate, hydrogen peroxide and phosphate was found. In the individual pollutant removal experiment, the removal of phosphate by ZVI was limited to 80% after 300 min. Its removal rate was considerably improved in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and the complete removal of phosphate was achieved after 15 min.

  9. Oxidative and Molecular Responses in Capsicum annuum L. after Hydrogen Peroxide, Salicylic Acid and Chitosan Foliar Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Teniente, Laura; de Dalia Durán-Flores, Flor; Chapa-Oliver, Angela María; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo; Cruz-Hernández, Andrés; González-Chavira, Mario M.; Ocampo-Velázquez, Rosalía V.; Guevara-González, Ramón G.

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an important ROS molecule (Reactive oxygen species) that serves as a signal of oxidative stress and activation of signaling cascades as a result of the early response of the plant to biotic stress. This response can also be generated with the application of elicitors, stable molecules that induce the activation of transduction cascades and hormonal pathways, which trigger induced resistance to environmental stress. In this work, we evaluated the endogenous H2O2 production caused by salicylic acid (SA), chitosan (QN), and H2O2 elicitors in Capsicum annuum L. Hydrogen peroxide production after elicitation, catalase (CAT) and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activities, as well as gene expression analysis of cat1, pal, and pathogenesis-related protein 1 (pr1) were determined. Our results displayed that 6.7 and 10 mM SA concentrations, and, 14 and 18 mM H2O2 concentrations, induced an endogenous H2O2 and gene expression. QN treatments induced the same responses in lesser proportion than the other two elicitors. Endogenous H2O2 production monitored during several days, showed results that could be an indicator for determining application opportunity uses in agriculture for maintaining plant alert systems against a stress. PMID:23676352

  10. Oxidative and molecular responses in Capsicum annuum L. after hydrogen peroxide, salicylic acid and chitosan foliar applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía-Teniente, Laura; de Dalia Duran-Flores, Flor; Chapa-Oliver, Angela María; Torres-Pacheco, Irineo; Cruz-Hernández, Andrés; González-Chavira, Mario M; Ocampo-Velázquez, Rosalía V; Guevara-González, Ramón G

    2013-05-15

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an important ROS molecule (Reactive oxygen species) that serves as a signal of oxidative stress and activation of signaling cascades as a result of the early response of the plant to biotic stress. This response can also be generated with the application of elicitors, stable molecules that induce the activation of transduction cascades and hormonal pathways, which trigger induced resistance to environmental stress. In this work, we evaluated the endogenous H2O2 production caused by salicylic acid (SA), chitosan (QN), and H2O2 elicitors in Capsicum annuum L. Hydrogen peroxide production after elicitation, catalase (CAT) and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) activities, as well as gene expression analysis of cat1, pal, and pathogenesis-related protein 1 (pr1) were determined. Our results displayed that 6.7 and 10 mM SA concentrations, and, 14 and 18 mM H2O2 concentrations, induced an endogenous H2O2 and gene expression. QN treatments induced the same responses in lesser proportion than the other two elicitors. Endogenous H2O2 production monitored during several days, showed results that could be an indicator for determining application opportunity uses in agriculture for maintaining plant alert systems against a stress.

  11. Oxidative and Molecular Responses in Capsicum annuum L. after Hydrogen Peroxide, Salicylic Acid and Chitosan Foliar Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramón G. Guevara-González

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 is an important ROS molecule (Reactive oxygen species that serves as a signal of oxidative stress and activation of signaling cascades as a result of the early response of the plant to biotic stress. This response can also be generated with the application of elicitors, stable molecules that induce the activation of transduction cascades and hormonal pathways, which trigger induced resistance to environmental stress. In this work, we evaluated the endogenous H2O2 production caused by salicylic acid (SA, chitosan (QN, and H2O2 elicitors in Capsicum annuum L. Hydrogen peroxide production after elicitation, catalase (CAT and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL activities, as well as gene expression analysis of cat1, pal, and pathogenesis-related protein 1 (pr1 were determined. Our results displayed that 6.7 and 10 mM SA concentrations, and, 14 and 18 mM H2O2 concentrations, induced an endogenous H2O2 and gene expression. QN treatments induced the same responses in lesser proportion than the other two elicitors. Endogenous H2O2 production monitored during several days, showed results that could be an indicator for determining application opportunity uses in agriculture for maintaining plant alert systems against a stress.

  12. Differential role of hydrogen peroxide and organic hydroperoxides in augmenting ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA)-mediated DNA damage: implications for carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Mohammad; Sharma, Som Datta; Mizote, Akiko; Fujisawa, Masayoshi; Okada, Shigeru

    2003-01-01

    An iron chelate, ferric nitrilotriacetate (Fe-NTA), is a potent nephrotoxic agent, and induces acute and subacute renal proximal tubular necrosis, a consequence of the Fenton-like reaction that eventually leads to a high incidence of renal adenocarcinoma in rodents. In order to examine the possible mechanism for carcinogenic activity, we investigated the DNA damage with Fe-NTA in the presence of various peroxides/organic hydroperoxides. S1 nuclease hydrolysis and deoxyribose degradation assays were performed. Incubation of calf thymus DNA with ferric nitrilotriacetate (0.1 mM) in the presence of peroxides/organic hydroperoxides at a final concentration of 40 mM of each in phosphate buffer (0.1 M, pH 7.4) augmented DNA damage severalfold as compared to the damage caused by individual treatments. Fe-NTA in the presence of hydrogen peroxide caused DNA single-strand breaks and damage to its deoxyribose sugar moiety as measured, respectively, by S1 nuclease hydrolysis and deoxyribose degradation using calf thymus DNA. However, only deoxyribose degradation could be recorded in the presence of other peroxide/organic hydroperoxides. No DNA single-strand break was observed by this treatment. The observed differences in DNA damage by hydrogen peroxide and organic hydroperoxides/peroxide have been ascribed to the differential reactivity of DNA with hydroxyl and alkoxy/aryloxy free radicals produced, respectively, from these inorganic and organic peroxides. These studies suggest that Fe-NTA not only mediated the production of reactive oxygen species, but also catalysed the decomposition of these peroxides and organic hydroperoxides, which may cause a clastogenic change in DNA. This reactivity enhances the clastogenic activity in DNA. These changes in the DNA structure may ultimately be responsible, at least in part, for the induction of carcinogenesis in Fe-NTA-exposed animals.

  13. Enzyme-free hydrogen peroxide sensor based on Au@Ag@C core-double shell nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yancai, E-mail: liyancai@mnnu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry & Environment, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Fujian Province Key Laboratory of Modern Analytical Science and Separation Technology, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Zhang, Yayun; Zhong, Yanmei [College of Chemistry & Environment, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Li, Shunxing [College of Chemistry & Environment, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Fujian Province Key Laboratory of Modern Analytical Science and Separation Technology, Minnan Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • A facile method was designed to synthesize Au@Ag@C core-double shell nanocomposites. • Carbon nanomaterials at the outermost layer could protect Au and Ag nanoparticles from oxidation and aggregation. • The Au@Ag@C core-double shell nanocomposites showed high sensitivity and selectivity to electrocatalytic reduction of hydrogen peroxide. • The hydrogen peroxide sensor has a wide linear range of 5.0 μM to 4.75 mM and a limit of detection as low as 0.14 μM. - Abstract: The well-designed Au@Ag@C core-double shell nanocomposites were synthesized via a facile method, and were used to fabricate an enzyme-free amperometric hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) sensor. The size, shape, elementary composition and structure of the nanocomposites were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM), energy-dispersed spectrum (EDS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The outermost layer of the nanocomposites was amorphous carbon, the second layer was Ag and the core was Au. The Au@Ag@C core-double shell nanocomposites exhibit attractive activity for electrocatalytic reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} according to the electrochemical experiments. It also demonstrates the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} sensor possess well performance with a wide linear range of 5.0 μM to 4.75 mM and a limit of detection (LOD) as low as 0.14 μM (S/N = 3). Furthermore, the interference from the common interfering species, such as glucose, ascorbic acid, dopamine and uric acid can be effectively avoided. In a word, the Au@Ag@C nanocomposites are promising candidates for enzyme-free H{sub 2}O{sub 2} sensor.

  14. Effects on gastric mucosa induced by dental bleaching – an experimental study with 6% hydrogen peroxide in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anabela Baptista PAULA

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The value of aesthetic dentistry has precipitated several developments in the investigation of dental materials related to this field. The free marketing of these products is a problem and it is subject to various interpretations regarding its legality. There are several techniques for tooth whitening, the most used one being the external bleaching. It is the later version of such technique that poses the greatest danger of ingesting the product. The present study analysed the systemic effect of these products when they are swallowed.Objective This experimental study aimed to observe the effects of a tooth whitening product, whose active agent is 6% hydrogen peroxide, on the gastric mucosa of healthy and non-tumour gastric pathology animals.Material and Methods Fifty Wistar-Han rats were used and then distributed into 5 groups, one for control and four test groups in which the bleaching product was administered in animals with and without non-tumour gastric pathology (induced by the administration of 1 sample of 50% ethanol and 5% of drinking water during 6 days at different times of study by gavage. There was a decrease in body weight in animals of groups handled during the study period, which was most pronounced in IV and VA groups. Changes in spleen weight relative to body weight revealed no statistically significant changes. An analysis of the frequency was performed on the results of macroscopic observation of the gastric mucosa.Results The gastric mucosa revealed lesions in all manipulated groups, being more frequent in groups III and IV. It appears that there is a synergism when using hydrogen peroxide and 50% ethanol in the same group.Conclusion Therefore, it seems that there are some signs of toxicity 3 to 4 days after administration of 6% hydrogen peroxide. The prescription of these therapies must be controlled by the clinician and the risks must be minimized.

  15. TAML activator/peroxide-catalyzed facile oxidative degradation of the persistent explosives trinitrotoluene and trinitrobenzene in micellar solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Soumen; Chanda, Arani; Khetan, Sushil K; Ryabov, Alexander D; Collins, Terrence J

    2013-05-21

    TAML activators are well-known for their ability to activate hydrogen peroxide to oxidize persistent pollutants in water. The trinitroaromatic explosives, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TNB), are often encountered together as persistent, toxic pollutants. Here we show that an aggressive TAML activator with peroxides boosts the effectiveness of the known surfactant/base promoted breakdown of TNT and transforms the surfactant induced nondestructive binding of base to TNB into an extensive multistep degradation process. Treatment of basic cationic surfactant solutions of either TNT or TNB with TAML/peroxide (hydrogen peroxide and tert-butylhydroperoxide, TBHP) gave complete pollutant removal for both in 75% of the nitrogen and ≥20% of the carbon converted to nitrite/nitrate and formate, respectively. For TNT, the TAML advantage is to advance the process toward mineralization. Basic surfactant solutions of TNB gave the colored solutions typical of known Meisenheimer complexes which did not progress to degradation products over many hours. However with added TAML activator, the color was bleached quickly and the TNB starting compound was degraded extensively toward minerals within an hour. A slower surfactant-free TAML activator/peroxide process also degrades TNT/TNB effectively. Thus, TAML/peroxide amplification effectively advances TNT and TNB water treatment giving reason to explore the environmental applicability of the approach.

  16. A hydrogen peroxide-generating agent, 6-formylpterin, enhances heat-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, S; Cui, Z-G; Kondo, T; Zhao, Q-L; Ogawa, R; Shoji, M; Arai, T; Makino, K; Furuta, I

    2005-05-01

    The enhancement of heat-induced apoptosis by 6-formylpterin, an intra-cellular generator of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), was examined in human myelomonocytic lymphoma U937 cells. The cells were treated with either 6-formylpterin alone at a nontoxic concentration of 300 microM (37 degrees C), heat shock (44 degrees C per 20 min) alone or a combination of the two, then incubated at 37 degrees C for 6 h. Assessments of apoptosis, mitochondrial membrane potential and caspase-3 activation were performed by flow cytometry. Moreover, caspase-8 activation and changes in the intra-cellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) were examined. Bax, Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, Bid, cytochrome c and PKCd were detected by Western blotting. The induction of heat-induced apoptosis evaluated by morphological observation and DNA fragmentation were promoted by the addition of 6-formylpterin. Mitochondrial membrane potential was decreased and the activation of caspase-3 and -8 was enhanced in the cells treated with the combination. A decreased-expression of Bid was noted, although no significant changes in Bax, Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL expression were observed after the combined treatment. Furthermore, both the release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol and the translocation of PKCd from cytosol to mitochondria, which were induced by heat shock, were enhanced by the addition of 6-formylpterin. The number of cells with a higher [Ca2+]i was also increased by the addition of 6-formylpterin. These findings suggest that the increase in [Ca2+]i, the activation of the mitochondria-caspase dependent pathway and the translocation of PKCd to mitochondria play principal roles in the enhancement of heat-induced apoptosis by 6-FP.

  17. Protective effect of oat bran extracts on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bing FENG; Lai-ji MA; Jin-jing YAO; Yun FANG; Yan-ai MEI; Shao-min WEI

    2013-01-01

    Oat contains different components that possess antioxidant properties;no study to date has addressed the antioxidant effect of the extract of oat bran on the cellular level.Therefore,the present study focuses on the investigation of the protective effect of oat bran extract by enzymatic hydrolysates on human dermal fibroblast injury induced by hydrogen peroxide(H2O2).Kjeldahl determination,phenol-sulfuric acid method,and high-performance liquid chromatography(HPLC)analysis indicated that the enzymatic products of oat bran contain a protein amount of 71.93%,of which 97.43% are peptides with a molecular range from 438.56 to 1301.01 Da.Assays for 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl(DPPH)radical scavenging activity indicate that oat peptide-rich extract has a direct and concentration-dependent antioxidant activity.3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide(MTT)colorimetric assay and the TdT-mediated digoxigenin-dUTP nick-end labeling(TUNEL)assay for apoptosis showed that administration of H2O2 in human dermal fibroblasts caused cell damage and apoptosis.Pre-incubation of human dermal fibroblasts with the Oatp for 24 h markedly inhibited human dermal fibroblast injury induced by H2O2,but application oat peptides with H2O2 at same time did not.Pre-treatment of human dermal fibroblasts with Oatp significantly reversed the H2O2-induced decrease of superoxide dismutase(SOD)and the inhibition of malondialdehyde(MDA).The results demonstrate that oat peptides possess antioxidant activity and are effective against H2O2-induced human dermal fibroblast injury by the enhanced activity of SOD and decrease in MDA level.Our results suggest that oat bran will have the potential to be further explored as an antioxidant functional food in the prevention of aging-related skin injury.

  18. Use of hydrogen peroxide in scrubbing towers for odor removal in wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, I; Féliers, C; Couvert, A; Laplanche, A; Patria, L; Requieme, B

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this work was to replace sodium hypochlorite (NaCIO) with hydrogen peroxide (H202) in chemical scrubbing towers, in order to avoid the formation of chlorinated species, harmful for human health. Some previous studies have already shown the ability of H2O2 to treat the hydrogen sulfide (H2S) pollution. However, an important decomposition of the oxidant was observed in the scrubbing solution (carbonates, transition metal and high pH are responsible for this decomposition) leading to high reactant consumption. Consequently, this study first focused on research into a compound able to reduce the hydrogen peroxide degradation. Experiments were conducted on a pilot unit (3,000 m3 h(-1)) in a wastewater treatment plant. The sodium silicate (Na2SiO3) proved to be a good scrubbing solution stabilizer. A very good removal of hydrogen sulfide (up to 98%) was also obtained. Finally, the study resulted in the determination of the best operating conditions to achieve both an efficient and economical process.

  19. Hydrogen peroxide route to Sn-doped titania photocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Štengl Václav

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The work aims at improving photocatalytic activity of titania under Vis light irradiation using modification by Sn ions and an original, simple synthesis method. Tin-doped titania catalysts were prepared by thermal hydrolysis of aqueous solutions of titanium peroxo-complexes in the presence of SnCl4 or SnCl2 using an original, proprietary "one pot" synthesis not employing organic solvents, metallo-organic precursors, autoclave aging nor post-synthesis calcination. The products were characterized in details by powder diffraction, XPS, UV–vis, IR, and Raman spectroscopies, electron microscopy and surface area and porosity measurements Results The presence of tin in synthesis mixtures favors the formation of rutile and brookite at the expense of anatase, decreases the particle size of all formed titania polymorphs, and extends light absorption of titania to visible light region >400 nm by both red shift of the absorption edge and introduction of new chromophores. The photocatalytic activity of titania under UV irradiation and >400 nm light was tested by decomposition kinetics of Orange II dye in aqueous solution Conclusions Doping by Sn improves titania photoactivity under UV light and affords considerable photoactivity under >400 nm light due to increased specific surface area and a phase heterogeneity of the Sn-doped titania powders.

  20. Detection of Hydrogen Peroxide Photogenerating from a Hypocrellin B Derivative

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘光艳; 马江华

    2003-01-01

    In order to further improve the photosensitizing activity of hypocrellin B (HB), the complex of 5,8-diBr-HB with Al3 + was designed and synthesized in high yield. The complex of aluminium ion with 5,8-di-Br-HB is a new water-soluble perylenequinonoid derivative with enhanced absorption over HB in the phototherapeutic window (600-900 nm). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurement and 9,10-diphenyl-anthracene bleaching methods were used to investigate the photosensitizing activity of [ Al2 ( 5,8-di-Br-HB ) Cl4 ]n in the presence of oxygen. Singlet oxygen, superoxide anion radical, hydroxyl radical can be generated by [ Al2 (5,8-di-Br-HB) Cl4 ]n photosensitization. The results showed that the production of hydroxyl radical (*OH) by [ Al2 (5,8-di-Br-HB) Cl4 ] n photosensitization comes from the Fenton Haber-Weiss reaction and the decomposition of DMPO-1O2 adduct. Formation of H2 O2 as one of main intermediates in the photogeneration of hydroxyl radical was detected by using the catalyzed oxidation of the DPD reagent by the POD enzyme method. Moreover, the experiments of EPR spin trap and catalase enzyme excluded the effect of organoperoxide on DPD oxidization. These results further support the proposed mechanism of *OH formation.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide centrally attenuates hyperosmolarity-induced thirst and natriuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanella, Regis C; Melo, Mariana Rosso; Furuya, Werner Issao; Colombari, Eduardo; Menani, José V; Colombari, Débora Simões Almeida

    2016-01-01

    Intragastric hypertonic NaCl that simulates the ingestion of osmotically active substances by food intake induces thirst, vasopressin and oxytocin release, diuresis and natriuresis. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced endogenously in central areas may act modulating autonomic and behavioral responses. In the present study, we investigated the effects of H2O2 injected centrally on water intake and renal responses induced by increasing plasma osmolality with intragastric (ig) administration of 2M NaCl (2 ml/rat). Male Holtzman rats (280-320 g) with stainless steel cannula implanted in the lateral ventricle (LV) were used. Injections of H2O2 (2.5 μmol/1 μl) into the LV reduced ig 2M NaCl-induced water intake (3.1 ± 0.7, vs. PBS: 8.6 ± 1.0 ml/60 min, pnatriuresis (769 ± 93, vs. PBS: 1158 ± 168 μEq/120 min, pdiuresis (4.1 ± 0.5, vs. PBS: 5.0 ± 0.5 ml/120 min, pnatriuresis induced by hyperosmolarity and on meal-associated thirst.

  2. Hydrogen peroxide homeostasis and signaling in plant cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The increases of H2O2 concentrations in plant cells often occur under biotic and abiotic stress conditions (e.g. light, environmental stresses and plant hormone abscisic acid).Atmospheric H2O2 as an ancient signal molecule not only plays the key role in inducing evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis, but also modulates many physiological events, such as stomatal movement, hypersensitive responses, programmed cell death and gene expressions. H2O2 levels in cells must sustain a fine equilibrium between production and scavenging. H2O2 enters cells from the apoplast or generated sources, and in turn is distributed in sub-cellular compartments.H2O2 can modulate the activities of many components in signaling, such as protein phosphatases,protein kinases, transcription factors (TFs), and calcium channels. Elevated cytosolic calcium concentrations will initiate further downstream responses, via the action of calcium-binding proteins. On the other hand, the research of H2O2 as a signal molecule is still in a comparatively juvenile stage, for example, little is known about how the cells sense H2O2, what the rate-limiting steps and most important cellular events are in cell signaling and what kind of genes is specific or necessary to H2O2 signaling. The answers to all the questions depend on the functional genomic and molecular genetics analysis.

  3. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of SLA titanium surfaces with further alkali or hydrogen peroxide and heat treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, E W; Wang, Y B; Zheng, Y F [State Key Laboratory for Turbulence and Complex System, Department of Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, College of Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Shuai, K G; Gao, F; Bai, Y J; Cheng, Y; Xiong, X L [Center for Biomedical Materials and Tissue Engineering, Academy for Advanced Interdisciplinary Studies, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wei, S C, E-mail: enwei@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: yanbo.pku@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: shuaikegang@gmail.com, E-mail: soarfgoal@gmail.com, E-mail: norice86@163.com, E-mail: chengyan@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: xxiaoling11@hotmail.com, E-mail: yfzheng@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: weishicheng99@163.com [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Stomatology, Peking University, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2011-04-15

    The present study aimed to evaluate the bioactivity of titanium surfaces sandblasted with large-grit corundum and acid etched (SLA) plus further alkali or hydrogen peroxide and heat treatment for dental implant application. Pure titanium disks were mechanically polished as control surface (Ti-control) and then sandblasted with large-grit corundum and acid etched (SLA). Further chemical modifications were conducted using alkali and heat treatment (ASLA) and hydrogen peroxide and heat treatment (HSLA) alternatively. The surface properties were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and contact angle and roughness measurements. Further evaluation of surface bioactivity was conducted by MC3T3-E1 cell attachment, proliferation, morphology, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium deposition on the sample surfaces. After insertion in the beagle's mandibula for a specific period, cylindrical implant samples underwent micro-CT examination and then histological examination. It was found that ASLA and HSLA surfaces significantly increased the surface wettability and MC3T3-E1 cell attachment percentage, ALP activity and the quality of calcium deposition in comparison with simple SLA and Ti-control surfaces. Animal studies showed good osseointegration of ASLA and HSLA surfaces with host bone. In conclusion, ASLA and HSLA surfaces enhanced the bioactivity of the traditional SLA surface by integrating the advantages of surface topography, composition and wettability.

  4. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of SLA titanium surfaces with further alkali or hydrogen peroxide and heat treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, E W; Wang, Y B; Shuai, K G; Gao, F; Bai, Y J; Cheng, Y; Xiong, X L; Zheng, Y F; Wei, S C

    2011-04-01

    The present study aimed to evaluate the bioactivity of titanium surfaces sandblasted with large-grit corundum and acid etched (SLA) plus further alkali or hydrogen peroxide and heat treatment for dental implant application. Pure titanium disks were mechanically polished as control surface (Ti-control) and then sandblasted with large-grit corundum and acid etched (SLA). Further chemical modifications were conducted using alkali and heat treatment (ASLA) and hydrogen peroxide and heat treatment (HSLA) alternatively. The surface properties were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and contact angle and roughness measurements. Further evaluation of surface bioactivity was conducted by MC3T3-E1 cell attachment, proliferation, morphology, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium deposition on the sample surfaces. After insertion in the beagle's mandibula for a specific period, cylindrical implant samples underwent micro-CT examination and then histological examination. It was found that ASLA and HSLA surfaces significantly increased the surface wettability and MC3T3-E1 cell attachment percentage, ALP activity and the quality of calcium deposition in comparison with simple SLA and Ti-control surfaces. Animal studies showed good osseointegration of ASLA and HSLA surfaces with host bone. In conclusion, ASLA and HSLA surfaces enhanced the bioactivity of the traditional SLA surface by integrating the advantages of surface topography, composition and wettability.

  5. Chemo-enzymatic epoxidation of olefins by carboxylic acid esters and hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruesch gen. Klaas, M.; Warwel, S. [Inst. for Biochemistry and Technology of Lipids, H.P. Kaufmanm-Inst., Federal Centre for Cereal, Potato and Lipid Research, Muenster (Germany)

    1998-12-31

    Ethylen and, recently, butadiene can be epoxidized directly with oxygen and for the epoxidation of propylene, the use of heterogeneous transition metals and organic peroxides (Halcon-Process) is the major player. But, beside from those notable exceptions, all other epoxidations, including large ones like the epoxidation of plant oils as PVC-stabilizers (about 200.000 t/year), are carried out with peroxy acids. Because mcpba is far to expensive for most applications, short chain peracids like peracetic acid are used. Being much less stable than mcpba and thus risky handled in large amounts and high concentrations, these peroxy acids were preferably prepared in-situ. However, conventional in-situ formation of peracids has the serious drawback, that a strong acid is necessary to catalyze peroxy acid formation from the carboxylic acid and hydrogen peroxide. The presence of a strong acid in the reaction mixture often results in decreased selectivity because of the formation of undesired by-products by opening of the oxirane ring. Therefore, we propose a new method for epoxidation based on the in-situ preparation of percarboxylic acids from carboxylic acid esters and hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by a commercial, immobilized lipase. (orig.)

  6. Sailuotong Prevents Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2)-Induced Injury in EA.hy926 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Sai Wang; Chang, Dennis; Ko, Wai Man; Zhou, Xian; Kiat, Hosen; Bensoussan, Alan; Lee, Simon M. Y.; Hoi, Maggie P. M.; Steiner, Genevieve Z.; Liu, Jianxun

    2017-01-01

    Sailuotong (SLT) is a standardised three-herb formulation consisting of Panax ginseng, Ginkgo biloba, and Crocus sativus designed for the management of vascular dementia. While the latest clinical trials have demonstrated beneficial effects of SLT in vascular dementia, the underlying cellular mechanisms have not been fully explored. The aim of this study was to assess the ability and mechanisms of SLT to act against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative damage in cultured human vascular endothelial cells (EAhy926). SLT (1–50 µg/mL) significantly suppressed the H2O2-induced cell death and abolished the H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in a concentration-dependent manner. Similarly, H2O2 (0.5 mM; 24 h) caused a ~2-fold increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release from the EA.hy926 cells which were significantly suppressed by SLT (1–50 µg/mL) in a concentration-dependent manner. Incubation of SLT (50 µg/mL) increased superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and suppressed the H2O2-enhanced Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and cleaved caspase-3 expression. In conclusion, our results suggest that SLT protects EA.hy916 cells against H2O2-mediated injury via direct reduction of intracellular ROS generation and an increase in SOD activity. These protective effects are closely associated with the inhibition of the apoptotic death cascade via the suppression of caspase-3 activation and reduction of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, thereby indicating a potential mechanism of action for the clinical effects observed. PMID:28067784

  7. Sailuotong Prevents Hydrogen Peroxide (H2O2-Induced Injury in EA.hy926 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Wang Seto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sailuotong (SLT is a standardised three-herb formulation consisting of Panax ginseng, Ginkgo biloba, and Crocus sativus designed for the management of vascular dementia. While the latest clinical trials have demonstrated beneficial effects of SLT in vascular dementia, the underlying cellular mechanisms have not been fully explored. The aim of this study was to assess the ability and mechanisms of SLT to act against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced oxidative damage in cultured human vascular endothelial cells (EAhy926. SLT (1–50 µg/mL significantly suppressed the H2O2-induced cell death and abolished the H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in a concentration-dependent manner. Similarly, H2O2 (0.5 mM; 24 h caused a ~2-fold increase in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH release from the EA.hy926 cells which were significantly suppressed by SLT (1–50 µg/mL in a concentration-dependent manner. Incubation of SLT (50 µg/mL increased superoxide dismutase (SOD activity and suppressed the H2O2-enhanced Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and cleaved caspase-3 expression. In conclusion, our results suggest that SLT protects EA.hy916 cells against H2O2-mediated injury via direct reduction of intracellular ROS generation and an increase in SOD activity. These protective effects are closely associated with the inhibition of the apoptotic death cascade via the suppression of caspase-3 activation and reduction of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, thereby indicating a potential mechanism of action for the clinical effects observed.

  8. The oxidation of yeast alcohol dehydrogenase-1 by hydrogen peroxide in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Men, Lijie; Wang, Yinsheng

    2007-01-01

    Yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) plays an important role in the conversion of alcohols to aldehydes or ketones. YADH-1 is a zinc-containing protein, and it accounts for the major part of ADH activity in growing baker's yeast. To gain insight into how oxidative modification of the enzyme affects its function, we exposed YADH-1 to hydrogen peroxide in vitro and assessed the oxidized protein by LC-MS/MS analysis of proteolytic cleavage products of the protein and by measurements of enzymatic activity, zinc release, and thiol/thiolate loss. The results illustrated that Cys43 and Cys153, which reside at the active site of the protein, could be selectively oxidized to cysteine sulfinic acid (Cys-SO2H) and cysteine sulfonic acid (Cys-SO3H). In addition, H2O2 induced the formation of three disulfide bonds: Cys43-Cys153 in the catalytic domain, Cys103-Cys111 in the noncatalytic zinc center, and Cys276-Cys277. Therefore, our results support the notion that the oxidation of cysteine residues in the zinc-binding domain of proteins can go beyond the formation of disulfide bond(s); the formation of Cys-SO2H and Cys-SO3H is also possible. Furthermore, most methionines could be oxidized to methionine sulfoxides. Quantitative measurement results revealed that, among all the cysteine residues, Cys43 was the most susceptible to H2O2 oxidation, and the major oxidation products of this cysteine were Cys-SO2H and Cys-SO3H. The oxidation of Cys43 might be responsible for the inactivation of the enzyme upon H2O2 treatment.

  9. Antioxidant properties of berberine on cultured rabbit corpus cavernosum smooth muscle cells injured by hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan TAN; Qiang TANG; Ben-rong HU; Ji-zhou XIANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the antioxidant properties of berberine (Ber) on corpus cavenosum smooth muscle cells (CCSMC) in penile erectile dysfunction. Methods: We examined the effects of Ber on cultured rabbit CCSMC damaged by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) through examining cell viability by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay and assessing the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, nitric oxide (NO) products, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) re- lease in cells after stimulation with H202. Results: Treatment with 1 mmol/L H2O2 significantly decreased the cell viability, NO products, and SOD activity of CCSMC from 100% to 48.57%+4.1% (P<0.01), 66.8±16.3 to 6.7±2.1 μmol/L (P<0.01), and 49.5±1.8 to 30.1±2.6 U/mL (P<0.01), respectively, and increased LDH release and MDA content from 497.6±69.5 to 1100.5±56.3 U/L (P<0.01) and 3.7±1.3 to 78.4±2.9 nmol/mg protein (P<0.01), respectively. However, treatment with different con- centrations of Ber (10-1000 μmol/L) inhibited the damaging effects of H2O2, with increased cell viability (P<0.05 or P<0.01), NO production (P<0.01), and SOD activity (P<0.01) and decreased LDH release and MDA content (both P<0.01). Conclusion: Bet could produce its antioxidant action on oxidative stress-induced cultured CCSMC. These effects may be of benefit in the prevention of penile erectile dysfunction.

  10. Haem oxygenase delays programmed cell death in wheat aleurone layers by modulation of hydrogen peroxide metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mingzhu; Huang, Jingjing; Xu, Sheng; Ling, Tengfang; Xie, Yanjie; Shen, Wenbiao

    2011-01-01

    Haem oxygenase-1 (HO-1) confers protection against a variety of oxidant-induced cell and tissue injury in animals and plants. In this report, it is confirmed that programmed cell death (PCD) in wheat aleurone layers is stimulated by GA and prevented by ABA. Meanwhile, HO activity and HO-1 protein expression exhibited lower levels in GA-treated layers, whereas the hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) content was apparently increased. The pharmacology approach illustrated that scavenging or accumulating H(2)O(2) either delayed or accelerated GA-induced PCD. Furthermore, pretreatment with the HO-1 specific inhibitor, zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPPIX), before exposure to GA, not only decreased HO activity but also accelerated GA-induced PCD significantly. The application of the HO-1 inducer, haematin, and the enzymatic reaction product of HO, carbon monoxide (CO) aqueous solution, both of which brought about a noticeable induction of HO expression, substantially prevented GA-induced PCD. These effects were reversed when ZnPPIX was added, suggesting that HO in vivo played a role in delaying PCD. Meanwhile, catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activities or transcripts were enhanced by haematin, CO, or bilirubin (BR), the catalytic by-product of HO. This enhancement resulted in a decrease in H(2)O(2) production and a delay in PCD. In addition, the antioxidants butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), dithiothreitol (DTT), and ascorbic acid (AsA) were able not only to delay PCD but also to mimic the effects of haematin and CO on HO up-regulation. Overall, the above results suggested that up-regulation of HO expression delays PCD through the down-regulation of H(2)O(2) production.

  11. Activation of Hydrogen Peroxide by Iron-Containing Minerals and Catalysts in Circumneutral pH Solutions: Implications for ex situ and in situ Treatment of Contaminated Water and Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Anh Le Tuan

    The decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on iron minerals can generate hydroxyl radical (•OH), a strong oxidant capable of transforming a wide range of contaminants. This reaction is critical to ex situ advanced oxidation processes employed in waste treatment systems, as well as in situ chemical oxidation processes used for soil and groundwater remediation. Unfortunately, the process in the ex situ treatment systems is relatively inefficient at circumneutral pH values. In this research, the development of iron-containing catalysts with improved efficiency was investigated. In addition, little is known about the factors that control the performance of in situ treatment systems. Another aim of this dissertation was to elucidate those factors to provide a basis for improving the efficiency of the remediation method. Two types of silica- and alumina-containing iron (hydr)oxide catalysts were synthesized by sol-gel processing techniques (Chapter 2). Relative to iron oxides, such as hematite and goethite, these catalysts were 10 to 80 times more effective in catalyzing the production of •OH from H2O2 under circumneutral conditions. The higher efficiency makes these catalysts promising candidates for ex situ advanced oxidation processes. Moreover, because alumina and silica alter the reactivity of the iron oxides with H2O2, understanding the activity of iron associated with natural aluminosilicates and silica-containing minerals in the subsurface is crucial to explaining the variability of •OH production observed in in situ treatment systems. In addition to the sol-gel technique used in Chapter 2, silica-containing iron (hydr)oxide catalysts were synthesized by immobilizing iron oxide onto mesoporous silica supports, such as SBA-15 (Chapter 5). The iron-containing SBA-15 was 10 times more effective than iron oxides in catalyzing the production of •OH from H2O2. Moreover, this catalyst could be employed for selective oxidation of small organic contaminants

  12. A respiratory chain controlled signal transduction cascade in the mitochondrial intermembrane space mediates hydrogen peroxide signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Heide Christine; Gerbeth, Carolin; Thiru, Prathapan; Vögtle, Nora F; Knoll, Marko; Shahsafaei, Aliakbar; Samocha, Kaitlin E; Huang, Cher X; Harden, Mark Michael; Song, Rui; Chen, Cynthia; Kao, Jennifer; Shi, Jiahai; Salmon, Wendy; Shaul, Yoav D; Stokes, Matthew P; Silva, Jeffrey C; Bell, George W; MacArthur, Daniel G; Ruland, Jürgen; Meisinger, Chris; Lodish, Harvey F

    2015-10-20

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) govern cellular homeostasis by inducing signaling. H2O2 modulates the activity of phosphatases and many other signaling molecules through oxidation of critical cysteine residues, which led to the notion that initiation of ROS signaling is broad and nonspecific, and thus fundamentally distinct from other signaling pathways. Here, we report that H2O2 signaling bears hallmarks of a regular signal transduction cascade. It is controlled by hierarchical signaling events resulting in a focused response as the results place the mitochondrial respiratory chain upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase Lyn, Lyn upstream of tyrosine-protein kinase SYK (Syk), and Syk upstream of numerous targets involved in signaling, transcription, translation, metabolism, and cell cycle regulation. The active mediators of H2O2 signaling colocalize as H2O2 induces mitochondria-associated Lyn and Syk phosphorylation, and a pool of Lyn and Syk reside in the mitochondrial intermembrane space. Finally, the same intermediaries control the signaling response in tissues and species responsive to H2O2 as the respiratory chain, Lyn, and Syk were similarly required for H2O2 signaling in mouse B cells, fibroblasts, and chicken DT40 B cells. Consistent with a broad role, the Syk pathway is coexpressed across tissues, is of early metazoan origin, and displays evidence of evolutionary constraint in the human. These results suggest that H2O2 signaling is under control of a signal transduction pathway that links the respiratory chain to the mitochondrial intermembrane space-localized, ubiquitous, and ancient Syk pathway in hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells.

  13. Trigonelline protects the cardiocyte from hydrogen peroxide induced apoptosis in H9c2 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Soundharrajan Ilavenil; Da Hye Kim; Young-Il Jeong; Mariadhas Valan Arasu; Mayakrishnan Vijayakumar; Ponnuraj Nagendra Prabhu; Srisesharam Srigopalram; Ki Choon Choi

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate the key parameters associated with hydrogen peroxide induced oxidative stress and investigates the mechanism of trigonelline (TG) for reducing the H2O2 induced toxicity in H9c2 cells. Methods: Cytotoxicity and antioxidant activity of TG was assessed by EZ-CYTOX kit. RNA extraction and cDNA synthesized according to the kit manufacture protocol. Apoptosis was measured by the Flowcytometry, general PCR and qPCR. Results: It was found that the TG significantly rescued the morphology of the H9c2 cells. Treatment of cells with TG attenuated H2O2 induced cell deaths and improved the antioxidant activity. In addition, TG regulated the apoptotic gene caspase-3, caspase-9 and anti-apoptotic gene Bcl-2, Bcl-XL during H2O2 induced oxidative stress in H9c2 cells. These results were comparable with quercetin treatment. For evident, flow cytometer results also confirmed the TG significantly reduced the H2O2 induced necrosis and apoptosis in H9c2 cells. However, further increment of TG concentration against H2O2 could induce the necrosis and apoptosis along with H2O2. Conclusions: It is suggested that less than 125 μM of TG could protect the cells from H2O2 induced cell damage by down regulating the caspases and up regulating the Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL expression. Therefore, we suggest the trigonelline could be useful for treatment of oxidative stress mediated cardiovascular diseases in future.

  14. ON-SITE APPLICABILITY OF HYDROGEN PEROXIDE PRODUCING MICROBIAL ELECTROCHEMICAL CELLS COUPLED WITH UV IN WASTEWATER DISINFECTION STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    There is an increased interest in the application of microbial electrochemical cell (MEC) for the recovery of value-added products such as hydrogen gas and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) from wastewater. H2O2 has strong oxidation capability and produces hydroxyl radicals when coupled w...

  15. On-site applicability of hydrogen peroxide producing microbial electrochemical cells (MECs) coupled with UV in wastewater disinfection study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: There is an increased interest in the application of microbial electrochemical cell (MEC) for the recovery of value-added products such as hydrogen gas and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) from wastewater. H2O2 has strong oxidation capability and produces hydroxyl radicals wh...

  16. 正己烷处理对菜蛾盘绒茧蜂滞育预蛹过氧化氢及抗氧化酶的影响%Effects of N-hexane on Hydrogen Peroxide Content and Activities of Three Antioxidant Enzymes in Diapausing Cotesia vestalis (Haliday) (Hymenoptera:Braconidae) Prepupae

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    侯佳秀; 徐登兰; 贺宜鹏; 陈超; 施祖华

    2014-01-01

    在27~29℃温度下,用1.5 mL/L的正己烷蒸气处理菜蛾盘绒茧蜂滞育蛹10~15 min后可以解除其滞育。为探讨解除滞育的机制,测定了正己烷处理后菜蛾盘绒茧蜂滞育预蛹体内的过氧化氢含量(H2O2)和3种抗氧化酶(SOD、POD和CAT)活性。结果表明正己烷处理后,滞育预蛹体内H2O2含量、SOD和POD活性均迅速上升,CAT活性则下降。就5个取样点的平均值而言,H2O2含量和SOD活性显著高于非滞育预蛹和未经处理的滞育预蛹,POD活性低于非滞育预蛹而高于未经处理的滞育预蛹,CAT活性则低于未经处理的滞育预蛹而高于非滞育预蛹。3种抗氧化酶活性的变化与体内H2O2含量的平衡有关,而H2O2含量的变化可能与体内激素水平的调节有关。%Exposure of the diapause individuals to 27-29 ℃ and 1.5 mL/L n-hexane for 10-15 min can effectively terminate diapause in Cotesia vestalis (Haliday). To unravel the mechanism of diapause termination, hydrogen peroxide content and activities of three antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD) and catalase (CAT), were quantified in diapause prepupae of C. vestalis. Results showed that, in the n-hexane-exposed diapause individuals, hydrogen peroxide content and activities of SOD and POD increased sharply, while activity of CAT declined. On average, hydrogen peroxide content and SOD activity were significantly higher in the exposed diapause prepupae than those in unexposed both diapause and non-diapause prepupae;POD activity was significantly lower than that in non-diapause prepupae but significantly higher than that in unexposed diapause prepupae; CAT activity was significantly lower than that in the unexposed diapause prepupae but significantly higher than that in non-diapause prepupae. Hydrogen peroxide content depends on activities of the three antioxidant enzymes, while the former can regulate hormone level in diapause prepupae, which may

  17. Sawhorse waveform voltammetry for selective detection of adenosine, ATP, and hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Ashley E; Venton, B Jill

    2014-08-05

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is an electrochemistry technique which allows subsecond detection of neurotransmitters in vivo. Adenosine detection using FSCV has become increasingly popular but can be difficult because of interfering agents which oxidize at or near the same potential as adenosine. Triangle shaped waveforms are traditionally used for FSCV, but modified waveforms have been introduced to maximize analyte sensitivity and provide stability at high scan rates. Here, a modified sawhorse waveform was used to maximize the time for adenosine oxidation and to manipulate the shapes of cyclic voltammograms (CVs) of analytes which oxidize at the switching potential. The optimized waveform consists of scanning at 400 V/s from -0.4 to 1.35 V and holding briefly for 1.0 ms followed by a ramp back down to -0.4 V. This waveform allows the use of a lower switching potential for adenosine detection. Hydrogen peroxide and ATP also oxidize at the switching potential and can interfere with adenosine measurements in vivo; however, their CVs were altered with the sawhorse waveform and they could be distinguished from adenosine. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to determine that the sawhorse waveform was better than the triangle waveform at discriminating between adenosine, hydrogen peroxide, and ATP. In slices, mechanically evoked adenosine was identified with PCA and changes in the ratio of ATP to adenosine were observed after manipulation of ATP metabolism by POM-1. The sawhorse waveform is useful for adenosine, hydrogen peroxide, and ATP discrimination and will facilitate more confident measurements of these analytes in vivo.

  18. Bromate Formation Characteristics of UV Irradiation, Hydrogen Peroxide Addition, Ozonation, and Their Combination Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoyuki Kishimoto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bromate formation characteristics of six-physicochemical oxidation processes, UV irradiation, single addition of hydrogen peroxide, ozonation, UV irradiation with hydrogen peroxide addition (UV/H2O2, ozonation with hydrogen peroxide addition (O3/H2O2, and ozonation with UV irradiation (O3/UV were investigated using 1.88 μM of potassium bromide solution with or without 6.4 μM of 4-chlorobenzoic acid. Bromate was not detected during UV irradiation, single addition of H2O2, and UV/H2O2, whereas ozone-based treatments produced . Hydroxyl radicals played more important role in bromate formation than molecular ozone. Acidification and addition of radical scavengers such as 4-chlorobenzoic acid were effective in inhibiting bromate formation during the ozone-based treatments because of inhibition of hydroxyl radical generation and consumption of hydroxyl radicals, respectively. The H2O2 addition was unable to decompose 4-chlorobenzoic acid, though O3/UV and O3/H2O2 showed the rapid degradation, and UV irradiation and UV/H2O2 showed the slow degradation. Consequently, if the concentration of organic contaminants is low, the UV irradiation and/or UV/H2O2 are applicable to organic contaminants removal without bromate formation. However, if the concentration of organic contaminants is high, O3/H2O2 and O3/UV should be discussed as advanced oxidation processes because of their high organic removal efficiency and low bromate formation potential at the optimum condition.

  19. Microscale Gradients of Oxygen, Hydrogen Peroxide, and pH in Freshwater Cathodic Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babauta, Jerome T.; Nguyen, Hung Duc; Istanbullu, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    Cathodic reactions in biofilms employed in sediment microbial fuel cells is generally studied in the bulk phase. However, the cathodic biofilms affected by these reactions exist in microscale conditions in the biofilm and near the electrode surface that differ from the bulk phase. Understanding these microscale conditions and relating them to cathodic biofilm performance is critical for better-performing cathodes. The goal of this research was to quantify the variation in oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, and the pH value near polarized surfaces in river water to simulate cathodic biofilms. We used laboratory river-water biofilms and pure culture biofilms of Leptothrix discophora SP-6 as two types of cathodic biofilms. Microelectrodes were used to quantify oxygen concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration, and the pH value near the cathodes. We observed the correlation between cathodic current generation, oxygen consumption, and hydrogen peroxide accumulation. We found that the 2e− pathway for oxygen reduction is the dominant pathway as opposed to the previously accepted 4e− pathway quantified from bulk-phase data. Biofouling of initially non-polarized cathodes by oxygen scavengers reduced cathode performance. Continuously polarized cathodes could sustain a higher cathodic current longer despite contamination. The surface pH reached a value of 8.8 when a current of only −30 μA was passed through a polarized cathode, demonstrating that the pH value could also contribute to preventing biofouling. Over time, oxygen-producing cathodic biofilms (Leptothrix discophora SP-6) colonized on polarized cathodes, which decreased the overpotential for oxygen reduction and resulted in a large cathodic current attributed to manganese reduction. However, the cathodic current was not sustainable. PMID:23766295

  20. Seasonal variations of hydrogen peroxide and water vapor on Mars: Further indications of heterogeneous chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encrenaz, T.; Greathouse, T. K.; Lefèvre, F.; Montmessin, F.; Forget, F.; Fouchet, T.; DeWitt, C.; Richter, M. J.; Lacy, J. H.; Bézard, B.; Atreya, S. K.

    2015-06-01

    We have completed our seasonal monitoring of hydrogen peroxide and water vapor on Mars using ground-based thermal imaging spectroscopy, by observing the planet in March 2014, when water vapor is maximum, and July 2014, when, according to photochemical models, hydrogen peroxide is expected to be maximum. Data have been obtained with the Texas Echelon Cross Echelle Spectrograph (TEXES) mounted at the 3 m-Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) at Maunakea Observatory. Maps of HDO and H2O2 have been obtained using line depth ratios of weak transitions of HDO and H2O2 divided by CO2. The retrieved maps of H2O2 are in good agreement with predictions including a chemical transport model, for both the March data (maximum water vapor) and the July data (maximum hydrogen peroxide). The retrieved maps of HDO are compared with simulations by Montmessin et al. (2005, J. Geophys. Res., 110, 03006) and H2O maps are inferred assuming a mean martian D/H ratio of 5 times the terrestrial value. For regions of maximum values of H2O and H2O2, we derive, for March 1 2014 (Ls = 96°), H2O2 = 20+/-7 ppbv, HDO = 450 +/-75 ppbv (45 +/-8 pr-nm), and for July 3, 2014 (Ls = 156°), H2O2 = 30+/-7 ppbv, HDO = 375+/-70 ppbv (22+/-3 pr-nm). In addition, the new observations are compared with LMD global climate model results and we favor simulations of H2O2 including heterogeneous reactions on water-ice clouds.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide reactions on cocaine in hair using imaging mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuypers, Eva; Flinders, Bryn; Bosman, Ingrid J; Lusthof, Klaas J; Van Asten, Arian C; Tytgat, Jan; Heeren, Ron M A

    2014-09-01

    Today, forensic hair analysis is considered to be a standard method for identifying chronic drug users since information about drug use stored and located in hair can cover several months to even years. When interpreting these results, one should be aware of all kind of pitfalls. External factors such as bleaching might influence the analytical result. Although the effect of hydrogen peroxide on cocaine in a solution was described before, it was never investigated whether the described reaction products (ecgonine methylester, benzoylecgonine, hydroxynorcocaine and dihydroxycocaine) are indeed found on contaminated or user hair. Since it is of great importance in forensic hair analysis to know whether cocaine and/or reaction products are detectable in hair after bleaching, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric imaging (MALDI-MSI) was used to study the effect of hydrogen peroxide treatment on incorporated cocaine in hairs. Cocaine oxidation products were identified in a solution based on MS/MS spectra and spatial distribution of these products in hair was explored using MALDI TOF-MS. All images were accomplished by spraying α-Cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (CHCA) as a MALDI-matrix. Images revealed a loss of detectability of cocaine and its reaction products in hairs already after a short bleaching period. Since all compounds of interest are found in the hydrogen peroxide and wash solution, these findings indicate that all evidence of cocaine use might be lost after a hair bleaching treatment. Therefore, forensic toxicologists should take into consideration whether hair samples were bleached before making any conclusions from hair analysis results.

  2. Inactivation of possible microorganism food contaminants on packaging foils using nonthermal plasma and hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholtz, V., E-mail: Vladimir.Scholtz@vscht.cz; Khun, J. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Physics and Measurements, Faculty of Chemical Engineering (Czech Republic); Soušková, H. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Computing and Control Engineering, Faculty of Chemical Engineering (Czech Republic); Čeřovský, M. [Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Department of Food Preservation, Faculty of Food and Biochemical Technology (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-15

    The inactivation effect of nonthermal plasma generated in electric discharge burning in air atmosphere with water or hydrogen peroxide aerosol for the application to the microbial decontamination of packaging foils is studied. The microbial inactivation is studied on two bacterial, two yeasts, and two filamentous micromycete species. The inactivation of all contaminating microorganisms becomes on the area of full 8.5 cm in diameter circular sample after short times of several tens of seconds. Described apparatus may present a possible alternative method of microbial decontamination of food packaging material or other thermolabile materials.

  3. Low-dose hydrogen peroxide application in closed recirculating aquaculture systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars-Flemming; Good, C.; Pedersen, Per Bovbjerg

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to simulate water treatment practices with hydrogen peroxide (HP) in recirculating aquaculture systems (RAS). Six identical 1,700-L pilot-scale RAS were divided into two experimental groups based on daily feed allocation and operated under constant conditions...... and contradict prevailing notions that HP cannot be used safely in RAS that employ biofiltration. The development of effective new HP treatment protocols for recirculating aquaculture could reduce the current dependence on formalin to improve water quality and control parasitic loads...

  4. Treated domestic sewage: kinetics of Escherichia coli and total coliform inactivation by oxidation with hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gean Delise L. P. Vargas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide has been used for decades in developed countries as an oxidizing agent in the treatment of water, domestic sewage and industrial effluents. This study evaluated the influence of the concentration of H2O2 and pH on the inactivation of Escherichia coli cells and the disinfection of sewage treated. The results showed that the inactivation rate increased with pH and H2O2. The presence of other contaminants dissolved in the effluent is probably the cause of these differences, because E. coli inactivation in synthetic wastewater was found to be much faster than in the real treated domestic sewage.

  5. Degradation and effect of hydrogen peroxide in small-scale recirculation aquaculture system biofilters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Martin Sune; Arvin, Erik; Pedersen, Lars-Flemming

    2010-01-01

    From an environmental point of view, hydrogen peroxide (HP) has beneficial attributes compared with other disinfectants in terms of its ready degradation and neutral by-products. The rapid degradation of HP can, however, cause difficulties with regard to safe and efficient water treatment when......−1 maintained over 3 h had a moderate inhibitory effect on the biofilter elements from one of the RAS with relatively high organic loading, while the nitrification was severely inhibited in the pilot-scale biofilters from the other RAS with a relatively low organic loading. A pilot-scale RAS...

  6. Degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in water by ozone-hydrogen peroxide process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Ying-hui; MA Jun; HOU Yan-jun

    2006-01-01

    This study reports an investigation into the degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in bubble contactor column by O3/H2O2 process, which is widely used as a principal advanced oxidation process. The degradation of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was studied under different H2O2/O3 molar ratio and pH value. Meanwhile, TOC removal was investigated both in distilled water and tap water. The influences of ozone transfer and consumed hydrogen peroxide were also discussed. The degradation products and oxidation intermediates were identified by GC-MS and LC-MS. A possible reaction mechanism was thus proposed.

  7. Environmentally Benign Oxidation of Some Organic Sulfides with 34% Hydrogen Peroxide Catalyzed by Simple Heteropolyoxometalates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAYEBEE,Reza; ALIZADEH,Moharnmad Hassan

    2007-01-01

    An environmentally benign oxygenation protocol was developed for selective oxidation of some types of aromatic and aliphatic sulfides in good to excellent yields utilizing 34% hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by simple heteropolyoxometalates in normal drinking water at room temperature. The catalysts could be recovered and reused for at least seven reaction cycles under the described reaction conditions without considerable loss of reactivity. This procedure introduced a new insight into the use of simple heteropolyanions as recoverable catalysts for the oxidation of organic sulfides by an environmentally acceptable protocol.

  8. Microbicidal efficacy of an advanced oxidation process using ozone/hydrogen peroxide in water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommer, R; Pribil, W; Pfleger, S; Haider, T; Werderitsch, M; Gehringer, P

    2004-01-01

    The combined application of ozone and hydrogen peroxide represents a kind of advanced oxidation for water treatment. The radicals that are generated during the process are used for the degradation of organic pollutants from groundwater and industrial effluents. The aim of our study was to evaluate the possible microbicidal, and particularly virucidal, efficacy of such a process, since no substantial data were available. The investigations were performed at a pilot plant installed for the elimination of perchloroethylene from polluted groundwater (reduction efficacy for perchloroethylene from 26 microg/L to 5 microg/L). To enable a reliable evaluation of the microbicidal effect, a set of alternate test organisms was used. As model viruses we chose bacteriophages MS2 (F+ specific, single-stranded RNA), phiX174 (single-stranded DNA) and PRD-1 (coated, double-stranded DNA). Furthermore, spores of Bacillus subtilis were included as possible surrogates for protozoa and Escherichia coli as representative for traditional indicator bacteria used in water analysis. The microbicidal efficiency was compared to the inactivation by means of ozone under two standard conditions (20 degrees C): (a) 0.4 mg/L residual after 4 min and (b) 0.1 mg/L residual after 10 min. Surprisingly, a good microbicidal effect of the ozone/hydrogen peroxide process was found. This was somewhat unexpected, because we had assumed that the disinfection potential of ozone would have been interfered with by the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Escherichia coli and the three test viruses revealed a reduction of about 6-log. In contrast, spores of Bacillus subtilis showed after the total process a reduction of 0.4-log. These results matched the effect of the ozone treatment (a) with a residual of 0.4 mg/L after 4 min contact time (20 degrees C). The test condition (b) with a residual of 0.1 mg/L ozone after a contact time of 10 min at 20 degrees C gave a higher reduction of the B. subtilis spores (1.5-log

  9. Protective effect of erdosteine metabolite I against hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative DNA-damage in lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marabini, Laura; Calò, Rossella; Braga, Pier Carlo

    2011-01-01

    It has been shown that the mucolytic agent erdosteine (N-carboxymethylthio-acetyl-homocysteine thiolactone, CAS 84611-23-4) has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties, and an active metabolite I (MET I) containing pharmacologically active sulphydryl group has been found to have a free radical scavenging activity. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of erdosteine metabolite I to protect A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cell against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-mediated oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage. When A549 cells were pre-treated with the active metabolite I (2.5-5-10 microg/ml) for 10-30 min and then exposed to H2O2 (1-4 mM) for two additional hours at 37 degrees C, 5% at CO2, the intracellular peroxide production, reflected by dichlorofluorescein (DCF) fluorescence, decreased in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, using a comet assay as an indicator for oxidative DNA damage, it was found that the metabolite I prevented damage to cells exposed to shortterm H2O2 treatment. The data suggest that this compound is effective in preventing H2O2-induced oxidative stress and DNA damage in A549 cells. The underlying mechanisms involve the scavenging of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS).

  10. Effect of hydrogen peroxide on persistent sodium current in guinea pig ventricular myocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji-hua MA; An-tao LUO; Pei-hua ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To study the effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on persistent sodium current (INa.P) in guinea pig ventricular myocytes.Methods: The whole-cell, cell-attached, and inside-out patch-clamp techniques were applied on isolated ventricular myocytes from guinea pig.Results: H2O2 (0.1 mmol/L, 0.5 mmol/L and 1.0mmol/L) increased the amplitude of whole-cell INa.P in a concentration-dependent mmol/L) increased persistent sodium channel activity in cell-attached and insideout patches.The mean open probability was increased from control values of 0.015±0.004 and 0.012±0.003 to 0.106±0.011 and 0.136±0.010, respectively (P<0.01 vs control).They were then decreased to 0.039±0.024 and 0.027±0.006,respectively, after the addition of 1 mmol/L GSH (P<0.01 vs H2O2).The time when open probability began to increase and reached a maximum was shorter in insideout patches than that in cell-attached patches (4.8± 1.0 min vs 11.5±3.9 min, P<0.01;9.6±1.6 min vs 18.7±4.7 min, P<0.01).Conclusion: H2O2 increased the INa.P of guinea pig ventricular myocytes in a concentration-dependent manner, possibly by directly oxidating the cell membrane.

  11. Role of galloylation and polymerization in cytoprotective effects of polyphenolic fractions against hydrogen peroxide insult.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitjans, Montserrat; Ugartondo, Vanessa; Martínez, Verónica; Touriño, Sonia; Torres, Josep L; Vinardell, M Pilar

    2011-03-09

    Byproducts and wastes generated by agricultural, food, and forestry industries contain large amounts of polyphenols, which can be potentially used as sources of natural or semisynthetic antioxidants. This study examined and compared the protection against peroxidative damage induced in erythrocytes and 3T3 cell line of polyphenolic fractions from white grape pomace, pine bark, and witch hazel bark. The work pays special attention to the different degrees of polymerization and galloylation of the extracts to contribute to the understanding of their mechanisms of action. Fractions demonstrated different protections against erythrocyte lipid peroxidation, hemolysis, and 3T3 cytotoxicity caused by H(2)O(2). Galloylation is claimed to be related to antioxidant protective capacity, and it is also responsible for the pro-oxidant effect observed at high doses. The results show that not only the percentage of galloylation but also the degree of polymerization are important modulators of their antioxidant capacity. In this sense, it is crucial that novel polyphenolic fractions were prepared attending a value of 3 for the mean degree of polymerization and did not exceed a 30% of galloylation to reach the highest antioxidant capacity with the lowest cytotoxic effects. For this reason, the grape extracts appear to be the best strategy to fight against hydrogen peroxide cell damage.

  12. Kinetics of Oxidation of L-Leucine by Mono-and Bimetallic Gold and Silver Nanoparticles in Hydrogen Peroxide Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    P.VENKATESAN; J.SANTHANALAKSHMI

    2012-01-01

    The catalytic activity of surfactant stabilized mono- and bimetallic Au and Ag nanoparticles for the oxidation of an amino acid,L-leucine,was studied using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidant.The Au and Ag nanoparticle catalysts exhibited very good catalytic activity and the kinetics of the reaction were found to be pseudo-first order with respect to the amino acid.The effects of several factors,such as oxidant concentration,ionic strength,pH,and catalyst concentration on the reaction,were also investigated.In particular,optimal oxidant and catalyst concentrations were determined.Very high concentrations of the metal nano-catalysts or the oxidant led to a dramatic increase in reaction rate.Moreover,bimetallic Au-Ag catalysts provided higher selectivity than pure Au or Ag.

  13. Facile synthesis of silver nanostructures by using various deposition potential and time: A nonenzymetic sensor for hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amiri, Mandana, E-mail: mandanaamiri@uma.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nouhi, Sima [Department of Chemistry, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azizian-Kalandaragh, Yashar [Department of Physics, University of Mohaghegh Ardabili, Ardabil (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-04-01

    Silver nanostructures have been successfully fabricated by using electrodeposition method onto indiumtinoxide (ITO) substrate. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy (UV–Vis) techniques were employed for characterization of silver nanostructures. The results show nanostructures with different morphology and electrochemical properties can be obtained by various deposition potentials and times. Electrochemical behavior of the nanostructures has been studied by using cyclic voltammetry. Silver nanostructures exhibits good electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The presented electrode can be employed as sensing element for hydrogen peroxide. - Highlights: • Silver nanostructures (AgNS) have been fabricated using electrodeposition ITO. • AgNS with different morphology and electrochemical properties obtained. • AgNS exhibits good electrocatalytic activity for reduction of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}.

  14. Microcalorimetric Investigation on the Kinetics of the Oxidation of Ascorbic Acid with Hydrogen Peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG,Xiang-Guang(孟祥光); KOU,Xing-Ming(寇兴明); XIE,Jia-Qing(谢家庆); DU,Juan(杜娟); ZENG,Xian-Cheng(曾宪诚)

    2004-01-01

    Based on the thermokinetic theory, a novel thermokinetic research method-self-function regression method,which could be used to determine the kinetic parameters k1, k2 and k 1 of the complex reaction:B+C(k1 k-1)Ik2→ P, was proposed in this paper. The kinetics of the reaction of ascorbic acid (H2A) with hydrogen peroxide was investigated at pH=5-7 and T=298.15 K, and the kinetic parameters k1, k 2 and k-1 were obtained with this method. The kinetics of the reaction was investigated in detail. The kinetic parameters of the oxidation of ascorbic monoanion (HA) and ascorbic dianion (A2-) with hydrogen peroxide were 3.33 × 10-3 s-1 and 25.48 s-1 at 298.15 K, respectively. The molar enthalpy change for the reaction was -554.64 kJ · mol-1 in phosphate buffer solution at pH 7 and at 298.15 K.

  15. Yield of Ozone, Nitrite Nitrogen and Hydrogen Peroxide Versus Discharge Parameter Using APPJ Under Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bingyan; Zhu, Changping; Fei, Juntao; He, Xiang; Yin, Cheng; Wang, Yuan; Gao, Ying; Jiang, Yongfeng; Wen, Wen; Chen, Longwei

    2016-03-01

    Discharge plasma in and in contact with water can be accompanied with ultraviolet radiation and electron impact, thus can generate hydroxyl radicals, ozone, nitrite nitrogen and hydrogen peroxide. In this paper, a non-equilibrium plasma processing system was established by means of an atmospheric pressure plasma jet immersed in water. The hydroxyl intensities and discharge energy waveforms were tested. The results show that the positive and negative discharge energy peaks were asymmetric, where the positive discharge energy peak was greater than the negative one. Meanwhile, the yield of ozone and nitrite nitrogen was enhanced with the increase of both the treatment time and the discharge energy. Moreover, the pH value of treated water was reduced rapidly and maintained at a lower level. The residual concentration of hydrogen peroxide in APPJ treated water was kept at a low level. Additionally, both the efficiency energy ratio of the yield of ozone and nitrite nitrogen and that of the removal of p-nitrophenol increased as a function of discharge energy and discharge voltage. The experimental results were fully analyzed and the chemical reaction equations and the physical processes of discharges in water were given. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11274092, 11404092, 61401146), the Nantong Science and Technology Project, Nantong, China (No. BK2014024), the Open Project of Jiangsu Province Key Laboratory of Environmental Engineering, Nanjing, China (No. KF2014001), and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities of China (No. 2014B11414)

  16. Study of the hydrogen peroxide bleaching agent effects on bovine enamel using X-ray fluorescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Ruda F.; Calazans, Fernanda S.; Miranda, Mauro S.; Santos, Ramon S.; Anjos, Marcelino J.; Assis, Joaquim T. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Hydrogen Peroxide's a bleaching agent capable of oxidizing a wide range of colored organic, causing discoloration and hence bleaching of the substrate, but some authors related the occurrence of side effects related to bleaching of the tooth structure, such as changes in morphology superficial. It was used 6 bovine incisors, each tooth was initially evaluated six times in different areas to obtain the count of elements phosphorus and calcium using X-Ray Fluorescence. The teeth were randomly divided in two groups: both groups were submitted to bleaching in office with hydrogen peroxide 38%, once a week during three weeks. Group 1 was stored in distilled water and group 2 in artificial saliva, between the sessions. The measurements were repeated every seven days before the bleaching treatment. Besides that, changes in mineral levels were always assessed in the same area and using the same procedure. It was observed that the bleaching was not able to demineralize the tooth enamel studied. (author)

  17. MODELING HYDROGEN PEROXIDE BLEACHING OF SODA PULP FROM OIL-PALM EMPTY FRUIT BUNCHES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Ferrer

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the variables soda (0.5-3.0%, hydrogen peroxide (1.0-6.0% and time (1-5 h in the bleaching of soda pulp of empty fruit bunches (EFB from oil-palm, on the properties of bleached pulps, was studied. Polynomial and neural fuzzy models reproduced the results of brightness, kappa number, and viscosity of the pulps with errors less than 10%. By the simulation of the bleaching of pulp, using the polynomial and neural fuzzy models, it was possible to find optimal values of operating variables, so that the properties of bleached pulps differed only slightly from their best values and yet it was possible to save chemical reagents, energy, and plant size, operating with lower values of operating variables. Thus, operating with 1.13% soda concentration and 2.25% hydrogen peroxide concentration for 3 hours, a pulp with a brightness of 75.1% (8.1% below the maximum and a viscosity of 740 mL/g (10.4% less than the maximum value, was obtained.

  18. Synthesis and radiosensitization properties of hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosli, Nur Ratasha Alia Md.; Mohamed, Faizal; Heng, Cheong Kai; Rahman, Irman Abdul; Ahmad, Ainee Fatimah; Mohamad, Hur Munawar Kabir [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM, Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    Cancer cells which are large in size are resistant towards radiation therapy due to the presence of large amount of anti-oxidative enzymes and hypoxic cancer cells. Thus radiosensitizer agents have been developed to enhance the therapeutic effect of radiotherapy by increasing the sensitivity of these cancer cells towards radiation. This study is conducted to investigate the radiosensitization properties of radiosensitizer complex containing hydrogen peroxide and sodium hyaluronate. Combination with sodium hyaluronate may decrease reactivity of hydrogen peroxide but maintain the oxygen concentration needed for radiosensitizing effect. HepG2 cancer cells are cultured as the mean of test subject. Cancer cell samples which are targeted and not targeted with these radiosensitizers are irradiated with 2Gy single fractionated dose. Results obtained shows that the cancer cells which are not targeted with radiosensitizers has a cell viability of 98.80±0.37% after a time interval of 48 hours and has even repopulated over 100% after a 72 hour time interval. This shows that the cancer cells are resistant towards radiation. However, when the cancer cells are targeted with radiosensitizers prior to irradiation, there is a reduction of cell viability by 25.50±10.81% and 10.30±5.10% at time intervals of 48 and 72 hours respectively. This indicates that through the use of these radiosensitizers, cancer cells are more sensitive towards radiation.

  19. Amperometric Biosensor for Hydrogen Peroxide Based on Electrodeposited Sub-micrometer Gold Modified Glassy Carbon Electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG,Shu-Qing(王树青); CHEN,Jun(陈峻); LIN,Xiang-Qin(林祥钦)

    2004-01-01

    A new type of hydrogen peroxide amperometric biosensor was fabricated based on electrochemically deposited sub-micrometer Au particles(sm-Au)on a glassy carbon electrode(GCE).Electrochemical deposition condition was optimized for obtaining uniformly distributed sub-micrometer sized Au array on the electrode surface.The hydrogen peroxide sensor was fabricated by adsorbing phenothiazine methylene blue(MB)molecules on the surface of sm-Au and covering a cross-linked horseradish pero