WorldWideScience

Sample records for activity guide presents

  1. Activity-guided identification of acetogenins as novel lipophilic antioxidants present in avocado pulp (Persea americana).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, Dariana; Silva-Platas, Christian; Rojo, Rocío P; García, Noemí; Cisneros-Zevallos, Luis; García-Rivas, Gerardo; Hernández-Brenes, Carmen

    2013-12-30

    Avocado fruit is a rich source of health-related lipophilic phytochemicals such as monounsaturated fatty acids, tocopherols, carotenes, acetogenins and sterols. However, limited information is available on the contribution of specific phytochemicals to the overall antioxidant capacity (AOC) of the fruit. Centrifugal partition chromatography was used as fractionation tool, guided by an in vitro chemical assay of oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC). Subsequent experiments focused on isolation and characterization of the chemical nature of the main contributors to lipophilic AOC of avocado pulp. ORAC values obtained for acetogenins were contrasted with results from an isolated kidney mitochondria membrane lipid peroxidation bioassay. The present study established that lipophilic AOC of the pulp was significantly higher than its hydrophilic AOC. Our results confirmed the presence of acetogenins in the fractions with highest lipophilic AOC, and for the first time linked them as contributors to lipophilic-ORAC values. Further HPLC-PDA/MS-TOF analysis led to structural elucidation of two novel acetogenins, not previously reported as present in avocado pulp, along with five already known related-compounds. Antioxidant properties observed for avocado pulp acetogenins by the ORAC assay suggested that, in the presence of an emulsifying agent, acetogenins could serve as novel lipophilic antioxidants in a food matrix. Results from isolated mitochondria lipid peroxidation bioassay, indicated that L-ORAC values which may have relevance for food matrix applications, should not be interpreted to have a direct relevance in health-related claims, compounds need to be evaluated considering the complexity of biological systems. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Sex Roles, Past, Present and Future; A Guide to Simulations, Games and Activities. 2nd Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Population Inst., Washington, DC.

    This brief listing describes games, activities, awareness exercises and projects which explore the realities and myths about the nature, history and potential of men and women. Among the activities are projects designed for children and adults, for individuals, groups, clubs, couples and classes. They can be used in self-education efforts, in…

  3. GreyGuide. Poster presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Biagioni, Stefania; Farace, Dominic

    2014-01-01

    Welcome to the GreyGuide, a repository of good practices and resources in grey literature. The GreyGuide seeks to capture proposed as well as published practices dealing with the supply and demand sides of grey literature. This is a collaborative project involving GreyNet International and ISTI-CNR. The launch of the GreyGuide Repository took place in December 2013 at the Fifteenth International Conference on Grey Literature. Since then, the acquisition of both proposed and published good pra...

  4. Guide to Physical Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Families ( We Can! ) Health Professional Resources Guide to Physical Activity Physical activity is an important part of your ... to injury. Examples of moderate-intensity amounts of physical activity Common Chores Washing and waxing a car for ...

  5. UNSCEAR: present and future activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holm, Lars-Erik

    2000-01-01

    United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) was established in 1955. The Committee reviews the exposure of the world population to all sources of radiation under normal circumstances as well as after accidents, and is also the prime international scientific body reviewing and assessing the health risks of exposure to ionizing radiation. Its estimates have been and are still being used by major international bodies including the ICRP, IAEA, and WHO. UNSCEAR's publications form the scientific basis on which international and national agencies develop appropriate radiation protection standards for workers, patients and the general public. UNSCEAR reports yearly to the General Assembly and submits regularly comprehensive reports with detailed scientific annexes on the sources and biological effects of ionizing radiation. In 1995, UNSCEAR began a new program of review of the sources, exposure and biological effects of ionizing radiation. A comprehensive report with scientific annexes will be published in the year 2000. The report will include exposures from natural and man-made radiation sources, occupational and medical radiation exposures, and dose assessment methodologies. The biological effects will cover epidemiological evaluation of radiation-induced cancer, DNA repair and mutagenesis, hereditary effects, combined effects of radiation and other agents, as well as models, mechanisms and uncertainties of biological effects at low radiation doses. An assessment of exposures and effects of the Chernobyl accidents is also made. A brief overview is presented here of the range of subjects considered by the Committee. (author)

  6. Rockets: Physical science teacher's guide with activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Gregory L.; Rosenberg, Carla R. (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    This guide begins with background information sections on the history of rocketry, scientific principles, and practical rocketry. The sections on scientific principles and practical rocketry are based on Isaac Newton's three laws of motion. These laws explain why rockets work and how to make them more efficient. The background sections are followed with a series of physical science activities that demonstrate the basic science of rocketry. Each activity is designed to be simple and take advantage of inexpensive materials. Construction diagrams, materials and tools lists, and instructions are included. A brief discussion elaborates on the concepts covered in the activities and is followed with teaching notes and discussion questions. The guide concludes with a glossary of terms, suggested reading list, NASA educational resources, and an evaluation questionnaire with a mailer.

  7. MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlesinger, David, E-mail: djs9c@virginia.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 and Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States); Benedict, Stanley [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Davis, California 95817 (United States); Diederich, Chris [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94115 (United States); Gedroyc, Wladyslaw [Department of Medicine, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Klibanov, Alexander [Departments of Medicine, Cardiovascular Medicine, and Biomedical Engineering, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States); Larner, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22908 (United States)

    2013-08-01

    MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) is a quickly developing technology with potential applications across a spectrum of indications traditionally within the domain of radiation oncology. Especially for applications where focal treatment is the preferred technique (for example, radiosurgery), MRgFUS has the potential to be a disruptive technology that could shift traditional patterns of care. While currently cleared in the United States for the noninvasive treatment of uterine fibroids and bone metastases, a wide range of clinical trials are currently underway, and the number of publications describing advances in MRgFUS is increasing. However, for MRgFUS to make the transition from a research curiosity to a clinical standard of care, a variety of challenges, technical, financial, clinical, and practical, must be overcome. This installment of the Vision 20/20 series examines the current status of MRgFUS, focusing on the hurdles the technology faces before it can cross over from a research technique to a standard fixture in the clinic. It then reviews current and near-term technical developments which may overcome these hurdles and allow MRgFUS to break through into clinical practice.

  8. MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlesinger, David; Benedict, Stanley; Diederich, Chris; Gedroyc, Wladyslaw; Klibanov, Alexander; Larner, James

    2013-01-01

    MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery (MRgFUS) is a quickly developing technology with potential applications across a spectrum of indications traditionally within the domain of radiation oncology. Especially for applications where focal treatment is the preferred technique (for example, radiosurgery), MRgFUS has the potential to be a disruptive technology that could shift traditional patterns of care. While currently cleared in the United States for the noninvasive treatment of uterine fibroids and bone metastases, a wide range of clinical trials are currently underway, and the number of publications describing advances in MRgFUS is increasing. However, for MRgFUS to make the transition from a research curiosity to a clinical standard of care, a variety of challenges, technical, financial, clinical, and practical, must be overcome. This installment of the Vision 20/20 series examines the current status of MRgFUS, focusing on the hurdles the technology faces before it can cross over from a research technique to a standard fixture in the clinic. It then reviews current and near-term technical developments which may overcome these hurdles and allow MRgFUS to break through into clinical practice

  9. A practical guide to designing a poster for presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, D J

    Poster presentations are frequently used to disseminate research findings and clinical initiatives at conferences, and present module material for educational courses. However, many nurses lack confidence when it comes to designing posters. This article considers the skills required to design a poster. Aspects of good poster design are also discussed.

  10. Presentations for librarians a complete guide to creating effective, learner-centred presentations

    CERN Document Server

    Hilyer, Lee Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Recent research on learning from multimedia presentations has indicated that the current way many people prepare their slide presentations may actually hinder learning. Considering the ubiquity of the PowerPoint presentation in business and in education, presenters should be concerned whether or not their audience members are effectively receiving the information they wish to impart. This issue is of special import for librarians who teach, as they often must convey complex information in a very limited amount of time. Combining the best evidence on multimedia learning with real-world practica

  11. Retrieval activates related words more than presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausman, Hannah; Rhodes, Matthew G

    2018-03-23

    Retrieving information enhances learning more than restudying. One explanation of this effect is based on the role of mediators (e.g., sand-castle can be mediated by beach). Retrieval is hypothesised to activate mediators more than restudying, but existing tests of this hypothesis have had mixed results [Carpenter, S. K. (2011). Semantic information activated during retrieval contributes to later retention: Support for the mediator effectiveness hypothesis of the testing effect. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 37(6), 1547-1552. doi: 10.1037/a0024140 ; Lehman, M., & Karpicke, J. D. (2016). Elaborative retrieval: Do semantic mediators improve memory? Journal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition, 42(10), 1573-1591. doi: 10.1037/xlm0000267 ]. The present experiments explored an explanation of the conflicting results, testing whether mediator activation during a retrieval attempt depends on the accessibility of the target information. A target was considered less versus more accessible when fewer versus more cues were given during retrieval practice (Experiments 1 and 2), when the target had been studied once versus three times initially (Experiment 3), or when the target could not be recalled versus could be recalled during retrieval practice (Experiments 1-3). A mini meta-analysis of all three experiments revealed a small effect such that retrieval activated mediators more than presentation, but mediator activation was not reliably related to target accessibility. Thus, retrieval may enhance learning by activating mediators, in part, but these results suggest the role of other processes, too.

  12. The World of Business. Teacher's Activity and Resource Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Columbus Public Schools, OH.

    This activity and resource guide is intended to assist teachers in developing course content and effective teaching methods in business education. (General Business for Economic Understanding," 11th edition, is the adopted textbook for this guide.) The guide is organized into twelve major units and is designed so that each unit builds upon the…

  13. Radon adsorption on present activated charcoals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazankin, Yu.N.; Trofimov, A.M.; Mikhajlova, L.K.

    1978-01-01

    Radon adsorption from helium and air has been studied on modern activated carbons of SKT-1, SKT-2a, SKT-3, SKT-2b, SKT-6, PAU-1 within the temperature range from 100 to 80 deg. It has been shown that PAU-1 carbon has the highest activity with respect to radon in the temperature range studied. With decreasing temperature the adsorption coefficients increase sharply. It has been found that for the case of radon adsorption from helium the logarythm of the Henry coefficient linearly depends on the inverse value of absolute temperature. Adsorption of radon from air is inhibited and the above-cited relationship is deviated from linear. The results of calculating differential heats of radon and air adsorption as well as coefficients of radon and air separation on carbons are presented

  14. A Guided Inquiry Activity for Teaching Ligand Field Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Brian J.; Graham, Kate J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper will describe a guided inquiry activity for teaching ligand field theory. Previous research suggests the guided inquiry approach is highly effective for student learning. This activity familiarizes students with the key concepts of molecular orbital theory applied to coordination complexes. Students will learn to identify factors that…

  15. The Oratorical Scientist: A Guide for Speechcraft and Presentation for Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, G. E.

    2015-12-01

    Public speaking organizations are highly valuable for individuals seeking to improve their skills in speech development and delivery. The methodology of such groups usually focuses on repetitive, guided practice. Toastmasters International, for instance, uses a curriculum based on topical manuals that guide their members through some number of prepared speeches with specific goals for each speech. I have similarly developed a public speaking manual for scientists with the intention of guiding scientists through the development and presentation of speeches that will help them hone their abilities as public speakers. I call this guide The Oratorical Scientist. The Oratorical Scientist will be a free, digital publication that is meant to guide scientists through five specific types of speech that the scientist may be called upon to deliver during their career. These five speeches are: The Coffee Talk, The Educational Talk, Research Talks for General Science Audiences, Research Talks for Specific Subdiscipline Audiences, and Taking the Big Stage (talks for public engagement). Each section of the manual focuses on speech development, rehearsal, and presentation for each of these specific types of speech. The curriculum was developed primarily from my personal experiences in public engagement. Individuals who use the manual may deliver their prepared speeches to groups of their peers (e.g. within their research group) or through video sharing websites like Youtube and Vimeo. Speeches that are broadcast online can then be followed and shared through social media networks (e.g. #OratoricalScientist), allowing a larger audience to evaluate the speech and to provide criticism. I will present The Oratorical Scientist, a guide for scientists to become better public speakers. The process of guided repetitive practice of scientific talks will improve the speaking capabilities of scientists, in turn benefitting science communication and public engagement.

  16. HBR guide to persuasive presentations inspire action, engage the audience, sell your ideas

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Terrified of speaking in front of a group? Or simply looking to polish your skills? No matter where you are on the spectrum, this guide will give you the confidence and the tools you need to get results. Written by presentation expert Nancy Duarte, the "HBR Guide to Persuasive Presentations" will help you: (1) Win over tough crowds, (2) Organize a coherent narrative, (3) Create powerful messages and visuals, (4) Connect with and engage your audience, (5) Show people why your ideas matter to them, and (6) Strike the right tone, in any situation.

  17. DESIGN CONSIDERATION INVOLVING ACTIVE SEDIMENT CAPS (PRESENTATION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    When contaminated sediments pose unacceptable risks to human health and the environment, management activities such as removal, treatment, or isolation of contaminated sediments may be required. Various capping designs are being considered for isolating contaminated sediment are...

  18. DOING OTHER PEOPLE’S TRAINING PRESENTATIONS - a guide for teachers in implementing a scheme

    OpenAIRE

    Neal, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Often, experienced teachers in schools and colleges are asked to present training packs written by others. The assumption is that since they are experienced teachers, making training presentations to their colleagues will be easy. They often find that it is not. Usually, the material has been designed to be delivered using a model where one person within a school or college will make themselves responsible for familiarising themselves with Trainer's Notes, the Teachers' Guide and the rest of ...

  19. Problem solution as a guided activity with Mexican schoolchildren

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solovieva, Yulia

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study was to describe the organization of a guided activity for problem solution in primary school. The method, which was applied to mathematical problems, allowed us to propose a specific orientation for the proper solution of arithmetic problems by pupils. The study was based on the activity-theory approach applied to the process of teaching and learning. It was carried out with pupils in the second grade of a private school in the city of Puebla (Mexico. The method was used in the classroom during 30 school sessions of 1 hour per day. The methodology of formative experiment was used in the study. Qualitative analysis of the pedagogical process of teaching and learning was conducted. The results show that, after participation in the formative process, the schoolchildren became able to identify essential elements, data, and all relationships among them in order to solve mathematical problems. At the end of the program the verbal external level was raised for the process of orientation and the solution of problems together with the ability to use logarithms independently. We conclude that orientation, as a guided form of activity in primary school, is essential for the development of the ability to analyze problems.

  20. Active Metamaterial Based Ultrasonic Guided Wave Transducer System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An active and tunable metamaterial phased array transducer for guided wave mode selection with high intensity per driving channel and with dramatically lower modal...

  1. Active and passive beam application design guide for global application

    CERN Document Server

    Rimmer, Julian

    2015-01-01

    The Active and Passive Beam Application Design Guide is the result of collaboration by worldwide experts to give system designers a current, authoritative guide on successfully applying active and passive beam technology. Active and Passive Beam Application Design Guide provide energy-efficient methods of cooling, heating, and ventilating indoor areas, especially spaces that require individual zone control and where internal moisture loads are moderate. The systems are simple to operate, with low maintenance requirements. This book is an essential resource for consulting engineers, architects, owners, and contractors who are involved in the design, operation, and installation of these systems. Building on REHVA’s Chilled Beam Application Guidebook, this new guide provides up-to-date tools and advice for designing, commissioning, and operating chilled-beam systems to achieve a determined indoor climate, and includes examples of active and passive beam calculations and selections. Dual units (SI and I-P) are...

  2. Brain in Space: A Teacher's Guide with Activities for Neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Walter W., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    The lessons and activities in this guide will engage your students in the excitement of space life science investigations after the Neurolab Spacelab mission. It is the authors' goal that the information in this guide will inspire both you and your students to become interested and active participants in this space mission. Few experiences can compare with the excitement and thrill of watching a Shuttle launch. This guide provides an opportunity for you and your students to go one step further by conducting the experiments on Earth that are relevent to the research conducted in space.

  3. Fuel cell activities at the CSIR: Presentation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Modibedi, M

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available substrate Pt catalyst substrate ITO glass substrate Complete DSCs Solar tester Autolab system 0 0.001 0.002 0.003 0.004 0.005 0.006 0.007 0.008 0 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.1 j / m A c m - 2 Voltage (V) ZnOCPc (OH)2SiOCPc (OH)GaOCPc (a) 0 0.002 0.004 0.../Ni foam -0.429 -0.590 Future Work © CSIR 2013 www.csir.co.za • Membrane work: incorporation of nanocomposites and FC testing including AE ionomer optimisation • Electrocatalysis: MEA fabrication and FC testing under active...

  4. Present activities of the Danube environmental Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botterweg, T.; Turcan, J.

    1997-01-01

    The international character of the Danube river basin reflects among other aspects also the importance and the need of international co-operation at various levels. The response of this need has been expressed by the formation of different international commissions and organisations in the basin, covering mainly technical but in the recent time also the environmental interests of the riparian states. The Danube countries, several G-24 governments, as well as international and non governmental organisations decided in the autumn of 1991 to start the Environmental Programme for the Danube River Basin (EPDRB) and form the Danube Task Force. A joint Programme work plan was agreed by the Task Force in February 1992, thereby launching a series of priority projects designed to built environmental co-operation among the Danube countries. The main objective was to establish an operational basis for strategic and integrated management of the Danube river basin environment. The planning and working documents, which were outlining the activities within the EPDRB are the Strategic Action Plan (SAP-1994) and the Strategic Action Plan Implementation Programme (SIP-1996). These documents frame the works of the 13 Tasks of the Applied Research Programme, Sub-Groups of the Accident Emergency Warning System, Monitoring, Laboratories and Information Management and Data Management as well as the major areas of work, divided in Groups and Clusters, each of which will involve projects to be carried out in a number of Danube countries. All activities are oriented to the improvement of the environment, however special attention is paid to task dealing with biodiversity, wetlands restoration, water and soil protection. The main funding, which is secured until the year 2000 comes from the Danube countries, the EU Phare and Tacis programmes, the UN GEF, international banks and foundations. (author)

  5. Do You Read Me? Service Supplement: Reading Development Activities Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Elizabeth L.; Chenoweth, Roberta

    This activity guide is one of four supplements to be used with "Do You Read Me? Prevocational-Vocational Reading Development Activities" (ED 210 454). Each supplement deals with a different occupational category. Games, puzzles, and other activities are offered to aid in developing the word recognition, vocabulary, and comprehension…

  6. Past, present, future of neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinn, V.P.

    1991-01-01

    Although the method of NAA was originated in 1936, use of the method was minimal for about the next ten years - due to the lack of a high-flux source of thermal neutrons. When such a copious source of neutrons - the nuclear reactor - became available, commencing in 1945, the power of the method to determine many elements, quantitatively, even though present in samples at concentrations as low as ppb, attracted many scientists. During about the next 20 years (1945-1965), NAA provided the first major results on trace elements (essential and toxic) in biomedical materials. These studies constituted the first major achievement of NAA - and such studies continue. Due to the initial lack of a high-efficiency detector of gamma radiation, work during the early part of this period had to be carried out by tedious radiochemical separations. Starting in the early 1950's, with the advent of the NaI(Tl) scintillation detector and multichannel pulse-height analyzers, the purely-instrumental form of the method (INAA) was born, and research and applications mushroomed. In the 1960s, two additional important applications of NAA were its vital use in the semiconductor industry and in the analysis of the lunar rocks. The INAA method in this period was greatly advanced by the availability of high-resolution germanium detectors. Applications in environmental studies, archaeology, and forensic chemistry were also of note. INAA is now a mature method, but still improving. As for the future, what is still needed are less expensive high-flux neutron sources, simple automated systems, gamma-ray detectors of even better resolution, and faster electronics. The field of NAA has been, and is, blessed by a large number of outstanding scientists, world-wide, all intrigued by the atomic nucleus and radioactive decay

  7. The CAREM project: Present status and development activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boado Magan, H.J.; Ordonez, J.P.; Hey, A.

    1997-01-01

    The CAREM Project is a low power NPP of 25 Mwe, with an integrated self pressurized primary system. The cooling of the primary system is of the natural circulation type and several passive safety systems are included. The owner of the Project is Argentina's CNEA (Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica) and its associated company, INVAP, is the main contractor. The present status of the CAREM Project is presented. The possible evolution of the CAREM project is mentioned in relation with a new containment design. A short description of the Experimental Facilities, listed below, already in operation and under construction are also included: CAPCN High Pressure Loop. Natural convection loop to verify dynamic response and critical heat flux; RA-8. Critical Facility, designed and constructed for the CAREM Project (that may be used as a general uses facility); RPV lnternals. The whole assembly of absorbent rods, connecting rods and the rode guides are being constructed in a 1:1 scale. The aims of this experimental facility are vibration analysis and manufacturing parameters definitions. Control Drive Mechanisms. A series of verification and tests are being carried out on these within RPV Hydraulically driven mechanisms. Other development activities are mentioned in relation with the thermalhydraulics, Steam Generators and Control. (author)

  8. California Women: Activities Guide, Kindergarten through Grade Twelve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Marie

    Women have always been an integral part of California's history as shamans, settlers, wives, mothers, workers, inventors, and reformers. Yet the names of California women may not be familiar to many students. This activities guide, which was designed to accompany the poster, "California Women: Courage, Compassion, Conviction," provides…

  9. Training Cambodian Village Health Support Guides in Diabetes Prevention: Effects on Guides' Knowledge and Teaching Activities Over 6 Months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Julie; Keuky, Lim; Fraser-King, Lorraine; Kuoch, Theanvy; Scully, Mary

    2016-04-01

    Type 2 diabetes is a pressing public health concern in Cambodia, a country with limited human resource capacity due to genocide. Cambodian village health support guides (Guides) promote health at the local level. This paper reports preliminary results of training Guides in diabetes prevention. The curriculum, called Eat, Walk, Sleep was delivered to Guides in Siem Reap province once over 3 h. Participants completed a pretest and posttest on diabetes knowledge. Guides were offered continuing education through Eat, Walk, Sleep resources and were encouraged to teach Eat, Walk, Sleep in their villages. For each of 6 months following their training, Guides completed a checklist regarding their activities. One hundred eighty-five Guides attended one of ten trainings. Knowledge scores increased significantly from pretest to posttest. During 6 months of follow-up, n = 159 Guides (85 %) completed at least one monthly checklist. Guides reported high rates of uptake and delivery of the Eat, Walk, Sleep curriculum and moderate rates of continuing education about diabetes. Diabetes prevention in Cambodia is nascent. Guides show excellent uptake and dissemination of the curriculum. Future research should examine effect of support for Guide activities and the effect of the curriculum on villager health behaviors, and ultimately, on rates of type 2 diabetes.

  10. Energy activity guide : simple steps to reduce your household energy use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byckalo-Khan, F.; Wallace, C.L. (ed.)

    2003-07-01

    This guide presents 13 practical activities that can help households reduce energy consumption in order to create a more sustainable lifestyle and to help meet Canada's Kyoto commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Most energy sources create pollution that harms both human health and the Earth. The burning of fossil fuels creates greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change, smog, pollution and adverse health effects. This guide offers suggestions on how households can reduce the impact on the environment while saving money. Some of the initiatives include lowering the thermostat, replacing incandescent light bulbs with compact fluorescent light bulbs, turning off appliances when not in use, weatherising building envelopes, using a clothes line to dry clothes instead of a dryer, laundering clothes with cold water, and proper maintenance of heating equipment. An energy use chart is included with this guide to help track activities and to estimate how much time and money is required by each activity. refs., figs.

  11. Energy activity guide : simple steps to reduce your household energy use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byckalo-Khan, F; Wallace, C L [ed.

    2003-07-01

    This guide presents 13 practical activities that can help households reduce energy consumption in order to create a more sustainable lifestyle and to help meet Canada's Kyoto commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Most energy sources create pollution that harms both human health and the Earth. The burning of fossil fuels creates greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to climate change, smog, pollution and adverse health effects. This guide offers suggestions on how households can reduce the impact on the environment while saving money. Some of the initiatives include lowering the thermostat, replacing incandescent light bulbs with compact fluorescent light bulbs, turning off appliances when not in use, weatherising building envelopes, using a clothes line to dry clothes instead of a dryer, laundering clothes with cold water, and proper maintenance of heating equipment. An energy use chart is included with this guide to help track activities and to estimate how much time and money is required by each activity. refs., figs.

  12. Comet Kohoutek, 1973-1974, A Teachers' Guide with Student Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Robert D.

    This teacher's guide provides background information, curriculum source materials, and suggested class activities for class discussion and study. Information related to the discovery of the comet is presented as well as photographic and schematic pictures showing the sky through which the comet travels. Historical data regarding comets of the past…

  13. Ute Unit: Study Guide and Follow Up Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North Conejos School District, Capulin, CO.

    The study guide and follow-up activities were designed primarily to give students a feeling of Ute life in the San Luis Valley in Colorado. The unit begins with six Southern Ute stories about the wolf and coyote, the race between the skunk and the coyote, the frog and the eagle, why the frog croaks, the bear (Que Ye Qat), and the two Indian…

  14. Percutaneous tracheostomy with the guide wire dilating forceps technique : presentation of 171 consecutive patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fikkers, Bernard G; van Heerbeek, Niels; Krabbe, Paul F M; Marres, Henri A M; van den Hoogen, Frank J A

    BACKGROUND: Evaluation of percutaneous tracheostomy (PT) with the guide wire dilating forceps (GWDF) technique. METHODS: Prospective study of perioperative complications, retrospective analysis of early and late complications in an ICU in a teaching university hospital. RESULTS: The success rate of

  15. Percutaneous tracheostomy with the guide wire dilating forceps technique: presentation of 171 consecutive patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fikkers, B.G.; Heerbeek, N. van; Krabbe, P.F.M.; Marres, H.A.M.; Hoogen, F.J.A. van den

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evaluation of percutaneous tracheostomy (PT) with the guide wire dilating forceps (GWDF) technique. METHODS: Prospective study of perioperative complications, retrospective analysis of early and late complications in an ICU in a teaching university hospital. RESULTS: The success rate of

  16. Workshop Physics Activity Guide, Module 4: Electricity and Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Priscilla W.

    2004-05-01

    The Workshop Physics Activity Guide is a set of student workbooks designed to serve as the foundation for a two-semester calculus-based introductory physics course. It consists of 28 units that interweave text materials with activities that include prediction, qualitative observation, explanation, equation derivation, mathematical modeling, quantitative experiments, and problem solving. Students use a powerful set of computer tools to record, display, and analyze data, as well as to develop mathematical models of physical phenomena. The design of many of the activities is based on the outcomes of physics education research. The Workshop Physics Activity Guide is supported by an Instructor's Website that: (1) describes the history and philosophy of the Workshop Physics Project; (2) provides advice on how to integrate the Guide into a variety of educational settings; (3) provides information on computer tools (hardware and software) and apparatus; and (4) includes suggested homework assignments for each unit. Log on to the Workshop Physics Project website at http://physics.dickinson.edu/ Workshop Physics is a component of the Physics Suite--a collection of materials created by a group of educational reformers known as the Activity Based Physics Group. The Physics Suite contains a broad array of curricular materials that are based on physics education research, including: Understanding Physics, by Cummings, Laws, Redish and Cooney (an introductory textbook based on the best-selling text by Halliday/Resnick/Walker) RealTime Physics Laboratory Modules Physics by Inquiry (intended for use in a workshop setting) Interactive Lecture Demonstration Tutorials in Introductory Physics Activity Based Tutorials (designed primarily for use in recitations)

  17. Modulation of Neural Activity during Guided Viewing of Visual Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Arcos, Guillermo; Tamez-Duque, Jesús; Acosta-De-Anda, Elsa Y; Kwan-Loo, Kevin; de-Alba, Mayra; Tamez-Duque, Ulises; Contreras-Vidal, Jose L; Soto, Rogelio

    2017-01-01

    Mobile Brain-Body Imaging (MoBI) technology was deployed to record multi-modal data from 209 participants to examine the brain's response to artistic stimuli at the Museo de Arte Contemporáneo (MARCO) in Monterrey, México. EEG signals were recorded as the subjects walked through the exhibit in guided groups of 6-8 people. Moreover, guided groups were either provided with an explanation of each art piece (Guided-E), or given no explanation (Guided-NE). The study was performed using portable Muse (InteraXon, Inc, Toronto, ON, Canada) headbands with four dry electrodes located at AF7, AF8, TP9, and TP10. Each participant performed a baseline (BL) control condition devoid of artistic stimuli and selected his/her favorite piece of art (FP) during the guided tour. In this study, we report data related to participants' demographic information and aesthetic preference as well as effects of art viewing on neural activity (EEG) in a select subgroup of 18-30 year-old subjects (Nc = 25) that generated high-quality EEG signals, on both BL and FP conditions. Dependencies on gender, sensor placement, and presence or absence of art explanation were also analyzed. After denoising, clustering of spectral EEG models was used to identify neural patterns associated with BL and FP conditions. Results indicate statistically significant suppression of beta band frequencies (15-25 Hz) in the prefrontal electrodes (AF7 and AF8) during appreciation of subjects' favorite painting, compared to the BL condition, which was significantly different from EEG responses to non-favorite paintings (NFP). No significant differences in brain activity in relation to the presence or absence of explanation during exhibit tours were found. Moreover, a frontal to posterior asymmetry in neural activity was observed, for both BL and FP conditions. These findings provide new information about frequency-related effects of preferred art viewing in brain activity, and support the view that art appreciation is

  18. Canada's Physical Activity Guide: examining print-based material for motivating physical activity in the workplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikoff, Ronald C; Todosijczuk, Ivan; Johnson, Steven T; Karunamuni, Nandini

    2012-01-01

    The authors conducted a secondary analysis on 202 adults from the Physical Activity Workplace Study. The aim of this analysis was to examine demographic characteristics associated with reading Canada's Physical Activity Guide (CPAG), being motivated by the guide, and whether participants in the Physical Activity Workplace Study who read the CPAG increased their physical activity levels over 1 year. Results revealed that less than 50% of participants read the full version of CPAG, and less than 10% were motivated by it. The CPAG also appears to be more appealing to and effective for women than for men. Although the CPAG had some influence in increasing mild physical activity levels in a workplace sample, there was also a decrease in physical activity levels among some members of the group. Overall, the effectiveness of CPAG was not substantial, and the findings of this analysis could help guide future targeted intervention materials and programs.

  19. Make your own video with ActivePresenter

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    A step-by-step video tutorial on how to use ActivePresenter, a screen recording tool for Windows and Mac. The installation step is not needed for CERN users, as the product is already made available. This tutorial explains how to install ActivePresenter, how to do a screen recording and edit a video using ActivePresenter and finally how to exports the end product. Tell us what you think about this or any other video in this category via e-learning.support at cern.ch All info about the CERN rapid e-learning project is linked from http://twiki.cern.ch/ELearning  

  20. Guided participation in cultural activity by toddlers and caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogoff, B; Mistry, J; Göncü, A; Mosier, C

    1993-01-01

    In this Monograph, we examine how toddlers and their caregivers from four cultural communities collaborate in shared activities. We focus both on similarities across communities in processes of guided participation--structuring children's participation and bridging between their understanding and that of their caregivers--and on differences in how guided participation occurs. We examine the idea that a key cultural difference entails who is responsible for learning--whether adults take this responsibility by structuring teaching situations or whether children take responsibility for learning through observation and through participating in adult activities with caregivers' support. We speculate that these two patterns relate to cultural variation in the segregation of children from adult activities of their community and in emphasis on formal schooling. The four communities of our study vary along these lines as well as in other ways: a Mayan Indian town in Guatemala, a middle-class urban group in the United States, a tribal village in India, and a middle-class urban neighborhood in Turkey. In each community, we visited the families of 14 toddlers (aged 12-24 months) for an interview that was focused on child-rearing practices, which included observations of caregivers helping the toddlers operate novel objects spontaneously during adult activities. Results are based on systematic analysis of patterns of communication and attention in each family in each community, combining the tools of ethnographic description, graphic analysis, and statistics.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Activation analysis in Europe: present and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Corte, F.; Hoste, J.

    1984-01-01

    A survey is given of the present-day European contribution to activation analysis, covering neutron activation analysis (NAA), charged particle activation analysis (CPAA) and photon activation analysis (PAA). Attention is paid to the available irradiation facilities, in particular nuclear reactors, cyclotrons and Van de Graaff accelerators, and linear electron accelerators. Mention is made of progress in fundamental fields, but the attention is especially focussed on practical applications: environmental, geochemical/cosmochemical, biological/medical, and high-purity materials. Eventually, the role of activation analysis in research projects of the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) and in the Reference Materials program of the Community Bureau of Reference (BCR) is emphasized

  2. Past, present and future of the nuclear activities in Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cirimelo, Roberto O.

    2001-01-01

    A short history is given of the activities of the National Atomic Energy Commission. The present program in the field of the fuel cycle, material sciences, waste management, nuclear reactors, radioisotope production, radiation and radioisotope applications, research and development and education and training is described. The objectives and activities of the companies related to the National Atomic Energy Commission are also outlined

  3. From an Ancient Tradition to the Present. Chinese Cultural Heritage Resource Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching Fang; Lee, Amy

    This cultural heritage resource guide has been prepared as a tool for teachers to help promote better understanding of Chinese students in the New York City public schools. China has an ancient history and a rich cultural tradition, and people all over the world have recognized China as one of the world's greatest civilizations. The earliest…

  4. Charged particle activation analysis at RIKEN. Past, present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, T.

    2008-01-01

    From 1960s to 1980s many groups in the world actively studied and utilized charged particle activation analysis (CPAA) mainly for absolute determination of B, C, N, and O in high-purity substances, particularly semiconductor materials. Here, after a short historical note on CPAA, works of the author's group mainly at RIKEN are outlined and then his opinion is shown about how to anticipate on the present shrinking of CPAA. (author)

  5. WE-EF-BRD-01: Past, Present and Future: MRI-Guided Radiotherapy From 2005 to 2025

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagendijk, J. [University Medical Center Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2015-06-15

    MRI-guided treatment is a growing area of medicine, particularly in radiotherapy and surgery. The exquisite soft tissue anatomic contrast offered by MRI, along with functional imaging, makes the use of MRI during therapeutic procedures very attractive. Challenging the utility of MRI in the therapy room are many issues including the physics of MRI and the impact on the environment and therapeutic instruments, the impact of the room and instruments on the MRI; safety, space, design and cost. In this session, the applications and challenges of MRI-guided treatment will be described. The session format is: Past, present and future: MRI-guided radiotherapy from 2005 to 2025: Jan Lagendijk Battling Maxwell’s equations: Physics challenges and solutions for hybrid MRI systems: Paul Keall I want it now!: Advances in MRI acquisition, reconstruction and the use of priors to enable fast anatomic and physiologic imaging to inform guidance and adaptation decisions: Yanle Hu MR in the OR: The growth and applications of MRI for interventional radiology and surgery: Rebecca Fahrig Learning Objectives: To understand the history and trajectory of MRI-guided radiotherapy To understand the challenges of integrating MR imaging systems with linear accelerators To understand the latest in fast MRI methods to enable the visualisation of anatomy and physiology on radiotherapy treatment timescales To understand the growing role and challenges of MRI for image-guided surgical procedures My disclosures are publicly available and updated at: http://sydney.edu.au/medicine/radiation-physics/about-us/disclosures.php.

  6. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The presented materials consist of presentations of international workshop which held in Warsaw from 4 to 5 October 2007. Main subject of the meeting was progress in manufacturing as well as research program development for neutron detector which is planned to be placed at GANIL laboratory and will be used in nuclear spectroscopy research

  7. present

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    as medium of instruction enhances concept formation, especially in science subjects as ... The study, on which this paper is based, was conducted to evaluate Malawi's ... corrected in the wake of information flowing from the evaluation phase (Kaplan .... concerning the background information and suggested activities (Thodi,.

  8. Guide to the collection and presentation of electrical, electronic, and sensing component reliability data for nuclear-power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    This Guide is intended to establish a method of collecting and presenting reliability data for quantitative systematic reliability analysis in nuclear power generating stations, as outlined in IEEE Std 351-1975. Appendix D, which is not a part of IEEE Std 500-1977 but which comprises the bulk of this publication, presents tables of reliability data for nuclear power generating stations, intended for use of nuclear systems reliability analysts or design engineers

  9. Occlus-o-Guide® versus Andresen activator appliance: neuromuscular evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farronato, Giampietro; Giannini, Lucia; Galbiati, Guido; Grillo, Elena; Maspero, Cinzia

    2013-05-20

    The aim of the present study was to assess the muscular variations at the electromyography (EMG) level for the anterior temporalis muscles and masseter muscles during treatment with Occlus-o-Guide® and Andresen activator appliances. Eighty-two patients (35 males and 47 females) aged between 8 and 12 years (mean age, 10.5±0.8 years) participated in the study. Fifty patients underwent treatment with an Occlus-o-Guide® and 32 patients with an Andresen activator. All patients underwent EMG examination using a Freely EMG (De Gotzen, Legnano, Italy) and surface bipolar electrodes when the appliances were worn for the first time (T0), and after 6 months (T1) and after 12 months (T2) of appliance use. Statistical analysis showed that both at T0 and T2, the percent overlapping coefficient (POC) of the anterior temporalis muscles was not statistically different between the appliance groups. At T0, the POC of the masseter muscles was significantly lower for the Andresen appliance as compared to the Occlus-o-Guide® (p=0.02), while at T2 this significance was lost. At insertion of an appliance, all patients show neuromuscular balance that does not correspond to orthognathic occlusion. Both appliances work by creating muscular imbalance. With the appliances in situ, EMG responses were generally analogous for the Occlus-o-Guide® and the Andresen activator; however, the imbalance was greater and the recovery of the orthological muscular balance was slower in patients under treatment with the Andresen activator as compared to those with the Occlus-o-Guide®.

  10. Presentation and exhibition activities for promoting theexportof transport services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darya Vladimirovna Nesterova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Development of presentation and exhibition activities is considered as an important factor in providing new competitive advantages at the strategic markets for exporting of transportation services. A specific role for exhibition activities as a factor to overcome market failures arose from imperfect information and incomplete markets is displayed. Exhibitions are considered as a true reflection of most market parameters, as a means to get correct information concerning market capacity and its borders, as an instrument to access to new markets. At the firm level presentation and branding activities should be considered as a modern technology (especially it concerns Russian companies which provide to hold up already existed markets and to conquer new ones. Presentation and branding activities are an effective technology to promote company trade-mark, competitive advantages for market demand increasing. Comparative analysis of the main exhibitions on transport and logistics issues is fulfilled on the data basecollected by authors. Data observes geographical distribution of transport exhibition and exhibition facilities development at several regions for the last years. The analyses allow to revealing a geographical structure of the exhibitions and its distribution by type of transport. The most promising and economically favorable exhibition areas for the promotion of Russian transport services are shown.

  11. TECHNOLOGIES OF INITIATING STUDENTS INTO INDEPENDENT (SELF-GUIDED ACTIVITY IN SUPPLEMENTARY DISTANCE LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina V. Abakumova

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The research in question investigates the technologies of initiating independent activity within the framework of distance learning and their psychological aspects. The authors’ classification of educational technologies of initiating students into independent cognitive activity is presented. Such technologies utilize various psychological mechanisms of exciting students’ cognitive interest, intensifying cognitive processes, developing independent activity skills, and, as a result, increase motivation for independent activity and learning on the whole. These include such types of technologies as developmental technologies, interactive technologies, technologies of information transfer, technologies of meaning-making initiation. The research of the attitude of distance learning educators to independent activity of students and the content of the academic courses were done at Moodle-based education programs. The findings show the differences in retention rate among distance learning educators whose competence in terms of initiating students into independent (self-guided activity varies. It’s emphasized that interactive lectures, videoconferences, audio-visual aids, interactive seminars, glossaries, interactive tests are considered the most efficient technologies in initiating students into independent (self-guided activity. The obtained results have made it possible to stress the developmental effect of distance learning technologies and the technologies of initiating students into independent (self-guided activity in various psychic spheres of students: cognitive, individual, emotional. We mention the changes in motivational sphere of students and their meaning-making activity. In the course of correct development of distance learning we notice the development of voluntary and nonvoluntary cognitive activity. A student starts actively participating in educational process, he becomes the creator of his own world.

  12. Task Rotation: Strategies for Differentiating Activities and Assessments by Learning Style. A Strategic Teacher PLC Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Harvey; Moirao, Daniel; Jackson, Joyce

    2011-01-01

    One of the hardest jobs in teaching is to differentiate learning activities and assessments to your students' learning styles. But you and your colleagues can learn how to do this together when each of you has this guide to the Task Rotation strategy from our ultimate guide to teaching strategies, "The Strategic Teacher". Use the guide in your…

  13. A novel concept for continuous peripheral nerve blocks. Presentation of a new ultrasound-guided device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothe, C; Steen-Hansen, C; Madsen, M H

    2015-01-01

    positioning as well as during later in-plane readjustment of the catheter. We tested the system in the popliteal region of two fresh cadavers in a preliminary proof of concept study. RESULTS: Both initial placement and secondary readjustment were precise, judged by the catheter orifices placed close......BACKGROUND: Existing techniques for placing and maintaining the position of peripheral nerve catheters are associated with variable success rates and frequent secondary failures. These factors may affect the clinical efficacy and usefulness of peripheral nerve catheters. METHODS: We developed a new...... concept and prototype for ultrasound-guided in-plane positioning and readjustment of peripheral nerve catheters (patent pending). The integrated catheter-needle prototype comprises three parts: a curved needle, a catheter with clear echogenic markings attached to the needle tail and a detachable hub...

  14. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The PARIS meeting held in Cracow, Poland from 14 to 15 May 2007. The main subjects discussed during this meeting were the status of international project dedicated to gamma spectroscopy research. The scientific research program includes investigations of giant dipole resonance, probe of hot nuclei induced in heavy reactions, Jacobi shape transitions, isospin mixing and nuclear multifragmentation. The mentioned programme needs Rand D development such as new scintillations materials as lanthanum chlorides and bromides as well as new photo detection sensors as avalanche photodiodes - such subjects are also subjects of discussion. Additionally results of computerized simulations of scintillation detectors properties by means of GEANT- 4 code are presented

  15. Macrophage Activation Syndrome as Initial Presentation of Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Say-Tin Yeap

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS is known to be a severe and potentially life-threatening complication of rheumatic disorder, especially systemic juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. It is very rare for MAS to be an initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE. Here, we report a 14-year-old girl in whom MAS developed as an initial presentation of SLE. With early diagnosis and administration of cyclosporine A, she had a fair outcome. Further testing showed positive anti-dsDNA about 8 months later.

  16. Charged particle activation analysis: present status and future perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, D.P.

    2006-01-01

    Charged particle activation analysis is a highly sensitive nuclear analytical technique for the determination of elements at trace and ultra trace levels. CPAA involves the irradiation of samples with high energy charged particles, both light ions and heavy ions, from an accelerator in the energy range of 10 to 100 MeV. CPAA has been developed and standardized for the determination of several elements at trace levels in various types of materials using high energy ion beams from VEC machine at Kolkata. A brief review on CPAA is presented here based on our present works and its applications in future. (author)

  17. Present and future activities of TRIGA RC-1 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Festinesi, A.

    1986-01-01

    A summary of reactor activities is presented and discussed. The RC-1 reactor is used by ENEA's laboratories, research institutes and national industries for different aims: research, analysis materials behaviour under neutron flux, etc. To satisfy the requests increase it is important to signalize: - the realization of a new radiochemical laboratory for radioisotopes production, to be used in a medical and/or diagnostic field in general; - the realization of a tritium handling laboratory, to study tritium solubility, release and diffusion in different material (particularly in ceramic breeder as lithium aluminate) to support Italian programs on fusion technology; - a research activity on the reactors computerized control by a console of advanced conception. The aim of this activity is the development of an ergonomic control room that could be a reference point for the planning of the power reactor control rooms

  18. Microgravity: Teacher's guide with activities for physical science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Gregory L.; Wargo, Michael J.; Rosenberg, Carla B. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This guide is an educational tool for teachers of grades 5 through 12. It is an introduction to microgravity and its application to spaceborne laboratory experiments. Specific payloads and missions are mentioned with limited detail, including Spacelab, the International Microgravity Laboratory, and the United States Microgravity Laboratory. Activities for students demonstrate chemistry, mathematics, and physics applications of microgravity. Activity objectives include: modeling how satellites orbit Earth; demonstrating that free fall eliminates the local effects of gravity; measuring the acceleration environments created by different motions; using a plasma sheet to observe acceleration forces that are experienced on board a space vehicle; demonstrating how mass can be measured in microgravity; feeling how inertia affects acceleration; observing the gravity-driven fluid flow that is caused by differences in solution density; studying surface tension and the fluid flows caused by differences in surface tension; illustrating the effects of gravity on the burning rate of candles; observing candle flame properties in free fall; measuring the contact angle of a fluid; illustrating the effects of gravity and surface tension on fiber pulling; observing crystal growth phenomena in a 1-g environment; investigating temperature effects on crystal growth; and observing crystal nucleation and growth rate during directional solidification. Each activity includes a background section, procedure, and follow-up questions.

  19. Present status and future of high-precision image guided adaptive brachytherapy for cervix carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poetter, Richard; Kirisits, Christian; Fidarova, Elena F.; Dimopoulos, Johan nes C. A.; Berger, Daniel; Tanderup, Kari; Lindegaard, Jacob C.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction. Image guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT) for cervical cancer, using mainly MRI, is an evolving method, increasingly replacing the 2D approach based on conventional radiography. During the complex 4D chain of this procedure image-assistance is provided for disease assessment, provisional treatment planning ('pre-planning'), applicator placement and reconstruction, as well as for contouring, definitive treatment planning and quality control of dose delivery. With IGABT changes of topography adjacent to the applicator, caused by tumour regression, oedema, organ changes and dilation are identified. Thus, the CTV for IGABT is primarily based on the tumour volume at the time of BT and takes into account both time and spatial domains. IGABT requires systematic concepts for target, OAR, biological modelling, DVH analysis, and dose-volume-adaptation. Methods and Results. This report focuses on the advantages and uncertainties, dose-effect relations and clinical results of the IGABT procedure addressing the current status and future perspectives. Uncertainties during the 4D chain of IGABT are mainly related to target contouring, applicator reconstruction, as well as to inter-fraction, intra-fraction and inter-application variability, as caused by tumour response and organ changes. Different from EBRT where set-up uncertainties are compensated by adding a margin to the CTV, no margins to the lateral and anterior-posterior directions can be used for IGABT. Discussion. By 3D treatment planning for IGABT significant improvement of the DVH parameters is achieved compared to 2D library plans. In small tumours the benefit is primarily obtained by a decrease of dose to nearby OAR while in large tumours the use of supplementary interstitial techniques and optimization may double the target volume that can be treated at a therapeutic dose level. The clinical impact of IGABT could recently be demonstrated by the establishment of some correlations between target- and

  20. Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Vicente

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present edition of Significação – Scientific Journal for Audiovisual Culture and in the others to follow something new is brought: the presence of thematic dossiers which are to be organized by invited scholars. The appointed subject for the very first one of them was Radio and the invited scholar, Eduardo Vicente, professor at the Graduate Course in Audiovisual and at the Postgraduate Program in Audiovisual Media and Processes of the School of Communication and Arts of the University of São Paulo (ECA-USP. Entitled Radio Beyond Borders the dossier gathers six articles and the intention of reuniting works on the perspectives of usage of such media as much as on the new possibilities of aesthetical experimenting being build up for it, especially considering the new digital technologies and technological convergences. It also intends to present works with original theoretical approach and original reflections able to reset the way we look at what is today already a centennial media. Having broadened the meaning of “beyond borders”, four foreign authors were invited to join the dossier. This is the first time they are being published in this country and so, in all cases, the articles where either written or translated into Portuguese.The dossier begins with “Radio is dead…Long live to the sound”, which is the transcription of a thought provoking lecture given by Armand Balsebre (Autonomous University of Barcelona – one of the most influential authors in the world on the Radio study field. It addresses the challenges such media is to face so that it can become “a new sound media, in the context of a new soundscape or sound-sphere, for the new listeners”. Andrew Dubber (Birmingham City University regarding the challenges posed by a Digital Era argues for a theoretical approach in radio studies which can consider a Media Ecology. The author understands the form and discourse of radio as a negotiation of affordances and

  1. Activity-Guided Identification of in Vitro Antioxidants in Beer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spreng, Stefan; Hofmann, Thomas

    2018-01-24

    In order to locate the key antioxidants contributing to oxidative stability of beer, activity-guided fractionation in combination with the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assay, hydrogen peroxide scavenging (HPS) assay, and linoleic acid (LA) assay was applied to a pilsner-type beer. LC-MS and 1D/2D NMR experiments led to the identification of a total of 31 antioxidants, among which 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl-β-d-glucopyranoside (tachioside), 4-(2-formylpyrrol-1-yl)butyric acid, 4-[2-formyl-5-(hydroxymethyl)pyrrol-1-yl]butyric acid, n-multifidol-3-O-β-d-glucoside, quercetin-3-O-(6″-malonyl)-glucoside, 4-feruloylquinic acid, syringaresinol, saponarin, and hordatines A-C have been isolated from beer for the first time. On a molar comparison, the hordatines A-C, saponarin, and quercetin-3-O-β-d-(6″-malonyl)glucoside were evaluated with the highest antioxidant activities of all identified beer constituents, reaching values of 10-17.5 (ORAC), 2.0-4.1 (HPS), and 1.1-6.1 μmol TE/μmol (LA) for hordatines A-C.

  2. Data presentation options to manage variability in physical activity research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valbuena, Diego; Miller, Bryon G; Samaha, Andrew L; Miltenberger, Raymond G

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents seven tactics for managing the variability evident in some physical activity data. High levels of variability in daily step-count data from pedometers or accelerometers can make typical visual inspection difficult. Therefore, the purpose of the current paper is to discuss several strategies that might facilitate the visual interpretation of highly variable data. The seven strategies discussed in this paper are phase mean and median lines, daily average per week, weekly cumulative, proportion of baseline, 7-day moving average, change point detection, and confidence intervals. We apply each strategy to a data set and discuss the advantages and disadvantages. © 2017 Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  3. ESA remote-sensing programme - Present activities and future plans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plevin, J [ESA, Directorate of Planning and Future Programmes, Paris, France; Pryke, I [ESA, Directorate of Applications Programmes, Toulouse, France

    1979-02-01

    The present activities and future missions of the ESA program of spaceborne remote sensing of earth resources and environment are discussed. Program objectives have been determined to be the satisfaction of European regional needs by agricultural, land use, water resources, coastal and polar surveys, and meeting the requirements of developing nations in the areas of agricultural production, mineral exploration and disaster warning and assessment. The Earthnet system of data processing centers presently is used for the distribution of remote sensing data acquired by NASA satellites. Remote sensing experiments to be flown aboard Spacelab are the Metric Camera, to test high resolution mapping capabilities of a large format camera, and the Microwave Remote-Sensing Experiment, which operates as a two-frequency scatterometer, a synthetic aperture radar and a passive microwave radiometer. Studies carried out on the definition of future remote sensing satellite systems are described, including studies of system concepts for land applications and coastal monitoring satellites.

  4. Present status of tritium research activities at universities in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, K.

    1983-01-01

    The behaviours of tritium towards various materials are very similar to those of hydrogen, since tritium is one of the hydrogen isotope. In addition to those properties, tritium shows the radiochemical and radiological reactivities due to an emitted #betta#-ray. The permeability of tritium through various materials is the example of the former. The formation of tritiated methane in tritium stored in stainless steel vessels and the increase of helium content in tritium-bearing metallic materials are the examples of the latter. For these reasons, advanced and somewhat more complicated techniques are required for handling tritium. After the Ministry of Education, Science and Culture (MOE) made an appropriation on Grant-in-Aid for Fusion Research in 1975 year's budget, development of tritium handling technology for fusion reactors have been actively pursued. The specific experiments to be embodied in present research activities are: 1. Measurements of tritium permeation rate through various materials. 2. Fundamental studies on tritium containment materials. 3. Fundamental studies of tritium waste treatment and storage. In this paper, the works achieved under the above research activities are described and some results obtained from experiments are reported. (author)

  5. Using human brain activity to guide machine learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Ruth C; Scheirer, Walter J; Cox, David D

    2018-03-29

    Machine learning is a field of computer science that builds algorithms that learn. In many cases, machine learning algorithms are used to recreate a human ability like adding a caption to a photo, driving a car, or playing a game. While the human brain has long served as a source of inspiration for machine learning, little effort has been made to directly use data collected from working brains as a guide for machine learning algorithms. Here we demonstrate a new paradigm of "neurally-weighted" machine learning, which takes fMRI measurements of human brain activity from subjects viewing images, and infuses these data into the training process of an object recognition learning algorithm to make it more consistent with the human brain. After training, these neurally-weighted classifiers are able to classify images without requiring any additional neural data. We show that our neural-weighting approach can lead to large performance gains when used with traditional machine vision features, as well as to significant improvements with already high-performing convolutional neural network features. The effectiveness of this approach points to a path forward for a new class of hybrid machine learning algorithms which take both inspiration and direct constraints from neuronal data.

  6. Business and Office Education: Accounting, Clerk. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide. Kit No. 204.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cliatt, Katherine H.

    This learning activity guide and instructor's manual provide information and exercises for an exploratory activity in accounting. Instructional objectives covered in the guide are for the students to learn (1) reasons for studying accounting and related job descriptions, (2) definitions for accounting terms, (3) the accounting equation, (4) how to…

  7. Educational activities of remote sensing archaeology (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjimitsis, Diofantos G.; Agapiou, Athos; Lysandrou, Vasilki; Themistocleous, Kyriacos; Cuca, Branka; Nisantzi, Argyro; Lasaponara, Rosa; Masini, Nicola; Krauss, Thomas; Cerra, Daniele; Gessner, Ursula; Schreier, Gunter

    2016-10-01

    Remote sensing science is increasingly being used to support archaeological and cultural heritage research in various ways. Satellite sensors either passive or active are currently used in a systematic basis to detect buried archaeological remains and to systematic monitor tangible heritage. In addition, airborne and low altitude systems are being used for documentation purposes. Ground surveys using remote sensing tools such as spectroradiometers and ground penetrating radars can detect variations of vegetation and soil respectively, which are linked to the presence of underground archaeological features. Education activities and training of remote sensing archaeology to young people is characterized of highly importance. Specific remote sensing tools relevant for archaeological research can be developed including web tools, small libraries, interactive learning games etc. These tools can be then combined and aligned with archaeology and cultural heritage. This can be achieved by presenting historical and pre-historical records, excavated sites or even artifacts under a "remote sensing" approach. Using such non-form educational approach, the students can be involved, ask, read, and seek to learn more about remote sensing and of course to learn about history. The paper aims to present a modern didactical concept and some examples of practical implementation of remote sensing archaeology in secondary schools in Cyprus. The idea was built upon an ongoing project (ATHENA) focused on the sue of remote sensing for archaeological research in Cyprus. Through H2020 ATHENA project, the Remote Sensing Science and Geo-Environment Research Laboratory at the Cyprus University of Technology (CUT), with the support of the National Research Council of Italy (CNR) and the German Aerospace Centre (DLR) aims to enhance its performance in all these new technologies.

  8. A "how-to" guide in preparing abstracts and poster presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boullata, Joseph I; Mancuso, Carissa E

    2007-12-01

    The preparation of an abstract or poster to share information from a project or case report with colleagues is a professional goal for many nutrition support practitioners. This paper provides an approach to help practitioners prepare an abstract for submission and subsequently a poster for presentation at a meeting. A nutrition support question that required collecting and evaluating information, or a unique patient case or case series, can serve as the focus of an abstract and subsequent poster. The professional meeting selected should be appropriate for the abstract topic, and the authors should closely adhere to the organization's abstract submission guidelines. The well-prepared abstract will then serve as the outline for the poster content; the visual aspect of the poster is also important to effectively communicate the information to colleagues at the meeting. Adequate time is required to prepare both the abstract and the poster in order to fittingly reflect the value of the information. Efforts in preparing the abstract will be worthwhile once the abstract has been accepted by reviewers for a poster session at the meeting. Likewise, the effort in preparing the poster in advance allows the presenter to enjoy the poster session and discuss the project with colleagues.

  9. Photovoltaic Reliability Group activities in USA and Brazil (Presentation Recording)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Cruz, Leila R. O.

    2015-09-01

    Recently prices of photovoltaic (PV) systems have been reduced considerably and may continue to be reduced making them attractive. If these systems provide electricity over the stipulated warranty period, it would be possible attain socket parity within the next few years. Current photovoltaic module qualifications tests help in minimizing infant mortality but do not guarantee useful lifetime over the warranty period. The PV Module Quality Assurance Task Force (PVQAT) is trying to formulate accelerated tests that will be useful towards achieving the ultimate goal of assuring useful lifetime over the warranty period as well as to assure manufacturing quality. Unfortunately, assuring the manufacturing quality may require 24/7 presence. Alternatively, collecting data on the performance of fielded systems would assist in assuring manufacturing quality. Here PV systems installed by home-owners and small businesses can constitute as an important untapped source of data. The volunteer group, PV - Reliable, Safe and Sustainable Quality! (PVRessQ!) is providing valuable service to small PV system owners. Photovoltaic Reliability Group (PVRG) is initiating activities in USA and Brazil to assist home owners and small businesses in monitoring photovoltaic (PV) module performance and enforcing warranty. It will work in collaboration with small PV system owners, consumer protection agencies. Brazil is endowed with excellent solar irradiance making it attractive for installation of PV systems. Participating owners of small PV systems would instruct inverter manufacturers to copy the daily e-mails to PVRG and as necessary, will authorize the PVRG to carry out review of PV systems. The presentation will consist of overall activities of PVRG in USA and Brazil.

  10. Deep learning improves prediction of CRISPR-Cpf1 guide RNA activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hui Kwon; Min, Seonwoo; Song, Myungjae; Jung, Soobin; Choi, Jae Woo; Kim, Younggwang; Lee, Sangeun; Yoon, Sungroh; Kim, Hyongbum Henry

    2018-03-01

    We present two algorithms to predict the activity of AsCpf1 guide RNAs. Indel frequencies for 15,000 target sequences were used in a deep-learning framework based on a convolutional neural network to train Seq-deepCpf1. We then incorporated chromatin accessibility information to create the better-performing DeepCpf1 algorithm for cell lines for which such information is available and show that both algorithms outperform previous machine learning algorithms on our own and published data sets.

  11. Present and future of the Image Guided Radiotherapy (I.G.R.T.) and its applications in lung cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefkopoulos, D.; Ferreira, I.; Isambert, A.; Le Pechoux, C.; Mornex, F.

    2007-01-01

    These last years, the new irradiation techniques as the conformal 3D radiotherapy and the IMRT are strongly correlated with the technological developments in radiotherapy. The rigorous definition of the target volume and the organs at risk required by these irradiation techniques, imposed the development of various image guided patient positioning and target tracking techniques. The availability of these imaging systems inside the treatment room has lead to the exploration of performing real-time adaptive radiation therapy. In this paper we present the different image guided radiotherapy (IGRT) techniques and the adaptive radiotherapy (ART) approaches. IGRT developments are focused in the following areas: 1) biological imaging for better definition of tumor volume; 2) 4D imaging for modeling the intra-fraction organ motion; 3) on-board imaging system or imaging devices registered to the treatment machines for inter-fraction patient localization; and 4) treatment planning and delivery schemes incorporating the information derived from the new imaging techniques. As this paper is included in the 'Cancer Radiotherapie' special volume dedicated to the lung cancers, in the description of the different IGRT techniques we try to present the lung tumors applications when this is possible. (author)

  12. Multiple Active Contours Guided by Differential Evolution for Medical Image Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Aceves, I.; Avina-Cervantes, J. G.; Lopez-Hernandez, J. M.; Rostro-Gonzalez, H.; Garcia-Capulin, C. H.; Torres-Cisneros, M.; Guzman-Cabrera, R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a new image segmentation method based on multiple active contours guided by differential evolution, called MACDE. The segmentation method uses differential evolution over a polar coordinate system to increase the exploration and exploitation capabilities regarding the classical active contour model. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, a set of synthetic images with complex objects, Gaussian noise, and deep concavities is introduced. Subsequently, MACDE is applied on datasets of sequential computed tomography and magnetic resonance images which contain the human heart and the human left ventricle, respectively. Finally, to obtain a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the medical image segmentations compared to regions outlined by experts, a set of distance and similarity metrics has been adopted. According to the experimental results, MACDE outperforms the classical active contour model and the interactive Tseng method in terms of efficiency and robustness for obtaining the optimal control points and attains a high accuracy segmentation. PMID:23983809

  13. Multiple Active Contours Guided by Differential Evolution for Medical Image Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Cruz-Aceves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new image segmentation method based on multiple active contours guided by differential evolution, called MACDE. The segmentation method uses differential evolution over a polar coordinate system to increase the exploration and exploitation capabilities regarding the classical active contour model. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, a set of synthetic images with complex objects, Gaussian noise, and deep concavities is introduced. Subsequently, MACDE is applied on datasets of sequential computed tomography and magnetic resonance images which contain the human heart and the human left ventricle, respectively. Finally, to obtain a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the medical image segmentations compared to regions outlined by experts, a set of distance and similarity metrics has been adopted. According to the experimental results, MACDE outperforms the classical active contour model and the interactive Tseng method in terms of efficiency and robustness for obtaining the optimal control points and attains a high accuracy segmentation.

  14. Animals Alive! An Ecological Guide to Animal Activities. Revised Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Dennis

    This guide is designed to help teachers develop an inquiry-oriented program for studying the animal kingdom in which live animals are collected locally, studied, observed, and then released completely unharmed back into their natural habitats. This book addresses such concerns of life science teachers as the environmental soundness of methods and…

  15. Visitor Learning on Guided Tours: An Activity Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Lily Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    Guided tours, field trips, and other non-formal learning experiences occur in a variety of settings such as museums, parks, civic buildings, and architectural landmarks for the purpose of educating the public. This study yielded four main findings. (1) Program educational goals were visitor awareness, positive affective experience, and advocacy.…

  16. Strychnos pseudoquina and Its Purified Compounds Present an Effective In Vitro Antileishmanial Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Sousa Lage

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of new and cost-effective alternative therapeutic strategies to treat leishmaniasis has become a high priority. In the present study, the antileishmanial activity of Strychnos pseudoquina St. Hil. was investigated and pure compounds that presented this biological effect were isolated. An ethyl acetate extract was prepared, and it proved to be effective against Leishmania amazonensis. A bioactivity-guided fractionation was performed, and two flavonoids were identified, quercetin 3-O-methyl ether and strychnobiflavone, which presented an effective antileishmanial activity against L. amazonensis, and studies were extended to establish their minimum inhibitory concentrations (IC50, their leishmanicidal effects on the intra-macrophage Leishmania stage, as well as their cytotoxic effects on murine macrophages (CC50, and in O+ human red blood cells. The data presented in this study showed the potential of an ethyl acetate extract of S. pseudoquina, as well as two flavonoids purified from it, which can be used as a therapeutic alternative on its own, or in association with other drugs, to treat disease evoked by L. amazonensis.

  17. Safeguards Implementation Practices Guide on Facilitating IAEA Verification Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2014-12-15

    The IAEA implements safeguards pursuant to agreements concluded with States. It is in the interests of both States and the IAEA to cooperate to facilitate the practical implementation of safeguards. Such cooperation is explicitly required under all types of safeguards agreement. Effective cooperation depends upon States and the IAEA sharing a common understanding of their respective rights and obligations. To address this, in 2012 the IAEA published Services Series 21, Guidance for States Implementing Comprehensive Safeguards Agreements and Additional Protocols, which aimed at enhancing understanding of the safeguards obligations of both States and the IAEA and at improving their cooperation in safeguards implementation. States may establish different processes and procedures at the national level, and set up different systems as required to meet their safeguards obligations. Indeed, a variety of approaches are to be expected, owing to such differences as the size and complexity of States’ nuclear programmes and their regulatory framework. The purpose of this Safeguards Implementation Practices (SIP) Guide is to share the experiences and good practices as well as the lessons learned by both States and the IAEA, acquired over the many decades of safeguards implementation. The information contained in the SIP Guides is provided for explanatory purposes and use of the Guides is not mandatory. The descriptions in the SIP Guides have no legal status and are not intended to add to, subtract from, amend or derogate from, in any way, the rights and obligations of the IAEA and the States set forth in The Structure and Content of Agreements between the Agency and States Required in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (issued as INFCIRC/153 (Corrected)) and Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between State(s) and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards (issued as INFCIRC/540 (Corrected)). This SIP

  18. Safeguards Implementation Practices Guide on Facilitating IAEA Verification Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The IAEA implements safeguards pursuant to agreements concluded with States. It is in the interests of both States and the IAEA to cooperate to facilitate the practical implementation of safeguards. Such cooperation is explicitly required under all types of safeguards agreement. Effective cooperation depends upon States and the IAEA sharing a common understanding of their respective rights and obligations. To address this, in 2012 the IAEA published Services Series 21, Guidance for States Implementing Comprehensive Safeguards Agreements and Additional Protocols, which aimed at enhancing understanding of the safeguards obligations of both States and the IAEA and at improving their cooperation in safeguards implementation. States may establish different processes and procedures at the national level, and set up different systems as required to meet their safeguards obligations. Indeed, a variety of approaches are to be expected, owing to such differences as the size and complexity of States’ nuclear programmes and their regulatory framework. The purpose of this Safeguards Implementation Practices (SIP) Guide is to share the experiences and good practices as well as the lessons learned by both States and the IAEA, acquired over the many decades of safeguards implementation. The information contained in the SIP Guides is provided for explanatory purposes and use of the Guides is not mandatory. The descriptions in the SIP Guides have no legal status and are not intended to add to, subtract from, amend or derogate from, in any way, the rights and obligations of the IAEA and the States set forth in The Structure and Content of Agreements between the Agency and States Required in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (issued as INFCIRC/153 (Corrected)) and Model Protocol Additional to the Agreement(s) between State(s) and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards (issued as INFCIRC/540 (Corrected)). This SIP

  19. Predicting activities of daily living for cancer patients using an ontology-guided machine learning methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Hua; Mobahi, Hedyeh; Irvin, Katherine; Avramovic, Sanja; Wojtusiak, Janusz

    2017-09-16

    Bio-ontologies are becoming increasingly important in knowledge representation and in the machine learning (ML) fields. This paper presents a ML approach that incorporates bio-ontologies and its application to the SEER-MHOS dataset to discover patterns of patient characteristics that impact the ability to perform activities of daily living (ADLs). Bio-ontologies are used to provide computable knowledge for ML methods to "understand" biomedical data. This retrospective study included 723 cancer patients from the SEER-MHOS dataset. Two ML methods were applied to create predictive models for ADL disabilities for the first year after a patient's cancer diagnosis. The first method is a standard rule learning algorithm; the second is that same algorithm additionally equipped with methods for reasoning with ontologies. The models showed that a patient's race, ethnicity, smoking preference, treatment plan and tumor characteristics including histology, staging, cancer site, and morphology were predictors for ADL performance levels one year after cancer diagnosis. The ontology-guided ML method was more accurate at predicting ADL performance levels (P ontologies. This study demonstrated that bio-ontologies can be harnessed to provide medical knowledge for ML algorithms. The presented method demonstrates that encoding specific types of hierarchical relationships to guide rule learning is possible, and can be extended to other types of semantic relationships present in biomedical ontologies. The ontology-guided ML method achieved better performance than the method without ontologies. The presented method can also be used to promote the effectiveness and efficiency of ML in healthcare, in which use of background knowledge and consistency with existing clinical expertise is critical.

  20. Reduced-activation steels: present status and future development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced-activation steels for fusion reactor applications were developed in the 1980's to replace the commercial elevated- temperature steels first considered. In the United States, this involved replacing Sandvik HT9 and modified 9Cr-1Mo steels. Reduced-activation steels, which were developed for more rapid radioactivity decay following exposure in a fusion neutron environment, were patterned after the commercial steels they were to replace. The objective for the reduced-activation steels was that they have strengths (yield stress and ultimate tensile strength from room temperature to 600 deg. C) and impact toughness (measured in a Charpy test) comparable to or better than the steels they were replacing. That objective was achieved in reduced-activation steels developed in Japan, Europe, and the United States. Since the reduced-activation steels were developed in the 1980's, reactor designers have been interested designs for increased efficiency of future fusion plants. This means reactors will need to operate at higher temperatures-above 550 deg. C, which is the upper-temperature limit for the reduced-activation steels. Although the tensile and impact toughness of the reduced-activation steels exceed those of the commercial steels they were patterned after, their creep-rupture properties are inferior to some of the commercial steels they replaced. furthermore, they are much inferior to commercial steels that have been developed since the 1980's. Reasons for why the creep-rupture properties for the new commercial ferritic/martensitic steels are superior to the earlier commercial steels and the reduced-activation steels were examined. The reasons involve compositional changes that were made in the earlier commercial steels to give the new commercial steels their superior properties. Computational thermodynamics calculations were carried out to compare the expected equilibrium phases. It appears that similar changes in composition

  1. Rockets: Educator's Guide with Activities in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Deborah A.; Vogt, Gregory L.

    2008-01-01

    This guide provides teachers and students many opportunities. Chapters within the guide present the history of rocketry, National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) 21st Century Space Exploration Policy, rocketry principles, and practical rocketry. These topics lay the foundation for what follows--a wealth of dynamic rocket science…

  2. The Development of Environmental Guide Training Activities For Conservation Tourism in Ubonrat District, Khonkean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosin Sata

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this research on the development of training activities environmental guide to environmental conservation tourism Ubonrat district, Khonkean province were to 1 To study the problem of tourist place in ubonrat district Khonkean province, 2 to develop training activities environmental guide to environmental conservation tourism Ubonrat district, Khonkean province 3 to study and compare the knowledge, attitude and skills as a guide about ecotourism in Ubonrat district before and after the training. The sample were of 50 youth in Ubonrat district, who voluntarily participated in training. The research tools were the manual training activities environmental guide to environmental conservation tourism Ubonrat district, Khonkaen province, knowledge test, attitude test and skills test as a environmental guide. The statistical analysis of data were percentage, mean, standard deviation, and Paired t-test. results showed that the tourist attraction in Ubonrat district, Khonkean province had importance 3 source ; Nam Phong national park, Ubolrat Dam, Phu koa–Phu Phan kham national park. The findings revealed that environmental guide training activities development for ecotourism had approviatences. Comparing the score of knowledge, attitude and skill as a environmental guide of youths after the training higher than those before the training at .05 level of significance.

  3. Biological activity of phenolic compounds present in buckwheat plants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kalinová, J.; Tříska, Jan; Vrchotová, Naděžda

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 16, č. 1 (2005), s. 123-129 ISSN 0971-4693 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : biological activity, extract, Fagopyrum esculenthum Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 0.686, year: 2005

  4. Present and future position of neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Bruin, M.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented of the performance of INAA and RNAA and when compared with other spectrometric methods for trace element analysis. Indications are given for further developments aiming at exploiting the advantage and reducing the drawbacks of these two analysis technique. (author) 12 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 tab

  5. T & I--Electric Motors. Kit No. 621. Instructor's Manual and Student Learning Activity Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomar, William

    This instructor's manual and student learning activity guide comprise a kit for trade and industrial education (T & I) activities on electric motors. Purpose stated for the activities is to teach the student the four basic types of electric motors, the advantages and disadvantages of each, the types of jobs each can perform, and how to disassemble…

  6. Disparity in Physical Activity among Urban Youth: An Ecologically Guided Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenhart, Clare M.; Patterson, Freda; Brown, Michael D.; O'Brien, Matthew J.; Nelson, Deborah B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Insufficient physical activity among urban youth increases risk of chronic disease.Purpose:This study assessed reported physical activity to determine when disparities in participation emerge and what ecologically guided factors are linked with high activity. Methods:We administered a cross-sectional survey to a diverse sample of 321…

  7. Overview of the present progress and activities on the CFETR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yuanxi; Li, Jiangang; Liu, Yong; Wang, Xiaolin; Chan, Vincent; Chen, Changan; Duan, Xuru; Fu, Peng; Gao, Xiang; Feng, Kaiming; Liu, Songlin; Song, Yuntao; Weng, Peide; Wan, Baonian; Wan, Farong; Wang, Heyi; Wu, Songtao; Ye, Minyou; Yang, Qingwei; Zheng, Guoyao; Zhuang, Ge; Li, Qiang; CFETR Team

    2017-10-01

    The China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor (CFETR) is the next device in the roadmap for the realization of fusion energy in China, which aims to bridge the gaps between the fusion experimental reactor ITER and the demonstration reactor (DEMO). CFETR will be operated in two phases. Steady-state operation and self-sufficiency will be the two key issues for Phase I with a modest fusion power of up to 200 MW. Phase II aims for DEMO validation with a fusion power over 1 GW. Advanced H-mode physics, high magnetic fields up to 7 T, high frequency electron cyclotron resonance heating and lower hybrid current drive together with off-axis negative-ion neutral beam injection will be developed for achieving steady-state advanced operation. The recent detailed design, research and development (R&D) activities including integrated modeling of operation scenarios, high field magnet, material, tritium plant, remote handling and future plans are introduced in this paper.

  8. The State Regulation of Innovation Activity at the Present Stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qoqiauri Lamara G.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the necessity of state regulation in the field of development of innovations and technologies at the present stage. The main directions of the state innovation policies in developed countries of the world are studied and analyzed. Special attention is paid to the objectives of the national strategy for development of science and innovations and to searching the ways for fulfilling this strategy. Apart from these specific problems, the work considers the issue of the state regulation and support of further introduction of innovations and increase of the so called “entrepreneurial” role of the state.

  9. Energy Storage. Teachers Guide. Science Activities in Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Mary Lynn, Ed.

    Included in this science activities energy package for students in grades 4-10 are 12 activities related to energy storage. Each activity is outlined on the front and back of a single sheet and is introduced by a key question. Most of the activities can be completed in the classroom with materials readily available in any community. Among the…

  10. Present status of some technological activities supporting the MOLCARE project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torazza, A. [Ansaldo Ricerche S.r.l., Genova (Italy); Rocchini, G. [ENEL, Milano (Italy); Scagliotti, M. [CISE, Milano (Italy)

    1996-12-31

    The development of MCFC stack technology is carried out at Ansaldo Ricerche in the framework of the MOLCARE project, a cooperation with Spanish companies under a partial UE funding, while a specific research program concerning the physico-chemical characterization of materials is performed jointly by CISE and ENEL. The project includes the development, the construction and the testing of a full scale 100 kW prototype, the assessment of stack technology on subscale stacks, the mathematical modelling of the MCFC based plants and the basic researches. The aim of the basic researches, carried out on single cells, is to improve the effectiveness and durability of both the active and the hardware materials. The Ansaldo stack technology is based on external manifolding. The full scale 100 kW prototype will be integrated with the sensible heat reformer and other ancillary equipments according to the {open_quote}Compact Unit (CU){close_quotes} concept. These technical choices stress requirements for manifold gasket configuration. electrolyte migration control, {Delta}p management and porous component compaction.

  11. Present status of neutron activation analysis in environmental research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinnes, E.

    1984-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis, in spite of its many advantageous features, is less widely used than some alternative trace element techniques, and has been losing ground during the last decade. In the environmental field however there are still many problems which can be solved in a better way by the contribution of NAA. The combination of multi-element capability and high accuracy is of great importance in many studies related to atmospheric trace elements. Also in aquatic studies NAA still has a significant role to play. Applications to soils, sediments, and plant material have so far been limited, but there is a place for further development. The scope of NAA in environmental research may be extended by further use of pre-irradiation separations. NAA is particularly important in the certification of analytical reference materials in the environmental field. In future applications of NAA an appropriate combination with other analytical techniques will often be a requisite for success. The general future of NAA is dependent on the availability of nuclear reactors, radiochemical laboratoties and appropriate competence. 21 references

  12. Seismic activity in Ghana: past, present and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. E. Amponsah

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Though Ghana is far away from the major earthquake zones of the world, it is prone to earthquake disaster. Ghana has records of damaging earthquakes dating as far back as 1615. The last three major events occurred in 1862, 1906 and 1939. This paper presents the main historical and current instrumental recorded earthquakes of Ghana and the steps being taken to mitigate the negative effects of such disastrous occurrences in the country. The discussion is based on historical and current data obtained from the seismological observatories in Accra and Kukurantumi. Historical earthquakes of magnitude greater than 6.0 and current local tremors with magnitudes ranging from 1.0 to 4.8 on the Richter scale have been recorded since the establishment of the seismograph stations.

  13. Presentation on CSNI Activities and Introduction to the Seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amri, A.

    2008-01-01

    The standing committees of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (Nea) which consist of delegates from its Member countries, determine the Agency's programme of work. This paper explains how the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) and its groups of experts function. Programmes of work are carried out in the areas of operating experience and human factors, thermal-hydraulics and coolant system behaviour, reactor component integrity and ageing, confinement of accidental radioactive releases, severe accident management, risk assessment, nuclear fuel safety, nuclear fuel cycle safety, and safety margins. Some of these activities are open to countries who are not Members of the OECD. Selected programmes of work are described briefly. The objectives and the methods of work of the OECD and the Nea are outlined in the first part of the paper. Nea's nuclear reactor safety programme is a varied and evolving patch-work of studies, tasks and projects, interspersed with specialist meetings and workshops. It provides a efficient forum for delegates and experts of Member countries to discuss issues of mutual concern and to arrive at consensus views and conclusions. Because of the nature of its membership, its flexibility, and its methods of working, Nea is in a unique position to provide the international community, quickly and efficiently, with advanced views and complete up-to-date information on a broad range of nuclear safety and regulation issues. Nea's programme is performed in close collaboration with other international organisations, in particular the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Commission of the European Communities.

  14. Forecasting the peak of the present solar activity cycle 24

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, R. H.; Marzouk, B. A.

    2018-06-01

    Solar forecasting of the level of sun Activity is very important subject for all space programs. Most predictions are based on the physical conditions prevailing at or before the solar cycle minimum preceding the maximum in question. Our aim is to predict the maximum peak of cycle 24 using precursor techniques in particular those using spotless event, geomagnetic aamin. index and solar flux F10.7. Also prediction of exact date of the maximum (Tr) is taken in consideration. A study of variation over previous spotless event for cycles 7-23 and that for even cycles (8-22) are carried out for the prediction. Linear correlation between maximum of solar cycles (RM) and spotless event around the preceding minimum gives R24t = 88.4 with rise time Tr = 4.6 years. For the even cycles R24E = 77.9 with rise time Tr = 4.5 y's. Based on the average aamin. index for cycles (12-23), we estimate the expected amplitude for cycle 24 to be Raamin = 99.4 and 98.1 with time rise of Traamin = 4.04 & 4.3 years for both the total and even cycles in consecutive. The application of the data of solar flux F10.7 which cover only cycles (19-23) was taken in consideration and gives predicted maximum amplitude R24 10.7 = 126 with rise time Tr107 = 3.7 years, which are over estimation. Our result indicating to somewhat weaker of cycle 24 as compared to cycles 21-23.

  15. A Rare Presentation of a Morel-Lavallee Lesion of the Lower Leg Successfully Treated With Ultrasound-Guided Aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconi, Audrey; Crellin, Holly; Tagawa, Chelsea

    2017-07-21

    A Morel-Lavallee lesion (MLL) is a relatively rare condition that is caused by a traumatic shearing force. This force leads to a closed degloving injury of the subcutaneous tissue and fascia that creates a potential space that can fill with lymph, blood, and necrotic fat. The MLLs are traditionally seen after high impact trauma and typically located at the greater trochanter and pelvis, although recent reports have found them to be located at the knee, thigh, and lower leg. The MLLs typically present as swelling at the site of injury, which can be difficult to differentiate from several other diagnoses. This case report discusses an MLL in the lower extremity that occurred during a rugby game. A lack of familiarity with MLLs often leads to delayed diagnosis and treatment. The diagnosis was eventually made with an magnetic resonance imaging, and the lesion was successfully treated with ultrasound-guided aspiration and compression. The athlete was able to return to play without recurrence of the lesion.

  16. Be Active Your Way: A Guide for Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... couple of months. You might want to add biking on the weekends for variety. 4 Be Active ... activities (check off the ones you will try): ❑ Biking slowly ❑ Canoeing ❑ Dancing ❑ General gardening (raking, trimming shrubs) ❑ ...

  17. Improving Physical Activity Resource Guides to Bridge the Divide Between the Clinic and the Community

    OpenAIRE

    Seligman, Hilary K.; Grossman, Melanie D.; Bera, Nathalie; Stewart, Anita L.

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Primary care providers have limited time for physical activity counseling. They can optimize counseling time by referring patients to community resources for more comprehensive support. To facilitate referrals, resource guides (lists of community opportunities with descriptive information) are often created but seldom used. We elicited the detailed opinions of providers about how to make resource guides more useful for them. Methods We asked a convenience sample of health care pr...

  18. Field dose radiation determination by active learning with Gaussian Process for autonomous robot guiding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas Naiff, Danilo de; Silveira, Paulo R.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A.

    2017-01-01

    This article proposes an approach for determination of radiation dose pro le in a radiation-susceptible environment, aiming to guide an autonomous robot in acting on those environments, reducing the human exposure to dangerous amount of dose. The approach consists of an active learning method based on information entropy reduction, using log-normally warped Gaussian Process (GP) as surrogate model, resulting in non-linear online regression with sequential measurements. Experiments with simulated radiation dose fields of varying complexity were made, and results showed that the approach was effective in reconstruct the eld with high accuracy, through relatively few measurements. The technique was also shown some robustness in presence measurement noise, present in real measurements, by assuming Gaussian noise. (author)

  19. Field dose radiation determination by active learning with Gaussian Process for autonomous robot guiding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas Naiff, Danilo de; Silveira, Paulo R.; Pereira, Claudio M.N.A., E-mail: danilonai1992@poli.ufrj.br, E-mail: paulo@lmp.ufrj.br, E-mail: cmnap@ien.gov.br [Coordenacao de Pos-Graduacao e Pesquisa de Engenharia (PEN/COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    This article proposes an approach for determination of radiation dose pro le in a radiation-susceptible environment, aiming to guide an autonomous robot in acting on those environments, reducing the human exposure to dangerous amount of dose. The approach consists of an active learning method based on information entropy reduction, using log-normally warped Gaussian Process (GP) as surrogate model, resulting in non-linear online regression with sequential measurements. Experiments with simulated radiation dose fields of varying complexity were made, and results showed that the approach was effective in reconstruct the eld with high accuracy, through relatively few measurements. The technique was also shown some robustness in presence measurement noise, present in real measurements, by assuming Gaussian noise. (author)

  20. An Active System for Visually-Guided Reaching in 3D across Binocular Fixations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester Martinez-Martin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the importance of relative disparity between objects for accurate hand-eye coordination, this paper presents a biological approach inspired by the cortical neural architecture. So, the motor information is coded in egocentric coordinates obtained from the allocentric representation of the space (in terms of disparity generated from the egocentric representation of the visual information (image coordinates. In that way, the different aspects of the visuomotor coordination are integrated: an active vision system, composed of two vergent cameras; a module for the 2D binocular disparity estimation based on a local estimation of phase differences performed through a bank of Gabor filters; and a robotic actuator to perform the corresponding tasks (visually-guided reaching. The approach’s performance is evaluated through experiments on both simulated and real data.

  1. Space-Based Astronomy: An Educator Guide with Activities for Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Gregory L.

    2001-01-01

    If you go to the country, far from city lights, you can see about 3,000 stars on a clear night. If your eyes were bigger, you could see many more stars. With a pair of binoculars, an optical device that effectively enlarges the pupil of your eye by about 30 times, the number of stars you can see increases to the tens of thousands. With a medium-sized telescope with a light-collecting mirror 30 centimeters in diameter, you can see hundreds of thousands of stars. With a large observatory telescope, millions of stars become visible. This curriculum guide uses hands-on activities to help students and teachers understand the significance of space-based astronomy--astronomical observations made from outer space. It is not intended to serve as a curriculum. Instead, teachers should select activities from this guide that support and extend existing study. The guide contains few of the traditional activities found in many astronomy guides such as constellation studies, lunar phases, and planetary orbits. It tells, rather, the story of why it is important to observe celestial objects from outer space and how to study the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Teachers are encouraged to adapt these activities for the particular needs of their students. When selected activities from this guide are used in conjunction with traditional astronomy curricula, students benefit from a more complete experience.

  2. Recycle Alaska: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle. Activities Handbook, Teacher's Guide, and Student Worksheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau.

    Recycling is a very important aspect of conserving the environment for future generations. This guide addresses the topic of litter prevention for the Alaskan environment and contains 42 activities. Activity topics covered include Natural Cycles, Human Interruption of Natural Cycles, Reduce, Reuse, Recycle and Recycled Classroom. Grade level,…

  3. All "Trashed" Out: An Activity Guide to Solid Waste Management for Grades K-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illinois Univ., Springfield. Center for Solid Waste Management and Research, Springfield.

    This activity guide, specifically designed for Illinois classrooms but adaptable for other states, seeks to encourage primary students to make their own personal statement and responses to the environment through increased awareness of reducing, reusing, recycling, and composting of solid waste materials. The activities incorporate environmental…

  4. Biomass I. Science Activities in Energy [and] Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN.

    Designed for science students in fourth, fifth, and sixth grades, the activities in this unit illustrate principles and problems related to biomass as a form of energy. (The word biomass is used to describe all solid material of animal or vegetable origin from which energy may be extracted.) Twelve student activities using art, economics,…

  5. The Effectiveness of WhatsApp Mobile Learning Activities Guided by Activity Theory on Students' Knowledge Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barhoumi, Chokri

    2015-01-01

    This research paper explores the effectiveness of using mobile technologies to support a blended learning course titled Scientific Research Methods in Information Science. Specifically, it discusses the effects of WhatsApp mobile learning activities guided by activity theory on students' knowledge Management (KM). During the 2014 academic year,…

  6. The benefits of paired-agent imaging in molecular-guided surgery: an update on methods and applications (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tichauer, Kenneth M.

    2016-03-01

    One of the major complications with conventional imaging-agent-based molecular imaging, particularly for cancer imaging, is variability in agent delivery and nonspecific retention in biological tissue. Such factors can account to "swamp" the signal arising from specifically bound imaging agent, which is presumably indicative of the concentration of targeted biomolecule. In the 1950s, Pressman et al. proposed a method of accounting for these delivery and retention effects by normalizing targeted antibody retention to the retention of a co-administered "untargeted"/control imaging agent [1]. Our group resurrected the approach within the last 5 years, finding ways to utilize this so-called "paired-agent" imaging approach to directly quantify biomolecule concentration in tissue (in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo) [2]. These novel paired-agent imaging approaches capable of quantifying biomolecule concentration provide enormous potential for being adapted to and optimizing molecular-guided surgery, which has a principle goal of identifying distinct biological tissues (tumor, nerves, etc…) based on their distinct molecular environment. This presentation will cover the principles and nuances of paired-agent imaging, as well as the current status of the field and future applications. [1] D. Pressman, E. D. Day, and M. Blau, "The use of paired labeling in the determination of tumor-localizing antibodies," Cancer Res, 17(9), 845-50 (1957). [2] K. M. Tichauer, Y. Wang, B. W. Pogue et al., "Quantitative in vivo cell-surface receptor imaging in oncology: kinetic modeling and paired-agent principles from nuclear medicine and optical imaging," Phys Med Biol, 60(14), R239-69 (2015).

  7. Prussian blue nanocubes: multi-functional nanoparticles for multimodal imaging and image-guided therapy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jason R.; Dumani, Diego S.; Kubelick, Kelsey P.; Luci, Jeffrey; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2017-03-01

    Imaging modalities utilize contrast agents to improve morphological visualization and to assess functional and molecular/cellular information. Here we present a new type of nanometer scale multi-functional particle that can be used for multi-modal imaging and therapeutic applications. Specifically, we synthesized monodisperse 20 nm Prussian Blue Nanocubes (PBNCs) with desired optical absorption in the near-infrared region and superparamagnetic properties. PBNCs showed excellent contrast in photoacoustic (700 nm wavelength) and MR (3T) imaging. Furthermore, photostability was assessed by exposing the PBNCs to nearly 1,000 laser pulses (5 ns pulse width) with up to 30 mJ/cm2 laser fluences. The PBNCs exhibited insignificant changes in photoacoustic signal, demonstrating enhanced robustness compared to the commonly used gold nanorods (substantial photodegradation with fluences greater than 5 mJ/cm2). Furthermore, the PBNCs exhibited superparamagnetism with a magnetic saturation of 105 emu/g, a 5x improvement over superparamagnetic iron-oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles. PBNCs exhibited enhanced T2 contrast measured using 3T clinical MRI. Because of the excellent optical absorption and magnetism, PBNCs have potential uses in other imaging modalities including optical tomography, microscopy, magneto-motive OCT/ultrasound, etc. In addition to multi-modal imaging, the PBNCs are multi-functional and, for example, can be used to enhance magnetic delivery and as therapeutic agents. Our initial studies show that stem cells can be labeled with PBNCs to perform image-guided magnetic delivery. Overall, PBNCs can act as imaging/therapeutic agents in diverse applications including cancer, cardiovascular disease, ophthalmology, and tissue engineering. Furthermore, PBNCs are based on FDA approved Prussian Blue thus potentially easing clinical translation of PBNCs.

  8. Parents and Schools: Success through Partnership. A Presentation Guide for School Administration & Teachers = Arriba los padres y las escuelas: una asociacion critica. Guia para padres hispanos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Augustine, Jr.; Vasquez, Melba J. T.

    These two documents pertain to the "Parents and Schools: Success through Partnership" program. The presentation guide for school administrators and Teachers" is intended to help school personnel present the program and its associated video, which addresses common culturally-based causes of misunderstandings between Hispanic American parents and…

  9. RNA-Guided Activation of Pluripotency Genes in Human Fibroblasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiong, Kai; Zhou, Yan; Blichfeld, Kristian Aabo

    2017-01-01

    -associated protein 9 (dCas9)-VP64 (CRISPRa) alone, or a combination of dCas9-VP64 and MS2-P65-HSF1 [synergistic activation mediator (SAM) system] mediated activation of five pluripotency genes: KLF4 (K), LIN28 (L), MYC (M), OCT4 (O), and SOX2 (S) in human cells (HEK293T, HeLa, HepG2, and primary fibroblasts...... could be obtained from these SAM fibroblasts. In conclusion, our study showed that CRISPR/Cas9-based ATFs are potent to activate and maintain transcription of endogenous human pluripotent genes. However, future improvements of the system are still required to improve activation efficiency and cellular...

  10. activity guided isolation of chemical constituents from the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acer truncatum Bunge by high-speed counter-current chromatography. J. Chromatogr. A. 2005, 1070, 211–214. 11. Morton, J.J.; Malone, M.H. Evaluation of vulneray activity by an open wound procedure in rats. Arch.Int. Pharmacodyn. Ther. 1972, 196, 117–126. 12. Dash, G.K.; Murthy, P.N. Studies on wound healing activity ...

  11. Rationale and development of image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy post-prostatectomy: the present standard of care?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murray JR

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Julia R Murray,1,2 Helen A McNair,2 David P Dearnaley1,2 1Academic Urology Unit, Institute of Cancer Research, London, 2Department of Radiotherapy, The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Sutton, UK Abstract: The indications for post-prostatectomy radiotherapy have evolved over the last decade, although the optimal timing, dose, and target volume remain to be well defined. The target volume is susceptible to anatomical variations with its borders interfacing with the rectum and bladder. Image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy has become the gold standard for radical prostate radiotherapy. Here we review the current evidence for image-guided techniques with intensity-modulated radiotherapy to the prostate bed and describe current strategies to reduce or account for interfraction and intrafraction motion. Keywords: radiotherapy, prostate cancer, post-prostatectomy, image-guided radiation therapy

  12. MiDAS Field Guide – a Comprehensive Online Source of Information About the Microbes of Activated Sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nierychlo, Marta; McIlroy, Simon Jon; Saunders, Aaron Marc

    activated sludge wastewater treatment systems, linking their identity with available information on their function and distribution. The guide includes the approx. 100 abundant genera that are present in most treatment plants (based on a survey of 25 full-scale Danish wastewater treatment plants...... are provided. The MiDAS Field Guide is a continuously developing resource where all working in the field are invited to contribute....... that would be otherwise excluded from analyses. The MiDAS database importantly provides a common taxonomy for the field that gives a solid foundation for the study of microbial ecology of the activated sludge process and related wastewater treatment processes, such as biofilms and granular sludge. Each genus...

  13. Animals Alive! An Ecological Guide to Animal Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holley, Dennis

    Animals Alive! is designed to help teachers develop an inquiry-oriented program for studying the animal kingdom in which, whenever possible, live animals are collected locally, studied, observed, and then released completely unharmed back into their natural habitats. By careful selection and modification of the chapter questions, activities, and…

  14. Activities for Teaching Positive Psychology: A Guide for Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froh, Jeffrey J., Ed.; Parks, Acacia C., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    Positive psychology is a rapidly expanding area of study that is of great interest to students at the graduate, undergraduate, and high school levels. But the field is so broad that teachers who want to cover all the bases when designing a positive psychology course may have difficulty locating and selecting materials. "Activities for Teaching…

  15. Bioassay Guided Isolation of Active Compounds from Alchemilla barbatiflora Juz.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülin Renda

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aerial parts of Alchemilla L. species (Rosaceae are used internally as diuretic, laxative, tonic and externally for wound healing in Turkish folk medicine. Antioxidant effects of the extracts, fractions and isolated compounds from the aerial parts of A. barbatiflora Juz. were investigated with following methods: 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH, and superoxide radical scavenging (SOD, phosphomolibdenum-reducing antioxidant power (PRAP, ferric-reducing antioxidant power (FRAP assays. In addition, tyrosinase, α-glucosidase and acetylcholinesterase inhibition activities of samples were analyzed. The methanol extract from the aerial parts of plant was consecutively fractionated into four subextracts; n-hexane, chloroform, and remaining water extracts. Further studies were carried out on the most active water subextract and the fractions obtained from water subextract with column chromatography. Phytochemical studies on active fractions of the water subextract led to the isolation of seven metabolites including catechin (1 and a catechin dimer; procyanidin B3 (2, a flavonol glucuronide; quercetin-3-O- β-D-glucuronic acid (miquelianin (3 with flavonoid glycosides; quercetin-3-O- β-D-galactoside (hyperoside (4, quercetin-3-O- β-D-arabinoside (guaiaverin (5, kaempferol-3-O-β-D-xylopyranoside (6 and kaempferol-3-O -(6″-coumaroyl-β-D-glycoside (tiliroside (7. Their structures were elucidated by spectral techniques (1D and 2D NMR. The experimental data verified that procyanidin B3 displayed remarkable enzyme inhibitory activity among the whole isolated compounds.

  16. A Guide to Performance Contracting. A Presentation and Discussion of the Multiple Considerations Regarding Contracted Services in Local Education Agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, John W.; Kitchak, Karen H.

    This report provides a framework for evaluating the use of performance contracts. It serves as a working guide for those who are considering or are committed to performance contracts with public or private organizations. The topics cover (1) the theoretical basis and rationale of performance contracting, (2) the procurement model and the request…

  17. Trypanocidal Activity of Smallanthus sonchifolius: Identification of Active Sesquiterpene Lactones by Bioassay-Guided Fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. M. Frank

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to find novel plant-derived biologically active compounds against Trypanosoma cruzi, we isolated, from the organic extract of Smallanthus sonchifolius, the sesquiterpene lactones enhydrin (1, uvedalin (2, and polymatin B (3 by bioassay-guided fractionation technique. These compounds showed a significant trypanocidal activity against the epimastigote forms of the parasite with IC50 values of 0.84 μM (1, 1.09 μM (2, and 4.90 μM (3. After a 24 h treatment with 10 μg/mL of enhydrin or uvedalin, parasites were not able to recover their replication rate. Compounds 1 and 2 showed IC50 values of 33.4 μM and 25.0 μM against T. cruzi trypomastigotes, while polymatin B was not active. When the three compounds were tested against the intracellular forms of T. cruzi, they were able to inhibit the amastigote replication with IC50 of 5.17 μM, 3.34 μM, and 9.02 μM for 1, 2, and 3, respectively. The cytotoxicity of the compounds was evaluated in Vero cells obtaining CC50 values of 46.5 μM (1, 46.8 μM (2, and 147.3 μM (3 and the selectivity index calculated. According to these results, enhydrin and uvedalin might have potentials as agents against Chagas disease and could serve as lead molecules to develop new drugs.

  18. Application of the management system for facilities and activities. Safety guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    This Safety Guide supports the Safety Requirements publication on The Management System for Facilities and Activities. It provides generic guidance to aid in establishing, implementing, assessing and continually improving a management system that complies with the requirements established. In addition to this Safety Guide, there are a number of Safety Guides for specific technical areas. Together these provide all the guidance necessary for implementing these requirements. This publication supersedes Safety Series No. 50-SG-Q1-Q7 (1996). The guidance provided here may be used by organizations in the following ways: - To assist in the development of the management systems of organizations directly responsible for operating facilities and activities and providing services for: Nuclear facilities; Activities using sources of ionizing radiation; Radioactive waste management; The transport of radioactive material; Radiation protection activities; Any other practices or circumstances in which people may be exposed to radiation from naturally occurring or artificial sources; The regulation of such facilities and activities; - To assist in the development of the management systems of the relevant regulatory bodies; - By the operator, to specify to a supplier, via contractual documentation, any guidance of this Safety Guide that should be included in the supplier's management system for the supply and delivery of products

  19. PET/CT-guided biopsies of metabolically active bone lesions: applications and clinical impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klaeser, Bernd; Wartenberg, Jan; Weitzel, Thilo; Krause, Thomas [Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Wiskirchen, Jakub [Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); University Hospital Tuebingen, Department of Radiology, Neuroradiology, and Nuclear Medicine, Tuebingen (Germany); Schmid, Ralph A. [Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Department of Thoracic Surgery, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland); Mueller, Michel D. [Bern University Hospital and University of Bern, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Inselspital, Bern (Switzerland)

    2010-11-15

    In a minority of cases a definite diagnosis and stage grouping in cancer patients is not possible based on the imaging information of PET/CT. We report our experience with percutaneous PET/CT-guided bone biopsies to histologically verify the aetiology of hypermetabolic bone lesions. We retrospectively reviewed the data of 20 consecutive patients who underwent multimodal image-guided bone biopsies using a dedicated PET/CT system in a step-by-step technique. Technical and clinical success rates of PET/CT-guided biopsies were evaluated. Questionnaires were sent to the referring physicians to assess the impact of biopsies on patient management and to check the clinical need for PET/CT-guided biopsies. Clinical indications for biopsy were to histologically verify the aetiology of metabolically active bone lesions without a morphological correlate confirming the suspicion of metastases in 15 patients, to determine the origin of suspected metastases in 3 patients and to evaluate the appropriateness of targeted therapy options in 2 patients. Biopsies were technically successful in all patients. In 19 of 20 patients a definite histological diagnosis was possible. No complications or adverse effects occurred. The result of PET/CT-guided bone biopsies determined a change of the planned treatment in overall 56% of patients, with intramodality changes, e.g. chemotherapy with palliative instead of curative intent, and intermodality changes, e.g. systemic therapy instead of surgery, in 22 and 50%, respectively. PET/CT-guided bone biopsies are a promising alternative to conventional techniques to make metabolically active bone lesions - especially without a distinctive morphological correlate - accessible for histological verification. PET/CT-guided biopsies had a major clinical impact in patients who otherwise cannot be reliably stage grouped at the time of treatment decisions. (orig.)

  20. Guide to the assessment of physical activity: Clinical and research applications: a scientific statement from the American Heart Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strath, Scott J; Kaminsky, Leonard A; Ainsworth, Barbara E; Ekelund, Ulf; Freedson, Patty S; Gary, Rebecca A; Richardson, Caroline R; Smith, Derek T; Swartz, Ann M

    2013-11-12

    The deleterious health consequences of physical inactivity are vast, and they are of paramount clinical and research importance. Risk identification, benchmarks, efficacy, and evaluation of physical activity behavior change initiatives for clinicians and researchers all require a clear understanding of how to assess physical activity. In the present report, we have provided a clear rationale for the importance of assessing physical activity levels, and we have documented key concepts in understanding the different dimensions, domains, and terminology associated with physical activity measurement. The assessment methods presented allow for a greater understanding of the vast number of options available to clinicians and researchers when trying to assess physical activity levels in their patients or participants. The primary outcome desired is the main determining factor in the choice of physical activity assessment method. In combination with issues of feasibility/practicality, the availability of resources, and administration considerations, the desired outcome guides the choice of an appropriate assessment tool. The decision matrix, along with the accompanying tables, provides a mechanism for this selection that takes all of these factors into account. Clearly, the assessment method adopted and implemented will vary depending on circumstances, because there is no single best instrument appropriate for every situation. In summary, physical activity assessment should be considered a vital health measure that is tracked regularly over time. All other major modifiable cardiovascular risk factors (diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, and smoking) are assessed routinely. Physical activity status should also be assessed regularly. Multiple physical activity assessment methods provide reasonably accurate outcome measures, with choices dependent on setting-specific resources and constraints. The present scientific statement provides a guide to

  1. IEEE guide to the collection and presentation of electrical, electronic, and sensing component reliability data for nuclear-power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Guidelines are given for the purpose of establishing standardization methods for collecting and presenting reliability data for quantitative systematic analysis in nuclear power plants. This guide may be also used for reliability analysis in other segments of power industry. The data considered include failure rates, failure modes and environmental impact on component behavior

  2. Home Economics--Food Service Catering. Kit No. 54. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Ann

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on food service, catering are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of home economics. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home…

  3. Agriculture--Agricultural Mechanics, Electric Motors. Kit No. 56. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomar, William

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on agricultural mechanics (electric motors) are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of agriculture. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings:…

  4. T & I--Machine Shop. Kit No. 83. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jim

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on the machine shop are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of trade and industry. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home…

  5. Assisting in Radiology/Imaging. Instructor's Guide, Student's Manual, and Student Learning Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fair, Helena J.

    The instructor's guide, the first of three documents in this package, is designed for a course to help students who are investigating the activities within a radiology department or considering any of the imaging technologies as a career. The material is designed to relate training experience to information studied in the classroom. This…

  6. Suited for Spacewalking: A Teacher's Guide with Activities for Technology Education, Mathematics, and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Gregory L.; George, Jane A. (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    A Teacher's Guide with Activities for Technology Education, Mathematics, and Science National Aeronautics and Space Administration Office of Human Resources and Education Education Division Washington, DC Education Working Group NASA Johnson Space Center Houston, Texas This publication is in the Public Domain and is not protected by copyright. Permission is not required for duplication.

  7. Community Living Skills Guide: Additional Activities for Nutrition, Cooking, Homemaking, and Family Living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickovich, Marti; Kreps, Alice Roelofs

    These activities are intended to supplement materials for three courses available in the Community Living Skills Guide for the College for Living series: Cooking/Food Preparation (CE 024 475), Homemaking and Family Living (CE 024 477), and Nutrition (CE 024 484). These courses for developmentally disabled adults are intended to supplement…

  8. Rockets: An Educator's Guide with Activities in Science, Mathematics, and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This educational guide discusses rockets and includes activities in science, mathematics, and technology. It begins with background information on the history of rocketry, scientific principles, and practical rocketry. The sections on scientific principles and practical rocketry focus on Sir Isaac Newton's Three Laws of Motion. These laws explain…

  9. Curriculum development for the workplace using Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs): AMEE Guide No. 99.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Cate, TJ; Chen, H.C.; Hoff, RG; Peters, H.; Bok, H.; van der Schaaf, M.F.

    2015-01-01

    This Guide was written to support educators interested in building a competency-based workplace curriculum. It aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the literature on Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs), supplemented with suggestions for practical application to curriculum construction,

  10. Curriculum development for the workplace using Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs) : AMEE Guide No. 99

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Cate, Th.J.; Chen, Huiju Carrie; Hoff, Reinier; Bok, Harold|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323072356; Peters, Harm; van der Schaaf, Marieke|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073361917

    2015-01-01

    This Guide was written to support educators interested in building a competency-based workplace curriculum. It aims to provide an up-to-date overview of the literature on Entrustable Professional Activities (EPAs), supplemented with suggestions for practical application to curriculum construction,

  11. Office Occupations--Accounting, Payroll. Kit No. 64. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conner, Connie

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on payroll management are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of office occupations (accounting). (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture,…

  12. Open-Ended versus Guided Laboratory Activities: Impact on Students' Beliefs about Experimental Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Bethany R.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Improving students' understanding of the nature of experimental physics is often an explicit or implicit goal of undergraduate laboratory physics courses. However, lab activities in traditional lab courses are typically characterized by highly structured, guided labs that often do not require or encourage students to engage authentically in the…

  13. Actively Teaching Research Methods with a Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, Mary H.

    2017-01-01

    Active learning approaches have shown to improve student learning outcomes and improve the experience of students in the classroom. This article compares a Process Oriented Guided Inquiry Learning style approach to a more traditional teaching method in an undergraduate research methods course. Moving from a more traditional learning environment to…

  14. Rare & Endangered Species: Understanding Our Disappearing Plants and Animals. Activities Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Gas Association, Arlington, VA. Educational Services.

    About 464 plants and animals found in the United States and its territories are listed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as threatened or endangered. Another 3900 are candidates for protection. The activities in this guide are designed to help teachers and students understand the issue of endangered species. It includes ideas for several…

  15. The Dynamic Density Bottle: A Make-and-Take, Guided Inquiry Activity on Density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntzleman, Thomas S.

    2015-01-01

    An activity is described wherein students observe dynamic floating and sinking behavior of plastic pieces in various liquids. The liquids and solids are all contained within a plastic bottle; the entire assembly is called a "density bottle". After completing a series of experiments that guides students to think about the relative…

  16. T & I--Cosmetology, Skin Care. Kit No. 77. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Carolyn

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on skin care are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of trade and industry (cosmetology). (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home…

  17. Guided goal setting: effectiveness in a dietary and physical activity intervention with low-income adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shilts, Mical Kay; Horowitz, Marcel; Townsend, Marilyn S

    2009-01-01

    Determining the effectiveness of the guided goal setting strategy on changing adolescents' dietary and physical activity self-efficacy and behaviors. Adolescents were individually assigned to treatment (intervention with guided goal setting) or control conditions (intervention without guided goal setting) with data collected before and after the education intervention. Urban middle school in a low-income community in Central California. Ethnically diverse middle school students (n = 94, 55% male) who were participants of a USDA nutrition education program. Driven by the Social Cognitive Theory, the intervention targeted dietary and physical activity behaviors of adolescents. Dietary self-efficacy and behavior; physical activity self-efficacy and behavior; goal effort and spontaneous goal setting. ANCOVA and path analysis were performed using the full sample and a sub-sample informed by Locke's recommendations (accounting for goal effort and spontaneous goal setting). No significant differences were found between groups using the full sample. Using the sub-sample, greater gains in dietary behavior (p goal effort and spontaneous goal setting, this study provides some evidence that the use of guided goal setting with adolescents may be a viable strategy to promote dietary and physical activity behavior change.

  18. Social Participation, a guide for counsellors in social activation, reintegration in the labour market and active assistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Henk Spies; drs. Johny Vanschoren

    2005-01-01

    This book contains a practical description of a successful method to guide people that have been standing in the sideline for long periods of time, to them a fitting form of social participation. This can be done through paid or voluntary work, activities aimed at physical or psychological and

  19. Suited for spacewalking: Teacher's guide with activities for physical and life science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Gregory L.; Manning, Cheryl A.; Rosenberg, Carla B.

    1994-01-01

    Space walking has captured the imagination of generations of children and adults since science-fiction authors first placed their characters on the Moon. This publication is an activity guide for teachers interested in using the intense interest many children have in space exploration as a launching point for exciting hands-on learning opportunities. The guide begins with brief discussions of the space environment, the history of space walking, the Space Shuttle spacesuit, and working in space. These are followed by a series of activities that enable children to explore the space environment as well as the science and technology behind the functions of spacesuits. The activities are not rated for specific grade levels because they can be adapted for students of many ages. The chart on curriculum application at the back of the book is designed to help teachers incorporate activities into various subject areas.

  20. MiDAS: the field guide to the microbes of activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlroy, Simon Jon; Saunders, Aaron Marc; Albertsen, Mads; Nierychlo, Marta; McIlroy, Bianca; Hansen, Aviaja Anna; Karst, Søren Michael; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2015-01-01

    The Microbial Database for Activated Sludge (MiDAS) field guide is a freely available online resource linking the identity of abundant and process critical microorganisms in activated sludge wastewater treatment systems to available data related to their functional importance. Phenotypic properties of some of these genera are described, but most are known only from sequence data. The MiDAS taxonomy is a manual curation of the SILVA taxonomy that proposes a name for all genus-level taxa observed to be abundant by large-scale 16 S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing of full-scale activated sludge communities. The taxonomy can be used to classify unknown sequences, and the online MiDAS field guide links the identity to the available information about their morphology, diversity, physiology and distribution. The use of a common taxonomy across the field will provide a solid foundation for the study of microbial ecology of the activated sludge process and related treatment processes. The online MiDAS field guide is a collaborative workspace intended to facilitate a better understanding of the ecology of activated sludge and related treatment processes--knowledge that will be an invaluable resource for the optimal design and operation of these systems. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  1. Evaluation of the in vitro Anti-inflammatory Activity of Nerium oleander L. Flower Extracts and Activity-Guided Isolation of the Active Constituents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İrem Atay Balkan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro anti-inflammatory activity profile of the Nerium oleander flower EtOH extract/its subextracts (n-hexane, CH 2Cl 2, EtOAc, remaining H 2O were evaluated on LPS induced Raw 264.7 macrophages. The effects of the crude EtOH extract and its subextracts on nitric oxide (NO production and cell viability were determined. The most active subextract was determined to be the EtOAc subextract without exerting any toxicity towards Raw 264.7 macrophages. This subextract significantly inhibited NO production of Raw 264.7 macrophages after LPS induction (62.56±1.91% at 200 µg/mL concentration. The levels of iNOS were reduced up to 67.50%. Moreover, this subextract slightly reduced the phosphorylation levels of MAP kinases (p-ERK, p-JNK, p-38. The highest inhibition was observed for ERK phosphorylation, which was inhibited by 20.53% at 200 µg/mL concentration. Through activity-guided fractionation procedures, kaempferol, kaempferol 3-O-β-glucopyranoside and chlorogenic acid were isolated as the main active components. The structures of the active compounds were determined by 2D-NMR techniques and HRMS analysis. All compounds significantly inhibited NO productions. Results of the present study supported the traditional use of N. oleander flowers to treat inflammatory complaints.

  2. Mechanism-Guided Discovery of an Esterase Scaffold with Promiscuous Amidase Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Kürten

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The discovery and generation of biocatalysts with extended catalytic versatilities are of immense relevance in both chemistry and biotechnology. An enhanced atomistic understanding of enzyme promiscuity, a mechanism through which living systems acquire novel catalytic functions and specificities by evolution, would thus be of central interest. Using esterase-catalyzed amide bond hydrolysis as a model system, we pursued a simplistic in silico discovery program aiming for the identification of enzymes with an internal backbone hydrogen bond acceptor that could act as a reaction specificity shifter in hydrolytic enzymes. Focusing on stabilization of the rate limiting transition state of nitrogen inversion, our mechanism-guided approach predicted that the acyl hydrolase patatin of the α/β phospholipase fold would display reaction promiscuity. Experimental analysis confirmed previously unknown high amidase over esterase activity displayed by the first described esterase machinery with a protein backbone hydrogen bond acceptor to the reacting NH-group of amides. The present work highlights the importance of a fundamental understanding of enzymatic reactions and its potential for predicting enzyme scaffolds displaying alternative chemistries amenable to further evolution by enzyme engineering.

  3. The Explicit Instruction of Reading Strategies: Directed Reading Thinking Activity vs. Guided Reading Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Mehdi Yazdani

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Investigating the efficiencies and deficiencies of reading strategies is one of the noticeable issues in the related theory and research in reading comprehension instruction. This study was to examine the impact of Directed Reading Thinking Activity (DRTA and Guided Reading (GR on reading comprehension. Sixty three Iranian students of grade one in Shahed high school in the city of Bojnourd took part in the study. They were assigned in three groups, one control and two experimental groups. The instruction lasted for ten weeks. This study utilized a pretest posttest control group in quantitative quasi- experimental design. The same reading comprehension test was administered as pre-test and post-test. The results were twofold: First, the instruction of learning strategies could foster reading comprehension skill. Second, while the explicit instruction of both strategies could improve the students' reading comprehension skill, Directed Reading Thinking Activity had a more significant positive effect than Guided Reading.

  4. 77 FR 70846 - Regulatory Guide 1.182, “Assessing and Managing Risk Before Maintenance Activities at Nuclear...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-27

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2012-0285] Regulatory Guide 1.182, ``Assessing and Managing Risk Before Maintenance Activities at Nuclear Power Plants'' AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... withdrawing Regulatory Guide (RG)1.182, Revision (Rev.) 0, ``Assessing and Managing Risk Before Maintenance...

  5. Ultrasound-guided photoacoustic imaging of lymph nodes with biocompatible gold nanoparticles as a novel contrast agent (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, In-Cheol; Dumani, Diego; Emelianov, Stanislav Y.

    2017-02-01

    A key step in staging cancer is the diagnosis of metastasis that spreads through lymphatic system. For this reason, researchers develop various methods of sentinel lymph node mapping that often use a radioactive tracer. This study introduces a safe, cost-effective, high-resolution, high-sensitivity, and real-time method of visualizing the sentinel lymph node: ultrasound-guided photoacoustic (US/PA) imaging augmented by a contrast agent. In this work, we use clearable gold nanoparticles covered by a biocompatible polymer (glycol chitosan) to enhance cellular uptake by macrophages abundant in lymph nodes. We incubate macrophages with glycol-chitosan-coated gold nanoparticles (0.05 mg Au/ml), and then fix them with paraformaldehyde solution for an analysis of in vitro dark-field microscopy and cell phantom. The analysis shows enhanced cellular uptake of nanoparticles by macrophages and strong photoacoustic signal from labeled cells in tissue-mimicking cell phantoms consisting gelatin solution (6 %) with silica gel (25 μm, 0.3%) and fixed macrophages (13 X 105 cells). The in-vivo US/PA imaging of cervical lymph nodes in healthy mice (nu/nu, female, 5 weeks) indicates a strong photoacoustic signal from a lymph node 10 minutes post-injection (2.5 mg Au/ml, 80 μl). The signal intensity and the nanoparticle-labeled volume of tissue within the lymph node continues to increase until 4 h post-injection. Histological analysis further confirms the accumulation of gold nanoparticles within the lymph nodes. This work suggests the feasibility of molecular/cellular US/PA imaging with biocompatible gold nanoparticles as a photoacoustic contrast agent in the diagnosis of lymph-node-related diseases.

  6. Sonography-guided hydrostatic reduction of ileocolic intussusception in children: analysis of failure and success in consecutive patients presenting timely to the hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, Jan; Kahl, Fritz

    2015-03-01

    In children with ileocolic intussusception sonography is increasingly being used for diagnosis, whereas fluoroscopy is frequently used for guiding non-invasive reduction. This study assessed the success rate of radiation-free sonography-guided hydrostatic reduction in children with ileocolic intussusception, using novel well-defined success rate indices. All children were evaluated who presented from 2005 to 2013 to the local university hospital with ileocolic intussusception. The patients were treated with sonography-guided hydrostatic reduction unless primary surgery was clinically indicated. The according success rate was determined by indices of Bekdash et al. They represent the ratio of persistently successful non-surgical reductions versus four different denominators, depending on including/excluding cases with primary surgery and including/excluding cases requiring bowel resection/intervention. Fifty-six consecutive patients were included (age, 3 months to 7.8 years). About 80% of the patients presented until 24 h and 20% until 48 h after the onset of symptoms. Seven patients underwent primary surgery, with bowel resection required in three cases. Hydrostatic reduction was attempted in 49 patients, being permanently successful in 41 cases (selective reduction rate 41/49 = 83.7%; crude reduction rate 41/56 = 73.2%). The remaining eight patients underwent secondary surgery, with just two patients not requiring surgical bowel resection/intervention (corrected selective reduction rate 41/43 = 95.3%). The composite reduction rate was 87.2% (successful/feasible reductions, 41/47). Radiation-free sonography-guided hydrostatic reduction has a good success rate in children with ileocolic intussusception. It may be particularly valuable in centers that are already experienced with using sonography for the diagnosis.

  7. Neural Activations of Guided Imagery and Music in Negative Emotional Processing: A Functional MRI Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Eun; Han, Yeji; Park, HyunWook

    2016-01-01

    The Bonny Method of Guided Imagery and Music uses music and imagery to access and explore personal emotions associated with episodic memories. Understanding the neural mechanism of guided imagery and music (GIM) as combined stimuli for emotional processing informs clinical application. We performed functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to demonstrate neural mechanisms of GIM for negative emotional processing when personal episodic memory is recalled and re-experienced through GIM processes. Twenty-four healthy volunteers participated in the study, which used classical music and verbal instruction stimuli to evoke negative emotions. To analyze the neural mechanism, activated regions associated with negative emotional and episodic memory processing were extracted by conducting volume analyses for the contrast between GIM and guided imagery (GI) or music (M). The GIM stimuli showed increased activation over the M-only stimuli in five neural regions associated with negative emotional and episodic memory processing, including the left amygdala, left anterior cingulate gyrus, left insula, bilateral culmen, and left angular gyrus (AG). Compared with GI alone, GIM showed increased activation in three regions associated with episodic memory processing in the emotional context, including the right posterior cingulate gyrus, bilateral parahippocampal gyrus, and AG. No neural regions related to negative emotional and episodic memory processing showed more activation for M and GI than for GIM. As a combined multimodal stimulus, GIM may increase neural activations related to negative emotions and episodic memory processing. Findings suggest a neural basis for GIM with personal episodic memories affecting cortical and subcortical structures and functions. © the American Music Therapy Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Stepwise-activable multifunctional peptide-guided prodrug micelles for cancerous cells intracellular drug release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Jing, E-mail: zhangjing@zjut.edu.cn; Li, Mengfei [Zhejiang University of Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering (China); Yuan, Zhefan [Zhejiang University, Key Laboratory of Biomass Chemical Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering (China); Wu, Dan; Chen, Jia-da; Feng, Jie, E-mail: fengjie@zjut.edu.cn [Zhejiang University of Technology, College of Materials Science and Engineering (China)

    2016-10-15

    A novel type of stepwise-activable multifunctional peptide-guided prodrug micelles (MPPM) was fabricated for cancerous cells intracellular drug release. Deca-lysine sequence (K{sub 10}), a type of cell-penetrating peptide, was synthesized and terminated with azido-glycine. Then a new kind of molecule, alkyne modified doxorubicin (DOX) connecting through disulfide bond (DOX-SS-alkyne), was synthesized. After coupling via Cu-catalyzed azide–alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) click chemistry reaction, reduction-sensitive peptide-guided prodrug was obtained. Due to the amphiphilic property of the prodrug, it can assemble to form micelles. To prevent the nanocarriers from unspecific cellular uptake, the prodrug micelles were subsequently modified with 2,3-dimethyl maleic anhydride to obtain MPPM with a negatively charged outer shell. In vitro studies showed that MPPM could be shielded from cells under psychological environment. However, when arriving at mild acidic tumor site, the cell-penetrating capacity of MPPM would be activated by charge reversal of the micelles via hydrolysis of acid-labile β-carboxylic amides and regeneration of K{sub 10}, which enabled efficient internalization of MPPM by tumor cells as well as following glutathione- and protease-induced drug release inside the cancerous cells. Furthermore, since the guide peptide sequences can be accurately designed and synthesized, it can be easily changed for various functions, such as targeting peptide, apoptotic peptide, even aptamers, only need to be terminated with azido-glycine. This method can be used as a template for reduction-sensitive peptide-guided prodrug for cancer therapy.Graphical abstractA novel type of stepwise-activable multifunctional peptide-guided prodrug micelles (MPPM) was fabricated for selective drug delivery in cancerous cells. MPPM could be shielded from cells under psychological environment. However, when arriving at mild acidic tumor site, the cell-penetrating capacity of MPPM would

  9. Physical activity guides for Canadians: messaging strategies, realistic expectations for change, and evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brawley, Lawrence R; Latimer, Amy E

    2007-01-01

    Physical activity guidelines offer evidence-based behavioural benchmarks that relate to reduced risk of morbidity and mortality if people adhere to them. Essentially, the guidelines tell people what to do, but not why and how they should do it. Thus, to motivate adherence, messages that translate guidelines should convey not only how much physical activity one should attempt and why it is recommended, but also how to achieve such a recommendation. Canada's physical activity guides exemplify how guidelines can be translated. This paper (i) provides a brief overview of the challenges encountered in creating the existing guides and (ii) highlights important practical issues and empirical evidence that should be considered in the future when translating guidelines into messages and disseminating these messages. We draw on the successes of past efforts to translate the goals of physical activity guidelines and on recent literature on messages and media campaigns to make recommendations. Information to motivate people to move toward the goals in physical activity guidelines should be translated into a set of messages that are informative, thought provoking, and persuasive. These messages should be disseminated to the public via a multi-phase social-marketing campaign that is carefully planned and thoroughly evaluated.

  10. Open-ended versus guided laboratory activities:Impact on students' beliefs about experimental physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Bethany R.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2016-12-01

    Improving students' understanding of the nature of experimental physics is often an explicit or implicit goal of undergraduate laboratory physics courses. However, lab activities in traditional lab courses are typically characterized by highly structured, guided labs that often do not require or encourage students to engage authentically in the process of experimental physics. Alternatively, open-ended laboratory activities can provide a more authentic learning environment by, for example, allowing students to exercise greater autonomy in what and how physical phenomena are investigated. Engaging in authentic practices may be a critical part of improving students' beliefs around the nature of experimental physics. Here, we investigate the impact of open-ended activities in undergraduate lab courses on students' epistemologies and expectations about the nature of experimental physics, as well as their confidence and affect, as measured by the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics (E-CLASS). Using a national data set of student responses to the E-CLASS, we find that the inclusion of some open-ended lab activities in a lab course correlates with more expertlike postinstruction responses relative to courses that include only traditional guided lab activities. This finding holds when examining postinstruction E-CLASS scores while controlling for the variance associated with preinstruction scores, course level, student major, and student gender.

  11. Presentation of the decay data group activities at LPRI. (Links with international evaluation works)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Be, M.M.

    1999-01-01

    The activities of the Primary Ionizing Radiation Laboratory (LPRI) which is affiliated with the French National Bureau of Metrology (BNM), include evaluation of decay data, absolute activity measurements, X- and gamma-ray spectrometry, development of new measuring techniques, etc. The following three activities in the field of decay data evaluation are briefly presented: NUCLEIDE software, internal conversion coefficients, and nuclide evaluations

  12. Physical Activity and Pregnancy: Past and Present Evidence and Future Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Symons Downs, Danielle; Chasan-Taber, Lisa; Evenson, Kelly R.; Leiferman, Jenn; Yeo, SeonAe

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this review, we provide researchers and practitioners with an overview of the physical activity and pregnancy literature to promote prenatal physical activity, improve measurement, further elucidate the role of activity in reducing maternal health complications, and inform future research. Method: We examined past and present physical…

  13. Sport and active recreation injuries in Australia: evidence from emergency department presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, C.; Valuri, G.; Ozanne-Smith, J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Despite the rise in specialist clinical services for the management of sports and active recreation injury, many patients attend hospital emergency departments for treatment. The purpose of this study was to describe sports injury cases presented to selected hospital emergency departments around Australia for the period 1989-1993. METHODS: Routinely collected emergency department injury presentation data from the Australian National Injury Surveillance Unit were examined. Data on 98,040 sports and active recreation emergency department presentations were analysed. Sports and active recreation activities were ranked according to frequency of presentation. Relative proportions of injury type and body region injured were determined. Data are presented separately for children (15 years of age). RESULTS: Among the 10 activities that most commonly led to a sports or active recreation injury presentation for all ages were cycling, Australian football, basketball, soccer, cricket, netball, and rugby. For children, injuries were also commonly associated with roller skating/blading, skateboarding, and trampolining. Hockey, martial arts, and dancing injuries were frequent in adults. Most sporting injuries occurred during organised competition or practice whereas the active recreation injuries occurred in a variety of settings. Fractures, strains, and sprains, particularly to the lower and upper extremities, were common types of injury. CONCLUSION: The rich, but nevertheless limited, information available about sports and active recreation injuries from data collected in emergency departments indicates that these activities are a common context for injury at the community level in Australia. 


 PMID:9773170

  14. Sport and active recreation injuries in Australia: evidence from emergency department presentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finch, C; Valuri, G; Ozanne-Smith, J

    1998-09-01

    Despite the rise in specialist clinical services for the management of sports and active recreation injury, many patients attend hospital emergency departments for treatment. The purpose of this study was to describe sports injury cases presented to selected hospital emergency departments around Australia for the period 1989-1993. Routinely collected emergency department injury presentation data from the Australian National Injury Surveillance Unit were examined. Data on 98,040 sports and active recreation emergency department presentations were analysed. Sports and active recreation activities were ranked according to frequency of presentation. Relative proportions of injury type and body region injured were determined. Data are presented separately for children (15 years of age). Among the 10 activities that most commonly led to a sports or active recreation injury presentation for all ages were cycling, Australian football, basketball, soccer, cricket, netball, and rugby. For children, injuries were also commonly associated with roller skating/blading, skateboarding, and trampolining. Hockey, martial arts, and dancing injuries were frequent in adults. Most sporting injuries occurred during organised competition or practice whereas the active recreation injuries occurred in a variety of settings. Fractures, strains, and sprains, particularly to the lower and upper extremities, were common types of injury. The rich, but nevertheless limited, information available about sports and active recreation injuries from data collected in emergency departments indicates that these activities are a common context for injury at the community level in Australia.

  15. MiDAS Field Guide – a Comprehensive Online Source of Information About the Microbes of Activated Sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nierychlo, Marta; McIlroy, Simon Jon; Saunders, Aaron Marc

    this information in MiDAS field guide (www.midasfieldguide.org). MiDAS taxonomy gives a solid foundation for the study of microbial ecology of the wastewater treatment processes. The online MiDAS field guide links the identity of genera that are important for the wastewater treatment process to details about...... guide to the microbes of activated sludge by comparing microbial community composition in 32 WWTPs located worldwide. This will facilitate a better understanding of the ecology of the ecosystem of activated sludge. Reference: McIlroy et al. MiDAS: the field guide to the microbes of activated sludge...... on a survey of 25 full-scale Danish wastewater treatment plants over 6 years and using MiDAS taxonomy, we have collected more than 150 key organisms in activated sludge wastewater treatment systems, linked their identity with available information on their function and distribution and included...

  16. Antibacterial assay-guided isolation of active compounds from Artocarpus heterophyllus heartwoods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septama, Abdi Wira; Panichayupakaranant, Pharkphoom

    2015-01-01

    Preparations from Artocarpus heterophyllus Lam. (Moraceae) heartwoods are used in the traditional folk medicine for the treatment of inflammation, malarial fever, and to prevent bacterial and fungal infections. The objective of this study was to isolate pure antibacterial compounds from A. heterophyllus heartwoods. The dried and powdered A. heterophyllus heartwoods were successively extracted with the following solvents: hexane, ethyl acetate, and methanol. Each of the extracts was screened for their antibacterial activities using a disc diffusion method (10 mg/disc). Their minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) were determined using a broth microdilution method. The extract that showed the strongest antibacterial activities was fractionated to isolate the active compounds by an antibacterial assay-guided isolation process. The ethyl acetate extract exhibited the strongest antibacterial activities against Streptococcus mutans, S. pyogenes, and Bacillus subtilis with MIC values of 78, 39, and 9.8 µg/mL, respectively. Based on an antibacterial assay-guided isolation, four antibacterial compounds: cycloartocarpin (1), artocarpin (2), artocarpanone (3), and cyanomaclurin (4) were purified. Among these isolated compounds, artocarpin exhibited the strongest antibacterial activity against Gram-positive bacteria, including S. mutans, S. pyogenes, B. subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, and S. epidermidis with MICs of 4.4, 4.4, 17.8, 8.9, and 8.9 µM, respectively, and MBCs of 8.9, 8.9, 17.8, 8.9, and 8.9 µM, respectively, while artocarpanone showed the strongest activity against Escherichia coli, a Gram-negative bacteria with MIC and MBC values of 12.9 and 25.8 µM, respectively. Only artocarpin showed inhibitory activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa with an MIC of 286.4 µM.

  17. Activation of Visuomotor Systems during Visually Guided Movements: A Functional MRI Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellermann, Jutta M.; Siegal, Joel D.; Strupp, John P.; Ebner, Timothy J.; Ugurbil, Kâmil

    1998-04-01

    The dorsal stream is a dominant visuomotor pathway that connects the striate and extrastriate cortices to posterior parietal areas. In turn, the posterior parietal areas send projections to the frontal primary motor and premotor areas. This cortical pathway is hypothesized to be involved in the transformation of a visual input into the appropriate motor output. In this study we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of the entire brain to determine the patterns of activation that occurred while subjects performed a visually guided motor task. In nine human subjects, fMRI data were acquired on a 4-T whole-body MR system equipped with a head gradient coil and a birdcage RF coil using aT*2-weighted EPI sequence. Functional activation was determined for three different tasks: (1) a visuomotor task consisting of moving a cursor on a screen with a joystick in relation to various targets, (2) a hand movement task consisting of moving the joystick without visual input, and (3) a eye movement task consisting of moving the eyes alone without visual input. Blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) contrast-based activation maps of each subject were generated using period cross-correlation statistics. Subsequently, each subject's brain was normalized to Talairach coordinates, and the individual maps were compared on a pixel by pixel basis. Significantly activated pixels common to at least four out of six subjects were retained to construct the final functional image. The pattern of activation during visually guided movements was consistent with the flow of information from striate and extrastriate visual areas, to the posterior parietal complex, and then to frontal motor areas. The extensive activation of this network and the reproducibility among subjects is consistent with a role for the dorsal stream in transforming visual information into motor behavior. Also extensively activated were the medial and lateral cerebellar structures, implicating the cortico

  18. Activity-guided isolation of cytotoxic bis-bibenzyl constituents from Dumortiera hirsuta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Masao; Ikeda, Risa; Kenmoku, Hiromichi; Asakawa, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    Activity-guided fractionation of the ether extract of Dumortiera hirsute (Japanese liverwort), using cytotoxicity testing with cultured HL 60 and KB cells, resulted in the isolation of a new cytotoxic bis-bibenzyl compound, along with the two known bis-bibenzyls: isomarchantin C and isoriccardin C. The structural determination of the new bis-bibenzyl through extensive NMR spectral data indicated a derivative of marchantin A, which has been isolated from the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha. The cytotoxicity of the bis-bibenzyls was evaluated by the MTT (3-(4,5-di-methylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay using cultured HL 60 and KB cells.

  19. Coherent versus incoherent dynamics in InAs quantum-dot active wave guides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borri, Paola; Langbein, W.; Hvam, Jørn Märcher

    2001-01-01

    Coherent dynamics measured by time-resolved four-wave mixing is compared to incoherent population dynamics measured by differential transmission spectroscopy on the ground-state transition at room temperature of two types of InAs-based quantum dots with different confinement energies. The measure....... The measurements are performed with heterodyne detection on quantum-dot active wave guides to enhance the light-matter interaction length. An elastic nature of the measured dephasing is revealed which is independent of the dot energy level scheme....

  20. Graphic Arts--Offset Press Operator/Duplicating Machine. TI-622. Instructor's Manual and Student Learning Activity Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsen, Robert F.

    This instructor's manual and student learning activity guide comprise a kit for a graphic arts activity on offset press operator/duplicating machine. Purpose stated for the activity is to provide the student with an understanding of the basic operation involved in the production of printed matter in the graphic communications industry through the…

  1. Deep learning based classification of morphological patterns in RCM to guide noninvasive diagnosis of melanocytic lesions (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kose, Kivanc; Bozkurt, Alican; Ariafar, Setareh; Alessi-Fox, Christi A.; Gill, Melissa; Dy, Jennifer G.; Brooks, Dana H.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2017-02-01

    In this study we present a deep learning based classification algorithm for discriminating morphological patterns that appear in RCM mosaics of melanocytic lesions collected at the dermal epidermal junction (DEJ). These patterns are classified into 6 distinct types in the literature: background, meshwork, ring, clod, mixed, and aspecific. Clinicians typically identify these morphological patterns by examination of their textural appearance at 10X magnification. To mimic this process we divided mosaics into smaller regions, which we call tiles, and classify each tile in a deep learning framework. We used previously acquired DEJ mosaics of lesions deemed clinically suspicious, from 20 different patients, which were then labelled according to those 6 types by 2 expert users. We tried three different approaches for classification, all starting with a publicly available convolutional neural network (CNN) trained on natural image, consisting of a series of convolutional layers followed by a series of fully connected layers: (1) We fine-tuned this network using training data from the dataset. (2) Instead, we added an additional fully connected layer before the output layer network and then re-trained only last two layers, (3) We used only the CNN convolutional layers as a feature extractor, encoded the features using a bag of words model, and trained a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. Sensitivity and specificity were generally comparable across the three methods, and in the same ranges as our previous work using SURF features with SVM . Approach (3) was less computationally intensive to train but more sensitive to unbalanced representation of the 6 classes in the training data. However we expect CNN performance to improve as we add more training data because both the features and the classifier are learned jointly from the data. *First two authors share first authorship.

  2. Phytochemical Study of Tapirira guianensis Leaves Guided by Vasodilatory and Antioxidant Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélia M. G. Rodrigues

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research was to perform a phytochemical study of the methanol leaves extract of T. guianensis (MET guided by vasodilatory and antioxidant activities. The chemical profile of MET and the ethyl acetate fraction (EA fraction was determined by HPLC-UV-MS and EA fraction guided fractionation by reverse-phase chromatography. The vasorelaxant effects of MET, fractions, sub-fractions and constituents were assessed on rat aorta pre-contracted with phenylephrine. Antioxidant activity was evaluated by using a DPPH assay. The results show that MET-induced vasodilation was dependent on NO/cGMP; and that the PI3K/Akt pathway seems to be the main route involved in eNOS activation. The EA fraction showed greater vasodilatory and antioxidant potency and was submitted to further fractionation. This allowed the isolation and characterization of quercetin, quercetin 3-O-(6″-O-galloyl-β-d-galactopyranoside and 1,4,6-tri-O-galloyl-β-d-glucose. Also, galloyl-HHDP-hexoside and myricetin deoxyhexoside were identified by HPLC-UV-MS. These compounds are being described for the first time for T. guianensis. 1,4,6-tri-O-galloyl-β-d-glucose and quercetin 3-O-(6″-O-galloyl-β-d-galactopyranoside showed no vasodilatory activity. Quercetin and myricetin glycoside seems to contribute to the MET activity, since they have been reported as vasodilatory flavonoids. MET-induced vasodilation could contribute to the hypotensive effect of T. guianensis previously reported.

  3. RNA-guided transcriptional activation via CRISPR/dCas9 mimics overexpression phenotypes in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Jin Park

    Full Text Available Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR and the CRISPR associated protein 9 (Cas9 system allows effective gene modification through RNA-guided DNA targeting. The Cas9 has undergone a series of functional alterations from the original active endonuclease to partially or completely deactivated Cas9. The catalytically deactivated Cas9 (dCas9 offers a platform to regulate transcriptional expression with the addition of activator or repressor domains. We redesigned a CRISPR/Cas9 activation system by adding the p65 transactivating subunit of NF-kappa B and a heat-shock factor 1 (HSF activation domain to dCas9 bound with the VP64 (tetramer of VP16 activation domain for application in plants. The redesigned CRISPR/Cas9 activation system was tested in Arabidopsis to increase endogenous transcriptional levels of production of anthocyanin pigment 1 (PAP1 and Arabidopsis thaliana vacuolar H+-pyrophosphatase (AVP1. The expression of PAP1 was increased two- to three-fold and the activated plants exhibited purple leaves similar to that of PAP1 overexpressors. The AVP1 gene expression was increased two- to five-fold in transgenic plants. In comparison to the wild type, AVP1 activated plants had increased leaf numbers, larger single-leaf areas and improved tolerance to drought stress. The AVP1 activated plants showed similar phenotypes to AVP1 overexpressors. Therefore, the redesigned CRISPR/Cas9 activation system containing modified p65-HSF provides a simple approach for producing activated plants by upregulating endogenous transcriptional levels.

  4. IAEA activities to prepare safety codes and guides for thermal neutron nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iansiti, E.

    1977-01-01

    In accordance with the programme presented to, and endorsed by, the eighteenth General Conference in September 1974, the IAEA is now developing a complete set of safety codes and guides that will represent recommendations for the safety of thermal neutron power plants. The safety codes outline the minimum requirements for achieving this safety, and the safety guides set forth the criteria, procedures and methods to implement the safety codes. The whole programme is directed towards the five areas of Governmental Organization, Siting, Design, Operation, and Quality Assurance. One Scientific Secretary from the Agency Secretariat is responsible for each of these areas and a Co-ordinator takes care of common problems. For the development of each of these documents a working group of a few world experts is first convened which prepare a preliminary draft. This draft is then reviewed by a larger, international Technical Review Committee (one for each of the five areas) and a subsequent review by the Senior Advisory Group - with representatives from 20 states - ensures that the document is well coordinated within the programme. At this stage, it is sent to Member States for comments. The Technical Review Committee concerned is reconvened to integrate these comments into the document, and, after a final review by the Senior Advisory Group, the document is ready for transmission to the Director General of the Agency for endorsement and publication. A preliminary to this procedure is the collation by the Secretariat of large amounts of information submitted by Member States so that the first draft is really based on a very complete knowledge of what is done in each area all over the world. This collation frequently reveals differences in approach which are not random but due, rather, to the local conditions and the types of reactors. These differences must be harmonized in the documents produced without detracting from the effectiveness of the code or guide. The whole

  5. Isolation of active constituents from cherry laurel (Laurocerasus officinalis Roem.) leaves through bioassay-guided procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkol, Esra Küpeli; Kırmızıbekmez, Hasan; Küçükboyacı, Nurgün; Gören, Ahmet C; Yesilada, Erdem

    2012-01-31

    The fresh leaves of Laurocerasus officinalis Roem. (Rosaceae) are externally used against pain and feverish symptoms in Turkish folk medicine. Effects of the extracts, fractions and isolated compounds from the leaves of L. officinalis were investigated using in vivo models of inflammation and pain in mice. The crude ethanolic extract from the leaves of plant was sequentially fractionated into five subextracts; explicitly, n-hexane, chloroform, ethyl acetate (EtOAc), n-butanol, and remaining water extracts. Further studies were carried out on the most active EtOAc subextract was further subjected to fractionation through column chromatography. For the anti-inflammatory activity, carrageenan-induced hind paw edema and acetic acid-induced increase in capillary permeability models, and for the antinociceptive activity p-benzoquinone-induced writhing test in mice were employed. Ethanolic extract of the leaves was shown to possess significant inhibitory activity in the assay methods without inducing any gastric damage. Through bioassay-guided fractionation and isolation procedures three phenolic compounds, 2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-2-hydroxyphenyl-acetic acid (1), kaempferol-3-O-β-D-xylopyranosyl-(1→2)-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (2) and (+)-catechin (3) were isolated from the active fraction and their structures were elucidated by spectral techniques (1D and 2D NMR, ESIMS). The experimental data verified that Laurocerasus officinalis leaves displayed remarkable anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Control of activities at the neighbourhood of basic nuclear installations. Guide Nr 15, Release of the 2016/03/24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    After having indicated the relevant regulatory texts, and described the context (the taking of nuclear activities into account in various town and land planning documents), this guide defines the ASN national doctrine for the control of activities about basic nuclear installations (BNI) and at presenting tools aiming at limiting the presence and growth of populations exposed to nuclear risks. It recalls and discusses the four main pillars of the management of risks posed by BNIs: risk reduction at the origin (on charge of the operator), implementation of emergency and rescue plans, preventive information of population and local communities, and control of activities in areas exposed to the risks. It states the principles adopted by the ASN regarding the control of activities about BNIs. This doctrine is based on three principles: to preserve the rescue plan operability, to favour a local development beyond an area of risk with fast kinetics, and to enable a controlled development which responds to the needs of the resident population. Then, the issue of land use conditions is addressed and discussed: objectives to be reached, discussion of vulnerability levels depending on activities, management of new projects by using various tools (servitude of public interest, town planning documents and code)

  7. Guiding transcranial brain stimulation by EEG/MEG to interact with ongoing brain activity and associated functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thut, Gregor; Bergmann, Til Ole; Fröhlich, Flavio

    2017-01-01

    of NTBS with respect to the ongoing brain activity. Temporal patterns of ongoing neuronal activity, in particular brain oscillations and their fluctuations, can be traced with electro- or magnetoencephalography (EEG/MEG), to guide the timing as well as the stimulation settings of NTBS. These novel, online...... and offline EEG/MEG-guided NTBS-approaches are tailored to specifically interact with the underlying brain activity. Online EEG/MEG has been used to guide the timing of NTBS (i.e., when to stimulate): by taking into account instantaneous phase or power of oscillatory brain activity, NTBS can be aligned......Non-invasive transcranial brain stimulation (NTBS) techniques have a wide range of applications but also suffer from a number of limitations mainly related to poor specificity of intervention and variable effect size. These limitations motivated recent efforts to focus on the temporal dimension...

  8. 3...2...1...Liftoff!: An Educator's Guide with Activities in Science, Mathematics, Technology, and Language Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    This curriculum supplement introduces students in the early childhood classroom to the International Space Station and the role rockets play in its construction. The guide uses these topics as the basis for interdisciplinary activities for the early learner. Each activity features objectives, a material list, educator information, procedures, and…

  9. The nuclear present. A guide to recent books on nuclear war, weapons, the peace movement, and related issues, with a chronology of nuclear events, 1789-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, G.

    1992-01-01

    The Nuclear Present brings the interested reader up-to-date on significant English-language books about nuclear weapons and related topics, identifying primarily important works of nuclear non-fiction that have come out since 1984. Each reference has a paragraph of comment about its subject and value. General organizational areas include the following: Reference Works; Nuclear weapons and Nuclear war (14 sub-headings including overviews, development, effects, tests, arms race, prospectives, legal considerations etc.); Strategy; proliferation; Stratigic Defense; Arms control and disarmament; ethical, pholosophical and religous perspectives; new paths to peace; periodic guide; the Chernobyl Disaster. An extensive Nuclear Chronology (1789-1991) written by the author allows a fairly detailed sense of the historical record of nuclear weapons, including testing, manufacture, use and movements for arms control and disarmament

  10. Transfer parameters of fission and activation products present in effluents of nuclear power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancio, D.; Menossi, C.A.; Ciallella, N.R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper presents results of research carried out in Argentina on transfer parameters of fission and activation products which may be present in the effluents of nuclear power reactors. For some nuclides, as Sr-90, Co-137 and I-131, the parameters were obtained by studies of the fallout, from measurements of integrated levels in the environment and in the food chains. Other values are concentration factors derived from laboratory and field experiments. They refer to fish, molluscs, crustaces and fresh water plants, for several fission and activation nuclides. Transfer parameters obtained have been of significant importance for environmental assessments, relating to nuclear installations in Argentina. (author)

  11. A Variation of the Present Star Formation Activity of Spiral Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Tomita, Akihiko; Tomita, Yoshio; Saito, Mamoru

    1996-01-01

    The star formation rate in spiral galaxies is considered to be decreasing continuously with time in a time scale of $10^{9}$ yr. The present star formation activity, on the other hand, shows various degrees among galaxies. We make a new data set of 1681 nearby spiral galaxies from available databases and study the statistics of the present star formation activity. We analyze far-infrared and optical B-band surface brightnesses of the H II regions and the non-H II regions in M~31 and show that...

  12. Association of serotonin transporter promoter regulatory region polymorphism and cerebral activity to visual presentation of food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaurijoki, Salla; Kuikka, Jyrki T; Niskanen, Eini; Carlson, Synnöve; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Pesonen, Ullamari; Kaprio, Jaakko M; Rissanen, Aila; Tiihonen, Jari; Karhunen, Leila

    2008-07-01

    Recent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have revealed links between genetic polymorphisms and cognitive and behavioural processes. Serotonin is a classical neurotransmitter of central nervous system, and it is connected to the control of appetite and satiety. In this study, the relationship between the functional variation in the serotonin transporter gene and the activity in the left posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), a brain area activated by visual food stimuli was explored. Thirty subjects underwent serial fMRI studies and provided DNA for genetic analyses. Subjects homozygous for the long allele exhibited greater left PCC activity in the comparison food > non-food compared with individuals heterozygous or homozygous for the short allele. The association between genotype and activation was linear, the subjects with two copies of the long allele variant having the strongest activation. These results demonstrate the possible genetically driven variation in the response of the left PCC to visual presentation of food in humans.

  13. Behaviour of molluscs in cantabrian biota with respect to the activity present in the marine medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montesinos, M.; Santos, A.M. de los

    1981-01-01

    The behaviour of molluscs with regard to the activity present in the marine medium is studied. For this purpose three large groups are considered, with special reference to their ecology and their particular mode of incorporating activity. Determinations are made of the total alpha and beta activity, as well as that due to elements such as 90 Sr, 137 Cs and natural U, in the organisms in question and in their eco-environment. A comparison is likewise established between the biocoenoses inhabiting Cantabrian and Mediterranean biota. (author)

  14. Regulatory and law framework of agricultural methanization and composting activities. User's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-08-01

    After a presentation of the general context of organic waste management (its techniques, materials, legal and regulatory sources, i.e. European and French laws), this guide indicates the main regulatory and law aspects to those wishing to implement a project of methanization or composting of organic by-products in the agricultural sector. Several aspects are therefore discussed and presented in practical sheets. They concern the health and environment regulation, but not the professional risk prevention (explosion, fire, and so on). These aspects are the project setting up, input materials (animal by-products, organic materials coming from agricultural production or from out of it), waste collection and transport, process steps, organic product valorization, biogas valorization, solid and liquid release management

  15. Sport and active recreation injuries in Australia: evidence from emergency department presentations

    OpenAIRE

    Finch, C.; Valuri, G.; Ozanne-Smith, J.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Despite the rise in specialist clinical services for the management of sports and active recreation injury, many patients attend hospital emergency departments for treatment. The purpose of this study was to describe sports injury cases presented to selected hospital emergency departments around Australia for the period 1989-1993. METHODS: Routinely collected emergency department injury presentation data from the Australian National Injury Surveillance Unit were examined. Dat...

  16. Activity-Guided Isolation of Antioxidant Compounds from Rhizophora apiculata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbin Xiao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Rhizophora apiculata (R. apiculata contains an abundance of biologically active compounds due its special salt-tolerant living surroundings. In this study, the total phenolic content and antioxidant activities of various extract and fractions of stem of R. apiculata were investigated. Results indicated that butanol fraction possesses the highest total phenolic content (181.84 mg/g GAE/g dry extract with strongest antioxidant abilities. Following in vitro antioxidant activity-guided phytochemical separation procedures, lyoniresinol-3α-O-β-arabinopyranoside (1, lyoniresinol-3α-O-β-rhamnoside (2, and afzelechin-3-O-L-rhamno-pyranoside (3 were separated from the butanol fraction. These compounds showed more noticeable antioxidant activity than a BHT standard in the DPPH, ABTS and hydroxyl radical scavenging assays. HPLC analysis results showed that among different plant parts, the highest content of 13 was located in the bark (0.068%, 0.066% and 0.011%, respectively. The results imply that the R. apiculata might be a potential source of natural antioxidants and 13 are antioxidant ingredients in R. apiculata.

  17. Active illumination based 3D surface reconstruction and registration for image guided medialization laryngoplasty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Ge; Lee, Sang-Joon; Hahn, James K.; Bielamowicz, Steven; Mittal, Rajat; Walsh, Raymond

    2007-03-01

    The medialization laryngoplasty is a surgical procedure to improve the voice function of the patient with vocal fold paresis and paralysis. An image guided system for the medialization laryngoplasty will help the surgeons to accurately place the implant and thus reduce the failure rates of the surgery. One of the fundamental challenges in image guided system is to accurately register the preoperative radiological data to the intraoperative anatomical structure of the patient. In this paper, we present a combined surface and fiducial based registration method to register the preoperative 3D CT data to the intraoperative surface of larynx. To accurately model the exposed surface area, a structured light based stereo vision technique is used for the surface reconstruction. We combined the gray code pattern and multi-line shifting to generate the intraoperative surface of the larynx. To register the point clouds from the intraoperative stage to the preoperative 3D CT data, a shape priori based ICP method is proposed to quickly register the two surfaces. The proposed approach is capable of tracking the fiducial markers and reconstructing the surface of larynx with no damage to the anatomical structure. We used off-the-shelf digital cameras, LCD projector and rapid 3D prototyper to develop our experimental system. The final RMS error in the registration is less than 1mm.

  18. Present status of research activities on transmutation of actinides in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Hiroshi

    1978-01-01

    In Japan, the idea to make use of transmutation for the final disposal method of HLW was first examined by Ichimiya, Amano, Hamada et al., when the Japan Atomic Industry forum had organized a study committee for HLW treatment in 1973. This article has the scope to outline the present research activities on transmutation of actinides in Japan

  19. Active Learning to Improve Presentation Skills: The Use of Pecha Kucha in Undergraduate Sales Management Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Robert E.; Derby, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Recruiters seek candidates with certain business skills that are not developed in the typical lecture-based classroom. Instead, active-learning techniques have been shown to be effective in honing these skills. One skill that is particularly important in sales careers is the ability to make a powerful and effective presentation. To help students…

  20. Incidental primary mediastinal choriocarcinoma diagnosed by endobronchial ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration in a patient presenting with transient ischemic attack and stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francischetti, Ivo M B; Cajigas, Antonio; Suhrland, Mark; Farinhas, Joaquim M; Khader, Samer

    2017-08-01

    We describe a case of a 41-year old male patient with no significant prior medical history who presents with symptoms of Transient Ischemic Attack and stroke. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of the brain identified areas of ischemia in the left side, and angiography showed occlusion of the left Medial Cerebral Artery (MCA). Cardiac Transthoracic Echocardiogram (TTE) for stroke evaluation incidentally noted a mediastinal abnormality leading to cancer work-up. Computer Tomography (CT) and 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET-CT scan of the chest incidentally revealed an avid 6 cm paraesophagial/subcarinal mass. Further diagnostic work-up with endoscopic and endobronchial ultra sound (EBUS)-guided fine needle aspiration (FNA) of the mass yielded a cytology diagnosis of Germ Cell Tumor (GCT), with choriocarcinoma component. Additionally, high plasma levels of β-human chorionic gonadotrophin (β-HCG) were detected with no evidence of testicular tumor. This exceedingly rare presentation for a primary mediastinal choriocarcinoma underscores the importance of complete investigation of young patients presenting with neurological symptoms compatible with ischemic events. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2017;45:738-743. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Behavior Change Techniques Present in Wearable Activity Trackers: A Critical Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Kathryn; Li, Melissa; Giangregorio, Lora; Burns, Catherine; Grindrod, Kelly

    2016-04-27

    Wearable activity trackers are promising as interventions that offer guidance and support for increasing physical activity and health-focused tracking. Most adults do not meet their recommended daily activity guidelines, and wearable fitness trackers are increasingly cited as having great potential to improve the physical activity levels of adults. The objective of this study was to use the Coventry, Aberdeen, and London-Refined (CALO-RE) taxonomy to examine if the design of wearable activity trackers incorporates behavior change techniques (BCTs). A secondary objective was to critically analyze whether the BCTs present relate to known drivers of behavior change, such as self-efficacy, with the intention of extending applicability to older adults in addition to the overall population. Wearing each device for a period of 1 week, two independent raters used CALO-RE taxonomy to code the BCTs of the seven wearable activity trackers available in Canada as of March 2014. These included Fitbit Flex, Misfit Shine, Withings Pulse, Jawbone UP24, Spark Activity Tracker by SparkPeople, Nike+ FuelBand SE, and Polar Loop. We calculated interrater reliability using Cohen's kappa. The average number of BCTs identified was 16.3/40. Withings Pulse had the highest number of BCTs and Misfit Shine had the lowest. Most techniques centered around self-monitoring and self-regulation, all of which have been associated with improved physical activity in older adults. Techniques related to planning and providing instructions were scarce. Overall, wearable activity trackers contain several BCTs that have been shown to increase physical activity in older adults. Although more research and development must be done to fully understand the potential of wearables as health interventions, the current wearable trackers offer significant potential with regard to BCTs relevant to uptake by all populations, including older adults.

  2. Activation of professional antigen presenting cells by acharan sulfate isolated from giant African snail, Achatina fulica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Sun; Lee, Young-Hee; Lee, Young-Ran; Im, Sun-A; Lee, Jae-Kwon; Kim, Yeong Shik; Sim, Joon-Soo; Choi, Hyung Seok; Lee, Chong-Kil

    2007-07-01

    Acharan sulfate isolated from the giant African snail, Achatina fulica, has been reported to have antitumor activity in vivo. In an effort to determine the mechanisms of its antitumor activity, we examined the effects of acharan sulfate on professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Acharan sulfate increased the phagocytic activity, the production of cytokines such as TNF-alpha and IL-1beta, and the release of nitric oxide on a macrophage cell line, Raw 264.7 cells. In addition, acharan sulfate induced phenotypic and functional maturation of immature dendritic cells (DCs). Immature DCs cultured with acharan sulfate expressed higher levels of class II MHC molecules and major co-stimulatory molecules such as B7-1, B7-2, and CD40. Functional maturation of immature DCs cultured in the presence of acharan sulfate was confirmed by the increased allostimulatory capacity and IL-12 production. These results suggest that the antitumor activity of acharan sulfate is partly due to the activation of professional antigen presenting cells.

  3. [The theory of mechanical activity of lungs--a creation history, the present and development prospects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetenev, F F; Tetenev, K F

    2014-01-01

    In article the history of creation of the doctrine about respiratory movements of lungs, history of classical mechanics of breathing is stated. Supervision of the paradoxical facts which became a basis for hypothesis creation, then the theory of mechanical activity of lungs are presented. The facts proving mechanical activity of lungs on an inspiration and an expiration are given. Options of interaction of intra pulmonary and extra pulmonary sources of mechanical energy are considered. Theoretical justification for development of the new direction of studying of physiology of mechanical movements of the internal which does not have own skeleton is stated.

  4. Guide to hazardous industrial activities: handbook for the cataloguing and selection of industrial activities for which an Emergency Management Plan ought to be drafted

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ham, J.M.; Blom-Bruggeman, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    A methodology has been developed for the cataloguing of hazardous (industrial) activities and the evaluation of these activities as part of the process of formulating an emergency management plan. This guide will enable priorities to be set at local level (district, region) for the drafting of

  5. Solar Energy Education. Humanities: activities and teacher's guide. Field test edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    Activities are outlined to introduce students to information on solar energy while performing ordinary classroom work. In this teaching manual solar energy is integrated with the humanities. The activities include such things as stories, newspapers, writing assignments, and art and musical presentations all filled with energy related terms. An energy glossary is provided. (BCS)

  6. A novel approach for reliable detection of cathepsin S activities in mouse antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steimle, Alex; Kalbacher, Hubert; Maurer, Andreas; Beifuss, Brigitte; Bender, Annika; Schäfer, Andrea; Müller, Ricarda; Autenrieth, Ingo B; Frick, Julia-Stefanie

    2016-05-01

    Cathepsin S (CTSS) is a eukaryotic protease mostly expressed in professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). Since CTSS activity regulation plays a role in the pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases like multiple sclerosis, atherosclerosis, Sjögren's syndrome and psoriasis as well as in cancer progression, there is an ongoing interest in the reliable detection of cathepsin S activity. Various applications have been invented for specific detection of this enzyme. However, most of them have only been shown to be suitable for human samples, do not deliver quantitative results or the experimental procedure requires technical equipment that is not commonly available in a standard laboratory. We have tested a fluorogen substrate, Mca-GRWPPMGLPWE-Lys(Dnp)-DArg-NH2, that has been described to specifically detect CTSS activities in human APCs for its potential use for mouse samples. We have modified the protocol and thereby offer a cheap, easy, reproducible and quick activity assay to detect CTSS activities in mouse APCs. Since most of basic research on CTSS is performed in mice, this method closes a gap and offers a possibility for reliable and quantitative CTSS activity detection that can be performed in almost every laboratory. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. The present and future roles of Traditional Health Practitioners within the formal healthcare sector of South Africa, as guided by the Traditional Health Practitioners Act No 22 (2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Louw

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background The promulgation of the Traditional Health Practitioners Act No 22 (2007 was seen as the long awaited start-up of the traditional healing profession in South Africa. Act No 22 (2007 was strongly politically driven from the late 1960s onward. Many of these political motivators were based upon outdated cultural ideas, customs and traditions, rooted outside the modern day healthcare needs and demands of the particular population that traditional healing intends to serve. An in-depth needs and skills analysis, to test the viability and sustainability of the South African traditional healers as well as their positions and roles as health practitioners inside the formal healthcare sector, as guided and stipulated by the Traditional Health Practitioners Act No 22 (2007, was lacking in this early development and start-up process. This resulted in the traditional healers’ present and future roles as specific healthcare practitioners being both undefined and insufficiently formulated. In addition their existing education, training, skills and abilities to compete in the formal healthcare sector were ignored. Therefore, since the promulgation of the Act in 2007, there was limited professional-development for traditional healers, to improve their immediate professionalism and thus to promote effective role-playing and management in the formal healthcare sector. The South African traditional healing professional model is still in the foundational stage of its professional development; a stage which the other registered/regulated healthcare practitioners of the country surpassed long ago, making them well-equipped for role-playing and management as health professionals in the formal healthcare sector. The whole venture of the statutory recognition of the traditional health practitioners in 2007 as new healthcare professionals with the promulgation of the Traditional Health Practitioners Act No 22 (2007 seems to increasingly be a failure. There is

  8. Actinides record, power calculations and activity for present isotopes in the spent fuel of a BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enriquez C, P.; Ramirez S, J. R.; Lucatero, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    The administration of spent fuel is one of the more important stages of the nuclear fuel cycle, and this has become a problem of supreme importance in countries that possess nuclear reactors. Due to this in this work, the study on the actinides record and present fission products to the discharge of the irradiated fuel in a light water reactor type BWR is shown, to quantify the power and activity that emit to the discharge and during the cooling time. The analysis was realized on a fuel assembly type 10 x 10 with an enrichment average of 3.69 wt % in U-235 and the assembly simulation assumes four cycles of operation of 18 months each one and presents an exposition of 47 G Wd/Tm to the discharge. The module OrigenArp of the Scale 6 code is the computation tool used for the assembly simulation and to obtain the results on the actinides record presents to the fuel discharge. The study covers the following points: a) Obtaining of the plutonium vector used in the fuel production of mixed oxides, and b) Power calculation and activity for present actinides to the discharge. The results presented in this work, correspond at the same time immediate of discharge (0 years) and to a cooling stage in the irradiated fuel pool (5 years). (Author)

  9. Tales from the Dark Side: Teacher Professional Development , Support , Activities, Student Research & Presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. E.; Pompea, S. M.

    2013-12-01

    In a partnership last Spring with Arizona Public Service, the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) created the 'Dark-Skies Energy Education Program: Energy Awareness for a Sustainable Future'. In this program, experienced science and technology education specialists from NOAO led 2 one-day professional development workshops for thirteen 6th grade teachers on dark skies and energy education. The workshops focused on three foundational, scaffolding activities and a final student research project. This in turn culminated in a Family Science Night where students presented their projects. In between these events, our NOAO team provided support for teachers through real-time video conferencing using FaceTime. In addition to the professional development, each teacher received a kit full of resource materials to perform the activities and research project. The kit was at no cost to the teacher, school, or district. Each kit contained the latest version of a tablet, which was used to facilitate communication and support for the teachers, as well as provide all the program's written teaching materials. The activities are in accordance with state, Common Core and Next Generation Science Standards. Our NOAO instructors gave firsthand experiences on how best to use these materials in a classroom or public setting. They also discussed opportunities on how they can incorporate, adapt and expand upon the activities and research projects in the classroom. Evaluation reports from the program's independent evaluator showed that the students enjoyed learning from the three foundational activities and research projects. The project presentations by the Yuma students were outstanding in their creativity, level of effort, and scientific accuracy. To summarize the evaluations, significant changes in knowledge and attitude were made with the teachers and students (from one-on-one interviews and surveys), but behavioral changes (albeit only over a semester) seemed minimal. The AGU

  10. Memory-guided attention during active viewing of edited dynamic scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valuch, Christian; König, Peter; Ansorge, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Films, TV shows, and other edited dynamic scenes contain many cuts, which are abrupt transitions from one video shot to the next. Cuts occur within or between scenes, and often join together visually and semantically related shots. Here, we tested to which degree memory for the visual features of the precut shot facilitates shifting attention to the postcut shot. We manipulated visual similarity across cuts, and measured how this affected covert attention (Experiment 1) and overt attention (Experiments 2 and 3). In Experiments 1 and 2, participants actively viewed a target movie that randomly switched locations with a second, distractor movie at the time of the cuts. In Experiments 1 and 2, participants were able to deploy attention more rapidly and accurately to the target movie's continuation when visual similarity was high than when it was low. Experiment 3 tested whether this could be explained by stimulus-driven (bottom-up) priming by feature similarity, using one clip at screen center that was followed by two alternative continuations to the left and right. Here, even the highest similarity across cuts did not capture attention. We conclude that following cuts of high visual similarity, memory-guided attention facilitates the deployment of attention, but this effect is (top-down) dependent on the viewer's active matching of scene content across cuts.

  11. Image-guided recording system for spatial and temporal mapping of neuronal activities in brain slice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Geonho; Lee, Jeonghyeon; Kim, Hyeongeun; Jang, Jaemyung; Im, Changkyun; Jeon, Nooli; Jung, Woonggyu

    2018-03-01

    In this study, we introduce the novel image-guided recording system (IGRS) for efficient interpretation of neuronal activities in the brain slice. IGRS is designed to combine microelectrode array (MEA) and optical coherence tomography at the customized upright microscope. It allows to record multi-site neuronal signals and image of the volumetric brain anatomy in a single body configuration. For convenient interconnection between a brain image and neuronal signals, we developed the automatic mapping protocol that enables us to project acquired neuronal signals on a brain image. To evaluate the performance of IGRS, hippocampal signals of the brain slice were monitored, and corresponding with two-dimensional neuronal maps were successfully reconstructed. Our results indicated that IGRS and mapping protocol can provide the intuitive information regarding long-term and multi-sites neuronal signals. In particular, the temporal and spatial mapping capability of neuronal signals would be a very promising tool to observe and analyze the massive neuronal activity and connectivity in MEA-based electrophysiological studies. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Agriculture--Agriculture Science--Seed Germination. Kit No. 51. Instructor's Manual [and] Student Learning Activity Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Samuel

    An instructor's manual and student activity guide on seed germination are provided in this set of prevocational education materials which focuses on the vocational area of agriculture. (This set of materials is one of ninety-two prevocational education sets arranged around a cluster of seven vocational offerings: agriculture, home economics,…

  13. PARK-IT! Elementary School Land Laboratories in Toledo City Parks. Curriculum Activity Guide, Grades K-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuFour, Marilyn Berry; Courter, Linda Kothera; Garvin, Dennis M.

    The project PARK-IT! represents a unique partnership between a public elementary school and a city park in which students and teachers utilize a small naturalized area of the park as a Land Laboratory, and in return become its stewards. The project also includes this curriculum activity guide which can assist teachers in using the Land Lab with…

  14. PARK-IT! Elementary School Land Laboratories in Toledo City Parks. Curriculum Activity Guide, Grades 2-3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuFour, Marilyn Berry; Courter, Linda Kothera; Garvin, Dennis M.

    The project PARK-IT! represents a unique partnership between a public elementary school and a city park in which students and teachers utilize a small naturalized area of the park as a Land Laboratory, and in return become its stewards. The project also includes this curriculum activity guide which can assist teachers in using the Land Lab with…

  15. PARK-IT! Elementary School Land Laboratories in Toledo City Parks. Curriculum Activity Guide, Grades 4-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuFour, Marilyn Berry; Courter, Linda Kothera; Garvin, Dennis M.

    The project PARK-IT! represents a unique partnership between a public elementary school and a city park in which students and teachers utilize a small naturalized area of the park as a Land Laboratory, and in return become its stewards. The project also includes this curriculum activity guide which can assist teachers in using the Land Lab with…

  16. MainXchange in the Classroom: The New Internet Stock Market Game. Teacher's Guide and Student Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    This teaching guide/student activities booklet, for grades 6-9 and 7-11, outlines an Internet-based stock exchange simulation that allows students to learn about the stock market in a fun format. The simulation (the "MainXchange") described in the booklet offers students the opportunity to engage in "real-life" investing, while…

  17. SNAC: San Mateo Nutrition Activity Curriculum. "Swing Into Nutrition" (Staff In-Service Guide and Staff Workbook).

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Mateo City Elementary School District, CA.

    This inservice training guide on nutrition activities for preschool and elementary school teachers consists of 14 lesson plans for two workshops and more than 20 related instructional handouts that can be copied for teachers. The first workshop for teachers provides a rationale for nutrition education ine elementary curriculum as well as…

  18. The Clubbers' Guide: A Treasure Trove of Science Activities/A Treasure Hunt through Time and Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howarth, Sue; Scott, Linda; Carter, Liz

    2013-01-01

    This issue of Clubbers' Guide contains an article written by Liz Carter, Senior Science Technician at the Warwick School, Redhill, Surrey (UK), describing some of the wide variety of science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) based activities that her school puts on during an eight-day summer school in the holidays for prospective…

  19. TNF-Induced Target Cell Killing by CTL Activated through Cross-Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Wohlleber

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses can escape cytotoxic T cell (CTL immunity by avoiding presentation of viral components via endogenous MHC class I antigen presentation in infected cells. Cross-priming of viral antigens circumvents such immune escape by allowing noninfected dendritic cells to activate virus-specific CTLs, but they remain ineffective against infected cells in which immune escape is functional. Here, we show that cross-presentation of antigen released from adenovirus-infected hepatocytes by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells stimulated cross-primed effector CTLs to release tumor necrosis factor (TNF, which killed virus-infected hepatocytes through caspase activation. TNF receptor signaling specifically eliminated infected hepatocytes that showed impaired anti-apoptotic defense. Thus, CTL immune surveillance against infection relies on two similarly important but distinct effector functions that are both MHC restricted, requiring either direct antigen recognition on target cells and canonical CTL effector function or cross-presentation and a noncanonical effector function mediated by TNF.

  20. TNF-induced target cell killing by CTL activated through cross-presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlleber, Dirk; Kashkar, Hamid; Gärtner, Katja; Frings, Marianne K; Odenthal, Margarete; Hegenbarth, Silke; Börner, Carolin; Arnold, Bernd; Hämmerling, Günter; Nieswandt, Bernd; van Rooijen, Nico; Limmer, Andreas; Cederbrant, Karin; Heikenwalder, Mathias; Pasparakis, Manolis; Protzer, Ulrike; Dienes, Hans-Peter; Kurts, Christian; Krönke, Martin; Knolle, Percy A

    2012-09-27

    Viruses can escape cytotoxic T cell (CTL) immunity by avoiding presentation of viral components via endogenous MHC class I antigen presentation in infected cells. Cross-priming of viral antigens circumvents such immune escape by allowing noninfected dendritic cells to activate virus-specific CTLs, but they remain ineffective against infected cells in which immune escape is functional. Here, we show that cross-presentation of antigen released from adenovirus-infected hepatocytes by liver sinusoidal endothelial cells stimulated cross-primed effector CTLs to release tumor necrosis factor (TNF), which killed virus-infected hepatocytes through caspase activation. TNF receptor signaling specifically eliminated infected hepatocytes that showed impaired anti-apoptotic defense. Thus, CTL immune surveillance against infection relies on two similarly important but distinct effector functions that are both MHC restricted, requiring either direct antigen recognition on target cells and canonical CTL effector function or cross-presentation and a noncanonical effector function mediated by TNF. Copyright © 2012 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Paralysis as a Presenting Symptom of Hyperthyroidism in an Active Duty Soldier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennette, John; Tauferner, Dustin

    2015-01-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) is an endocrine disorder presenting with proximal motor weakness, typically greatest in the lower extremities, hypokalemia, and signs or laboratory findings consistent with hyperthyroidism. The incidence of TPP is highest in Asian males. This is a case report of a 30-year-old male active duty Soldier who presented to the emergency department complaining of several recent episodes of lower extremity paralysis. The patient underwent a workup which included serum and cerebrospinal fluid studies, and was found to be hypokalemic and hyperthyroid. Following consultation with neurology, the patient was admitted to the medicine service and treated for thyrotoxic periodic paralysis with potassium replacement and treatment of his hyperthyroidism. Since achieving a euthyroid state, he has had no recurrences of TPP. This disease should be considered in patients presenting with symmetric motor weakness and hypokalemia, whether or not symptoms of hyperthyroidism are elicited during the review of systems.

  2. Context-dependent neural activation: internally and externally guided rhythmic lower limb movement in individuals with and without neurodegenerative disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Eve Hackney

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s Disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder that has received considerable attention in allopathic medicine over the past decades. However, it is clear that, to date, pharmacological and surgical interventions do not fully address symptoms of PD and patients’ quality of life. As both an alternative therapy and as an adjuvant to conventional approaches, several types of rhythmic movement (e.g., movement strategies, dance, tandem biking, tai chi have shown improvements to motor symptoms, lower limb control and postural stability in people with PD (Amano, Nocera, Vallabhajosula, Juncos, Gregor, Waddell et al., 2013; Earhart, 2009; M. E. Hackney & Earhart, 2008; Kadivar, Corcos, Foto, & Hondzinski, 2011; Morris, Iansek, & Kirkwood, 2009; Ridgel, Vitek, & Alberts, 2009. However, while these programs are increasing in number, still little is known about the neural mechanisms underlying motor improvements attained with such interventions. Studying limb motor control under task specific contexts can help determine the mechanisms of rehabilitation effectiveness. Both internally guided (IG and externally guided (EG movement strategies have evidence to support their use in rehabilitative programs. However, there appears to be a degree of differentiation in the neural substrates involved in IG versus EG designs. Because of the potential task specific benefits of rhythmic training within a rehabilitative context, this report will consider the use of IG and EG movement strategies, and observations produced by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI and other imaging techniques. This review will present findings from lower limb imaging studies, under IG and EG conditions for populations with and without movement disorders. We will discuss how these studies might inform movement disorders rehabilitation (in the form of rhythmic, music-based movement training and highlight research gaps. We believe better understanding of lower limb neural

  3. Move faster, think later: Women who play action video games have quicker visually-guided responses with later onset visuomotor-related brain activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbet, Diana J; Sergio, Lauren E

    2018-01-01

    A history of action video game (AVG) playing is associated with improvements in several visuospatial and attention-related skills and these improvements may be transferable to unrelated tasks. These facts make video games a potential medium for skill-training and rehabilitation. However, examinations of the neural correlates underlying these observations are almost non-existent in the visuomotor system. Further, the vast majority of studies on the effects of a history of AVG play have been done using almost exclusively male participants. Therefore, to begin to fill these gaps in the literature, we present findings from two experiments. In the first, we use functional MRI to examine brain activity in experienced, female AVG players during visually-guided reaching. In the second, we examine the kinematics of visually-guided reaching in this population. Imaging data demonstrate that relative to women who do not play, AVG players have less motor-related preparatory activity in the cuneus, middle occipital gyrus, and cerebellum. This decrease is correlated with estimates of time spent playing. Further, these correlations are strongest during the performance of a visuomotor mapping that spatially dissociates eye and arm movements. However, further examinations of the full time-course of visuomotor-related activity in the AVG players revealed that the decreased activity during motor preparation likely results from a later onset of activity in AVG players, which occurs closer to beginning motor execution relative to the non-playing group. Further, the data presented here suggest that this later onset of preparatory activity represents greater neural efficiency that is associated with faster visually-guided responses.

  4. Move faster, think later: Women who play action video games have quicker visually-guided responses with later onset visuomotor-related brain activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbet, Diana J.; Sergio, Lauren E.

    2018-01-01

    A history of action video game (AVG) playing is associated with improvements in several visuospatial and attention-related skills and these improvements may be transferable to unrelated tasks. These facts make video games a potential medium for skill-training and rehabilitation. However, examinations of the neural correlates underlying these observations are almost non-existent in the visuomotor system. Further, the vast majority of studies on the effects of a history of AVG play have been done using almost exclusively male participants. Therefore, to begin to fill these gaps in the literature, we present findings from two experiments. In the first, we use functional MRI to examine brain activity in experienced, female AVG players during visually-guided reaching. In the second, we examine the kinematics of visually-guided reaching in this population. Imaging data demonstrate that relative to women who do not play, AVG players have less motor-related preparatory activity in the cuneus, middle occipital gyrus, and cerebellum. This decrease is correlated with estimates of time spent playing. Further, these correlations are strongest during the performance of a visuomotor mapping that spatially dissociates eye and arm movements. However, further examinations of the full time-course of visuomotor-related activity in the AVG players revealed that the decreased activity during motor preparation likely results from a later onset of activity in AVG players, which occurs closer to beginning motor execution relative to the non-playing group. Further, the data presented here suggest that this later onset of preparatory activity represents greater neural efficiency that is associated with faster visually-guided responses. PMID:29364891

  5. Dried extracts of Encholirium spectabile (Bromeliaceae) present antioxidant and photoprotective activities in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Raimundo Gonçalves; Souza, Grasielly Rocha; Guimarães, Amanda Leite; de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Silva Morais, Amanda Caroline; da Cruz Araújo, Edigênia Cavalcante; Nunes, Xirley Pereira; Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva

    2013-01-01

    The antioxidant and photoprotective activities of dried extracts from the leaves of Encholirium spectabile were investigated. It was also evaluated the total phenolic and flavonoid contents by the Folin–Ciocalteu and aluminum chloride methods, respectively. Antioxidant activities of the extracts were evaluated by using of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazil (DPPH) radical scavenging and β-carotene–linoleic acid bleaching and compared with ascorbic acid, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) used as reference compounds. The photoprotective effect was evaluated by the spectrophotometric method. The most significant total phenolic and flavonoid contents was of 188.50 ± 27.50 mg of gallic acid equivalent/g and 129.70 ± 4.59 mg of catechin equivalent/g, respectively, for chloroform fraction (Es-CHCl3). The Es-CHCl3 also presented the best antioxidant activity (IC50 25.35 ± 4.35 μg/ml) for DPPH scavenging. The ethanol extract (Es-EtOH), Es-CHCl3 and the fraction ethyl acetate (Es-AcOEt) showed characteristic absorption bands in regions UVB and UVA in a concentration-dependent manner. Es-CHCl3 presented the highest sun protection factor SPF (8.89 ± 2.11). It shows the possibility to use this extract as sunscreen in pharmaceutical preparations. PMID:24396251

  6. Activating thyrotropin receptor mutations are present in nonadenomatous hyperfunctioning nodules of toxic or autonomous multinodular goiter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonacchera, M; Agretti, P; Chiovato, L; Rosellini, V; Ceccarini, G; Perri, A; Viacava, P; Naccarato, A G; Miccoli, P; Pinchera, A; Vitti, P

    2000-06-01

    Toxic multinodular goiter, a heterogeneous disease producing hyperthyroidism, is frequently found in iodine-deficient areas. The pathogenesis of this common clinical entity is still unclear. The aim of the present study was to search for activating TSH receptor (TSHr) or Gs alpha mutations in areas of toxic or functionally autonomous multinodular goiters that appeared hyperfunctioning at thyroid scintiscan but did not clearly correspond to definite nodules at physical or ultrasonographic examination. Surgical tissue specimens from nine patients were carefully dissected, matching thyroid scintiscan and thyroid ultrasonography, to isolate hyperfunctioning and nonfunctioning areas even if they did not correspond to well-defined nodules. TSHr and Gs alpha mutations were searched for by direct sequencing after PCR amplification of genomic DNA. Only 2 adenomas were identified at microscopic examination, whereas the remaining 18 hyperfunctioning areas corresponded to hyperplastic nodules containing multiple aggregates of micromacrofollicules not surrounded by a capsule. Activating TSHr mutations were detected in 14 of these 20 hyperfunctioning areas, whereas no mutation was identified in nonfunctioning nodules or areas contained in the same gland. No Gs alpha mutation was found. In conclusion, activating TSHr mutations are present in the majority of nonadenomatous hyperfunctioning nodules scattered throughout the gland in patients with toxic or functionally autonomous multinodular goiter.

  7. International nuclear energy guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning current technical and economical events in the nuclear field. Twelve papers have been abstracted and input to the data base. The ''international nuclear energy guide'' gives a general directory of the name, the address and the telephone number of the companies and bodies quoted in this guide; a chronology of the main events 1982. The administrative and professional organization, the nuclear courses and research centers in France are presented, as also the organization of protection and safety, and of nuclear fuel cycle. The firms concerned by the design and the construction of NSSS and the allied nuclear firms are also presented. The last part of this guide deals with the nuclear energy in the world: descriptive list of international organizations, and, the nuclear activities throughout the world (alphabetical order by countries) [fr

  8. Maytenus erythroxylon Reissek (Celastraceae) ethanol extract presents antidiarrheal activity via antimotility and antisecretory mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formiga, Rodrigo de Oliveira; Quirino, Zelma Glebya Maciel; Diniz, Margareth de Fátima Formiga Melo; Marinho, Alexsandro Fernandes; Tavares, Josean Fechine; Batista, Leônia Maria

    2017-01-01

    AIM To investigate the acute toxicity, phytochemical profile, antidiarrheal activity and mechanisms of action of Maytenus erythroxylon (M. erythroxylon) ethanol extract. METHODS A castor oil-induced diarrhea model was used to evaluate antidiarrheal activity. Intestinal transit and gastric emptying protocols were used to evaluate a possible antimotility effect. KATP channels, nitric oxide, presynaptic α2-adrenergic and tissue adrenergic receptors were investigated to uncover antimotility mechanisms of action and castor oil-induced enteropooling to elucidate antisecretory mechanisms. RESULTS All tested doses of the extract (62.5, 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg) possessed antidiarrheal activity, with a significant decrease of the evacuation index. This activity is possibly related to a reduced gastric emptying (125, 250 and 500 mg/kg) and to a decreased percentage of intestinal transit for all tested doses. That last effect seems to be modulated by nitric oxide, KATP channels and tissue adrenergic receptors. Besides, the extract also presented antisecretory effect due to a decrease of intestinal fluid accumulation. CONCLUSION The antidiarrheal effect of M. erythroxylon found in this study involves antimotility and antisecretory mechanisms that may be attributed to the chemical compounds found in this species: saponins, flavonoids, tannins, triterpenes and steroids. PMID:28706420

  9. Maytenus erythroxylon Reissek (Celastraceae) ethanol extract presents antidiarrheal activity via antimotility and antisecretory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formiga, Rodrigo de Oliveira; Quirino, Zelma Glebya Maciel; Diniz, Margareth de Fátima Formiga Melo; Marinho, Alexsandro Fernandes; Tavares, Josean Fechine; Batista, Leônia Maria

    2017-06-28

    To investigate the acute toxicity, phytochemical profile, antidiarrheal activity and mechanisms of action of Maytenus erythroxylon ( M. erythroxylon ) ethanol extract. A castor oil-induced diarrhea model was used to evaluate antidiarrheal activity. Intestinal transit and gastric emptying protocols were used to evaluate a possible antimotility effect. K ATP channels, nitric oxide, presynaptic α2-adrenergic and tissue adrenergic receptors were investigated to uncover antimotility mechanisms of action and castor oil-induced enteropooling to elucidate antisecretory mechanisms. All tested doses of the extract (62.5, 125, 250 and 500 mg/kg) possessed antidiarrheal activity, with a significant decrease of the evacuation index. This activity is possibly related to a reduced gastric emptying (125, 250 and 500 mg/kg) and to a decreased percentage of intestinal transit for all tested doses. That last effect seems to be modulated by nitric oxide, K ATP channels and tissue adrenergic receptors. Besides, the extract also presented antisecretory effect due to a decrease of intestinal fluid accumulation. The antidiarrheal effect of M. erythroxylon found in this study involves antimotility and antisecretory mechanisms that may be attributed to the chemical compounds found in this species: saponins, flavonoids, tannins, triterpenes and steroids.

  10. The modality-switch effect: Visually and aurally presented prime sentences activate our senses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa eScerrati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Verifying different sensory modality properties for concepts results in a processing cost known as the Modality-Switch Effect. It has been argued that this cognitive cost is the result of a perceptual simulation. This paper extends this argument and reports an experiment investigating whether the effect is the result of an activation of sensory information which can also be triggered by perceptual linguistically described stimuli. Participants were first exposed to a prime sentence describing a light or a sound’s perceptual property (e.g. The light is flickering, The sound is echoing, then required to perform a property-verification task on a target sentence (e.g. Butter is yellowish, Leaves rustle. The content modalities of the prime and target sentences could be compatible (i.e. in the same modality: e.g. visual-visual or not (i.e. in different modalities. Crucially, we manipulated the stimuli’s presentation modality such that half of the participants was faced with written sentences while the other half was faced with aurally presented sentences. Results show a cost when two different modalities alternate, compared to when the same modality is repeated with both visual and aural stimuli presentations. This result supports the embodied and grounded cognition view which claims that conceptual knowledge is grounded into the perceptual system. Specifically, this evidence suggests that sensory modalities can be pre-activated through the simulation of either read or listened linguistic stimuli describing visual or acoustic perceptual properties.

  11. Learning to Fly: The Wright Brothers' Adventure. A Guide for Educators and Students with Activities in Aeronautics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, R.; Benson, T.; Galica, C.; McCredie, P.

    2003-01-01

    This guide was produced by the NASA Glenn Research Center Office of Educational Programs in Cleveland, OH, and the NASA Aerospace Educational Coordinating Committee. It includes activity modules for students, including the history of the Wright Brothers and their family in Dayton, Ohio and flight experimentation in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. Student activities such as building models of the Wright Brothers glider and writing press releases of the initial flight are included.

  12. Present-day biogeochemical activities of anaerobic bacteria and their relevance to future exobiological investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R.S.

    1989-01-01

    If the primordial atmosphere was reducing, then the first microbial ecosystem was probably composed of anaerobic bacteria. However, despite the presence of an oxygen-rich atmosphere, anaerobic habitats are important, commonplace components of the Earth's present biosphere. The geochemical activities displayed by these anaerobes impact the global cycling of certain elements (e.g., C, N, S, Fe, Mn, etc.). Methane provides an obvious example of how human-enhanced activities on a global scale can influence the content of a "radiative" (i.e., infrared absorbing) trace gas in the atmosphere. Methane can be oxidized by anaerobic bacteria, but this does not appear to support their growth. Acetylene, however, does support such growth. This may form the basis for future exobiological investigations of the atmospheres of anoxic, hydrocarbon-rich planets like Jupiter and Saturn, as well as the latter's satellite Titan. ?? 1989.

  13. Present and future activities of the IAEA on internal dosimetry: Lessons learned from international intercomparisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz Suarez, R.; Gustafsson, M.; Mrabit, K.

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducts safety activities to support the assessment of occupational exposure due to intakes of radionuclides; a comprehensive set of safety documents will soon be completed. In recent years, extensive improvements in measurement techniques, phantoms and computational tools have been made. Thus, it is important for laboratories involved in internal dosimetry to undergo performance testing procedures to demonstrate the correctness of the methods applied and also to determine the consistency of their results with those obtained by other laboratories. Several intercomparisons were organised, and they revealed significant differences among laboratories in their approaches, methods and assumptions, and consequently in their results. This paper presents the current and future IAEA activities in support of assessment of occupational exposure due to intakes of radionuclides in the IAEA Member States, as well as the lessons learned from several intercomparison exercises in the last 5 years. (author)

  14. Antiprotozoal Activity of Buxus sempervirens and Activity-Guided Isolation of O-tigloylcyclovirobuxeine-B as the Main Constituent Active against Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia B. Althaus

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Buxus sempervirens L. (European Box, Buxaceae has been used in ethnomedicine to treat malaria. In the course of our screening of plant extracts for antiprotozoal activity, a CH2Cl2 extract from leaves of B. sempervirens showed selective in vitro activity against Plasmodium falciparum (IC50 = 2.79 vs. 20.2 µg/mL for cytotoxicity against L6 rat cells. Separation of the extract by acid/base extraction into a basic and a neutral non-polar fraction led to a much more active and even more selective fraction with alkaloids while the fraction of non-polar neutral constituents was markedly less active than the crude extract. Thus, the activity of the crude extract could clearly be attributed to alkaloid constituents. Identification of the main triterpene-alkaloids and characterization of the complex pattern of this alkaloid fraction was performed by UHPLC/+ESI-QTOF-MS analyses. ESI-MS/MS target-guided larger scale preparative separation of the alkaloid fraction was performed by ‘spiral coil-countercurrent chromatography’. From the most active subfraction, the cycloartane alkaloid O-tigloylcyclovirobuxeine-B was isolated and evaluated for antiplasmodial activity which yielded an IC50 of 0.455 µg/mL (cytotoxicity against L6 rat cells: IC50 = 9.38 µg/mL. O-tigloylcyclovirobuxeine-B is thus most significantly responsible for the high potency of the crude extract.

  15. Neural activity induced by visual food stimuli presented out of awareness: a preliminary magnetoencephalography study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Katsuko; Ishii, Akira; Matsuo, Takashi; Nakamura, Chika; Uji, Masato; Yoshikawa, Takahiro

    2018-02-15

    Obesity is a major public health problem in modern society. Appetitive behavior has been proposed to be partially driven by unconscious decision-making processes and thus, targeting the unconscious cognitive processes related to eating behavior is essential to develop strategies for overweight individuals and obese patients. Here, we presented food pictures below the threshold of awareness to healthy male volunteers and examined neural activity related to appetitive behavior using magnetoencephalography. We found that, among participants who did not recognize food pictures during the experiment, an index of heart rate variability assessed by electrocardiography (low-frequency component power/high-frequency component power ratio, LF/HF) just after picture presentation was increased compared with that just before presentation, and the increase in LF/HF was negatively associated with the score for cognitive restraint of food intake. In addition, increased LF/HF was negatively associated with increased alpha band power in Brodmann area (BA) 47 caused by food pictures presented below the threshold of awareness, and level of cognitive restraint was positively associated with increased alpha band power in BA13. Our findings may provide valuable clues to the development of methods assessing unconscious regulation of appetite and offer avenues for further study of the neural mechanisms related to eating behavior.

  16. Mauritia flexuosa Presents In Vitro and In Vivo Antiplatelet and Antithrombotic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Fuentes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fruit from the palm Mauritia flexuosa is one of the most important species in Peru, Venezuela, Brazil, Colombia, Bolivia, and Guyana. The present study aimed to investigate the antiplatelet and antithrombotic activities of oil extracted from Mauritia flexuosa. The fatty acid contents were determined by gas chromatography—mass spectrometry. Oil extract of peel of Mauritia flexuosa was extracted by soxhlet extraction. The oil extract inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, and TRAP-6 by a concentration-dependent way (0.1 to 1 mg/mL without the participation of the adenylyl cyclase pathway and diminished platelet rolling and firm adhesion under flow conditions. Furthermore, the oil extract induced a marked increase in the rolling speed of leukocytes retained on the platelet surface, reflecting a reduction of rolling and less adhesion. At the concentrations used, the oil extract significantly decreased platelet release of sP-selectin, an atherosclerotic-related inflammatory mediator. Oil extract inhibited thrombus growth at the same concentration as that of aspirin, a classical reference drug. Finally, the data presented herein also demonstrate for the first time to our knowledge the protective effect of oil extracted from Mauritia flexuosa on platelet activation and thrombosis formation.

  17. International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility conceptual design activity. Present status and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Tatsuo; Noda, Kenji; Oyama, Yukio

    1998-01-01

    For developing the materials for nuclear fusion reactors, it is indispensable to study on the neutron irradiation behavior under fusion reactor conditions, but there is not any high energy neutron irradiation facility that can simulate fusion reactor conditions at present. Therefore, the investigation of the IFMIF was begun jointly by Japan, USA, Europe and Russia following the initiative of IEA. The conceptual design activities were completed in 1997. As to the background and the course, the present status of the research on heavy irradiation and the testing means for fusion materials, the requirement and the technical basis of high energy neutron irradiation, and the international joint design activities are reported. The materials for fusion reactors are exposed to the neutron irradiation with the energy spectra up to 14 MeV. The requirements from the users that the IFMIF should satisfy, the demand of the tests for the materials of prototype and demonstration fusion reactors and the evaluation of the neutron field characteristics of the IFMIF are discussed. As to the conceptual design of the IFMIF, the whole constitution, the operational mode, accelerator system and target system are described. (K.I.)

  18. Crossmodal Activation of Visual Object Regions for Auditorily Presented Concrete Words

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasper J F van den Bosch

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Dual-coding theory (Paivio, 1986 postulates that the human mind represents objects not just with an analogous, or semantic code, but with a perceptual representation as well. Previous studies (eg, Fiebach & Friederici, 2004 indicated that the modality of this representation is not necessarily the one that triggers the representation. The human visual cortex contains several regions, such as the Lateral Occipital Complex (LOC, that respond specifically to object stimuli. To investigate whether these principally visual representations regions are also recruited for auditory stimuli, we presented subjects with spoken words with specific, concrete meanings (‘car’ as well as words with abstract meanings (‘hope’. Their brain activity was measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Whole-brain contrasts showed overlap between regions differentially activated by words for concrete objects compared to words for abstract concepts with visual regions activated by a contrast of object versus non-object visual stimuli. We functionally localized LOC for individual subjects and a preliminary analysis showed a trend for a concreteness effect in this region-of-interest on the group level. Appropriate further analysis might include connectivity and classification measures. These results can shed light on the role of crossmodal representations in cognition.

  19. Present situation of Japan's public acceptance of nuclear energy - JAERO's activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akama, Kozo

    1993-01-01

    Electricity demand in Japan is expected to keep increasing without doubt, reflecting her constant economic growth and the rising living standard of the people. The target figure is 20.5% or a capacity of 52 million kW, and 11 nuclear power plants with a capacity of 12 million kW are under construction. Whether such a target is achievable depends on whether or not information activities will succeed in obtaining public consensus to the siting of the new nuclear power plants. According to the result of public opinion poll by the Science and Technology Agency in 1992, 73 % people recognize the necessity of nuclear energy, however, 10% feel uneasy as well. It seems that the scale of damage caused by severe accidents and the distrust against nuclear promoters are major factors to create uneasiness among the people. This presentation describes public information activities by JAERO, the Japan Atomic Energy Relations Organization (JAERO), a non-profit organization established in 1969. There is no secret strategy or specific remedy to obtain public consensus on the nuclear issues, and an immediate effect is in no way expected, either. It is all the more imperative to enhance the safety of nuclear power plants, pursue further the operational safety, and to gain the trust from the general public. We must investigate more effective means for public information activities to gain public consent, and implement them positively and continuously with beliefs. We are prepared to do so. Activities for public acceptance of nuclear energy may vary in line with the situation in each country. It is therefore very meaningful to have the experts' gatherings like this workshop to exchange, views on the public acceptance

  20. Latent Presentation of Decompression Sickness After Altitude Chamber Training in an Active Duty Flier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, James; Rango, Juan; Zhang, Jianzhong; Biedermann, Shane

    2017-04-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a potential danger and risk for both divers and aircrew alike. DCS is also a potential side effect of altitude (hypobaric) chamber training as well and can present long after training occurs. Literature review shows that altitude chamber induced DCS has approximately a 0.25% incidence. A 32-yr-old, active duty military member developed symptoms of DCS 3 h after his hypobaric chamber training. Unfortunately, he did not seek treatment for DCS until 48 h after the exposure. His initial treatment included ground level oxygen therapy for 30 min at 12 L of oxygen per minute using a nonrebreathing mask. He achieved complete symptom resolution and was returned to duty. However, 12 d after his initial Flight Medicine evaluation, the patient returned complaining of a right temporal headache, multijoint pains, and fatigue. He was treated in the hyperbaric chamber and had complete resolution of symptoms. He was returned to flying status and 5 mo later denied any return of symptoms. Hypobaric chamber familiarity training is a requirement for all military aircrew personnel to allow them assess their ability to identify symptoms of hypoxia. This training method is not only costly to maintain, but it also places aircrew and chamber technicians at risk for potential long-term side effects from failed recompression treatment of DCS. We are presenting a case of recurrent DCS symptoms 12 d after initial ground level oxygen therapy.Gentry J, Rango J, Zhang J, Biedermann S. Latent presentation of decompression sickness after altitude chamber training in an active duty flier. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2017; 88(4):427-430.

  1. Activity-Guided Isolation of Bioactive Constituents with Antinociceptive Activity from Muntingia calabura L. Leaves Using the Formalin Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd. Izwan Mohamad Yusof

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted to determine the antinociceptive potential of methanol extract of Muntingia calabura L. (MEMC and to isolate and identify the bioactive compound(s responsible for the observed antinociceptive activity. The MEMC and its partitions (petroleum ether (PEP, ethyl acetate (EAP, and aqueous (AQP partitions, in the dose range of 100, 500, and 1000 mg/kg, were tested using the formalin-induced nociceptive test. The PEP, which exerted the most effective activity in the respective early and late phase, was further subjected to the fractionation procedures and yielded seven fractions (labelled A to G. These fractions were tested, at the dose of 300 mg/kg, together with distilled water or 10% DMSO (negative controls; morphine and aspirin (positive controls for potential antinociceptive activity. Of all fractions, Fraction D showed the most significant antinociceptive activity, which is considered as equieffective to morphine or aspirin in the early or late phase, respectively. Further isolation and identification processes on fraction D led to the identification of three known and one new compounds, namely, 5-hydroxy-3,7,8-trimethoxyflavone (1, 3,7-dimethoxy-5-hydroyflavone (2, 2′,4′-dihydroxy-3′-methoxychalcone (3, and calaburone (4. At the dose of 50 mg/kg, compound 3 exhibited the highest percentage of antinociceptive activity in both phases of the formalin test. In conclusion, the antinociceptive activity of MEMC involved, partly, the synergistic activation of the flavonoid types of compounds.

  2. South Carolina Guide for Sales Promotion. Marketing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Ronald T.

    This guide presents a competency-based curriculum for a high school course in sales promotion. It addresses all three domains of learning: psychomotor, cognitive, and affective. Activities suggested in the guide deal with getting along with others, with supervisors or staff members, and with small or large groups. The guide, which can be used with…

  3. Optical Design of COATLI: A Diffraction-Limited Visible Imager with Fast Guiding and Active Optics Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Fernández, J.; Cuevas, S.; Watson, A. M.

    2018-04-01

    We present the optical design of COATLI, a two channel visible imager for a comercial 50 cm robotic telescope. COATLI will deliver diffraction-limited images (approximately 0.3 arcsec FWHM) in the riz bands, inside a 4.2 arcmin field, and seeing limited images (approximately 0.6 arcsec FWHM) in the B and g bands, inside a 5 arcmin field, by means of a tip-tilt mirror for fast guiding, and a deformable mirror for active optics, both located on two optically transferred pupil planes. The optical design is based on two collimator-camera systems plus a pupil transfer relay, using achromatic doublets of CaF2 and S-FTM16 and one triplet of N-BK7 and CaF2. We discuss the effciency, tolerancing, thermal behavior and ghosts. COATLI will be installed at the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional in Sierra San Pedro Mártir, Baja California, Mexico, in 2018.

  4. Applied and industrial activities at the ESRF: Present status and future development

    CERN Document Server

    Doucet, J

    2003-01-01

    Be it proteins, new superconductors, polymers or ferro-magnetic compounds, fundamental research is laying foundations for possible technical applications as well as industrial exploitation. At the ESRF, industrial companies can be involved in two main ways, depending on the type of research they are interested in. The first concerns beam time allocation for non-proprietary and fully-published research, the procedure is the same as for public laboratories. The second concerns the proprietary research, for which a fee is charged and where results are kept confidential. The use of synchrotron radiation for the characterisation of materials is certain to play a crucial role in the development of new materials in the close future. It is a policy of the ESRF that European industry should share the benefit of its facilities. A survey of the today industrial activity at the ESRF and of its perspective in near future is presented.

  5. 21st Century Extravehicular Activities: Synergizing Past and Present Training Methods for Future Spacewalking Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sandra K.; Gast, Matthew A.

    2009-01-01

    Neil Armstrong's understated words, "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind." were spoken from Tranquility Base forty years ago. Even today, those words resonate in the ears of millions, including many who had yet to be born when man first landed on the surface of the moon. By their very nature, and in the the spirit of exploration, extravehicular activities (EVAs) have generated much excitement throughout the history of manned spaceflight. From Ed White's first space walk in June of 1965, to the first steps on the moon in 1969, to the expected completion of the International Space Station (ISS), the ability to exist, live and work in the vacuum of space has stood as a beacon of what is possible. It was NASA's first spacewalk that taught engineers on the ground the valuable lesson that successful spacewalking requires a unique set of learned skills. That lesson sparked extensive efforts to develop and define the training requirements necessary to ensure success. As focus shifted from orbital activities to lunar surface activities, the required skill-set and subsequently the training methods, changed. The requirements duly changed again when NASA left the moon for the last time in 1972 and have continued to evolve through the Skylab, Space Shuttle; and ISS eras. Yet because the visits to the moon were so long ago, NASA's expertise in the realm of extra-terrestrial EVAs has diminished. As manned spaceflight again shifts its focus beyond low earth orbit, EVA success will depend on the ability to synergize the knowledge gained over 40+ years of spacewalking to create a training method that allows a single crewmember to perform equally well, whether performing an EVA on the surface of the Moon, while in the vacuum of space, or heading for a rendezvous with Mars. This paper reviews NASA's past and present EVA training methods and extrapolates techniques from both to construct the basis for future EVA astronaut training.

  6. 21st Century extravehicular activities: Synergizing past and present training methods for future spacewalking success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Sandra K.; Gast, Matthew A.

    2010-10-01

    Neil Armstrong's understated words, "That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind" were spoken from Tranquility Base forty years ago. Even today, those words resonate in the ears of millions, including many who had yet to be born when man first landed on the surface of the moon. By their very nature, and in the true spirit of exploration, extravehicular activities (EVAs) have generated much excitement throughout the history of manned spaceflight. From Ed White's first spacewalk in the June of 1965, to the first steps on the moon in 1969, to the expected completion of the International Space Station (ISS), the ability to exist, live and work in the vacuum of space has stood as a beacon of what is possible. It was NASA's first spacewalk that taught engineers on the ground the valuable lesson that successful spacewalking requires a unique set of learned skills. That lesson sparked extensive efforts to develop and define the training requirements necessary to ensure success. As focus shifted from orbital activities to lunar surface activities, the required skill set and subsequently the training methods changed. The requirements duly changed again when NASA left the moon for the last time in 1972 and have continued to evolve through the SkyLab, Space Shuttle, and ISS eras. Yet because the visits to the moon were so long ago, NASA's expertise in the realm of extra-terrestrial EVAs has diminished. As manned spaceflight again shifts its focus beyond low earth orbit, EVA's success will depend on the ability to synergize the knowledge gained over 40+ years of spacewalking to create a training method that allows a single crewmember to perform equally well, whether performing an EVA on the surface of the Moon, while in the vacuum of space, or heading for a rendezvous with Mars. This paper reviews NASA's past and present EVA training methods and extrapolates techniques from both to construct the basis for future EVA astronaut training.

  7. A new parameter to simultaneously assess antioxidant activity for multiple phenolic compounds present in food products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Xue, Xuejia; Li, Huan; Tay-Chan, Su Chin; Ong, Seng Poon; Tian, Edmund Feng

    2017-08-15

    In this work, we established a new methodology to simultaneously assess the relative reaction rates of multiple antioxidant compounds in one experimental set-up. This new methodology hypothesizes that the competition among antioxidant compounds towards limiting amount of free radical (in this article, DPPH) would reflect their relative reaction rates. In contrast with the conventional detection of DPPH decrease at 515nm on a spectrophotometer, depletion of antioxidant compounds treated by a series of DPPH concentrations was monitored instead using liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight (LC-QTOF). A new parameter, namely relative antioxidant activity (RAA), has been proposed to rank these antioxidants according to their reaction rate constants. We have investigated the applicability of RAA using pre-mixed standard phenolic compounds, and also extended this application to two food products, i.e. red wine and green tea. It has been found that RAA correlates well with the reported k values. This new parameter, RAA, provides a new perspective in evaluating antioxidant compounds present in food and herbal matrices. It not only realistically reflects the antioxidant activity of compounds when co-existing with competitive constituents; and it could also quicken up the discovery process in the search for potent yet rare antioxidants from many herbs of food/medicinal origins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Present status of low activation materials R and D for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohyama, Akira

    1999-01-01

    Low activation materials development is one of the key technologies for fusion engineering. Starting with a brief introduction about design concepts of low activation materials for fusion, current activities on the major three low activation material categories, such as low activation ferritic steels, vanadium alloys and SiC/SiC composite materials, are provided. Material database improvement in low-activation ferritic steel R and D and material property improvements in SiC/SiC are emphasized. (author)

  9. HBR guides

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte, Nancy; Dillon, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Master your most pressing professional challenges with this seven-volume set that collects the smartest best practices from leading experts all in one place. "HBR Guide to Better Business Writing" and "HBR Guide to Persuasive Presentations" help you perfect your communication skills; "HBR Guide to Managing Up and Across" and "HBR Guide to Office Politics" show you how to build the best professional relationships; "HBR Guide to Finance Basics for Managers" is the one book you'll ever need to teach you about the numbers; "HBR Guide to Project Management" addresses tough questions such as how to manage stakeholder expectations and how to manage uncertainty in a complex project; and "HBR Guide to Getting the Right Work Done" goes beyond basic productivity tips to teach you how to prioritize and focus on your work. This specially priced set of the most popular books in the series makes a perfect gift for aspiring leaders looking for trusted advice. Arm yourself with the advice you need to succeed on the job, from ...

  10. Gamma activity as a guide for the building raw materials selection and controlling the environmental hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Ye. Kaglyan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Results of the specific activity of 90Sr and 137Cs estimation at the indigenous representatives of fish fauna in water bodies of the Chernobyl exclusion zone are presented during 2006 - 2011. The data of species specificity of radionuclide accumulation and distributing in different organs and tissues of pray and predatory fishes in water bodies with different hydrological regime and level of radioactive contamination are analyzed. The size, weight and age dynamics of radionuclide accumulation in fish are evaluated. It is note, that presently 90Sr is main dose-formed radionuclide for fishes of stagnant water bodies of the Chernobyl exclusion zone.

  11. Cardiorespiratory fitness moderates the effect of an affect-guided physical activity prescription: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Austin S; Kangas, Julie L; Denman, Deanna C; Smits, Jasper A J; Yamada, Tetsuhiro; Otto, Michael W

    2016-11-01

    Physical activity (PA) interventions have a clear role in promoting mental health. Current PA guidelines directed toward specific PA intensities may have negative effects on affective response to exercise, and affective response is an important determinant of PA adherence. In this randomized trial of 67 previously inactive adults, we compared the effects of a PA prescription emphasizing the maintenance of positive affect to one emphasizing a target heart rate, and tested the extent to which the effect of the affect-guided prescription on PA is moderated by cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF). We found the effect of an affect-guided prescription was significantly moderated by CRF. At one week, for participants with lower CRF (i.e. poor conditioning), the affect-guided prescription resulted in significantly greater change in PA minutes (M = 240.8) than the heart rate-guided prescription (M = 165.7), reflecting a moderate-sized effect (d = .55). For those with higher CRF (i.e. good conditioning), the means were in the opposite direction but not significantly different. At one month, the same pattern emerged but the interaction was not significant. We discuss the implications of these findings for the type of PA prescriptions offered to individuals in need.

  12. Guide related to the management of activities in the vicinity of INBs - Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This document aims at proposing a national framework for local dialogue on the management of activities in the vicinity of nuclear sites. According to official documents, this dialogue between local actors and public services, based on risk characterization, aims at examining peculiarities and challenges of the concerned territory, and at identifying the most adapted perspectives for economic development while taking risks related to nuclear activities into account. The document first gives an overview of modalities for the taking of the nuclear risk into account. It proposes some definitions related to these issues, indicates general principles of management of activities in the vicinity of basic nuclear installations, and presents some general rules regarding project vulnerability, current projects, road infrastructures, and outdoor temporary events. The next part of the report addresses issues related to local dialogue: roles and missions of the different actors, expected approach at the local level (risk characterization, definition of the area of activity management, territory pre-diagnosis, elaboration of the 'bringing to attention', exchanges with local actors). Appendices present the legal context related to risk management, and a model of requirements specification for a territory pre-diagnosis

  13. Activity-based cost analysis of hepatic tumor ablation using CT-guided high-dose rate brachytherapy or CT-guided radiofrequency ablation in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnapauff, D; Collettini, F; Steffen, I; Wieners, G; Hamm, B; Gebauer, B; Maurer, M H

    2016-02-25

    To analyse and compare the costs of hepatic tumor ablation with computed tomography (CT)-guided high-dose rate brachytherapy (CT-HDRBT) and CT-guided radiofrequency ablation (CT-RFA) as two alternative minimally invasive treatment options of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). An activity based process model was created determining working steps and required staff of CT-RFA and CT-HDRBT. Prorated costs of equipment use (purchase, depreciation, and maintenance), costs of staff, and expenditure for disposables were identified in a sample of 20 patients (10 treated by CT-RFA and 10 by CT-HDRBT) and compared. A sensitivity and break even analysis was performed to analyse the dependence of costs on the number of patients treated annually with both methods. Costs of CT-RFA were nearly stable with mean overall costs of approximately 1909 €, 1847 €, 1816 € and 1801 € per patient when treating 25, 50, 100 or 200 patients annually, as the main factor influencing the costs of this procedure was the single-use RFA probe. Mean costs of CT-HDRBT decreased significantly per patient ablation with a rising number of patients treated annually, with prorated costs of 3442 €, 1962 €, 1222 € and 852 € when treating 25, 50, 100 or 200 patients, due to low costs of single-use disposables compared to high annual fix-costs which proportionally decreased per patient with a higher number of patients treated annually. A break-even between both methods was reached when treating at least 55 patients annually. Although CT-HDRBT is a more complex procedure with more staff involved, it can be performed at lower costs per patient from the perspective of the medical provider when treating more than 55 patients compared to CT-RFA, mainly due to lower costs for disposables and a decreasing percentage of fixed costs with an increasing number of treatments.

  14. Piper betel leaf extract: anticancer benefits and bio-guided fractionation to identify active principles for prostate cancer management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paranjpe, Rutugandha; Gundala, Sushma R; Lakshminarayana, N; Sagwal, Arpana; Asif, Ghazia; Pandey, Anjali; Aneja, Ritu

    2013-07-01

    Plant extracts, a concoction of bioactive non-nutrient phytochemicals, have long served as the most significant source of new leads for anticancer drug development. Explored for their unique medicinal properties, the leaves of Piper betel, an evergreen perennial vine, are a reservoir of phenolics with antimutagenic, antitumor and antioxidant activities. Here, we show that oral feeding of betel leaf extract (BLE) significantly inhibited the growth of human prostate xenografts implanted in nude mice compared with vehicle-fed controls. To gain insights into the 'active principles', we performed a bioactivity-guided fractionation of methanolic BLE employing solvents of different polarity strengths using classical column chromatography. This approach yielded 15 fractions, which were then pooled to 10 using similar retention factors on thin-layer chromatographs. Bioactivity assays demonstrated that one fraction in particular, F2, displayed a 3-fold better in vitro efficacy to inhibit proliferation of prostate cancer cells than the parent BLE. The presence of phenols, hydroxychavicol (HC) and chavibetol (CHV), was confirmed in F2 by nuclear magnetic resonance, high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy. Further, the HC containing F2 subfraction was found to be ~8-fold more potent than the F2 subfraction that contained CHV, in human prostate cancer PC-3 cells as evaluated by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay. Removing CHV from F2 remarkably decreased the IC50 of this fraction, indicating that HC is perhaps the major bioactive constituent, which is present to an extent of 26.59% in BLE. These data provide evidence that HC is a potential candidate for prostate cancer management and warrants further preclinical evaluation.

  15. A novel synthetic quinolinone inhibitor presents proteolytic and hemorrhagic inhibitory activities against snake venom metalloproteases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraldi, Patrícia T; Magro, Angelo J; Matioli, Fábio F; Marcussi, Silvana; Lemke, Ney; Calderon, Leonardo A; Stábeli, Rodrigo G; Soares, Andreimar M; Correa, Arlene G; Fontes, Marcos R M

    2016-02-01

    Metalloproteases play a fundamental role in snake venom envenomation inducing hemorrhagic, fibrigen(ogen)olytic and myotoxic effects in their victims. Several snake venoms, such as those from the Bothrops genus, present important local effects which are not efficiently neutralized by conventional serum therapy. Consequently, these accidents may result in permanent sequelae and disability, creating economic and social problems, especially in developing countries, leading the attention of the World Health Organization that considered ophidic envenomations a neglected tropical disease. Aiming to produce an efficient inhibitor against bothropic venoms, we synthesized different molecules classified as quinolinones - a group of low-toxic chemical compounds widely used as antibacterial and antimycobacterial drugs - and tested their inhibitory properties against hemorrhage caused by bothropic venoms. The results from this initial screening indicated the molecule 2-hydroxymethyl-6-methoxy-1,4-dihydro-4-quinolinone (Q8) was the most effective antihemorrhagic compound among all of the assayed synthetic quinolinones. Other in vitro and in vivo experiments showed this novel compound was able to inhibit significantly the hemorrhagic and/or proteolytic activities of bothropic crude venoms and isolated snake venom metalloproteases (SVMPs) even at lower concentrations. Docking and molecular dynamic simulations were also performed to get insights into the structural basis of Q8 inhibitory mechanism against proteolytic and hemorrhagic SVMPs. These structural studies demonstrated that Q8 may form a stable complex with SVMPs, impairing the access of substrates to the active sites of these toxins. Therefore, both experimental and structural data indicate that Q8 compound is an interesting candidate for antiophidic therapy, particularly for the treatment of the hemorrhagic and necrotic effects induced by bothropic venoms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de

  16. Cleaning and dismantling of a high activity laboratory (abstract and presentation slides)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bredel; Thierry; Buzare, Alain

    2005-01-01

    The high activity laboratories have been built at the end of the 50ies. The particularity of this facility was that about 14 different laboratories worked in 14 different fields (biology, production of Cs and Cf sources, metallurgy, mechanical testing ...). Because of the optimization of the nuclear research, the CEA decided to close progressively this facility and to transfer the different experiments in other places. This action began in 1997 and is planed to end in 2010. 6 laboratories have been closed from 1997 to 2001 and the dismantling of the shielded cells has begun since 2002. Therefore, several laboratories have been cleaned of the materials and experiments. Nevertheless, the main particularity of this subject is that some experimental activities have been pursued during the cleaning and dismantling of other laboratories. For example, we describe the dismantling of the laboratory that performed metallurgical and mechanical characterization of irradiated materials. This laboratory occupied 20 lead cells and 2 glove boxes. The exploitation of those cells has been stopped progressively (12 at the end of 2001 and 5 at the end of 2003). The end of the last 3 cell exploitation is planed to end 2005. Since the end of 2001, 9 lead cells have been cleaned. Their dismantling is planed for next the two years. In parallel, we will clean all the other cells. During this phase we will have also to transfer all the irradiated samples (about 5000) that are still in the laboratory to the waste treatment facility of the CEA centre or to the new laboratory which has been presented during the previous hotlab meeting in Saclay. The paper gives details for background about ended operations: Organization, waste production, specific designs which improve radioprotection, waste destinations and costs, Difficulties and feedback experience of dismantling. (Author)

  17. Physical Activity and Motor Competence Present a Positive Reciprocal Longitudinal Relationship Across Childhood and Early Adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Rodrigo A; Pfeiffer, Karin; Larsen, Lisbeth R; Bugge, Anna; Moller, Niels C; Anderson, Lars B; Stodden, David F

    2017-06-01

    The current study evaluated the reciprocal longitudinal relationship between physical activity (PA) and motor competence (MC) and the potential mediation of cardiorespiratory endurance across 7 years. This was a 7-year longitudinal study, the Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study (CoSCIS), with 3 measuring points [mean ages (in years) and respective sample size: 6.75 ± 0.37, n = 696; 9.59 ± 1.07, n = 617; 13.35 ± 0.34, n = 513]. PA was assessed using accelerometers. MC was evaluated by the Körperkoordinationstest für Kinder (KTK) test battery. Cardiorespiratory fitness (VO 2 peak) was evaluated using a continuous running protocol until exhaustion. Structural equation modeling was performed to evaluate the longitudinal associations. Vigorous PA (VPA) and MC presented reciprocal longitudinal association during the 7-year follow-up (VPA → MC; β = 0.18; 95% CI: 0.10, 0.26; MC → VPA; β = 0.14; 95% CI: 0.08, 0.21). In addition, VO 2 peak mediated the relationship in both directions (VPA → MC; β = 0.09; 95% CI: 0.06, 0.12; MC → VPA; β = 0.06; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.09). PA and MC presented a positive reciprocal relationship across childhood through early adolescence and VO 2 peak mediated the association in both directions. Interventions targeting to increase PA in children and adolescents should also address the development of MC skills because of the clear positive feedback loop between PA and MC.

  18. Management of soils polluted by activities of a basic nuclear installations. Guide Nr 24, Release of the 2016/08/30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    After having indicated the relevant regulatory texts and guides related to sanitation and dismantling, and having stated definitions of some important terms, this guide addresses the sanitation or soil management approach to be adopted as soon as a soil pollution requires it. This pollution can be radioactive or chemical, and the case of a pollution going out of the installation is also included. Legal responsibility is outlined. The guide aims then at detailing the articulation between the various concerned and relevant documents for the management of a radioactive or chemical pollution related to the activities of a basic nuclear installation (BNI), and at detailing ASN expectations in this respect. Thus, it recalls the adopted management approach and methodological tools: diagnosis, interpretation of environment condition, management plan. It describes the approach related to soil sanitation: diagnosis, document to be produced, field and additional investigations, implementation of the reference approach for a complete removal of pollution, actions to be undertaken when the application of the reference approach is impossible, end of sanitation works. The third part discusses the methodology of soil sanitation by excavation by distinguishing three defence lines, by discussing the management of excavated soils (management modalities, warehousing within the installation). Administrative procedures to be applied before, during and after sanitation works are then presented. Specific management approaches are indicated for a BNI being operated or being dismantled. Actions of information are also indicated. Finally, requirements in terms of quality assurance are evoked

  19. Exploring the Extreme: High Performance Learning Activities in Mathematics, Science and Technology. An Educator's Guide. EG-2002-10-001-DFRC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dana, Judi; Kock, Meri; Lewis, Mike; Peterson, Bruce; Stowe, Steve

    2010-01-01

    The many activities contained in this teaching guide emphasize hands-on involvement, prediction, data collection and interpretation, teamwork, and problem solving. The guide also contains background information about aeronautical research that can help students learn how airplanes fly. Following the background sections are a series of activities…

  20. Bioassay-guided fractionation of Melastoma malabathricum Linn. leaf solid phase extraction fraction and its anticoagulant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Li Teng; Abdullah, Janna Ong; Abas, Faridah; Tohit, Eusni Rahayu Mohd; Hamid, Muhajir

    2015-02-24

    The aims of this study were to examine the bioactive component(s) responsible for the anticoagulant activity of M. malabathricum Linn. leaf hot water crude extract via bioassay-guided fractionation and to evaluate the effect of bioactive component(s) on the intrinsic blood coagulation pathway. The active anticoagulant fraction of F3 was subjected to a series of chromatographic separation and spectroscopic analyses. Furthermore, the effect of the bioactive component(s) on the intrinsic blood coagulation pathway was studied through immediate and time incubation mixing studies. Through Activated Partial Thromboplastin Time (APTT) assay-guided fractionation, Subfraction B was considered the most potent anticoagulant fraction. Characterisation of Subfraction B indicated that anticoagulant activity could partly be due to the presence of cinnamic acid and a cinnamic acid derivative. APTT assays for both the immediate and time incubation mixing were corrected back into normal clotting time range (35.4-56.3 s). In conclusion, cinnamic acid and cinnamic acid derivative from Subfraction B were the first such compounds to be discovered from M. malabathricum Linn. leaf hot water crude extract that possess anticoagulant activity. This active anticoagulant Subfraction B prolonged blood clotting time by causing factor(s) deficiency in the intrinsic blood coagulation pathway.

  1. Beyond the limits of present active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) for diagnostic radiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonuk, Larry E.; El-Mohri, Youcef; Jee, Kyung-Wook; Maolinbay, Manat; Nassif, Samer C.; Rong, Xiujiang; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Zhao, Qihua; Street, Robert A.

    1999-05-01

    A theoretical cascaded systems analysis of the performance limits of x-ray imagers based on thin-film, active matrix flat-panel technology is presented. This analysis specifically focuses upon an examination of the functional dependence of the detective quantum efficiency on exposure. While the DQE of AMFPI systems is relatively high at the large exposure levels associated with radiographic x-ray imaging, there is a significant decline in DQE with decreasing exposure over the medium and lower end of the exposure range associated with fluoroscopic imaging. This fall-off in DQE originates from the relatively large size of the additive noise of AMFPI systems compared to their overall system gain. Therefore, strategies to diminish additive noise and increase system gain should significantly improve performance. Potential strategies for noise reduction include the use of charge compensation lines while strategies for gain enhancement include continuous photodiodes, pixel amplification structures, or higher gain converters. The effect of the implementation of such strategies is examined for a variety for hypothetical imager configurations. Through the modeling of these configurations, such enhancements are shown to hold the potential of making low frequency DQE response large and essentially independent of exposure while greatly reducing the fall-off in DQE at higher spatial frequencies.

  2. A Field Guide to Outdoor Learning in Powell County, Biome Descriptions, Field Activities, Field Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell County High School, Deer Lodge, MT.

    Serving as a guide to the outdoor areas of Powell County, Montana, and the surrounding area, this resource book is useful for teachers who wish to explore the out-of-doors with their students, particularly those interested in nature studies. Its aim is to produce a citizenry that is knowledgeable concerning the biophysical environment and its…

  3. Gravity Probe B: Examining Einstein's Spacetime with Gyroscopes. An Educator's Guide with Activities in Space Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Range, Shannon K'doah; Mullins, Jennifer

    This teaching guide introduces a relativity gyroscope experiment aiming to test two unverified predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. An introduction to the theory includes the following sections: (1) "Spacetime, Curved Spacetime, and Frame-Dragging"; (2) "'Seeing' Spacetime with Gyroscopes"; (3)…

  4. Hospitality Services. Curriculum Guide [and] Student Activity Book [and] Reference Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Curriculum Center for Family and Consumer Sciences.

    These three publications comprise a course that provides occupationally specific training designed to develop knowledge and skills for employment in the multifaceted hospitality services industry. The curriculum guide is the teacher component of the series. Contents include the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS); sample course outlines;…

  5. Asymmetric Aldol Additions: A Guided-Inquiry Laboratory Activity on Catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Jorge H. Torres; Wang, Hong; Yezierski, Ellen J.

    2018-01-01

    Despite the importance of asymmetric catalysis in both the pharmaceutical and commodity chemicals industries, asymmetric catalysis is under-represented in undergraduate chemistry laboratory curricula. A novel guided-inquiry experiment based on the asymmetric aldol addition was developed. Students conduct lab work to compare the effectiveness of…

  6. Management of Wolff-Parkinson-White Tachyarrhythmia Presenting as Syncope with Seizure-like Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Kaplan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: Emergency Medicine residents and medical students. Introduction: An estimated 3% of the United States population suffers from recurrent convulsive episodes that are most often attributed to primary epileptic seizures.1 However, recent studies have estimated about 20%-30% of such episodes are associated with occult cardiac etiology,2 which carry one-year mortality rates of up to 30%.3 Cardiogenic cerebral hypoxia has been associated with a wide variety of neurologic disturbances, including dizzy spells, headache, syncope, focal motor deficit, generalized tonic-clonic seizure, confusion, dementia, and psychosis.4 Convulsive activity has tentatively been ascribed to the ensuing activation of the medullary reticular formation.5,6 This scenario is based on a patient that presented to University of California Irvine Medical Center Emergency Department in April 2017 who, following witnessed seizure-like episodes, was diagnosed with underlying Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW disorder. WPW is a congenital condition involving aberrantly conductive cardiac tissue between the atria and the ventricles that provides a pathway for a reentrant tachycardia circuit and ventricular pre-excitation.7 Diagnosis is primarily based on the presence of a short PR interval and delta waves on electrocardiography.8 While definitive treatment is catheter-based radiofrequency ablation of the accessory pathway, the hallmark of acute management is vagal maneuvers and antiarrhythmic drugs in the symptomatic but hemodynamically stable patient, and synchronized cardioversion in the unstable patient.9 WPW is thought to affect between 0.1% and 0.3% of the population, and while the usual clinical course is benign, sudden cardiac death occurs in about 3%-4% of such patients.7,10 One survey found 19% of patients with WPW had a history of syncopal episodes;11 however, precise prevalence surveys of WPW-associated seizure-like episodes are lacking in the current literature. This case

  7. Smart Novel Semi-Active Tuned Mass Damper for Fixed-Bottom and Floating Offshore Wind (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez Tsouroukdissian, Arturo [Alstom Renewable US LLC

    2016-05-02

    The intention of this paper is to present the results of a novel smart semi-active tuned mass damper (SA-TMD), which mitigates unwanted loads for both fixed-bottom and floating offshore wind systems. (Presentation Format).

  8. Evaluating the Acceptability and Usability of EASEL: A Mobile Application that Supports Guided Reflection for Experiential Learning Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerry C Schnepp

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: To examine the early perceptions (acceptability and usability of EASEL (Education through Application-Supported Experiential Learning, a mobile platform that delivers reflection prompts and content before, during, and after an experiential learning activity. Background: Experiential learning is an active learning approach in which students learn by doing and by reflecting on the experience. This approach to teaching is often used in disciplines such as humanities, business, and medicine. Reflection before, during, and after an experience allows the student to analyze what they learn and why it is important, which is vital in helping them to understand the relevance of the experience. A just-in-time tool (EASEL was needed to facilitate this. Methodology: To inform the development of a mobile application that facilitates real-time guided reflection and to determine the relevant feature set, we conducted a needs analysis with both students and faculty members. Data collected during this stage of the evaluation helped guide the creation of a prototype. The user experience of the prototype and interface interactions were evaluated during the usability phase of the evaluation study. Contribution: Both the needs analysis and usability assessment provided justification for continued development of EASEL as well as insight that guides current development. Findings: The interaction design of EASEL is understandable and usable. Both students and teachers value an application that facilitates real-time guided reflection. Recommendations for Practitioners: The use of a system such as EASEL can leverage time and location-based services to support students in field experiences. This technology aligns with evidence that guided reflection provides opportunities for metacognition. Recommendation for Researchers: Iterative prototyping, testing, and refinement can lead to a deliberate and effective app development process. Impact on Society: The EASEL

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging guided transatrial electrophysiological studies in swine using active catheter tracking - experience with 14 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grothoff, Matthias; Gutberlet, Matthias [University of Leipzig - Heart Center, Department of Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Hindricks, Gerhard; Sommer, Philipp; Hilbert, Sebastian [University of Leipzig - Heart Center, Department of Electrophysiology, Leipzig (Germany); Fleiter, Christian [Helios Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Berlin (Germany); Schnackenburg, Bernhard [Philips Healthcare, Hamburg (Germany); Weiss, Steffen; Krueger, Sascha [Philips Innovative Technologies, Hamburg (Germany); Piorkowski, Christopher; Gaspar, Thomas [University of Dresden - Heart Center, Department of Electrophysiology, Dresden (Germany); Wedan, Steve; Lloyd, Thomas [Imricor Medical Systems, Burnsville, MN (United States)

    2017-05-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of performing comprehensive Cardiac Magnetic resonance (CMR) guided electrophysiological (EP) interventions in a porcine model encompassing left atrial access. After introduction of two femoral sheaths 14 swine (41 ± 3.6 kg) were transferred to a 1.5 T MR scanner. A three-dimensional whole-heart sequence was acquired followed by segmentation and the visualization of all heart chambers using an image-guidance platform. Two MR conditional catheters were inserted. The interventional protocol consisted of intubation of the coronary sinus, activation mapping, transseptal left atrial access (n = 4), generation of ablation lesions and eventually ablation of the atrioventricular (AV) node. For visualization of the catheter tip active tracking was used. Catheter positions were confirmed by passive real-time imaging. Total procedure time was 169 ± 51 minutes. The protocol could be completed in 12 swine. Two swine died from AV-ablation induced ventricular fibrillation. Catheters could be visualized and navigated under active tracking almost exclusively. The position of the catheter tips as visualized by active tracking could reliably be confirmed with passive catheter imaging. Comprehensive CMR-guided EP interventions including left atrial access are feasible in swine using active catheter tracking. (orig.)

  10. Present status of research activities conducted by research group for heavy elements microbiology in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Ozaki, Takuo; Yoshida, Takahiro

    2004-01-01

    It has been recognized that microbial transformations of radionuclides and toxic metals could be significant in the environment, but there is a paucity of information on the mechanisms of biotransformation of radionuclides by the microorganisms. An understanding at the fundamental level the mechanisms of mobilization, immobilization and bioavailability of radioactive elements in particular the actinides is important from the standpoint of mobility of actinides in the environment, disposal of radioactive wastes in deep geological formation, remediation of contaminated soils and materials, and development of strategies for the long-term stewardship of the contaminated sites. The microbiology research group in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) is conducting basic scientific research on microbial interactions with actinides. Fundamental research on microbial transformations of actinides include elucidation of the mechanisms of dissolution and precipitation of various chemical forms such as ionic, oxides, organic and inorganic complexes of actinides by aerobic or anaerobic microorganisms under relevant microbial process conditions. State-of-the-art analytical techniques are used to determine the interaction of actinides with microorganisms at the molecular level to understand the structure function relationship. These techniques include time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) to determine the coordination number, oxidation states and the nearest neighbor by X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) at the Synchrotron Light Source, identification of functional groups by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), determination of chemical forms by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and genomic (DNA) manipulation by molecular techniques. We here report the present status of our research activities on accumulation of lanthanides(III) by microorganisms, application of micro-particle induced X

  11. Improved Neural Signal Classification in a Rapid Serial Visual Presentation Task Using Active Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marathe, Amar R; Lawhern, Vernon J; Wu, Dongrui; Slayback, David; Lance, Brent J

    2016-03-01

    The application space for brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies is rapidly expanding with improvements in technology. However, most real-time BCIs require extensive individualized calibration prior to use, and systems often have to be recalibrated to account for changes in the neural signals due to a variety of factors including changes in human state, the surrounding environment, and task conditions. Novel approaches to reduce calibration time or effort will dramatically improve the usability of BCI systems. Active Learning (AL) is an iterative semi-supervised learning technique for learning in situations in which data may be abundant, but labels for the data are difficult or expensive to obtain. In this paper, we apply AL to a simulated BCI system for target identification using data from a rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) paradigm to minimize the amount of training samples needed to initially calibrate a neural classifier. Our results show AL can produce similar overall classification accuracy with significantly less labeled data (in some cases less than 20%) when compared to alternative calibration approaches. In fact, AL classification performance matches performance of 10-fold cross-validation (CV) in over 70% of subjects when training with less than 50% of the data. To our knowledge, this is the first work to demonstrate the use of AL for offline electroencephalography (EEG) calibration in a simulated BCI paradigm. While AL itself is not often amenable for use in real-time systems, this work opens the door to alternative AL-like systems that are more amenable for BCI applications and thus enables future efforts for developing highly adaptive BCI systems.

  12. GASB 35 Implementation Guide: Questions and Answers for Public Colleges and Universities Using Business Type Activity (BTA) Reporting. A Supplement to GASB's Implementation Guide for Statement 34

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of College and University Business Officers (NJ1), 2001

    2001-01-01

    This guide was prepared for public institution business officers as a supplement to the "Guide to Implementation of GASB Statement 54 on Basic Financial Statements--and Management's Discussion and Analysis--for State and Local Governments, published in April 2000 by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board (GASB) on GASB Statements 34 and 35.…

  13. Antigen presentation by resting B cells. Radiosensitivity of the antigen-presentation function and two distinct pathways of T cell activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashwell, J.D.; DeFranco, A.L.; Paul, W.E.; Schwartz, R.H.

    1984-01-01

    In this report we have examined the ability of small resting B cells to act as antigen-presenting cells (APC) to antigen-specific MHC-restricted T cells as assessed by either T cell proliferation or T cell-dependent B cell stimulation. We found that 10 of 14 in vitro antigen-specific MHC-restricted T cell clones and lines and three of four T cell hybridomas could be induced to either proliferate or secrete IL-2 in the presence of lightly irradiated (1,000 rads) purified B cells and the appropriate foreign antigen. All T cell lines and hybridomas were stimulated to proliferate or make IL-2 by macrophage- and dendritic cell-enriched populations and all T cells tested except one hybridoma caused B cell activation when stimulated with B cells as APC. Furthermore, lightly irradiated, highly purified syngeneic B cells were as potent a source of APC for inducing B cell activation as were low density dendritic and macrophage-enriched cells. Lymph node T cells freshly taken from antigen-primed animals were also found to proliferate when cultured with purified B cells and the appropriate antigen. This APC function was easily measured when the cells were irradiated with 1,000 rads, but was greatly diminished or absent when they were irradiated with 3,300 rads. In addition, this radiosensitivity allowed us to easily distinguish B cell antigen presentation from presentation by the dendritic cell and macrophage, as the latter was resistant to 3,300 rads. Finally, one T cell clone that failed to proliferate when B cells were used as APC was able to recruit allogeneic B cells to proliferate in the presence of syngeneic B cells and the appropriate antigen. This result suggests that there are at least two distinct pathways of activation in T cells, one that leads to T cell proliferation and one that leads to the secretion of B cell recruitment factor(s)

  14. Bovine lactoferrin counteracts Toll-like receptor mediated activation signals in antigen presenting cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrizia Puddu

    Full Text Available Lactoferrin (LF, a key element in mammalian immune system, plays pivotal roles in host defence against infection and excessive inflammation. Its protective effects range from direct antimicrobial activities against a large panel of microbes, including bacteria, viruses, fungi and parasites, to antinflammatory and anticancer activities. In this study, we show that monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MD-DCs generated in the presence of bovine LF (bLF fail to undergo activation by up-modulating CD83, co-stimulatory and major histocompatibility complex molecules, and cytokine/chemokine secretion. Moreover, these cells are weak activators of T cell proliferation and retain antigen uptake activity. Consistent with an impaired maturation, bLF-MD-DC primed T lymphocytes exhibit a functional unresponsiveness characterized by reduced expression of CD154 and impaired expression of IFN-γ and IL-2. The observed imunosuppressive effects correlate with an increased expression of molecules with negative regulatory functions (i.e. immunoglobulin-like transcript 3 and programmed death ligand 1, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, and suppressor of cytokine signaling-3. Interestingly, bLF-MD-DCs produce IL-6 and exhibit constitutive signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activation. Conversely, bLF exposure of already differentiated MD-DCs completely fails to induce IL-6, and partially inhibits Toll-like receptor (TLR agonist-induced activation. Cell-specific differences in bLF internalization likely account for the distinct response elicited by bLF in monocytes versus immature DCs, providing a mechanistic base for its multiple effects. These results indicate that bLF exerts a potent anti-inflammatory activity by skewing monocyte differentiation into DCs with impaired capacity to undergo activation and to promote Th1 responses. Overall, these bLF-mediated effects may represent a strategy to block excessive DC activation upon TLR-induced inflammation, adding

  15. Visibility of solid and liquid fiducial markers used for image-guided radiation therapy on optical coherence tomography: an esophageal phantom study (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelvehgaran, Pouya; Alderliesten, Tanja; Weda, Jelmer J. A.; de Bruin, Daniel M.; Faber, Dirk J.; Hulshof, Maarten C. C. M.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; van Herk, Marcel B.; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2017-03-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is used in operable and inoperable esophageal cancer patients. Endoscopic ultrasound-guided fiducial marker placement allows improved translation of the disease extent on endoscopy to computed tomography (CT) images used for RT planning and enables image-guided RT. However, microscopic tumor extent at the time of RT planning is unknown. Endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a high-resolution (10-30µm) imaging modality with the potential for accurately determining the longitudinal disease extent. Visibility of fiducial markers on OCT is crucial for integrating OCT findings with the RT planning CT. We investigated the visibility on OCT (NinePoint Medical, Inc.) of 13 commercially available solid (Visicoil, Gold Anchor, Flexicoil, Polymark, and QLRAD) and liquid (BioXmark, Lipiodol, and Hydrogel) fiducial markers of different diameter. We designed and manufactured a set of dedicated Silicone-based esophageal phantoms to perform imaging in a controlled environment. The esophageal phantoms consist of several layers with different TiO2 concentrations to simulate the scattering properties of a typical healthy human esophagus. Markers were placed at various depths (0.5, 1.1, 2.0, and 3.0mm). OCT imaging allowed detection of all fiducial markers and phantom layers. The signal to background ratio was 6-fold higher for the solid fiducial markers than the liquid fiducial markers, yet OCT was capable of visualizing all 13 fiducial markers at all investigated depths. We conclude that RT fiducial markers can be visualized with OCT. This allows integration of OCT findings with CT for image-guided RT.

  16. Structure-guided Design and Immunological Characterization of Immunogens Presenting the HIV-1 gp120 V3 Loop on a CTB Scaffold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Totrov; X Jiang; X Kong; S Cohen; C Krachmarov; A Salomon; C Williams; M Seaman; R Abagyan; et al.

    2011-12-31

    V3 loop is a major neutralizing determinant of the HIV-1 gp120. Using 3D structures of cholera toxin B subunit (CTB), complete V3 in the gp120 context, and V3 bound to a monoclonal antibody (mAb), we designed two V3-scaffold immunogen constructs (V3-CTB). The full-length V3-CTB presenting the complete V3 in a structural context mimicking gp120 was recognized by the large majority of our panel of 24 mAbs. The short V3-CTB presenting a V3 fragment in the conformation observed in the complex with the 447-52D Fab, exhibited high-affinity binding to this mAb. The immunogens were evaluated in rabbits using DNA-prime/protein-boost protocol. Boosting with the full-length V3-CTB induced high anti-V3 titers in sera that potently neutralize multiple HIV virus strains. The short V3-CTB was ineffective. The results suggest that very narrow antigenic profile of an immunogen is associated with poor Ab response. An immunogen with broader antigenic activity elicits robust Ab response.

  17. Discriminating active from latent tuberculosis in patients presenting to community clinics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurjinder Sandhu

    Full Text Available Because of the high global prevalence of latent TB infection (LTBI, a key challenge in endemic settings is distinguishing patients with active TB from patients with overlapping clinical symptoms without active TB but with co-existing LTBI. Current methods are insufficiently accurate. Plasma proteomic fingerprinting can resolve this difficulty by providing a molecular snapshot defining disease state that can be used to develop point-of-care diagnostics.Plasma and clinical data were obtained prospectively from patients attending community TB clinics in Peru and from household contacts. Plasma was subjected to high-throughput proteomic profiling by mass spectrometry. Statistical pattern recognition methods were used to define mass spectral patterns that distinguished patients with active TB from symptomatic controls with or without LTBI.156 patients with active TB and 110 symptomatic controls (patients with respiratory symptoms without active TB were investigated. Active TB patients were distinguishable from undifferentiated symptomatic controls with accuracy of 87% (sensitivity 84%, specificity 90%, from symptomatic controls with LTBI (accuracy of 87%, sensitivity 89%, specificity 82% and from symptomatic controls without LTBI (accuracy 90%, sensitivity 90%, specificity 92%.We show that active TB can be distinguished accurately from LTBI in symptomatic clinic attenders using a plasma proteomic fingerprint. Translation of biomarkers derived from this study into a robust and affordable point-of-care format will have significant implications for recognition and control of active TB in high prevalence settings.

  18. Oh, What a Pane! An Inquiry Based on Activity with a Mathematical Approach to Investigation Windows on Earth...and in Space. Teacher Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Marshalyn; Mailhot, Michele; Graff, Paige Valderrama

    2010-01-01

    This is a teacher's guide to assist teachers in developing modules on windows for use in both earth and space and astronaut photographs. Activities incorporating mathematical exercises are suggested for grades five through ten.

  19. Active functional devices using parity-time symmetry optics (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brac de la Perriere, Vincent; Benisty, Henri; Ramdane, Abderrahim; Lupu, Anatole

    2017-05-01

    The progress of nanotechnologies has triggered the emergence of many photonic artificial structures: photonic crystals, metamaterials, plasmonic resonators. Recently the intriguing class of PT-symmetric devices, referring to Parity-Time symmetry [1] has attracted much attention. The characteristic feature of PT-symmetry is that the structures' refractive index profile is complex-valued due to the presence of alternating gain and loss regions in the system. Apart from fundamental research motivations, the tremendous interest in these artificial systems is strongly driven by the practical outcomes expected to foster a new generation of tunable, reconfigurable and non-reciprocal devices. The principle of gain-loss modulation lying in the heart of PT-symmetry optics enables a range of innovative solutions in the field of integrated optics at 1.5μm [2-7]. By using PT-symmetric coupled waveguides and Bragg reflectors as fundamental building blocks, it is possible to build a wide variety of functional optical devices. The PT-symmetry principle provides an alternative way for the realization of active devices that could become functional in a new platform for integrated optics. For instance one major bottleneck of the III-V/Si hybrid integration approach is that each type of active devices (laser, modulator, etc) requires a specific composition of III-V semiconductor alloy, involving a variety of (re)growth challenges. The advantage of the PT-symmetry solution is that the fabrication of all these devices can be done with a single stack of III-V semiconductor alloys that greatly simplifies the technological process. The aim of the current contribution is to provide a survey of the most promising applications of PT-symmetry in photonics with a particular emphases on the transition from theoretical concepts to experimental devices. The intention is to draw attention to the risks and issues related to the practical implementation that are most often overlooked in the basic

  20. Microgravity: A Teacher's Guide with Activities in Science, Mathematics, and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Melissa J.B.; Vogt, Gregory L.; Wargo, Michael J.

    1997-01-01

    Microgravity is the subject of this teacher's guide. This publication identifies the underlying mathematics, physics, and technology principles that apply to microgravity. The topics included in this publication are: 1) Microgravity Science Primer; 2) The Microgravity Environment of Orbiting Spacecraft; 3) Biotechnology; 4) Combustion Science; 5) Fluid Physics; 6) Fundamental Physics; and 7) Materials Science; 8) Microgravity Research and Exploration; and 9) Microgravity Science Space Flights. This publication also contains a glossary of selected terms.

  1. Activity-Based Intelligence prevedere il futuro osservando il presente con gli strumenti Hexagon Geospatial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Zotti

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The intelligence of human activities on the earth's surface, obtained through the analysis of earth observation data and other geospatial information, is vital for the planning and execution of any military action, for peacekeeping or for humanitarian emergencies. The success of these actions largely depends on the ability to analyze timely data from multiple sources. However, the proliferation of new sources of intelligence in a Geospatial big data scenario increasingly complicate the analysis of such activities by human analysts. Modern technologies solve these problems by enabling the Activity Based Intelligence, a methodology that improves the efficiency and timeliness of intelligence through the analysis of historical, current and future activity, to identify patterns, trends and relationships hidden in large data collections from different sources.

  2. Physical activity and motor competence present a positive reciprocal longitudinal relationship across childhood and early adolescence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lima, Rodrigo A.; Pfeiffer, Karin; Larsen, Lisbeth R.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The current study evaluated the reciprocal longitudinal relationship between physical activity (PA) and motor competence (MC) and the potential mediation of cardiorespiratory endurance across 7 years. Methods: This was a 7-year longitudinal study, the Copenhagen School Child Intervent......Background: The current study evaluated the reciprocal longitudinal relationship between physical activity (PA) and motor competence (MC) and the potential mediation of cardiorespiratory endurance across 7 years. Methods: This was a 7-year longitudinal study, the Copenhagen School Child...

  3. Research Activities of Geotechnical Research Group of NIIS from the Past to Present

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horii, N.; Toyosawa, Y.; Tamate, S.; Itoh, K.

    In this paper, firstly the memories of Prof. Tatsuoka's laboratory and research works carried out when the first author visited Prof. Tatsuoka's laboratory as a visiting researcher from May 1986 for about 1 year are described. Secondly, the research activities of Geotechnical Research Group of NIIS are introduced. Main emphasis is given on the research activities conducted using old geotechnical centrifuge (NIIS Mark-I centrifuge) and newly developed geotechnical centrifuge (NIIS Mark-II centrifuge).

  4. Anesthetic activity and bio-guided fractionation of the essential oil of Aloysia gratissima (Gillies & Hook.) Tronc. in silver catfish Rhamdia quelen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benovit, Simone C; Silva, Lenise L; Salbego, Joseânia; Loro, Vania L; Mallmann, Carlos A; Baldisserotto, Bernardo; Flores, Erico M M; Heinzmann, Berta M

    2015-09-01

    This work aimed to determine the efficacy of the essential oil of A. gratissima as anesthetic for silver catfish, and to perform the bio-guided fractionation of essential oil aiming to isolate compounds responsible for the noted effects. Fish were submitted to anesthesia bath with essential oil, its fractions and isolated compounds to determine time of anesthetic induction and recovery. Eugenol (50 mg L(-1)) was used as positive control. Essential oil of A. gratissima was effective as an anesthetic at concentrations of 300 to 900 mg L(-1). Fish presented involuntary muscle contractions during induction and recovery. The bio-guided fractionation of essential oil furnished E-(-)-pinocamphone, (-)-caryophyllene oxide, (-)-guaiol and (+)-spathulenol. E-(-)-pinocamphone caused the same side effects observed for essential oil. (-)-Caryophyllene oxide, (-)-guaiol and (+)-spathulenol showed only sedative effects at proportional concentrations to those of the constituents in essential oil. (+)-Spathulenol (51.2 mg L(-1)) promoted deep anesthesia without side effects. A higher concentration of (+)-spathulenol, and lower or absent amounts ofE-(-)-pinocamphone could contribute to increase the activity and safety of the essential oil of A. gratissima. (+)-Spathulenol showed potent sedative and anesthetic activities in silver catfish, and could be considered as a viable compound for the development of a new anesthetic.

  5. Identification of Lilial as a fragrance sensitizer in a perfume by bioassay-guided chemical fractionation and structure-activity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnau, E G; Andersen, K E; Bruze, M; Frosch, P J; Johansen, J D; Menné, T; Rastogi, S C; White, I R; Lepoittevin, J P

    2000-12-01

    Fragrance materials are among the most common causes of allergic contact dermatitis. The aim of this study was to identify in a perfume fragrance allergens not included in the fragrance mix, by use of bioassay-guided chemical fractionation and chemical analysis/structure-activity relationships (SARs). The basis for the investigation was a 45-year-old woman allergic to her own perfume. She had a negative patch test to the fragrance mix and agreed to participate in the study. Chemical fractionation of the perfume concentrate was used for repeated patch testing and/or repeated open application test on the pre-sensitized patient. The chemical composition of the fractions giving a positive patch-test response and repeated open application test reactions was obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. From the compounds identified, those that contained a "structural alert" in their chemical structure, indicating an ability to modify skin proteins and thus behave as a skin sensitizer, were tested on the patient. The patient reacted positively to the synthetic fragrance p-t-butyl-alpha-methylhydrocinnamic aldehyde (Lilial), a widely used fragrance compound not present in the fragrance mix. The combination of bioassay-guided chemical fractionation and chemical analysis/structure-activity relationships seems to be a valuable tool for the investigation of contact allergy to fragrance materials.

  6. Field Trip Guide to Serpentinite, Silica-Carbonate Alteration, and Related Hydrothermal Activity in the Clear Lake Region, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser Goff; George Guthrie

    1999-06-01

    This guide is designed to familiarize scientists with the geology, structure, alteration, and fluids typical of California serpentinites for purposes of carbon dioxide sequestration (Lackner et al., 1995). Goff et al. (1997) and Goff and Lackner (1998) describe the geology and geochemistry of some of the serpentinites from this area. Mechanisms of silica-carbonate alteration were outlined by Barnes et al. (1973). Donnelly-Nolan et al. (1993) most recently reviewed relations between regional hydrothermal alteration and Quarternary volcanic activity. Stanley et al. (1998) summarized geophysical characteristics of the region.

  7. Biosynthetically Guided Structure-Activity Relationship Studies of Merochlorin A, an Antibiotic Marine Natural Product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Pérez, Borja; Pepper, Henry P; Ma, Rong; Fawcett, Benjamin J; Pehere, Ashok D; Wei, Qi; Ji, Zengchun; Polyak, Steven W; Dai, Huanqin; Song, Fuhang; Abell, Andrew D; Zhang, Lixin; George, Jonathan H

    2017-12-07

    The onset of new multidrug-resistant strains of bacteria demands continuous development of antibacterial agents with new chemical scaffolds and mechanisms of action. We present the first structure-activity relationship (SAR) study of 16 derivatives of a structurally novel antibiotic merochlorin A that were designed using a biosynthetic blueprint. Our lead compounds are active against several Gram-positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus (SA), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE) and Bacillus subtilis, inhibit intracellular growth of Mycobacterium bovis, and are relatively nontoxic to human cell lines. Furthermore, derivative 12 c {(±)-(3aR,4S,5R,10bS)-5-bromo-7,9-dimethoxy-4-methyl-4-(4-methylpent-3-en-1-yl)-2-(propan-2-ylidene)-1,2,3,3a,4,5-hexahydro-6H-5,10b-methanobenzo[e]azulene-6,11-dione} was found to inhibit the growth of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-infected cells at concentrations similar to rifampicin. These results outperform the natural product, underscoring the potential of merochlorin analogues as a new class of antibiotics. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Antibacterial activity of Pinus elliottii against anaerobic bacteria present in primary endodontic infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caetano da Silva, Sandro Donizete; Mendes de Souza, Maria Gorete; Oliveira Cardoso, Miguel Jorge; da Silva Moraes, Thais; Ambrósio, Sérgio Ricardo; Sola Veneziani, Rodrigo Cássio; Martins, Carlos Henrique G

    2014-12-01

    Endodontic infections have a polymicrobial nature, but anaerobic bacteria prevail among the infectious microbes. Considering that it is easy to eliminate planktonic bacteria, biofilm-forming bacteria still challenge clinicians during the fight against endodontic diseases. The chemical constituents of the oleoresin of Pinus elliottii, a plant belonging to the family Pinaceae, stand out in the search for biologically active compounds based on natural products with potential application in the treatment of endodontic infections. Indeed, plant oleoresins are an abundant natural source of diterpenes that display significant and well-defined biological activities as well as potential antimicrobial action. In this context, this study aimed to (1) evaluate the in vitro antibacterial activity of the oleoresin, fractions, and subfractions of P. elliottii as well as the action of dehydroabietic acid against 11 anaerobic bacteria that cause endodontic infection in both their planktonic and biofilm forms and (2) assess the in vitro antibiofilm activity of dehydroabietic acid against the same group of bacteria. The broth microdilution technique helped to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the oleoresin and fractions. This same technique aided determination of the MIC values of nine subfractions of Fraction 1, the most active fraction. The MIC, minimum bactericidal concentration, and antibiofilm activity of dehydroabietic acid against the tested anaerobic bacteria were also examined. The oleoresin and fractions, especially fraction PE1, afforded promising MIC values, which ranged from 0.4 to 50 μg/mL. Concerning the nine evaluated subfractions, PE1.3 and PE1.4 furnished the most noteworthy MIC values, between 6.2 and 100 μg/mL. Dehydroabietic acid displayed antibacterial activity, with MIC values lying from 6.2 to 50 μg/mL, as well as bactericidal effect for all the investigated bacteria, except for Prevotella nigrescens. Assessment of the antibiofilm

  9. Activity-guided separation of Chromolaena odorata leaf extract reveals fractions with rice disease-reducing properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez Algaba, Julian; Sørensen, Jens Christian; Sørensen, Hilmer

    2015-01-01

    with water and methanol and the extracts separated using a group separation system followed by analysis using capillary electrophoresis. The fractions from the extracts were tested in vitro and in planta using Bipolaris oryzae (cause of brown spot of rice) to test for their potential to reduce disease...... severity. Activity-guided separation of the C. odorata extracts indicated that compounds with activity could, at least partly, be isolated on a weakly acidic cation exchange column. Further purification yielded fractions with disease reducing effects of up to 72 % at 15 days after inoculation. Activity...... was found both in methanol and water extracts, indicating that the bioactive compound(s) are hydrophilic, low molecular weight compounds. The disease-reducing fractions did not display any direct antimicrobial effects, but data indicate that they protect the plants by induced resistance as evidenced from...

  10. Chitosan-caffeic acid-genipin films presenting enhanced antioxidant activity and stability in acidic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Cláudia; Maricato, Élia; Cunha, Ângela; Nunes, Alexandra; da Silva, José A Lopes; Coimbra, Manuel A

    2013-01-02

    The use of chitosan films has been limited due to their high degradability in aqueous acidic media. In order to produce chitosan films with high antioxidant activity and insoluble in acid solutions caffeic acid was grafted to chitosan by a radical mechanism using ammonium cerium (IV) nitrate (60 mM). Genipin was used as cross-linker. This methodology originated films with 80% higher antioxidant activity than the pristine film. Also, these films only lost 11% of their mass upon seven days immersion into an aqueous solution at pH 3.5 under stirring. The films surface wettability (contact angle 105°), mechanical properties (68 MPa of tensile strength and 4% of elongation at break), and thermal stability for temperatures lower than 300 °C were not significantly influenced by the covalent linkage of caffeic acid and genipin to chitosan. Due to their characteristics, mainly higher antioxidant activity and lower solubility, these are promising materials to be used as active films. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Images of Germany, Past and Present: A Film Collection. Series I, Instructional Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goethe House, New York, NY.

    This set of lessons accompanies a series of 30-minute films for teaching about Germany. Available to educators throughout the United States upon request, the 17 films and accompanying instructional activities focus on culture, politics, economics, society, and sports and are appropriate for middle and high school students. Permission is granted to…

  12. Images of Germany: Past and Present. A Film Collection, Series II Instructional Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blankenship, Glen; Hutcheson, Gwen

    This booklet offers classroom activities for use with 15 social studies-related films for teaching about Germany. The series of 25-minute films are made available by Deutsche Welle Television and Goethe House New York. Lessons in the booklet include: (1) "Germany Since 1945: A Focus on Berlin"; (2) "'I'll Get You All Out of Here!' A…

  13. Identification of antihyperuricemic peptides in the proteolytic digest of shark cartilage water extract using in vivo activity-guided fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murota, Itsuki; Taguchi, Satoko; Sato, Nobuyuki; Park, Eun Young; Nakamura, Yasushi; Sato, Kenji

    2014-03-19

    A peptide that exerts antihyperuricemic activity after oral administration was identified from a microbial protease (alcalase) digest of the water extract of shark cartilage by in vivo activity-guided fractionation, using oxonate-induced hyperuricemic rats. Water extract of shark cartilage was first fractionated by preparative ampholine-free isoelectric focusing, followed by preparative reversed-phase liquid chromatography. The antihyperuricemic activity of the alcalse digests of the obtained fractions was evaluated using an animal model. Alcalase digests of the basic and hydrophobic fractions exerted antihyperuricemic activity. A total of 18 peptides were identified in the alcalase digest of the final active fraction. These peptides were chemically synthesized and evaluated for antihyperuricemic activity. Tyr-Leu-Asp-Asn-Tyr and Ser-Pro-Pro-Tyr-Trp-Pro-Tyr lowered the serum uric acid level via intravenous injection at 5 mg/kg of body weight. Furthermore, orally administered Tyr-Leu-Asp-Asn-Tyr showed antihyperuricemic activity. Therefore, these peptides are at least partially responsible for the antihyperuricemic activity of the alcalase digest of shark cartilage.

  14. Active fault and other geological studies for seismic assessment: present state and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakimi, Toshihiro

    1997-01-01

    Evaluation system of earthquakes from an active fault is, in Japan, based on the characteristic earthquake model of a wide sense that postulates essentially the same (nearly the maximum) magnitude and recurrence interval during the recent geological times. Earthquake magnitude M is estimated by empirical relations among M, surface rupture length L, and surface fault displacement D per event of the earthquake faults on land in Japan. Recurrence interval R of faulting/earthquake is calculated from D and the long-term slip rate S of a fault as R=D/S. Grouping or segmentation of complicatedly distributed faults is an important, but difficult problem in order to distinguish a seismogenic fault unit corresponding to an individual characteristic earthquake. If the time t of the latest event is obtained, the 'cautiousness' of a fault can be judged from R-t or t/R. According to this idea, several faults whose t/R exceed 0.5 have been designated as the 'precaution faults' having higher probability of earthquake occurrence than the others. A part of above evaluation has been introduced at first into the seismic-safety examination system of NPPs in 1978. According to the progress of research on active faults, the weight of interest in respect to the seismic hazard assessment shifted gradually from the historic data to the fault data. Most of recent seismic hazard maps have been prepared in consideration with active faults on land in Japan. Since the occurrence of the 1995 Hyogoken-Nanbu earthquake, social attention has been concentrated upon the seismic hazard due to active faults, because this event was generated from a well-known active fault zone that had been warned as a 'precaution fault'. In this paper, a few recent topics on other geological and geotechnical researches aiming at improving the seismic safety of NPPs in Japan were also introduced. (J.P.N.)

  15. Active fault and other geological studies for seismic assessment: present state and problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakimi, Toshihiro [Nuclear Power Engineering Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    Evaluation system of earthquakes from an active fault is, in Japan, based on the characteristic earthquake model of a wide sense that postulates essentially the same (nearly the maximum) magnitude and recurrence interval during the recent geological times. Earthquake magnitude M is estimated by empirical relations among M, surface rupture length L, and surface fault displacement D per event of the earthquake faults on land in Japan. Recurrence interval R of faulting/earthquake is calculated from D and the long-term slip rate S of a fault as R=D/S. Grouping or segmentation of complicatedly distributed faults is an important, but difficult problem in order to distinguish a seismogenic fault unit corresponding to an individual characteristic earthquake. If the time t of the latest event is obtained, the `cautiousness` of a fault can be judged from R-t or t/R. According to this idea, several faults whose t/R exceed 0.5 have been designated as the `precaution faults` having higher probability of earthquake occurrence than the others. A part of above evaluation has been introduced at first into the seismic-safety examination system of NPPs in 1978. According to the progress of research on active faults, the weight of interest in respect to the seismic hazard assessment shifted gradually from the historic data to the fault data. Most of recent seismic hazard maps have been prepared in consideration with active faults on land in Japan. Since the occurrence of the 1995 Hyogoken-Nanbu earthquake, social attention has been concentrated upon the seismic hazard due to active faults, because this event was generated from a well-known active fault zone that had been warned as a `precaution fault`. In this paper, a few recent topics on other geological and geotechnical researches aiming at improving the seismic safety of NPPs in Japan were also introduced. (J.P.N.)

  16. An overview of past and present CFD activities within the framework of WGAMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.L.; Mahaffy, J.H.; Bestion, D.; Zigh, G.

    2011-01-01

    In 2003, three Writing Groups (WG1, WG2, WG3) were established within the Working Group on Analysis and Management of Accidents (WGAMA) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. The groups had the responsibility of summarising the state-of-the-art in the application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to items of concern in nuclear reactor safety. The Best Practice Guidelines (BPGs) drawn up by the WG1 group defined the procedures which need to be followed to produce trustworthy results from a CFD simulation. The WG2 group itemised the assessment base which underpins single-phase CFD as an established technology. The WG3 group focused on the challenges that still need to be faced before two-phase CFD may be regarded as a mature science. The background to the activity, method of approach, documented evidence, status and current activities are described under appropriate section headings in this paper. (author)

  17. Present activity in ASME Section XI regarding risk-informed maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedden, Owen; Chockie, Alan

    2005-01-01

    Since 1996 Section XI of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code has actively incorporated risk-informed concepts. The risk-informed process provides a framework for allocating inspection resources in a cost-effective manner and helps focus inspections where most critical for plant safety. Based on the success of the risk-informed ISI piping applications at US and non-US plants, Section XI has refined existing Code Cases and expanded the use of the risk-informed process to a variety of high-risk components and systems. The risk informed approach started in the area of inspection and is now being expanded to other plant maintenance activities. This article summarizes the Section XI actions and the continued development of the risk-informed process to improve nuclear plant maintenance. (author)

  18. Physical activity and motor competence present a positive reciprocal longitudinal relationship across childhood and early adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Rodrigo Antunes; Pfeiffer, Karin Allor; Larsen, Lisbeth Runge; Bugge, Anna; Møller, Niels Christian; Andersen, Lars Bo; Stodden, David F.

    2017-01-01

    I Brage finner du siste tekst-versjon av artikkelen, og den kan inneholde ubetydelige forskjeller fra forlagets pdf-versjon. Forlagets pdf-versjon finner du på humankinetics.com / In Brage you'll find the final text version of the article, and it may contain insignificant differences from the journal's pdf version. The definitive version is available at humankinetics.com Background: The current study evaluated the reciprocal longitudinal relationship between physical activity (PA) and moto...

  19. The fourth outburst during the present active stage of symbiotic binary AG Dra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galis, R.; Merc, J.; Vrastak, M.; Teyssier, F.; Lester, T.; Boyd, D.; Sims, W.; Leedjarv, L.

    2018-04-01

    The symbiotic system AG Dra regularly undergoes quiescent and active stages which consist of several outbursts repeating at about 360d interval (Galis et al. 2017, OEJV 180, 24). After seven years of flat quiescence following the 2006-08 major outbursts, in the late spring of 2015, AG Dra began rising again in brightness toward what appeared to be a new minor outburst (ATel #7582).

  20. Questions and Answers for Ken Thomas' "Intra-Extra Vehicular Activity Russian and Gemini Spacesuits" Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kenneth S.

    2016-01-01

    Kenneth Thomas will discuss the Intra-Extra Vehicular Activity Russian & Gemini spacesuits. While the United States and Russia adapted to existing launch- and reentry-type suits to allow the first human ventures into the vacuum of space, there were differences in execution and capabilities. Mr. Thomas will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of this approach compared to exclusively intravehicular or extra-vehicular suit systems.

  1. Physical Activity Motivation: A Practitioner's Guide to Self-Determination Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, Marcus; Hebert, Edward; Jacobsen, Dee

    2002-01-01

    Describes the relationship of self-determination theory to elective physical activity motivation, offering the following recommendations for physical activity practitioners: give positive feedback, promote moderately difficult goals, provide choice of activities, provide a rational for activities, promote the development of social relationships,…

  2. Competitive activity of highly skilled freestyle wrestlers at the present stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.F. Boyko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to compare competitive activity of highly skilled freestyle wrestlers after making adjustments to the wrestling rules. Material: the analysis involved 80 bouts performed by high skilled wrestlers at 2011 World Wrestling Championships (Ankara, Turkey and 2012 Olympic Games in London (weight categories 84 and 96 kg. Results: the resultant technical actions have been analyzed in the standing position performed by highly skilled freestyle wrestlers in major events of the annual cycle for the last three years. The characteristic changes in a competitive activity of highly skilled freestyle wrestlers in the weight categories 84 and 96 kg have been determined. We identified the techniques which were used most frequently in different periods of bout by elite athletes: spurt moving, throwing by knock, pressing, pushing the mat, etc. Conclusions: the competitions in the training of athletes are not only a means of controlling the level of preparedness, the process for deciding the winner, but also an important means of improving fitness and sports mastership. In the future, specialists can use these features of competitive activity in determining the overall training strategy of freestyle wrestlers to competitions at various levels.

  3. Triterpenic Acids Present in Hawthorn Lower Plasma Cholesterol by Inhibiting Intestinal ACAT Activity in Hamsters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuguang Lin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hawthorn (Crataegus pinnatifida is an edible fruit used in traditional Chinese medicine to lower plasma lipids. This study explored lipid-lowering compounds and underlying mechanisms of action of hawthorn. Hawthorn powder extracts inhibited acylCoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT activity in Caco-2 cells. The inhibitory activity was positively associated with triterpenic acid (i.e., oleanolic acid (OA and ursolic acid (UA contents in the extracts. Cholesterol lowering effects of hawthorn and its potential additive effect in combination with plant sterol esters (PSE were further studied in hamsters. Animals were fed a semi-synthetic diet containing 0.08% (w/w cholesterol (control or the same diet supplemented with (i 0.37% hawthorn dichloromethane extract, (ii 0.24% PSE, (iii hawthorn dichloromethane extract (0.37% plus PSE (0.24% or (iv OA/UA mixture (0.01% for 4 weeks. Compared to the control diet, hawthorn, PSE, hawthorn plus PSE and OA/UA significantly lowered plasma non-HDL (VLDL + LDL cholesterol concentrations by 8%, 9%, 21% and 6% and decreased hepatic cholesterol ester content by 9%, 23%, 46% and 22%, respectively. The cholesterol lowering effects of these ingredients were conversely associated with their capacities in increasing fecal neutral sterol excretion. In conclusion, OA and UA are responsible for the cholesterol lowering effect of hawthorn by inhibiting intestinal ACAT activity. In addition, hawthorn and particularly its bioactive compounds (OA and UA enhanced the cholesterol lowering effect of plant sterols.

  4. Modeling the Activities of Scientists: Prospective Science Teachers' Poster Presentations in An STS Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dogan, Alev; Kaya, Osman Nafiz; Kilic, Ziya; Kilic, Esma; Aydogdu, Mustafa

    2004-01-01

    In this study, prospective science teachers' (PSTs) views about their poster presentations were investigated. These posters were developed through PSTs' online and library research and scientific mini-symposiums in chemistry related topics in the framework of science, technology and society course (STS). During the first four weeks of STS course,…

  5. Antibacterial, antifungal and antiprotozoal activities of fungal communities present in different substrates from Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antarctica is a pristine and extreme environment that represents a unique opportunity for taxonomic, ecological and biotechnological studies of the microorganisms. In the present work, the fungal communities of rhizosphere soil of Deschampsia antarctica, soil, ornithogenic soil, marine and lake sedi...

  6. Present status of plasma-wall interactions research and materials development activities in the US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirooka, Y.; Conn, R.W.

    1989-08-01

    It is well known in the fusion engineering community that the plasma confinement performance in magnetic fusion devices is strongly affected by edge-plasma interactions with surface components. These plasma-material interactions (PMI) include fuel particle recycling and impurity generation both during normal and off-normal operation. To understand and then to control PMI effects, considerable effort has been made, particularly over the last decade in US, supported by Department of Energy, Division of Development and Technology. Also, because plasma-facing components are generally expected to receive significant amount of heat due to plasma bombardment and run-away electrons, materials must tolerate high-heat fluxes (HHF). The HHF-component research has been conducted in parallel with PMI research. One strong motivation for these research activities is that DT-burning experiments are currently planned in the Tokamak Test Fusion Reactor (TFTR) in early 1990s. Several different but mutually complementary approaches have been taken in the PMI+HHF research. The first approach is to conduct PMI experiments using toroidal fusion devices such as TFTR. The second one is to simulate elemental processes involved in PMI using ion beams and electron beams, etc. The last one but not least is to use non-tokamak plasma facilities. Along with these laboratory activities, new materials have been developed and evaluated from the PMI+HHF point of view. In this paper, several major PMI+HHF research facilities in US and their activities are briefly reviewed. 21 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Physical activity and motor competence present a positive reciprocal longitudinal relationship across childhood and early adolescence

    OpenAIRE

    Lima, Rodrigo Antunes; Pfeiffer, Karin Allor; Larsen, Lisbeth Runge; Bugge, Anna; Møller, Niels Christian; Andersen, Lars Bo; Stodden, David F.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The current study evaluated the reciprocal longitudinal relationship between physical activity (PA) and motor competence (MC) and the potential mediation of cardiorespiratory endurance across 7 years. Methods: This was a 7-year longitudinal study, the Copenhagen School Child Intervention Study (CoSCIS), with 3 measuring points [mean ages (in years) and respective sample size: 6.75 ± 0.37, n = 696; 9.59 ± 1.07, n = 617; 13.35 ± 0.34, n = 513]. PA was assessed using accelerometers. ...

  8. Activity-Based Costing & Warm Fuzzies - Costing, Presentation & Framing Influences on Decision-Making ~ A Business Optimization Simulation ~

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, David Shelby

    1998-01-01

    Activity-Based Costing is presented in accounting text books as a costing system that can be used to make valuable managerial decisions. Accounting journals regularly report the successful implementations and benefits of activity-based costing systems for particular businesses. Little experimental or empirical evidence exists, however, that has demonstrated the benefits of activity-based costing under controlled conditions. Similarly, although case studies report conditions that may or may...

  9. The IAEA's activities in safeguarding nuclear materials and in developing internationally acceptable safety codes and guides for nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rometsch, Rudolf; Specter, Herschel

    1977-01-01

    Promoting the peaceful use of nuclear energy and aiming at the international sharing of its benefits are objectives that guide the activities of the Agency. But this promotional work is carried out on condition that security and safety are provided for. All Agency assistance involving nuclear facilities will be subjected to standards of safety or other standards, which are proposed by a State the Agency finds essentially equivalent. Safeguards are always applied on the basis of agreement. States party to NPT are obligated to negotiate and conclude with the Agency agreements which cover all their peaceful nuclear activities. Safeguards agreements concluded outside NPT are applied to specific supplies of facilities, equipment and material. To assist countries in laying down their nuclear safety regulations the Agency's program for the developing of codesof practice and safety guides for nuclear power plants draws up guidelines for governmental organizations, siting, design, operation and quality assurance. Codes are the fundamental documents laying down the objectives of each field of nuclear safety

  10. MR-guided joint reconstruction of activity and attenuation in brain PET-MR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehranian, Abolfazl; Zaidi, Habib; Reader, Andrew J

    2017-01-01

    by unknown scaling factors. We recently demonstrated that in hybrid PET-MR, the scaling issue of this algorithm can be effectively addressed by imposing MR spatial constraints on the estimation of attenuation maps using a penalized MLAA (P-MLAA(+)) algorithm. With the advent of simultaneous PET-MR systems......, MRI-guided PET image reconstruction has also gained attention for improving the quantitative accuracy of PET images, usually degraded by noise and partial volume effects. The aim of this study is therefore to increase the benefits of MRI information for improving the quantitative accuracy of PET...... as a reference. The simulation results showed that the proposed method can notably improve the visual quality of the PET images by reducing noise while preserving structural boundaries and at the same time improving the quantitative accuracy of the PET images. Our clinical reconstruction results showed...

  11. Analysis of elements present in beers and brewing waters by neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krausova, Ivana; Kucera, Jan; Dostalek, Pavel; Potesil, Vaclav

    2011-01-01

    Neutron activation analysis (NAA) was used for determination of Si, Na, K, Ca, Sc, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Zn, Rb, Cs, and La in Czech beers and brewing waters. The Si concentration in beer determined by the reaction 29 Si(n,p) 29 Al with fast neutrons confirmed that beer is an important Si source in human diet. Determination of other trace elements by NAA with the whole spectrum of reactor neutrons aimed at the feasibility of identification of Gambrinus beers brewed in various breweries. The elements Ca and V appeared to be the best candidates for this purpose. The concentrations of elements determined by NAA were also compared with the recommended daily element intake for humans. The accuracy of the method was proved by analysis of reference materials, specifically NIST SRM 2704 Buffalo River Sediment, NIST SRM 1633b Coal Fly Ash, and NIST SRM 1515 Apple Leaves. (author)

  12. The interpretation of mu suppression as an index of mirror neuron activity: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobson, Hannah M; Bishop, Dorothy V M

    2017-03-01

    Mu suppression studies have been widely used to infer the activity of the human mirror neuron system (MNS) in a number of processes, ranging from action understanding, language, empathy and the development of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Although mu suppression is enjoying a resurgence of interest, it has a long history. This review aimed to revisit mu's past, and examine its recent use to investigate MNS involvement in language, social processes and ASDs. Mu suppression studies have largely failed to produce robust evidence for the role of the MNS in these domains. Several key potential shortcomings with the use and interpretation of mu suppression, documented in the older literature and highlighted by more recent reports, are explored here.

  13. Dietary intake of adolescents compared with the Brazilian Food Guide and their differences according to anthropometric data and physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Cristina Enes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Objective: To assess the dietary intake of adolescents compared with the Brazilian Food Guide and to explore their differences according to anthropometric data and physical activity. Methods: A total of 476 adolescents from public schools of Piracicaba, SP, Brazil participated in this study. A semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire was used to estimate food group intake of adolescents. Height, weight and waist circumference of all participants were measured. Physical activity pattern was determined by questioning about participation in regular sport activities. Results: The prevalence of overweight was 36.1% and 60% were not physically active. 7.8, 7.1, 6.3, and 0.2% of adolescents consumed vegetables, fruits, milk and derivatives, and cereals, respectively, according to recommendations. About 55 and 79% of adolescents consumed excessively oils/fats and sugar/sweets, respectively. Physically active adolescents consumed more cereals, fruits, vegetables, milk and derivatives, and meats and eggs. Conclusion: Most adolescents did not follow the food group recommendations and those who were physically active have healthier food habits.

  14. Understanding Insurance. A Guide for Industrial Cooperative Training Programs. Learning Activity Package No. 15.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duenk, Lester G.; Tuel, Charles

    This learning activity package (LAP) on the insurance industry and the methods used to give protection to the insured is designed for student self-study. Following a list of learning objectives, the LAP contains a pretest (answer key provided at the back). Six learning activities follow. The learning activities cover the following material: terms…

  15. Analysts guide to FEEMA for financial analysis of ecosystem management activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger D. Fight; John T. Chmelik

    1998-01-01

    This report describes strategies for using the Financial Evaluation of Ecosystem Management Activities (FEEMA) software. This program was developed as a tool for assessing the financial viability of management activities for removing small trees for manufacture into wood products. Combinations of tree stands, management activities, and contractual requirements can be...

  16. EULAR Sjögren's syndrome disease activity index (ESSDAI) : a user guide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seror, Raphaèle; Bowman, Simon J; Brito-Zeron, Pilar; Theander, Elke; Bootsma, Hendrika; Tzioufas, Athanasios; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Ramos-Casals, Manel; Dörner, Thomas; Ravaud, Philippe; Vitali, Claudio; Mariette, Xavier; Asmussen, Karsten; Jacobsen, Soren; Bartoloni, Elena; Gerli, Roberto; Bijlsma, Johannes Wj; Kruize, Aike A; Bombardieri, Stefano; Bookman, Arthur; Kallenberg, Cees; Meiners, Petra; Brun, Johan G; Jonsson, Roland; Caporali, Roberto; Carsons, Steven; De Vita, Salvatore; Del Papa, Nicoletta; Devauchelle, Valerie; Saraux, Alain; Fauchais, Anne-Laure; Sibilia, Jean; Hachulla, Eric; Illei, Gabor; Isenberg, David; Jones, Adrian; Manoussakis, Menelaos; Mandl, Thomas; Jacobsson, Lennart; Demoulins, Frederic; Montecucco, Carlomaurizio; Ng, Wan-Fai; Nishiyama, Sumusu; Omdal, Roald; Parke, Ann; Praprotnik, Sonja; Tomsic, Matjia; Price, Elizabeth; Scofield, Hal; L Sivils, Kathy; Smolen, Josef; Laqué, Roser Solans; Steinfeld, Serge; Sutcliffe, Nurhan; Sumida, Takayuki; Valesini, Guido; Valim, Valeria; Vivino, Frederick B; Vollenweider, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    The EULAR Sjögren's syndrome (SS) disease activity index (ESSDAI) is a systemic disease activity index that was designed to measure disease activity in patients with primary SS. With the growing use of the ESSDAI, some domains appear to be more challenging to rate than others. The ESSDAI is now in

  17. Island of the Sharks Activity Guide To Accompany the Large-Format Film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowell, Elizabeth Tayntor

    This document targets upper elementary and middle school students and provides activities to understand what the ocean floor looks like, the interactions of ocean communities, and the true nature of sharks. The activities are developed at three levels: beginner, intermediate, and advanced. The twelve activities include: (1) "Ocean…

  18. Choosing the Future You Prefer. A Goal Setting Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindaman, Edward B.; Lippitt, Ronald O.

    The guide, intended for group and organization leaders, presents activities and exercises to aid in personal and group goal-setting and planning for the future. The objective is to help groups choose goals which are sensitive to and oriented toward the evolving future with its rapid rate of change. The guide is presented in eight chapters.…

  19. THE EFFECTIVENESS OF CTL MODEL GUIDED INQUIRI-BASED IN THE TOPIC OF CHEMICALS IN DAILY LIFE TO IMPROVE STUDENTS’ LEARNING OUTCOMES AND ACTIVENESS

    OpenAIRE

    N. R. Fitriani; A. Widiyatmoko; M. Khusniati

    2016-01-01

    Science learning in school can be applied by connecting the material in the learning with real life. However in fact science learning process in SMP Negeri 10 Magelang has not emphasized students’ activity to relate science to real life. Learning science using CTL guided inquiry-based model implement the learning in where teacher provides initial questions related issues or events in everyday life, then students do experiments to prove concepts of science guided by teacher.The purpose of this...

  20. Effects of rhythmic stimulus presentation on oscillatory brain activity: the physiology of cueing in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    te Woerd, Erik S; Oostenveld, Robert; Bloem, Bastiaan R; de Lange, Floris P; Praamstra, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The basal ganglia play an important role in beat perception and patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are impaired in perception of beat-based rhythms. Rhythmic cues are nonetheless beneficial in gait rehabilitation, raising the question how rhythm improves movement in PD. We addressed this question with magnetoencephalography recordings during a choice response task with rhythmic and non-rhythmic modes of stimulus presentation. Analyses focused on (i) entrainment of slow oscillations, (ii) the depth of beta power modulation, and (iii) whether a gain in modulation depth of beta power, due to rhythmicity, is of predictive or reactive nature. The results show weaker phase synchronisation of slow oscillations and a relative shift from predictive to reactive movement-related beta suppression in PD. Nonetheless, rhythmic stimulus presentation increased beta modulation depth to the same extent in patients and controls. Critically, this gain selectively increased the predictive and not reactive movement-related beta power suppression. Operation of a predictive mechanism, induced by rhythmic stimulation, was corroborated by a sensory gating effect in the sensorimotor cortex. The predictive mode of cue utilisation points to facilitation of basal ganglia-premotor interactions, contrasting with the popular view that rhythmic stimulation confers a special advantage in PD, based on recruitment of alternative pathways.

  1. A qualitative theory guided analysis of stroke survivors' perceived barriers and facilitators to physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Sarah L; Donaghy, Marie; Johnston, Marie; Sniehotta, Falko F; van Wijck, Frederike; Johnston, Derek; Greig, Carolyn; McMurdo, Marion E T; Mead, Gillian

    2014-01-01

    After stroke, physical activity and physical fitness levels are low, impacting on health, activity and participation. It is unclear how best to support stroke survivors to increase physical activity. Little is known about the barriers and facilitators to physical activity after stroke. Thus, our aim was to explore stroke survivors' perceived barriers and facilitators to physical activity. Semi-structured interviews with 13 ambulatory stroke survivors exploring perceived barriers and facilitators to physical activity post stroke were conducted in participants' homes, audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. The Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) informed content analysis of the interview transcripts. Data saturation was reached after interviews with 13 participants (median age of 76 years (inter-quartile range (IQR) = 69-83 years). The median time since stroke was 345 d (IQR = 316-366 d). The most commonly reported TDF domains were "beliefs about capabilities", "environmental context and resources" and "social influence". The most commonly reported perceived motivators were: social interaction, beliefs of benefits of exercise, high self-efficacy and the necessity of routine behaviours. The most commonly reported perceived barriers were: lack of professional support on discharge from hospital and follow-up, transport issues to structured classes/interventions, lack of control and negative affect. Stroke survivors perceive several different barriers and facilitators to physical activity. Stroke services need to address barriers to physical activity and to build on facilitators to promote physical activity after stroke. Physical activity post stroke can improve physical fitness and function, yet physical activity remains low among stroke survivors. Understanding stroke survivors' perceived barriers and facilitators to physical activity is essential to develop targeted interventions to increase physical activity. Beliefs about capabilities, environmental

  2. Brain activation during dichotic presentations of consonant-vowel and musical instrument stimuli: a 15O-PET study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugdahl, K; Brønnick, K; Kyllingsbaek, S; Law, I; Gade, A; Paulson, O B

    1999-04-01

    Dichotic listening means that two different stimuli are presented at the same time, one in each ear. This technique is frequently used in experimental and clinical studies as a measure of hemispheric specialization. The primary aim of the present study was to record regional changes in the distribution of cerebral blood flow (CBF) with the 15O-PET technique to dichotically presented consonant-vowel (CV) and musical instrument stimuli, in order to test the basic assumption of differential hemispheric involvement when stimuli presented to one ear dominate over stimuli presented in the other ear. All stimuli were 380 ms in duration with a 1000 ms interstimulus interval, and were presented in blocks of either CV-syllable or musical instrument pairs. Twelve normal healthy subjects had to press a button whenever they detected a CV-syllable or a musical instrument target in a stream of CV- and musical instrument distractor stimuli. The targets appeared equally often in the right and left ear channel. The CV-syllable and musical instrument targets activated bilateral areas in the superior temporal gyri. However, there were significant interactions with regard to asymmetry of the magnitude of peak activation in the significant activation clusters. The CV-syllables resulted in greater neural activation in the left temporal lobe while the musical instruments resulted in greater neural activation in the right temporal lobe. Within-subjects correlations between magnitude of dichotic listening and CBF asymmetry were, however, non-significant. The changes in neural activation were closely mimicked by the performance data which showed a right ear superiority in response accuracy for the CV-syllables, and a left ear superiority for the musical instruments. In addition to the temporal lobe activations, there were activation tendencies in the left inferior frontal lobe, right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, left occipital lobe, and cerebellum.

  3. Present status of research activities relating global warming problems in Japan (mainly MITI and relating organizations)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, O.

    1993-12-31

    Japanese government has issued action program so called {open_quotes}Action Program to Arrest Global Warming{close_quotes} for preventing global warming at Oct., 1990. According to the program, CO{sub 2} emission should be stabilized on a per capita basis in the year 2000 and beyond at about same level as in 2000 by introducing several methods such as energy conservation, improvement of energy using efficiency, expanding use of renewable energy and so on. The basic concept, target and methods are summarized. At the same time, MITI published so called {open_quotes}New Earth 21{close_quotes} project which aims remedying the earth environment modified by human activities since industrial innovation began at about 200 years ago in coming 100 years. This plan proposed yearly step of research development of technology for mitigating CO{sub 2} emission. According to the MITI`s plan, 15 institutions belonging to AIST have carrying research for developing technology of reducing emission of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases, with cooperation of other research organizations such as RITE (research Institute of Innovative Technology for Earth) and NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Developing Organization). Time schedule of the research development by The New Earth 21 project is summarized in Table 2. Now, in Japan, many national institutions and universities, research works relating reduction and mitigation of GHG are carried out according to this guideline.

  4. Identification of Lilial as a fragrance sensitizer in a perfume by bioassay-guided chemical fractionation and structure-activity relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnau, E G; Andersen, Klaus Ejner; Bruze, M

    2000-01-01

    Fragrance materials are among the most common causes of allergic contact dermatitis. The aim of this study was to identify in a perfume fragrance allergens not included in the fragrance mix, by use of bioassay-guided chemical fractionation and chemical analysis/structure-activity relationships...... (SARs). The basis for the investigation was a 45-year-old woman allergic to her own perfume. She had a negative patch test to the fragrance mix and agreed to participate in the study. Chemical fractionation of the perfume concentrate was used for repeated patch testing and/or repeated open application......" in their chemical structure, indicating an ability to modify skin proteins and thus behave as a skin sensitizer, were tested on the patient. The patient reacted positively to the synthetic fragrance p-t-butyl-alpha-methylhydrocinnamic aldehyde (Lilial), a widely used fragrance compound not present in the fragrance...

  5. Activated Eosinophils are Present in Esophageal Muscle in Patients with Achalasia of the Esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hong; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Li-li

    2018-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to undertake a histological evaluation of the presence of eosinophils in esophageal muscle in patients with achalasia before treatment with peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM), with clinical follow-up at one year. Material/Methods Before treatment, esophageal biopsies including mucosa and esophageal muscle were obtained from 28 patients with achalasia. Nine patients who had undergone esophagectomy for esophageal carcinoma were included in the control group. The Eckardt Score was used to evaluate the clinical symptoms of achalasia. Histology of routinely processed tissue sections was used to perform eosinophil cell counts (0 to +++), and immunohistochemistry was used to detect expression of eosinophil major basic protein (MBP), eosinophil-derived neurotoxin (EDN), and S100 protein in cases of achalasia (n=28) and controls (n=9). The findings in patients with achalasia were compared before and one year following POEM. Results Esophageal tissue from patients with achalasia showed eosinophils infiltrating into the muscularis externa in 85.7% (24/28), into the muscularis propria in 28.6% (8/28), and in 89% (25/28) there were few remaining myenteric ganglion cells, before POEM. The extent of inflammation was similar in all regions of the esophagus and between subtypes of achalasia. At one year following POEM, the Eckardt Scores between the former eosinophil (0) group and the eosinophil (+++) group were significantly different (Z=3.50, P=0.030). Conclusions Achalasia of the esophagus was associated with infiltration of the esophageal muscle by activated eosinophils and a decrease in the density of ganglion cells in the myenteric esophageal plexus. PMID:29672471

  6. Frontotemporal dementia with trans-activation response DNA-binding protein 43 presenting with catatonic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Ryohei; Kawakami, Ito; Onaya, Mitsumoto; Higashi, Shinji; Arai, Nobutaka; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Hasegawa, Masato; Arai, Tetsuaki

    2017-11-07

    Catatonia is a clinical syndrome characterized by symptoms such as immobility, mutism, stupor, stereotypy, echophenomena, catalepsy, automatic obedience, posturing, negativism, gegenhalten and ambitendency. This syndrome occurs mostly in mood disorder and schizophrenic patients, and is related to neuronal dysfunction involving the frontal lobe. Some cases of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) with catatonia have been reported, but these cases were not examined by autopsy. Here, we report on a FTD case which showed catatonia after the first episode of brief psychotic disorder. At the age of 58, the patient had a sudden onset of disorganized behavior and meaningless speech. Psychotropic drugs were effective for catatonic symptoms. However, after remission apathy, hyperorality, socially inappropriate behavior, hoarding, and an instinctive grasp reaction appeared and persisted. Brain MRI showed significant atrophy of the bilateral fronto-temporal lobes. A neuropathological examination revealed extensive trans-activation response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) positive neurocytoplasmic inclusions and dystrophic neurites in the brain, including the cerebral cortex, basal ganglia, and brainstem. Pathological diagnosis was frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) with TDP-43 (FTLD-TDP) type C, which was also confirmed by the band pattern of C-terminal fragments of TDP-43 on western blotting of sarkosyl-insoluble fractions extracted from the frozen brain. Dysfunction of the thalamus, globus pallidus, supplementary motor area, amygdala and cingulate cortex have been said to be related to the catatonic syndrome. In this case, these areas were affected, showing abnormal TDP-43-positive structures. Further studies are expected to confirm further clinical - pathological correlations to FTLD. © 2017 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  7. Activities of the task group 8 on thin film PV module reliability (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhere, Neelkanth G.

    2016-09-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) modules and systems are being used increasingly to provide renewable energy to schools, residences, small businesses and utilities. At this time, the home owners and small businesses have considerable difficulty in detecting module and/or system degradation and especially enforcing warranty. It needs to be noted that IEC 61215-1 (test req.), -2 (test proc.) and -1-1 (c-Si) are forecasted to be circulated end of Feb 2016 and only editorial changes would be possible. 61215 series does include thin film technologies and would be replacing 61646. Moreover, IEC 61215-1, section 7.2 power output and electric circuitry does contain significant changes to acceptance criteria regarding rated label values, particularly rated power. Even though it is believed that consensus could be achieved within IEC TC82 WG2, some of the smaller players that do not participate actively in IEC TC82 - may not be surprised and must be informed. The other tech specific parts 61215-1-2 (CdTe), -1-3 (a-Si, µc-Si) and -1-4 (CIS, CIGS) are out for comments. The IEC closing date was January 29, 2016. The additions alternative damp heat (DH) test proposed Solar Frontier is being reviewed. In the past, only 600 V systems were permitted in the grid-connected residential and commercial systems in the US. The US commercial systems can now use higher voltage (1,000-1500V) in order to reduce BOS component costs. It is believed that there would not be any problems. The Task Group 8 is collecting data on higher voltage systems.

  8. Activation of nickel-specific CD4+ T lymphocytes in the absence of professional antigen-presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasorri, Francesca; Sebastiani, Silvia; Mariani, Valentina; De Pità, Ornella; Puddu, Pietro; Girolomoni, Giampiero; Cavani, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis ensues from exaggerated T cell responses to haptens. Dendritic cells are required for the initiation of hapten sensitization, but they may not be necessary for disease expression. Here we investigated the antigen-presenting cell requirement of nickel-specific CD4+ lymphocytes isolated from the blood of six allergic individuals. A significant proportion (42 out of 121; 35%) of the T cell clones proliferated in vitro to nickel also in the absence of professional antigen-presenting cells, suggesting a direct T-T hapten presentation. Antigen-presenting-cell-independent T cells showed a predominant T helper 1 phenotype. Nickel recognition by these T cells was major histocompatibility complex class II restricted, not influenced by CD28 triggering, independent from their state of activation, and did not require processing. The capacity of this T cell subset to be directly stimulated by nickel was not due to unique antigen-presenting properties, as both antigen-presenting-cell-dependent and antigen-presenting-cell-independent clones displayed comparable levels of HLA-DR, CD80, and CD86, and were equally capable of presenting nickel to antigen-presenting-cell-independent clones. In contrast, neither T cell types activated antigen-presenting-cell-dependent T lymphocytes. T-T presentation induced T cell receptor downregulation, CD25, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DR upregulation, and interferon-gamma release, although to a lesser extent compared to those induced by dendritic cell-T presentation. Following T-T presentation, the clones did not undergo unresponsiveness and maintained the capacity to respond to dendritic cells pulsed with antigen. In aggregate, our data suggest that antigen-presenting-cell-independent T cell activation can effectively amplify hapten- specific immune responses.

  9. Evaluation of the antiproliferative activity of the leaves from Arctium lappa by a bioassay-guided fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Fabio Bahls; Yamamoto, Rafael Eidi; Zanoli, Karine; Nocchi, Samara Requena; Novello, Cláudio Roberto; Schuquel, Ivânia Teresinha Albrecht; Sakuragui, Cássia Mônica; Luftmann, Heinrich; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; de Mello, João Carlos Palazzo

    2012-02-14

    Arctium lappa L. (Asteraceae) is used in folk medicine around the World, and shows several kinds of biological activity, particularly in vitro antitumor activity in different cell lines. This study evaluated the antiproliferative activity of the crude extract, semipurified fractions, and isolated compounds from the leaves of A. lappa, through bioassay-guided testing in Caco-2 cells. The crude extract was obtained with a 50% hydroethanolic extract and then partitioned with hexane, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol. The ethyl-acetate fraction (EAF) showed antiproliferative activity. This fraction was subjected to sequential column chromatography over silica gel to afford onopordopicrin (1), mixtures of 1 with dehydromelitensin-8-(4'-hydroxymethacrylate) (2), a mixture of 2 with dehydromelitensin (3), mixture of 1 with melitensin (4), dehydrovomifoliol (5), and loliolide (6). The compounds were identified by spectroscopic methods (NMR, MS) and comparison with literature data. This is the first description of compounds 2-5 from this species. The compounds tested in Caco-2 cells showed the following CC(50) (µg/mL) values: 1: 19.7 ± 3.4, 1 with 2: 24.6 ± 1.5, 2 with 3: 27 ± 11.7, 1 with 4: 42 ± 13.1, 6 30 ± 6.2; compound 5 showed no activity.

  10. Evaluation of the Antiproliferative Activity of the Leaves from Arctium lappa by a Bioassay-Guided Fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Vataru Nakamura

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Arctium lappa L. (Asteraceae is used in folk medicine around the World, and shows several kinds of biological activity, particularly in vitro antitumor activity in different cell lines. This study evaluated the antiproliferative activity of the crude extract, semipurified fractions, and isolated compounds from the leaves of A. lappa, through bioassay-guided testing in Caco-2 cells. The crude extract was obtained with a 50% hydroethanolic extract and then partitioned with hexane, ethyl acetate, and n-butanol. The ethyl-acetate fraction (EAF showed antiproliferative activity. This fraction was subjected to sequential column chromatography over silica gel to afford onopordopicrin (1, mixtures of 1 with dehydromelitensin-8-(4'-hydroxymethacrylate (2, a mixture of 2 with dehydromelitensin (3, mixture of 1 with melitensin (4, dehydrovomifoliol (5, and loliolide (6. The compounds were identified by spectroscopic methods (NMR, MS and comparison with literature data. This is the first description of compounds 2–5 from this species. The compounds tested in Caco-2 cells showed the following CC50 (µg/mL values: 1: 19.7 ± 3.4, 1 with 2: 24.6 ± 1.5, 2 with 3: 27 ± 11.7, 1 with 4: 42 ± 13.1, 6 30 ± 6.2; compound 5 showed no activity.

  11. Dinosaurs and Power Plants. Energy from the Past for the Future. Teacher's Lesson Plan and Activity Guide; Teacher's Guide Supplement of Reproducible Graphics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Office of Fossil Energy.

    This teacher's guide and its accompanying supplement were prepared for use with the U.S. Department of Energy's Dinosaurs and Power Plants, a publication designed for students in grades 5-8 about the history, detection, extraction, transportation, use, environmental problem/solutions, and future of fossil energy. The study of energy science shows…

  12. Novel peptide-based platform for the dual presentation of biologically active peptide motifs on biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mas-Moruno, Carlos; Fraioli, Roberta; Albericio, Fernando; Manero, José María; Gil, F Javier

    2014-05-14

    Biofunctionalization of metallic materials with cell adhesive molecules derived from the extracellular matrix is a feasible approach to improve cell-material interactions and enhance the biointegration of implant materials (e.g., osseointegration of bone implants). However, classical biomimetic strategies may prove insufficient to elicit complex and multiple biological signals required in the processes of tissue regeneration. Thus, newer strategies are focusing on installing multifunctionality on biomaterials. In this work, we introduce a novel peptide-based divalent platform with the capacity to simultaneously present distinct bioactive peptide motifs in a chemically controlled fashion. As a proof of concept, the integrin-binding sequences RGD and PHSRN were selected and introduced in the platform. The biofunctionalization of titanium with this platform showed a positive trend towards increased numbers of cell attachment, and statistically higher values of spreading and proliferation of osteoblast-like cells compared to control noncoated samples. Moreover, it displayed statistically comparable or improved cell responses compared to samples coated with the single peptides or with an equimolar mixture of the two motifs. Osteoblast-like cells produced higher levels of alkaline phosphatase on surfaces functionalized with the platform than on control titanium; however, these values were not statistically significant. This study demonstrates that these peptidic structures are versatile tools to convey multiple biofunctionality to biomaterials in a chemically defined manner.

  13. Antimicrobial Activity of Some Essential Oils—Present Status and Future Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouhan, Sonam; Sharma, Kanika

    2017-01-01

    Extensive documentation on the antimicrobial properties of essential oils and their constituents has been carried out by several workers. Although the mechanism of action of a few essential oil components has been elucidated in many pioneering works in the past, detailed knowledge of most of the compounds and their mechanism of action is still lacking. This knowledge is particularly important for the determination of the effect of essential oils on different microorganisms, how they work in combination with other antimicrobial compounds, and their interaction with food matrix components. Also, recent studies have demonstrated that nanoparticles (NPs) functionalized with essential oils have significant antimicrobial potential against multidrug- resistant pathogens due to an increase in chemical stability and solubility, decreased rapid evaporation and minimized degradation of active essential oil components. The application of encapsulated essential oils also supports their controlled and sustained release, which enhances their bioavailability and efficacy against multidrug-resistant pathogens. In the recent years, due to increasingly negative consumer perceptions of synthetic preservatives, interest in essential oils and their application in food preservation has been amplified. Moreover, the development of resistance to different antimicrobial agents by bacteria, fungi, viruses, parasites, etc. is a great challenge to the medical field for treating the infections caused by them, and hence, there is a pressing need to look for new and novel antimicrobials. To overcome these problems, nano-encapsulation of essential oils and exploiting the synergies between essential oils, constituents of essential oils, and antibiotics along with essential oils have been recommended as an answer to this problem. However, less is known about the interactions that lead to additive, synergistic, or antagonistic effects. A contributing role of this knowledge could be the design of new

  14. CERN honours its guides

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    At the end of January, CERN's guides were rewarded for their devotion to the Laboratory. They have a passion for their work, know CERN inside-out and for 40 years have shown people of all ages and nationalities, from all walks of life, around the Laboratory. Who are they? Why, the CERN guides, of course. On 27 January, ten of CERN's 180 guides received special honours for their impressive number of guided tours in 2003. Presenting the awards in the Microcosm hall, CERN's Director-General Robert Aymar congratulated the winners on the key role they play with respect to the general public. "CERN would be nothing without you who show them its activities," he stressed. CERN's Director-General Robert Aymar congratulates Alberto Ribon for his tally of over 40 visits in the course of 2003.One of the prizes was the book «The Particle Odyssey». Here the book's co-author Christine Sutton dedicates it for Sijin Qian. Tzanko Spassoff (PH) and retired staff members Klaus Batzner and Antonio Francano wo...

  15. Preparing Soups. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 5.10b. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 5: Basic Food Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with preparing and serving soups. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities are provided in these areas: thin soups, thick soups, convenience soups,…

  16. Yeast Breads. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 5.15a. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 5: Basic Food Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with yeast breads and their ingredients. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities are provided in these areas: yeast breads and their ingredients,…

  17. Using Importance-Performance Analysis to Guide Instructional Design of Experiential Learning Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Sheri; Hsu, Yu-Chang; Kinney, Judy

    2016-01-01

    Designing experiential learning activities requires an instructor to think about what they want the students to learn. Using importance-performance analysis can assist with the instructional design of the activities. This exploratory study used importance-performance analysis in an online introduction to criminology course. There is limited…

  18. Interesting Guided-Inquiry Labs for a Large-Enrollment, Active Learning Physics II Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagoner, Kasey; Hynes, K. Mairin; Flanagan, Daniel

    2018-04-01

    Introductory physics labs often focus on a series of common experiments intending to teach the student the measurement side of physics. While these experiments have the potential to be quite instructive, we observed that our students often consider them to be boring and monotonous, which often leads to them being uninstructive. To combat this, we have designed a series of labs with two major goals: the experiments should be relevant to the students' world, and the labs should gently guide the students to develop the experimental process on their own. Meeting these goals is difficult, particularly in a course with large enrollment where labs are instructed by graduate students. We have had success meeting these goals in our classroom, where over the last decade our introductory physics course has transformed from a traditional, lecture-learning class to a flipped class based on the textbook Six Ideas that Shaped Physics. Here we describe the structure of the new labs we have designed to capitalize on our classroom success while overcoming the aforementioned difficulties. These new labs are more engaging and instructive for our introductory physics students.

  19. Assessment of chitosan-affected metabolic response by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor bioluminescent imaging-guided transcriptomic analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Hung Kao

    Full Text Available Chitosan has been widely used in food industry as a weight-loss aid and a cholesterol-lowering agent. Previous studies have shown that chitosan affects metabolic responses and contributes to anti-diabetic, hypocholesteremic, and blood glucose-lowering effects; however, the in vivo targeting sites and mechanisms of chitosan remain to be clarified. In this study, we constructed transgenic mice, which carried the luciferase genes driven by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR, a key regulator of fatty acid and glucose metabolism. Bioluminescent imaging of PPAR transgenic mice was applied to report the organs that chitosan acted on, and gene expression profiles of chitosan-targeted organs were further analyzed to elucidate the mechanisms of chitosan. Bioluminescent imaging showed that constitutive PPAR activities were detected in brain and gastrointestinal tract. Administration of chitosan significantly activated the PPAR activities in brain and stomach. Microarray analysis of brain and stomach showed that several pathways involved in lipid and glucose metabolism were regulated by chitosan. Moreover, the expression levels of metabolism-associated genes like apolipoprotein B (apoB and ghrelin genes were down-regulated by chitosan. In conclusion, these findings suggested the feasibility of PPAR bioluminescent imaging-guided transcriptomic analysis on the evaluation of chitosan-affected metabolic responses in vivo. Moreover, we newly identified that downregulated expression of apoB and ghrelin genes were novel mechanisms for chitosan-affected metabolic responses in vivo.

  20. Electromagnetic ultrasonic guided waves

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Songling; Li, Weibin; Wang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces the fundamental theory of electromagnetic ultrasonic guided waves, together with its applications. It includes the dispersion characteristics and matching theory of guided waves; the mechanism of production and theoretical model of electromagnetic ultrasonic guided waves; the effect mechanism between guided waves and defects; the simulation method for the entire process of electromagnetic ultrasonic guided wave propagation; electromagnetic ultrasonic thickness measurement; pipeline axial guided wave defect detection; and electromagnetic ultrasonic guided wave detection of gas pipeline cracks. This theory and findings on applications draw on the author’s intensive research over the past eight years. The book can be used for nondestructive testing technology and as an engineering reference work. The specific implementation of the electromagnetic ultrasonic guided wave system presented here will also be of value for other nondestructive test developers.

  1. Integrin specificity and enhanced cellular activities associated with surfaces presenting a recombinant fibronectin fragment compared to RGD supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Timothy A; Capadona, Jeffrey R; Reyes, Catherine D; García, Andrés J

    2006-11-01

    Biomimetic strategies focusing on presenting short bioadhesive oligopeptides, including the arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif present in numerous adhesive proteins, on a non-fouling support have emerged as promising approaches to improve cellular activities and healing responses. Nevertheless, these bio-inspired strategies are limited by low activity of the oligopeptides compared to the native ligand due to the absence of complementary or modulatory domains. In the present analysis, we generated well-defined biointerfaces presenting RGD-based ligands of increasing complexity to directly compare their biological activities in terms of cell adhesion strength, integrin binding and signaling. Mixed self-assembled monolayers of alkanethiols on gold were optimized to engineer robust supports that present anchoring groups for ligand tethering within a non-fouling, protein adsorption-resistant background. Controlled bioadhesive interfaces were generated by tethering adhesive ligands via standard peptide chemistry. On a molar basis, biointerfaces functionalized with the FNIII7-10 recombinant fragment presenting the RGD and PHSRN adhesive motifs in the correct structural context exhibited significantly higher adhesion strength, FAK activation, and cell proliferation rate than supports presenting RGD ligand or RGD-PHSRN, an oligopeptide presenting these two sites separated by a polyglycine linker. Moreover, FNIII7-10-functionalized surfaces displayed specificity for alpha5beta1 integrin, while cell adhesion to supports presenting RGD or RGD-PHSRN was primarily mediated by alphavbeta3 integrin. These results are significant to the rational engineering of bioactive materials that convey integrin binding specificity for directed cellular and tissue responses in biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  2. Identification of anti-HIV active dicaffeoylquinic- and tricaffeoylquinic acids in Helichrysum populifolium by NMR-based metabolomic guided fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, Heino Martin; Senejoux, François; Seibert, Isabell; Klimkait, Thomas; Maharaj, Vinesh Jaichand; Meyer, Jacobus Johannes Marion

    2015-06-01

    South Africa being home to more than 35% of the world's Helichrysum species (c.a. 244) of which many are used in traditional medicine, is seen potentially as a significant resource in the search of new anti-HIV chemical entities. It was established that five of the 30 Helichrysum species selected for this study had significant anti-HIV activity ranging between 12 and 21 μg/mL (IC50) by using an in-house developed DeCIPhR method on a full virus model. Subsequent toxicity tests also revealed little or no toxicity for these active extracts. With the use of NMR-based metabolomics, the search for common chemical characteristics within the plant extract was conducted, which resulted in specific chemical shift areas identified that could be linked to the anti-HIV activity of the extracts. The NMR chemical shifts associated with the activity were identified to be 2.56-3.08 ppm, 5.24-6.28 ppm, 6.44-7.04 ppm and 7.24-8.04 ppm. This activity profile was then used to guide the fractionation process by narrowing down and focusing the fractionation and purification processes to speed up the putative identification of five compounds with anti-HIV activity in the most active species, Helichrysum populifolium. The anti-HIV compounds identified for the first time from H. populifolium were three dicaffeoylquinic acid derivatives, i.e. 3,4-dicaffeoylquinic acid, 3,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid and 4,5-dicaffeoylquinic acid as well as two tricaffeoylquinic acid derivatives i.e. 1,3,5-tricaffeoylquinic acid and either 5-malonyl-1,3,4-tricaffeoylquinic or 3-malonyl-1,4,5-tricaffeoylquinic acid, with the latter being identified for the first time in the genus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Guide d'exploitation des filières de traitement par boues activées

    OpenAIRE

    Boutin, C.; Caquel, O.; Dimastromatteo, N.,; Dumaine, J.,; Fernandes. G.,; Gervasi, C.; Parotin, S.; Prost Boucle, S.; Tscherter, C.

    2015-01-01

    / Ce guide, à destination des maîtres d'ouvrage et des exploitants, a pour objet de présenter de façon synthétique, les modalités d'exploitation courante d'une station d'épuration par boues activées de capacité < 600 kg DBO5/jour (soit 10 000 équivalents habitants (EH)), et dimensionnée dans le domaine de charge de l'aération prolongée (Cm < 0,1 kg DBO5 /kg MVS/jour). Conçu au fil de l'eau, il recense, tant pour la file eau que pour la file boues, l'ensemble des tâches d'exploitation courante...

  4. Bioactivity-guided fractionation and analysis of compounds with anti-influenza virus activity from Gardenia jasminoides Ellis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Quanjun; Wu, Bin; Shi, Yujing; Du, Xiaowei; Fan, Mingsong; Sun, Zhaolin; Cui, Xiaolan; Huang, Chenggang

    2012-01-01

    Bioassay-guided fractionation of extracts from Fructus Gardeniae led to analysis of its bioactive natural products. After infection by influenza virus strain A/FM/1/47-MA in vivo, antiviral activity of the extracts were investigated. The target fraction was orally administered to rats and blood was collected. High-performance liquid chromatography coupled with photo diode array detector and electrospray ion trap multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometry was applied to screen the compounds absorbed into the blood. A structural characterization based on the retention time, ultraviolet spectra, parent ions and fragmentation ions was performed. Thirteen compounds were confirmed or tentatively identified. This provides an accurate profile of the composition of bioactive compounds responsible for the anti-influenza properties.

  5. Conformation guides molecular efficacy in docking screens of activated β-2 adrenergic G protein coupled receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Dahlia R; Ahn, SeungKirl; Sassano, Maria F; Kleist, Andrew; Zhu, Xiao; Strachan, Ryan; Roth, Bryan L; Lefkowitz, Robert J; Shoichet, Brian K

    2013-05-17

    A prospective, large library virtual screen against an activated β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR) structure returned potent agonists to the exclusion of inverse-agonists, providing the first complement to the previous virtual screening campaigns against inverse-agonist-bound G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) structures, which predicted only inverse-agonists. In addition, two hits recapitulated the signaling profile of the co-crystal ligand with respect to the G protein and arrestin mediated signaling. This functional fidelity has important implications in drug design, as the ability to predict ligands with predefined signaling properties is highly desirable. However, the agonist-bound state provides an uncertain template for modeling the activated conformation of other GPCRs, as a dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) activated model templated on the activated β2AR structure returned few hits of only marginal potency.

  6. Evaluation of cholinesterase inhibitory and antioxidant activities of wild and cultivated samples of sage (Salvia fruticosa) by activity-guided fractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senol, Fatma Sezer; Orhan, Ilkay Erdogan; Erdem, Sinem Aslan; Kartal, Murat; Sener, Bilge; Kan, Yüksel; Celep, Ferhat; Kahraman, Ahmet; Dogan, Musa

    2011-11-01

    In European folk medicine, Salvia species have traditionally been used to enhance memory. In our previous study of 55 Salvia taxa, we explored significant anticholinesterase activity of cultivated S. fruticosa. In this study, we compared the inhibitory activity of dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, and ethanol extracts of 3 wild-grown samples and 1 cultivated sample of S. fruticosa against acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase enzymes (which are associated with pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease) by using the spectrophotometric Ellman method. Antioxidant activities were assessed by determining 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical-scavenging activity, iron-chelating capacity, and ferric-reducing antioxidant power. The dichloromethane extract of the cultivated sample was then subjected to fractionation by using open column chromatography and medium-pressure liquid chromatography to obtain the most active fraction by activity-guided fractionation. All fractions and subfractions were tested in the same manner, and inactive subfractions were discarded. The essential oil of the cultivated sample was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

  7. Bioassay Guided Isolation of an Antidermatophytic Active Constituent from the Stem Bark of Entada spiralis ridl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiza Harun; Siti Zaiton Mat Soad; Norazian Mohd Hassan

    2015-01-01

    Entada spiralis Ridl. (Leguminoceae) is a liana or woody climber that grows in the wild in Malaysia and is locally known as Beluru or Sintok. The isolation and characterization of the chemical constituent from an active fraction have been carried out since no previous study has determined any active components from the stem bark. Our previous study had revealed methanol extract of E. spiralis stem bark exhibited promising antifungal activity against three dermatophytes strains, namely Trichophyton mentagrophytes ATCC 9533, Trichophyton tonsurans ATCC 28942 and Microsporum gypseum ATCC 24102 that cause skin infection. This study was performed to elucidate the structure of active constituent known as ester saponin from the active fraction of E. spiralis stem bark. The fractions were prepared using fractionation process and repeated antifungal test was conducted to identify the most active fraction. The structure elucidation of this compound was based on spectroscopic data ( 1 H, 13 C NMR, HMQC, HMBC and DEPT135) and comparison with literature. On the basis of spectroscopic analysis, the compound was identified as 28-α,L-rhamnopyranosyl-18,21,22-trihydroxy-12-en-29- (2-acetylamino-β-D-gluco-pyranosyl) triterpene ester. The current study provides important baseline information for the use of E.spiralis stem bark for the treatment of skin infection caused by the microorganisms investigated in this study. (author)

  8. Activity-Guided Isolation of Antioxidant Compounds from Andrographis stenophylla Leaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelaveni Thangavel

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant potency of various extracts of Andrographis stenophylla leaf was evaluated in vitro using ferric thiocyanate method. Reductive ability and free radical scavenging activity of the extracts were also investigated. Amounts of phenolic compounds in each of the extracts were determined using Folin-Ciocalteau reagent and compared to observe the correlation between antioxidant activities and total phenolic content. Methanol extract exhibited maximum antioxidant activity and was found to contain 2% of total phenolic compounds. Methanol extract was subjected to column chromatographic separation over silica gel G using ethyl acetate: formic acid: acetic acid: water. Fractions thus obtained were screened for their antioxidant activity. Among the eleven fractions screened, fraction C was more active than the standard butylated hydroxyanisole. Fraction C on further fractionation with n-butanol: acetic acid: water afforded two flavanoids namely acacetine and isosakuranetine. Fraction A was also shown to possess good antioxidant activity which was developed using TLC and indicated the presence of a terpenoid, Andrographolide. The structures of the isolated compounds were confirmed by UV, IR, MS, 1H and 13C NMR spectral data. This is the first report wherein Andrographolide, Acacetine and Isosakuranetine are isolated from Andrographis stenophylla leaf.

  9. APT drug R&D: the right active ingredient in the right presentation for the right therapeutic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalla, David

    2009-11-01

    Drug repurposing, in which an established active pharmaceutical ingredient is applied in a new way - for example, for a new indication, and often combined with an alternative method of presentation, such as a novel delivery route - is an evolving strategy for pharmaceutical R&D. This article discusses examples of the success of this strategy, and presents an analysis of sales of US pharmaceutical products that suggests that this low-risk approach to new product development retains substantial commercial value.

  10. Does erotic stimulus presentation design affect brain activation patterns? Event-related vs. blocked fMRI designs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühler, Mira; Vollstädt-Klein, Sabine; Klemen, Jane; Smolka, Michael N

    2008-07-22

    Existing brain imaging studies, investigating sexual arousal via the presentation of erotic pictures or film excerpts, have mainly used blocked designs with long stimulus presentation times. To clarify how experimental functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) design affects stimulus-induced brain activity, we compared brief event-related presentation of erotic vs. neutral stimuli with blocked presentation in 10 male volunteers. Brain activation differed depending on design type in only 10% of the voxels showing task related brain activity. Differences between blocked and event-related stimulus presentation were found in occipitotemporal and temporal regions (Brodmann Area (BA) 19, 37, 48), parietal areas (BA 7, 40) and areas in the frontal lobe (BA 6, 44). Our results suggest that event-related designs might be a potential alternative when the core interest is the detection of networks associated with immediate processing of erotic stimuli.Additionally, blocked, compared to event-related, stimulus presentation allows the emergence and detection of non-specific secondary processes, such as sustained attention, motor imagery and inhibition of sexual arousal.

  11. Does erotic stimulus presentation design affect brain activation patterns? Event-related vs. blocked fMRI designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klemen Jane

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Existing brain imaging studies, investigating sexual arousal via the presentation of erotic pictures or film excerpts, have mainly used blocked designs with long stimulus presentation times. Methods To clarify how experimental functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI design affects stimulus-induced brain activity, we compared brief event-related presentation of erotic vs. neutral stimuli with blocked presentation in 10 male volunteers. Results Brain activation differed depending on design type in only 10% of the voxels showing task related brain activity. Differences between blocked and event-related stimulus presentation were found in occipitotemporal and temporal regions (Brodmann Area (BA 19, 37, 48, parietal areas (BA 7, 40 and areas in the frontal lobe (BA 6, 44. Conclusion Our results suggest that event-related designs might be a potential alternative when the core interest is the detection of networks associated with immediate processing of erotic stimuli. Additionally, blocked, compared to event-related, stimulus presentation allows the emergence and detection of non-specific secondary processes, such as sustained attention, motor imagery and inhibition of sexual arousal.

  12. Bioassay-guided evaluation of anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities of pistachio, Pistacia vera L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, I; Küpeli, E; Aslan, M; Kartal, M; Yesilada, E

    2006-04-21

    The ethanolic and aqueous extracts prepared from different parts of Pistacia vera L. (Anacardiaceae) as well as its oleoresin were evaluated for their in vivo anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities. Among the extracts screened, only the oleoresin was shown to possess a marked anti-inflammatory activity against carrageenan-induced hind paw edema model in mice without inducing any gastric damage at both 250 and 500 mg/kg doses whereas the rest of the extracts were totally inactive. While the oleoresin was found to display significant antinociceptive activity at 500 mg/kg dose, the ethanolic and aqueous extracts belonging to fruit, leaf, branch and peduncle of Pistacia vera did not exhibit any noticeable antinociception in p-benzoquinone-induced abdominal contractions in mice. Fractionation of the oleoresin indicated the n-hexane fraction to be active, which further led to recognition of some monoterpenes, mainly alpha-pinene (77.5%) by capillary gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) as well as the oleoresin itself. alpha-Pinene was also assessed for its antinociceptive and anti-inflammatory activities in the same manner and exerted a moderate anti-inflammatory effect at 500 mg/kg dose.

  13. Gamma activity as a guide for the building raw materials selection and controlling the environmental hazards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ibrahim

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The spectrometric measurements can provide an alarm for the radiation activity and radioelement concentra-tions. The activity increase over the ambient background can be achieved by well calibrated gamma-spectrometers. In comparison between Wadi El-Dahl and Abu Zawal quarries for building raw materials (feld-spar, the activity concentration of El-Dahl stream sediments are 54.5 and 44.5 Bq/kg for uranium and thorium respectively. While the activity concentration of Abu Zawal rock quarry are 167.03 and 79.77 Bq/kg for uranium and thorium respectively. These activities yielding effective dose rates of 0.63 mSv/y for Wadi El-Dahl stream sediments and 1.48 mSv/y for Abu Zawal rock quarry. In summary, the spectrometric measurements are excellent selective tool to monitoring the environment against the radiation risk. In this aspect, Wadi El-Dahl stream sedi-ment quarry considered as the more suitable for producing feldspar as a raw materials to building industry. In comparison, Abu Zawal rock quarry has a higher effective dose rate exceeds the international permissible limits which is 1 mSv/y. A total of 19 feldspar samples were completely described regarding their general chemical fea-tures by using x-ray fluorescence. From the study all the samples contain high concentration of barium and ru-bidium which can separate using different methods in order to use in different important industry.

  14. Application of the Management System for Facilities and Activities. Safety Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This publication provides guidance for following the requirements for management systems that integrate safety, health, security, quality assurance and environmental objectives. A successful management system ensures that nuclear safety matters are not dealt with in isolation but are considered within the context of all these objectives. The aim of this publication is to assist Member States to establish and implement effective management systems that coherently integrate all aspects of managing nuclear facilities and activities. Contents: 1. Introduction; 2. Management system; 3. Management responsibility; 4. Resource management; 5. Process implementation; 6. Measurement, assessment and improvement; Appendix I: Transition to an integrated management system; Appendix II: Activities in the document control process; Appendix III: Activities in the procurement process; Appendix IV: Performance of independent assessments; Annex I: Electronic document management system; Annex II: Media for record storage; Annex III: Record retention and storage; Glossary.

  15. PFP functional development planning guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SINCLAIR, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    The PFP Functional Development Planning Guide presents the strategy and process used for the identification, development, and analysis of functions (activities) necessary to satisfy the requirements within the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) integrated project baseline. The functional analysis will provide the basis for the development of a function driven work breakdown structure. Future revisions to this document will include as attachments the results of the PFP Functional Analysis resulting from this approach. This document is intended be a Project-owned management tool. As such, the guide will periodically require revisions resulting from improvements of the information, processes, and techniques as now described

  16. Averting Uncertainty: A Practical Guide to Physical Activity Research in Australian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachele, Jerome N.; Cuddihy, Thomas F.; Washington, Tracy L.; McPhail, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Preventative health has become central to contemporary health care, identifying youth physical activity as a key factor in determining health and functioning. Schools offer a unique research setting due to distinctive methodological circumstances. However, school-based researchers face several obstacles in their endeavour to complete successful…

  17. 78 FR 69684 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Guide To Minimize...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    ... require documentation and recordkeeping are recall and traceback programs. In the event of a food safety concern, processors who adopt these recommended programs will be prepared to recall products from the... Recordkeeping Burden \\1\\ No. of records Average burden Activity No. of per Total annual per Total hours...

  18. 75 FR 48692 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Guide to Minimize...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-11

    ... recordkeeping are recall and traceback programs. In the event of a food safety concern, processors who adopt these recommended programs will be prepared to recall products from the market place or be able to trace.... of Annual Frequency per Total Annual Activity Recordkeepers Recordkeeping Records Hours per Record...

  19. Optics: Light, Color, and Their Uses. An Educator's Guide With Activities In Science and Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This document includes information on the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, the Hubble Space Telescope, the Next Generation Space Telescope, Soft X-Ray Imager, and the Lightning Imaging System. Classroom activities from grades K-12 are included, focusing on light and color, using mirrors, lenses, prisms, and filters.

  20. Solar Energy Education. Social studies: activities and teacher's guide. Field test edition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    Solar energy information is made available to students through classroom instruction by way of the Solar Energy Education teaching manuals. In this manual solar energy, as well as other energy sources like wind power, is introduced by performing school activities in the area of social studies. A glossary of energy related terms is included. (BCS)

  1. LC-MS guided isolation of diterpenoids from Sapium insigne with α-glucosidase inhibitory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, De-Xiu; Geng, Chang-An; Yang, Tong-Hua; Huang, Xiao-Yan; Li, Tian-Ze; Gao, Zhen; Ma, Yun-Bao; Peng, Hua; Zhang, Xue-Mei; Chen, Ji-Jun

    2018-04-08

    Ten new (1-10) and ten known (11-20) diterpenoids involving ent-atisane, ent-seco-atisane, ent-kaurane and ent-seco-kaurane types were isolated from Sapium insigne under the guidance of LCMS-IT-TOF analyses. Their structures were characterized by extensive spectroscopic analyses (HRESIMS, UV, IR, 1D and 2D NMR). A putative biosynthetic pathway was proposed for ent-seco-atisane diterpenoids. Their inhibitory activities on α-glucosidase in vitro were tested for the first time. Compound 4 showed moderate inhibitory effect on α-glucosidase with an IC 50 value of 0.34 mM via a noncompetitive inhibition mechanism (K i  = 0.27 mM). The preliminary structure-activity relationships of the ent-atisane diterpenoids inhibiting α-glucosidase were discussed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. LASR-Guided Variability Subtraction: The Linear Algorithm for Significance Reduction of Stellar Seismic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, Sarah; Myers, Sam; Ahlers, Johnathon; Barnes, Jason W.

    2017-10-01

    Stellar seismic activity produces variations in brightness that introduce oscillations into transit light curves, which can create challenges for traditional fitting models. These oscillations disrupt baseline stellar flux values and potentially mask transits. We develop a model that removes these oscillations from transit light curves by minimizing the significance of each oscillation in frequency space. By removing stellar variability, we prepare each light curve for traditional fitting techniques. We apply our model to $\\delta$-Scuti KOI-976 and demonstrate that our variability subtraction routine successfully allows for measuring bulk system characteristics using traditional light curve fitting. These results open a new window for characterizing bulk system parameters of planets orbiting seismically active stars.

  3. Application of the Management System for Facilities and Activities. Safety Guide (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    This publication provides guidance for following the requirements for management systems that integrate safety, health, security, quality assurance and environmental objectives. A successful management system ensures that nuclear safety matters are not dealt with in isolation but are considered within the context of all these objectives. The aim of this publication is to assist Member States to establish and implement effective management systems that coherently integrate all aspects of managing nuclear facilities and activities.

  4. Noticing relevant problem features: activating prior knowledge affects problem solving by guiding encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crooks, Noelle M.; Alibali, Martha W.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated whether activating elements of prior knowledge can influence how problem solvers encode and solve simple mathematical equivalence problems (e.g., 3 + 4 + 5 = 3 + __). Past work has shown that such problems are difficult for elementary school students (McNeil and Alibali, 2000). One possible reason is that children's experiences in math classes may encourage them to think about equations in ways that are ultimately detrimental. Specifically, children learn a set of patterns that are potentially problematic (McNeil and Alibali, 2005a): the perceptual pattern that all equations follow an “operations = answer” format, the conceptual pattern that the equal sign means “calculate the total”, and the procedural pattern that the correct way to solve an equation is to perform all of the given operations on all of the given numbers. Upon viewing an equivalence problem, knowledge of these patterns may be reactivated, leading to incorrect problem solving. We hypothesized that these patterns may negatively affect problem solving by influencing what people encode about a problem. To test this hypothesis in children would require strengthening their misconceptions, and this could be detrimental to their mathematical development. Therefore, we tested this hypothesis in undergraduate participants. Participants completed either control tasks or tasks that activated their knowledge of the three patterns, and were then asked to reconstruct and solve a set of equivalence problems. Participants in the knowledge activation condition encoded the problems less well than control participants. They also made more errors in solving the problems, and their errors resembled the errors children make when solving equivalence problems. Moreover, encoding performance mediated the effect of knowledge activation on equivalence problem solving. Thus, one way in which experience may affect equivalence problem solving is by influencing what students encode about the

  5. Exploring the interaction of activity limitations with context, systems, community and personal factors in accessing public health care services: A presentation of South African case studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mji, Gubela; Braathen, Stine H; Vergunst, Richard; Scheffler, Elsje; Kritzinger, Janis; Mannan, Hasheem; Schneider, Marguerite; Swartz, Leslie; Visagie, Surona

    2017-02-08

    There are many factors that influence access to public health services, such as the context people live in, the existing health services, and personal, cultural and community factors. People with disabilities (activity limitations), through their experience of health services, may offer a particular understanding of the performance of the health services, thus exposing health system limitations more clearly than perhaps any other health service user. This article explores how activity limitations interact with factors related to context, systems, community and personal factors in accessing public health care services in South Africa. We present four case studies of people with disabilities from four low-resource diverse contexts in South Africa (rural, semi-rural, farming community and peri-urban) to highlight challenges of access to health services experienced by people with activity limitations in a variety of contexts. One case study of a person with disabilities was chosen from each study setting to build evidence using an intensive qualitative case study methodology to elucidate individual and household experiences of challenges experienced by people with activity limitations when attempting to access public health services. In-depth interviews were used to collect data, using an interview guide. The analysis was conducted in the form of a thematic analysis using the interview topics as a starting point. First, these four case studies demonstrate that equitable access to health services for people with activity limitations is influenced by a complex interplay of a variety of factors for a single individual in a particular context. Secondly, that while problems with access to public health services are experienced by everyone, people with activity limitations are affected in particular ways making them particularly vulnerable in using public health services. The revitalisation of primary health care and the introduction of national health

  6. A Marketing and Distribution Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Carol

    This curriculum guide in marketing and distribution has been designed for children in grades K-6. It is presented much like a cookbook from which recipes (activities) may be extracted and experimented with depending on the tastes (needs) of the children. It is suggested that objectives be reinforced through teacher-developed activities or through…

  7. Fast automatic 3D liver segmentation based on a three-level AdaBoost-guided active shape model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Baochun; Huang, Cheng; Zhou, Shoujun; Hu, Qingmao; Jia, Fucang, E-mail: fc.jia@siat.ac.cn [Shenzhen Institutes of Advanced Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Sharp, Gregory [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Fang, Chihua; Fan, Yingfang [Department of Hepatology (I), Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510280 (China)

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: A robust, automatic, and rapid method for liver delineation is urgently needed for the diagnosis and treatment of liver disorders. Until now, the high variability in liver shape, local image artifacts, and the presence of tumors have complicated the development of automatic 3D liver segmentation. In this study, an automatic three-level AdaBoost-guided active shape model (ASM) is proposed for the segmentation of the liver based on enhanced computed tomography images in a robust and fast manner, with an emphasis on the detection of tumors. Methods: The AdaBoost voxel classifier and AdaBoost profile classifier were used to automatically guide three-level active shape modeling. In the first level of model initialization, fast automatic liver segmentation by an AdaBoost voxel classifier method is proposed. A shape model is then initialized by registration with the resulting rough segmentation. In the second level of active shape model fitting, a prior model based on the two-class AdaBoost profile classifier is proposed to identify the optimal surface. In the third level, a deformable simplex mesh with profile probability and curvature constraint as the external force is used to refine the shape fitting result. In total, three registration methods—3D similarity registration, probability atlas B-spline, and their proposed deformable closest point registration—are used to establish shape correspondence. Results: The proposed method was evaluated using three public challenge datasets: 3Dircadb1, SLIVER07, and Visceral Anatomy3. The results showed that our approach performs with promising efficiency, with an average of 35 s, and accuracy, with an average Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 0.94 ± 0.02, 0.96 ± 0.01, and 0.94 ± 0.02 for the 3Dircadb1, SLIVER07, and Anatomy3 training datasets, respectively. The DSC of the SLIVER07 testing and Anatomy3 unseen testing datasets were 0.964 and 0.933, respectively. Conclusions: The proposed automatic approach

  8. Fast automatic 3D liver segmentation based on a three-level AdaBoost-guided active shape model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Baochun; Huang, Cheng; Sharp, Gregory; Zhou, Shoujun; Hu, Qingmao; Fang, Chihua; Fan, Yingfang; Jia, Fucang

    2016-05-01

    A robust, automatic, and rapid method for liver delineation is urgently needed for the diagnosis and treatment of liver disorders. Until now, the high variability in liver shape, local image artifacts, and the presence of tumors have complicated the development of automatic 3D liver segmentation. In this study, an automatic three-level AdaBoost-guided active shape model (ASM) is proposed for the segmentation of the liver based on enhanced computed tomography images in a robust and fast manner, with an emphasis on the detection of tumors. The AdaBoost voxel classifier and AdaBoost profile classifier were used to automatically guide three-level active shape modeling. In the first level of model initialization, fast automatic liver segmentation by an AdaBoost voxel classifier method is proposed. A shape model is then initialized by registration with the resulting rough segmentation. In the second level of active shape model fitting, a prior model based on the two-class AdaBoost profile classifier is proposed to identify the optimal surface. In the third level, a deformable simplex mesh with profile probability and curvature constraint as the external force is used to refine the shape fitting result. In total, three registration methods-3D similarity registration, probability atlas B-spline, and their proposed deformable closest point registration-are used to establish shape correspondence. The proposed method was evaluated using three public challenge datasets: 3Dircadb1, SLIVER07, and Visceral Anatomy3. The results showed that our approach performs with promising efficiency, with an average of 35 s, and accuracy, with an average Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) of 0.94 ± 0.02, 0.96 ± 0.01, and 0.94 ± 0.02 for the 3Dircadb1, SLIVER07, and Anatomy3 training datasets, respectively. The DSC of the SLIVER07 testing and Anatomy3 unseen testing datasets were 0.964 and 0.933, respectively. The proposed automatic approach achieves robust, accurate, and fast liver

  9. The Zemstvo’s Activities to Guide the Primary School Teacher Resources Formation and Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timur A. Magsumov

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to study the activities of the zemstvo in the Volga-Ural region of the second half of XIX – early XX century aimed at forming and supporting primary school teacher resources. The study of the complex process required the use of a large number of information sources, including extractions from the regional documentation archives, reference books and periodicals to carry out a systemic and panoramic analysis of the zemstvo’s activities in terms of teacher resources formation and support. The focus of the study was on the issues of the zemstvo’s participation in the development of teacher training and scholarship support for students, advanced training of teachers through courses, congresses, teachers’ self-organization, as well as financial and material situation of zemsky teachers and the activities carried out by the teachers’ mutual aid societies. The authors make a conclusion that, despite the complicated conditions, the zemstvo was able to create a network of schools and provide them with teachers, including women teachers. To achieve this, the zemstvo had set up their own educational institutions as well as funded the state-run institutions or issued scholarships to future teachers. The zemstvo tried to make up for the apparent insufficiency of qualified teachers by starting a system of professional retraining and advanced training through specially organized short-term and long-term courses and congresses for teachers, as well as by providing more books for teachers’ libraries. The zemstvo tried to do their best to improve the financial and material position of zemsky teachers that was aggravated by complicated working conditions. Despite particular counterproductive activities of the state, the zemstvo was able to create a certain stratum of zemsky teachers that consisted of qualified teachers with professional education, who had been taught primary education methodology and enjoyed respect in the

  10. Criticality safety basics, a study guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. L. Putman

    1999-09-01

    This document is a self-study and classroom guide, for criticality safety of activities with fissile materials outside nuclear reactors. This guide provides a basic overview of criticality safety and criticality accident prevention methods divided into three parts: theory, application, and history. Except for topic emphasis, theory and history information is general, while application information is specific to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Information presented here should be useful to personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. However, the guide's primary target audience is fissile material handler candidates.

  11. Criticality safety basics, a study guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Putman, V.L.

    1999-01-01

    This document is a self-study and classroom guide, for criticality safety of activities with fissile materials outside nuclear reactors. This guide provides a basic overview of criticality safety and criticality accident prevention methods divided into three parts: theory, application, and history. Except for topic emphasis, theory and history information is general, while application information is specific to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Information presented here should be useful to personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. However, the guide's primary target audience is fissile material handler candidates

  12. Immunohistochemical expression of AQP-3 in vitiligo: a new potential guide for disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodeib, Abeer; Hegab, Doaa; Rizk, Omnia; Mohammed, Shahdan

    2017-08-01

    Vitiligo is a depigmenting skin disorder, with disappearance of functioning epidermal melanocytes. Aquaporin-3 (AQP-3) is an aquaglyceroporin expressed in epidermal keratinocytes, where it shares in regulating their proliferation and differentiation, and so it might affect melanocytes indirectly. So far, little is known regarding its possible role in vitiligo. This work aimed to study the changes in immunohistochemical expression of AQP-3 protein in vitiligo to detect its possible role in disease pathogenesis. Skin biopsies were taken from lesional skin of 30 vitiligo patients in addition to 20 normal controls. Epidermal immunohistochemical expression of AQP-3 was assessed as: +3 = strong expression, +2 = moderate, +1= weak and 0= negative expression. AQP-3 was significantly less expressed in vitiligo epidermis than control (PVitiligo Index of Disease Activity (r =-0.505, P=0.004). Reduced epidermal AQP-3 may have a role in impaired melanocyte survival in vitiligo, and might be a potential negative biological marker for vitiligo activity. Larger trials should further elucidate the effect of changes in epidermal AQP-3 expression in development of vitiligo, and that might pave the road for discovering new therapeutic modalities for the disease.

  13. Dosimetry-guided high-activity 131I therapy in patients with advanced differentiated thyroid carcinoma: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verburg, Frederik A.; Haenscheid, Heribert; Biko, Johannes; Hategan, Maria C.; Lassmann, Michael; Kreissl, Michael C.; Reiners, Christoph; Luster, Markus

    2010-01-01

    In patients with advanced differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC), therapy with the highest safe 131 I activity is desirable to maximize the tumour radiation dose yet avoid severe myelotoxicity. Recently, the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) published a standard operational procedure (SOP) for pre-therapeutic dosimetry in DTC patients incorporating a safety threshold of a 2 Gy absorbed dose to the blood as a surrogate for the red marrow. We sought to evaluate the safety and effectiveness in everyday tertiary referral centre practice of treating advanced DTC with high 131 I activities chosen primarily based on the results of dosimetry following this SOP. We retrospectively assessed toxicity as well as biochemical and scintigraphic response in our first ten patients receiving such therapy for advanced DTC. The 10 patients received a total of 13 dosimetrically guided treatments with a median administered activity of 14.0 GBq (range: 7.0-21.4 GBq) 131 I. After 6 of 13 treatments in 6 of 10 patients, short-term side effects of 131 I therapy, namely nausea, vomiting or sialadenitis, were observed. Leukocyte and platelet counts dropped significantly in the weeks after 131 I treatment, but returned to pre-treatment levels by 3 months post-therapy. Serum thyroglobulin levels decreased after 12 of 13 treatments (median reduction: 58%) in 9 of 10 patients. In our initial patient cohort, high-activity 131 I therapy for advanced DTC based on pre-therapeutic blood dosimetry following the EANM SOP was safe and well tolerated. Such treatment almost always produced a partial biochemical tumour response. (orig.)

  14. Preparing Stocks. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 5.10a. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 5: Basic Food Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with the uses for and types of stocks and also gives information on how to cook, cool, and store stocks. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities…

  15. Using PyMOL to Explore the Effects of ph on Noncovalent Interactions between Immunoglobulin G and Protein A: A Guided-Inquiry Biochemistry Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche Allred, Zahilyn D.; Tai, Heeyoung; Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Page, Richard C.

    2017-01-01

    Students' understandings of foundational concepts such as noncovalent interactions, pH and pK[subscript a] are crucial for success in undergraduate biochemistry courses. We developed a guided-inquiry activity to aid students in making connections between noncovalent interactions and pH/pK[subscript a]. Students explore these concepts by examining…

  16. Vegetables. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 5.14. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 5: Basic Food Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with the major types of vegetables, with the procedures for storing vegetables, and with the general rules and methods of vegetable cookery. Illustrated…

  17. How To Select an Event Management System: A Guide to Selecting the Most Effective Resource Management System for College Union and Student Activities Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Scott; Raasch, Kevin

    2002-01-01

    Provides an evaluation template for student activities professionals charged with evaluating competitive event scheduling software. Guides staff in making an informed decision on whether to retain event management technology provided through an existing vendor or choose "best-of-breed" scheduling software. (EV)

  18. Loss of Proliferation and Antigen Presentation Activity following Internalization of Polydispersed Carbon Nanotubes by Primary Lung Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Mandavi; Sachar, Sumedha; Saxena, Rajiv K.

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between poly-dispersed acid functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (AF-SWCNTs) and primary lung epithelial (PLE) cells were studied. Peritoneal macrophages (PMs, known phagocytic cells) were used as positive controls in this study. Recovery of live cells from cultures of PLE cells and PMs was significantly reduced in the presence of AF-SWCNTs, in a time and dose dependent manner. Both PLE cells as well as PMs could take up fluorescence tagged AF-SWCNTs in a time dependent manner and this uptake was significantly blocked by cytochalasin D, an agent that blocks the activity of acto-myosin fibers and therefore the phagocytic activity of cells. Confocal microscopic studies confirmed that AF-SWCNTs were internalized by both PLE cells and PMs. Intra-trachially instilled AF-SWCNTs could also be taken up by lung epithelial cells as well as alveolar macrophages. Freshly isolated PLE cells had significant cell division activity and cell cycling studies indicated that treatment with AF-SWCNTs resulted in a marked reduction in S-phase of the cell cycle. In a previously standardized system to study BCG antigen presentation by PLE cells and PMs to sensitized T helper cells, AF-SWCNTs could significantly lower the antigen presentation ability of both cell types. These results show that mouse primary lung epithelial cells can efficiently internalize AF-SWCNTs and the uptake of nanotubes interfered with biological functions of PLE cells including their ability to present BCG antigens to sensitized T helper cells. PMID:22384094

  19. An investigation into the use of CMOS active pixel technology in image-guided radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osmond, J P F; Holland, A D; Harris, E J; Ott, R J; Evans, P M; Clark, A T

    2008-01-01

    The increased intelligence, read-out speed, radiation hardness and potential large size of CMOS active pixel sensors (APS) gives them a potential advantage over systems currently used for verification of complex treatments such as IMRT and the tracking of moving tumours. The aim of this work is to investigate the feasibility of using an APS-based system to image the megavoltage treatment beam produced by a linear accelerator (Linac), and to demonstrate the logic which may ultimately be incorporated into future sensor and FPGA design to evaluate treatment and track motion. A CMOS APS was developed by the MI 3 consortium and incorporated into a megavoltage imaging system using the standard lens and mirror configuration employed in camera-based EPIDs. The ability to resolve anatomical structure was evaluated using an Alderson RANDO head phantom, resolution evaluated using a quality control (QC3) phantom and contrast using an in-house developed phantom. A complex intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment was imaged and two algorithms were used to determine the field-area and delivered dose, and the position of multi-leaf collimator (MLC) leaves off-line. Results were compared with prediction from the prescription and found to agree within a single image frame time for dose delivery and 0.02-0.03 cm for the position of collimator leaves. Such a system therefore shows potential as the basis for an on-line verification system capable of treatment verification and monitoring patient motion

  20. Experiences of a guided smartphone-based behavioral activation therapy for depression: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kien Hoa Ly

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recently, a number of studies have investigated treatments administered via smartphones showing that this treatment format has a potential to be effective. However, we still have limited knowledge of how patients experience this treatment format. The objective of this study was to explore participants' views of a smartphone-based behavioral activation treatment. In-depth interviews were conducted with 12 strategically (participants with different overall experiences selected participants, suffering from major depression according to the DSM-IV. The interview data were processed with the aid of thematic analysis. The analysis generated the three main themes: Commitment, Treatment and Lack of important components, with attached subthemes. In conclusion, the findings from the current study correspond with existing knowledge in the field of internet-based treatment. Considering that this kind of treatment is still quite new, the need for further research and development is considerable. Nevertheless, its availability, assimilation into users' everyday lives and possible motivational qualities speak of its potential.

  1. Obtaining active parental consent for school-based research: a guide for researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfenden, Luke; Kypri, Kypros; Freund, Megan; Hodder, Rebecca

    2009-06-01

    Schools increasingly require researchers to obtain active parental consent for students to participate in health research. We sought to identify effective strategies for the recruitment of child research participants through schools. A search of Medline, PsycINFO, Educational Resources Information Center, ProQuest 5000 and the Cochrane Library electronic databases was conducted for the period 1988 to 2008. The review found evidence that the following strategies may be effective in enhancing participation rates: 1) promotion of the research to school principals, teachers, parents and students; 2) dissemination of study information using methods allowing direct contact with parents (i.e. telephone or face-to-face); 3) provision of incentives to teachers, students and at a class level; 4) making reminder contacts; and 5) having a member of the research team co-ordinate and closely monitor the recruitment process. Application of these strategies should reduce the risk of non-response and other biases that result from selective non-participation. Further randomised controlled trials of these and other strategies are required to strengthen the evidence base.

  2. Grey Guide Repository: presentation and demo

    OpenAIRE

    Biagioni, Stefania; Carlesi, Carlo; Schopfel, Joachim; Farace, Dominic; Frantzen, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this project is to develop an open source repository of good practices in the field of grey literature. That which originated in monographic form will now open and expand to include content from the global grey literature community. Such practices will range from the production and processing of grey literature through to its distribution, uses, and preservation.

  3. Student Guide Presentation Retail Marketing (Merchandising)

    OpenAIRE

    Juan Vigaray, María Dolores de

    2010-01-01

    La asignatura se imparte íntegramente en inglés. Presentación de la asignatura RETAIL MARKETING con los contenidos, requisitos, métodos y técnicas de aprendizaje, sistema de evaluación, trabajo a realizar.

  4. Prostate Cancer Imaging and Biomarkers Guiding Safe Selection of Active Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary A. Glaser

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundActive surveillance (AS is a widely adopted strategy to monitor men with low-risk, localized prostate cancer (PCa. Current AS inclusion criteria may misclassify as many as one in four patients. The advent of multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI and novel PCa biomarkers may offer improved risk stratification. We performed a review of recently published literature to characterize emerging evidence in support of these novel modalities.MethodsAn English literature search was conducted on PubMed for available original investigations on localized PCa, AS, imaging, and biomarkers published within the past 3 years. Our Boolean criteria included the following terms: PCa, AS, imaging, biomarker, genetic, genomic, prospective, retrospective, and comparative. The bibliographies and diagnostic modalities of the identified studies were used to expand our search.ResultsOur review identified 222 original studies. Our expanded search yielded 244 studies. Among these, 70 met our inclusion criteria. Evidence suggests mpMRI offers improved detection of clinically significant PCa, and MRI-fusion technology enhances the sensitivity of surveillance biopsies. Multiple studies demonstrate the promise of commercially available screening assays for prediction of AS failure, and several novel biomarkers show promise in this setting.ConclusionIn the era of AS for men with low-risk PCa, improved strategies for proper stratification are needed. mpMRI has dramatically enhanced the detection of clinically significant PCa. The advent of novel biomarkers for prediction of aggressive disease and AS failure has shown some initial promise, but further validation is warranted.

  5. Incidence, clinical presentation, and outcome of HIV-1-associated cryptococcal meningitis during the highly active antiretroviral therapy era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Touma, Madeleine; Rasmussen, Line D.; Martin-Iguacel, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    Background: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection with advanced immunosup-pression predisposes to cryptococcal meningitis (CM). We describe the incidence, clinical presentation, and outcome of CM in HIV-infected individuals during the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era. Methods......: A nationwide, population-based cohort of HIV-infected individuals was used to estimate incidence and mortality of CM including risk factors. A description of neurological symptoms of CM at presentation and follow-up in the study period 1995–2014 was included in this study. Results: Among 6,351 HIV...... was associated with increased risk of CM [IRR, 2.05 (95% CI, 1.00–4.20)]. The main signs and symptoms at presentation were headache, cognitive deficits, fever, neck stiffness, nausea, and vomiting. All individuals diagnosed with CM had a CD4 + cell count

  6. Incidence, clinical presentation, and outcome of HIV-1-associated cryptococcal meningitis during the highly active antiretroviral therapy era

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Touma, Madeleine; Rasmussen, Line D.; Martin-Iguacel, Raquel

    2017-01-01

    : A nationwide, population-based cohort of HIV-infected individuals was used to estimate incidence and mortality of CM including risk factors. A description of neurological symptoms of CM at presentation and follow-up in the study period 1995-2014 was included in this study. RESULTS: Among 6,351 HIV......BACKGROUND: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection with advanced immunosuppression predisposes to cryptococcal meningitis (CM). We describe the incidence, clinical presentation, and outcome of CM in HIV-infected individuals during the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era. METHODS...... was associated with increased risk of CM [IRR, 2.05 (95% CI, 1.00-4.20)]. The main signs and symptoms at presentation were headache, cognitive deficits, fever, neck stiffness, nausea, and vomiting. All individuals diagnosed with CM had a CD4(+) cell count

  7. Long-term degradation of resin-based cements in substances present in the oral environment: influence of activation mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Moreira da SILVA

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Indirect restorations in contact with free gingival margins or principally within the gingival sulcus, where the presence of organic acids produced by oral biofilm is higher, may present faster degradation of the resin-based cement pellicle. Objectives To investigate the degradation of four resin-based cements: Rely X ARC (R, Variolink II (V, Enforce (E and All Cem (A, after immersion in distilled water (DW, lactic acid (LA and artificial saliva (AS and to analyze the influence of the activation mode on this response. Material and Methods Two activation modes were evaluated: chemical (Ch and dual (D. In the dual activation, a two-millimeter thick ceramic disk (IPS Empress System was interposed between the specimen and light-curing unit tip. Specimens were desiccated, immersed in distilled water, artificial saliva and lactic acid 0.1 M at 37°C for 180 days, weighed daily for the first 7 days, and after 14, 21, 28, 90 and 180 days and were desiccated again. Sorption and solubility (µg/mm 3 were calculated based on ISO 4049. The data were submitted to multifactor analysis of variance (MANOVA and Tukey's HSD test for media comparisons (α=0.05. Results Sorption was higher after immersion in LA (pD (p<0.05. The lowest solubility was presented by R (p<0.05. Conclusions Lactic acid increased the degradation of resin-based cements. Moreover, the physical component of activation, i.e., light-activation, contributed to a low degradation of resin-based cements.

  8. [Neuronal activity of monkey dorso-lateral premotor cortex during tasks of figure recognition guided motor sequence vs memorized spatial motor sequence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y C; Huang, F D; Chen, N H; Shou, J Y; Wu, L

    1998-04-01

    In the last 2-3 decades the role of the premotor cortex (PM) of monkey in memorized spatial sequential (MSS) movements has been amply investigated. However, it is as yet not known whether PM participates in the movement sequence behaviour guided by recognition of visual figures (i.e. the figure-recognition sequence, FRS). In the present work three monkeys were trained to perform both FRS and MSS tasks. Postmortem examination showed that 202 cells were in the dorso-lateral premotor cortex. Among 111 cells recorded during the two tasks, more than 50% changed their activity during the cue periods in either task. During the response period, the ratios of cells with changes of firing rate in both FRS and MSS were high and roughly equal to each other, while during the image period, the proportion in the FRS (83.7%) was significantly higher than that in the MSS (66.7%). Comparison of neuronal activities during same motor sequence of two different tasks showed that during the image periods PM neuronal activities were more closely related to the FRS task, while during the cue periods no difference could be found. Analysis of cell responses showed that the neurons with longer latency were much more in MSS than in FRS in either cue or image period. The present results indicate that the premotor cortex participates in FRS motor sequence as well as in MSS and suggest that the dorso-lateral PM represents another subarea in function shared by both FRS and MSS tasks. However, in view of the differences of PM neuronal responses in cue or image periods of FRS and MSS tasks, it seems likely that neural networks involved in FRS and MSS tasks are different.

  9. Supporting Adaptive and Adaptable Hypermedia Presentation Semantics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C.A. Bulterman (Dick); L. Rutledge (Lloyd); L. Hardman (Lynda); J.R. van Ossenbruggen (Jacco)

    1999-01-01

    textabstractHaving the content of a presentation adapt to the needs, resources and prior activities of a user can be an important benefit of electronic documents. While part of this adaptation is related to the encodings of individual data streams, much of the adaptation can/should be guided by the

  10. Guided Learning at Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billett, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Guided learning (questioning, diagrams/analogies, modeling, coaching) was studied through critical incident interviews in five workplaces. Participation in everyday work activities was the most effective contributor to workplace learning. Organizational readiness and the efficacy of guided learning in resolving novel tasks were also important. (SK)

  11. Career Education Instructional Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    State Univ. of New York, Oswego. Coll. at Oswego. Dept. of Industrial Arts and Technology.

    The guide is designed primarily for industrial arts teachers at the middle school level who wish to integrate career education into their curricula. The lessons and activities attempt to establish a balance among career information, technical information, and hands-on experience. The guide contains six lesson plans which cover the topics: the…

  12. Living in Space. Book II. Levels D, E, F for Grades 4, 5, 6. Operation Liftoff: Elementary School Space Program. A Resource Guide with Activities for Elementary School Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Sheila Briskin; Kirschenbaum, Audrey

    This guide contains teacher background information and activities for students which deal with space travel and is designed to encourage elementary school students to take a greater interest in mathematics and science. The activities in this guide are to be used with grades 4 to 6 and cover the topics of food, clothing, health, housing,…

  13. Living in Space. Book 1. Levels A, B, C for Grades 1, 2, 3. Operation Liftoff: Elementary School Space Program. A Resource Guide with Activities for Elementary School Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Sheila Briskin; Kirschenbaum, Audrey

    This guide contains teacher background information and activities for students that relate to space travel and is designed to encourage elementary school students to take a greater interest in mathematics and science. The activities in this guide are to be used with grades 1 to 3 and cover the topics of food, clothing, health, housing,…

  14. Amino-terminal extension present in the methionine aminopeptidase type 1c of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is indispensible for its activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumaran Sangaralingam

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methionine aminopeptidase (MetAP is a ubiquitous enzyme in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, which catalyzes co-translational removal of N-terminal methionine from elongating polypeptide chains during protein synthesis. It specifically removes the terminal methionine in all organisms, if the penultimate residue is non-bulky and uncharged. The MetAP action for exclusion of N-terminal methionine is mandatory in 50-70% of nascent proteins. Such an activity is required for proper sub cellular localization, additional processing and eventually for the degradation of proteins. Results We cloned genes encoding two such metalloproteases (MtMetAP1a and MtMetAP1c present in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and expressed them as histidine-tagged proteins in Escherichia coli. Although they have different substrate preferences, for Met-Ala-Ser, we found, MtMetAP1c had significantly high enzyme turnover rate as opposed to MtMetAP1a. Circular dichroism spectroscopic studies as well as monitoring of enzyme activity indicated high temperature stability (up to 50°C of MtMetAP1a compared to that of the MtMetAP1c. Modelling of MtMetAP1a based on MtMetAP1c crystal structure revealed the distinct spatial arrangements of identical active site amino acid residues and their mutations affected the enzymatic activities of both the proteins. Strikingly, we observed that 40 amino acid long N-terminal extension of MtMetAP1c, compared to its other family members, contributes towards the activity and stability of this enzyme, which has never been reported for any methionine aminopeptidase. Furthermore, mutational analysis revealed that Val-18 and Pro-19 of MtMetAP1c are crucial for its enzymatic activity. Consistent with this observation, molecular dynamic simulation studies of wild-type and these variants strongly suggest their involvement in maintaining active site conformation of MtMetAP1c. Conclusion Our findings unequivocally emphasized that N

  15. In vitro pharmacological activity of the tetrahydroisoquinoline salsolinol present in products from Theobroma cacao L. like cocoa and chocolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melzig, M F; Putscher, I; Henklein, P; Haber, H

    2000-11-01

    Cocoa and chocolate contain the tetrahydroisoquinoline alkaloid salsolinol up to a concentration of 25 microg/g. Salsolinol is a dopaminergic active compound which binds to the D(2) receptor family, especially to the D(3) receptor with a K(i) of 0.48+/-0.021 micromol/l. It inhibits the formation of cyclic AMP and the release of beta-endorphin and ACTH in a pituitary cell system. Taking the detected concentration and the pharmacological properties into account, salsolinol seems to be one of the main psychoactive compounds present in cocoa and chocolate and might be included in chocolate addiction.

  16. Multi-site damage localization in anisotropic plate-like structures using an active guided wave structural health monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moll, J; Schulte, R T; Fritzen, C-P; Hartmann, B; Nelles, O

    2010-01-01

    A new approach for structural health monitoring using guided waves in plate-like structures has been developed. In contrast to previous approaches, which mainly focused on isotropic or quasi-isotropic plates, the proposed algorithm does not assume any simplifications regarding anisotropic wave propagation. Thus, it can be used to improve the probability of detection. In this paper the mathematical background for damage localization in anisotropic plates will be introduced. This is an extension of the widely known ellipse method. The formalism is based on a distributed sensor network, where each piezoelectric sensor acts in turn as an actuator. The automatic extraction of the onset time of the first waveform in the differential signal in combination with a statistical post-processing via a two-dimensional probability density function and the application of the expectation-maximization algorithm allows a completely automatic localization procedure. Thus, multiple damages can be identified at the same time. The present study uses ultrasonic signals provided by the spectral element method. This simulation approach shows good agreement with experimental measurements. A local linear neural network is used to model the nonlinear dispersion curves. The benefit of using a neural network approach is to increase the angular resolution that results from the sparse sensor network. Furthermore, it can be used to shorten the computational time for the damage localization procedure

  17. Elementary Environmental Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Robert J.

    This guide presents suggestions for field trips, out-of-doors activities, material for centers, and individualized activities in the teaching of elementary school science and particularly environmental education at the elementary level. The guide includes a section on preparation and procedures for conducting field trips, including sample…

  18. Female PFP patients present alterations in eccentric muscle activity but not the temporal order of activation of the vastus lateralis muscle during the single leg triple hop test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalytczak, Marcelo Martins; Lucareli, Paulo Roberto Garcia; Dos Reis, Amir Curcio; Bley, André Serra; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida; Correa, João Carlos Ferrari; Politti, Fabiano

    2018-04-07

    This study aimed to compare the concentric and eccentric activity and the temporal order of peak activity of the hip and knee muscles between women with patellofemoral pain (PFP) and healthy women during the single leg triple hop test (SLTHT). Electromyographic (EMG) and Kinematic data were collected from 14 healthy women (CG) and 14 women diagnosed with PFP (PFG) during a single session of the single leg triple hop test. Integral surface electromyography (iEMG) data of the hip and knee muscles in eccentric and concentric phases and the length of time that each muscle needed to reach the maximal peak of muscle activity were calculated. The iEMG in the eccentric phase was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than the concentric phase, for the gluteus maximus and gluteus medius muscles (CG and PFG) and for the vastus lateralis muscle (PFG). The vastus lateralis muscle was the first muscle to reach the highest peak of activity in the PFG, and the third to reach this peak in the CG. In the present study, the activity of the vastus lateralis muscle during the eccentric phase of the jump was greater than concentric phase, as a temporal anticipation of its peak in activity among women with PFP. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. [Clinical presentation, therapeutic approach and outcomes in acute poisoning treated with activated charcoal. Are there differences between men and women?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amigó-Tadín, Montserrat; Nogué-Xarau, Santiago; Miró-Andreu, Oscar

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether there are gender-based differences in the clinical presentation, therapeutic approaches and outcomes in acute poisoning treated with activated charcoal. A descriptive study conducted in the Emergency Department of the Hospital Clínic de Barcelona over the 7 years between the years 2001 and 2008. The study included poisoned patients who had received activated charcoal. The variables included, epidemiological data, clinical and toxicological presentation, therapeutic approach, time in emergency department and outcomes. A total of 575 patients were included in the study. The mean age was 37.8 (SD 14.8) years and 65.7% were females. No differences were observed between males and females with respect to age, number of drugs involved in the poisoning or the number of tablets ingested, but a higher prevalence of benzodiazepine poisoning was observed in females compared to males (69.8 vs. 61.2%; Ppoisoning was more common in males than in females (32.4 vs.18.8%; Ppoisoning was also more common in males than in females (7.9 vs. 3.2%; Ppoisonings, delays in care, hours of emergency department stay, treatment or outcome. Benzodiazepine poisoning was more prevalent in females than in males. Non-drug poisonings and alcohol combined with drug ingestion were more common in males. The clinical outcomes of the poisonings, delays in care, therapeutic requirements and admissions were similar between genders. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. Solanum paranense Extracts and Solanine Present Anti-Inflammatory Activity in an Acute Skin Inflammation Model in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Piana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of the S. paranense crude extract, S. paranense alkaloid fraction, and solanine alkaloid. These samples reduce the croton oil-induced ear edema in a dose-dependent manner and a maximum inhibition of 81%, 98%, and 80% in the doses of 1.0, 0.73, and 0.37 mg/ear, respectively. Moreover, the samples inhibit the MPO activity with an inhibition maximum of 51%, 40%, and 46% in the doses of 1.0, 0.73, and 0.37 mg/ear, respectively. Similar results were found for dexamethasone 0.10 mg/ear (positive control, which showed inhibitions of ear edema and MPO activity of 100% and 65%, respectively. These results found probably are related to the presence of solanine which is present in significant quantity in the alkaloid fraction and others as rutin and rosmarinic, chlorogenic, and gallic acids. These results support the use of S. paranense for the treatment of inflammatory skin disorders.

  1. Workshop presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanden, Per-Olof; Edland, Anne; Reiersen, Craig; Mullins, Peter; Ingemarsson, Karl-Fredrik; Bouchard, Andre; Watts, Germaine; Johnstone, John; Hollnagel, Erik; Ramberg, Patric; Reiman, Teemu

    2009-01-01

    An important part of the workshop was a series of invited presentations. The presentations were intended to both provide the participants with an understanding of various organisational approaches and activities as well as to stimulate the exchange of ideas during the small group discussion sessions. The presentation subjects ranged from current organisational regulations and licensee activities to new organisational research and the benefits of viewing organisations from a different perspective. There were more than a dozen invited presentations. The initial set of presentations gave the participants an overview of the background, structure, and aims of the workshop. This included a short presentation on the results from the regulatory responses to the pre-workshop survey. Representatives from four countries (Sweden, Canada, Finland, and the United Kingdom) expanded upon their survey responses with detailed presentations on both regulatory and licensee safety-related organisational activities in their countries. There were also presentations on new research concerning how to evaluate safety critical organisations and on a resilience engineering perspective to safety critical organisations. Below is the list of the presentations, the slides of which being available in Appendix 2: 1 - Workshop Welcome (Per-Olof Sanden); 2 - CSNI Working Group on Human and Organisational Factors (Craig Reiersen); 3 - Regulatory expectations on justification of suitability of licensee organisational structures, resources and competencies (Anne Edland); 4 - Justifying the suitability of licensee organisational structures, resources and competencies (Karl-Fredrik Ingemarsson); 5 - Nuclear Organisational Suitability in Canada (Andre Bouchard); 6 - Designing and Resourcing for Safety and Effectiveness (Germaine Watts); 7 - Organisational Suitability - What do you need and how do you know that you've got it? (Craig Reiersen); 8 - Suitability of Organisations - UK Regulator's View (Peter

  2. Lecture Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Symposium on Physics of Elementary Interactions in the LHC Era held in Warsaw from 21 to 22 April 2008. The main subject of the workshop was to present the progress in CERN LHC collider project. Additionally some satellite activities in field of education, knowledge and technology transfer in the frame of CERN - Poland cooperation were shown

  3. An overview of past and present activities in the severe accident domain within the framework of WGAMA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guentay, S.

    2011-01-01

    was introduced in 2005 to set-up the priorities and timeline of new activities. As a result, selection of the currently running activities was established by a careful review of all relevant severe accident issues and considering the status of research being conducted in 2006-2007. Several severe accident issues that have potential to be tackled by means of the standard OECD tools were identified and grouped under 11 main titles. The appropriate activity type was assigned to each issue under the main title, their risk and regulatory relevance was determined based on responses of WGAMA members and possible activities in the short, mid and long term were defined. Currently (2010-2011), the screening process is repeated since many of the international severe accident projects have been completed or are well advanced. The present paper will provide a brief overview of the WGAMA activities carried out in the last three decades in the severe accident field. It will highlight the results achieved in fission product release, transport, deposition and retention behavior, in-vessel behavior of degraded cores and in-vessel protection, containment behavior and containment protection, as well as in reaching a common understanding of severe accident management measures and their treatment in risk assessment. (author)

  4. Activation of CH4 by Th(+) as studied by guided ion beam mass spectrometry and quantum chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Richard M; Armentrout, P B; de Jong, Wibe A

    2015-04-06

    The reaction of atomic thorium cations with CH4 (CD4) and the collision-induced dissociation (CID) of ThCH4(+) with Xe are studied using guided ion beam tandem mass spectrometry. In the methane reactions at low energies, ThCH2(+) (ThCD2(+)) is the only product; however, the energy dependence of the cross-section is inconsistent with a barrierless exothermic reaction as previously assumed on the basis of ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry results. The dominant product at higher energies is ThH(+) (ThD(+)), with ThCH3(+) (ThCD3(+)) having a similar threshold energy. The latter product subsequently decomposes at still higher energies to ThCH(+) (ThCD(+)). CID of ThCH4(+) yields atomic Th(+) as the exclusive product. The cross-sections of all product ions are modeled to provide 0 K bond dissociation energies (in eV) of D0(Th(+)-H) ≥ 2.25 ± 0.18, D0(Th(+)-CH) = 6.19 ± 0.16, D0(Th(+)-CH2) ≥ 4.54 ± 0.09, D0(Th(+)-CH3) = 2.60 ± 0.30, and D0(Th(+)-CH4) = 0.47 ± 0.05. Quantum chemical calculations at several levels of theory are used to explore the potential energy surfaces for activation of methane by Th(+), and the effects of spin-orbit coupling are carefully considered. When spin-orbit coupling is explicitly considered, a barrier for C-H bond activation that is consistent with the threshold measured for ThCH2(+) formation (0.17 ± 0.02 eV) is found at all levels of theory, whereas this barrier is observed only at the BHLYP and CCSD(T) levels otherwise. The observation that the CID of the ThCH4(+) complex produces Th(+) as the only product with a threshold of 0.47 eV indicates that this species has a Th(+)(CH4) structure, which is also consistent with a barrier for C-H bond activation. This barrier is thought to exist as a result of the mixed ((4)F,(2)D) electronic character of the Th(+) J = (3)/2 ground level combined with extensive spin-orbit effects.

  5. Collegiate Drug Management Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janosik, Steven M.; Anderson, David S.

    A checklist to help colleges and universities reevaluate their policies and procedures regarding drug use among college students is presented. It is designed to supplement the "Collegiate Alcohol Risk Assessment Guide." In this guide drugs other than alcohol are of concern, although alcohol is viewed by many as the "drug of choice" among college…

  6. How useful is determination of anti-factor Xa activity to guide bridging therapy with enoxaparin? A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerstingl, Christoph; Omran, Heyder; Tripp, Christian; Poetzsch, Bernd

    2009-02-01

    Low-molecular-weight heparins (LMWH) are commonly used as peri-procedural bridging anticoagulants. The usefulness of measurement of anti-factor Xa activity (anti-Xa) to guide bridging therapy with LMWH is unknown. It was the objective of this study to determine levels of anti-Xa during standard bridging therapy with enoxaparin, and to examine predictors for residual anti-Xa. Consecutive patients receiving enoxaparin at a dosage of 1 mg/kg body weight/12 hours for temporary interruption of phenprocoumon were prospectively enrolled to the study. Blood-samples were obtained 14 hours after LMWH-application immediately pre- procedurally. Procedural details, clinical and demographic data were collected and subsequently analyzed. Seventy patients were included (age 75.2 +/- 10.8 years, Cr Cl 55.7 +/- 21.7ml/min, body mass index [BMI] 27.1 +/- 4.9). LMWH- therapy was for a mean of 4.2 +/- 1.6 days; overall anti-Xa was 0.58 +/- 0.32 U/ml. In 37 (52.8%) of patients anti-Xa was > or U/ml, including 10 (14.3%) patients with anti-Xa > 1U/ml. Linear regression analysis of single variables and logistic multivariable regression analysis failed to prove a correlation between anti-Xa and single or combined factors. No major bleeding, no thromboembolism and four (5.7%) minor haemorrhages were observed. When bridging OAC with therapeutic doses of enoxaparin a high percentage of patients undergo interventions with high residual anti-Xa. The levels of anti-Xa vary largely and are independent of single or combined clinical variables. Since the anti-Xa-related outcome of patients receiving bridging therapy with LMWH is not investigated, no firm recommendation on the usefulness of monitoring of anti-Xa can be given at this stage.

  7. Bio-guided fractionation of methanol extract of Ziziphus mauritiana Lam. (bark and effect of the most active fraction on cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Simo Tagne

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the anticancer and antioxidant potential of methanol bark extract of Ziziphus mauritiana (Z. mauritiana, which is used by traditional healers to cure some cases of cancer in Cameroon. Methods: The methanol crude extract of Z. mauritiana has the antiproliferative activity on four cancer cell lines and its antioxidant activity. The extract was partitioned in five different solvents, and each fraction was tested. The effect of the most antiproliferative fraction on cell cycle was determined. Bio-guided fractionation was performed on the fraction with the highest antiproliferative and the highest antioxidant activities. Results: Z. mauritiana methanol extract was active on all tested cells, and showed promising antioxidant activity. All fractions except hexane fraction were active with the dichloromethane fraction being the most active and showed S and G2-M phase arrest (P<0.01 on cell cycle progression of NCI-H460 and MCF-7, respectively. Bio-guided fractionation of the dichloromethane fraction led to lupeol and betulinic acid. The greatest antioxidant activity was recorded with ethyl acetate fraction and its fractionation led to catechin and epigallocatechin. Conclusions: Overall, this study showed that Z. mauritiana barks has benefits as a chemoprevention agent cancer.

  8. Aeronautics. An Educator's Guide with Activities in Science, Mathematics, and Technology Education: What Pilot, Astronaut, or Aeronautical Engineer didn't Start out with a Toy Glider?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggs, Pat (Editor); Huetter, Ted (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    Welcome to the exciting world of aeronautics. The term aeronautics originated in France, and was derived from the Greek words for "air" and "to sail." It is the study of flight and the operation of aircraft. This educator guide explains basic aeronautical concepts, provides a background in the history of aviation, and sets them within the context of the flight environment (atmosphere, airports, and navigation). The activities in this guide are designed to be uncomplicated and fun. They have been developed by NASA Aerospace Education Services Program specialists, who have successfully used them in countless workshops and student programs around the United States. The activities encourage students to explore the nature of flight, and experience some real-life applications of mathematics, science, and technology. The subject of flight has a wonderful power to inspire learning.

  9. Present Situation and Activities of ISO 14000 series in Heavy Machinery Industries; Jukikai meka no taiou jokyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomisawa, Yukio. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Research Institute

    1999-01-15

    This paper shows the outline of the present situation and activities of ISO14000 series, environmental management system in heavy machinery industries. Today, main heavy machinery industries have already certified to ISO 14001 until this summer. The aim of the introduction of ISO 14001 are to establish the system improvement continuously by PDCA, to have essential elements in international trade and to keep up with the risk management. Some example of conducted ISO 14001 in heavy machinery industries are shown. The trend of heavy machinery industries will be able to predict to three key words, internationalization, network and opening information. The new role expected to environmental material engineer are indicated to research and develop ecomaterial by using LCA and to support the recycling, waste treatment and other technical basis of the environmental management system. (author)

  10. Complete genome sequence of Serratia sp. YD25 (KCTC 42987) presenting strong antagonistic activities to various pathogenic fungi and bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chun; Liu, Yibo; Sun, Yan; Li, Zhi

    2017-03-10

    Serratia sp. YD25 (KCTC 42987) was originally isolated from rhizosphere soil in a continuous cropping tobacco-planting farm. Here, we show that its metabolites efficiently suppress the growth of various important pathogenic fungi and bacteria, causing infection in both plants and humans. In addition, Serratia sp. YD25 has a special trait of simultaneous production of both serrawettin W2 and prodigiosin, two important bioactive secondary metabolites produced by Serratia strains. Such co-production has not been reported in other Serratia strains. The complete genome sequence of Serratia sp. YD25 is presented, which is valuable for further exploration of its biotechnological applications in agriculture and medicine. The genome sequence reported here is also useful for understanding the unique regulatory mechanisms underlying biosynthesis of active compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Predictors of Intrathoracic Injury after Blunt Torso Trauma in Children Presenting to an Emergency Department as Trauma Activations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Caitlin; Mironova, Irina; Lehman, Erik; Olympia, Robert P

    2017-06-01

    Thoracic injuries are a major cause of death associated with blunt trauma in children. Screening for injury with chest x-ray study, compared with chest computed tomography (CT) scan, has been controversial, weighing the benefits of specificity with the detriment of radiation exposure. To identify predictors of thoracic injury in children presenting as trauma activations to a Level I trauma center after blunt torso trauma, and to compare these predictors with those previously reported in the literature. We performed a retrospective chart review of pediatric patients (trauma center between June 2010 and June 2013 as a trauma activation after sustaining a blunt torso trauma and who received diagnostic imaging of the chest as part of their initial evaluation. Data analysis was performed on 166 patients. There were 33 patients (20%) with 45 abnormalities detected on diagnostic imaging of the chest, with the most common abnormalities being lung contusion (36%), pneumothorax (22%), and rib fracture (13%). Statistically significant predictors of abnormal diagnostic imaging of the chest included Glasgow Coma Scale score (GCS) trauma include GCS < 15, hypoxia, syncope/dizziness, cervical spine tenderness, thoraco-lumbar-sacral spine tenderness, and abdominal/pelvic tenderness. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Packaging supplier inspection guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stromberg, H.M.; Gregg, R.E.; Kido, C.; Boyle, C.D.

    1991-05-01

    This is document is a guide for conducting quality assurance inspections of transportations packaging suppliers, where suppliers are defined as designers, fabricators, distributors, users, or owners of transportation packaging. This document can be used during an inspection to determine regulatory compliance within the requirements of 10 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71, Subpart H (10 CFR 71.101--71.135). The guidance described in this document provides a framework for an inspection. It provides the inspector with the flexibility to adapt the methods and concepts presented here to meet the needs of the particular facility being inspected. The guide was developed to ensure a structured and consistent approach for inspections. The method treats each activity at a supplier facility as a separate entity (or functional element), and combines the activities within the framework of an ''inspection tree.'' The method separates each functional element into several areas of performance and then identifies guidelines, based on regulatory requirements, to be used to qualitatively rate each area. This document was developed to serve as a field manual to facilitate the work of inspectors. 1 ref., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  13. Human factors guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penington, J.

    1995-10-01

    This document presents human factors guides, which have been developed in order to provide licensees of the AECB with advice as to how to address human factors issues within the design and assessment process. This documents presents the results of a three part study undertaken to develop three guides which are enclosed in this document as Parts B, C and D. As part of the study human factors standards, guidelines, handbooks and other texts were researched, to define those which would be most useful to the users of the guides and for the production of the guides themselves. Detailed specifications were then produced to outline the proposed contents and format of the three guides. (author). 100 refs., 3 tabs., 11 figs

  14. Human factors guides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penington, J [PHF Services Inc., (Canada)

    1995-10-01

    This document presents human factors guides, which have been developed in order to provide licensees of the AECB with advice as to how to address human factors issues within the design and assessment process. This documents presents the results of a three part study undertaken to develop three guides which are enclosed in this document as Parts B, C and D. As part of the study human factors standards, guidelines, handbooks and other texts were researched, to define those which would be most useful to the users of the guides and for the production of the guides themselves. Detailed specifications were then produced to outline the proposed contents and format of the three guides. (author). 100 refs., 3 tabs., 11 figs.

  15. Identification of subjects for social responsibility education at universities and the present activity at the university of Tokyo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karima, Risuke; Oshima, Yoshito; Yamamoto, Kazuo

    2006-01-01

    The management of corporate social responsibility (CSR) has recently become a critical concern for companies in advanced countries. For universities, there is a requirement to contribute to the promotion of CSR, resulting in graduates who have sufficient cognition of and a good attitude towards CSR. In addition, universities have social responsibilities, which can be called "University Social Responsibility (USR)." On the basis of the concepts of the guidelines for CSR in the "Green Paper," which was presented by the European Committee (EC) in 2001, we provide a perspective here on what factors dictate the establishment of education programs for social responsibilities at universities. These factors include an outline of the concepts and the significance of CSR, social ethics and the morals of higher education and research, compliances, human resource management, human rights, safety and health in academic settings, and various concerns regarding environmental safety and preservation. Additionally, through the concept postulated here for social responsible education, in this paper, we introduce the present activity at the University of Tokyo (UT) in terms of the education program for CSR and USR, proposing that the future establishment of university-wide education programs based on the concept of CSR and the value of sustainability is required at UT.

  16. Insertion of an active fixation lead in the inferior interatrial septum via a 9.0 Fr guiding catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumpei Mori, MD

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Placing an atrial lead in the inferior interatrial septum (IAS reportedly reduces the incidence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF and slows the progression to chronic AF; however, in certain cases, inferior IAS pacing is technically difficult. When this procedure is unsuccessful, insertion of the lead in the right atrial appendage can be considered, but it is associated with a risk of cardiac perforation. Here, we describe a technique for lead insertion in the inferior IAS via a 9.0 Fr guiding catheter, which may serve as an alternative technique for inferior IAS pacing when the conventional stylet-guided insertion is not successful.

  17. Present status of research activities at the national institute for fusion science and its role in international collaboration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, J.

    1997-01-01

    In the National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS), Japan, a helical magnetic confinement system named Large Helical Device (LHD) is under construction with objective of comprehensive studies of high temperature plasmas in a helical system and investigation of a helical reactor as an alternative approach. Superconducting coils of l = 2, m = 10, major radius R = 3.9 m, produce a steady state helical magnetic field for confinement, together with poloidal coils on LHD. The magnetic field strength on the axis is 3.0 T in the phase I and 4.0 T in the phase II experiment. The plasma major radius in LHD is 3.75 m, and averaged plasma radius is 0.6 m. The plasma will be produced and heated with ECH, and further heated with NBI and ICRF. It is also planned to produced a steady state plasma in LHD. It is expected to have the first plasma in 1998. Small devices such as CHS and others are under operation in the NIFS for supporting the LHD project. The Data and Planning Center of NIFS is collecting, compiling and evaluating atomic and molecular data which are necessary for nuclear fusion research. The talk will include the present status of the construction of LHD, research activities on the development of heating and diagnostic devices for LHD, and experimental results obtained on CHS, JIPP T-IIU and other devices. The role of NIFS on promoting IAEA activities to bridge large scale institutions and small and medium scale laboratories for world-wide collaborations in the field of plasma physics and fusion research will also be introduced, together with an idea of organizing a regional center in Asia. (author)

  18. Guide to ship sanitation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2011-01-01

    "The third edition of the Guide to Ship Sanitation presents the public health significance of ships in terms of disease and highlights the importance of applying appropriate control measures"--Back cover...

  19. A imanência, apresentação de um roteiro de estudo sobre Gilles Deleuze Immanence plan and forms of life presenting a study guide about Gilles Deleuze

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jairo Dias Carvalho

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available O texto pretende mostrar um tipo de abordagem e de entrada no texto deleuziano. A partir do problema do fato da não existência de consenso no mundo da vida sentiu-se a necessidade de começar a pensar e formular um conceito de formas de vida. Escolheu-se, para isto, a idéia de plano de imanência e o conceito de multiplicidade virtual de Deleuze. Apresentamos, então, uma espécie de roteiro desse percurso. É o conceito de formas de vida, articulado e pensado a partir de Deleuze, a resposta ao problema da pluralidade e da diferença.This text intends to show a kind of aprproach and introduction to Deleuze's work. Based on the problem of the non-existence of consensus in the world of life, we feel the need to start thinking and formulating the concept of virtual multiplicity. Then we present a kind of guide to do so. The solution to the problem of plurality and difference is the concept of forms of life formulated and thought in acordance with Deleuze.

  20. Effects of a self-guided, web-based activity programme for patients with persistent musculoskeletal pain in primary healthcare: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calner, T; Nordin, C; Eriksson, M K; Nyberg, L; Gard, G; Michaelson, P

    2017-07-01

    Web-based interventions for pain management are increasingly used with possible benefits, but never used in addition to multimodal rehabilitation (MMR). MMR is recommended treatment for persistent pain in Sweden. The aim was to evaluate the effects of a self-guided, web-based programme added to MMR for work ability, pain, disability and health-related quality of life. We included 99 participants with persistent musculoskeletal pain in a randomized study with two intervention arms: (1) MMR and web-based intervention, and (2) MMR. Data was collected at baseline, 4 and 12 months. Outcome measures were work ability, working percentage, average pain intensity, pain-related disability, and health-related quality of life. There were no significant effects of adding the web-based intervention to MMR regarding any of the outcome variables. This trial provides no support for adding a self-guided, web-based activity programme to MMR for patients with persistent musculoskeletal pain. The comprehensive self-guided, web-based programme for activity, Web-BCPA, added to multimodal treatment in primary health care had no effect on work ability, pain, disability or health-related quality of life. Future web-based interventions should be tailored to patients' individual needs and expectations. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  1. [Present-day sports activities among the blind and persons with poor vision in different countries of the world].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmachev, R A

    2003-01-01

    The approach of a country to persons with limited physical abilities is an important component of country's social-and-cultural policy. Blindness is a most severe variety of health disorders leading to social defect and social insufficiency. The role of adaptive physical culture is important within the system of the social-and-medical rehabilitation of the blind because the sedentary life mode has a negative effect on organisms of the disabled due to vision. Sports is not only a method for correcting the general somatic condition, but it is also an important social-and-physiological factor that enables the blind to comprehend their abilities as an example for others. As for our country, the information about the modern sports activities among the disabled due to vision is absolutely insufficient for the public at large. An analysis of results of examination (conducted by using the computer data base of the International Blind Sportsmen Association--IBSA) of 2386 blind and impaired vision sportsmen is presented in the paper. Data about sport disciplines and types of ophthalmic pathologies encountered among the high-class blind and impaired vision athletes from different world countries are described. The above data can be helpful in elaborating the rehabilitation programs for persons with severe disorders of the organ of vision to be used in rehabilitation centers, sport federations and clubs of the disabled as well as in other institutions dealing with rehabilitation of the disabled due to vision in our country.

  2. Regulatory and law framework of agricultural methanization and composting activities. User's guide; Le cadre reglementaire et juridique des activites agricoles de methanisation et de compostage. Guide Pratique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-08-15

    After a presentation of the general context of organic waste management (its techniques, materials, legal and regulatory sources, i.e. European and French laws), this guide indicates the main regulatory and law aspects to those wishing to implement a project of methanization or composting of organic by-products in the agricultural sector. Several aspects are therefore discussed and presented in practical sheets. They concern the health and environment regulation, but not the professional risk prevention (explosion, fire, and so on). These aspects are the project setting up, input materials (animal by-products, organic materials coming from agricultural production or from out of it), waste collection and transport, process steps, organic product valorization, biogas valorization, solid and liquid release management

  3. Antioxidant activity of phenolic acids and esters present in red wine on human Low-Density Lipoproteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urizzi, P.; Monje, M.-C.; Souchard, J.-P.; Abella, A.; Chalas, J.; Lindenbaum, A.; Vergnes, L.; Labidalle, S.; Nepveu, F.

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the antioxidant activity of different phenolic acids and their esters, three types of experiments have been used. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) quantitative analysis was carried out using the acetaldehyde/xanthine oxidase system and Fenton's reaction to generate superoxide and hydroxyl radicals, respectively. In a second test, hydroperoxides generated by Cu2+-catalysed oxidation of low density lipoproteins (LDL) were quantified by a modified iodometric method. In a third assay, LDL were oxidized with Esterbauer's method and modified LDL species were quantified by HPLC. The results show that the esterified phenolic derivatives present a better antioxidant activity, on the lipoperoxidation of LDL, than the corresponding phenolic acids. Trois expériences ont été menées afin d'évaluer l'activité antioxydante de différents acides et de leurs esters. Une analyse quantitative par résonance paramagnétique électronique (RPE) a été réalisée en utilisant le système acétaldéhyde/xanthine oxydase et la réaction de Fenton générant, respectivement, les radicaux superoxyde et hydroxyle. Dans un second test, les hydroperoxydes générés par une réaction d'oxydation des lipoprotéines de basse densité (LDL) catalysée par Cu2+ ont été quantifiés par une méthode iodométrique modifiée. Dans une troisième étude, les LDL ont été oxydées par la méthode d'Esterbauer et les espèces oxydées ont été quantifiées par HPLC. Les résultats montrent que les dérivés estérifiés présentent une activité antioxydante contre la lipoperoxydation des LDL bien plus importante que celle des acides phénoliques correspondants.

  4. Determination of activity by gamma spectrometry of radionuclides present in drums of residues generated in nuclear centrals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguiar, J.C.; Fernandez, J.

    2006-01-01

    The generation of radioactive residuals in nuclear centrals as CNA I (Atucha I Nuclear Central) and CNE (Embalse Nuclear Central) makes that the measurement of those radionuclides has been a previous stage to the waste management. A method used in those nuclear centrals it is the gamma spectrometry with HPGe detectors, previous to the immobilization of the residual in a cemented matrix, with this the contact with the external agents and its possible dispersion to the atmosphere in the short term is avoided. The ARN (Nuclear Regulatory Authority) of Argentina it carries out periodically intercomparisons and evaluations of the measurement and procedures systems used in the nuclear power stations for the correct measurement and determination of activity of radioactive residuals by gamma spectrometry. In this work an independent method of measurement is exposed to the nuclear power stations. To determine the activity of the residuals by gamma spectrometry deposited in drums, it is required of the precise knowledge of the efficiency curve for such geometry and matrix. Due to the RNA doesn't have a pattern of these characteristics, a mathematical model has been used to obtain this efficiency curve. For it, it is necessary to determine previously: 1) the geometric efficiency or solid angle sustained by the source-detector system (drum-detector) applying a mathematical model described in this work. 2) To estimate the auto-attenuation factor that present the photons in the cemented matrix, these calculations are carried out with a simple equation and its are verified with the Micro Shield 6.10 program. The container commonly used by these nuclear power stations its are drums for 220 liters constructed with SAE 1010 steel and with a thickness of 0.127 cm, with an approximate weight 7.73 Kg., internal diameter of 57.1 cm, and height: 87 cm. The results obtained until the moment register a discrepancy from 5 to 10% with relationship to the measurements carried out by the

  5. Screening of Luzula species native to the Carpathian Basin for anti-inflammatory activity and bioactivity-guided isolation of compounds from Luzula luzuloides (Lam.) Dandy & Wilmott.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Barbara; Chang, Fang-Rong; Hwang, Tsong-Long; Szappanos, Ádám; Mándi, Attila; Hunyadi, Attila; Kurtán, Tibor; Jakab, Gusztáv; Hohmann, Judit; Vasas, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The present study focused on the anti-inflammatory screening of Luzula species native to the Carpathian Basin and bioactivity-guided isolation of compounds of Luzula luzuloides (Lam.) Dandy & Wilmott. The anti-inflammatory properties of extracts with different polarity prepared from Luzula species were determined. Among them, the CH 2 Cl 2 -soluble fraction of L. luzuloides possessed strong inhibitory effects on superoxide anion generation (99.39±0.37%) and elastase release (114.22±3.13%) in fMLP/CB-induced human neutrophils at concentration of 10μg/mL. From this fraction, six compounds (1-6) were isolated by the combination of different chromatographic methods. The structures of the compounds were determined by means of MS, 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy. The results allowed the identification of the new 1,6-dihydroxy-2-keto-1,7-dimethyl-8-vinyl-1,2-dihydrophenanthrene (1) from the plant, named luzulin A. Chiral HPLC and HPLC-ECD analysis revealed that 1 possesses low enantiomeric excess and TDDFT-ECD calculations afforded the configurational assignment of the separated enantiomers. Three known phenanthrenes [juncuenin B (2), dehydrojuncuenin B (3) and juncusol (4)] and two flavonoids [apigenin (5) and luteolin (6)] were also isolated. The anti-inflammatory activity of the isolated compounds was tested and IC 50 values were determined. This was the first time that phenanthrenes were detected in a Luzula species. The oxidative transformation of juncuenin B (3) led to the isolation of its possible biometabolites, namely luzulin A (1), dehydrojuncuenin B (4), and juncuenin D (7). The isolated compounds (1-4) confirm that besides flavonoids, phenanthrenes could also serve as chemotaxonomic markers for Luzula species and prove the close relationship of Juncus and Luzula genus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Tank characterization reference guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Lorenzo, D.S.; DiCenso, A.T.; Hiller, D.B.; Johnson, K.W.; Rutherford, J.H.; Smith, D.J.; Simpson, B.C.

    1994-09-01

    Characterization of the Hanford Site high-level waste storage tanks supports safety issue resolution; operations and maintenance requirements; and retrieval, pretreatment, vitrification, and disposal technology development. Technical, historical, and programmatic information about the waste tanks is often scattered among many sources, if it is documented at all. This Tank Characterization Reference Guide, therefore, serves as a common location for much of the generic tank information that is otherwise contained in many documents. The report is intended to be an introduction to the issues and history surrounding the generation, storage, and management of the liquid process wastes, and a presentation of the sampling, analysis, and modeling activities that support the current waste characterization. This report should provide a basis upon which those unfamiliar with the Hanford Site tank farms can start their research

  7. Guided labworks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Lærke Bang

    For the last 40 years physics education research has shown poor learning outcomes of guided labs. Still this is found to be a very used teaching method in the upper secodary schools. This study explains the teacher's choice of guided labs throught the concept of redesign as obstacle dislodgement...

  8. Quarterly report on the activities in safety administration division. The third quarter of 2002. Document on present state of affairs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishibashi, Takashi

    2003-06-01

    The activities of Safety Administration Division covers many fields in Tokai-Works such as the management of a labor safety health, the crisis management and the security, the safeguards of the nuclear materials, the transport of nuclear materials, and the management of a quality assurance. This report is summary of the activities of Safety Administration Division in October to December in 2002. (author)

  9. Destination: Marshall Islands. Video Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legowski, Margaret

    This video guide was developed by the Peace Corps' Office of World Wise Schools. Activities that the guide describes are for use in a 3- to 5-day unit on one of the nations of Oceania, the Republic of the Marshall Islands. The activities are designed to provide students with opportunities to: (1) compare and contrast Marshallese and U.S. culture;…

  10. Day By Day in English: An ESL-SEDAC Daily Living Skills Resource Activities Guide. Final Edition and Resource Activities Packet, Final Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Special Education.

    The guide provides daily living experiences built around topics of interest to limited English speaking students in special education programs. Units are organized around eight themes: (1) at school; (2) living at home; (3) community, communication, and travel; (4) clothing and seasons; (5) shopping and food; (6) health, hygiene, and safety; (7)…

  11. An examination of eating attitudes and physical activity levels of Turkish university students with regard to self-presentational concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aşçi, F Hülya; Tüzün, Macide; Koca, Canan

    2006-11-01

    This study aimed to examine eating attitudes and physical activity level of young women and men university students with regard to social physique anxiety level. 482 university students participated in this study voluntarily. "Eating Attitude Test (EAT-40)", "Social Physique Anxiety Scale" and "Physical Activity Assessment Questionnaire" were used to assess the eating attitude, social physique anxiety and physical activity level of participants, respectively. Women and men participants in this study were assigned to high (HSPA) and low (LSPA) social physique anxiety groups with respect to their median scores. Men had favorable eating attitudes and higher physical activity level than women. In addition, participants in the HSPA group had unfavorable eating attitudes and higher physical activity MET values than participants in the LSPA group. On the other hand, groupxgender interaction was only significant for the eating attitudes scores but, not for physical activity level. Women in the HSPA group scored higher on the EAT-40 than men in HSPA and women and men in the LSPA groups.

  12. International Buyers' guide 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    A guide is presented of manufactures, consultants, architect engineers and specialist service companies in the nuclear industry. The guide which is in three sections, supplies the following information: addresses of principal national and international agencies and nuclear organisations; addresses etc of companies in all major countries serving the nuclear industry; a list classified in terms of products and services and grouped according to country showing in which fields the companies operate. (author)

  13. Determination of boron in ceramic reference materials by prompt gamma activation analysis using focused neutron guided beam of JRR-3M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, T.; Kuroiwa, T.; Chiba, K.; Matsue, H.

    2008-01-01

    Prompt gamma activation analysis using a focused thermal neutron guided beam at JAEA JRR-3M was applied to the determination of B in ceramic certified reference materials (BAM CRM S-003 Silicon Carbide Powder and NMIJ CRM 8004-a Silicon Nitride Powder). Cl and Si were used as internal standards to obtain linear calibration curves of B. The analytical result of B in BAM CRM S-003 was in good agreement with the certified value. The relative expanded measurement uncertainties (k = 2) were 4.8% for BAM CRM S-003 and 4.9% for NMIJ CRM 8004-a. (author)

  14. Identification of Lilial as a fragrance sensitizer in a perfume by bioassay-guided chemical fractionation and structure-activity relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimenéz-Arnau, Elena; Andersen, K E; Bruze, M

    2000-01-01

    Fragrance materials are among the most common causes of allergic contact dermatitis. The aim of this study was to identify in a perfume fragrance allergens not included in the fragrance mix, by use of bioassay-guided chemical fractionation and chemical analysis/structure-activity relationships...... (SARs). The basis for the investigation was a 45-year-old woman allergic to her own perfume. She had a negative patch test to the fragrance mix and agreed to participate in the study. Chemical fractionation of the perfume concentrate was used for repeated patch testing and/or repeated open application...

  15. RADTRAN 4: User guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuhauser, K.S.; Kanipe, F.L.

    1992-01-01

    RADTRAN 4 is used to evaluate radiological consequences of incident-free transportation, as well as the radiological risks from vehicular accidents occurring during transportation. This User Guide is Volume 3 in a series of four volume of the documentation of the RADTRAN 4 computer code for transportation risk analysis. The other three volumes are Volume 1, the Executive Summary; Volume 2, the Technical Manual; and Volume 4, the Programmer's Manual. The theoretical and calculational basis for the operations performed by RADTRAN 4 are discussed in Volume 2. Throughout this User Guide the reader will be referred to Volume 2 for detailed discussions of certain RADTRAN features. This User Guide supersedes the document ''RADTRAN III'' by Madsen et al. (1983). This RADTRAN 4 User Guide specifies and describes the required data, control inputs, input sequences, user options, program limitations, and other activities necessary for execution of the RADTRAN 4 computer code

  16. Nuclear safety guide. TID-7016, Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.T.

    1978-01-01

    The Nuclear Safety Guide was first issued in 1956 as classified AEC report LA-2063 and was reprinted the next year, unclassified, as TID-7016. Revision 1, published in 1961, extended the scope and refined the guiding information. The present revision of the Guide differs significantly from its predecessor in that the latter was intentionally conservative in its recommendations. Firmly based on experimental evidence of criticality, the original Guide and the first revision were considered to be of most value to organizations whose activities with fissionable materials were not extensive and, secondarily, that it would serve as a point of departure for members of established nuclear safety teams, experienced in the field. The reader will find a significant change in the character of information presented in this version. Nuclear Criticality Safety has matured in the past twelve years. The advance of calculational capability has permitted validated calculations to extend and substitute for experimental data. The broadened data base has enabled better interpolation, extension, and understanding of available information, especially in areas previously addressed by undefined but adequate factors of safety. The content has been thereby enriched in qualitative guidance. The information inherently contains, and the user can recapture, the quantitative guidance characteristic of the formerGuides by employing appropriate safety factors. In fact, it becomes incumbent on the Criticality Safety Specialist to necessarily impose safety factors consistent with the possible normal and abnormal credible contingencies of an operation as revealed by his evaluation. In its present form the Guide easily becomes a suitable module in any compendium or handbook tailored for internal use by organizations. It is hoped the Guide will continue to serve immediate needs and will encourage continuing and more comprehensive efforts toward organizing nuclear criticality safety information

  17. Nuclear safety guide. TID-7016, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, J T [ed.

    1978-05-01

    The Nuclear Safety Guide was first issued in 1956 as classified AEC report LA-2063 and was reprinted the next year, unclassified, as TID-7016. Revision 1, published in 1961, extended the scope and refined the guiding information. The present revision of the Guide differs significantly from its predecessor in that the latter was intentionally conservative in its recommendations. Firmly based on experimental evidence of criticality, the original Guide and the first revision were considered to be of most value to organizations whose activities with fissionable materials were not extensive and, secondarily, that it would serve as a point of departure for members of established nuclear safety teams, experienced in the field. The reader will find a significant change in the character of information presented in this version. Nuclear Criticality Safety has matured in the past twelve years. The advance of calculational capability has permitted validated calculations to extend and substitute for experimental data. The broadened data base has enabled better interpolation, extension, and understanding of available information, especially in areas previously addressed by undefined but adequate factors of safety. The content has been thereby enriched in qualitative guidance. The information inherently contains, and the user can recapture, the quantitative guidance characteristic of the formerGuides by employing appropriate safety factors. In fact, it becomes incumbent on the Criticality Safety Specialist to necessarily impose safety factors consistent with the possible normal and abnormal credible contingencies of an operation as revealed by his evaluation. In its present form the Guide easily becomes a suitable module in any compendium or handbook tailored for internal use by organizations. It is hoped the Guide will continue to serve immediate needs and will encourage continuing and more comprehensive efforts toward organizing nuclear criticality safety information.

  18. Medication Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Size Small Text Medium Text Large Text Contrast Dark on Light Light on Dark Donate Search Menu Donate What is Glaucoma? Care ... Low Vision Resources Medication Guide Resources on the Web » See All Articles Where the Money Goes Have ...

  19. Effects of Different Multimedia Presentations on Viewers' Information-Processing Activities Measured by Eye-Tracking Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Hsueh-Hua; Liu, Han-Chin

    2012-01-01

    This study implemented eye-tracking technology to understand the impact of different multimedia instructional materials, i.e., five successive pages versus a single page with the same amount of information, on information-processing activities in 21 non-science-major college students. The findings showed that students demonstrated the same number…

  20. Increased Interest in Physiology and Science among Adolescents after Presentations and Activities Administered by Undergraduate Physiology Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva de Vargas, Liane; Rosa de Menezes, Jefferson; Billig Mello-Carpes, Pâmela

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe a set of activities performed in south Brazil that are aligned with the objectives of PhUn Week and promote the integration between universities and public schools and the dissemination of knowledge of physiology. To achieve this goal, the authors adopted a program in which undergraduate physiology students…

  1. Identification and characterization of a DNA primase activity present in herpes simplex virus type 1-infected HeLa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmes, A.M.; Wietstock, S.M.; Ruyechan, W.T.

    1988-01-01

    A novel DNA primase activity has been identified in HeLa cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Such an activity has not been detected in mock-infected cells. The primase activity coeluted with a portion of HSV-1 DNA polymerase from single-stranded DNA agarose columns loaded with high-salt extracts derived from infected cells. This DNA primase activity could be distinguished from host HeLa cell DNA primase by several criteria. First, the pH optimum of the HSV primase was relatively broad and peaked at 8.2 to 8.7 pH units. Second, freshly isolated HSV DNA primase was less salt sensitive than the HeLa primase. Third, antibodies raised against individual peptides of the calf thymus DNA polymerase:primase complex cross-reacted with the HeLa primase but did not react with the HSV DNA primase. Fourth, freshly prepared HSV DNA primase appeared to be associated with the HSV polymerase, but after storage at 4 degree C for several weeks, the DNA primase separated from the viral DNA polymerase. This free DNA primase had an apparent molecular size of approximately 40 kilodaltons, whereas free HeLa DNA primase had an apparent molecular size of approximately 110 kilodaltons. On the basis of these data, the authors believe that the novel DNA primase activity in HSV-infected cells may be virus coded and that this enzyme represents a new and important function involved in the replication of HSV DNA

  2. Model evaluation for the prediction of solubility of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs to guide solid–liquid separator design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuveneshan Moodley

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available The assumptions and models for solubility modelling or prediction in systems using non-polar solvents, or water and complex triterpene and other active pharmaceutical ingredients as solutes aren't well studied. Furthermore, the assumptions concerning heat capacity effects (negligibility, experimental values or approximations are explored, using non-polar solvents (benzene, or water as reference solvents, for systems with solute melting points in the range of 306–528 K and molecular weights in the range of 90–442 g/mol. New empirical estimation methods for the ΔfusCpi of APIs are presented which correlate the solute molecular masses and van der Waals surface areas with ΔfusCpi. Separate empirical parameters were required for oxygenated and non-oxygenated solutes. Subsequently, the predictive capabilities of the various approaches to solubility modelling for complex pharmaceuticals, for which data is limited, are analysed. The solute selection is based on a principal component analysis, considering molecular weights, fusion temperatures, and solubilities in a non-polar solvent, alcohol, and water, where data was available. New NRTL-SAC parameters were determined for selected steroids, by regression. The original UNIFAC, modified UNIFAC (Dortmund, COSMO-RS (OL, and COSMO-SAC activity coefficient predictions are then conducted, based on the availability of group constants and sigma profiles. These are undertaken to assess the predictive capabilities of these models when each assumption concerning heat capacity is employed. The predictive qualities of the models are assessed, based on the mean square deviation and provide guidelines for model selection, and assumptions concerning phase equilibrium, when designing solid–liquid separators for the pharmaceutical industry on process simulation software. The most suitable assumption regarding ΔfusCpi was found to be system specific, with modified UNIFAC (Dortmund performing well in benzene as

  3. Impact of a magnetic resonance imaging-guided treat-to-target strategy on disease activity and progression in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (the IMAGINE-RA trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Bisgaard, Signe; Hørslev-Petersen, Kim; Ejbjerg, Bo Jannik

    2015-01-01

    /absence of BME may therefore be clinically beneficial. We present the design of a randomized controlled trial (RCT) aiming to evaluate whether an MRI-guided treatment strategy compared to a conventional treatment strategy in anti-CCP-positive erosive RA is better to prevent progression of erosive joint damage...... swollen joints and treatment with synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) will be included. Patients will be randomized to either a treatment strategy based on conventional laboratory and clinical examinations (control group) or a treatment strategy based on conventional laboratory...

  4. Human risk contributions in process industry: Guides for their pre-identification in well-structured activities and for post-incident analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedersen, O.M.

    1985-05-01

    The report should be considered a guide for the treating of human errors: for identifying their possibilities of occurrence when designing well-structured human tasks and for their improvement when they occur in reality. For these purposes a strong coupling between predictive and retrospective analysis is emphasized: In order to control human errors, post-incident analysis of cases with human errors in a given industrial plant should be performed as means of feedback from reality for the verification of results of predictive analysis and also as general means of identifying and improving such human errors which cannot be expected covered by predictive analysis. Primarily, the guide addresses people with a knowledge of the technical plant in question and involved in the safety-oriented design and improvement of human activities and without a particular human factors background. The main report describes the procedures for post-incident analysis and for Work Analysis, which is a search strategy developed for well-defined activities, e.g. test and calibration, and constitutes a formalized procedure for the pre-identification of relevant human errors leading to a lack of task result and/or to immediate effects not covered by the lack of task result itself. Work Analysis and the post-incident analysis procedure are based on a common description system for human malfunctions. This system is explained in appendix and so are its underlying models and way of reasoning. Finally, a word index is provided for supporting the reader. (author)

  5. SYMPAL: utilities guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.A.; Sublet, J.-Ch.

    1997-02-01

    The processing code SYMPAL is used to perform the data treatment for creating a new version of the European Activation File (EAF). The entire process is handled by different modules of the code in a sequential and orderly manner. The modular code system accesses, translates and processes cross section data from a wide variety of libraries and calculations with nuclear model codes. Two major data bases are accessed and merged so as to create a new library version. The Master Data File (MDF) contains the original cross section data extracted, unmodified but reformatted, from numerous sources. The Master Parameter File (MPF) contains a compilation of all physical information necessary to renormalise, split and internally validate any particular type of cross section. The combination of these two files generates a new activation library in pointwise and various groupwise formats. The SYMPAL utilities guide describes a set of programs developed to handle certain aspects of the procedure done outside of the main processing tasks. These include counting, translating, selecting and plotting data streams. Special printing and plotting procedures have been written to handle the large amounts of information present in activation libraries. (author)

  6. Anti-Streptococcal activity of Brazilian Amazon Rain Forest plant extracts presents potential for preventive strategies against dental caries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Paola Corrêa da SILVA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Caries is a global public health problem, whose control requires the introduction of low-cost treatments, such as strong prevention strategies, minimally invasive techniques and chemical prevention agents. Nature plays an important role as a source of new antibacterial substances that can be used in the prevention of caries, and Brazil is the richest country in terms of biodiversity. Objective: In this study, the disk diffusion method (DDM was used to screen over 2,000 Brazilian Amazon plant extracts against Streptococcus mutans. Material and Methods: Seventeen active plant extracts were identified and fractionated. Extracts and their fractions, obtained by liquid-liquid partition, were tested in the DDM assay and in the microdilution broth assay (MBA to determine their minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs and minimal bactericidal concentrations (MBCs. The extracts were also subjected to antioxidant analysis by thin layer chromatography. Results: EB271, obtained from Casearia spruceana, showed significant activity against the bacterium in the DDM assay (20.67±0.52 mm, as did EB1129, obtained from Psychotria sp. (Rubiaceae (15.04±2.29 mm. EB1493, obtained from Ipomoea alba, was the only extract to show strong activity against Streptococcus mutans (0.08 mg/mLactive extracts, discovered in the Amazon rain forest, show potential as sources of new antibacterial agents for use as chemical coadjuvants in prevention strategies to treat caries.

  7. Recombinase Activating Gene 1 Deficiencies Without Omenn Syndrome May Also Present With Eosinophilia and Bone Marrow Fibrosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ulusoy, Ezgi; Karaca, Neslihan Edeer; Azarsiz, Elif; Berdeli, Afig; Aksu, Guzide; Kutukculer, Necil

    2016-01-01

    Background Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) syndromes are a heterogenous group of diseases characterized by impairment in both cellular and humoral immunity with a range of genetic disorders. Complete recombinase activating gene (RAG) deficiency is associated with classical T-B-NK+ SCID which is the most common phenotype of Turkish SCID patients. There is a broad spectrum of hypomorfic RAG mutations including Omenn syndrome, leaky or atypical SCID with expansion of ?? T cells, autoimmu...

  8. Present status and progress of safeguards activities and physical protection on the eve of year 2000 in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simov, R.; Gotzev, A.

    1999-01-01

    From the very beginning of the IAEA safeguards implementation in Bulgaria, up to now the IAEA inspections verified no deviations or uncertainties in accounting of the nuclear materials. According to the official IAEA reports Bulgaria has fulfilled completely its duties under the safeguards and the Non-proliferation Treaty and has fully assisted the IAEA inspection activity. As for the physical protection, the complicated up-to-date system was established contributing to the safety of Kozloduy NPP and the plant operation

  9. Vibrational imaging of glucose uptake activity in live cells and tissues by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fanghao; Chen, Zhixing; Zhang, Luyuan; Shen, Yihui; Wei, Lu; Min, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Glucose is consumed as an energy source by virtually all living organisms, from bacteria to humans. Its uptake activity closely reflects the cellular metabolic status in various pathophysiological transformations, such as diabetes and cancer. Extensive efforts such as positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence microscopy have been made to specifically image glucose uptake activity but all with technical limitations. Here, we report a new platform to visualize glucose uptake activity in live cells and tissues with subcellular resolution and minimal perturbation. A novel glucose analogue with a small alkyne tag (carbon-carbon triple bond) is developed to mimic natural glucose for cellular uptake, which can be imaged with high sensitivity and specificity by targeting the strong and characteristic alkyne vibration on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscope to generate a quantitative three dimensional concentration map. Cancer cells with differing metabolic characteristics can be distinguished. Heterogeneous uptake patterns are observed in tumor xenograft tissues, neuronal culture and mouse brain tissues with clear cell-cell variations. Therefore, by offering the distinct advantage of optical resolution but without the undesirable influence of bulky fluorophores, our method of coupling SRS with alkyne labeled glucose will be an attractive tool to study energy demands of living systems at the single cell level.

  10. Innovative presentations for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Anthony, Ray

    2014-01-01

    Be the speaker they follow with breakthrough innovative presentations Innovative Presentations For Dummies is a practical guide to engaging your audience with superior, creative, and ultra-compelling presentations. Using clear language and a concise style, this book goes way beyond PowerPoint to enable you to reimagine, reinvent, and remake your presentations. Learn how to stimulate, capture, and hold your audience in the palm of your hand with sound, sight, and touch, and get up to speed on the latest presentation design methods that make you a speaker who gets audiences committed and acting

  11. Determination of some elements present in black pepper by thermal neutron activation analysis. [/sup 124/Sb-Be neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacharkar, M P; Vaidya, M M; Ray, M N [Nagpur Univ. (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    1981-01-01

    An analysis for the determination of some elements present in black pepper was carried out using low level isotopic neutron source. Gamma-ray spectra of the irradiated samples showed only one peak at 0.85 MeV. The decay curves, on the other hand exhibited the presence of at least two radioactive nuclides of halflives 2.6 h and 15 h which correspond to the halflives of /sup 56/Mn and /sup 24/Na respectively. The amount of Mn present was also determined. The results are confirmed by other physicochemical methods. 6 refs.

  12. Machine Accounting. An Instructor's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, E. Noah, Ed.

    Designed to prepare students to operate the types of accounting machines used in many medium-sized businesses, this instructor's guide presents a full-year high school course in machine accounting covering 120 hours of instruction. An introduction for the instructor suggests how to adapt the guide to present a 60-hour module which would be…

  13. Characterizing Hypervelocity Impact (HVI-Induced Pitting Damage Using Active Guided Ultrasonic Waves: From Linear to Nonlinear

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menglong Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Hypervelocity impact (HVI, ubiquitous in low Earth orbit with an impacting velocity in excess of 1 km/s, poses an immense threat to the safety of orbiting spacecraft. Upon penetration of the outer shielding layer of a typical two-layer shielding system, the shattered projectile, together with the jetted materials of the outer shielding material, subsequently impinge the inner shielding layer, to which pitting damage is introduced. The pitting damage includes numerous craters and cracks disorderedly scattered over a wide region. Targeting the quantitative evaluation of this sort of damage (multitudinous damage within a singular inspection region, a characterization strategy, associating linear with nonlinear features of guided ultrasonic waves, is developed. Linear-wise, changes in the signal features in the time domain (e.g., time-of-flight and energy dissipation are extracted, for detecting gross damage whose characteristic dimensions are comparable to the wavelength of the probing wave; nonlinear-wise, changes in the signal features in the frequency domain (e.g., second harmonic generation, which are proven to be more sensitive than their linear counterparts to small-scale damage, are explored to characterize HVI-induced pitting damage scattered in the inner layer. A numerical simulation, supplemented with experimental validation, quantitatively reveals the accumulation of nonlinearity of the guided waves when the waves traverse the pitting damage, based on which linear and nonlinear damage indices are proposed. A path-based rapid imaging algorithm, in conjunction with the use of the developed linear and nonlinear indices, is developed, whereby the HVI-induced pitting damage is characterized in images in terms of the probability of occurrence.

  14. E3 Financing How-to Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Financing How-to-Guide is intended to help manufacturers and their communities navigate financing and investment opportunities. While this guide provides an overview, there is no one-way to pay for E3 activities or attract investment.

  15. Lathe Operator. Coordinator's Guide. Individualized Study Guide. General Metal Trades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East Texas State Univ., Commerce. Occupational Curriculum Lab.

    This guide provides information to enable coordinators to direct learning activities for students using an individualized study guide on operating a lathe. The study material is designed for students enrolled in cooperative part-time training and employed, or desiring to be employed, as lathe operators. Contents include a sample progress chart,…

  16. Effects of rhythmic stimulus presentation on oscillatory brain activity: the physiology of cueing in Parkinson’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    te Woerd, Erik S.; Oostenveld, Robert; Bloem, Bastiaan R.; de Lange, Floris P.; Praamstra, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The basal ganglia play an important role in beat perception and patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are impaired in perception of beat-based rhythms. Rhythmic cues are nonetheless beneficial in gait rehabilitation, raising the question how rhythm improves movement in PD. We addressed this question with magnetoencephalography recordings during a choice response task with rhythmic and non-rhythmic modes of stimulus presentation. Analyses focused on (i) entrainment of slow oscillations, (ii) ...

  17. Present status of SiCf/SiC composites as low-activation structural materials of fusion reactor in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohyama, A.; Katoh, Y.; Hasegawa, A.; Noda, T.

    2001-01-01

    The outline of research subjects on SiCf/SiC composites to apply to the structural components of fusion reactors are described and present status on material development of SiCf/SiC composites in Japan is reviewed. Irradiation experiments of the composites using fission reactors conducted by international collaborations to clarify their radiation response and to optimize the fabrication processes are introduced. (author)

  18. FAA Offers Free Guide on Elementary Aviation Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Aerospace Education, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes a teaching guide in aviation education for grades 2 through 6. The guide contains activities designed to enrich an existing science curriculum. An address for ordering the guide is included. (MA)

  19. Volumetric 3D display with multi-layered active screens for enhanced the depth perception (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hak-Rin; Park, Min-Kyu; Choi, Jun-Chan; Park, Ji-Sub; Min, Sung-Wook

    2016-09-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) display technology has been studied actively because it can offer more realistic images compared to the conventional 2D display. Various psychological factors such as accommodation, binocular parallax, convergence and motion parallax are used to recognize a 3D image. For glass-type 3D displays, they use only the binocular disparity in 3D depth cues. However, this method cause visual fatigue and headaches due to accommodation conflict and distorted depth perception. Thus, the hologram and volumetric display are expected to be an ideal 3D display. Holographic displays can represent realistic images satisfying the entire factors of depth perception. But, it require tremendous amount of data and fast signal processing. The volumetric 3D displays can represent images using voxel which is a physical volume. However, it is required for large data to represent the depth information on voxel. In order to simply encode 3D information, the compact type of depth fused 3D (DFD) display, which can create polarization distributed depth map (PDDM) image having both 2D color image and depth image is introduced. In this paper, a new volumetric 3D display system is shown by using PDDM image controlled by polarization controller. In order to introduce PDDM image, polarization states of the light through spatial light modulator (SLM) was analyzed by Stokes parameter depending on the gray level. Based on the analysis, polarization controller is properly designed to convert PDDM image into sectioned depth images. After synchronizing PDDM images with active screens, we can realize reconstructed 3D image. Acknowledgment This work was supported by `The Cross-Ministry Giga KOREA Project' grant from the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning, Korea

  20. Effect of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Extraction Parameters on the Biological Activities and Metabolites Present in Extracts from Arthrospira platensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esquivel-Hernández, Diego A; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, José; Cuéllar-Bermúdez, Sara P; García-Pérez, J Saúl; Mancera-Andrade, Elena I; Núñez-Echevarría, Jade E; Ontiveros-Valencia, Aura; Rostro-Alanis, Magdalena; García-García, Rebeca M; Torres, J Antonio; Chen, Wei Ning; Parra-Saldívar, Roberto

    2017-06-12

    Arthrospira platensis was used to obtain functional extracts through supercritical carbon dioxide extraction (SFE-CO₂). Pressure (P), temperature (T), co-solvent (CX), static extraction (SX), dispersant (Di) and dynamic extraction (DX) were evaluated as process parameters through a Plackett-Burman design. The maximum extract yield obtained was 7.48 ± 0.15% w/w. The maximum contents of bioactive metabolites in extracts were 0.69 ± 0.09 µg/g of riboflavin, 5.49 ± 0.10 µg/g of α-tocopherol, 524.46 ± 0.10 µg/g of β-carotene, 1.44 ± 0.10 µg/g of lutein and 32.11 ± 0.12 mg/g of fatty acids with 39.38% of palmitic acid, 20.63% of linoleic acid and 30.27% of γ-linolenic acid. A. platensis extracts had an antioxidant activity of 76.47 ± 0.71 µg GAE/g by Folin-Ciocalteu assay, 0.52 ± 0.02, 0.40 ± 0.01 and 1.47 ± 0.02 µmol TE/g by DPPH, FRAP and TEAC assays, respectively. These extracts showed antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Candida albicans ATCC 10231. Overall, co-solvent was the most significant factor for all measured effects ( p extraction parameters P: 450 bar, CX: 11 g/min, SX: 15 min, DX: 25 min, T: 60 °C and Di: 35 g.

  1. Annual report on the present state and activities of the radiation protection division, JNC Tokai Works in fiscal 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-09-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities on radiation control in the radiation facilities, personnel monitoring, monitoring of gas and liquid waste effluents, environmental monitoring, instrumentation, safety research, and technical support, undertaken by the Radiation Protection Division at JNC Tokai Works in fiscal 2004. The major radiation facilities in the Tokai Works are the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP), three MOX fuel fabrication facilities, the Chemical Processing Facility (CPF), and various other radioisotope and uranium research laboratories. The Radiation Protection Division is responsible for radiation control in and around these radiation facilities, including personnel monitoring, workplace monitoring, consultation on radiological work planning and evaluation, monitoring of gas and liquid waste effluents, environmental monitoring, instrumentation, calibration, quality assurance, and safety research. The Division also provides technical support and cooperation to other international and domestic institutes in the radiation protection field. In fiscal 2004, the results of radiological monitoring showed the situation to be normal, and no radiological incident or accident occurred. The maximum annual effective dose to radiation workers was 6.1 mSv and the mean annual effective dose was 0.1 mSv. Individual doses were kept within the annual dose limit specified in the safety regulations. The estimated effective dose caused by gas and liquid effluents from the TRP to members of the public around the Tokai Works was 4.4x10 -4 mSv. Environmental monitoring and effluent control were performed appropriately in compliance with safety regulation and standards. Research and development on radiation protection in nuclear fuel cycle are also performed actively. Safety audit and Nuclear Safety Inspection were made in accordance with the quality assurance system which had been introduced to safety regulation since fiscal 2004. (author)

  2. Projecting the environmental profile of Singapore's landfill activities: Comparisons of present and future scenarios based on LCA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, Hsien H; Tan, Lester L Z; Tan, Reginald B H

    2012-05-01

    This article aims to generate the environmental profile of Singapore's Semakau landfill by comparing three different operational options associated with the life cycle stages of landfilling activities, against a 'business as usual' scenario. Before life cycle assessment or LCA is used to quantify the potential impacts from landfilling activities, an attempt to incorporate localized and empirical information into the amounts of ash and MSW sent to the landfill was made. A linear regression representation of the relationship between the mass of waste disposed and the mass of incineration ash generated was modeled from waste statistics between years 2004 and 2009. Next, the mass of individual MSW components was projected from 2010 to 2030. The LCA results highlighted that in a 'business as usual' scenario the normalized total impacts of global warming, acidification and human toxicity increased by about 2% annually from 2011 to 2030. By replacing the 8000-tonne barge with a 10000-tonne coastal bulk carrier or freighter (in scenario 2) a grand total reduction of 48% of both global warming potential and acidification can be realized by year 2030. Scenario 3 explored the importance of having a Waste Water Treatment Plant in place to reduce human toxicity levels - however, the overall long-term benefits were not as significant as scenario 2. It is shown in scenario 4 that the option of increased recycling championed over all other three scenarios in the long run, resulting in a total 58% reduction in year 2030 for the total normalized results. A separate comparison of scenarios 1-4 is also carried out for energy utilization and land use in terms of volume of waste occupied. Along with the predicted reductions in environmental burdens, an additional bonus is found in the expanded lifespan of Semakau landfill from year 2032 (base case) to year 2039. Model limitations and suggestions for improvements were also discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Delivery presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregnancy - delivery presentation; Labor - delivery presentation; Occiput posterior; Occiput anterior; Brow presentation ... The mother can walk, rock, and try different delivery positions during labor to help encourage the baby ...

  4. The activation of the adaptive immune system: cross-talk between antigen-presenting cells, T cells and B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Haan, Joke M M; Arens, Ramon; van Zelm, Menno C

    2014-12-01

    The adaptive immune system consists of T and B cells that express clonally distributed antigen receptors. To achieve functional adaptive immune responses, antigen-specific T cell populations are stimulated by professional antigen-presenting cells like dendritic cells (DCs), which provide crucial stimulatory signals for efficient expansion and development of effector functions. Antigen-specific B cells receive costimulatory signals from helper T cells to stimulate affinity maturation and isotype switching. Here we elaborate on the interactions between DCs, T cells and B cells, and on the important signals for efficient induction of adaptive immune responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Control system design guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sellers, David; Friedman, Hannah; Haasl, Tudi; Bourassa, Norman; Piette, Mary Ann

    2003-05-01

    The ''Control System Design Guide'' (Design Guide) provides methods and recommendations for the control system design process and control point selection and installation. Control systems are often the most problematic system in a building. A good design process that takes into account maintenance, operation, and commissioning can lead to a smoothly operating and efficient building. To this end, the Design Guide provides a toolbox of templates for improving control system design and specification. HVAC designers are the primary audience for the Design Guide. The control design process it presents will help produce well-designed control systems that achieve efficient and robust operation. The spreadsheet examples for control valve schedules, damper schedules, and points lists can streamline the use of the control system design concepts set forth in the Design Guide by providing convenient starting points from which designers can build. Although each reader brings their own unique questions to the text, the Design Guide contains information that designers, commissioning providers, operators, and owners will find useful.

  6. Effects of rhythmic stimulus presentation on oscillatory brain activity: the physiology of cueing in Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik S. te Woerd

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The basal ganglia play an important role in beat perception and patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD are impaired in perception of beat-based rhythms. Rhythmic cues are nonetheless beneficial in gait rehabilitation, raising the question how rhythm improves movement in PD. We addressed this question with magnetoencephalography recordings during a choice response task with rhythmic and non-rhythmic modes of stimulus presentation. Analyses focused on (i entrainment of slow oscillations, (ii the depth of beta power modulation, and (iii whether a gain in modulation depth of beta power, due to rhythmicity, is of predictive or reactive nature. The results show weaker phase synchronisation of slow oscillations and a relative shift from predictive to reactive movement-related beta suppression in PD. Nonetheless, rhythmic stimulus presentation increased beta modulation depth to the same extent in patients and controls. Critically, this gain selectively increased the predictive and not reactive movement-related beta power suppression. Operation of a predictive mechanism, induced by rhythmic stimulation, was corroborated by a sensory gating effect in the sensorimotor cortex. The predictive mode of cue utilisation points to facilitation of basal ganglia-premotor interactions, contrasting with the popular view that rhythmic stimulation confers a special advantage in PD, based on recruitment of alternative pathways.

  7. Guide device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brammer, C.M. Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Disclosed is a fuel handling guide tube centering device for use in nuclear reactors during fuel assembly handling operations. The device comprises an outer ring secured to the flange of a nuclear reactor pressure vessel, a rotatable table rotatably coupled to the outer ring, and a plurality of openings through the table. Truncated locating cones are positioned in each of the openings in the table, and the locating cones center the guide tube during fuel handling operations. The openings in the table are located such that each fuel assembly in the nuclear core may be aligned with one of the openings by a suitable rotation of the table. The locating cones thereby provide alignment between the fuel handling mechanism located in the guide tube and the individual fuel assemblies of the cone. The need for a device to provide alignment is especially critical for floating nuclear power plants, where wave motion may exist during fuel handling operations. 5 claims, 4 figures

  8. Removal of blue indigo and cadmium present in aqueous solutions using a modified zeolitic material and an activated carbonaceous material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez S, E. E.

    2011-01-01

    In the last years the use of water has been increased substantially, it has been also altered its quality as a result of human activities such as mining, industrial activities and others. Water pollution caused by dyes and heavy metals has adverse effects on the environment, since both pollutants are very persisten even after conventional treatments. Denim blue and cadmium are not biodegradable. There is a growing interest in finding new, efficient and low cost alternative materials to remove such pollutants from the aqueous medium. The purpose of this work was to evaluate a modified zeolitic tuff and an activated carbonaceous material obtained from the pyrolysis of sewage sludge for the removal of denim blue and cadmium. The zeolitic material was modified with Na + and Fe 3+ solutions to improve its sorption properties for the removal of cadmium and denim blue, respectively. Carbonaceous material was treated with 10% HCl solution to remove ashes. Both materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and elemental analysis (EDS), specific surface areas (Bet), thermogravimetric analysis, infrared spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Simultaneously, the denim blue dye was characterized by infrared spectroscopy and its pKa value was determined, these data allowed the determination of its chemical properties and its acid-base behavior in solution. In the content of this work the term indigo blue was changed by denim blue, as it corresponds to the commercial name of the dye. To assess the sorption capacity of sorbents, the sorption kinetics and sorption isotherms in batch system were determined; the results were fitted to mathematical models such as the pseudo-first order, pseudo second order and second order to describe the sorption kinetics and the Langmuir, Freundlich and Langmuir-Freundlich isotherms to describe sorption processes. The results show that the most efficient material to remove denim blue from aqueous solutions is the carbonaceous material

  9. Stephen Hawking's Universe. Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Malcolm H.; Rameau, Jonathan D.

    This program guide is meant to help teachers assist their students in viewing the six-part public television series, "Stephen Hawking's Universe." The guide features program summaries that give background information and brief synopses of the programs; previewing activities that familiarize students with the subject; vocabulary that…

  10. Community Living Skills Guide: Art.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobol, Sheila; Kreps, Alice Roelofs

    One of twenty course guides in the Community Living Skills Guide for the College for Living series, this document provides guidelines and workbook activities for the course, Art. The series of courses for developmentally disabled adults is intended to supplement residential programs and to aid in orienting institutionalized persons to eventual…

  11. Welding. Student Learning Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palm Beach County Board of Public Instruction, West Palm Beach, FL.

    This student learning guide contains 30 modules for completing a course in welding. It is designed especially for use in secondary schools in Palm Beach County, Florida. Each module covers one task, and consists of a purpose, performance objective, enabling objectives, learning activities keyed to resources, information sheets, student self-check…

  12. Elementary Science Resource Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Education Agency, Austin. Div. of Curriculum Development.

    This guide for elementary teachers provides information on getting ideas into action, designing and implementing the right situation, ways in which to evaluate science process activities with students, and seven sample units. The units cover using the senses, magnets, forces, weather forecasting, classification of living things, and the physical…

  13. Teacher's Guide for Earthworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Merle S.; And Others

    This teacher's guide on earthworms includes four major sections: (1) introduction, (2) caring for earthworms in the classroom, (3) classroom activities, and (4) the appendix. The introduction includes information concerning grade level, scheduling, materials, obtaining earthworms, field study, classroom clean-up, and records. Caring for earthworms…

  14. MS/MS fragmentation-guided search of TMG-chitooligomycins and their structure-activity relationship in specific β-N-acetylglucosaminidase inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuki, Hirokazu; Yamamoto, Yukihiro; Kumagai, Yuya; Nitoda, Teruhiko; Kanzaki, Hiroshi; Hatanaka, Tadashi

    2011-04-21

    The reducing tetrasaccharide TMG-chitotriomycin (1) is an inhibitor of β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (GlcNAcase), produced by the actinomycete Streptomyces anulatus NBRC13369. The inhibitor shows a unique inhibitory spectrum, that is, selectivity toward enzymes from chitin-containing organisms such as insects and fungi. Nevertheless, its structure-selectivity relationship remains to be clarified. In this study, we conducted a structure-guided search of analogues of 1 in order to obtain diverse N,N,N-trimethylglucosaminium (TMG)-containing chitooligosaccharides. In this approach, the specific fragmentation profile of 1 on ESI-MS/MS analysis was used for the selective detection of desired compounds. As a result, two new analogues, named TMG-chitomonomycin (3) and TMG-chitobiomycin (2), were obtained from a culture filtrate of 1-producing Streptomyces. Their enzyme-inhibiting activity revealed that the potency and selectivity depended on the degree of polymerization of the reducing end GlcNAc units. Furthermore, a computational modeling study inspired the inhibitory mechanism of TMG-related compounds as a mimic of the substrate in the Michaelis complex of the GH20 enzyme. This study is an example of the successful application of a MS/MS experiment for structure-guided isolation of natural products.

  15. Comprehensive Analysis of the Activation and Proliferation Kinetics and Effector Functions of Human Lymphocytes, and Antigen Presentation Capacity of Antigen-Presenting Cells in Xenogeneic Graft-Versus-Host Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Yasufumi; Sato, Kazuya; Hayakawa, Hiroko; Takayama, Norihito; Nakano, Hirofumi; Ito, Ryoji; Mashima, Kiyomi; Oh, Iekuni; Minakata, Daisuke; Yamasaki, Ryoko; Morita, Kaoru; Ashizawa, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Chihiro; Hatano, Kaoru; Fujiwara, Shin-Ichiro; Ohmine, Ken; Muroi, Kazuo; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2018-04-17

    Xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) models in highly immunodeficient mice are currently being used worldwide to investigate human immune responses against foreign antigens in vivo. However, the individual roles of CD4 + and CD8 + T cells, and donor/host hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic antigen-presenting cells (APCs) in the induction and development of GVHD have not been fully investigated. In the present study, we comprehensively investigated the immune responses of human T cells and the antigen presentation capacity of donor/host hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic APCs in xenogeneic GVHD models using nonobese diabetic/Shi-scid-IL2rg null mice. CD4 + T cells and, to a lesser extent, CD8 + T cells individually mediated potentially lethal GVHD. In addition to inflammatory cytokine production, CD4 + T cells also supported the activation and proliferation of CD8 + T cells. Using bone marrow chimeras, we demonstrated that host hematopoietic, but not nonhematopoietic, APCs play a critical role in the development of CD4 + T cell-mediated GVHD. During early GVHD, we detected 2 distinct populations in memory CD4 + T cells. One population was highly activated and proliferated in major histocompatibility complex antigen (MHC) +/+ mice but not in MHC -/- mice, indicating alloreactive T cells. The other population showed a less activated and slowly proliferative status regardless of host MHC expression, and was associated with higher susceptibility to apoptosis, indicating nonalloreactive T cells in homeostasis-driven proliferation. These observations are clinically relevant to donor T cell response after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Our findings provide a better understanding of the immunobiology of humanized mice and support the development of novel options for the prevention and treatment for GVHD. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Association of the weekly practice of guided physical activity with the reduction of falls and symptoms of fibromyalgia in adult women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Amat, Antonio; Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Latorre-Román, Pedro A; Gutierrez-López, María de la Cabeza; García-Pinillos, Felipe; Martínez-López, Emilio J

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of weekly physical activity on the risk of falls and the impact of fibromyalgia (FM) symptoms on daily function in Spanish women. Fibromyalgia is a common widespread pain condition that has been linked to an increased risk of falling and a low amount of guided physical activity, defined as regular participation in moderate-intensity exercise. Before the development of fall-risk reduction interventions, it is essential to understand the context of falls and fall-related experiences in patients with FM. Ours was a descriptive longitudinal study, wherein 140 women participated, all aged 28-73 years and belonging to AFIXA (Asociación Provincial de Fibromialgia y Síndrome de Fatiga Crónica), the Fibromyalgia Association of Jaén (Andalusia, Spain). The study took place during 2013; data were collected through fall diaries, interviews, and questionnaires. Results showed that weekly physical activity can explain up to 12% of the variance in the fear of falling and 18% of the number of falls per year in patients with FM. However, the weekly physical activity prediction against the perceived impact of FM yielded R values below 10% in the 3 factors and in the total score of the Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ-R). Inactive women were proven to have a significantly higher number of falls per year than active ones (1.86 ± 1.46 vs. 0.69 ± 0.43, p 0.05). In addition, physically active women had a significantly lower intensity in the symptoms of their condition (FIQ-R symptoms: 30.87 ± 8.58 vs. 34.78 ± 7.58 arbitrary units [a.u.], p = 0.014), and lower scores in the total score of the FIQ-R (54.33 ± 21.50 vs. 65.19 ± 19.27 a.u., p = 0.004). Results show that, with at least 1 hour per session of guided physical activity, a higher weekly number of sessions reduced the fear of falling in patients with FM and the total number of falls per year, and is associated with less severe symptoms (FIQ-R3).

  17. Recognition and Use of Kitchen Tools and Utensils. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 4.4. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 4: Equipment Handling, Operation, and Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with common tools and utensils used in commercial kitchens. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities are provided on various kitchen tools (cutting,…

  18. Introduction to Commercial Cooking Equipment. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 4.1. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 4: Equipment Handling, Operation and Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with the workings of and equipment found in commercial kitchens. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities are provided on each of the following…

  19. Buying, Preparing, and Cooking Fish. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 5.13b. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 5: Basic Food Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with the market forms of fish, how to clean and portion them, and how to cook them. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities are provided in these…

  20. Buying, Preparing, and Cooking Shellfish. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 5.13c. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 5: Basic Food Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with the various market forms of shellfish and how to clean, prepare, and cook them. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities are provided in these…

  1. Using Cooking, Baking, and Cutting Terms. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 5.1a. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 5: Basic Food Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with some of the terms used in recipes. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities are provided on important cooking, baking, and cutting terms. The…

  2. Introduction to Fish and Shellfish. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 5.13a. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 5: Basic Food Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with fish and shellfish for restaurant use. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities are provided in these areas: buying and storing fish and…

  3. Using Herbs and Spices/Preparing Sauces and Gravies. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 5.11. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 5: Basic Food Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with herbs and spices and the selection and preparation of sauces and gravies. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities are provided in these areas:…

  4. Dining Room Service/Clearing and Cleaning Tables. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 8.1c. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 8: Related Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with efficient table clearing and cleaning duties. Illustrated information sheets and learning activities are provided in these areas: table clearing and cleaning…

  5. Annual report on the present state and activities of the radiation protection division, JNC Tokai Works in fiscal 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-10-01

    This annual report summarizes the activities, such as radiation control in the radiation facilities, personnel monitoring, monitoring of gas and liquid waste effluents, environmental monitoring, instrumentation, safety research, and technical support, undertaken by the Radiation Protection Division at JNC Tokai Works in fiscal 2003. The major radiation facilities in the Tokai Works are the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP), three MOX fuel fabrication facilities, the Chemical Processing Facility (CPF), and various other radioisotope and uranium research laboratories. The Radiation Protection Division is responsible for radiation control in and around these radiation facilities, including personnel monitoring, workplace monitoring, consultation on radiological work planning and evaluation, monitoring of gas and liquid waste effluents, environmental monitoring, instrumentation, calibration, quality assurance, and safety research. The Division also provides technical support and cooperation to other international and domestic institutes in the radiation protection field. In fiscal 2003, the results of radiological monitoring showed the situation to be normal, and no radiological incident or accident occurred. The maximum annual effective dose to radiation workers was 6.2 mSv and the mean annual effective dose was 0.1 mSv. Individual doses were kept within the annual dose limit specified in the safety regulations. The estimated effective dose caused by gas and liquid effluents form the TRP to members of the public around the Tokai Works was 4.2 x 10 -4 mSv. Environmental monitoring and effluent control were performed appropriately in compliance with safety regulation and standards. In addition, the various preparations were made for introduction of the quality assurance to regulation since fiscal 2004. (author)

  6. Nuclear safety guide TID-7016 Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    The present revision of TID-7016 Nuclear Safety Guide is discussed. This Guide differs significantly from its predecessor in that the latter was intentionally conservative in its recommendations. Firmly based on experimental evidence of criticality, the original Guide and the first revision were considered to be of most value to organizations whose activities with fissionable materials were not extensive and, secondarily, that it would serve as a point of departure for members of established nuclear safety teams, experienced in the field. The reader will find a significant change in the character of information presented in this version. Nuclear Criticality Safety has matured in the past twelve years. The advance of calculational capability has permitted validated calculations to extend and substitute for experimental data. The broadened data base has enabled better interpolation, extension, and understanding of available, information, especially in areas previously addressed by undefined but adequate factors of safety. The content has been thereby enriched in qualitative guidance. The information inherently contains, and the user can recapture, the quantitative guidance characteristic of the former Guides by employing appropriate safety factors. In fact, it becomes incumbent on the Criticality Safety Specialist to necessarily impose safety factors consistent with the possible normal and abnormal credible contingencies of an operation as revealed by his evaluation. In its present form the Guide easily becomes a suitable module in any compendium or handbook tailored for internal use by organizations. It is hoped the Guide will continue to serve immediate needs and will encourage continuing and more comprehensive efforts toward organizing nuclear criticality safety information

  7. The development of all-polymer-based piezoelectrically active photocurable resin for 3D printing process (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Evan; Chu, Weishen; Ware, Henry Oliver T.; Farsheed, Adam C.; Sun, Cheng

    2017-02-01

    We present in this work the development and experimental validation of a new piezoelectric material (V-Ink) designed for compatibility with projection stereolithography additive manufacturing techniques. Piezoelectric materials generate a voltage output when a stress is applied to the material, and also can be actuated by using an external voltage and power source. This new material opens up new opportunities for functional devices to be developed and rapidly produced at low cost using emerging 3D printing techniques. The new piezoelectric material was able to generate 115mV under 1N of strain after being polled at 80°C for 40 minutes and the optimal results had a piezoelectric coefficient of 105x10^(-3)V.m/N. The current iteration of the material is a suspension, although further work is ongoing to make the resin a true solution. The nature of the suspension was characterized by a time-lapse monitoring and through viscosity testing. The potential exists to further increase the piezoelectric properties of this material by integrating a mechanical to electrical enhancer such as carbon nanotubes or barium titanate into the material. Such materials need to be functionalized to be integrated within the material, which is currently being explored. Printing with this material on a "continuous SLA" printer that we have developed will reduce build times by an order of magnitude to allow for mass manufacturing. Pairing those two advancements will enable faster printing and enhanced piezoelectric properties.

  8. Upstream petroleum industry flaring guide : review draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-03-01

    The Alberta requirements and expectations for upstream petroleum flaring are presented. Flaring is associated with a wide range of energy activities including oil and gas well drilling and well completion operations. The guide incorporates the recommendations made to the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board (EUB) in June 1998 by the multi-stakeholder Clean Air Strategic Alliance (CASA) on associated or solution gas flaring. Additional requirements which address flaring issues not covered in the CASA report are also included in this guide. The Guide requires a 15 per cent reduction in solution gas flare volume by the end of year 2000 from the 1996 baseline, and a 25 per cent reduction by the end of 2001. The Guide prescribes new flare performance requirements for all flares, within three years for existing solution gas flares, five years for flares at other existing permanent facilities. It sets personal consultation and public notification requirements for new and existing solution gas batteries, and new sulphur recovery requirements for facilities not covered by existing EUB regulations. The Guide also addresses the question of conflict resolution to deal with flaring concerns, the release of flaring and venting data, the proposed reduction of flare limits, progress towards minimizing requirements for electricity generators using otherwise flared gas, annual reporting to the EUB, and management framework review in 2001

  9. Homebuyer's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindt, Roger P.; Harris, Jack

    Designed to assist prospective buyers in making such important decisions as whether to buy a new or older home and within what price range, the guide provides information on the purchase process. Discussion of the purchase process covers the life-cycle costs (recurring homeownership costs that must be met every month); selection of a home;…

  10. IEA Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Meredydd; Meier, Alan; Runci, Paul J.

    2008-08-05

    This guide presents insights and guidance from DOE’s gathered through longstanding and extensive participation in IEA implementing agreements (IAs) and annexes. Even though DOE has been a key participant in international research activities through the IEA since the 1970s, the experience, knowledge, and institutional memory associated with these activities can be lost or forgotten easily as key DOE managers retire or leave the department. The guide seeks to assemble in a single reference some of the learning that has occurred through participation in IEA IAs as a guide for BTP managers currently responsible for IAs and for those who might consider entering into new IEA activities in the future.

  11. Study protocol: a double blind randomised control trial of high volume image guided injections in Achilles and patellar tendinopathy in a young active population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker-Davies, Robert M; Nicol, Alastair; McCurdie, I; Watson, James; Baker, Polly; Wheeler, Patrick; Fong, Daniel; Lewis, Mark; Bennett, Alexander N

    2017-05-22

    Chronic tendinopathy is a significant problem particularly in active populations limiting sporting and occupational performance. The prevalence of patellar tendinopathy in some sports is near 50% and the incidence of lower limb tendinopathy is 1.4% p.a. in the UK Military. Management includes isometric, eccentric, heavy slow resistance exercises and extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT). Often these treatments are inadequate yet there is no good evidence for injection therapies and success rates from surgery can be as low as 50%. High Volume Image Guided Injection (HVIGI) proposes to strip away the neovascularity and disrupt the nerve ingrowth seen in chronic cases and has shown promising results in case series. This study aims to investigate the efficacy of HVIGI in a randomised controlled trial (RCT). RCT comparing 40ml HVIGI, with or without corticosteroid, with a 3ml local anaesthetic sham-control injection. Ninety-six participants will be recruited. male, 18-55 years old, chronic Achilles or patellar tendinopathy of at least 6 months, failed conservative management including ESWT, and Ultrasound (US) evidence of neovascularisation, tendon thickening and echogenic changes. Outcome measures will be recorded at baseline, 6 weeks, 3, 6 and 12 months. Primary outcome measures include The Victoria Institute of Sport Assessments for Achilles and patellar tendinopathy (VISA-A and VISA-P) and VAS pain. Secondary outcome measures include Modified Ohberg score, maximum tendon diameter and assessment of hypoechoic appearance on US, and Functional Activity Assessment. Despite previous interventional trials and reviews there is still insufficient evidence to guide injectable therapy for chronic tendinopathy that has failed conservative treatment. The scant evidence available suggests HVIGI has the greatest potential however there is no level one RCT evidence to support this. Investigating the efficacy of HVIGI against control in a RCT and separating the effect of HVIGI

  12. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP) and its receptors are present and biochemically active in the central nervous system of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirger, Zsolt; Laszlo, Zita; Hiripi, Laszlo; Hernadi, Laszlo; Toth, Gabor; Lubics, Andrea; Reglodi, Dora; Kemenes, Gyorgy; Mark, Laszlo

    2010-11-01

    PACAP is a highly conserved adenylate cyclase (AC) activating polypeptide, which, along with its receptors (PAC1-R, VPAC1, and VPAC2), is expressed in both vertebrate and invertebrate nervous systems. In vertebrates, PACAP has been shown to be involved in associative learning, but it is not known if it plays a similar role in invertebrates. To prepare the way for a detailed investigation into the possible role of PACAP and its receptors in a suitable invertebrate model of learning and memory, here, we undertook a study of their expression and biochemical role in the central nervous system of the pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Lymnaea is one of the best established invertebrate model systems to study the molecular mechanisms of learning and memory, including the role of cyclic AMP-activated signaling mechanisms, which crucially depend on the learning-induced activation of AC. However, there was no information available on the expression of PACAP and its receptors in sensory structures and central ganglia of the Lymnaea nervous system known to be involved in associative learning or whether or not PACAP can actually activate AC in these ganglia. Here, using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight (MALDI-TOF) and immunohistochemistry, we established the presence of PACAP-like peptides in the cerebral ganglia and the lip region of Lymnaea. The MALDI-TOF data indicated an identity with mammalian PACAP-27 and the presence of a squid-like PACAP-38 highly homologous to vertebrate PACAP-38. We also showed that PACAP, VIP, and maxadilan stimulated the synthesis of cAMP in Lymnaea cerebral ganglion homogenates and that this effect was blocked by the appropriate general and selective PACAP receptor antagonists.

  13. Users guide for the ANL IBM SPx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gropp, W.; Lusk, E.

    1994-12-01

    This guide presents the features of the IBM SPx installed in the Mathematics and Computer Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory. The guide describes the available hardware and software, access policies, and hints for using the system productively.

  14. FFTF operations procedures preparation guide. Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-12-01

    The Guide is intended to provide guidelines for the initial preparation of FFTF Operating Procedures. The Procedures Preparation Guide was developed from the plan presented and approved in the FFTF Reactor Plant Procedures Plan, PC-1, Revision 3

  15. A very rare cause of dyspnea with a unique presentation on a computed tomography scan of the chest: macrophage activation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandao-Neto, Rodrigo Antonio; Santana, Alfredo Nicodemos Cruz; Danilovic, Debora Lucia Seguro; Mendonca, Berenice Bilharinho de; Bernardi, Fabiola Del Carlo; Barbas, Carmen Silvia Valente

    2008-01-01

    Macrophage activation syndrome is a rare and potentially life-threatening disease. It occurs due to immune dysregulation manifested as excessive macrophage proliferation, typically causing hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia and hepatic dysfunction. Here, we report an unusual case of macrophage activation syndrome presenting as dyspnea, as well as (reported here for the first time) high resolution computed tomography findings of an excavated nodule, diffuse ground glass opacities and consolidations (mimicking severe pneumonia or alveolar hemorrhage). The patient was successfully treated with human immunoglobulin. We recommend that macrophage activation syndrome be considered in the differential diagnosis of respiratory failure. Rapid diagnosis and treatment are essential to achieving favorable outcomes in patients with this syndrome. (author)

  16. Pocket companion to PMI's PMBOK guide

    CERN Document Server

    Snijders, Paul; Zandhuis, Anton

    2010-01-01

    This pocket guide is based on the PMBOK Guide® Fourth Edition.This pocket guide supplies a summary of the PMBOK Guide® , to provide a quick introduction as well as a structured overview of this method for project management.This pocket guide deals with the key issues and themes within project management and PMBOK:A short overview of the activities of PMI Inc., The organization and its standards: PMBOK Guide®, Standard for Project Portfolio Management, Standard for Program Management, OPM3.The essentials of the Project Lifecycle and Organization.What are the key project management knowledge ar

  17. School Chemistry Laboratory Safety Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brundage, Patricia; Palassis, John

    2006-01-01

    The guide presents information about ordering, using, storing, and maintaining chemicals in the high school laboratory. The guide also provides information about chemical waste, safety and emergency equipment, assessing chemical hazards, common safety symbols and signs, and fundamental resources relating to chemical safety, such as Material…

  18. Automotive Mechanics. Student Learning Guides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridge Vocational-Technical Center, Winter Haven, FL.

    These 33 learning guides are self-instructional packets for 33 tasks identified as essential for performance on an entry-level job in automotive mechanics. Each guide is based on a terminal performance objective (task) and 1-9 enabling objectives. For each enabliing objective, some or all of these materials may be presented: learning steps…

  19. Wild Bitter Melon Leaf Extract Inhibits Porphyromonas gingivalis-Induced Inflammation: Identification of Active Compounds through Bioassay-Guided Isolation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzung-Hsun Tsai

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Porphyromonas gingivalis has been identified as one of the major periodontal pathogens. Activity-directed fractionation and purification processes were employed to identify the anti-inflammatory active compounds using heat-killed P. gingivalis-stimulated human monocytic THP-1 cells in vitro. Five major fractions were collected from the ethanol/ethyl acetate extract of wild bitter melon (Momordica charantia Linn. var. abbreviata Ser. leaves and evaluated for their anti-inflammatory activity against P. gingivalis. Among the test fractions, Fraction 5 effectively decreased heat-killed P. gingivalis-induced interleukin (IL-8 and was subjected to separation and purification by using chromatographic techniques. Two cucurbitane triterpenoids were isolated from the active fraction and identified as 5β,19-epoxycucurbita-6,23-diene-3β,19,25-triol (1 and 3β,7β,25-trihydroxycucurbita-5,23-dien-19-al (2 by comparing spectral data. Treatments of both compounds in vitro potently suppressed P. gingivalis-induced IL-8, IL-6, and IL-1β levels and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK in THP-1 cells. Both compounds effectively inhibited the mRNA levels of IL-6, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, and cyclooxygenase (COX-2 in P. gingivalis-stimulated gingival tissue of mice. These findings imply that 5β,19-epoxycucurbita-6,23-diene-3β,19,25-triol and 3β,7β,25-trihydroxycucurbita-5,23-dien-19-al could be used for the development of novel therapeutic approaches against P. gingivalis infections.

  20. SALOME. User's guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zastrow, K.D.

    1994-01-01

    A user's guide for a least squares fit analysis program is presented, which has been developed for VUV and visible plasma spectroscopy on the Extrap-T1 experiment. The program can be used for line and multiplet identification, multiplet intensity and line width measurements. Atomic data are used extensively to aid the interpretation of the spectra. 7 figs

  1. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  2. Teens Working: Turning Earning into Learning. Facilitator Guide [and] Critical Workplace Issues [and] Student Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR. Education, Career, and Community Program.

    These guides are part of a toolkit designed to help young people make connections between the jobs they now hold, the classes they are taking, and the goals they may have for the near and distant future. The guides contain a variety of materials and activities appropriate for all skill levels. The activities in the student guide are grounded in…

  3. Lecture Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Heavy-Ion Collisions in the LHC workshop held in Cracow from 18 to 18 May 2007. The main subject of the workshop was to present the newest results of research provided at CERN LHC collider. Additionally some theoretical models and methods used for presented data analysis were discussed

  4. CATCHY PRESENTATIONS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Kaare; Tollestrup, Christian; Ovesen, Nis

    2011-01-01

    An important competence for designers is the ability to communicate and present ideas and proposals for customers, partners, investors and colleagues. The Pecha Kucha principle, developed by Astrid Klein and Mark Dytham, has become a widely used and easy format for the presentation of new concepts...

  5. South Carolina Guide for Small Business Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Ellen C.; Elliott, Ronald T.

    This guide for small business management in South Carolina addresses the three domains of learning: psychomotor, cognitive, and affective. The guide contains suggestions for specific classroom activities for each domain. Each of the 11 units or tasks in the guide contains a competency statement followed by performance objectives, job-relevant…

  6. Curriculum Guide for Fashion Merchandising (Fashion Salesperson).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Margaret R.

    This curriculum guide is designed to help teachers teach a course in fashion merchandising to high school students. The guide contains eight performance-based learning modules, each consisting of one to seven units. Each unit teaches a job-relevant task, and includes performance objectives, performance guides, resources, learning activities,…

  7. Aging and the Social Cognitive Determinants of Physical Activity Behavior and Behavior Change: Evidence from the Guide to Health Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Smith Anderson-Bill

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Part one of this study investigated the effect of aging on social-cognitive characteristics related to physical activity (PA among adults in the baseline phase of a health promotion intervention. Participants' questionnaire responses and activity logs indicated PA levels and self-efficacy declined with age, while social support and the use of self-regulatory behaviors (e.g., goal setting, planning, and keeping track increased. With age participants were also less likely to expect PA to interfere with their daily routines and social obligations. Part two of the study was among overweight/obese, inactive participants completing the intervention; it examined whether improvements in psychosocial variables might counteract declining PA associated with age. After treatment, participants were more active and decreased body weight regardless of age, and improved self-efficacy, outcome expectations, and self-regulatory behaviors. In a causal model, increases in self-efficacy at 7-months lead to increased PA levels and, albeit marginally, weight loss at 16 months; increased PA was associated with greater weight loss. Aging adults who were more confident exercised more and as a result lost more weight. This longitudinal study suggests interventions that offset the effect of aging on self-efficacy may be more successful in helping older participants become more active and avoid weight gain.

  8. Cardiorespiratory fitness moderates the effect of an affect-guided physical activity prescription: A pilot randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldwin, A.S.; Kangas, J.L.; Denman, D.C.; Smits, J.A.J.; Yamada, T.; Otto, M.W.

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity (PA) interventions have a clear role in promoting mental health. Current PA guidelines directed toward specific PA intensities may have negative effects on affective response to exercise, and affective response is an important determinant of PA adherence. In this randomized trial

  9. Owning and Operating a Small Business. A Guide for Industrial Cooperative Training Programs. Learning Activity Package No. 14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braden, Robert P.; Remzi, Kerim

    This learning activity package (LAP) on starting a small business is designed for student self-study. It will help students learn about their aptitudes and abilities as well as about the basics of running a small business. Following a list of learning objectives, the LAP contains a pretest (answer key provided at the end of the LAP). Ten learning…

  10. A cross-sectional study of physical activity and sedentary behaviours in a Caribbean population: combining objective and questionnaire data to guide future interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Howitt

    2016-10-01

    -report, contributing 57 % (95 % CI: 52,61. The most popular leisure activities for both genders were walking and gardening. Conclusions The use of both objective and self-report methods to assess PA and sedentary behaviour provides important complementary information to guide public health programmes. Our results emphasize the urgent need to increase PA and reduce sedentary time in this developing country population. Women and those with higher social economic position are particularly at risk from low levels of physical activity.

  11. A cross-sectional study of physical activity and sedentary behaviours in a Caribbean population: combining objective and questionnaire data to guide future interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howitt, Christina; Brage, Soren; Hambleton, Ian R; Westgate, Kate; Samuels, T Alafia; Rose, Angela Mc; Unwin, Nigel

    2016-10-01

    popular leisure activities for both genders were walking and gardening. The use of both objective and self-report methods to assess PA and sedentary behaviour provides important complementary information to guide public health programmes. Our results emphasize the urgent need to increase PA and reduce sedentary time in this developing country population. Women and those with higher social economic position are particularly at risk from low levels of physical activity.

  12. Influenza pandemic planning guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-11-15

    An influenza pandemic will have serious economic impacts on the natural gas industry due to absenteeism as well as downstream effects due to supply disruption.This guide was prepared to assist gas distribution companies in planning for an influenza epidemic. The guide aimed to minimize the risks that an influenza pandemic might pose to the health and safety of employees and the continuity of business operations. The guide discussed 5 critical aspects of emergency planning: (1) prevention and threat mitigation; (2) preparedness; (3) response; (4) business continuity; and (5) communication. The legal context of the emergency plans were discussed. The plans were also discussed to other essential infrastructure emergency response plans. Recommendations were presented for infection control, decentralization and access restriction. Outlines for pandemic response planning teams and training and exercise programs were provided. Issues related to alert, mobilization, and response procedures were also discussed. 10 refs., 3 tabs., 1 fig.

  13. TRAC User's Guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boyack, B.E.; Stumpf, H.; Lime, J.F.

    1985-11-01

    This guide has been prepared to assist users in applying the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC). TRAC is an advanced best-estimate systems code for analyzing transients in thermal-hydraulic systems. The code is very general. Because it is general, efforts to model specific nuclear power plants or experimental facilities often present a challenge to the TRAC user. This guide has been written to assist first-time or intermediate users. It is specifically written for the TRAC version designated TRAC-PF1/MOD1. The TRAC User's Guide should be considered a companion document to the TRAC Code Manual; the user will need both documents to use TRAC effectively. 18 refs., 45 figs., 19 tabs

  14. Brain regions activated by the passive processing of visually- and auditorily-presented words measured by averaged PET images of blood flow change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S.E.; Fox, P.T.; Posner, M.I.; Raichle, M.E.

    1987-01-01

    A limited number of regions specific to input modality are activated by the auditory and visual presentation of single words. These regions include primary auditory and visual cortex, and modality-specific higher order region that may be performing computations at a word level of analysis

  15. Application of fMRI to obesity research: differences in reward pathway activation measured with fMRI BOLD during visual presentation of high and low calorie foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Sinchai; Adam, Tanja C.; Goran, Michael I.; Singh, Manbir

    2012-03-01

    The factors behind the neural mechanisms that motivate food choice and obesity are not well known. Furthermore, it is not known when these neural mechanisms develop and how they are influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. This study uses fMRI together with clinical data to shed light on the aforementioned questions by investigating how appetite-related activation in the brain changes with low versus high caloric foods in pre-pubescent girls. Previous studies have shown that obese adults have less striatal D2 receptors and thus reduced Dopamine (DA) signaling leading to the reward-deficit theory of obesity. However, overeating in itself reduces D2 receptor density, D2 sensitivity and thus reward sensitivity. The results of this study will show how early these neural mechanisms develop and what effect the drastic endocrinological changes during puberty has on these mechanisms. Our preliminary results showed increased activations in the Putamen, Insula, Thalamus and Hippocampus when looking at activations where High Calorie > Low Calorie. When comparing High Calorie > Control and Low Calorie > Control, the High > Control test showed increased significant activation in the frontal lobe. The Low > Control also yielded significant activation in the Left and Right Fusiform Gyrus, which did not appear in the High > Control test. These results indicate that the reward pathway activations previously shown in post-puberty and adults are present in pre-pubescent teens. These results may suggest that some of the preferential neural mechanisms of reward are already present pre-puberty.

  16. Development of a method for determining the location of heterogeneous activity present in 200 litre waste drum using USB based MCS system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sarbjit; Mhatre, Amol; Sagar, Veena; Gupta, Nidhi

    2014-01-01

    A method was developed for determining the location of activity present in 200 litre waste drum using USB based MCS system coupled to a segmented gamma ray scanner. 137 Cs source was kept at various distances from centre of the drum along the axis of the detector. Drum was rotated and the activity profiles were determined as a function of angle of rotation. The plot of the count rate as a function of angle of rotation was found to have two peaks. The experimental and calculated data were found to match well at all angles. Present studies have shown that the ratio of height and width of the profile at angles of 0 ° and 180° can be used to determine the location of the activity in the drum. (author)

  17. Research on elaboration of the evaluation guidelines for activities implemented jointly; Kyodo jisshi katsudo hyoka guide line sakutei chosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    Elaboration of the evaluation guidelines for activities implemented jointly (AIJ) was researched to prevent the earth from warming. AIJ is the means to globally promote countermeasures against global warming cost-effectively by optimally combining every country`s technology, know-how and fund. AIJ was established in the 1st Conference of the Parties (COPI) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change in March, 1995. The pilot phase of AIJ is first carried out by voluntary workers jointly with developing countries under the agreement of the parties. The current situation of activities is reported in COPI as materials for evaluation of AIJ. To promote AIJ, elaboration of the evaluation guidelines for AIJ Japan program is also necessary for Japan. This research arranged the contents of the evaluation guidelines and the method of classifying projects for AIJ Japan program, and carried out some case studies of promising projects to reduce greenhouse gas emission for future proposal. 3 figs., 31 tabs.

  18. CERN presentations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2011-01-01

    Presentation by CERN (10 minutes each) Rolf Landua - Education and Outreach Salvatore Mele - Open Access Jean-Yves Le Meur - Digital Library in Africa Francois Fluckiger - Open Source/Standards (tbc) Tim Smith - Open Data for Science Tullio Basiglia - tbc

  19. Delivery presentations

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has entered the pelvis. If the presenting part lies above the ischial spines, the station is reported ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  20. Information Presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, K.L.; Boyer, J.L.; Sandor, A.; Thompson, S.G.; McCann, R.S.; Begault, D.R.; Adelstein, B.D.; Beutter, B.R.; Stone, L.S.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of the Information Presentation Directed Research Project (DRP) is to address design questions related to the presentation of information to the crew. The major areas of work, or subtasks, within this DRP are: 1) Displays, 2) Controls, 3) Electronic Procedures and Fault Management, and 4) Human Performance Modeling. This DRP is a collaborative effort between researchers at Johnson Space Center and Ames Research Center.