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Sample records for activity dopaminergic systems

  1. Semax, an ACTH(4-10) analogue with nootropic properties, activates dopaminergic and serotoninergic brain systems in rodents.

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    Eremin, Kirill O; Kudrin, Vladimir S; Saransaari, Pirjo; Oja, Simo S; Grivennikov, Igor A; Myasoedov, Nikolay F; Rayevsky, Kirill S

    2005-12-01

    Corticotrophin (ACTH) and its analogues, particularly Semax (Met-Glu-His-Phe-Pro-Gly-Pro), demonstrate nootropic activity. Close functional and anatomical links have been established between melanocortinergic and monoaminergic brain systems. The aim of present work was to investigate the effects of Semax on neurochemical parameters of dopaminergic- and serotonergic systems in rodents. The tissue content of 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in the striatum was significantly increased (+25%) 2 h after Semax administration. The extracellular striatal level of 5-HIAA gradually increased up to 180% within 1-4 h after Semax (0.15 mg/kg, ip) administration. This peptide alone failed to alter the tissue and extracellular concentrations of dopamine and its metabolites. Semax injected 20 min prior D: -amphetamine dramatically enhanced the effects of the latter on the extracellular level of dopamine and on the locomotor activity of animals. Our results reveal the positive modulatory effect of Semax on the striatal serotonergic system and the ability of Semax to enhance both the striatal release of dopamine and locomotor behavior elicited by D-amphetamine.

  2. Dopaminergic system abnormalities Etiopathogenesis of dystonia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuhui Wu; Huifang Shang; Xiaoyi Zou

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Much research has focused on the close relationship between etiopathogenesis of dystonia and abnormalities of the dopaminergic system. Nevertheless, details of the mechanism are still not clear.OBJECTIVE: To review studies from the past few years about pathogenesis and molecular interactions involved in the relationship between dystonia and abnormalities of the dopaminergic system.RETRIEVAL STRATEGY: Using the key words "dystonia" and "dopamine", PubMed database and SCI databases were searched from January 1990 to December 2005 for relevant English publications. A total of 73 articles were searched and, initially, all articles were selected. Inclusive criteria: studies based on pathogenesis and molecular interactions involved in the relationship between dystonia and abnormalities of the dopaminergic system. Exclusive criteria: duplicated studies. A total of 19 articles were extracted after preliminary screening.LITERATURE EVALUATION: The data sources were the PubMed and SCI databases. The types of articles chosen were reviews and original articles.DATA SYNTHESIS: Metabolism and function of dopamine in the central nervous system: the chemical constitution of dopamine is a single benzene ring. The encephalic regions of dopamine synthesis and their fiber projections comprise four nervous system pathways. One of these pathways is the substantia nigra-striatum dopamine pathway, which is a side-loop of the basal ganglia circuitry that participates in movement control and plays a main role in the adjustment of extracorticospinal tract movement. Dopamine can lead to the facilitation of movement. Dystonia and abnormalities of the dopaminergic system: different modes of dopamine abnormality exist in various forms of dystonia. Abnormalities of the dopaminergic system in several primary dystonias: at present, fifteen gene loci of primary dystonia have been reported (DYT1-DYT15). The relationship between abnormalities of the dopaminergic system and the

  3. Renin angiotensin system and gender differences in dopaminergic degeneration

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    Rodriguez-Perez Ana I

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are sex differences in dopaminergic degeneration. Men are approximately two times as likely as premenopausal women of the same age to develop Parkinson's disease (PD. It has been shown that the local renin angiotensin system (RAS plays a prominent role in sex differences in the development of chronic renal and cardiovascular diseases, and there is a local RAS in the substantia nigra and dopaminergic cell loss is enhanced by angiotensin via type 1 (AT1 receptors. Results In the present study, we observed that intrastriatal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine induced a marked loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of male rats, which was significantly higher than the loss induced in ovariectomized female rats given estrogen implants (i.e. rats with estrogen. However, the loss of dopaminergic neurons was significantly lower in male rats treated with the AT1 antagonist candesartan, and similar to that observed in female rats with estrogen. The involvement of the RAS in gender differences in dopaminergic degeneration was confirmed with AT1a-null mice lesioned with the dopaminergic neurotoxin MPTP. Significantly higher expression of AT1 receptors, angiotensin converting enzyme activity, and NADPH-oxidase complex activity, and much lower levels of AT2 receptors were observed in male rats than in female rats with estrogen. Conclusions The results suggest that brain RAS plays a major role in the increased risk of developing PD in men, and that manipulation of brain RAS may be an efficient approach for neuroprotective treatment of PD in men, without the feminizing effects of estrogen.

  4. The dopaminergic system in hypertension.

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    Zeng, Chunyu; Zhang, Meng; Asico, Laureano D; Eisner, Gilbert M; Jose, Pedro A

    2007-06-01

    Dopamine plays an important role in the pathogenesis of hypertension by regulating epithelial sodium transport, vascular smooth muscle contractility and production of reactive oxygen species and by interacting with the renin-angiotensin and sympathetic nervous systems. Dopamine receptors are classified into D(1)-like (D(1) and D(5)) and D(2)-like (D(2), D(3) and D(4)) subtypes based on their structure and pharmacology. Each of the dopamine receptor subtypes participates in the regulation of blood pressure by mechanisms specific for the subtype. Some receptors regulate blood pressure by influencing the central and/or peripheral nervous system; others influence epithelial transport and regulate the secretion and receptors of several humoral agents. This review summarizes the physiology of the different dopamine receptors in the regulation of blood pressure, and the relationship between dopamine receptor subtypes and hypertension.

  5. Dopaminergic Activity in the Medial Prefrontal Cortex Modulates Fear Conditioning

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    Parvin Babaei

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available "nThe purpose of the present study was to determine the role of medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC dopaminergic system in fear conditioning response considering individual differences. Animals were initially counterbalanced and classified based on open field test, and then were given a single infusion of the dopamine agonist, amphetamine (AMPH and antagonist, clozapine (CLZ into the medial prefrontal cortex. Rats received tone-shock pairing in a classical fear conditioning test and then exposed to the tone alone. Freezing responses were measured as conditioned fear index. The results showed that both AMPH and CLZ infusion in mPFC reduced the expression of conditioned fear. This finding indicates that elevation or reduction in the dopaminergic activity is associated with the decrease of fear responses, despite preexisting individual-typological differences.

  6. Ketogenic diet alters dopaminergic activity in the mouse cortex.

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    Church, William H; Adams, Ryan E; Wyss, Livia S

    2014-06-13

    The present study was conducted to determine if the ketogenic diet altered basal levels of monoamine neurotransmitters in mice. The catecholamines dopamine (DA) and norephinephrine (NE) and the indolamine serotonin (5HT) were quantified postmortem in six different brain regions of adult mice fed a ketogenic diet for 3 weeks. The dopamine metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) and the serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid (5HIAA) were also measured. Tissue punches were collected bilaterally from the motor cortex, somatosensory cortex, nucleus accumbens, anterior caudate-putamen, posterior caudate-putamen and the midbrain. Dopaminergic activity, as measured by the dopamine metabolites to dopamine content ratio - ([DOPAC]+[HVA])/[DA] - was significantly increased in the motor and somatosensory cortex regions of mice fed the ketogenic diet when compared to those same areas in brains of mice fed a normal diet. These results indicate that the ketogenic diet alters the activity of the meso-cortical dopaminergic system, which may contribute to the diet's therapeutic effect in reducing epileptic seizure activity.

  7. Simultaneous activation of mitophagy and autophagy by staurosporine protects against dopaminergic neuronal cell death.

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    Ha, Ji-Young; Kim, Ji-Soo; Kim, Seo-Eun; Son, Jin H

    2014-02-21

    Abnormal autophagy is frequently observed during dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD). However, it is not yet firmly established whether active autophagy is beneficial or pathogenic with respect to dopaminergic cell loss. Staurosporine, a common inducer of apoptosis, is often used in mechanistic studies of dopaminergic cell death. Here we report that staurosporine activates both autophagy and mitophagy simultaneously during dopaminergic neuronal cell death, and evaluate the physiological significance of these processes during cell death. First, staurosporine treatment resulted in induction of autophagy in more than 75% of apoptotic cells. Pharmacological inhibition of autophagy by bafilomycin A1 decreased significantly cell viability. In addition, staurosporine treatment resulted in activation of the PINK1-Parkin mitophagy pathway, of which deficit underlies some familial cases of PD, in the dopaminergic neuronal cell line, SN4741. The genetic blockade of this pathway by PINK1 null mutation also dramatically increased staurosporine-induced cell death. Taken together, our data suggest that staurosporine induces both mitophagy and autophagy, and that these pathways exert a significant neuroprotective effect, rather than a contribution to autophagic cell death. This model system may therefore be useful for elucidating the mechanisms underlying crosstalk between autophagy, mitophagy, and cell death in dopaminergic neurons.

  8. Splenectomy modifies hyperactive states of the dopaminergic system induced by morphine in C57BL/6J-bg(J)/bg(J) (beige-J) mice.

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    Funada, Masahiko; Mori, Tomohisa; Maeda, Jun; Tsuda, Yuko; Komiya, Sachiko; Shimizu, Norifumi; Kamei, Junzo; Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2014-11-05

    Genetic factors affect the locomotor activity induced by morphine, which mainly depends on the activation of dopaminergic systems, and morphine has distinct pharmacological activities in C57BL/6J-bg(J)bg(J) (beige-J) mice, which have genetic deficiencies in immunological function. We previously showed that beige-J mice exhibited greater locomotor activity and dopamine turnover, whereas splenectomy reduced this hyperlocomotion and dopamine turnover, which suggests that beige-J mice could be an experimental animal model for investigating hyperactivation of the dopaminergic system, and that the spleen may contribute to the susceptibility to activation of the dopaminergic system. Furthermore, morphine can induce hyperlocomotion mediated by activation of the dopaminergic system. Therefore, we examined the effects of splenectomy on the hyperlocomotion and regulation of the dopaminergic system induced by morphine in beige-J mice. Morphine induced hyperlocomotion, which was accompanied by activation of the dopaminergic system, in beige-J mice. Furthermore, splenectomy enhanced the hyperlocomotion and activation of the mesolimbic dopaminergic system induced by morphine in beige-J mice. Our findings indicate that substances originating from the spleen may regulate both spontaneous activation of the mesolimbic dopaminergic system and the µ-opioidergic system-mediated activation of the mesolimbic dopaminergic system by morphine through different modes of action. These results imply that beige-J mice could be a practical animal model for investigating the interactions between immune-modulation and the µ-opioidergic system and/or dopaminergic system.

  9. Chronic exposure to low levels of inorganic arsenic causes alterations in locomotor activity and in the expression of dopaminergic and antioxidant systems in the albino rat.

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    Rodríguez, Verónica Mireya; Limón-Pacheco, Jorge Humberto; Carrizales, Leticia; Mendoza-Trejo, María Soledad; Giordano, Magda

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have associated chronic arsenicism with decreases in IQ and sensory and motor alterations in humans. Likewise, studies of rodents exposed to inorganic arsenic ((i)As) have found changes in locomotor activity, brain neurochemistry, behavioral tasks, oxidative stress, and in sensory and motor nerves. In the current study, male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to environmentally relevant doses of (i)As (0.05, 0.5 mg (i)As/L) and to a high dose (50 mg (i)As/L) in drinking water for one year. Hypoactivity and increases in the striatal dopamine content were found in the group treated with 50 mg (i)As/L. Exposure to 0.5 and 50 mg (i)As/L increased the total brain content of As. Furthermore, (i)As exposure produced a dose-dependent up-regulation of mRNA for Mn-SOD and Trx-1 and a down-regulation of DAR-D₂ mRNA levels in the nucleus accumbens. DAR-D₁ and Nrf2 mRNA expression were down-regulated in nucleus accumbens in the group exposed to 50 mg (i)As/L. Trx-1 mRNA levels were up-regulated in the cortex in an (i)As dose-dependent manner, while DAR-D₁ mRNA expression was increased in striatum in the 0.5 mg (i)As/L group. These results show that chronic exposure to low levels of arsenic causes subtle but region-specific changes in the nervous system, especially in antioxidant systems and dopaminergic elements. These changes became behaviorally evident only in the group exposed to 50 mg (i)As/L.

  10. Combined effects of diethylpropion and alcohol on locomotor activity of mice: participation of the dopaminergic and opioid systems

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    Gevaerd M.S.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The widespread consumption of anorectics and combined anorectic + alcohol misuse are problems in Brazil. In order to better understand the interactive effects of ethanol (EtOH and diethylpropion (DEP we examined the locomotion-activating effects of these drugs given alone or in combination in mice. We also determined whether this response was affected by dopamine (DA or opioid receptor antagonists. A total of 160 male Swiss mice weighing approximately 30 g were divided into groups of 8 animals per group. The animals were treated daily for 7 consecutive days with combined EtOH + DEP (1.2 g/kg and 5.0 mg/kg, ip, EtOH (1.2 g/kg, ip, DEP (5.0 mg/kg, ip or the control solution coadministered with the DA antagonist haloperidol (HAL, 0.075 mg/kg, ip, the opioid antagonist naloxone (NAL, 1.0 mg/kg, ip, or vehicle. On days 1, 7 and 10 after the injections, mice were assessed in activity cages at different times (15, 30, 45 and 60 min for 5 min. The acute combination of EtOH plus DEP induced a significantly higher increase in locomotor activity (day 1: 369.5 ± 34.41 when compared to either drug alone (day 1: EtOH = 232.5 ± 23.79 and DEP = 276.0 ± 12.85 and to control solution (day 1: 153.12 ± 7.64. However, the repeated administration of EtOH (day 7: 314.63 ± 26.79 and day 10: 257.62 ± 29.91 or DEP (day 7: 309.5 ± 31.65 and day 10: 321.12 ± 39.24 alone or in combination (day 7: 459.75 ± 41.28 and day 10: 427.87 ± 33.0 failed to induce a progressive increase in the locomotor response. These data demonstrate greater locomotion-activating effects of the EtOH + DEP combination, probably involving DA and/or opioid receptor stimulation, since the daily pretreatment with HAL (day 1: EtOH + DEP = 395.62 ± 11.92 and EtOH + DEP + HAL = 371.5 ± 6.76; day 7: EtOH + DEP = 502.5 ± 42.27 and EtOH + DEP + HAL = 281.12 ± 16.08; day 10: EtOH + DEP = 445.75 ± 16.64 and EtOH + DEP + HAL = 376.75 ± 16.4 and NAL (day 1: EtOH + DEP = 553.62 ± 38.15 and Et

  11. Sexually dimorphic activation of dopaminergic areas depends on affiliation during courtship and pair formation

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    Mai eIwasaki

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available For many species, dyadic interaction during courtship and pair bonding engage intense emotional states that control approach or avoidance behavior. Previous studies have shown that one component of a common social brain network (SBN, dopaminergic areas, are highly engaged during male songbird courtship of females. We tested whether the level of activity in dopaminergic systems of both females and males during courtship is related to their level of affiliation. In order to objectively quantify affiliative behaviors, we developed a system for tracking the position of both birds during free interaction sessions. During a third successive daily interaction session, there was a range of levels of affiliation among bird pairs, as quantified by several position and movement parameters. Because both positive and negative social interactions were present, we chose to characterize affiliation strength by pair valence. As a potential neural system involved in regulating pair valence, the level of activity of the dopaminergic group A11 (within the central gray was selectively reduced in females of positive valence pairs. Further, activation of non-dopaminergic neurons in VTA was negatively related to valence, with this relationship strongest in ventral VTA of females. Together, these results suggest that inhibition of fear or avoidance networks may be associated with development of close affiliation, and highlight the importance of negative as well as positive emotional states in the process of courtship, and in development of long-lasting social bonds.

  12. Parthanatos Mediates AIMP2 Activated Age Dependent Dopaminergic Neuronal Loss

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    Lee, Yunjong; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar S.; Shin, Joo-Ho; Lee, Yun-Il; Ko, Han Seok; Swing, Debbie; Jiang, Haisong; Kang, Sung-Ung; Lee, Byoung Dae; Kang, Ho Chul; Kim, Donghoon; Tessarollo, Lino; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2013-01-01

    The defining pathogenic feature of Parkinson’s disease is the age dependent loss of dopaminergic neurons. Mutations and inactivation of parkin, an ubiquitin E3 ligase, cause Parkinson’s disease through accumulation of pathogenic substrates. Here we show that transgenic overexpression of the parkin substrate, aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase complex interacting multifunctional protein-2 (AIMP2) leads to a selective, age-dependent progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons via activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1). AIMP2 accumulation in vitro and in vivo results in PARP1 overactivation and dopaminergic cell toxicity via direct association of these proteins in the nucleus providing a new path to PARP1 activation other than DNA damage. Inhibition of PARP1 through gene deletion or drug inhibition reverses behavioral deficits and protects in vivo against dopamine neuron death in AIMP2 transgenic mice. These data indicate that brain permeable PARP inhibitors could be effective in delaying or preventing disease progression in Parkinson’s disease. PMID:23974709

  13. Differential effects of histamine on the activity of hypothalamic dopaminergic neurons in the rat.

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    Fleckenstein, A E; Lookingland, K J; Moore, K E

    1994-01-01

    The effect of intracerebroventricular administration of histamine on hypothalamic dopaminergic neuronal activity was estimated in male rats by measuring concentrations of dopamine and its metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) in brain regions containing terminals or perikarya of these neurons. Three distinct, regionally specific neurochemical responses were apparent. In the median eminence and intermediate lobe of the pituitary, histamine affected neither DOPAC nor dopamine concentrations, suggesting no effect on tuberoinfundibular or periventricular-hypophysial dopaminergic neuronal activity. In the medial zona incerta and in the dorsomedial, rostral periventricular and medial preoptic hypothalamic nuclei, histamine effected a dose- and time-related increase in both DOPAC and dopamine concentrations; these effects were blocked by destruction of noradrenergic neurons projecting to these regions, suggesting that these changes are attributable to noradrenergic neuronal activation, and that histamine does not affect the activity of incertohypothalamic or periventricular-preoptic dopaminergic neurons located in these brain regions. In the suprachiasmatic, caudal periventricular and paraventricular hypothalamic nuclei, histamine effected a dose- and time-related increase in DOPAC, but not dopamine, concentrations; these effects were blocked by the H1 antagonist mepyramine, but not the H2 antagonist zolantidine. Destruction of noradrenergic neurons projecting to these regions did not prevent the histamine-induced increases in DOPAC concentrations. These data indicate that histamine increases the activity of dopaminergic neurons projecting to the suprachiasmatic, caudal periventricular and paraventricular nuclei via an action at H1 receptors. Overall, these results reveal that i.c.v. administration of histamine differentially affects the activity of the various dopaminergic neuronal systems of the rat hypothalamus.

  14. Imbalance between thyroid hormones and the dopaminergic system might be central to the pathophysiology of restless legs syndrome: a hypothesis

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    Jose Carlos Pereira Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Data collected from medical literature indicate that dopaminergic agonists alleviate Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms while dopaminergic agonists antagonists aggravate them. Dopaminergic agonists is a physiological regulator of thyroid-stimulating hormone. Dopaminergic agonists infusion diminishes the levels of thyroid hormones, which have the ability to provoke restlessness, hyperkinetic states, tremors, and insomnia. Conditions associated with higher levels of thyroid hormones, such as pregnancy or hyperthyroidism, have a higher prevalence of Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms. Low iron levels can cause secondary Restless Legs Syndrome or aggravate symptoms of primary disease as well as diminish enzymatic activities that are involved in dopaminergic agonists production and the degradation of thyroid hormones. Moreover, as a result of low iron levels, dopaminergic agonists diminishes and thyroid hormones increase. Iron therapy improves Restless Legs Syndrome symptoms in iron deprived patients. Medical hypothesis. To discuss the theory that thyroid hormones, when not counterbalanced by dopaminergic agonists, may precipitate the signs and symptoms underpinning Restless Legs Syndrome. The main cause of Restless Legs Syndrome might be an imbalance between the dopaminergic agonists system and thyroid hormones.

  15. Manganese nanoparticle activates mitochondrial dependent apoptotic signaling and autophagy in dopaminergic neuronal cells

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    Afeseh Ngwa, Hilary; Kanthasamy, Arthi [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Iowa Center for Advanced Neurotoxicology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Gu, Yan; Fang, Ning [Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Anantharam, Vellareddy [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Iowa Center for Advanced Neurotoxicology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Kanthasamy, Anumantha G., E-mail: akanthas@iastate.edu [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Iowa Center for Advanced Neurotoxicology, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2011-11-15

    activate mitochondrial cell death signaling in dopaminergic neuron. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn nanoparticles activate caspase-mediated proteolytic cleavage of PKC{delta} cascade. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn nanoparticles induce autophagy in dopaminergic neuronal cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mn nanoparticles induce loss of TH{sup +} neurons in primary mesencephalic cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Study emphasizes neurotoxic risks of Mn nanoparticles to nigral dopaminergic system.

  16. Dopaminergic parameters during social isolation in low- and high-active mice.

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    Rilke, O; Jähkel, M; Oehler, J

    1998-06-01

    Alterations induced by social isolation (1 day to 18 weeks) in low- and high-active mice (LAM and HAM) were studied in respect to locomotor activity, [3H]-spiperone binding in the striatum, striatal, and cortical dopamine metabolism, and presynaptic dopaminergic sensitivity to apomorphine (0.75 mg/kg; i.p.). Isolated HAM and LAM showed increased locomotor activity compared to group-housed mice after long-term isolation (6-18 weeks). Considering the studied dopaminergic parameters, it has been found that social isolation did not affect striatal D2 receptors, striatal and cortical dopamine metabolism, and apomorphine-mediated reduction of dopaminergic metabolism. The change of housing conditions was generally associated with an increase of cortical dopamine metabolism after 1 week. Activity type specific differences in group-housed LAM and HAM were found in the basal striatal dopamine metabolism and in the sensitivity of the nigrostriatal system to autoreceptor activation. The reduced striatal dopamine metabolism and the higher presynaptic sensitivity of HAM may be related to their high active running wheel behavior.

  17. Imaging of the dopaminergic system in differential diagnosis of dementia

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    Tatsch, Klaus [University of Munich Hospital - Campus Grosshadern, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany)

    2008-03-15

    specifically dealing with imaging of the dopaminergic system in the differential diagnosis of dementia. (orig.)

  18. PET in neuroscience. Dopaminergic, CABA/benzodiazepine, and opiate system; PET in den Neurowisssenschaften: dopaminerges, GABA/Benzodiazepin- und Opiatsystem

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    Bartenstein, P. [Mainz Univ. (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2004-02-01

    This article gives an overview on radiotracer imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) in measuring various aspects of neurotransmission. The review focusses on the dopaminergic system, the GABA/benzodiazepine system, and the opiate system. Besides dealing with the current clinical applications for brain PET studies with specific radiopharmaceuticals this article outlines an idea on potential future developments for the use of these methods in basic neuroscience. (orig.) [German] Diese Arbeit praesentiert eine Uebersicht zur aktuellen Forschung und klinischen Anwendung von PET-Untersuchungen mit Radiopharmaka, die verschiedene Komponenten der Neurotransmission erfassen. Ausserdem werden Perspektiven und Trend der Methodik gezeigt. Im Mittelpunkt stehen das dopaminerge System, das GABA/Benzodiazepinsystem, und das Opiatsystem. Ausfuehrlich dargestellt werden aktuelle klinische und kliniknahe Moeglichkeiten sowie methodische Aspekte der grundlagenorientierten Forschung, die fuer eine zukunftsorientierte Anwendung von PET-Studien mit Rezeptorliganden u.a. Radiopharmaka zur Bildgebung komplexer biochemischer Prozesse von Bedeutung sind. (orig.)

  19. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide and Renal Dopaminergic System: A Positive Friendly Relationship?

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    Marcelo Roberto Choi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium metabolism by the kidney is accomplished by an intricate interaction between signals from extrarenal and intrarenal sources and between antinatriuretic and natriuretic factors. Renal dopamine plays a central role in this interactive network. The natriuretic hormones, such as the atrial natriuretic peptide, mediate some of their effects by affecting the renal dopaminergic system. Renal dopaminergic tonus can be modulated at different steps of dopamine metabolism (synthesis, uptake, release, catabolism, and receptor sensitization which can be regulated by the atrial natriuretic peptide. At tubular level, dopamine and atrial natriuretic peptide act together in a concerted manner to promote sodium excretion, especially through the overinhibition of Na+, K+-ATPase activity. In this way, different pathological scenarios where renal sodium excretion is dysregulated, as in nephrotic syndrome or hypertension, are associated with impaired action of renal dopamine and/or atrial natriuretic peptide, or as a result of impaired interaction between these two natriuretic systems. The aim of this review is to update and comment on the most recent evidences demonstrating how the renal dopaminergic system interacts with atrial natriuretic peptide to control renal physiology and blood pressure through different regulatory pathways.

  20. Developmental Deltamethrin Exposure Causes Persistent Changes in Dopaminergic Gene Expression, Neurochemistry, and Locomotor Activity in Zebrafish.

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    Kung, Tiffany S; Richardson, Jason R; Cooper, Keith R; White, Lori A

    2015-08-01

    Pyrethroids are commonly used insecticides that are considered to pose little risk to human health. However, there is an increasing concern that children are more susceptible to the adverse effects of pesticides. We used the zebrafish model to test the hypothesis that developmental exposure to low doses of the pyrethroid deltamethrin results in persistent alterations in dopaminergic gene expression, neurochemistry, and locomotor activity. Zebrafish embryos were treated with deltamethrin (0.25-0.50 μg/l), at concentrations below the LOAEL, during the embryonic period [3-72 h postfertilization (hpf)], after which transferred to fresh water until the larval stage (2-weeks postfertilization). Deltamethrin exposure resulted in decreased transcript levels of the D1 dopamine (DA) receptor (drd1) and increased levels of tyrosine hydroxylase at 72 hpf. The reduction in drd1 transcripts persisted to the larval stage and was associated with decreased D2 dopamine receptor transcripts. Larval fish, exposed developmentally to deltamethrin, had increased levels of homovanillic acid, a DA metabolite. Since the DA system is involved in locomotor activity, we measured the swim activity of larval fish following a transition to darkness. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin significantly increased larval swim activity which was attenuated by concomitant knockdown of the DA transporter. Acute exposure to methylphenidate, a DA transporter inhibitor, increased swim activity in control larva, while reducing swim activity in larva developmentally exposed to deltamethrin. Developmental exposure to deltamethrin causes locomotor deficits in larval zebrafish, which is likely mediated by dopaminergic dysfunction. This highlights the need to understand the persistent effects of low-dose neurotoxicant exposure during development.

  1. Metformin, besides exhibiting strong in vivo anti-inflammatory properties, increases mptp-induced damage to the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system.

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    Ismaiel, Afrah A K; Espinosa-Oliva, Ana M; Santiago, Martiniano; García-Quintanilla, Albert; Oliva-Martín, María J; Herrera, Antonio J; Venero, José L; de Pablos, Rocío M

    2016-05-01

    Metformin is a widely used oral antidiabetic drug with known anti-inflammatory properties due to its action on AMPK protein. This drug has shown a protective effect on various tissues, including cortical neurons. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of metformin on the dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra of mice using the animal model of Parkinson's disease based on the injection of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial complex I. In vivo and in vitro experiments were used to study the activation of microglia and the damage of the dopaminergic neurons. Our results show that metformin reduced microglial activation measured both at cellular and molecular levels. Rather than protecting, metformin exacerbated dopaminergic damage in response to MPTP. Our data suggest that, contrary to other brain structures, metformin treatment could be deleterious for the dopaminergic system. Hence, metformin treatment may be considered as a risk factor for the development of Parkinson's disease.

  2. A new digitized method of the compulsive gnawing test revealed dopaminergic activity of salvinorin A in vivo.

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    Phipps, Stephen M; Butterweck, Veronika

    2010-09-01

    The compulsive gnawing (CG) test has been used for numerous years as an assay to determine the dopaminergic activity of various compounds. We developed a new method of quantification via a digitization step which allowed a more precise measurement of the gnawing activity. It was the aim of the present study to explore possible dopaminergic effects of salvinorin A (SA), the major active compound of Salvia divinorum, using the new digitized CG test. A group of experiments using male C57BL/6 mice were performed to validate the new method of quantification showing only significant increases of gnawing when the dopamine reuptake inhibitors buproprion (20 mg/kg, p.0.) and nomifensine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) were given concomitantly with apomorphine (10 mg/kg, i.p.). Different concentrations of the SA (1.0, 2.5, 5, and 10 mg/kg, i.p.) were tested with positive dopaminergic activity when administered with apomorphine which differed from the semisynthetic counterpart U-69593. Furthermore, the activity observed with SA was unsuccessfully antagonized by the κ-opioid receptor antagonist norbinaltorphimine (NorBNI; 10 and 20 mg/kg, i.p.), while the dopamine antagonist haloperidol did successfully block (0.06 mg/kg, i.p.) the gnawing activity seen with SA. Our data further strengthen the argument that salvinorin A is not a selective κ-opioid receptor agonist and is the first in vivo study that veers from salvinorin A acting solely like its synthetic counterparts. Furthermore, the digitized CG test system used in this study provides a new computational method to accurately detect behavior associated with dopaminergic neurotransmission.

  3. The Dopaminergic Reward System and Leisure Time Exercise Behavior: A Candidate Allele Study

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    Charlotte Huppertz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Twin studies provide evidence that genetic influences contribute strongly to individual differences in exercise behavior. We hypothesize that part of this heritability is explained by genetic variation in the dopaminergic reward system. Eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in DRD1: rs265981, DRD2: rs6275, rs1800497, DRD3: rs6280, DRD4: rs1800955, DBH: rs1611115, rs2519152, and in COMT: rs4680 and three variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs in DRD4, upstream of DRD5, and in DAT1 were investigated for an association with regular leisure time exercise behavior. Materials and Methods. Data on exercise activities and at least one SNP/VNTR were available for 8,768 individuals aged 7 to 50 years old that were part of the Netherlands Twin Register. Exercise behavior was quantified as weekly metabolic equivalents of task (MET spent on exercise activities. Mixed models were fitted in SPSS with genetic relatedness as a random effect. Results. None of the genetic variants were associated with exercise behavior (P>.02, despite sufficient power to detect small effects. Discussion and Conclusions. We did not confirm that allelic variants involved in dopaminergic function play a role in creating individual differences in exercise behavior. A plea is made for large genome-wide association studies to unravel the genetic pathways that affect this health-enhancing behavior.

  4. ROLE OF CHOLINERGIC SYSTEM ON THE CONSTRUCTION OF MEMORY AND ITS INTERACTION WITH DOPAMINERGIC SYSTEM

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    F. Z. Zangeneh

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The central cholinergic system has been associated with cognitive function and memory and acetylcholine plays an important role during the early stages of memory consolidation. In this study, after training mice were tested with one way active avoidance procedure and retention were tested at 4, 8, 12, 16 and 24 hours of training and compared with non-shocked mice, in which it took 24 hours, a suitable time for retention test. Low dose administration of arecoline and physostigmine pre-training, immediate post-training and before retrieval showed that muscarinic agonist arecoline can potentiated memory in post trained and retrieval phases and reversible cholinesterase inhibitor physostigmine potentiated memory only in retrieval phase. Scopolamine disrupted acetylcholine potentiation only in retrieval phase. In the second part of this study, the effect of dopaminergic system was investigated. Low dose of apomorphine and D2 agonist bromocriptine potentiated memory when administered immediately post-training, and D2 antagonist sulpiride impaired memory. When the cholinergic system was blocked by scopolamine immediately post-training, apomorphine and bromocriptine potentiated memory and sulpiride impaired it. In conclusion, these results suggest that, cholinergic system in retrieval phase is very critical and there was no interaction between the two systems in the post-training phase.

  5. Rotenone induces degeneration of photoreceptors and impairs the dopaminergic system in the rat retina.

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    Esteve-Rudd, Julián; Fernández-Sánchez, Laura; Lax, Pedro; De Juan, Emilio; Martín-Nieto, José; Cuenca, Nicolás

    2011-10-01

    Rotenone is a widely used pesticide and a potent inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I (NADH-quinone reductase) that elicits the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and thereby the appearance of a parkinsonian syndrome. Here we have addressed the alterations induced by rotenone at the functional, morphological and molecular levels in the retina, including those involving both dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic retinal neurons. Rotenone-treated rats showed abnormalities in equilibrium, postural instability and involuntary movements. In their outer retina we observed a loss of photoreceptors, and a reduced synaptic connectivity between those remaining and their postsynaptic neurons. A dramatic loss of mitochondria was observed in the inner segments, as well as in the axon terminals of photoreceptors. In the inner retina we observed a decrease in the expression of dopaminergic cell molecular markers, including loss of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity, associated with a reduction of the dopaminergic plexus and cell bodies. An increase in immunoreactivity of AII amacrine cells for parvalbumin, a Ca(2+)-scavenging protein, was also detected. These abnormalities were accompanied by a decrease in the amplitude of scotopic and photopic a- and b-waves and an increase in the b-wave implicit time, as well as by a lower amplitude and greater latency in oscillatory potentials. These results indicate that rotenone induces loss of vision by promoting photoreceptor cell death and impairment of the dopaminergic retinal system.

  6. Antinociceptive Activity of Trichilia catigua Hydroalcoholic Extract: New Evidence on Its Dopaminergic Effects

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    Alice F. Viana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichilia catigua is a native plant of Brazil; its barks are used by some local pharmaceutical companies to prepare tonic drinks, such as Catuama. The present study was addressed to evaluate the effects of T. catigua hydroalcoholic extract in mouse nociception behavioral models, and to evaluate the possible mechanisms involved in its actions. Male Swiss mice were submitted to hot-plate, writhing and von Frey tests, after oral treatment with T. catigua extract (200 mg kg−1, p.o.. The extract displayed antinociceptive effect in all three models. For characterization of the mechanisms involved in the antinociceptive action of the extract, the following pharmacological treatments were done: naloxone (2.5 mg kg−1, s.c., SR141716A (10 mg kg−1, i.p., SCH23390 (15 μg kg−1, i.p., sulpiride (50 mg kg−1, i.p., prazosin (1 mg kg−1, i.p., bicuculline (1 mg kg−1, i.p. or dl-p-chlorophenylalanine methyl ester (PCPA, 100 mg kg−1, i.p.. In these experiments, the action of T. catigua extract was evaluated in the hot-plate test. The treatment with SCH23390 completely prevented the antinociceptive effect, while naloxone partially prevented it. The possible involvement of the dopaminergic system in the actions of T. catigua extract was substantiated by data showing the potentiation of apomorphine-induced hypothermia and by the prevention of haloperidol-induced catalepsy. In conclusion, the antinociceptive effects of T. catigua extract seem to be mainly associated with the activation of dopaminergic system and, to a lesser extent, through interaction with opioid pathway.

  7. Age-related changes in midbrain dopaminergic regulation of the human reward system

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    Dreher, Jean-Claude; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Kohn, Philip; Berman, Karen Faith

    2008-01-01

    The dopamine system, which plays a crucial role in reward processing, is particularly vulnerable to aging. Significant losses over a normal lifespan have been reported for dopamine receptors and transporters, but very little is known about the neurofunctional consequences of this age-related dopaminergic decline. In animals, a substantial body of data indicates that dopamine activity in the midbrain is tightly associated with reward processing. In humans, although indirect evidence from pharmacological and clinical studies also supports such an association, there has been no direct demonstration of a link between midbrain dopamine and reward-related neural response. Moreover, there are no in vivo data for alterations in this relationship in older humans. Here, by using 6-[18F]FluoroDOPA (FDOPA) positron emission tomography (PET) and event-related 3T functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in the same subjects, we directly demonstrate a link between midbrain dopamine synthesis and reward-related prefrontal activity in humans, show that healthy aging induces functional alterations in the reward system, and identify an age-related change in the direction of the relationship (from a positive to a negative correlation) between midbrain dopamine synthesis and prefrontal activity. These results indicate an age-dependent dopaminergic tuning mechanism for cortical reward processing and provide system-level information about alteration of a key neural circuit in healthy aging. Taken together, our findings provide an important characterization of the interactions between midbrain dopamine function and the reward system in healthy young humans and older subjects, and identify the changes in this regulatory circuit that accompany aging. PMID:18794529

  8. Fast oscillatory activity in the anterior cingulate cortex: dopaminergic modulation and efect of perineuronal net loss

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    Pascal eSteullet

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine release in the prefrontal cortex plays a critical role in cognitive function such as working memory, attention and planning. Dopamine exerts complex modulation on excitability of pyramidal neurons and interneurons, and regulates excitatory and inhibitory synaptic transmission. Because of the complexity of this modulation, it is difficult to fully comprehend the effect of dopamine on neuronal network activity. In this study, we investigated the effect of dopamine on local high-frequency oscillatory neuronal activity (in  band in slices of the mouse anterior cingulate cortex (ACC. We found that dopamine enhanced the power of these oscillations induced by kainate and carbachol, but did not affect their peak frequency. Activation of D2R and in a lesser degree D1R increased the oscillation power, while activation of D4R had no effect. These high-frequency oscillations in the ACC relied on both phasic inhibitory and excitatory transmission and functional gap junctions. Thus, dopamine released in the ACC promotes high-frequency synchronized local cortical activity which is known to favor information transfer, fast selection and binding of distributed neuronal responses. Finally, the power of these oscillations was significantly enhanced after degradation of the perineuronal nets enwrapping most parvalbumin interneurons. This study provides new insights for a better understanding of the abnormal prefrontal gamma activity in schizophrenia patients who display prefrontal anomalies of both the dopaminergic system and the perineuronal nets.

  9. Endogenous 17ß-estradiol is required for activity-dependent long-term potentiation in the striatum: interaction with the dopaminergic system

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    Alessandro eTozzi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available 17β-estradiol (E2, a neurosteroid synthesized by P450-aromatase (ARO, modulates various brain functions. We characterized the role of the locally synthesized E2 on striatal long-term synaptic plasticity and explored possible interactions between E2 receptors (ERs and dopamine (DA receptors in the dorsal striatum of adult male rats. Inhibition of E2 synthesis or antagonism of ERs prevented the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP in both medium spiny neurons (MSNs and cholinergic interneurons (ChIs. Activation of a D1-like DA receptor/cAMP/PKA-dependent pathway restored LTP. In MSNs exogenous E2 reversed the effect of ARO inhibition. Also antagonism of M1 muscarinic receptors prevented the D1-like receptor-mediated restoration of LTP confirming a role for ChIs in controlling the E2-mediated LTP of MSNs. A novel striatal interaction, occurring between ERs and D1-like receptors in both MSNs and ChIs, might be critical to regulate basal ganglia physiology and to compensate synaptic alterations in Parkinson's disease.

  10. Hyperactivity of the Dopaminergic System in NTS1 and NTS2 Null Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Yanqi; Boules, Mona; Li, Zhimin; Williams, Katrina; Miura, Tomofumi; Oliveros, Alfredo; Richelson, Elliott

    2010-01-01

    Neurotensin (NT) is a tridecapeptide that acts as a neuromodulator in the central nervous system mainly through two NT receptors, NTS1 and NTS2. The functional-anatomical interactions between NT, the mesotelencephalic dopamine system, and structures targeted by dopaminergic projections have been studied. The present study was conducted to determine the effects of NT receptor subtypes on dopaminergic function with the use of mice lacking either NTS1 (NTS1−/−) or NTS2 (NTS2−/−). Basal and amphe...

  11. Role of brain dopaminergic system in the adrenomedullin-induced diuresis and natriuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Emilia; Silva, María; Israel, Anita

    2003-11-01

    Intracerebroventricular (IVT) administration of adrenomedullin (AM) to conscious male hydrated rats increases urinary volume and sodium excretion. The possible involvement of brain dopamine (DA) system on the renal action of IVT-AM was investigated. AM-induced diuretic and natriuretic action was prevented following selective central dopaminergic denervation with 6-hydroxydopamine (6OHDA) in combination with desmethylimipramine (DMI). Selective D(2) DA receptor antagonism with haloperidol, sulpiride, and remoxipride; or with the D(1) DA receptor antagonist, SCH 23390, blunted the increase in urinary volume and sodium excretion induced by IVT-AM. The present results suggest that AM acts centrally, at least in part, via an interaction with endogenous DA through the activation of both DA D(1)/D(2) receptor subtype.

  12. A combinatorial regulatory signature controls terminal differentiation of the dopaminergic nervous system in C. elegans.

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    Doitsidou, Maria; Flames, Nuria; Topalidou, Irini; Abe, Namiko; Felton, Terry; Remesal, Laura; Popovitchenko, Tatiana; Mann, Richard; Chalfie, Martin; Hobert, Oliver

    2013-06-15

    Terminal differentiation programs in the nervous system are encoded by cis-regulatory elements that control the expression of terminal features of individual neuron types. We decoded the regulatory information that controls the expression of five enzymes and transporters that define the terminal identity of all eight dopaminergic neurons in the nervous system of the Caenorhabditis elegans hermaphrodite. We show that the tightly coordinated, robust expression of these dopaminergic enzymes and transporters ("dopamine pathway") is ensured through a combinatorial cis-regulatory signature that is shared by all dopamine pathway genes. This signature is composed of an Ets domain-binding site, recognized by the previously described AST-1 Ets domain factor, and two distinct types of homeodomain-binding sites that act in a partially redundant manner. Through genetic screens, we identified the sole C. elegans Distalless/Dlx ortholog, ceh-43, as a factor that acts through one of the homeodomain sites to control both induction and maintenance of terminal dopaminergic fate. The second type of homeodomain site is a Pbx-type site, which is recognized in a partially redundant and neuron subtype-specific manner by two Pbx factors, ceh-20 and ceh-40, revealing novel roles of Pbx factors in the context of terminal neuron differentiation. Taken together, we revealed a specific regulatory signature and cognate, terminal selector-type transcription factors that define the entire dopaminergic nervous system of an animal. Dopaminergic neurons in the mouse olfactory bulb express a similar combinatorial transcription factor collective of Ets/Dlx/Pbx factors, suggesting deep phylogenetic conservation of dopaminergic regulatory programs.

  13. Cocaine increases dopaminergic neuron and motor activity via midbrain α1 adrenergic signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertz, Richard Brandon; Wanat, Matthew J; Gomez, Jorge A; Brown, Zeliene J; Phillips, Paul E M; Paladini, Carlos A

    2015-03-13

    Cocaine reinforcement is mediated by increased extracellular dopamine levels in the forebrain. This neurochemical effect was thought to require inhibition of dopamine reuptake, but cocaine is still reinforcing even in the absence of the dopamine transporter. Here, we demonstrate that the rapid elevation in dopamine levels and motor activity elicited by cocaine involves α1 receptor activation within the ventral midbrain. Activation of α1 receptors increases dopaminergic neuron burst firing by decreasing the calcium-activated potassium channel current (SK), as well as elevates dopaminergic neuron pacemaker firing through modulation of both SK and the hyperpolarization-activated cation currents (Ih). Furthermore, we found that cocaine increases both the pacemaker and burst-firing frequency of rat ventral-midbrain dopaminergic neurons through an α1 adrenergic receptor-dependent mechanism within the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra pars compacta. These results demonstrate the mechanism underlying the critical role of α1 adrenergic receptors in the regulation of dopamine neurotransmission and behavior by cocaine.

  14. The Effect of Dopaminergic Activity on Aldosterone Secretion in Edematous State

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    Han, Bong Heon; Ro, Heung Kyu [Chungnam National University College of Medicine, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    1985-09-15

    To evaluate the effect of dopaminergic activity on aldosterone secretion, the plasma renin activity, serum cortisol and aldosterone were measured by radioimmunoassay in 6 normal controls and 12 patients who had hyponatremia and generalized edema or ascites with possible condition with secondary aldosteronism before and after(15, 30, and 60 min) 15 mg of metaclopramide by iv bolus injection and same method with 500 mg of L-dopa by per oral in 6 normal controls and 12 patients with edema ascites. The result were as follows; l) The basal level of PRA was higher in patients rather than normal controls but PRA was not influenced by MC or L-dopa administration on both normal controls and patients group. 2) The serum cortisol level was significantly elevated at 30 min after MC injection compared with basal level in normal controls but no significant change was not patients group. After L-dopa administration the serum cortisol level was noted in changed in both normal controls and patients group, 3) The serum aldosterone level was significantly elevated in 15, 30 and 60 min after MC injection in normal controls, and there also same tendency of aldosterone secretion was noticed in patients group. On the other hands, there was no changes in aldosterone level in both normal controls and patients group with L-dopa administration. Above result means that MC stimulate aldosterone secretion by dopaminergic antagonist and aldosterone secretion in normal subject is controlled by maximal tonic dopaminergic inhibition. In edematous patients, however, both of the dopaminergic inhibitory and stimulating effect of PRA, ACTH etc on the aldosterone secretion seems to be variable.

  15. Activity enhances dopaminergic long-duration response in Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auinger, Peggy; Fahn, Stanley; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira; Kieburtz, Karl; Rudolph, Alice; Marek, Kenneth; Seibyl, John; Lang, Anthony; Olanow, C. Warren; Tanner, Caroline; Schifitto, Giovanni; Zhao, Hongwei; Reyes, Lydia; Shinaman, Aileen; Comella, Cynthia L.; Goetz, Christopher; Blasucci, Lucia M.; Samanta, Johan; Stacy, Mark; Williamson, Kelli; Harrigan, Mary; Greene, Paul; Ford, Blair; Moskowitz, Carol; Truong, Daniel D.; Pathak, Mayank; Jankovic, Joseph; Ondo, William; Atassi, Farah; Hunter, Christine; Jacques, Carol; Friedman, Joseph H.; Lannon, Margaret; Russell, David S.; Jennings, Danna; Fussell, Barbara; Standaert, David; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Growdon, John H.; Tennis, Marsha; Gauthier, Serge; Panisset, Michel; Hall, Jean; Gancher, Stephen; Hammerstad, John P.; Stone, Claudia; Alexander-Brown, Barbara; Factor, Stewart A.; Molho, Eric; Brown, Diane; Evans, Sharon; Clark, Jeffrey; Manyam, Bala; Simpson, Patricia; Wulbrecht, Brian; Whetteckey, Jacqueline; Martin, Wayne; Roberts, Ted; King, Pamela; Hauser, Robert; Zesiewicz, Theresa; Gauger, Lisa; Trugman, Joel; Wooten, G. Frederick; Rost-Ruffner, Elke; Perlmutter, Joel; Racette, Brad A.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Ranawaya, Ranjit; Wood, Susan; Pantella, Carol; Kurlan, Roger; Richard, Irene; Pearson, Nancy; Caviness, John N.; Adler, Charles; Lind, Marlene; Simuni, Tanya; Siderowf, Andrew; Colcher, Amy; Lloyd, Mary; Weiner, William; Shulman, Lisa; Koller, William; Lyons, Kelly; Feldman, Robert G.; Saint-Hilaire, Marie H.; Ellias, Samuel; Thomas, Cathi-Ann; Juncos, Jorge; Watts, Ray; Partlow, Anna; Tetrud, James; Togasaki, Daniel M.; Stewart, Tracy; Mark, Margery H.; Sage, Jacob I.; Caputo, Debbie; Gould, Harry; Rao, Jayaraman; McKendrick, Ann; Brin, Mitchell; Danisi, Fabio; Benabou, Reina; Hubble, Jean; Paulson, George W.; Reider, Carson; Birnbaum, Alex; Miyasaki, Janis; Johnston, Lisa; So, Julie; Pahwa, Rajesh; Dubinsky, Richard M.; Wszolek, Zbigniew; Uitti, Ryan; Turk, Margaret; Tuite, Paul; Rottenberg, David; Hansen, Joy; Ramos, Serrano; Waters, Cheryl; Lew, Mark; Welsh, Mickie; Kawai, Connie; O'Brien, Christopher; Kumar, Rajeev; Seeberger, Lauren; Judd, Deborah; Barclay, C. Lynn; Grimes, David A.; Sutherland, Laura; Dawson, Ted; Reich, Stephen; Dunlop, Rebecca; Albin, Roger; Frey, Kirk; Wernette, Kristine; Fahn, Stanley; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira; Kieburtz, Karl; Rudolph, Alice; Marek, Kenneth; Seibyl, John; Lang, Anthony; Olanow, C. Warren; Tanner, Caroline; Schifitto, Giovanni; Zhao, Hongwei; Reyes, Lydia; Shinaman, Aileen; Comella, Cynthia L.; Goetz, Christopher; Blasucci, Lucia M.; Samanta, Johan; Stacy, Mark; Williamson, Kelli; Harrigan, Mary; Greene, Paul; Ford, Blair; Moskowitz, Carol; Truong, Daniel D.; Pathak, Mayank; Jankovic, Joseph; Ondo, William; Atassi, Farah; Hunter, Christine; Jacques, Carol; Friedman, Joseph H.; Lannon, Margaret; Russell, David S.; Jennings, Danna; Fussell, Barbara; Standaert, David; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Growdon, John H.; Tennis, Marsha; Gauthier, Serge; Panisset, Michel; Hall, Jean; Gancher, Stephen; Hammerstad, John P.; Stone, Claudia; Alexander-Brown, Barbara; Factor, Stewart A.; Molho, Eric; Brown, Diane; Evans, Sharon; Clark, Jeffrey; Manyam, Bala; Simpson, Patricia; Wulbrecht, Brian; Whetteckey, Jacqueline; Martin, Wayne; Roberts, Ted; King, Pamela; Hauser, Robert; Zesiewicz, Theresa; Gauger, Lisa; Trugman, Joel; Wooten, G. Frederick; Rost-Ruffner, Elke; Perlmutter, Joel; Racette, Brad A.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Ranawaya, Ranjit; Wood, Susan; Pantella, Carol; Kurlan, Roger; Richard, Irene; Pearson, Nancy; Caviness, John N.; Adler, Charles; Lind, Marlene; Simuni, Tanya; Siderowf, Andrew; Colcher, Amy; Lloyd, Mary; Weiner, William; Shulman, Lisa; Koller, William; Lyons, Kelly; Feldman, Robert G.; Saint-Hilaire, Marie H.; Ellias, Samuel; Thomas, Cathi-Ann; Juncos, Jorge; Watts, Ray; Partlow, Anna; Tetrud, James; Togasaki, Daniel M.; Stewart, Tracy; Mark, Margery H.; Sage, Jacob I.; Caputo, Debbie; Gould, Harry; Rao, Jayaraman; McKendrick, Ann; Brin, Mitchell; Danisi, Fabio; Benabou, Reina; Hubble, Jean; Paulson, George W.; Reider, Carson; Birnbaum, Alex; Miyasaki, Janis; Johnston, Lisa; So, Julie; Pahwa, Rajesh; Dubinsky, Richard M.; Wszolek, Zbigniew; Uitti, Ryan; Turk, Margaret; Tuite, Paul; Rottenberg, David; Hansen, Joy; Ramos, Serrano; Waters, Cheryl; Lew, Mark; Welsh, Mickie; Kawai, Connie; O'Brien, Christopher; Kumar, Rajeev; Seeberger, Lauren; Judd, Deborah; Barclay, C. Lynn; Grimes, David A.; Sutherland, Laura; Dawson, Ted; Reich, Stephen; Dunlop, Rebecca; Albin, Roger; Frey, Kirk; Wernette, Kristine; Mendis, Tilak

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We tested the hypothesis that dopamine-dependent motor learning mechanism underlies the long-duration response to levodopa in Parkinson disease (PD) based on our studies in a mouse model. By data-mining the motor task performance in dominant and nondominant hands of the subjects in a double-blind randomized trial of levodopa therapy, the effects of activity and dopamine therapy were examined. Methods: We data-mined the Earlier versus Later Levodopa Therapy in Parkinson's Disease (ELLDOPA) study published in 2005 and performed statistical analysis comparing the effects of levodopa and dominance of handedness over 42 weeks. Results: The mean change in finger-tapping counts from baseline before the initiation of therapy to predose at 9 weeks and 40 weeks increased more in the dominant compared to nondominant hand in levodopa-treated subjects in a dose-dependent fashion. There was no significant difference in dominant vs nondominant hands in the placebo group. The short-duration response assessed by the difference of postdose performance compared to predose performance at the same visit did not show any significant difference between dominant vs nondominant hands. Conclusions: Active use of the dominant hand and dopamine replacement therapy produces synergistic effect on long-lasting motor task performance during “off” medication state. Such effect was confined to dopamine-responsive symptoms and not seen in dopamine-resistant symptoms such as gait and balance. We propose that long-lasting motor learning facilitated by activity and dopamine is a form of disease modification that is often seen in trials of medications that have symptomatic effects. PMID:22459675

  16. Antidepressant-like effect of creatine in mice involves dopaminergic activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Mauricio P; Machado, Daniele G; Capra, Juliano C; Jacinto, Jardel; Bettio, Luis Eb; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S

    2012-11-01

    Creatine has been shown to play a significant role in health and disease. However, studies concerning its effect on mood are scarce. This study investigated the effect of creatine (p.o.) in the tail suspension test, a predictive test of antidepressant activity. Creatine reduced the immobility time in the tail suspension test (0.1-1000 mg/kg, male and female mice), without affecting locomotor activity. Furthermore, the involvement of the dopaminergic system in creatine-induced antidepressant-like effect in male mice in the tail suspension test was investigated. The anti-immobility effect of creatine (1 mg/kg) was prevented by the pre-treatment of mice with haloperidol (0.2 mg/kg, intraperitoneal (i.p.) route, non-selective dopamine receptor antagonist), (R)-(+)-7-chloro-8-hydroxy-3-methyl-1-phenyl-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine hydrochloride (SCH23390; 0.05 mg/kg, subcutaneous (s.c.) route, dopamine D₁ receptor antagonist) and sulpiride (50 mg/kg, i.p., dopamine D₂ receptor antagonist). Creatine (0.01 mg/kg, sub-effective dose) in combination with sub-effective doses of (1-phenyl-7,8-dihydroxy-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1H-3-benzazepine) hydrochloride (SKF38393; 0.1 mg/kg, s.c., dopamine D₁ receptor agonist), apomorphine (0.5 µg/kg, i.p., preferential dopamine D₂ receptor agonist) or bupropion (1 mg/kg, p.o., dopamine reuptake inhibitor with subtle activity on noradrenergic reuptake) reduced the immobility time in the tail suspension test as compared with either drug alone. These results indicate that the antidepressant-like effect of creatine is likely mediated by an activation of dopamine D₁ and D₂ receptors.

  17. Structure-activity relationship of sulfated hetero/galactofucan polysaccharides on dopaminergic neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Liu, Huaide; Jin, Weihua; Zhang, Hong; Zhang, Quanbin

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is associated with progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and more-widespread neuronal changes that cause complex symptoms. The aim of this study was to investigate the structure-activity relationship of sulfated hetero-polysaccharides (DF1) and sulfated galactofucan polysaccharides (DF2) on dopaminergic neuron in vivo and in vitro. Treatment with samples significantly ameliorated the depletion of both DA and TH-, Bcl-2- and Bax-positive neurons in MPTP-induced PD mice, DF1 showed the highest activity. The in vitro results found that DF1 and DF2 could reverse the decreased mitochondrial activity and the increased LDL release induced by MPP(+) (Pneuronal injury caused by MPP(+). Furthermore, the administration of samples effectively decreased lipid peroxidation and increased the level/activities of GSH, GSH-PX, MDA and CAT in MPTP mice. Thus, the neuron protective effect may be mediated, in part, through antioxidant activity and the prevention of cell apoptosis. The chemical composition of DF1, DF2 and DF differed markedly, the DF1 fraction had the most complex chemical composition and showed the highest neuron protective activity. These results suggest that diverse monosaccharides and uronic acid might contribute to neuron protective activity.

  18. Behavioral Functions of the Mesolimbic Dopaminergic System: an Affective Neuroethological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaro, Antonio; Huber, Robert; Panksepp, Jaak

    2008-01-01

    The mesolimbic dopaminergic (ML-DA) system has been recognized for its central role in motivated behaviors, various types of reward, and, more recently, in cognitive processes. Functional theories have emphasized DA's involvement in the orchestration of goal-directed behaviors, and in the promotion and reinforcement of learning. The affective neuroethological perspective presented here, views the ML-DA system in terms of its ability to activate an instinctual emotional appetitive state (SEEKING) evolved to induce organisms to search for all varieties of life-supporting stimuli and to avoid harms. A description of the anatomical framework in which the ML system is embedded is followed by the argument that the SEEKING disposition emerges through functional integration of ventral basal ganglia (BG) into thalamocortical activities. Filtering cortical and limbic input that spread into BG, DA transmission promotes the “release” of neural activity patterns that induce active SEEKING behaviors when expressed at the motor level. Reverberation of these patterns constitutes a neurodynamic process for the inclusion of cognitive and perceptual representations within the extended networks of the SEEKING urge. In this way, the SEEKING disposition influences attention, incentive salience, associative learning, and anticipatory predictions. In our view, the rewarding properties of drugs of abuse are, in part, caused by the activation of the SEEKING disposition, ranging from appetitive drive to persistent craving depending on the intensity of the affect. The implications of such a view for understanding addiction are considered, with particular emphasis on factors predisposing individuals to develop compulsive drug seeking behaviors. PMID:17905440

  19. Initiation of dopaminergic differentiation of Nurr1(-) mesencephalic precursor cells depends on activation of multiple mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabolek, Michael; Baumann, Bernd; Heinrich, Maria; Meyer, Anne K; Herborg, Anna; Liebau, Stefan; Maisel, Martina; Hermann, Andreas; Ventz, Katharina; Schwarz, Johannes; Wirth, Thomas; Storch, Alexander

    2009-08-01

    Interleukin-1 (IL-1) plays a pivotal role in terminal dopaminergic differentiation of midbrain-derived neural precursor cells already committed to the mesencephalic dopaminergic phenotype (named mdNPCs for mesencephalic dopaminergic neural precursor cells). Here we characterized the molecular events in long-term expanded rat nuclear receptor related-1(-) (Nurr1(-)) mdNPCs in response to IL-1beta during their terminal dopaminergic specification. We showed that IL-1beta induced a rapid induction of mRNA of dopaminergic key fate-determining transcription factors, such as Nurr1 and Pitx3, and a subsequent increase of tyrosine hydroxylase protein as an early marker for dopaminergic neurons in vitro. These effects of IL-1beta were specific for mdNPCs and were not observed in striatal neural precursor cells (NPCs). Surprisingly, IL-1beta did not activate the NF-kappaB pathway or the transcription factor activating protein 1 (AP-1), but inhibition of nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB by SN50 facilitated IL-1beta-induced Nurr1 expression and dopaminergic differentiation of mdNPCs. Incubation of mdNPCs with IL-1beta led to a rapid phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases within 1 to 3 hours, whereas Jun kinase was not phosphorylated in response to IL-1beta. Consistently, inhibition of the ERK1/2 pathway or p38 MAP kinase blocked Nurr1 upregulation and further dopaminergic specification of mdNPCs, but not differentiation into MAP2ab(+) neurons. IL-1 receptor antagonist did not block early dopaminergic differentiation events, suggesting that the effects of IL-1beta are not mediated through activation of IL-1 receptor type I. Our results indicate that induction of terminal dopaminergic specification of Nurr1(-) mdNPCs by IL-1beta depends on activation of the ERK1/2 and p38 MAP kinase pathway.

  20. Influence of the dopaminergic system, CREB, and transcription factor-B on cocaine neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.S. Planeta

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Cocaine is a widely used drug and its abuse is associated with physical, psychiatric and social problems. Abnormalities in newborns have been demonstrated to be due to the toxic effects of cocaine during fetal development. The mechanism by which cocaine causes neurological damage is complex and involves interactions of the drug with several neurotransmitter systems, such as the increase of extracellular levels of dopamine and free radicals, and modulation of transcription factors. The aim of this review was to evaluate the importance of the dopaminergic system and the participation of inflammatory signaling in cocaine neurotoxicity. Our study showed that cocaine activates the transcription factors NF-κB and CREB, which regulate genes involved in cellular death. GBR 12909 (an inhibitor of dopamine reuptake, lidocaine (a local anesthetic, and dopamine did not activate NF-κB in the same way as cocaine. However, the attenuation of NF-κB activity after the pretreatment of the cells with SCH 23390, a D1 receptor antagonist, suggests that the activation of NF-κB by cocaine is, at least partially, due to activation of D1 receptors. NF-κB seems to have a protective role in these cells because its inhibition increased cellular death caused by cocaine. The increase in BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA can also be related to the protective role of both CREB and NF-κB transcription factors. An understanding of the mechanisms by which cocaine induces cell death in the brain will contribute to the development of new therapies for drug abusers, which can help to slow down the progress of degenerative processes.

  1. Influence of the dopaminergic system, CREB, and transcription factor-κB on cocaine neurotoxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Planeta, C.S. [Laboratório de Neuropsicofarmacologia, Faculdade de Ciências Farmacêuticas, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Lepsch, L.B.; Alves, R.; Scavone, C. [Departamento de Farmacologia, Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-10-15

    Cocaine is a widely used drug and its abuse is associated with physical, psychiatric and social problems. Abnormalities in newborns have been demonstrated to be due to the toxic effects of cocaine during fetal development. The mechanism by which cocaine causes neurological damage is complex and involves interactions of the drug with several neurotransmitter systems, such as the increase of extracellular levels of dopamine and free radicals, and modulation of transcription factors. The aim of this review was to evaluate the importance of the dopaminergic system and the participation of inflammatory signaling in cocaine neurotoxicity. Our study showed that cocaine activates the transcription factors NF-κB and CREB, which regulate genes involved in cellular death. GBR 12909 (an inhibitor of dopamine reuptake), lidocaine (a local anesthetic), and dopamine did not activate NF-κB in the same way as cocaine. However, the attenuation of NF-κB activity after the pretreatment of the cells with SCH 23390, a D1 receptor antagonist, suggests that the activation of NF-κB by cocaine is, at least partially, due to activation of D1 receptors. NF-κB seems to have a protective role in these cells because its inhibition increased cellular death caused by cocaine. The increase in BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) mRNA can also be related to the protective role of both CREB and NF-κB transcription factors. An understanding of the mechanisms by which cocaine induces cell death in the brain will contribute to the development of new therapies for drug abusers, which can help to slow down the progress of degenerative processes.

  2. Evidence That GABA Mediates Dopaminergic and Serotonergic Pathways Associated with Locomotor Activity in Juvenile Chinook Salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, S.; Schreck, C.B.

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined the control of locomotor activity in juvenile salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) by manipulating 3 neurotransmitter systems-gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (GABA), dopamine, and serotonin-as well as the neuropeptide corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH). Intracerebroventricular (ICV) injections of CRH and the GABAAagonist muscimol stimulated locomotor activity. The effect of muscimol was attenuated by administration of a dopamine receptor antagonist, haloperidol. Conversely, the administration of a dopamine uptake inhibitor (4???,4??? -difluoro-3-alpha-[diphenylmethoxy] tropane hydrochloride [DUI]) potentiated the effect of muscimol. They found no evidence that CRH-induced hyperactivity is mediated by dopaminergic systems following concurrent injections of haloperidol or DUI with CRH. Administration of muscimol either had no effect or attenuated the locomotor response to concurrent injections of CRH and fluoxetine, whereas the GABAA antagonist bicuculline methiodide potentiated the effect of CRH and fluoxetine.

  3. Investigations into potential extrasynaptic communication between the dopaminergic and nitrergic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miso eMitkovski

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide is unconstrained by cell membranes and can therefore act along a broad distance as a volume transmitter. Spillover of nitric oxide between neurons may have a major impact on central nervous system diseases and particularly on neurodegeneration. There is evidence whereby communication between nitrergic and dopaminergic systems plays an essential role in the control of the nigrostriatal pathway. However, there is sparse information for either the coexistence or overlap of nitric oxide and dopaminergic structures. The present study used double-labeling immunofluorescent microscopy to investigate the degree of cellular co-localization between nitric oxide synthase and tyrosine hydroxylase, enzymes responsible for the synthesis of nitric oxide and dopamine, respectively, was examined in neurons of the nigrostriatal pathway regions in the rat brain. After perfusional fixation, the brains were cut and double immunostained. A proximity analysis of tyrosine hydroxylase and nitric oxide synthase structures was made using confocal laser scanning microscopy, in nigrostriatal regions of the rat brain. We used image acquired at the optical limit and generated binary masks at 2µm-wide margin from the respective maximum projections. Co-localization between the two antigens was infrequent (<10% in most areas examined. However, tyrosine hydroxylase labeling was particularly concentrated close to nitric oxide synthase dendrites/axons and the cell bodies. These results further substantiate an extrasynaptic substrate for interaction between nitrergic and dopaminergic systems, thereby modulating sensitivity to neural inputs and its gene expression.

  4. Involvement of the dopaminergic system in the central orexin-induced antinociceptive action against colonic distension in conscious rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Toshikatsu; Nozu, Tsukasa; Kumei, Shima; Takakusaki, Kaoru; Miyagishi, Saori; Ohhira, Masumi

    2015-09-25

    We have recently demonstrated that orexin acts centrally in the brain to induce antinociceptive action against colonic distension through orexin 1 receptors in conscious rats. Although the dopaminergic system can induce antinociceptive action for somatic pain, the association between changes in the dopaminergic system and visceral pain perception has not been investigated. In the present study, we hypothesized that the dopaminergic system may be involved in visceral nociception, and if so, the dopaminergic system may mediate the orexin-induced visceral antinociception. Visceral sensation was evaluated using the colonic distension-induced abdominal withdrawal reflex (AWR) in conscious rats. Intracisternal injection of D1 (SKF38398) or D2 (quinpirole) dopamine receptor agonist increased the threshold volume of colonic distension-induced AWR in a dose-dependent manner. Pretreatment with either the D1 or D2 dopamine receptor antagonist (SCH23390 or sulpiride, respectively) potently blocked the centrally injected orexin-A-induced antinociceptive action against colonic distension. These results suggest for the first time that dopaminergic signaling via D1 and D2 dopamine receptors in the brain may induce visceral antinociception and that the dopaminergic signaling may be involved in the central orexin-induced antinociceptive action against colonic distension.

  5. Influence of a long-term powdered diet on the social interaction test and dopaminergic systems in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niijima-Yaoita, Fukie; Tsuchiya, Masahiro; Saito, Hiroko; Nagasawa, Yuka; Murai, Shigeo; Arai, Yuichiro; Nakagawasai, Osamu; Nemoto, Wataru; Tadano, Takeshi; Tan-No, Koichi

    2013-10-01

    It is well known that the characteristics of mastication are important for the maintenance of our physical well-being. In this study, to assess the importance of the effects of food hardness during mastication, we investigated whether a long-term powdered diet might cause changes in emotional behavior tests, including spontaneous locomotor activity and social interaction (SI) tests, and the dopaminergic system of the frontal cortex and hippocampus in mice. Mice fed a powdered diet for 17 weeks from weaning were compared with mice fed a standard diet (control). The dopamine turnover and expression of dopamine receptors mRNA in the frontal cortex were also evaluated. Spontaneous locomotor activity, SI time and dopamine turnover of the frontal cortex were increased in powdered diet-fed mice. On the other hand, the expression of dopamine-4 (D4) receptors mRNA in the frontal cortex was decreased in powdered diet-fed mice. Moreover, we examined the effect of PD168077, a selective D4 agonist, on the increased SI time in powdered diet-fed mice. Treatment with PD168077 decreased the SI time. These results suggest that the masticatory dysfunction induced by long-term powdered diet feeding may cause the increased SI time and the changes in the dopaminergic system, especially dopamine D4 receptor subtype in the frontal cortex.

  6. Chemicals possessing a neurotrophin-like activity on dopaminergic neurons in primary culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Schmidt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neurotrophic factors have been shown to possess strong neuroprotective and neurorestaurative properties in Parkinson's disease patients. However the issues to control their delivery into the interest areas of the brain and their surgical administration linked to their unability to cross the blood brain barrier are many drawbacks responsible of undesirable side effects limiting their clinical use. A strategy implying the use of neurotrophic small molecules could provide an interesting alternative avoiding neurotrophin administration and side effects. In an attempt to develop drugs mimicking neurotrophic factors, we have designed and synthesized low molecular weight molecules that exhibit neuroprotective and neuritogenic potential for dopaminergic neurons. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A cell-based screening of an in-house quinoline-derived compound collection led to the characterization of compounds exhibiting both activities in the nanomolar range on mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons in spontaneous or 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+-induced neurodegeneration. This study provides evidence that rescued neurons possess a functional dopamine transporter and underlines the involvement of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 signaling pathway in these processes. CONCLUSION: Cell-based screening led to the discovery of a potent neurotrophic compound possessing expected physico-chemical properties for blood brain barrier penetration as a serious candidate for therapeutic use in Parkinson disease.

  7. Anatomical and functional characterisation of a dopaminergic system in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the neonatal Siberian hamster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffield, G E; McNulty, S; Ebling, F J

    1999-05-24

    in Syrian hamster tissue (+138%+/-28%) than in Siberian hamster tissue (+43%+/-11%). Although the anatomical studies demonstrate the existence of a dopaminergic system in the SCN of the early postnatal Siberian hamster, the unresponsiveness of c-fos expression and the relative lack of phosphorylation of CREB after D1-R activation suggests a diminished role for dopamine in the regulation of circadian events during the postnatal period in this species.

  8. Repeated treatment with (-)-sulpiride plus a low dose of SCH 23390 displays wider neuroleptic activity without inducing dopaminergic supersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Olio, R; Gandolfi, O; Roncada, P; Vaccheri, A; Montanaro, N

    1990-01-01

    Combined treatment with (-)-sulpiride plus a low dose of the D1 receptor antagonist SCH 23390, unlike (-)-sulpiride given alone, blocked rat striatal dopaminergic transmission. Five days after the withdrawal of 21-day repeated administration of the combined treatment, no increase in apomorphine-induced stereotyped behaviour was observed. The results suggest that the combination of a D2 blocker and a low dose of a D1 blocker produces a wider spectrum of neuroleptic activity without an overt risk of inducing dopaminergic behavioural supersensitivity.

  9. Neuron-derived IgG protects dopaminergic neurons from insult by 6-OHDA and activates microglia through the FcγR I and TLR4 pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Niu, Na; Wang, Mingyu; McNutt, Michael A; Zhang, Donghong; Zhang, Baogang; Lu, Shijun; Liu, Yuqing; Liu, Zhihui

    2013-08-01

    Oxidative and immune attacks from the environment or microglia have been implicated in the loss of dopaminergic neurons of Parkinson's disease. The role of IgG which is an important immunologic molecule in the process of Parkinson's disease has been unclear. Evidence suggests that IgG can be produced by neurons in addition to its traditionally recognized source B lymphocytes, but its function in neurons is poorly understood. In this study, extensive expression of neuron-derived IgG was demonstrated in dopaminergic neurons of human and rat mesencephalon. With an in vitro Parkinson's disease model, we found that neuron-derived IgG can improve the survival and reduce apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons induced by 6-hydroxydopamine toxicity, and also depress the release of NO from microglia triggered by 6-hydroxydopamine. Expression of TNF-α and IL-10 in microglia was elevated to protective levels by neuron-derived IgG at a physiologic level via the FcγR I and TLR4 pathways and microglial activation could be attenuated by IgG blocking. All these data suggested that neuron-derived IgG may exert a self-protective function by activating microglia properly, and IgG may be involved in maintaining immunity homeostasis in the central nervous system and serve as an active factor under pathological conditions such as Parkinson's disease.

  10. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor up-regulates GTP-cyclohydrolase I activity and tetrahydrobiopterin levels in primary dopaminergic neurones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bauer, M; Suppmann, S; Meyer, M;

    2002-01-01

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) protects dopaminergic neurones against toxic and physical damage. In addition, GDNF promotes differentiation and structural integrity of dopaminergic neurones. Here we show that GDNF can support the function of primary dopaminergic neurones...... by triggering activation of GTP-cyclohydrolase I (GTPCH I), a key enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis. GDNF stimulation of primary dopaminergic neurones expressing both tyrosine 3-monooxygenase and GTPCH I resulted in a dose-dependent doubling of GTPCH I activity, and a concomitant increase...... in tetrahydrobiopterin levels whereas tyrosine 3-monooxygenase activity was not altered. Actinomycin D, asan inhibitor of de novo biosynthesis, abolished any GDNF-mediated up-regulation of GTPCH I activity. However, GTPCH I mRNA levels in primary dopaminergic neurones were not altered by GDNF treatment, suggesting...

  11. Task-load-dependent activation of dopaminergic midbrain areas in the absence of reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehler, Carsten N; Hopf, Jens-Max; Krebs, Ruth M; Stoppel, Christian M; Schoenfeld, Mircea A; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Noesselt, Toemme

    2011-03-30

    Dopamine release in cortical and subcortical structures plays a central role in reward-related neural processes. Within this context, dopaminergic inputs are commonly assumed to play an activating role, facilitating behavioral and cognitive operations necessary to obtain a prospective reward. Here, we provide evidence from human fMRI that this activating role can also be mediated by task-demand-related processes and thus extends beyond situations that only entail extrinsic motivating factors. Using a visual discrimination task in which varying levels of task demands were precued, we found enhanced hemodynamic activity in the substantia nigra (SN) for high task demands in the absence of reward or similar extrinsic motivating factors. This observation thus indicates that the SN can also be activated in an endogenous fashion. In parallel to its role in reward-related processes, reward-independent activation likely serves to recruit the processing resources needed to meet enhanced task demands. Simultaneously, activity in a wide network of cortical and subcortical control regions was enhanced in response to high task demands, whereas areas of the default-mode network were deactivated more strongly. The present observations suggest that the SN represents a core node within a broader neural network that adjusts the amount of available neural and behavioral resources to changing situational opportunities and task requirements, which is often driven by extrinsic factors but can also be controlled endogenously.

  12. Subclinical nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation in the cerebellar subtype of multiple system atrophy (MSA-C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Esteban; Iranzo, Alex; Rauek, Sebastian; Lomeña, Francisco; Gallego, Judith; Ros, Doménec; Santamaría, Joan; Tolosa, Eduardo

    2011-12-01

    Nigrostriatal involvement is considered an additional feature in the new consensus criteria for the diagnosis of the cerebellar variant of multiple system atrophy (MSA-C). However, so far, only a few studies, which include a relative small number of patients, give support to this criterion. Our objective was to assess nigrostriatal dopaminergic innervation in patients with MSA-C without parkinsonism by use of dopamine transporter single photon emission computed tomography (DAT SPECT). Thirteen patients that fulfilled criteria for possible or probable MSA-C and presented no parkinsonian signs, and 12 age-matched healthy controls underwent ((123)I-2-β-carbomethoxy-3β-(4-iodophenyl)-N-(3-fluoropropyl) nortropane ([(123)I]FP-CIT) SPECT. Patients were also evaluated through the Unified Multiple System Atrophy Rating Scale (UMSARS) and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The mean duration of the cerebellar syndrome was 3.8 ± 1.7 years. DAT SPECT showed a significant decrease of striatal [(123)I]FP-CIT uptake ratios in patients (p MSA-C patients without parkinsonism have subclinical nigrostriatal dopaminergic denervation which is not related to disease duration, cerebellar dysfunction, or pontine atrophy.

  13. Transgenic expression and activation of PGC-1α protect dopaminergic neurons in the MPTP mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudò, Giuseppa; Mäkelä, Johanna; Di Liberto, Valentina; Tselykh, Timofey V; Olivieri, Melania; Piepponen, Petteri; Eriksson, Ove; Mälkiä, Annika; Bonomo, Alessandra; Kairisalo, Minna; Aguirre, Jose A; Korhonen, Laura; Belluardo, Natale; Lindholm, Dan

    2012-04-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress occur in Parkinson's disease (PD), but little is known about the molecular mechanisms controlling these events. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) is a transcriptional coactivator that is a master regulator of oxidative stress and mitochondrial metabolism. We show here that transgenic mice overexpressing PGC-1α in dopaminergic neurons are resistant against cell degeneration induced by the neurotoxin MPTP. The increase in neuronal viability was accompanied by elevated levels of mitochondrial antioxidants SOD2 and Trx2 in the substantia nigra of transgenic mice. PGC-1α overexpression also protected against MPTP-induced striatal loss of dopamine, and mitochondria from PGC-1α transgenic mice showed an increased respiratory control ratio compared with wild-type animals. To modulate PGC-1α, we employed the small molecular compound, resveratrol (RSV) that protected dopaminergic neurons against the MPTP-induced cell degeneration almost to the same extent as after PGC-1α overexpression. As studied in vitro, RSV activated PGC-1α in dopaminergic SN4741 cells via the deacetylase SIRT1, and enhanced PGC-1α gene transcription with increases in SOD2 and Trx2. Taken together, the results reveal an important function of PGC-1α in dopaminergic neurons to combat oxidative stress and increase neuronal viability. RSV and other compounds acting via SIRT1/PGC-1α may prove useful as neuroprotective agents in PD and possibly in other neurological disorders.

  14. Activation of mesolimbic dopaminergic neurons following central administration of histamine is mediated by H1 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleckenstein, A E; Lookingland, K J; Moore, K E

    1993-01-01

    The effect of intracerebroventricular administration of histamine on the activity of mesolimbic and nigrostriatal dopaminergic (DA) neurons was determined in male rats. The activity of these neurons was estimated by measuring: (1) the accumulation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) after administration of a decarboxylase inhibitor, and (2) the concentration of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) in the nucleus accumbens and striatum, which contain the terminals of these neurons. Central administration of histamine increased both DOPA accumulation and DOPAC concentrations in the nucleus accumbens, but was without effect in the striatum. The increase in DOPAC concentrations in the nucleus accumbens occurred within 10 min and was sustained for at least 120 min. The H1 antagonist mepyramine blocked whereas the H2 antagonist zolantidine did not affect histamine-induced increases in DOPAC concentrations in the nucleus accumbens. Neither mepyramine nor zolantidine affected basal DOPAC concentrations in the nucleus accumbens. These results indicate that central administration of histamine stimulates mesolimbic DA neurons through an action at the H1 receptor, but has no effect upon the activity of nigrostriatal DA neurons.

  15. Substantia nigra dopaminergic unit activity in behaving cats: effect of arousal on spontaneous discharge and sensory evoked activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strecker, R E; Jacobs, B L

    1985-12-30

    Single-unit activity of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra was recorded in freely moving cats during a variety of conditions designed to shed light on the hypotheses that these neurons are involved in the regulation of arousal-stress and/or selective attention. Both aversive and non-aversive arousing experimental conditions were used, including tail pinch, immersion of feet in ice-water, white noise, inaccessible food, feeding, grooming, inaccessible rats, and somatosensory stimulation. None of these conditions had an effect on tonic neuronal discharge rate. However, these neurons did exhibit brief excitatory and inhibitory responses to phasic auditory or visual stimuli presented when the cat was sitting quietly. These responses were dramatically attenuated if these stimuli were presented during the aforementioned conditions of behavioral arousal. This sharply contrasts with the inability of these same conditions to influence spontaneous discharge rate. The sensitivity of this neuronal sensory response to the concurrent behavioral condition supports the hypothesis that these neurons are involved in attentional processes or selective responding. The lack of responsiveness of these neurons to a variety of arousal/stress manipulations supports the hypothesis that dopaminergic neurons play a permissive, rather than an active, role in these processes.

  16. The role of purinergic and dopaminergic systems on MK-801-induced antidepressant effects in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Raquel Bohrer; Siebel, Anna Maria; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2015-12-01

    Depression is a serious disease characterized by low mood, anhedonia, loss of interest in daily activities, appetite and sleep disturbances, reduced concentration, and psychomotor agitation. There is a growing interest in NMDA antagonists as a promising target for the development of new antidepressants. Considering that purinergic and dopaminergic systems are involved in depression and anxiety states, we characterized the role of these signaling pathways on MK-801-induced antidepressant effects in zebrafish. Animals treated with MK-801 at the doses of 5, 10, 15, or 20μM during 15, 30, or 60min spent longer time in the top area of aquariums in comparison to control group, indicating an anxiolytic/antidepressant effect induced by this drug. Animals treated with MK-801 spent longer time period at top area until 2 (5μM MK-801) and 4 (20μM MK-801) hours after treatment, returning to basal levels from 24h to 7days after exposure. Repeated MK-801 treatment did not induce cumulative effects, since animals treated daily during 7days had the same behavioral response pattern observed since the first until the 7th day. In order to investigate the effects of adenosine A1 and A2A receptor antagonist and agonist and the influence of modulation of adenosine levels on MK-801 effects, we treated zebrafish with caffeine, DPCPX, CPA, ZM 241385, CGS 21680, AMPCP, EHNA, dipyridamole, and NBTI during 30min before MK-801 exposure. The non-specific adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine (50mg/kg) and the selective A1 receptor antagonist DPCPX (15mg/kg) prevented the behavioral changes induced by MK-801. The non-specific nucleoside transporter (NT) inhibitor dipyridamole (10mg/kg) exacerbated the behavioral changes induced by MK-801. Dopamine receptor antagonists (sulpiride and SCH 23390) did not change the behavioral alterations induced by MK-801. Our findings demonstrated that antidepressant-like effects of MK-801 in zebrafish are mediated through adenosine A1 receptor activation.

  17. [The role of genetic variants of the dopaminergic system in heroin dependence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereczkei, Andrea; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Barta, Csaba

    2009-06-01

    Heroin dependence is a disorder with complex inheritance. It is influenced by multiple genetic and environmental factors. This paper gives an overview on the specific risk factors in the background of heroin addiction, especially within the dopaminergic system, which is one of the most important components of the brain's reward system. In connection with the development of heroin addiction the role of the dopamine D2 and D4 receptors, the dopamine transporter and the catechol-O-methyltransferase genes is discussed. Certain polymorphisms of the most extensively studied dopamine D2 receptor gene show strong association with heroin dependence. Dopamine D4 receptor and catechol-O-methyltransferase genes are also associated with the disease, but some results are still controversial. Only few studies have been done in association with the dopamine transporter gene and substance misuse and no convincing results have been found. To unravel the contradictions and better understand the pathogenesis of the disease more research needs to be conducted.

  18. Ganoderma lucidum Protects Dopaminergic Neuron Degeneration through Inhibition of Microglial Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiping Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abundant evidence has suggested that neuroinflammation participates in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD. The emerging evidence has supported that microglia may play key roles in the progressive neurodegeneration in PD and might be a promising therapeutic target. Ganoderma lucidum (GL, a traditional Chinese medicinal herb, has been shown potential neuroprotective effects in our clinical trials that make us to speculate that it might possess potent anti-inflammatory and immunomodulating properties. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the potential neuroprotective effect of GL and possible underlying mechanism of action through protecting microglial activation using co-cultures of dopaminergic neurons and microglia. The microglia is activated by LPS and MPP+-treated MES 23.5 cell membranes. Meanwhile, GL extracts significantly prevent the production of microglia-derived proinflammatory and cytotoxic factors [nitric oxide, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interlukin 1β (IL-1β] in a dose-dependent manner and down-regulate the TNF-α and IL-1β expressions on mRNA level as well. In conclusion, our results support that GL may be a promising agent for the treatment of PD through anti-inflammation.

  19. Dopaminergic receptor agents and the basal ganglia : pharmacological properties and interactions with the GABA-ergic system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmerman, Wigerline

    1992-01-01

    In the present series of studies, attention was focussed particularly on dopaminergic D2 receptor compounds, with emphasis on the enantiomers of the potent and selective dopamine D2 receptor agonist N-0437. Drugs that display activity at D2 receptors are of great interest as potentially new therapeu

  20. The nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in familial early onset parkinsonism with parkin mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portman, AT; Giladi, N; Leenders, KL; Maguire, P; Veenma-van der Duin, L; Swart, J; Pruim, J; Simon, ES; Hassin-Baer, S; Korczyn, AD

    2001-01-01

    Nigrostriatal dopaminergic function and cerebral energy metabolism were measured with PET in two brothers with early-onset parkinsonism caused by mutation of the parkin gene. Energy metabolism did not differ, but the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pattern was clearly different than that of sporadic PD.

  1. Dopaminergic system and dream recall: An MRI study in Parkinson's disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gennaro, Luigi; Lanteri, Olimpia; Piras, Fabrizio; Scarpelli, Serena; Assogna, Francesca; Ferrara, Michele; Caltagirone, Carlo; Spalletta, Gianfranco

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the role of the dopamine system [i.e., subcortical-medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) network] in dreaming, by studying patients with Parkinson's Disease (PD) as a model of altered dopaminergic transmission. Subcortical volumes and cortical thickness were extracted by 3T-MR images of 27 PD patients and 27 age-matched controls, who were asked to fill out a dream diary upon morning awakening for one week. PD patients do not substantially differ from healthy controls with respect to the sleep, dream, and neuroanatomical measures. Multivariate correlational analyses in PD patients show that dopamine agonist dosage is associated to qualitatively impoverished dreams, as expressed by lower bizarreness and lower emotional load values. Visual vividness (VV) of their dream reports positively correlates with volumes of both the amygdalae and with thickness of the left mPFC. Emotional load also positively correlates with hippocampal volume. Beside the replication of our previous finding on the role of subcortical nuclei in dreaming experience of healthy subjects, this represents the first evidence of a specific role of the amygdala-mPFC dopaminergic network system in dream recall. The association in PD patients between higher dopamine agonist dosages and impoverished dream reports, however, and the significant correlations between VV and mesolimbic regions, however, provide an empirical support to the hypothesis that a dopamine network plays a key role in dream generation. The causal relation is however precluded by the intrinsic limitation of assuming the dopamine agonist dosage as a measure of the hypodopaminergic state in PD. Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Acrylamide increases dopamine levels by affecting dopamine transport and metabolism related genes in the striatal dopaminergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoqi; Guo, Xiongxiong; Xiong, Fei; Cheng, Guihong; Lu, Qing; Yan, Hong

    2015-07-01

    Dopaminergic system dysfunction is proved to be a possible mechanism in acrylamide (ACR) -induced neurotoxicity. The neurotransmitter dopamine (DA) has an increasingly important role in the dopaminergic system. Thus, the goal of this study is to evaluate effects of ACR on dopamine and its metabolite levels, dopamine transport and metabolic gene expression in dopaminergic neurons. Male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were dosed orally with ACR at 0 (saline), 20, 30, and 40 mg/kg/day for 20 days. Splayed hind limbs, reduced tail flick time and abnormal gait which preceded other neurologic parameters were observed in the above rats. ACR significantly increased dopamine levels, decreased 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanilic acid (HVA) contents in an area dependent manner in rat striatum. Immunohistochemical staining of the striatum revealed that the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive cells significantly increased, while monoamine oxidase (MAO) positive cells were drastically reduced, which was consistent with changes in their mRNA and protein expressions. In addition, dopamine transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) expression levels were both down-regulated in the striatum. These results suggest that dopamine levels increase significantly in response to ACR, presumably due to changes in the dopamine transport and metabolism related genes expression in the striatal dopaminergic neurons.

  3. FLZ protects dopaminergic neuron through activating protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway and inhibiting RTP801 expression in Parkinson's disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, X-Q; Kong, X-C; Qian, C; Zhang, D

    2012-01-27

    The pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease is characterized by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra (SNpc). FLZ, a novel synthetic squamosamide derivative from a Chinese herb, has been shown to have neuroprotective effects in experimental Parkinson's disease (PD) models. However, it is still unclear whether FLZ protects against PD through regulating the function of dopaminergic system. In this study, we carried out a set of in vitro and in vivo experiments to address these questions. Oral administration of FLZ significantly improved motor dysfunction of mice challenged by MPTP. The beneficial effects of FLZ on motor behavior attributed to the elevation of dopamine level in striatum, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive cells, and TH activity in the middle brain of mouse. Mechanism study showed that treatment of FLZ increased the phosphorylation of activating protein kinase B (Akt) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Using LY294002 to block phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway prevented the phosphorylation of mTOR and attenuated the neuroprotection of FLZ in MN9D cells challenged by MPP(+). In addition, FLZ reduced the expression of RTP801, an important protein in PD, in mice and cells intoxicated by MPTP/MPP(+). Taken together, these results revealed a novel role that FLZ elevated TH expression and activity in dopaminergic neuron through activation of Akt/mTOR survival pathway and inhibition of RTP801 in MPTP/MPP(+)-induced PD models. The data also provided evidence that FLZ had potent neuroprotecive effects and might become a new promising anti-PD drug.

  4. Proteolytic activation of proapoptotic kinase protein kinase Cδ by tumor necrosis factor α death receptor signaling in dopaminergic neurons during neuroinflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon Richard

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms of progressive dopaminergic neuronal loss in Parkinson’s disease (PD remain poorly understood, largely due to the complex etiology and multifactorial nature of disease pathogenesis. Several lines of evidence from human studies and experimental models over the last decade have identified neuroinflammation as a potential pathophysiological mechanism contributing to disease progression. Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF has recently emerged as the primary neuroinflammatory mediator that can elicit dopaminergic cell death in PD. However, the signaling pathways by which TNF mediates dopaminergic cell death have not been completely elucidated. Methods In this study we used a dopaminergic neuronal cell model and recombinant TNF to characterize intracellular signaling pathways activated during TNF-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Etanercept and neutralizing antibodies to tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 (TNFR1 were used to block TNF signaling. We confirmed the results from our mechanistic studies in primary embryonic mesencephalic cultures and in vivo using the stereotaxic lipopolysaccharide (LPS model of nigral dopaminergic degeneration. Results TNF signaling in dopaminergic neuronal cells triggered the activation of protein kinase Cδ (PKCδ, an isoform of the novel PKC family, by caspase-3 and caspase-8 dependent proteolytic cleavage. Both TNFR1 neutralizing antibodies and the soluble TNF receptor Etanercept blocked TNF-induced PKCδ proteolytic activation. Proteolytic activation of PKCδ was accompanied by translocation of the kinase to the nucleus. Notably, inhibition of PKCδ signaling by small interfering (siRNA or overexpression of a PKCδ cleavage-resistant mutant protected against TNF-induced dopaminergic neuronal cell death. Further, primary dopaminergic neurons obtained from PKCδ knockout (−/− mice were resistant to TNF toxicity. The proteolytic activation of PKCδ in the mouse substantia nigra in the

  5. Nicotinic, glutamatergic and dopaminergic synaptic transmission and plasticity in the mesocorticolimbic system: focus on nicotine effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistillo, Francesco; Clementi, Francesco; Zoli, Michele; Gotti, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is currently the leading cause of preventable deaths and disability throughout the world, being responsible for about five million premature deaths/year. Unfortunately, fewer than 10% of tobacco users who try to stop smoking actually manage to do so. The main addictive agent delivered by cigarette smoke is nicotine, which induces psychostimulation and reward, and reduces stress and anxiety. The use of new technologies (including optogenetics) and the development of mouse models characterised by cell-specific deletions of receptor subtype genes or the expression of gain-of-function nAChR subunits has greatly increased our understanding of the molecular mechanisms and neural substrates of nicotine addiction first revealed by classic electrophysiological, neurochemical and behavioural approaches. It is now becoming clear that various aspects of nicotine dependence are mediated by close interactions of the glutamatergic, dopaminergic and γ-aminobutyric acidergic systems in the mesocorticolimbic system. This review is divided into two parts. The first provides an updated overview of the circuitry of the ventral tegmental area, ventral striatum and prefrontal cortex, the neurotransmitter receptor subtypes expressed in these areas, and their physiological role in the mesocorticolimbic system. The second will focus on the molecular, functional and behavioural mechanisms involved in the acute and chronic effects of nicotine on the mesocorticolimbic system.

  6. LRRK2 knockout mice have an intact dopaminergic system but display alterations in exploratory and motor co-ordination behaviors

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    Hinkle Kelly M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mutations in the LRRK2 gene are the most common cause of genetic Parkinson’s disease. Although the mechanisms behind the pathogenic effects of LRRK2 mutations are still not clear, data emerging from in vitro and in vivo models suggests roles in regulating neuronal polarity, neurotransmission, membrane and cytoskeletal dynamics and protein degradation. We created mice lacking exon 41 that encodes the activation hinge of the kinase domain of LRRK2. We have performed a comprehensive analysis of these mice up to 20 months of age, including evaluation of dopamine storage, release, uptake and synthesis, behavioral testing, dendritic spine and proliferation/neurogenesis analysis. Our results show that the dopaminergic system was not functionally comprised in LRRK2 knockout mice. However, LRRK2 knockout mice displayed abnormal exploratory activity in the open-field test. Moreover, LRRK2 knockout mice stayed longer than their wild type littermates on the accelerated rod during rotarod testing. Finally, we confirm that loss of LRRK2 caused degeneration in the kidney, accompanied by a progressive enhancement of autophagic activity and accumulation of autofluorescent material, but without evidence of biphasic changes.

  7. Effects of Exposure to Heavy Particles on a Behavior Mediated by the Dopaminergic System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabin, B. M.; Joseph, J. A.; Shukitt-Hale, B.; McEwen, J.

    The effects of exposure to heavy particles on behaviors mediated by the central nervous system (CNS) are qualitatively different than the effects produced by exposure to other types of radiation. One behavior mediated by the CNS is the amphetamine-induced taste aversion, which is produced by pairing a novel tasting solution with injection of amphetamine. When the conditioning day is three days following irradiation, exposing rats to low doses of 56Fe particles (600 MeV/n or 1 GeV/n) eliminates the taste aversion produced by injection of amphetamine, which is dependent upon the integrity of the central dopaminergic system, but has no effect on the aversion produced by injection of lithium chloride which is mediated by the gastrointestinal system. In contrast to the effects obtained using heavy particles, exposing rats to 60Co gamma rays or to fission spectrum neutrons has no selective effect upon the acquisition of either amphetamine- or lithium chloride-induced taste aversions. When the conditioning day occurs four months following exposure to 1 GeV/n 56Fe particles, there is an enhancement of the amphetamine-induced taste aversion. The implications of these findings for approaches to risk assessment are considered

  8. The Dopaminergic System in Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes: From Physiology to Pharmacology and Potential Applications to Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Buttarelli, Francesca R.; Fanciulli, Alessandra; Pellicano, Clelia; Pontieri, Francesco E.

    2011-01-01

    Besides its action on the nervous system, dopamine (DA) plays a role on neural-immune interactions. Here we review the current evidence on the dopaminergic system in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). PBL synthesize DA through the tyrosine-hydroxylase/DOPA-decarboxylase pathway, and express DA receptors and DA transporter (DAT) on their plasma membrane. Stimulation of DA receptors on PBL membrane contributes to modulate the development and initiation of immune responses under physiolog...

  9. Signaling Pathways Involved in Renal Oxidative Injury: Role of the Vasoactive Peptides and the Renal Dopaminergic System

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    N. L. Rukavina Mikusic

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The physiological hydroelectrolytic balance and the redox steady state in the kidney are accomplished by an intricate interaction between signals from extrarenal and intrarenal sources and between antinatriuretic and natriuretic factors. Angiotensin II, atrial natriuretic peptide and intrarenal dopamine play a pivotal role in this interactive network. The balance between endogenous antioxidant agents like the renal dopaminergic system and atrial natriuretic peptide, by one side, and the prooxidant effect of the renin angiotensin system, by the other side, contributes to ensuring the normal function of the kidney. Different pathological scenarios, as nephrotic syndrome and hypertension, where renal sodium excretion is altered, are associated with an impaired interaction between two natriuretic systems as the renal dopaminergic system and atrial natriuretic peptide that may be involved in the pathogenesis of renal diseases. The aim of this review is to update and comment the most recent evidences about the intracellular pathways involved in the relationship between endogenous antioxidant agents like the renal dopaminergic system and atrial natriuretic peptide and the prooxidant effect of the renin angiotensin system in the pathogenesis of renal inflammation.

  10. Partial neurorescue effects of DHA following a 6-OHDA lesion of the mouse dopaminergic system.

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    Coulombe, Katherine; Saint-Pierre, Martine; Cisbani, Giulia; St-Amour, Isabelle; Gibrat, Claire; Giguère-Rancourt, Ariane; Calon, Frédéric; Cicchetti, Francesca

    2016-04-01

    Pre-clinical data collected in mouse models of Parkinson's disease (PD) support the neuroprotective potential of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA)-enriched diet on the dopaminergic (DAergic) system. In this study, we investigated the effects of an n-3 PUFA-rich diet using a neurorescue/neurorestorative paradigm. C57BL/6 adult mice were submitted to a striatal stereotaxic injection of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) to induce striatal DAergic denervation and subsequent nigral DAergic cell loss. Three weeks post-lesion, mice received either a docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-enriched or a control diet for a period of 6 weeks. HPLC analyses revealed a 111% post-lesion increase in striatal dopamine levels in the DHA-fed animals compared to controls (ctrl, PDHA treatment led to a 89% rise in tyrosine-hydroxylase (TH)-immunoreactive terminals within the striatum (PDHA did not change the number of TH+ neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc), morphological analyses revealed an increased in perimeters (+7%) and areas (+21%) of DAergic cell bodies in treated animals. Collectively, our results suggest that DHA induces a partial neurorescue/neurorestoration of the DAergic system and support further studies to investigate the potential of a diet-based intervention, or at least the combination of such approach, to current treatments in PD.

  11. Histamine impairs midbrain dopaminergic development in vivo by activating histamine type 1 receptors

    OpenAIRE

    Escobedo-Ávila, Itzel; Vargas-Romero, Fernanda; Molina-Hernández, Anayansi; López-González, Rodrigo; Cortés, Daniel; De Carlos, Juan A.; Velasco, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Histamine (HA) regulates the sleep-wake cycle, synaptic plasticity and memory in adult mammals. Dopaminergic specification in the embryonic ventral midbrain (VM) coincides with increased HA brain levels. To study the effect of HA receptor stimulation on dopamine neuron generation, we administered HA to dopamine progenitors, both in vitro and in vivo. Results Cultured embryonic day 12 (E12) VM neural stem/progenitor cells expressed transcripts for HA receptors H1R, H2R and H3R. Thes...

  12. Positron emission tomography molecular imaging of dopaminergic system in drug addiction.

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    Hou, Haifeng; Tian, Mei; Zhang, Hong

    2012-05-01

    Dopamine (DA) is involved in drug reinforcement, but its role in drug addiction remains unclear. Positron emission tomography (PET) is the first technology used for the direct measurement of components of the dopaminergic system in the living human brain. In this article, we reviewed the major findings of PET imaging studies on the involvement of DA in drug addiction, especially in heroin addiction. Furthermore, we summarized PET radiotracers that have been used to study the role of DA in drug addiction. To investigate presynaptic function in drug addiction, PET tracers have been developed to measure DA synthesis and transport. For the investigation of postsynaptic function, several radioligands targeting dopamine one (D1) receptor and dopamine two (D2) receptor are extensively used in PET imaging studies. Moreover, we also summarized the PET imaging findings of heroin addiction studies, including heroin-induced DA increases and the reinforcement, role of DA in the long-term effects of heroin abuse, DA and vulnerability to heroin abuse and the treatment implications. PET imaging studies have corroborated the role of DA in drug addiction and increase our understanding the mechanism of drug addiction.

  13. Age-Dependent Effects of Methylphenidate on the Human Dopaminergic System in Young vs Adult Patients With Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder: A Randomized Clincal Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrantee, A.; Tamminga, H.G.H.; Bouziane, C.; Bottelier, M.A.; Bron, E.E.; Mutsaerts, H.J.M.M.; Zwinderman, A.H.; Groote, I.R.; Rombouts, S.A.R.B.; Lindauer, R.J.L.; Klein, S.; Niessen, W.J.; Opmeer, B.C.; Boer, F.; Lucassen, P.J.; Andersen, S.L.; Geurts, H.M.; Reneman, L.

    2016-01-01

    Importance: Although numerous children receive methylphenidate hydrochloride for the treatment of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), little is known about age-dependent and possibly lasting effects of methylphenidate on the human dopaminergic system. Objectives: To determine whether th

  14. Inhibition of microglial activation by the herbal flavonoid baicalein attenuates inflammation-mediated degeneration of dopaminergic neurons.

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    Li, F-Q; Wang, T; Pei, Z; Liu, B; Hong, J-S

    2005-03-01

    Accumulating evidence has suggested that inflammation in the brain participates in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Therefore, anti-inflammatory therapy has attracted much attention as novel interference to neurodegenerative diseases. Baicalein, a major flavonoid extracted from a traditional Chinese herb Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi (Huangqin), possesses potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties. To test the potential neuroprotective effect of baicalein on dopaminergic neurons, primary midbrain neuron-glia cultures from E-14 rat embryos were used. Cultures were pretreated with baicalein for 30 min prior to stimulation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 10 ng/ml). LPS leads to massive activation of microglial cells revealed by OX-42 immunostaining, and produced excessive quantities of NO. Excessive elevation of superoxide level was also observed in enriched-microglia after stimulating with LPS. LPS-induced damage to dopaminergic neurons was evaluated by uptake capacity for [3H]dopamine and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-immunocytochemistry. Pretreatment with baicalein concentration-dependently attenuated LPS-induced decrease in [3H]dopamine uptake and loss of TH-immunoreactive (TH-ir) neurons, which the maximum protective effect was observed at the concentration of 5 microM. Post-treatment with baicalein (5 microM) was also shown to be effective even if baicalein administered up to 2 h later than LPS application. Morphological study shows that baicalein (5 microM) almost completely blocked LPS-induced activation of microglia. Excessive production of TNF(alpha) and free radicals such as NO and superoxide by LPS stimulation were also attenuated by baicalein at a concentration-dependent pattern. The present study indicates that baicalein exerts potent neuroprotective effect on LPS-induced injury of dopaminergic neurons. We hypothesize that the inhibition of LPS-induced production of NO and free radicals from microglia may underlie the mechanism of

  15. The long-term effects of the herbicide atrazine on the dopaminergic system following exposure during pubertal development.

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    Li, Yanshu; Sun, Yan; Yang, Junwei; Wu, Yanping; Yu, Jia; Li, Baixiang

    2014-03-15

    Atrazine (2-chloro-4-ethylamino-6-isopropylamino-s-triazine) is used worldwide as a herbicide, and its presence in the environment has resulted in documented human exposure. Atrazine has been shown to cause dopaminergic neurotoxicity. The juvenile period is particularly vulnerable to environmental agents, but only few studies have investigated the long-term effects of atrazine following exposure during the pubertal development. Therefore, we evaluated the effects of a 41-day exposure to atrazine on the dopaminergic system in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were treated orally with atrazine at 25 or 50mg/kg bw, daily from postnatal day 22 to 62. The content of dopamine (DA) was examined in striatum samples by HPLC-FL, and the mRNA and protein expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), orphan nuclear hormone (Nurr1), dopamine transporter (DAT) and vesicular monoaminetransporter 2 (VMAT2) were examined in samples of the ventral mid-brain by use of fluorescence PCR and Western-blot analysis when the rats reached the age of one year. Exposure of juvenile rats to the high dose of atrazine led to reduced levels of DA and mRNA of Nurr1 in one-year-old animals. This study shows that the long-term adverse effects of atrazine on the dopaminergic system have a special relevance after juvenile exposure.

  16. Expression changes of dopaminergic system-related genes in PC12 cells induced by manganese, silver, or copper nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianyong; Rahman, Mohammed F; Duhart, Helen M; Newport, Glenn D; Patterson, Tucker A; Murdock, Richard C; Hussain, Saber M; Schlager, John J; Ali, Syed F

    2009-11-01

    Nanoparticles have received a great deal of attention for producing new engineering applications due to their novel physicochemical characteristics. However, the broad application of nanomaterials has also produced concern for nanoparticle toxicity due to increased exposure from large-scale industry production. This study was conducted to investigate the potential neurotoxicity of manganese (Mn), silver (Ag), and copper (Cu) nanoparticles using the dopaminergic neuronal cell line, PC12. Selective genes associated with the dopaminergic system were investigated for expression changes and their correlation with dopamine depletion. PC12 cells were treated with 10 microg/ml Mn-40 nm, Ag-15 nm, or Cu-90 nm nanoparticles for 24 h. Cu-90 nanoparticles induced dopamine depletion in PC12 cells, which is similar to the effect induced by Mn-40 shown in a previous study. The expression of 11 genes associated with the dopaminergic system was examined using real-time RT-PCR. The expression of Txnrd1 was up-regulated after the Cu-90 treatment and the expression of Gpx1 was down-regulated after Ag-15 or Cu-90 treatment. These alterations are consistent with the oxidative stress induced by metal nanoparticles. Mn-40 induced a down-regulation of the expression of Th; Cu-90 induced an up-regulation of the expression of Maoa. This indicates that besides the oxidation mechanism, enzymatic alterations may also play important roles in the induced dopamine depletion. Mn-40 also induced a down-regulation of the expression of Park2; while the expression of Snca was up-regulated after Mn-40 or Cu-90 treatment. These data suggest that Mn and Cu nanoparticles-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity may share some common mechanisms associated with neurodegeneration.

  17. Chewing Prevents Stress-Induced Hippocampal LTD Formation and Anxiety-Related Behaviors: A Possible Role of the Dopaminergic System

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    Yumie Ono

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the effects of chewing on stress-induced long-term depression (LTD and anxiogenic behavior. Experiments were performed in adult male rats under three conditions: restraint stress condition, voluntary chewing condition during stress, and control condition without any treatments except handling. Chewing ameliorated LTD development in the hippocampal CA1 region. It also counteracted the stress-suppressed number of entries to the center region of the open field when they were tested immediately, 30 min, or 60 min after restraint. At the latter two poststress time periods, chewing during restraint significantly increased the number of times of open arm entries in the elevated plus maze, when compared with those without chewing. The in vivo microdialysis further revealed that extracellular dopamine concentration in the ventral hippocampus, which is involved in anxiety-related behavior, was significantly greater in chewing rats than in those without chewing from 30 to 105 min after stress exposure. Development of LTD and anxiolytic effects ameliorated by chewing were counteracted by administering the D1 dopamine receptor antagonist SCH23390, which suggested that chewing may activate the dopaminergic system in the ventral hippocampus to suppress stress-induced anxiogenic behavior.

  18. Gene expression profile of neuronal progenitor cells derived from hESCs: activation of chromosome 11p15.5 and comparison to human dopaminergic neurons.

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    William J Freed

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We initiated differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs into dopamine neurons, obtained a purified population of neuronal precursor cells by cell sorting, and determined patterns of gene transcription. METHODOLOGY: Dopaminergic differentiation of hESCs was initiated by culturing hESCs with a feeder layer of PA6 cells. Differentiating cells were then sorted to obtain a pure population of PSA-NCAM-expressing neuronal precursors, which were then analyzed for gene expression using Massive Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS. Individual genes as well as regions of the genome which were activated were determined. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A number of genes known to be involved in the specification of dopaminergic neurons, including MSX1, CDKN1C, Pitx1 and Pitx2, as well as several novel genes not previously associated with dopaminergic differentiation, were expressed. Notably, we found that a specific region of the genome located on chromosome 11p15.5 was highly activated. This region contains several genes which have previously been associated with the function of dopaminergic neurons, including the gene for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, the rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine biosynthesis, IGF2, and CDKN1C, which cooperates with Nurr1 in directing the differentiation of dopaminergic neurons. Other genes in this region not previously recognized as being involved in the functions of dopaminergic neurons were also activated, including H19, TSSC4, and HBG2. IGF2 and CDKN1C were also found to be highly expressed in mature human TH-positive dopamine neurons isolated from human brain samples by laser capture. CONCLUSIONS: The present data suggest that the H19-IGF2 imprinting region on chromosome 11p15.5 is involved in the process through which undifferentiated cells are specified to become neuronal precursors and/or dopaminergic neurons.

  19. Squamosamide derivative FLZ protected dopaminergic neuron by activating Akt signaling pathway in 6-OHDA-induced in vivo and in vitro Parkinson's disease models.

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    Bao, Xiu-Qi; Kong, Xiang-Chen; Kong, Li-Bing; Wu, Liang-Yu; Sun, Hua; Zhang, Dan

    2014-02-14

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease affecting up to 80% of dopaminergic neurons in the nigrostriatal pathway. FLZ, a novel synthetic squamosamide derivative from a Chinese herb, has been shown to have neuroprotective effects in experimental PD models. In this study, we carried out a set of in vitro and in vivo experiments to address the neuroprotective effect of FLZ and related mechanism. The results showed that FLZ significantly improved motor dysfunction and dopaminergic neuronal loss of rats injured by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). The beneficial effects of FLZ attributed to the elevation of dopaminergic neuron number, dopamine level and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) activity. Mechanistic study showed that FLZ protected TH activity and dopaminergic neurons through decreasing α-synuclein (α-Syn) expression and the interaction between α-Syn and TH. Further studies indicated the involvement of phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway in the protective effect of FLZ since it showed that blocking PI3K/Akt signaling pathway prevented the expression of α-Syn and attenuated the neuroprotection of FLZ. In addition, FLZ treatment reduced the expression of RTP801, an important protein involved in the pathogenesis of PD. Taken together, these results revealed that FLZ suppressed α-Syn expression and elevated TH activity in dopaminergic neuron through activating Akt survival pathway in 6-OHDA-induced PD models. The data also provided evidence that FLZ had potent neuroprotecive effects and might become a new promising agent for PD treatment.

  20. Disruption of dopaminergic transmission remodels tripartite synapse morphology and astrocytic calcium activity within substantia nigra pars reticulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosson, Anthony; Boisseau, Sylvie; Buisson, Alain; Savasta, Marc; Albrieux, Mireille

    2015-04-01

    The substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNr) is a major output nucleus of the basal ganglia circuitry particularly sensitive to pathological dopamine depletion. Indeed, hyperactivity of SNr neurons is known to be responsible for some motor disorders characteristic of Parkinson's disease. The neuronal processing of basal ganglia dysfunction is well understood but, paradoxically, the role of astrocytes in the regulation of SNr activity has rarely been considered. We thus investigated the influence of the disruption of dopaminergic transmission on plastic changes at tripartite glutamatergic synapses in the rat SNr and on astrocyte calcium activity. In 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned rats, we observed structural plastic changes of tripartite glutamatergic synapses and perisynaptic astrocytic processes. These findings suggest that subthalamonigral synapses undergo morphological changes that accompany the pathophysiological processes of Parkinson's disease. The pharmacological blockade of dopaminergic transmission (with sulpiride and SCH-23390) increased astrocyte calcium excitability, synchrony and gap junction coupling within the SNr, suggesting a functional adaptation of astrocytes to dopamine transmission disruption in this output nucleus. This hyperactivity is partly reversed by subthalamic nucleus high-frequency stimulation which has emerged as an efficient symptomatic treatment for Parkinson's disease. Therefore, our results demonstrate structural and functional reshaping of neuronal and glial elements highlighting a functional plasticity of neuroglial interactions when dopamine transmission is disrupted.

  1. Negative cerebral blood volume fMRI response coupled with Ca²⁺-dependent brain activity in a dopaminergic road map of nociception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Yi-Hua; Chang, Chen; Chen, Chiao-Chi V

    2014-04-15

    Decreased cerebral blood volume/flow (CBV/CBF) contributes to negative blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) functional MRI (fMRI) signals. But it is still strongly debated whether these negative BOLD or CBV/CBF signals are indicative of decreased or increased neuronal activity. The fidelity of Ca(2+) signals in reflecting neuronal excitation is well documented. However, the roles of Ca(2+) signals and Ca(2+)-dependent activity in negative fMRI signals have never been explored; an understanding of this is essential to unraveling the underlying mechanisms and correctly interpreting the hemodynamic response of interest. The present study utilized a nociception-induced negative CBV fMRI response as a model. Ca(2+) signals were investigated in vivo using Mn(2+)-enhanced MRI (MEMRI), and the downstream Ca(2+)-dependent signaling was investigated using phosphorylated cAMP response-element-binding (pCREB) immunohistology. The results showed that nociceptive stimulation led to (1) striatal CBV decreases, (2) Ca(2+) increases via the nigrostriatal pathway, and (3) substantial expression of pCREB in substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons and striatal neurons. Interestingly, the striatal negative fMRI response was abolished by blocking substantia nigra activity but was not affected by blocking the striatal activity. This suggests the importance of input activity other than output in triggering the negative CBV signals. These findings indicate that the striatal negative CBV fMRI signals are associated with Ca(2+) increases and Ca(2+)-dependent signaling along the nigrostriatal pathway. The obtained data reveal a new brain road map in response to nociceptive stimulation of hemodynamic changes in association with Ca(2+) signals within the dopaminergic system.

  2. Triptolide, a Chinese herbal extract, protects dopaminergic neurons from inflammation-mediated damage through inhibition of microglial activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng-Qiao; Lu, Xiu-Zhi; Liang, Xi-Bin; Zhou, Hui-Fang; Xue, Bing; Liu, Xian-Yu; Niu, Dong-Bin; Han, Ji-Sheng; Wang, Xiao-Min

    2004-03-01

    Mounting lines of evidence have suggested that brain inflammation participates in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. Triptolide is one of the major active components of Chinese herb Tripterygium wilfordii Hook F, which possesses potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive properties. We found that triptolide concentration-dependently attenuated the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced decrease in [3H]dopamine uptake and loss of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons in primary mesencephalic neuron/glia mixed culture. Triptolide also blocked LPS-induced activation of microglia and excessive production of TNFalpha and NO. Our data suggests that triptolide may protect dopaminergic neurons from LPS-induced injury and its efficiency in inhibiting microglia activation may underlie the mechanism.

  3. Paradoxical dopaminergic drug effects in extraversion: Dose- and time-dependent effects of Sulpiride on EEG theta activity

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    Mira-Lynn eChavanon

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Dopaminergic drugs frequently produce paradoxical effects depending on baseline performance levels, genotype or personality traits. The present study for the first time aimed to specify the mechanisms underlying such opposite effects using the following recently reported scenario as an example: Depending on the personality trait agentic extraversion (aE; i.e. assertiveness, dominance, ambition, positive emotionality the selective dopamine D2 receptor antagonist sulpiride (200 mg had opposite effects on resting posterior versus anterior theta activity in the electroencephalogram (EEG. In order to better describe these opposite pharmaco-EEG effects and to generate hypotheses regarding the underlying mechanisms, we measured the EEG intermittently over five hours in 80 healthy male volunteers extremely high or low in aE who had received either placebo or one of three doses of sulpiride (50 mg, 200 mg, or 400 mg. The findings suggest a model postulating stronger pre- versus postsynaptic subreceptor effects in high aE individuals compared to low aE individuals. Future studies may now systematically apply the model to other examples of paradoxical dopaminergic drug effects and examine the molecular basis of individual differences in pre- versus postsynaptic dopamine D2 subreceptor sensitivities and densities.

  4. Regulation of p53 by activated protein kinase C-delta during nitric oxide-induced dopaminergic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Jin; Kim, Dong-Chan; Choi, Bo-Hwa; Ha, Hyunjung; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2006-01-27

    Selective cell death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra is the major cause of Parkinson disease. Current evidence suggests that this cell death could be mediated by nitric oxide by-products such as nitrate and peroxynitrite. Because protein kinase C (PKC)-delta is implicated in apoptosis of various cell types, we studied its roles and activation mechanisms in nitric oxide (NO)-induced apoptosis of SN4741 dopaminergic cells. When cells were treated with sodium nitroprusside (SNP), a NO donor, endogenous PKC-delta was nitrated and activated. Immunoprecipitation revealed that p53 co-immunoprecipitated with PKC-delta and was phosphorylated at the 15th serine residue in SNP-treated cells. An in vitro kinase assay revealed that p53 was directly phosphorylated by SNP-activated PKC-delta. The p53 Ser-15 phosphorylation was suppressed in SNP-treated cells when the NO-mediated activation of PKC-delta was inhibited by rottlerin or (-)-epigallocatechin gallate. Within 3 h of p53 phosphorylation, its protein levels increased because of decreased ubiquitin-dependent proteosomal proteolysis, whereas the protein levels of MDM2, ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligase, were down-regulated in a p53 phosphorylation-dependent fashion. Taken together, these results demonstrate that nitration-mediated activation of PKC-delta induces the phosphorylation of the Ser-15 residue in p53, which increases its protein stability, thereby contributing to the nitric oxide-mediated apoptosis-like cell death pathway. These findings may be expanded to provide new insight into the cellular mechanisms of Parkinson disease.

  5. Activation instead of blocking mesolimbic dopaminergic reward circuitry is a preferred modality in the long term treatment of reward deficiency syndrome (RDS: a commentary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waite Roger L

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and hypothesis Based on neurochemical and genetic evidence, we suggest that both prevention and treatment of multiple addictions, such as dependence to alcohol, nicotine and glucose, should involve a biphasic approach. Thus, acute treatment should consist of preferential blocking of postsynaptic Nucleus Accumbens (NAc dopamine receptors (D1-D5, whereas long term activation of the mesolimbic dopaminergic system should involve activation and/or release of Dopamine (DA at the NAc site. Failure to do so will result in abnormal mood, behavior and potential suicide ideation. Individuals possessing a paucity of serotonergic and/or dopaminergic receptors, and an increased rate of synaptic DA catabolism due to high catabolic genotype of the COMT gene, are predisposed to self-medicating any substance or behavior that will activate DA release, including alcohol, opiates, psychostimulants, nicotine, gambling, sex, and even excessive internet gaming. Acute utilization of these substances and/or stimulatory behaviors induces a feeling of well being. Unfortunately, sustained and prolonged abuse leads to a toxic" pseudo feeling" of well being resulting in tolerance and disease or discomfort. Thus, a reduced number of DA receptors, due to carrying the DRD2 A1 allelic genotype, results in excessive craving behavior; whereas a normal or sufficient amount of DA receptors results in low craving behavior. In terms of preventing substance abuse, one goal would be to induce a proliferation of DA D2 receptors in genetically prone individuals. While in vivo experiments using a typical D2 receptor agonist induce down regulation, experiments in vitro have shown that constant stimulation of the DA receptor system via a known D2 agonist results in significant proliferation of D2 receptors in spite of genetic antecedents. In essence, D2 receptor stimulation signals negative feedback mechanisms in the mesolimbic system to induce mRNA expression causing

  6. INCREASE IN DOPAMINE RELEASE FROM THE NUCLEUS-ACCUMBENS IN RESPONSE TO FEEDING - A MODEL TO STUDY INTERACTIONS BETWEEN DRUGS AND NATURALLY ACTIVATED DOPAMINERGIC-NEURONS IN THE RAT-BRAIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WESTERINK, BHC; TEISMAN, A; DEVRIES, JB

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the interactions between the in vivo release of dopamine and certain drugs, during conditions of increased dopaminergic activity. Dopaminergic neurons in the nucleus accumbens were activated by feeding hungry rats. 48-96 h after implantation of a micro

  7. Is there a role for ghrelin in central dopaminergic systems? Focus on nigrostriatal and mesocorticolimbic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stievenard, Alicia; Méquinion, Mathieu; Andrews, Zane B; Destée, Alain; Chartier-Harlin, Marie-Christine; Viltart, Odile; Vanbesien-Mailliot, Christel C

    2017-02-01

    The gastro-intestinal peptide ghrelin has been assigned many functions. These include appetite regulation, energy metabolism, glucose homeostasis, intestinal motility, anxiety, memory or neuroprotection. In the last decade, this pleiotropic peptide has been proposed as a therapeutic agent in gastroparesis for diabetes and in cachexia for cancer. Ghrelin and its receptor, which is expressed throughout the brain, play an important role in motivation and reward. Ghrelin finely modulates the mesencephalic dopaminergic signaling and is thus currently studied in pathological conditions including dopamine-related disorders. Dopamine regulates motivated behaviors, modulating reward processes, emotions and motor functions to enable the survival of individuals and species. Numerous dopamine-related disorders including Parkinson's disease or eating disorders like anorexia nervosa involve altered ghrelin levels. However, despite the growing interest for ghrelin in these pathological conditions, global integrative studies investigating its role in brain dopaminergic structures are still lacking. In this review, we discuss the role of ghrelin on dopaminergic neurons and its relevance in the search for new therapeutics for Parkinson's disease- and anorexia nervosa-related dopamine deficits.

  8. Interaction between the dopaminergic and opioidergic systems in dorsal hippocampus in modulation of formalin-induced orofacial pain in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisi, Zahra; Haghparast, Amir; Pahlevani, Pouyan; Shamsizadeh, Ali; Haghparast, Abbas

    2014-09-01

    The hippocampus is a region of the brain that serves several functions. The dopaminergic system acts through D1- and D2-like receptors to interfere in pain modulation and the opioid receptors play major roles in analgesic processes and there are obvious overlaps between these two systems. The present study investigated the interaction between the opioidergic and dopaminergic systems in the dorsal hippocampus (CA1) region for formalin-induced orofacial pain. Two guide cannulae were stereotaxically implanted in the CA1 region and morphine (0.5, 1, 2 and 4 μg/0.5 μl saline) and naloxone (0.3, 1 and 3 μg/0.5 μl saline) were used as the opioid receptor agonist and antagonist, respectively. SKF-38393 (1 μg/0.5 μl saline) was used as a D1-like receptor agonist, quinpirole (2 μg/0.5 μl saline) as a D2-like receptor agonist, SCH-23390 (0.5 μg/0.5 μl saline) as a D1-like receptor antagonist and sulpiride (3 μg/0.5 μl DMSO) as a D2-like receptor antagonist. To induce orofacial pain, 50 μl of 1% formalin was subcutaneously injected into the left side of the upper lip. Our results showed that different doses of morphine significantly reduced orofacial pain in both phases induced by formalin. Naloxone (1 and 3 μg) reversed morphine induced analgesia in CA1. SKF-38393 and quinpirole with naloxone (1 μg) significantly decreased formalin-induced orofacial pain in both phases. SCH-23390 had no effect on the antinociceptive response of morphine in both phases of orofacial pain. Sulpiride reversed the antinociceptive effects of morphine only in the first phase, but this result was not significant. Our findings suggest that there is cross-talk between the opioidergic and dopaminergic systems. Opioidergic neurons also exerted antinociceptive effects by modulation of the dopaminergic system in the CA1 region of the brain.

  9. Preclinical assessment of dopaminergic system in rats by MicroPET using three positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lara-Camacho, V. M., E-mail: victormlc13@hotmail.com; Ávila-García, M. C., E-mail: victormlc13@hotmail.com; Ávila-Rodríguez, M. A., E-mail: victormlc13@hotmail.com [Unidad PET, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, 04510, México, D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-11-07

    Different diseases associated with dysfunction of dopaminergic system such as Parkinson, Alzheimer, and Schizophrenia are being widely studied with positron emission tomography (PET) which is a noninvasive method useful to assess the stage of these illnesses. In our facility we have recently implemented the production of [{sup 11}C]-DTBZ, [{sup 11}C]-RAC, and [{sup 18}F]-FDOPA, which are among the most common PET radiopharmaceuticals used in neurology applications to get information about the dopamine pathways. In this study two healthy rats were imaged with each of those radiotracers in order to confirm selective striatum uptake as a proof of principle before to release them for human use.

  10. Inhibition of Drp1 mitochondrial translocation provides neural protection in dopaminergic system in a Parkinson’s disease model induced by MPTP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filichia, Emily; Hoffer, Barry; Qi, Xin; Luo, Yu

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggest mitochondria-mediated pathways play an important role in dopaminergic neuronal cell death in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Drp1, a key regulator of mitochondrial fission, has been shown to be activated and translocated to mitochondria under stress, leading to excessive mitochondria fission and dopaminergic neuronal death in vitro. However, whether Drp1 inhibition can lead to long term stable preservation of dopaminergic neurons in PD-related mouse models remains unknown. In this study, using a classical MPTP animal PD model, we showed for the first time Drp1 activation and mitochondrial translocation in vivo after MPTP administration. Inhibition of Drp1 activation by a selective peptide inhibitor P110, blocked MPTP-induced Drp1 mitochondrial translocation and attenuated dopaminergic neuronal loss, dopaminergic nerve terminal damage and behavioral deficits caused by MPTP. MPTP-induced microglial activation and astrogliosis were not affected by P110 treatment. Instead, inhibition of Drp1 mitochondrial translocation diminished MPTP-induced p53, BAX and PUMA mitochondrial translocation. This study demonstrates that inhibition of Drp1 hyperactivation by a Drp1 peptide inhibitor P110 is neuroprotective in a MPTP animal model. Our data also suggest that the protective effects of P110 treatment might be mediated by inhibiting the p53 mediated apoptotic pathways in neurons through inhibition of Drp1-dependent p53 mitochondrial translocation. PMID:27619562

  11. Maternal Omega-3 Supplement Improves Dopaminergic System in Pre- and Postnatal Inflammation-Induced Neurotoxicity in Parkinson's Disease Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delattre, Ana Marcia; Carabelli, Bruno; Mori, Marco Aurélio; Kempe, Paula G; Rizzo de Souza, Luiz E; Zanata, Silvio M; Machado, Ricardo B; Suchecki, Deborah; Andrade da Costa, Belmira L S; Lima, Marcelo M S; Ferraz, Anete C

    2017-04-01

    Evidence suggests that idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD) is the consequence of a neurodevelopmental disruption, rather than strictly a consequence of aging. Thus, we hypothesized that maternal supplement of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (ω-3 PUFA) may be associated with neuroprotection mechanisms in a self-sustaining cycle of neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-model of PD. To test this hypothesis, behavioral and neurochemical assay were performed in prenatally LPS-exposed offspring at postnatal day 21. To further determine whether prenatal LPS exposure and maternal ω-3 PUFAs supplementation had persisting effects, brain injury was induced on PN 90 rats, following bilateral intranigral LPS injection. Pre- and postnatal inflammation damage not only affected dopaminergic neurons directly, but it also modified critical features, such as activated microglia and astrocyte cells, disrupting the support provided by the microenvironment. Unexpectedly, our results failed to show any involvement of caspase-dependent and independent apoptosis pathway in neuronal death mechanisms. On the other hand, learning and memory deficits detected with a second toxic exposure were significantly attenuated in maternal ω-3 PUFAs supplementation group. In addition, ω-3 PUFAs promote beneficial effect on synaptic function, maintaining the neurochemical integrity in remaining neurons, without necessarily protect them from neuronal death. Thus, our results suggest that ω-3 PUFAs affect the functional ability of the central nervous system in a complex way in a multiple inflammation-induced neurotoxicity animal model of PD and they disclose new ways of understanding how these fatty acids control responses of the brain to different challenges.

  12. Bilobalide inhibits 6-OHDA-induced activation of NF-κB and loss of dopaminergic neurons in rat substantia nigra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling-yun LI; Xi-lin ZHAO; Xi-feng FEI; Zhen-lun GU; Zheng-hong QIN; Zhong-qin LIANG

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the offect of bilobalide on the activation of NF-κB, and apoptasis of dopaminergic neurons induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Methods: A rat model of Parkinson's disease was produced with a unilateral infu-sion of 6-OHDA (8 μg) into the substantia nigra par compact. Bilobalide was administered 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg (ip) once a day for 7 d, starting 6 d prior to the 6-OHDA infusion. The rats were subjected to locomotor activity and rotational behavior testing 2 or 3 weeks after the 6-OHDA infusion. The expressions of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and NF-κB p65 were examined by immunofluorescence. The loss of dopaminergic neurons was detected by Nissl's staining. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling was used to iden-tify apoptosis. ResUltS; Tho behavioral changes due to 6-OHDA were signifi-cantly restored by bilobalide pretreatment. Bilobalide inhibited the 6-OHDA-induced loss of TH-positive neurons, decreased the activation of NF-κB, and protected dopaminergic neurons from apoptosis remarkably. Conclusion: NF-κB activation contributes to the 6-OHDA-induced loss of dopaminergic neurons, and the inhibition of the NF-κB pathway is likely to be involved in the neuroprotective effect of bilobalide.

  13. Omission of expected reward sensitizes the brain dopaminergic system of classically conditioned Atlantic salmon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vindas, M.A.; Höglund, Erik; Folkedal, O.

    in fishes. Here we show that the omission of expected reward (OER) leads to increased aggression towards conspecifics in classically conditioned Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Furthermore, in response to an acute stressor, OER fish displayed increased dopaminergic (DA) neurotransmission compared to controls....... There was also a general downregulation of dopamine receptor D1 gene expression in the telencephalon of OER groups, which suggests a coping mechanism in response to unbalanced DA metabolism. These results indicate that animals subjected to unpredictable reward conditions develop a senzitation of the DA...

  14. Post-trial dopaminergic modulation of conditioned catalepsy: A single apomorphine induced increase/decrease in dopaminergic activation immediately following a conditioned catalepsy response can reverse/enhance a haloperidol conditioned and sensitized catalepsy response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Lucas Rangel; Dias, Flávia Regina Cruz; Santos, Breno Garone; Silva, Jade Leal Loureiro; Carey, Robert J; Carrera, Marinete Pinheiro

    2016-09-15

    Haloperidol can induce catalepsy and this drug effect can be conditioned as well as sensitized to contextual cues. We used a paired/unpaired Pavlovian conditioning protocol to establish haloperidol catalepsy conditioned and sensitized responses. Groups of rats were given 10 daily catalepsy tests following administration of vehicle (n=24) or haloperidol (1.0mg/kg) either paired (n=18) or unpaired (n=18) to testing. Subsequently, testing for conditioning was conducted and conditioning and sensitization of catalepsy were observed selectively in the paired group. Immediately following a second test for catalepsy conditioning, the groups were subdivided into 4 vehicle groups, 3 unpaired haloperidol groups and 3 paired haloperidol groups and were given one of three post-trial treatments (vehicle, 0.05mg/kg or 2.0mg/kg apomorphine). One day later the conditioned catalepsy test 3 was carried out and on the next day, a haloperidol challenge test was performed. The post-trial apomorphine treatments had major effects on the paired groups upon both conditioning and the haloperidol challenge test. The low dose apomorphine post-trial treatment enhanced both the conditioned and the haloperidol sensitized catalepsy responses. The high dose apomorphine post-trial treatment eliminated conditioned catalepsy and eliminated the initial acute catalepsy response to haloperidol that was induced in the vehicle control groups. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of conditioned drug cues to modification by increases/decreases in activity of the dopamine system in the immediate post-trial interval after a conditioning trial. This demonstration that post-trial dopaminergic drug treatments can modify conditioned drug behavior has broad implications for conditioned drug effects.

  15. Manganese induces endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and activates multiple caspases in nigral dopaminergic neuronal cells, SN4741.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, H S; Lee, H; Son, J H

    2001-12-04

    Chronic exposure to manganese causes Parkinson's disease (PD)-like clinical symptoms (Neurotoxicology 5 (1984) 13; Arch. Neurol. 46 (1989) 1104; Neurology 56 (2001) 4). Occupational exposure to manganese is proposed as a risk factor in specific cases of idiopathic PD (Neurology 56 (2001) 8). We have investigated the mechanism of manganese neurotoxicity in nigral dopaminergic (DA) neurons using the DA cell line, SN4741 (J. Neurosci. 19 (1999) 10). Manganese treatment elicited endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress responses, such as an increased level of the ER chaperone BiP, and simultaneously activated the ER resident caspase-12. Peak activation of other major initiator caspases-like activities, such as caspase-1, -8 and -9, ensued, resulting in activation of caspase-3-like activity during manganese-induced DA cell death. The neurotoxic cell death induced by manganese was significantly reduced in the Bcl-2-overexpressing DA cell lines. Our findings suggest that manganese-induced neurotoxicity is mediated in part by ER stress and considerably ameliorated by Bcl-2 overexpression in DA cells.

  16. Antidepressant-like effect of ursolic acid isolated from Rosmarinus officinalis L. in mice: evidence for the involvement of the dopaminergic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, D G; Neis, V B; Balen, G O; Colla, A; Cunha, M P; Dalmarco, J B; Pizzolatti, M G; Prediger, R D; Rodrigues, A L S

    2012-12-01

    Ursolic acid, a constituent from Rosmarinus officinalis, is a triterpenoid compound which has been extensively known for its anticancer and antioxidant properties. In the present study, we investigated the antidepressant-like effect of ursolic acid isolated from this plant in two predictive tests of antidepressant property, the tail suspension test (TST) and the forced swimming test (FST) in mice. Furthermore, the involvement of dopaminergic system in its antidepressant-like effect was investigated in the TST. Ursolic acid reduced the immobility time in the TST (0.01 and 0.1mg/kg, p.o.) and in the FST (10mg/kg, p.o.), similar to fluoxetine (10mg/kg, p.o.), imipramine (1mg/kg, p.o.) and bupropion (10mg/kg, p.o.). The effect of ursolic acid (0.1mg/kg, p.o.) in the TST was prevented by the pretreatment of mice with SCH23390 (0.05mg/kg, s.c., a dopamine D(1) receptor antagonist) and sulpiride (50mg/kg, i.p., a dopamine D(2) receptor antagonist). The administration of a sub-effective dose of ursolic acid (0.001mg/kg, p.o.) in combination with sub-effective doses of SKF38393 (0.1mg/kg, s.c., a dopamine D(1) receptor agonist), apomorphine (0.5μg/kg, i.p., a preferential dopamine D(2) receptor agonist) or bupropion (1mg/kg, i.p., a dual dopamine/noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor) reduced the immobility time in the TST as compared with either drug alone. Ursolic acid and dopaminergic agents alone or in combination did not cause significant alterations in the locomotor and exploratory activities. These results indicate that the antidepressant-like effect of ursolic acid in the TST is likely mediated by an interaction with the dopaminergic system, through the activation of dopamine D(1) and D(2) receptors.

  17. Activation of phosphoinositide 3-kinase by D2 receptor prevents apoptosis in dopaminergic cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Venugopalan D; Olanow, C Warren; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2003-07-01

    Whereas dopamine agonists are known to provide symptomatic benefits for Parkinson's disease, recent clinical trials suggest that they might also be neuroprotective. Laboratory studies demonstrate that dopamine agonists can provide neuroprotective effects in a number of model systems, but the role of receptor-mediated signalling in these effects is controversial. We find that dopamine agonists have robust, concentration-dependent anti-apoptotic activity in PC12 cells that stably express human D(2L) receptors from cell death due to H(2)O(2) or trophic withdrawal and that the protective effects are abolished in the presence of D(2)-receptor antagonists. D(2) agonists are also neuroprotective in the nigral dopamine cell line SN4741, which express endogenous D(2) receptors, whereas no anti-apoptotic activity is observed in native PC12 cells, which do not express detectable D(2) receptors. Notably, the agonists studied differ in their relative efficacy to mediate anti-apoptotic effects and in their capacity to stimulate [(35)S]guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate ([(35)S]GTP[S]) binding, an indicator of G-protein activation. Studies with inhibitors of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase), extracellular-signal-regulated kinase or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase indicate that the PI 3-kinase pathway is required for D(2) receptor-mediated cell survival. These studies indicate that certain dopamine agonists can complex with D(2) receptors to preferentially transactivate neuroprotective signalling pathways and to mediate increased cell survival.

  18. The effect of Schisandra chinensis extracts on depression by noradrenergic, dopaminergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic systems in the forced swim test in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tingxu; Xu, Mengjie; Wu, Bo; Liao, Zhengzheng; Liu, Zhi; Zhao, Xu; Bi, Kaishun; Jia, Ying

    2016-06-15

    Schisandra chinensis (Turcz.) Baill., as a Chinese functional food, has been widely used in neurological disorders including insomnia and Alzheimer's disease. The treatment of classical neuropsychiatric disorder depression is to be developed from Schisandra chinensis. The antidepressant-like effects of the Schisandra chinensis extracts (SCE), and their probable involvement in the serotonergic, noradrenergic, dopaminergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic systems were investigated by the forced swim test (FST). Acute administration of SCE (600 mg kg(-1), i.g.), a combination of SCE (300 mg kg(-1), i.g.) and reboxetine (a noradrenalin reuptake inhibitor, 2.5 mg kg(-1), i.p.) or imipramine (a TCA, 2 mg kg(-1), i.p.) reduced the immobility time in the FST. Pretreatment with N-(2-chloroethyl)-N-ethyl-2-bromobenzylamine hydrochloride (DSP-4, a selective noradrenergic neurotoxin, 50 mg kg(-1), i.p., 4 days), haloperidol (a non-selective D2 receptor antagonist, 0.2 mg kg(-1), i.p.), SCH 23390 (a selective D1 receptor antagonist, 0.03 mg kg(-1), i.p.), bicuculline (a competitive GABA antagonist, 4 mg kg(-1), i.p.) and N-methyl-d-aspartic acid (NMDA, an agonist at the glutamate site, 75 mg kg(-1), i.p.) effectively reversed the antidepressant-like effect of SCE (600 mg kg(-1), i.g.). However, p-chlorophenylalanine (pCPA, an inhibitor of 5-HT synthesis, 100 mg kg(-1), i.p., 4 days,) did not eliminate the reduced immobility time induced by SCE (600 mg kg(-1), i.g.). Moreover, the treatments did not change the locomotor activity. Altogether, these results indicated that SCE produced antidepressant-like activity, which might be mediated by the modification of noradrenergic, dopaminergic, GABAergic and glutamatergic systems.

  19. Paeoniflorin attenuates neuroinflammation and dopaminergic neurodegeneration in the MPTP model of Parkinson's disease by activation of adenosine A1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hua-Qing; Zhang, Wei-Yu; Luo, Xue-Ting; Ye, Yang; Zhu, Xing-Zu

    2006-06-01

    1. This study examined whether Paeoniflorin (PF), the major active components of Chinese herb Paeoniae alba Radix, has neuroprotective effect in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD). 2. Subcutaneous administration of PF (2.5 and 5 mg kg(-1)) for 11 days could protect tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive substantia nigra neurons and striatal nerve fibers from death and bradykinesia induced by four-dose injection of MPTP (20 mg kg(-1)) on day 8. 3. When given at 1 h after the last dose of MPTP, and then administered once a day for the following 3 days, PF (2.5 and 5 mg kg(-1)) also significantly attenuated the dopaminergic neurodegeneration in a dose-dependent manner. Post-treatment with PF (5 mg kg(-1)) significantly attenuated MPTP-induced proinflammatory gene upregulation and microglial and astrocytic activation. 4. Pretreatment with 0.3 mg kg(-1) 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine, an adenosine A1 receptor (A1AR) antagonist, 15 min before each dose of PF, reversed the neuroprotective and antineuroinflammatory effects of PF. 5. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that PF could reduce the MPTP-induced toxicity by inhibition of neuroinflammation by activation of the A1AR, and suggested that PF might be a valuable neuroprotective agent for the treatment of PD.

  20. Dopaminergic neurotoxicant 6-OHDA induces oxidative damage through proteolytic activation of PKC{delta} in cell culture and animal models of Parkinson's disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latchoumycandane, Calivarathan; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Jin, Huajun; Kanthasamy, Anumantha; Kanthasamy, Arthi, E-mail: arthik@iastate.edu

    2011-11-15

    The neurotoxicant 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is used to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease (PD). Oxidative stress and caspase activation contribute to the 6-OHDA-induced apoptotic cell death of dopaminergic neurons. In the present study, we sought to systematically characterize the key downstream signaling molecule involved in 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic degeneration in cell culture and animal models of PD. Treatment of mesencephalic dopaminergic neuronal N27 cells with 6-OHDA (100 {mu}M) for 24 h significantly reduced mitochondrial activity and increased cytosolic cytochrome c, followed by sequential activation of caspase-9 and caspase-3. Co-treatment with the free radical scavenger MnTBAP (10 {mu}M) significantly attenuated 6-OHDA-induced caspase activities. Interestingly, 6-OHDA induced proteolytic cleavage and activation of protein kinase C delta (PKC{delta}) was completely suppressed by treatment with a caspase-3-specific inhibitor, Z-DEVD-FMK (50 {mu}M). Furthermore, expression of caspase-3 cleavage site-resistant mutant PKC{delta}{sup D327A} and kinase dead PKC{delta}{sup K376R} or siRNA-mediated knockdown of PKC{delta} protected against 6-OHDA-induced neuronal cell death, suggesting that caspase-3-dependent PKC{delta} promotes oxidative stress-induced dopaminergic degeneration. Suppression of PKC{delta} expression by siRNA also effectively protected N27 cells from 6-OHDA-induced apoptotic cell death. PKC{delta} cleavage was also observed in the substantia nigra of 6-OHDA-injected C57 black mice but not in control animals. Viral-mediated delivery of PKC{delta}{sup D327A} protein protected against 6-OHDA-induced PKC{delta} activation in mouse substantia nigra. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that proteolytic activation of PKC{delta} is a key downstream event in dopaminergic degeneration, and these results may have important translational value for

  1. Evidence for the involvement of the noradrenergic system, dopaminergic and imidazoline receptors in the antidepressant-like effect of tramadol in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Cristiano R; Wilhelm, Ethel A; Bortolatto, Cristiani F; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2010-05-01

    The involvement of the noradrenergic system, imidazoline, dopaminergic and adenosinergic receptors in the antidepressant-like action of tramadol in the mouse forced swimming test (FST) was evaluated in this study. The antidepressant-like effect of tramadol (40mg/kg, per oral, p.o.) in the FST was blocked with yohimbine (1mg/kg, i.p., an alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist), alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine methyl ester (AMPT, 100mg/kg, i.p., an inhibitor of tyrosine hydroxylase), efaroxan (1mg/kg, i.p., an imidazoline I(1)/alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist), idazoxan (0.06mg/kg, i.p., an imidazoline I(2)/alpha(2)-adrenoceptor antagonist), antazoline (5mg/kg, i.p., a ligand with high affinity for the I(2) receptor), haloperidol (0.2mg/kg, i.p., a non selective dopamine receptor antagonist), SCH23390 (0.05mg/kg, subcutaneously, s.c., a dopamine D(1) receptor antagonist), sulpiride (50mg/kg, i.p., a dopamine D(2) and D(3) receptor antagonist) but was not reversed by prazosin (1mg/kg, intraperitoneally, i.p., an alpha(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist) and caffeine (3mg/kg, i.p., a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist). Monoamine oxidase-A and -B (MAO-A and MAO-B) activities were neither inhibited in the whole brain nor in specific brain regions of mice treated with tramadol. These data demonstrated that the antidepressant-like effect caused by oral administration of tramadol in the mouse FST is mediated by the noradrenergic system, dopaminergic and imidazoline receptors.

  2. Activated astrocytes enhance the dopaminergic differentiation of stem cells and promote brain repair through bFGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Yunhui; Tu, Jie; Wan, Jun; Zhang, Jie; Wu, Bifeng; Chen, Shanping; Zhou, Jiawei; Mu, Yangling; Wang, Liping

    2014-12-17

    Astrocytes provide neuroprotective effects against degeneration of dopaminergic (DA) neurons and play a fundamental role in DA differentiation of neural stem cells. Here we show that light illumination of astrocytes expressing engineered channelrhodopsin variant (ChETA) can remarkably enhance the release of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and significantly promote the DA differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) in vitro. Light activation of transplanted astrocytes in the substantia nigra (SN) also upregulates bFGF levels in vivo and promotes the regenerative effects of co-transplanted stem cells. Importantly, upregulation of bFGF levels, by specific light activation of endogenous astrocytes in the SN, enhances the DA differentiation of transplanted stem cells and promotes brain repair in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD). Our study indicates that astrocyte-derived bFGF is required for regulation of DA differentiation of the stem cells and may provide a strategy targeting astrocytes for treatment of PD.

  3. The Association Between Genetic Variants in the Dopaminergic System and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: A Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lizhuo; Bao, Yijun; He, Songbai; Wang, Gang; Guan, Yanlei; Ma, Dexuan; Wang, Pengfei; Huang, Xiaolong; Tao, Shanwei; Zhang, Dewei; Liu, Qiwen; Wang, Yunjie; Yang, Jingyun

    2016-03-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a complex mental disorder and can severely interfere with the normal life of the affected people. Previous studies have examined the association of PTSD with genetic variants in multiple dopaminergic genes with inconsistent results. To perform a systematic literature search and conduct meta-analysis to examine whether genetic variants in the dopaminergic system is associated with PTSD. Data Sources: PubMed, Cochrane Library, Embase, Google Scholar, and HuGE. Study eligibility criteria and participants: The studies included subjects who had been screened for the presence of PTSD; the studies provided data for genetic variants of genes involved in the dopaminergic system; the outcomes of interest included diagnosis status of PTSD; and the studies were case-control studies. Study appraisal and synthesis methods: Odds ratio was used as a measure of association. We used random-effects model in all the meta-analyses. Between-study heterogeneity was assessed using I², and publication bias was evaluated using Egger test. Findings from meta-analyses were confirmed using random-effects meta-analyses under the framework of generalized linear model (GLM). A total of 19 studies met the eligibility criteria and were included in our analyses. We found that rs1800497 in DRD2 was significantly associated with PTSD (OR = 1.96, 95% CI: 1.15-3.33; P = 0.014). The 3'-UTR variable number tandem repeat (VNTR) in SLC6A3 also showed significant association with PTSD (OR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.12-2.35; P = 0.010), but there was no association of rs4680 in COMT with PTSD (P = 0.595). Sample size is limited for some studies; type and severity of traumatic events varied across studies; we could not control for potential confounding factors, such as age at traumatic events and gender; and we could not examine gene-environment interaction due to lack of data. We found that rs1800497 in DRD2 and the VNTR in SLC6A3 showed significant

  4. Psychostimulant-Induced Testicular Toxicity in Mice: Evidence of Cocaine and Caffeine Effects on the Local Dopaminergic System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Candela R González

    Full Text Available Several organ systems can be affected by psychostimulant toxicity. However, there is not sufficient evidence about the impact of psychostimulant intake on testicular physiology and catecholaminergic systems. The aim of the present study was to further explore potential toxic consequences of chronic exposure to cocaine, caffeine, and their combination on testicular physiology. Mice were injected with a 13-day chronic binge regimen of caffeine (3x5mg/kg, cocaine (3×10mg/kg, or combined administration. Mice treated with cocaine alone or combined with caffeine showed reduced volume of the seminiferous tubule associated to a reduction in the number of spermatogonia. Cocaine-only and combined treatments induced increased lipid peroxidation evaluated by TBARS assay and decreased glutathione peroxidase mRNA expression. Importantly, caffeine-cocaine combination potentiated the cocaine-induced germ cell loss, and induced pro-apoptotic BAX protein expression and diminished adenosine receptor A1 mRNA levels. We analyzed markers of dopaminergic function in the testis and detected the presence of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH in the cytoplasm of androgen-producing Leydig cells, but also in meiotic germs cells within seminiferous tubules. Moreover, using transgenic BAC-Drd1a-tdTomato and D2R-eGFP mice, we report for the first time the presence of dopamine receptors (DRs D1 and D2 in testicular mouse Leydig cells. Interestingly, the presence of DRD1 was also detected in the spermatogonia nearest the basal lamina of the seminiferous tubules, which did not show TH staining. We observed that psychostimulants induced downregulation of DRs mRNA expression and upregulation of TH protein expression in the testis. These findings suggest a potential role of the local dopaminergic system in psychostimulant-induced testicular pathology.

  5. Disinhibition Bursting of Dopaminergic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin J Lobb

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc dopaminergic neurons receive strong tonic inputs from GABAergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr and globus pallidus (GP, and glutamatergic neurons in the subthalamic nucleus. The presence of these tonic inputs raises the possibility that phasic disinhibition may trigger phasic bursts in dopaminergic neurons. We first applied constant NMDA and GABAA conductances onto a two-compartment single cell model of the dopaminergic neuron (Kuznetsov et al., 2006. The model exhibited disinhibition bursting upon stepwise removal of inhibition. A further bifurcation analysis suggests that disinhibition may be more robust than excitation alone in that for most levels of NMDA conductance, the cell remains capable of bursting even after a complete removal of inhibition, whereas too much excitatory input will drive the cell into depolarization block. To investigate the network dynamics of disinhibition, we used a modified version of an integrate-and-fire based model of the basal ganglia (Humphries et al., 2006. Synaptic activity generated in the network was delivered to the two-compartment single cell dopaminergic neuron. Phasic activation of the D1-expressing medium spiny neurons in the striatum (D1STR produced disinhibition bursts in dopaminergic neurons through the direct pathway (D1STR to SNpr to SNpc. Anatomical studies have shown that D1STR neurons have collaterals that terminate in GP. Adding these collaterals to the model, we found that striatal activation increased the intra-burst firing frequency of the disinhibition burst as the weight of this connection was increased. Our studies suggest that striatal activation is a robust means by which disinhibition bursts can be generated by SNpc dopaminergic neurons, and that recruitment of the indirect pathway via collaterals may enhance disinhibition bursting.

  6. Effects of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on α-synuclein aggregation and the ubiquitin-proteasome system in dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jie; Xie, Hongjun

    2016-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons (PC12 cells) were treated with different doses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs), to investigate their effects on α-Synuclein (α-Syn) aggregation and their mechanism of action. Western blotting and immunofluorescent staining were performed. Exposure to TiO2-NPs increased α-Syn expression (p < 0.05) and induced dose-dependent α-Syn aggregation. Pretreatment with N-acetylcysteine partially inhibited α-Syn expression induced by a 200 μg/ml dose of TiO2-NPs. TiO2-NPs reduced the expressions of parkin and ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase protein, and were associated with oxidative stress in PC12 cells. Dysfunction of the ubiquitin-proteasome system also contributed to α-Syn aggregation. The potentially neurotoxic TiO2-NPs may cause Parkinson's disease.

  7. Activation of Transcription Factor MEF2D by Bis(3)-cognitin Protects Dopaminergic Neurons and Ameliorates Parkinsonian Motor Defects*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lu; Li, Wenming; She, Hua; Dou, Juan; Jia, Leili; He, Yingli; Yang, Qian; Zhu, Jinqiu; Cápiro, Natalie L.; Walker, Douglas I.; Pennell, Kurt D.; Pang, Yuanping; Liu, Yong; Han, Yifan; Mao, Zixu

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by the selective demise of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantial nigra pars compacta. Dysregulation of transcriptional factor myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D) has been implicated in the pathogenic process in in vivo and in vitro models of PD. Here, we identified a small molecule bis(3)-cognitin (B3C) as a potent activator of MEF2D. We showed that B3C attenuated the toxic effects of neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) by activating MEF2D via multiple mechanisms. B3C significantly reduced MPP+-induced oxidative stress and potentiated Akt to down-regulate the activity of MEF2 inhibitor glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) in a DA neuronal cell line SN4741. Furthermore, B3C effectively rescued MEF2D from MPP+-induced decline in both nucleic and mitochondrial compartments. B3C offered SN4741 cells potent protection against MPP+-induced apoptosis via MEF2D. Interestingly, B3C also protected SN4741 cells from wild type or mutant A53T α-synuclein-induced cytotoxicity. Using the in vivo PD model of C57BL/6 mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine hydrochloride (MPTP), we showed that B3C maintained redox homeostasis, promoted Akt function activity, and restored MEF2D level in midbrain neurons. Moreover, B3C greatly prevented the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase signal in substantial nigra pars compacta DA neurons and ameliorated behavioral impairments in mice treated with MPTP. Collectedly, our studies identified B3C as a potent neuroprotective agent whose effectiveness relies on its ability to effectively up-regulate MEF2D in DA neurons against toxic stress in models of PD in vitro and in vivo. PMID:22891246

  8. Activation of transcription factor MEF2D by bis(3)-cognitin protects dopaminergic neurons and ameliorates Parkinsonian motor defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lu; Li, Wenming; She, Hua; Dou, Juan; Jia, Leili; He, Yingli; Yang, Qian; Zhu, Jinqiu; Cápiro, Natalie L; Walker, Douglas I; Pennell, Kurt D; Pang, Yuanping; Liu, Yong; Han, Yifan; Mao, Zixu

    2012-10-05

    Parkinson disease (PD) is characterized by the selective demise of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantial nigra pars compacta. Dysregulation of transcriptional factor myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D) has been implicated in the pathogenic process in in vivo and in vitro models of PD. Here, we identified a small molecule bis(3)-cognitin (B3C) as a potent activator of MEF2D. We showed that B3C attenuated the toxic effects of neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) by activating MEF2D via multiple mechanisms. B3C significantly reduced MPP(+)-induced oxidative stress and potentiated Akt to down-regulate the activity of MEF2 inhibitor glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) in a DA neuronal cell line SN4741. Furthermore, B3C effectively rescued MEF2D from MPP(+)-induced decline in both nucleic and mitochondrial compartments. B3C offered SN4741 cells potent protection against MPP(+)-induced apoptosis via MEF2D. Interestingly, B3C also protected SN4741 cells from wild type or mutant A53T α-synuclein-induced cytotoxicity. Using the in vivo PD model of C57BL/6 mice treated with 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine hydrochloride (MPTP), we showed that B3C maintained redox homeostasis, promoted Akt function activity, and restored MEF2D level in midbrain neurons. Moreover, B3C greatly prevented the loss of tyrosine hydroxylase signal in substantial nigra pars compacta DA neurons and ameliorated behavioral impairments in mice treated with MPTP. Collectedly, our studies identified B3C as a potent neuroprotective agent whose effectiveness relies on its ability to effectively up-regulate MEF2D in DA neurons against toxic stress in models of PD in vitro and in vivo.

  9. The dopaminergic system in patients with functional dyspepsia analysed by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and an alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine (AMPT) challenge test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braak, Breg; Klooker, Tamira K. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Booij, Jan [Academic Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Wijngaard, Rene M.J. van den [Academic Medical Center, Tytgat Institute of Liver and Intestinal Research, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Boeckxstaens, Guy E.E. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Amsterdam (Netherlands); University Hospital Leuven, Catholic University Leuven, Department of Gastroenterology, Leuven (Belgium)

    2012-04-15

    Functional dyspepsia (FD) is a chronic condition characterized by upper abdominal symptoms without an identifiable cause. While the serotonergic system is thought to play a key role in the regulation of gut physiology, the role of the dopaminergic system, which is important in the regulation of visceral pain and stress, is under-studied. Therefore, this study investigated the dopaminergic system and its relationship with drinking capacity and symptoms in FD patients. In FD patients and healthy volunteers (HV) the dopaminergic system was investigated by in-vivo assessment of central dopamine D2 receptors (D2Rs) with [{sup 123}I]IBZM SPECT and by an acute, but reversible, dopamine depletion alpha-methyl-para-tyrosine (AMPT) challenge test. A nutrient drink test was performed to investigate the association between maximal ingested volume, evoked symptoms, and D2Rs. The HV subjects comprised 12 women and 8 men (mean age 31 {+-} 3 years), and the FD patients comprised 5 women and 3 men (mean age 39 {+-} 5 years). The FD patients had a lower left plus right average striatal binding potential (BP{sub NP}) for the caudate nucleus (p = 0.02), but not for putamen (p = 0.15), which in the FD patients was correlated with maximal ingested volume (r = 0.756, p = 0.03). The D2R BP{sub NP} in the putamen was correlated with nausea (r = 0.857, p = 0.01). The acute dopamine depletion test, however, failed to reveal differences in prolactin release between the FD patients and the HV subjects. These preliminary data suggest that chronic rather than acute alterations in the dopaminergic system may be involved in the pathogenesis of FD. Further studies are required to reproduce our novel findings and to evaluate to what extent the dopaminergic changes may be secondary to abnormalities in serotonergic pathways. (orig.)

  10. In vivo imaging of brain dopaminergic neurotransmission system in small animals with high-resolution single photon emission computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saji, Hideo; Kawashima, Hidekazu; Ogawa, Mikako; Kitamura, Youji; Mukai, Takahiro [Kyoto University, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kyoto (Japan); Iida, Yasuhiko; Shimazu, Seiichiro; Yoneda, Fumiro [Fujimoto Pharmaceutical Corporation, Matsubara, Osaka (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides a unique capability to image the biodistribution of radiolabeled molecules in small laboratory animals. Thus, we applied the high-resolution SPECT to in vivo imaging of the brain dopaminergic neurotransmission system in common marmosets using two radiolabeled ligands, [{sup 123}I]2{beta}-carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ({beta}-CIT) as a dopamine transporter(DAT) ligand and [{sup 123}I]iodobenzamide (IBZM) as a dopamine D{sub 2} receptor (D{sub 2}R) ligand. Specific images of the striatum, a region with a high density of dopaminergic synapses, were obtained at 240 min and 60 min after injection of [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT and [{sup 123}I]IBZM, respectively. Furthermore, a significantly low accumulation of [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT in the striatum was observed in MPTP-treated animals compared with results for a control group, and a similar accumulation in the control group was observed with the pretreatment of deprenyl in the MPTP-treated animals. However, the striatal accumulation of [{sup 123}I]IBZM showed no changes among the control, MPTP-treated, and deprenyl-MPTP-treated groups. These SPECT imaging results agreed well with those of DA concentration and motor behavior. Since MPTP destroys nigrostriatal dopamine nerves and produces irreversible neurodegeneration associated with Parkinsonian syndrome, SPECDT imaging data in this study demonstrated that deprenyl shows its neuroprotective effect on Parkinsonism by protecting against the destruction of presynaptic dopamine neutrons. (author)

  11. Acupuncture prevents 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neuronal death in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in the rat Parkinson's disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hi-Joon; Lim, Sabina; Joo, Wan-Seok; Yin, Chang-Shik; Lee, Hyang-Sook; Lee, Hye-Jung; Seo, Jung Chul; Leem, Kanghyun; Son, Yang-Sun; Kim, Youn-Jung; Kim, Chang-Ju; Kim, Yong-Sik; Chung, Joo-Ho

    2003-03-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disorder, and it has been suggested that treatments promoting survival and functional recovery of affected dopaminergic neurons could have a significant and long-term therapeutic value. In the present study, we investigated the neuroprotective effects of acupuncture on the nigrostriatal system in rat unilaterally lesioned with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, 4 microg/microl, intrastriatal injection) using tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor, trkB, immunohistochemistries. Two weeks after the lesions were made, rats presented with asymmetry in rotational behavior (118.3 +/- 17.5 turns/h) following injection with apomorphine, a dopamine receptor agonist (0.5 mg/kg, sc). In contrast, acupunctural treatment at acupoints GB34 and LI3 was shown to significantly reduce this motor deficit (14.6 +/- 13.4 turns/h). Analysis via TH immunohistochemistry revealed a substantial loss of cell bodies in the substantia nigra (SN) (45.7% loss) and their terminals in the dorsolateral striatum ipsilateral to the 6-OHDA-induced lesion. However, acupunctural treatment resulted in the enhanced survival of dopaminergic neurons in the SN (21.4% loss) and their terminals in the dorsolateral striatum. Acupuncture also increased the expression of trkB significantly (35.6% increase) in the ipsilateral SN. In conclusion, we observed that only acupuncturing without the use of any drug has the neuroprotective effects against neuronal death in the rat PD model and these protective properties of acupuncture could be mediated by trkB.

  12. Dopaminergic regulation of circadian food anticipatory activity rhythms in the rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea N Smit

    Full Text Available Circadian activity rhythms are jointly controlled by a master pacemaker in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN and by food-entrainable circadian oscillators (FEOs located elsewhere. The SCN mediates synchrony to daily light-dark cycles, whereas FEOs generate activity rhythms synchronized with regular daily mealtimes. The location of FEOs generating food anticipation rhythms, and the pathways that entrain these FEOs, remain to be clarified. To gain insight into entrainment pathways, we developed a protocol for measuring phase shifts of anticipatory activity rhythms in response to pharmacological probes. We used this protocol to examine a role for dopamine signaling in the timing of circadian food anticipation. To generate a stable food anticipation rhythm, rats were fed 3h/day beginning 6-h after lights-on or in constant light for at least 3 weeks. Rats then received the D2 agonist quinpirole (1 mg/kg IP alone or after pretreatment with the dopamine synthesis inhibitor α-methylparatyrosine (AMPT. By comparison with vehicle injections, quinpirole administered 1-h before lights-off (19h before mealtime induced a phase delay of activity onset prior to the next meal. Delay shifts were larger in rats pretreated with AMPT, and smaller following quinpirole administered 4-h after lights-on. A significant shift was not observed in response to the D1 agonist SKF81297. These results provide evidence that signaling at D2 receptors is involved in phase control of FEOs responsible for circadian food anticipatory rhythms in rats.

  13. The dopaminergic system in peripheral blood lymphocytes: from physiology to pharmacology and potential applications to neuropsychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttarelli, Francesca R; Fanciulli, Alessandra; Pellicano, Clelia; Pontieri, Francesco E

    2011-06-01

    Besides its action on the nervous system, dopamine (DA) plays a role on neural-immune interactions. Here we review the current evidence on the dopaminergic system in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). PBL synthesize DA through the tyrosine-hydroxylase/DOPA-decarboxylase pathway, and express DA receptors and DA transporter (DAT) on their plasma membrane. Stimulation of DA receptors on PBL membrane contributes to modulate the development and initiation of immune responses under physiological conditions and in immune system pathologies such as autoimmunity or immunodeficiency.The characterization of DA system in PBL gave rise to a further line of research investigating the feasibility of PBL as a cellular model for studying DA derangement in neuropsychiatric disorders. Several reports showed changes of the expression of DAT and/or DA receptors in PBL from patients suffering from several neuropsychiatric disorders, in particular parkinsonian syndromes, schizophrenia and drug- or alcohol-abuse. Despite some methodological and theoretical limitations, these findings suggest that PBL may prove a cellular tool with which to identify the derangement of DA transmission in neuropsychiatric diseases, as well as to monitor the effects of pharmacological treatments.

  14. Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) exposure could modify the dopaminergic system in several limbic brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, R; López-Doval, S; Pereiro, N; Lafuente, A

    2016-01-05

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is the most representative of a rising class of persistent organic pollutants perfluorochemicals. In the present study, its neurotoxicity was examined using adult male rats orally treated with 0.5; 1.0; 3.0 and 6.0 mg of PFOS/kg/day for 28 days. At the end of the treatment, the dopamine concentration and its metabolism expressed like the ratio 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC)/dopamine and homovanillic acid (HVA)/dopamine were measured in the amygdala, prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. Gene and protein expression of the dopamine receptors D1 and D2 were also determined in these limbic areas. The obtained results suggest that: (1) PFOS can alter the dopamine system by modifying its neuronal activity and/or its D1 and D2 receptors in the studied brain regions; (2) the dopamine concentration and metabolism seem to be more sensitive against PFOS toxicity in the hippocampus than in the other analyzed brain areas; (3) the inhibited gene and protein expression of the D1 receptors induced by PFOS in the amygdala could be related to several changes in the HPA axis activity, and lastly; (4) the observed alterations on the dopamine system induced by PFOS could be a possible neurotoxicity mechanism of PFOS, leading to many neurological diseases.

  15. Diesel Exhaust Activates & Primes Microglia: Air Pollution, Neuroinflammation, & Regulation of Dopaminergic Neurotoxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air pollution is linked to central nervous system (CNS) disease, but the mechanisms responsible are poorly understood. Rats exposed to Diesel Exhaust (DE, 2.0,0.5, and 0 mg/m3) by inhalation over 4 weeks demonstrated elevated levels of whole brain IL-6 protein, nitrated proteins,...

  16. In actio optophysiological analyses reveal functional diversification of dopaminergic neurons in the nematode C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Yuki; Zheng, Ying Grace; Fei, Xianfeng; Fujie, Yukako; Hashimoto, Koichi; Kimura, Koutarou D.

    2016-05-01

    Many neuronal groups such as dopamine-releasing (dopaminergic) neurons are functionally divergent, although the details of such divergence are not well understood. Dopamine in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans modulates various neural functions and is released from four left-right pairs of neurons. The terminal identities of these dopaminergic neurons are regulated by the same genetic program, and previous studies have suggested that they are functionally redundant. In this study, however, we show functional divergence within the dopaminergic neurons of C. elegans. Because dopaminergic neurons of the animals were supposedly activated by mechanical stimulus upon entry into a lawn of their food bacteria, we developed a novel integrated microscope system that can auto-track a freely-moving (in actio) C. elegans to individually monitor and stimulate the neuronal activities of multiple neurons. We found that only head-dorsal pair of dopaminergic neurons (CEPD), but not head-ventral or posterior pairs, were preferentially activated upon food entry. In addition, the optogenetic activation of CEPD neurons alone exhibited effects similar to those observed upon food entry. Thus, our results demonstrated functional divergence in the genetically similar dopaminergic neurons, which may provide a new entry point toward understanding functional diversity of neurons beyond genetic terminal identification.

  17. Purified Wnt-5a increases differentiation of midbrain dopaminergic cells and dishevelled phosphorylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Gunnar; Bryja, Vítezslav; Rawal, Nina; Castelo-Branco, Goncalo; Sousa, Kyle M; Arenas, Ernest

    2005-03-01

    The Wnt family of lipoproteins regulates several aspects of the development of the nervous system. Recently, we reported that Wnt-3a enhances the proliferation of midbrain dopaminergic precursors and that Wnt-5a promotes their differentiation into dopaminergic neurones. Here we report the purification of hemagglutinin-tagged Wnt-5a using a three-step purification method similar to that previously described for Wnt-3a. Haemagglutinin-tagged Wnt-5a was biologically active and induced the differentiation of immature primary midbrain precursors into tyrosine hydroxylase-positive dopaminergic neurones. Using a substantia nigra-derived dopaminergic cell line (SN4741), we found that Wnt-5a, unlike Wnt-3a, did not promote beta-catenin phosphorylation or stabilization. However, both Wnt-5a and Wnt-3a activated dishevelled, as assessed by a phosphorylation-dependent mobility shift. Moreover, the activity of Wnt-5a on dishevelled was blocked by pre-treatment with acyl protein thioesterase-1, indicating that palmitoylation of Wnt-5a is necessary for its function. Thus, our results suggest that Wnt-3a and Wnt-5a, respectively, activate canonical and non-canonical Wnt signalling pathways in ventral midbrain dopaminergic cells. Furthermore, we identify dishevelled as a key player in transducing both Wnt canonical and non-canonical signals in dopaminergic cells.

  18. In actio optophysiological analyses reveal functional diversification of dopaminergic neurons in the nematode C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanimoto, Yuki; Zheng, Ying Grace; Fei, Xianfeng; Fujie, Yukako; Hashimoto, Koichi; Kimura, Koutarou D.

    2016-01-01

    Many neuronal groups such as dopamine-releasing (dopaminergic) neurons are functionally divergent, although the details of such divergence are not well understood. Dopamine in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans modulates various neural functions and is released from four left-right pairs of neurons. The terminal identities of these dopaminergic neurons are regulated by the same genetic program, and previous studies have suggested that they are functionally redundant. In this study, however, we show functional divergence within the dopaminergic neurons of C. elegans. Because dopaminergic neurons of the animals were supposedly activated by mechanical stimulus upon entry into a lawn of their food bacteria, we developed a novel integrated microscope system that can auto-track a freely-moving (in actio) C. elegans to individually monitor and stimulate the neuronal activities of multiple neurons. We found that only head-dorsal pair of dopaminergic neurons (CEPD), but not head-ventral or posterior pairs, were preferentially activated upon food entry. In addition, the optogenetic activation of CEPD neurons alone exhibited effects similar to those observed upon food entry. Thus, our results demonstrated functional divergence in the genetically similar dopaminergic neurons, which may provide a new entry point toward understanding functional diversity of neurons beyond genetic terminal identification. PMID:27193056

  19. A Genetic Variant (COMT) Coding Dopaminergic Activity Predicts Personality Traits in Healthy Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotyuk, Eszter; Duchek, Janet; Head, Denise; Szekely, Anna; Goate, Alison M; Balota, David A

    2015-08-01

    Association studies between the NEO five factor personality inventory and COMT rs4680 have focused on young adults and the results have been inconsistent. However, personality and cortical changes with age may put older adults in a more sensitive range for detecting a relationship. The present study examined associations of COMT rs4680 and personality in older adults. Genetic association analyses were carried out between the NEO and the targeted COMT rs4680 in a large, well-characterized sample of healthy, cognitively normal older adults (N = 616, mean age = 69.26 years). Three significant associations were found: participants with GG genotype showed lower mean scores on Neuroticism (p = 0.039) and higher scores on Agreeableness (p = 0.020) and Conscientiousness (p = 0.006) than participants with AA or AG genotypes. These results suggest that older adults with higher COMT enzymatic activity (GG), therefore lower dopamine level, have lower Neuroticism scores, and higher Agreeableness and Conscientiousness scores. This is consistent with a recent model of phasic and tonic dopamine release suggesting that even though GG genotype is associated with lower tonic dopamine release, the phasic release of dopamine might be optimal for a more adaptive personality profile.

  20. The antidepressant-like effect of 7-fluoro-1,3-diphenylisoquinoline-1-amine in the mouse forced swimming test is mediated by serotonergic and dopaminergic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesarico, Ana Paula; Sampaio, Tuane Bazanella; Stangherlin, Eluza Curte; Mantovani, Anderson C; Zeni, Gilson; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2014-10-03

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of monoaminergic system in the antidepressant-like action of 7-fluoro-1,3-diphenylisoquinoline-1-amine (FDPI), a derivative of isoquinoline class, in Swiss mice. The antidepressant-like effect of FDPI was characterized in the modified forced swimming test (FST) and the possible mechanism of action was investigated by using serotonergic, dopaminergic and noradrenergic antagonists. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) activity and [(3)H]serotonin (5-HT) uptake were determined in prefrontal cortices of mice. The results showed that FDPI (1, 10 and 20mg/kg, i.g.) reduced the immobility time and increased the swimming time but did not alter climbing time in the modified FST. These effects were similar to those of paroxetine (8mg/kg, i.p.), a positive control. Pretreatments with p-chlorophenylalanine (100mg/kg, i.p., an inhibitor of 5-HT synthesis), WAY100635 (0.1mg/kg, s.c., 5-HT1A antagonist), ondansetron (1mg/kg, i.p., a 5-HT3 receptor antagonist), haloperidol (0.2mg/kg, i.p., a non-selective D2 receptor antagonist) and SCH23390 (0.05mg/kg, s.c., a D1 receptor antagonist) were effective to block the antidepressant-like effect of FDPI at a dose of 1mg/kg in the FST. Ritanserin (1mg/kg, i.p., a 5-HT2A/2C receptor antagonist), sulpiride (50mg/kg, i.p., a D2 and D3 receptor antagonist), prazosin (1mg/kg, i.p., an α1 receptor antagonist), yohimbine (1mg/kg, i.p., an α2 receptor antagonist) and propranolol (2mg/kg, i.p., a β receptor antagonist) did not modify the effect of FDPI in the FST. FDPI did not change synaptosomal [(3)H]5-HT uptake. At doses of 10 and 20mg/kg FDPI inhibited MAO-A and MAO-B activities. These results suggest that antidepressant-like effect of FDPI is mediated mostly by serotonergic and dopaminergic systems.

  1. Alterations in pharmacological sensitivity of GABAergic but not dopaminergic and glutamatergic systems during ontogenesis in dystonic mutant hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, A; Löscher, W

    1993-01-26

    Attacks of sustained dystonia of the limbs and trunk can be initiated by handling or mild environmental stimuli (e.g. new cage) in mutant (gene symbol dtsz) Syrian golden hamsters. The severity of the dystonic syndrome in these mutant hamsters is age-dependent, with a peak at weaning (21 days of age) and a second peak at about 30-40 days of age. Spontaneous remission occurs at an age of about 70 days. The syndrome in hamsters is thus similar to transient paroxysmal dystonia in children. In the present experiments, it was examined whether dystonic hamsters exhibit age-dependent differences in susceptibility to drugs which affect GABA (gamma-aminobutyrate)ergic, glutamatergic or dopaminergic functions. After acute administration, the GABA-elevating drug aminooxyacetic acid was significantly less potent in attenuating the severity of dystonic attacks at 21 days than at 31 days of age. Similar but less marked age-dependent differences in antidystonic activity were found for phenobarbital and diazepam. In contrast to these GABAmimetic drugs, the NMDA receptor antagonist CGP 37849 (DL-[E]-2-amino-4-methyl-5-phosphono-3-pentenoic acid) or the dopamine receptor antagonist haloperidol had about the same antidystonic potency at both 21 and 31 days of age. Chronic treatment of dystonic hamsters with aminooxyacetic acid, starting at 21 days of age, did not alter the time course or the severity of dystonia.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. High vitamin A intake during pregnancy modifies dopaminergic reward system and decreases preference for sucrose in Wistar rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Hernández, Diana; Poon, Abraham N; Kubant, Ruslan; Kim, Hwanki; Huot, Pedro S P; Cho, Clara E; Pannia, Emanuela; Reza-López, Sandra A; Pausova, Zdenka; Bazinet, Richard P; Anderson, G Harvey

    2016-01-01

    High multivitamin (HV) content in gestational diets has long-term metabolic effects in rat offspring. These changes are associated with in utero modifications of gene expression in hypothalamic food intake regulation. However, the role of fat-soluble vitamins in mediating these effects has not been explored. Vitamin A is a plausible candidate due to its role in gene methylation. Vitamin A intake above requirements during pregnancy affects the development of neurocircuitries involved in food intake and reward regulation. Pregnant Wistar rats were fed AIN-93G diets with the following content: recommended multivitamins (1-fold multivitamins: RV), high vitamin A (10-fold vitamin A: HA) or HV with only recommended vitamin A (10-fold multivitamins, 1-fold vitamin A: HVRA). Body weight, food intake and preference, mRNA expression and DNA methylation of hippocampal dopamine-related genes were assessed in male offspring brains at different developmental windows: birth, weaning and 14weeks postweaning. HA offspring had changes in dopamine-related gene expression at all developmental windows and DNA hypermethylation in the dopamine receptor 2 promoter region compared to RV offspring. Furthermore, HA diet lowered sucrose preference but had no effect on body weight and expression of hypothalamic genes. In contrast, HVRA offspring showed only at adulthood changes in expression of hippocampal genes and a modest effect on hypothalamic genes. High vitamin A intake alone in gestational diets has long-lasting programming effects on the dopaminergic system that are further translated into decreased sucrose preference but not food intake.

  3. β-Caryophyllene, a phytocannabinoid attenuates oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, glial activation, and salvages dopaminergic neurons in a rat model of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, Shreesh; Javed, Hayate; Azimullah, Sheikh; Haque, M Emdadul

    2016-07-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive dopaminergic neurodegeneration in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) area. The present study was undertaken to evaluate the neuroprotective effect of β-caryophyllene (BCP) against rotenone-induced oxidative stress and neuroinflammation in a rat model of PD. In the present study, BCP was administered once daily for 4 weeks at a dose of 50 mg/kg body weight prior to a rotenone (2.5 mg/kg body weight) challenge to mimic the progressive neurodegenerative nature of PD. Rotenone administration results in oxidative stress as evidenced by decreased activities of superoxide dismutase, catalase, and depletion of glutathione with a concomitant rise in lipid peroxidation product, malondialdehyde. Rotenone also significantly increased pro-inflammatory cytokines in the midbrain region and elevated the inflammatory mediators such as cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in the striatum. Further, immunohistochemical analysis revealed loss of dopaminergic neurons in the SNc area and enhanced expression of ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule-1 (Iba-1) and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), indicators of microglia activation, and astrocyte hypertrophy, respectively, as an index of inflammation. However, treatment with BCP rescued dopaminergic neurons and decreased microglia and astrocyte activation evidenced by reduced Iba-1 and GFAP expression. BCP in addition to attenuation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and inflammatory mediators such as COX-2 and iNOS, also restored antioxidant enzymes and inhibited lipid peroxidation as well as glutathione depletion. The findings demonstrate that BCP provides neuroprotection against rotenone-induced PD and the neuroprotective effects can be ascribed to its potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities.

  4. Dose-dependent response of central dopaminergic systems to buspirone in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, S A; Gaikwad, R V; Gaonkar, R K; Thorat, V M; Gursale, S C; Balsara, J J

    2008-10-01

    Buspirone, a partial agonist of 5-hydroxytryptaminelA autoreceptors, preferentially blocks the presynaptic rather than the postsynaptic D2 dopamine (DA) receptors. Behavioural effects of a wide dose range of buspirone were therefore studied in mice. Buspirone at 0.625 to 5 mg/kg ip induced stereotyped cage climbing behaviour which was antagonized by pretreatment with haloperidol, alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine and small doses of apomorphine. Buspirone at 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg ip induced catalepsy and antagonized oral stereotypies induced by high doses of apomorphine and methamphetamine and apomorphine-induced cage climbing behaviour. The findings indicate that buspirone at 0.625 to 5 mg/kg selectively blocks the presynaptic mesolimbic D2 DA autoreceptors and releases DA which stimulates the postsynaptic mesolimbic D2 and D1 DA receptors and induces cage climbing behaviour. Buspirone, at 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg blocks the postsynaptic striatal and mesolimbic D2 and D1 DA receptors. Pretreatment with 1-tryptophan, dexfenfluramine and fluoxetine antagonized buspirone induced cage climbing behaviour and potentiated buspirone induced catalepsy. Pretreatment with trazodone, mianserin and p-chlorophenylalanine potentiated buspirone induced cage climbing behaviour and antagonized buspirone induced catalepsy. The results indicate that drugs which influence the activity of central serotonergic systems modulate the intensity of buspirone induced cage climbing behaviour and catalepsy.

  5. Smoking-specific parenting and smoking onset in adolescence: the role of genes from the dopaminergic system (DRD2, DRD4, DAT1 genotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marieke Hiemstra

    Full Text Available Although only few studies have shown direct links between dopaminergic system genes and smoking onset, this does not rule out the effect of a gene-environment interaction on smoking onset. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the associations between smoking-specific parenting (i.e., frequency and quality of communication and house rules and smoking onset while considering the potential moderating role of dopaminergic system genes (i.e., DRD2, DRD4, and DAT1 genotypes. Data from five annual waves of the 'Family and Health' project were used. At time 1, the sample comprised 365 non-smoking adolescents (200 younger adolescents, mean age = 13.31, SD = .48; 165 older adolescents, mean age = 15.19, SD = .57. Advanced longitudinal analyses were used (i.e., logistic regression analyses, (dual latent growth curves, and cross-lagged path models. The results showed a direct effect of quality of communication on smoking onset. No direct effects were found for frequency of communication and house rules. Furthermore, no direct and moderating effects of the DRD2, DRD4, or DAT1 genotypes were found. In conclusion, the findings indicated that the effects of smoking-specific parenting on smoking are similar for adolescent carriers and non-carriers of the dopaminergic system genes.

  6. Smoking-specific parenting and smoking onset in adolescence: the role of genes from the dopaminergic system (DRD2, DRD4, DAT1 genotypes).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, Marieke; Engels, Rutger C M E; Barker, Edward D; van Schayck, Onno C P; Otten, Roy

    2013-01-01

    Although only few studies have shown direct links between dopaminergic system genes and smoking onset, this does not rule out the effect of a gene-environment interaction on smoking onset. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the associations between smoking-specific parenting (i.e., frequency and quality of communication and house rules) and smoking onset while considering the potential moderating role of dopaminergic system genes (i.e., DRD2, DRD4, and DAT1 genotypes). Data from five annual waves of the 'Family and Health' project were used. At time 1, the sample comprised 365 non-smoking adolescents (200 younger adolescents, mean age = 13.31, SD = .48; 165 older adolescents, mean age = 15.19, SD = .57). Advanced longitudinal analyses were used (i.e., logistic regression analyses, (dual) latent growth curves, and cross-lagged path models). The results showed a direct effect of quality of communication on smoking onset. No direct effects were found for frequency of communication and house rules. Furthermore, no direct and moderating effects of the DRD2, DRD4, or DAT1 genotypes were found. In conclusion, the findings indicated that the effects of smoking-specific parenting on smoking are similar for adolescent carriers and non-carriers of the dopaminergic system genes.

  7. Restricted cortical and amygdaloid removal of vesicular glutamate transporter 2 in preadolescent mice impacts dopaminergic activity and neuronal circuitry of higher brain function.

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    Wallén-Mackenzie, Asa; Nordenankar, Karin; Fejgin, Kim; Lagerström, Malin C; Emilsson, Lina; Fredriksson, Robert; Wass, Caroline; Andersson, Daniel; Egecioglu, Emil; Andersson, My; Strandberg, Joakim; Lindhe, Orjan; Schiöth, Helgi B; Chergui, Karima; Hanse, Eric; Långström, Bengt; Fredriksson, Anders; Svensson, Lennart; Roman, Erika; Kullander, Klas

    2009-02-18

    A major challenge in neuroscience is to resolve the connection between gene functionality, neuronal circuits, and behavior. Most, if not all, neuronal circuits of the adult brain contain a glutamatergic component, the nature of which has been difficult to assess because of the vast cellular abundance of glutamate. In this study, we wanted to determine the role of a restricted subpopulation of glutamatergic neurons within the forebrain, the Vglut2-expressing neurons, in neuronal circuitry of higher brain function. Vglut2 expression was selectively deleted in the cortex, hippocampus, and amygdala of preadolescent mice, which resulted in increased locomotor activity, altered social dominance and risk assessment, decreased sensorimotor gating, and impaired long-term spatial memory. Presynaptic VGLUT2-positive terminals were lost in the cortex, striatum, nucleus accumbens, and hippocampus, and a downstream effect on dopamine binding site availability in the striatum was evident. A connection between the induced late-onset, chronic reduction of glutamatergic neurotransmission and dopamine signaling within the circuitry was further substantiated by a partial attenuation of the deficits in sensorimotor gating by the dopamine-stabilizing antipsychotic drug aripiprazole and an increased sensitivity to amphetamine. Somewhat surprisingly, given the restricted expression of Vglut2 in regions responsible for higher brain function, our analyses show that VGLUT2-mediated neurotransmission is required for certain aspects of cognitive, emotional, and social behavior. The present study provides support for the existence of a neurocircuitry that connects changes in VGLUT2-mediated neurotransmission to alterations in the dopaminergic system with schizophrenia-like behavioral deficits as a major outcome.

  8. Dopaminergic control of the globus pallidus through activation of D2 receptors and its impact on the electrical activity of subthalamic nucleus and substantia nigra reticulata neurons.

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    Omar Mamad

    Full Text Available The globus pallidus (GP receives dopaminergic afferents from the pars compacta of substantia nigra and several studies suggested that dopamine exerts its action in the GP through presynaptic D2 receptors (D2Rs. However, the impact of dopamine in GP on the pallido-subthalamic and pallido-nigral neurotransmission is not known. Here, we investigated the role of dopamine, through activation of D2Rs, in the modulation of GP neuronal activity and its impact on the electrical activity of subthalamic nucleus (STN and substantia nigra reticulata (SNr neurons. Extracellular recordings combined with local intracerebral microinjection of drugs were done in male Sprague-Dawley rats under urethane anesthesia. We showed that dopamine, when injected locally, increased the firing rate of the majority of neurons in the GP. This increase of the firing rate was mimicked by quinpirole, a D2R agonist, and prevented by sulpiride, a D2R antagonist. In parallel, the injection of dopamine, as well as quinpirole, in the GP reduced the firing rate of majority of STN and SNr neurons. However, neither dopamine nor quinpirole changed the tonic discharge pattern of GP, STN and SNr neurons. Our results are the first to demonstrate that dopamine through activation of D2Rs located in the GP plays an important role in the modulation of GP-STN and GP-SNr neurotransmission and consequently controls STN and SNr neuronal firing. Moreover, we provide evidence that dopamine modulate the firing rate but not the pattern of GP neurons, which in turn control the firing rate, but not the pattern of STN and SNr neurons.

  9. Repeated dexamphetamine treatment alters the dopaminergic system and increases the phMRI response to methylphenidate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrantee, Anouk; Tremoleda, Jordi L.; Wylezinska-Arridge, Marzena; Bouet, Valentine; Hesseling, Peter; Meerhoff, Gideon F.; de Bruin, Kora M.; Koeleman, Jan; Freret, Thomas; Boulouard, Michel; Desfosses, Emilie; Galineau, Laurent; Gozzi, Alessandro; Dauphin, François; Gsell, Willy; Booij, Jan; Lucassen, Paul J.; Reneman, Liesbeth

    2017-01-01

    Dexamphetamine (AMPH) is a psychostimulant drug that is used both recreationally and as medication for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that repeated exposure to AMPH can induce damage to nerve terminals of dopamine (DA) neurons. We here assessed the underlying neurobiological changes in the DA system following repeated AMPH exposure and pre-treated rats with AMPH or saline (4 times 5 mg/kg s.c., 2 hours apart), followed by a 1-week washout period. We then used pharmacological MRI (phMRI) with a methylphenidate (MPH) challenge, as a sensitive and non-invasive in-vivo measure of DAergic function. We subsequently validated the DA-ergic changes post-mortem, using a.o. high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and autoradiography. In the AMPH pre-treated group, we observed a significantly larger BOLD response to the MPH challenge, particularly in DA-ergic brain areas and their downstream projections. Subsequent autoradiography studies showed that AMPH pre-treatment significantly reduced DA transporter (DAT) density in the caudate-putamen (CPu) and nucleus accumbens, whereas HPLC analysis revealed increases in the DA metabolite homovanillic acid in the CPu. Our results suggest that AMPH pre-treatment alters DAergic responsivity, a change that can be detected with phMRI in rats. These phMRI changes likely reflect increased DA release together with reduced DAT binding. The ability to assess subtle synaptic changes using phMRI is promising for both preclinical studies of drug discovery, and for clinical studies where phMRI can be a useful tool to non-invasively investigate DA abnormalities, e.g. in neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:28241065

  10. Evolutionarily conserved organization of the dopaminergic system in lamprey: SNc/VTA afferent and efferent connectivity and D2 receptor expression.

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    Pérez-Fernández, Juan; Stephenson-Jones, Marcus; Suryanarayana, Shreyas M; Robertson, Brita; Grillner, Sten

    2014-12-01

    The dopaminergic system influences motor behavior, signals reward and novelty, and is an essential component of the basal ganglia in all vertebrates including the lamprey, one of the phylogenetically oldest vertebrates. The intrinsic organization and function of the lamprey basal ganglia is highly conserved. For instance, the direct and indirect pathways are modulated through dopamine D1 and D2 receptors in lamprey and in mammals. The nucleus of the tuberculum posterior, a homologue of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc)/ventral tegmental area (VTA) is present in lamprey, but only scarce data exist about its connectivity. Likewise, the D2 receptor is expressed in the striatum, but little is known about its localization in other brain areas. We used in situ hybridization and tracer injections, both in combination with tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry, to characterize the SNc/VTA efferent and afferent connectivity, and to relate its projection pattern with D2 receptor expression in particular. We show that most features of the dopaminergic system are highly conserved. As in mammals, the direct pallial (cortex in mammals) input and the basal ganglia connectivity with the SNc/VTA are present as part of the evaluation system, as well as input from the tectum as the evolutionary basis for salience/novelty detection. Moreover, the SNc/VTA receives sensory information from the olfactory bulbs, optic tectum, octavolateral area, and dorsal column nucleus, and it innervates, apart from the nigrostriatal pathway, several motor-related areas. This suggests that the dopaminergic system also contributes to the control of different motor centers at the brainstem level.

  11. Expression and function of nr4a2, lmx1b, and pitx3 in zebrafish dopaminergic and noradrenergic neuronal development

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    Willaredt Marc

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Dopaminergic neurons form in diverse areas of the vertebrate di- and mesencephalon to constitute several major neuromodulatory systems. While much is known about mammalian mesencephalic dopaminergic neuron development, little is known about the specification of the diencephalic dopaminergic groups. The transcription factors Pitx3 and Lmx1b play an important role in mammalian mesencephalic dopaminergic specification, and Nurr1/Nr4a2 has been shown to contribute to specification of the dopaminergic neurotransmitter phenotype. We use zebrafish to analyze potentially evolutionarily conserved roles of these transcription factors in a vertebrate brain that lacks a mesencephalic dopaminergic system, but has an ascending dopaminergic system in the ventral diencephalon. Results: We use a combination of fluorescent in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to determine whether nr4a2, lmx1b, and pitx3 genes are expressed in mature dopaminergic neurons or in potential precursor populations. We identify a second nr4a2 paralogue, nr4a2a, and find it co-expressed with Tyrosine hydroxylase in preoptic, pretectal and retinal amacrine dopaminergic neurons, while nr4a2b is only expressed in preoptic and retinal dopaminergic neurons. Both zebrafish nr4a2 paralogues are not expressed in ventral diencephalic dopaminergic neurons with ascending projections. Combined morpholino antisense oligo mediated knock-down of both nr4a2a and nr4a2b transcripts reveals that all zebrafish dopaminergic neurons expressing nr4a2a depend on Nr4a2 activity for tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine transporter expression. Zebrafish lmx1b.1 is expressed in noradrenergic neurons of the locus coeruleus and medulla oblongata, but knock-down reveals that it is specifically required for tyrosine hydroxylase expression only in the medulla oblongata area postrema noradrenergic neurons. Both lmx1b genes and pitx3 are not expressed in dopaminergic neurons, but in a

  12. Do Substantia Nigra Dopaminergic Neurons Differentiate Between Reward and Punishment?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michael J. Frank; D. James Surmeier

    2009-01-01

    The activity of dopaminergic neurons are thought to be increased by stimuli that predict reward and decreased by stimuli that predict aversive outcomes. Recent work by Matsumoto and Hikosaka challenges this model by asserting that stimuli associated with either rewarding or aversive outcomes increase the activity of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta.

  13. Somatodendritic ion channel expression in substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons across postnatal development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Martial A; Woodhouse, Adele; Goaillard, Jean-Marc

    2014-08-01

    Dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) are involved in the control of movement, sleep, reward, learning, and nervous system disorders and disease. To date, a thorough characterization of the ion channel phenotype of this important neuronal population is lacking. Using immunohistochemistry, we analyzed the somatodendritic expression of voltage-gated ion channel subunits that are involved in pacemaking activity in SNc dopaminergic neurons in 6-, 21-, and 40-day-old rats. Our results demonstrate that the same complement of somatodendritic ion channels is present in SNc dopaminergic neurons from P6 to P40. The major developmental changes were an increase in the dendritic range of the immunolabeling for the HCN, T-type calcium, Kv4.3, delayed rectifier, and SK channels. Our study sheds light on the ion channel subunits that contribute to the somatodendritic delayed rectifier (Kv1.3, Kv2.1, Kv3.2, Kv3.3), A-type (Kv4.3) and calcium-activated SK (SK1, SK2, SK3) potassium currents, IH (mainly HCN2, HCN4), and the L- (Cav1.2, Cav1.3) and T-type (mainly Cav3.1, Cav3.3) calcium currents in SNc dopaminergic neurons. Finally, no robust differences in voltage-gated ion channel immunolabeling were observed across the population of SNc dopaminergic neurons for each age examined, suggesting that differing levels of individual ion channels are unlikely to distinguish between specific subpopulations of SNc dopaminergic neurons. This is significant in light of previous studies suggesting that age- or region-associated variations in the expression profile of voltage-gated ion channels in SNc dopaminergic neurons may underlie their vulnerability to dysfunction and disease.

  14. Antidepressant-like effect of 17beta-estradiol: involvement of dopaminergic, serotonergic, and (or) sigma-1 receptor systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhir, Ashish; Kulkarni, S K

    2008-10-01

    17beta-estradiol has been reported to possess antidepressant-like activity in animal models of depression, although the mechanism for its effect is not well understood. The present study is an effort in this direction to explore the mechanism of the antidepressant-like effect of 17beta-estradiol in a mouse model(s) of behavioral depression (despair behavior). Despair behavior, expressed as helplessness to escape from a situation (immobility period), as in a forced swim test in which the animals are forced to swim for a total of 6 min, was recorded. The antiimmobility effects (antidepressant-like) of 17beta-estradiol were compared with those of standard drugs like venlafaxine (16 mg/kg, i.p.). 17beta-estradiol produced a U-shaped effect in decreasing the immobility period. It had no effect on locomotor activity of the animal. The antidepressant-like effect was comparable to that of venlafaxine (16 mg/kg, i.p.). 17beta-estradiol also exhibited a similar profile of antidepressant action in the tail suspension test. When coadministered with other antidepressant drugs, 17beta-estradiol (5 microg/kg, i.p.) potentiated the antiimmobility effect of subeffective doses of fluoxetine (5 mg/kg, i.p.), venlafaxine (2 mg/kg, i.p.), or bupropion (10 mg/kg, i.p.), but not of desipramine (5 mg/kg, i.p.) or tranylcypromine (2 mg/kg, i.p.), in the forced swim test. The reduction in the immobility period elicited by 17beta-estradiol (20 microg/kg, i.p.) was reversed by haloperidol (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.; a D(2) dopamine receptor antagonist), SCH 23390 (0.5 mg/kg, i.p.; a D(1) dopamine receptor antagonist), and sulpiride (5 mg/kg, i.p.; a specific dopamine D(2) receptor antagonist). In mice pretreated with (+)-pentazocine (2.5 mg/kg, i.p.; a high-affinity sigma-1 receptor agonist), 17beta-estradiol (5 microg/kg, i.p.) produced a synergistic effect. In contrast, pretreatment with progesterone (10 mg/kg, s.c.; a sigma-1 receptor antagonist neurosteroid), rimcazole (5 mg/kg, i.p.; another sigma

  15. Histamine H3 Receptor Regulates Sensorimotor Gating and Dopaminergic Signaling in the Striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kononoff Vanhanen, Jenni; Nuutinen, Saara; Tuominen, Mervi; Panula, Pertti

    2016-05-01

    The brain histamine system has been implicated in regulation of sensorimotor gating deficits and in Gilles de la Tourette syndrome. Histamine also regulates alcohol reward and consumption via H3 receptor (H3R), possibly through an interaction with the brain dopaminergic system. Here, we identified the histaminergic mechanism of sensorimotor gating and the role of histamine H3R in the regulation of dopaminergic signaling. We found that H3R knockout mice displayed impaired prepulse inhibition (PPI), indicating deficiency in sensorimotor gating. Histamine H1 receptor knockout and histidine decarboxylase knockout mice had similar PPI as their controls. Dopaminergic drugs increased PPI of H3R knockout mice to the same level as in control mice, suggesting that changes in dopamine receptors might underlie deficient PPI response when H3R is lacking. Striatal dopamine D1 receptor mRNA level was lower, and D1 and D2 receptor-mediated activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 was absent in the striatum of H3R knockout mice, suggesting that H3R is essential for the dopamine receptor-mediated signaling. In conclusion, these findings demonstrate that H3R is an important regulator of sensorimotor gating, and the lack of H3R significantly modifies striatal dopaminergic signaling. These data support the usefulness of H3R ligands in neuropsychiatric disorders with preattentional deficits and disturbances in dopaminergic signaling.

  16. [Impact of opiates on dopaminergic neurons].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufling, Jennifer; Freund-Mercier, Marie-José; Barrot, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Since the work of Johnson and North, it is known that opiates increase the activity of dopaminergic neurons by a GABA neuron-mediated desinhibition. This model should however be updated based on recent advances. Thus, the neuroanatomical location of the GABA neurons responsible for this desinhibition has been recently detailed: they belong to a brain structure in continuity with the posterior part of the ventral tegmental area and discovered this past decade. Other data also highlighted the critical role played by glutamatergic transmission in the opioid regulation of dopaminergic neuron activity. During protracted opiate withdrawal, the inhibitory/excitatory balance exerted on dopaminergic neurons is altered. These results are now leading to propose an original hypothesis for explaining the impact of protracted opiate withdrawal on mood.

  17. The role of the dopaminergic system in mood, motivation and cognition in Parkinson's disease: a double blind randomized placebo-controlled experimental challenge with pramipexole and methylphenidate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drijgers, Rosa L; Verhey, Frans R J; Tissingh, Gerrit; van Domburg, Peter H M F; Aalten, Pauline; Leentjens, Albert F G

    2012-09-15

    In Parkinson's disease (PD) reduced dopaminergic activity in the mesocorticolimbic pathway is implied in the pathophysiology of several non-motor symptoms related to mood, motivation and cognition. Insight in the pathophysiology of these syndromes may pave the way for more rational treatments. In a double-blind, randomized, placebo controlled, crossover design with three arms, we studied the effects of a direct dopaminergic challenge with the dopamine 2 receptor agonist pramipexole, an indirect challenge with the dopamine reuptake inhibitor methylphenidate, and placebo on measures of mood, motivation and cognition in 23 agonist-naïve PD patients and 23 healthy controls. Acute challenge with pramipexole had a negative effect on mood and fatigue in both patients and controls. In addition, challenge with pramipexole led to increased anger, fatigue, vigor and tension in healthy control subjects, but not in PD patients. Challenge with methylphenidate had a positive effect on anhedonia and vigor in PD patients. Due to its side effects after a single administration, pramipexole is probably less suitable for acute challenge studies. The acute effects of a methylphenidate challenge on anhedonia and vigor in PD patients make this drug an interesting choice for further studies of the treatment of mood and motivational disorders in this population.

  18. Simultaneous effects on parvalbumin-positive interneuron and dopaminergic system development in a transgenic rat model for sporadic schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburg, Hannah; Trossbach, Svenja V.; Bader, Verian; Chwiesko, Caroline; Kipar, Anja; Sauvage, Magdalena; Crum, William R.; Vernon, Anthony C.; Bidmon, Hans J.; Korth, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    To date, unequivocal neuroanatomical features have been demonstrated neither for sporadic nor for familial schizophrenia. Here, we investigated the neuroanatomical changes in a transgenic rat model for a subset of sporadic chronic mental illness (CMI), which modestly overexpresses human full-length, non-mutant Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), and for which aberrant dopamine homeostasis consistent with some schizophrenia phenotypes has previously been reported. Neuroanatomical analysis revealed a reduced density of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and reduced dopaminergic fibres in the striatum. Parvalbumin-positive interneuron occurrence in the somatosensory cortex was shifted from layers II/III to V/VI, and the number of calbindin-positive interneurons was slightly decreased. Reduced corpus callosum thickness confirmed trend-level observations from in vivo MRI and voxel-wise tensor based morphometry. These neuroanatomical changes help explain functional phenotypes of this animal model, some of which resemble changes observed in human schizophrenia post mortem brain tissues. Our findings also demonstrate how a single molecular factor, DISC1 overexpression or misassembly, can account for a variety of seemingly unrelated morphological phenotypes and thus provides a possible unifying explanation for similar findings observed in sporadic schizophrenia patients. Our anatomical investigation of a defined model for sporadic mental illness enables a clearer definition of neuroanatomical changes associated with subsets of human sporadic schizophrenia. PMID:27721451

  19. A glycoside of Nicotina tabacum affects mouse dopaminergic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Y; Ohnuma, S; Kawagoe, M; Sugiyama, T

    2003-01-01

    Climbing in the forced swimming test is considered a dopaminergic-specific behavior. A substance of Nicotina tabacum affecting dopamine neuronal activity was investigated using the mouse behavioral system. The substance was found to be a glycoside with the peripheral sugar chain structures Fuc alpha 1-2Gal, Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc and GalNAc alpha 1-3GalNAc and with basic polymannoses. The glycoside dose-dependently increased behavior via D2 neuronal activity, but not D1 activity. This suggests that smoking can affect human brain function not only via the nicotinic cholinergic neuron, but also via the D2 neuron.

  20. Laser Acupuncture at HT7 Acupoint Improves Cognitive Deficit, Neuronal Loss, Oxidative Stress, and Functions of Cholinergic and Dopaminergic Systems in Animal Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattanathorn, Jintanaporn; Sutalangka, Chatchada

    2014-01-01

    To date, the therapeutic strategy against cognitive impairment in Parkinson's disease (PD) is still not in satisfaction level and requires novel effective intervention. Based the oxidative stress reduction and cognitive enhancement induced by laser acupuncture at HT7, the beneficial effect of laser acupuncture at HT7 against cognitive impairment in PD has been focused. In this study, we aimed to determine the effect of laser acupuncture at HT7 on memory impairment, oxidative stress status, and the functions of both cholinergic and dopaminergic systems in hippocampus of animal model of PD. Male Wistar rats, weighing 180-220 g, were induced unilateral lesion at right substantianigra by 6-OHDA and were treated with laser acupuncture continuously at a period of 14 days. The results showed that laser acupuncture at HT7 enhanced memory and neuron density in CA3 and dentate gyrus. The decreased AChE, MAO-B, and MDA together with increased GSH-Px in hippocampus of a 6-OHDA lesion rats were also observed. In conclusion, laser acupuncture at HT7 can improve neuron degeneration and memory impairment in animal model of PD partly via the decreased oxidative stress and the improved cholinergic and dopaminergic functions. More researches concerning effect of treatment duration are still required.

  1. Modification of the striatal dopaminergic neuron system by carbon monoxide exposure in free-moving rats, as determined by in vivo brain microdialysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Shuichi; Kurosaki, Kunihiko; Kuriiwa, Fumi; Endo, Takahiko [Department of Forensic Medicine, Tokyo Medical University, 6-1-1 Shinjuku, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8402 (Japan); Mukai, Toshiji [Department of Legal Medicine, St. Marianna University School of Medicine, 2-16-1 Sugao, Miyamae-ku, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 216-0015 (Japan)

    2002-10-01

    Acute carbon monoxide (CO) intoxication in humans results in motor deficits, which resemble those in Parkinson's disease, suggesting possible disturbance of the central dopaminergic (DAergic) neuronal system by CO exposure. In the present study, therefore, we explored the effects of CO exposure on the DAergic neuronal system in the striatum of freely moving rats by means of in vivo brain microdialysis. Exposure of rats to CO (up to 0.3%) for 40 min caused an increase in extracellular dopamine (DA) levels and a decrease in extracellular levels of its major metabolites, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), in the striatum depending on the CO concentration. Reoxygenation following termination of the CO exposure resulted in a decline of DA to the control level and an overshoot in the recovery of DOPAC and HVA to levels higher than the control. A monoamine oxidase type A (MAO-A) inhibitor, clorgyline, significantly potentiated the CO-induced increase in DA and completely abolished the subsequent overshoot in the recovery of DOPAC and HVA. Tetrodotoxin, a Na{sup +} channel blocker, completely abolished both the CO-induced increase in DA and the overshoot of DOPAC and HVA. A DA uptake inhibitor, nomifensine, strongly potentiated the CO-induced increase in DA without affecting the subsequent overshoot of DOPAC and HVA. Clorgyline further potentiated the effect of nomifensine on the CO-induced increase in DA, although a slight overshoot of DOPAC and HVA appeared. These findings suggest that (1) CO exposure may stimulate Na{sup +}-dependent DA release in addition to suppressing DA metabolism, resulting in a marked increase in extracellular DA in rat striatum, and (2) CO withdrawal and subsequent reoxygenation may enhance the oxidative metabolism, preferentially mediated by MAO-A, of the increased extracellular DA. In the light of the neurotoxicity of DA per se and reactive substances, such as quinones and activated oxygen species

  2. Endogenous dopamine is involved in the herbicide paraquat-induced dopaminergic cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Yasuhiko; Ezumi, Masayuki; Takada-Takatori, Yuki; Akaike, Akinori; Kume, Toshiaki

    2014-06-01

    The herbicide paraquat is an environmental factor that may be involved in the etiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). Systemic exposure of mice to paraquat causes a selective loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, although paraquat is not selectively incorporated in dopaminergic neurons. Here, we report a contribution of endogenous dopamine to paraquat-induced dopaminergic cell death. Exposure of PC12 cells to paraquat (50μM) caused delayed toxicity from 36 h onward. A decline in intracellular dopamine content achieved by inhibiting tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), an enzyme for dopamine synthesis, conferred resistance to paraquat toxicity on dopaminergic cells. Paraquat increased the levels of cytosolic and vesicular dopamine, accompanied by transiently increased TH activity. Quinone derived from cytosolic dopamine conjugates with cysteine residues in functional proteins to form quinoproteins. Formation of quinoprotein was transiently increased early during exposure to paraquat. Furthermore, pretreatment with ascorbic acid, which suppressed the elevations of intracellular dopamine and quinoprotein, almost completely prevented paraquat toxicity. These results suggest that the elevation of cytosolic dopamine induced by paraquat participates in the vulnerability of dopaminergic cells to delayed toxicity through the formation of quinoproteins.

  3. Systemic administration of valproic acid and zonisamide promotes the survival and differentiation of induced pluripotent stem cell–derived dopaminergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya eYoshikawa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell replacement therapy using embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs is a promising strategy for the treatment of neurologic diseases such as Parkinson’s disease (PD. However, a limiting factor for effective cell transplantation is the low survival rate of grafted cells, especially neurons. In this study, we modified the host environment and investigated whether the simultaneous administration of soluble factors can improve the survival and differentiation of murine iPSC-derived dopaminergic (DA neurons in host brains. With the goal of applying this technology in clinical settings in the near future, we selected drugs that were already approved for clinical use. The drugs included two commonly used anticonvulsants, valproic acid (VPA and zonisamide (ZNS, and estradiol (E2, also known as biologically active estrogen. Following neural induction of murine iPSCs, we collected neural progenitor cells by sorting PSA-NCAM+ cells, then treated the PSA-NCAM+ cells with drugs for four days. An immunofluorescence study revealed that 0.01 mM and 0.1 mM of VPA and 10 nM of E2 increased the percentage of tyrosine hydroxylase+ (TH: a DA neuron marker cells in vitro. Furthermore, 0.1 mM of VPA increased the percentage of TH+ cells that simultaneously express the midbrain markers FOXA2 and NURR1. Next, in order to determine the effects of the drugs in vivo, the iPSC-derived NPCs were transplanted into the striata of intact SD rats. The animals received intraperitoneal injections of one of the drugs for four weeks, then were subjected to an immunofluorescence study. VPA administration (150 mg/kg/daily increased the number of NeuN+ postmitotic neurons and TH+ DA neurons in the grafts. Furthermore, VPA (150 mg/kg/daily and ZNS (30 mg/kg/daily increased the number of TH+FOXA2+ midbrain DA neurons. These results suggest that the systemic administration of VPA and ZNS may improve the efficiency of cell replacement therapy using i

  4. Behavioural, biochemical and molecular changes induced by chronic crack-cocaine inhalation in mice: The role of dopaminergic and endocannabinoid systems in the prefrontal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Areal, Lorena B; Rodrigues, Livia C M; Andrich, Filipe; Moraes, Livia S; Cicilini, Maria A; Mendonça, Josideia B; Pelição, Fabricio S; Nakamura-Palacios, Ester M; Martins-Silva, Cristina; Pires, Rita G W

    2015-09-01

    Crack-cocaine addiction has increasingly become a public health problem worldwide, especially in developing countries. However, no studies have focused on neurobiological mechanisms underlying the severe addiction produced by this drug, which seems to differ from powder cocaine in many aspects. This study investigated behavioural, biochemical and molecular changes in mice inhaling crack-cocaine, focusing on dopaminergic and endocannabinoid systems in the prefrontal cortex. Mice were submitted to two inhalation sessions of crack-cocaine a day (crack-cocaine group) during 11 days, meanwhile the control group had no access to the drug. We found that the crack-cocaine group exhibited hyperlocomotion and a peculiar jumping behaviour ("escape jumping"). Blood collected right after the last inhalation session revealed that the anhydroecgonine methyl ester (AEME), a specific metabolite of cocaine pyrolysis, was much more concentrated than cocaine itself in the crack-cocaine group. Most genes related to the endocannabinoid system, CB1 receptor and cannabinoid degradation enzymes were downregulated after 11-day crack-cocaine exposition. These changes may have decreased dopamine and its metabolites levels, which in turn may be related with the extreme upregulation of dopamine receptors and tyrosine hydroxylase observed in the prefrontal cortex of these animals. Our data suggest that after 11 days of crack-cocaine exposure, neuroadaptive changes towards downregulation of reinforcing mechanisms may have taken place as a result of neurochemical changes observed on dopaminergic and endocannabinoid systems. Successive changes like these have never been described in cocaine hydrochloride models before, probably because AEME is only produced by cocaine pyrolysis and this metabolite may underlie the more aggressive pattern of addiction induced by crack-cocaine.

  5. Dopaminergic modulation of mitral cell activity in the frog olfactory bulb: a combined radioligand binding-electrophysiological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchamp, A.; Moyse, E.; Delaleu, J.-C.; Coronas, V.; Duchamp-Viret, P. [Laboratoire de Physiologie Neurosensorielle, Universite Claude Bernard and CNRS, F69622 Villeurbanne (France)

    1997-04-28

    Dopamine content in the amphibian olfactory bulb is supplied by interneurons scattered among mitral cells in the external plexiform/mitral cell layer. In mammals, dopamine has been found to be involved in various aspects of bulbar information processing by influencing mitral cell odour responsiveness. Dopamine action in the bulb depends directly on the localization of its receptor targets, found to be mainly of the D{sub 2} type in mammals. The present study assessed, in the frog, both the anatomical localization of D{sub 2}-like, radioligand-labelled receptors of dopamine and the in vivo action of dopamine on unitary mitral cell activity in response to odours delivered over a wide range of concentrations. The [{sup 125}I]iodosulpride-labelled D{sub 2} binding sites were visualized on frozen sagittal sections of frog brains by film radioautography. The sites were found to be restricted to the external plexiform/mitral cell layer; other layers of the olfactory bulb were devoid of specific labelling. Electrophysiological recordings of mitral unit activity revealed that dopamine or its agonist apomorphine induced a drastic reduction of spontaneous firing rate of mitral cells in most cases without altering odour intensity coding properties of these cells. Moreover, pre-treatment with the D{sub 2} antagonist eticlopride blocked the dopamine-induced reduction of mitral cell spontaneous activity.In the frog olfactory bulb, both anatomical localization of D{sub 2}-like receptors and functional data on dopamine involvement in information processing differ from those reported in mammals. This suggests a phylogenetic evolution of dopamine action in the olfactory bulb. In the frog, anatomical data perfectly corroborate electrophysiological results, together strongly suggesting a direct action of dopamine on mitral cells. In a physiologically operating system, such an action would result in a global improvement of signal-to-noise ratio. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B

  6. Long Withdrawal of Methylphenidate Induces a Differential Response of the Dopaminergic System and Increases Sensitivity to Cocaine in the Prefrontal Cortex of Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maurício dos Santos Pereira

    Full Text Available Methylphenidate (MPD is one of the most prescribed drugs for alleviating the symptoms of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD. However, changes in the molecular mechanisms related to MPD withdrawal and susceptibility to consumption of other psychostimulants in normal individuals or individuals with ADHD phenotype are not completely understood. The aims of the present study were: (i to characterize the molecular differences in the prefrontal dopaminergic system of SHR and Wistar strains, (ii to establish the neurochemical consequences of short- (24 hours and long-term (10 days MPD withdrawal after a subchronic treatment (30 days with Ritalin® (Methylphenidate Hydrochloride; 2.5 mg/kg orally, (iii to investigate the dopaminergic synaptic functionality after a cocaine challenge in adult MPD-withdrawn SHR and Wistar rats. Our results indicate that SHR rats present reduced [3H]-Dopamine uptake and cAMP accumulation in the prefrontal cortex (PFC and are not responsive to dopaminergic stimuli in when compared to Wistar rats. After a 24-hour withdrawal of MPD, SHR did not present any alterations in [3H]-Dopamine Uptake, [3H]-SCH 23390 binding and cAMP production; nonetheless, after a 10-day MPD withdrawal, the results showed a significant increase of [3H]-Dopamine uptake, of the quantity of [3H]-SCH 23390 binding sites and of cAMP levels in these animals. Finally, SHR that underwent a 10-day MPD withdrawal and were challenged with cocaine (10 mg/kg i.p. presented reduced [3H]-Dopamine uptake and increased cAMP production. Wistar rats were affected by the 10-day withdrawal of MPD in [3H]-dopamine uptake but not in cAMP accumulation; in addition, cocaine was unable to induce significant modifications in [3H]-dopamine uptake and in cAMP levels after the 10-day withdrawal of MPD. These results indicate a mechanism that could explain the high comorbidity between ADHD adolescent patients under methylphenidate treatment and substance abuse in adult

  7. Long Withdrawal of Methylphenidate Induces a Differential Response of the Dopaminergic System and Increases Sensitivity to Cocaine in the Prefrontal Cortex of Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos Pereira, Maurício; Sathler, Matheus Figueiredo; Valli, Thais da Rosa; Marques, Richard Souza; Ventura, Ana Lucia Marques; Peccinalli, Ney Ronner; Fraga, Mabel Carneiro; Manhães, Alex C.; Kubrusly, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPD) is one of the most prescribed drugs for alleviating the symptoms of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). However, changes in the molecular mechanisms related to MPD withdrawal and susceptibility to consumption of other psychostimulants in normal individuals or individuals with ADHD phenotype are not completely understood. The aims of the present study were: (i) to characterize the molecular differences in the prefrontal dopaminergic system of SHR and Wistar strains, (ii) to establish the neurochemical consequences of short- (24 hours) and long-term (10 days) MPD withdrawal after a subchronic treatment (30 days) with Ritalin® (Methylphenidate Hydrochloride; 2.5 mg/kg orally), (iii) to investigate the dopaminergic synaptic functionality after a cocaine challenge in adult MPD-withdrawn SHR and Wistar rats. Our results indicate that SHR rats present reduced [3H]-Dopamine uptake and cAMP accumulation in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and are not responsive to dopaminergic stimuli in when compared to Wistar rats. After a 24-hour withdrawal of MPD, SHR did not present any alterations in [3H]-Dopamine Uptake, [3H]-SCH 23390 binding and cAMP production; nonetheless, after a 10-day MPD withdrawal, the results showed a significant increase of [3H]-Dopamine uptake, of the quantity of [3H]-SCH 23390 binding sites and of cAMP levels in these animals. Finally, SHR that underwent a 10-day MPD withdrawal and were challenged with cocaine (10 mg/kg i.p.) presented reduced [3H]-Dopamine uptake and increased cAMP production. Wistar rats were affected by the 10-day withdrawal of MPD in [3H]-dopamine uptake but not in cAMP accumulation; in addition, cocaine was unable to induce significant modifications in [3H]-dopamine uptake and in cAMP levels after the 10-day withdrawal of MPD. These results indicate a mechanism that could explain the high comorbidity between ADHD adolescent patients under methylphenidate treatment and substance abuse in adult life

  8. Long Withdrawal of Methylphenidate Induces a Differential Response of the Dopaminergic System and Increases Sensitivity to Cocaine in the Prefrontal Cortex of Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos Pereira, Maurício; Sathler, Matheus Figueiredo; Valli, Thais da Rosa; Marques, Richard Souza; Ventura, Ana Lucia Marques; Peccinalli, Ney Ronner; Fraga, Mabel Carneiro; Manhães, Alex C; Kubrusly, Regina

    2015-01-01

    Methylphenidate (MPD) is one of the most prescribed drugs for alleviating the symptoms of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). However, changes in the molecular mechanisms related to MPD withdrawal and susceptibility to consumption of other psychostimulants in normal individuals or individuals with ADHD phenotype are not completely understood. The aims of the present study were: (i) to characterize the molecular differences in the prefrontal dopaminergic system of SHR and Wistar strains, (ii) to establish the neurochemical consequences of short- (24 hours) and long-term (10 days) MPD withdrawal after a subchronic treatment (30 days) with Ritalin® (Methylphenidate Hydrochloride; 2.5 mg/kg orally), (iii) to investigate the dopaminergic synaptic functionality after a cocaine challenge in adult MPD-withdrawn SHR and Wistar rats. Our results indicate that SHR rats present reduced [3H]-Dopamine uptake and cAMP accumulation in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and are not responsive to dopaminergic stimuli in when compared to Wistar rats. After a 24-hour withdrawal of MPD, SHR did not present any alterations in [3H]-Dopamine Uptake, [3H]-SCH 23390 binding and cAMP production; nonetheless, after a 10-day MPD withdrawal, the results showed a significant increase of [3H]-Dopamine uptake, of the quantity of [3H]-SCH 23390 binding sites and of cAMP levels in these animals. Finally, SHR that underwent a 10-day MPD withdrawal and were challenged with cocaine (10 mg/kg i.p.) presented reduced [3H]-Dopamine uptake and increased cAMP production. Wistar rats were affected by the 10-day withdrawal of MPD in [3H]-dopamine uptake but not in cAMP accumulation; in addition, cocaine was unable to induce significant modifications in [3H]-dopamine uptake and in cAMP levels after the 10-day withdrawal of MPD. These results indicate a mechanism that could explain the high comorbidity between ADHD adolescent patients under methylphenidate treatment and substance abuse in adult life.

  9. Early specification of dopaminergic phenotype during ES cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Meng

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding how lineage choices are made during embryonic stem (ES cell differentiation is critical for harnessing strategies for controlled production of therapeutic somatic cell types for cell transplantation and pharmaceutical drug screens. The in vitro generation of dopaminergic neurons, the type of cells lost in Parkinson's disease patients' brains, requires the inductive molecules sonic hedgehog and FGF8, or an unknown stromal cell derived inducing activity (SDIA. However, the exact identity of the responding cells and the timing of inductive activity that specify a dopaminergic fate in neural stem/progenitors still remain elusive. Results Using ES cells carrying a neuroepithelial cell specific vital reporter (Sox1-GFP and FACS purification of Sox1-GFP neural progenitors, we have investigated the temporal aspect of SDIA mediated dopaminergic neuron specification during ES cell differentiation. Our results establish that SDIA induces a dopaminergic neuron fate in nascent neural stem or progenitor cells at, or prior to, Sox1 expression and does not appear to have further instructive role or neurotrophic activity during late neuronal differentiation of neural precursors. Furthermore, we show that dopaminergic neurons could be produced efficiently in a monolayer differentiation paradigm independent of SDIA activity or exogenous signalling molecules. In this case, the competence for dopaminergic neuron differentiation is also established at the level of Sox1 expression. Conclusion Dopaminergic neurons are specified early during mouse ES cell differentiation. The subtype specification seems to be tightly linked with the acquisition of a pan neuroectoderm fate.

  10. Dopaminergic D2 receptor is a key player in the substantia nigra pars compacta neuronal activation mediated by REM sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proença, Mariana B; Dombrowski, Patrícia A; Da Cunha, Claudio; Fischer, Luana; Ferraz, Anete C; Lima, Marcelo M S

    2014-01-01

    Currently, several studies addresses the novel link between sleep and dopaminergic neurotransmission, focusing most closely on the mechanisms by which Parkinson's disease (PD) and sleep may be intertwined. Therefore, variations in the activity of afferents during the sleep cycles, either at the level of DA cell bodies in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and/or substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) or at the level of dopamine (DA) terminals in limbic areas may impact functions such as memory. Accordingly, we performed striatal and hippocampal neurochemical quantifications of DA, serotonin (5-HT) and metabolites of rats intraperitoneally treated with haloperidol (1.5 mg/kg) or piribedil (8 mg/kg) and submitted to REM sleep deprivation (REMSD) and sleep rebound (REB). Also, we evaluated the effects of REMSD on motor and cognitive parameters and SNpc c-Fos neuronal immunoreactivity. The results indicated that DA release was strongly enhanced by piribedil in the REMSD group. In opposite, haloperidol prevented that alteration. A c-Fos activation characteristic of REMSD was affected in a synergic manner by piribedil, indicating a strong positive correlation between striatal DA levels and nigral c-Fos activation. Hence, we suggest that memory process is severely impacted by both D2 blockade and REMSD and was even more by its combination. Conversely, the activation of D2 receptor counteracted such memory impairment. Therefore, the present evidence reinforce that the D2 receptor is a key player in the SNpc neuronal activation mediated by REMSD, as a consequence these changes may have direct impact for cognitive and sleep abnormalities found in patients with PD. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'The Synaptic Basis of Neurodegenerative Disorders'.

  11. Do dopaminergic gene polymorphisms affect mesolimbic reward activation of music listening response? Therapeutic impact on Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Chen, Thomas J H; Chen, Amanda L H; Madigan, Margaret; Downs, B William; Waite, Roger L; Braverman, Eric R; Kerner, Mallory; Bowirrat, Abdalla; Giordano, John; Henshaw, Harry; Gold, Mark S

    2010-03-01

    Using fMRI, Menon and Levitin [9] clearly found for the first time that listening to music strongly modulates activity in a network of mesolimbic structures involved in reward processing including the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA), as well as the hypothalamus, and insula, which are thought to be involved in regulating autonomic and physiological responses to rewarding and emotional stimuli. Importantly, responses in the NAc and VTA were strongly correlated pointing to an association between dopamine release and NAc response to music. Listing to pleasant music induced a strong response and significant activation of the VTA-mediated interaction of the NAc with the hypothalamus, insula, and orbitofrontal cortex. Blum et al. [10] provided the first evidence that the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2) Taq 1 A1 allele significantly associated with severe alcoholism whereby the author's suggested that they found the first "reward gene" located in the mesolimbic system. The enhanced functional and effective connectivity between brain regions mediating reward, autonomic, and cognitive processing provides insight into understanding why listening to music is one of the most rewarding and pleasurable human experiences. However, little is known about why some people have a more or less powerful mesolimbic experience when they are listening to music. It is well-known that music may induce an endorphinergic response that is blocked by naloxone, a known opioid antagonist (Goldstein [19]). Opioid transmission in the NAc is associated with dopamine release in the VTA. Moreover, dopamine release in the VTA is linked to polymorphisms of the DRD2 gene and even attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), whereby carriers of the DRD2 A1 allele show a reduced NAc release of dopamine (DA). Thus it is conjectured that similar mechanisms in terms of adequate dopamine release and subsequent activation of reward circuitry by listening to music might also be

  12. Contribution of the central dopaminergic system in the anti-hypertensive effect of kinin B1 receptor antagonists in two rat models of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Brito Gariepy, H; Carayon, P; Ferrari, B; Couture, R

    2010-04-01

    Kinins are neuroactive peptides that could play a role in central autonomic control of blood pressure. Whereas kinin B1R binding sites were increased in specific brain areas of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Angiotensin II (AngII)-hypertensive rats, the contribution of kinin B1R in hypertension remains controversial. The aims of the study were to determine: (a) the effects on mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) of centrally and peripherally administered B1R antagonists in SHR (16weeks) and AngII-hypertensive rats (200ng/kg/minx2weeks, s.c.); (b) the contribution of central dopamine in the effects of SSR240612. The rationale is based on the overactivity of the dopaminergic system in hypertension. In both models, SSR240612 (1, 5 and 10mg/kg, gavage) reduced dose-dependently MAP (-75mm Hg at least up to 6-8h) and this therapeutic effect was resolved after 24h. At the dose of 5mg/kg, SSR240612-induced anti-hypertension was prevented by two dopamine receptor blockers, namely raclopride (0.16mg/kg, i.v.) and haloperidol (10mg/kg, s.c.). I.c.v. SSR240612 (1mug) decreased rapidly MAP in both models (1-6h) via a raclopride sensitive mechanism. In comparison, peripherally acting B1R antagonists (R-715 and R-954, 2mg/kg, s.c.) caused shorter and very modest decreases of MAP (from -20 to -30mm Hg). Centrally or peripherally administered B1R antagonists had no effect on MAP in control Wistar-Kyoto rats. Data provide the first pharmacological evidence that the up-regulated brain kinin B1R contributes through a central dopaminergic mechanism (DA-D2R) to the maintenance of arterial hypertension in genetic and experimental animal models of hypertension.

  13. Compensatory weight gain due to dopaminergic hypofunction: new evidence and own incidental observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohr Iwo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is increasing evidence for a role of dopamine in the development of obesity. More specifically, dopaminergic hypofunction might lead to (overcompensatory food intake. Overeating and resulting weight gain may be induced by genetic predisposition for lower dopaminergic activity, but might also be a behavioral mechanism of compensating for decreased dopamine signaling after dopaminergic overstimulation, for example after smoking cessation or overconsumption of high palatable food. This hypothesis is in line with our incidental finding of increased weight gain after discontinuation of pharmaceutical dopaminergic overstimulation in rats. These findings support the crucial role of dopaminergic signaling for eating behaviors and offer an explanation for weight-gain after cessation of activities associated with high dopaminergic signaling. They further support the possibility that dopaminergic medication could be used to moderate food intake.

  14. Tetramethylpyrazine Analogue CXC195 Protects Against Dopaminergic Neuronal Apoptosis via Activation of PI3K/Akt/GSK3β Signaling Pathway in 6-OHDA-Induced Parkinson's Disease Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Cheng, Li; Wei, Xinbing; Yuan, Zheng; Wu, Yanmei; Wang, Shuaishuai; Ren, Zhiping; Liu, Xinyong; Liu, Huiqing

    2016-12-22

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder and characterized by motor system disorders resulting in loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons. CXC195, a novel tetramethylpyrazine derivative, has been shown strongest neuroprotective effects due to its anti-apoptotic activity. However, whether CXC195 protects against DA neuronal damage in PD and the mechanisms underlying its beneficial effects are unknown. The purpose of our study was to investigate the potential neuroprotective role of CXC195 and to elucidate its mechanism of action against 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced mouse model of PD. CXC195 administration improved DA neurodegeneration in PD mice induced by 6-OHDA. Our further findings confirmed treatment of CXC195 at the dose of 10 mg/kg significantly inhibited the apoptosis by decreasing the level of cleaved caspase-3 and Bax, and increasing the level of Bcl-2 in 6-OHDA-lesioned mice. Meanwhile, 6-OHDA also decreased the amount of phosphorylated Akt while increased GSK-3β activity (the amount of phosphorylated GSK-3β at Ser9 was decreased) which was prevented by CXC195. Wortmannin, a specific PI3K inhibitor, dramatically abolished the changes induced by CXC195. Our study firstly demonstrated that CXC195 protected against DA neurodegeneration in 6-OHDA-induced PD model by its anti-apoptotic properties and PI3K/Akt/GSK3β signaling pathway was involved in it.

  15. Converging roles of ion channels, calcium, metabolic stress, and activity pattern of Substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons in health and Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Johanna; Pötschke, Christina; Liss, Birgit

    2016-10-01

    Dopamine-releasing neurons within the Substantia nigra (SN DA) are particularly vulnerable to degeneration compared to other dopaminergic neurons. The age-dependent, progressive loss of these neurons is a pathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD), as the resulting loss of striatal dopamine causes its major movement-related symptoms. SN DA neurons release dopamine from their axonal terminals within the dorsal striatum, and also from their cell bodies and dendrites within the midbrain in a calcium- and activity-dependent manner. Their intrinsically generated and metabolically challenging activity is created and modulated by the orchestrated function of different ion channels and dopamine D2-autoreceptors. Here, we review increasing evidence that the mechanisms that control activity patterns and calcium homeostasis of SN DA neurons are not only crucial for their dopamine release within a physiological range but also modulate their mitochondrial and lysosomal activity, their metabolic stress levels, and their vulnerability to degeneration in PD. Indeed, impaired calcium homeostasis, lysosomal and mitochondrial dysfunction, and metabolic stress in SN DA neurons represent central converging trigger factors for idiopathic and familial PD. We summarize double-edged roles of ion channels, activity patterns, calcium homeostasis, and related feedback/feed-forward signaling mechanisms in SN DA neurons for maintaining and modulating their physiological function, but also for contributing to their vulnerability in PD-paradigms. We focus on the emerging roles of maintained neuronal activity and calcium homeostasis within a physiological bandwidth, and its modulation by PD-triggers, as well as on bidirectional functions of voltage-gated L-type calcium channels and metabolically gated ATP-sensitive potassium (K-ATP) channels, and their probable interplay in health and PD. We propose that SN DA neurons possess several feedback and feed-forward mechanisms to protect and adapt

  16. Recent Advances in Imaging of Dopaminergic Neurons for Evaluation of Neuropsychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lie-Hang Shen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine is the most intensely studied monoaminergic neurotransmitter. Dopaminergic neurotransmission plays an important role in regulating several aspects of basic brain function, including motor, behavior, motivation, and working memory. To date, there are numerous positron emission tomography (PET and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT radiotracers available for targeting different steps in the process of dopaminergic neurotransmission, which permits us to quantify dopaminergic activity in the living human brain. Degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine system causes Parkinson’s disease (PD and related Parkinsonism. Dopamine is the neurotransmitter that has been classically associated with the reinforcing effects of drug abuse. Abnormalities within the dopamine system in the brain are involved in the pathophysiology of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. Dopamine receptors play an important role in schizophrenia and the effect of neuroleptics is through blockage of dopamine D2 receptors. This review will concentrate on the radiotracers that have been developed for imaging dopaminergic neurons, describe the clinical aspects in the assessment of neuropsychiatric disorders, and suggest future directions in the diagnosis and management of such disorders.

  17. Post effect of repetitive exposures to pressure nitrogen-induced narcosis on the dopaminergic activity at atmospheric pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoute, C; Weiss, M; Sainty, J M; Risso, J J; Rostain, J C

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen at pressure produces a neurological syndrome called nitrogen narcosis. Neurochemical experiments indicated that a single exposure to 3 MPa of nitrogen reduced the concentration of dopamine by 20% in the striatum, a structure involved in the control of extrapyramidal motor activity. This effect of nitrogen was explained by enhanced GABAergic neurotransmission through GABAA receptors and, to a lesser extent, by a decreased glutamatergic input to DA cells through NMDA receptors. The aim of this study was to study, under normobaric conditions, possible alterations of NMDA receptor activity in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) induced by repetitive exposures to nitrogen pressure. Under general anesthesia, male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted in the striatum with multifiber carbon dopamine-sensitive electrodes and in the SNc with guide cannulae for drug injections. After recovery from surgery, the striatal dopamine level was recorded by voltammetry in freely-moving rats, in normobaric conditions, before and after 5 repetitive exposures to 1MPa of nitrogen (threshold of nitrogen narcosis occurrence in rat). The effect of NMDA receptor activity on DA concentration was investigated using agonist (NMDA) and specific antagonist (AP7) SNc administration. Following repetitive nitrogen exposures, the ability of NMDA to elevate DA concentrations was enhanced. In contrast, after nitrogen exposure AP7 produced a paradoxical increase in DA concentration compared to its inhibitory effect before any exposure. Similar responses were obtained after a single exposure to 3MPa nitrogen. Thus, repetitive exposures to nitrogen narcosis produced a sensitization of postsynaptic NMDA receptors on DA cells, related to a decreased glutamatergic input in SNc. Consequently, successive nitrogen narcosis exposures disrupted ion-channel receptor activity revealing a persistent nitrogen-induced neurochemical change underlying the pathologic process.

  18. Paeoniflorin attenuates neuroinflammation and dopaminergic neurodegeneration in the MPTP model of Parkinson's disease by activation of adenosine A1 receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Hua-Qing; Zhang, Wei-Yu; Luo, Xue-Ting; Ye, Yang; Zhu, Xing-Zu

    2006-01-01

    This study examined whether Paeoniflorin (PF), the major active components of Chinese herb Paeoniae alba Radix, has neuroprotective effect in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of Parkinson's disease (PD).Subcutaneous administration of PF (2.5 and 5 mg kg−1) for 11 days could protect tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive substantia nigra neurons and striatal nerve fibers from death and bradykinesia induced by four-dose injection of MPTP (20 mg kg−1) on day 8.When...

  19. Dopaminergic modulation of the striatal microcircuit: receptor-specific configuration of cell assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Hernández-López, Salvador; Tapia, Dagoberto; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, José

    2011-10-19

    Selection and inhibition of motor behaviors are related to the coordinated activity and compositional capabilities of striatal cell assemblies. Striatal network activity represents a main step in basal ganglia processing. The dopaminergic system differentially regulates distinct populations of striatal medium spiny neurons (MSNs) through the activation of D(1)- or D(2)-type receptors. Although postsynaptic and presynaptic actions of these receptors are clearly different in MSNs during cell-focused studies, their activation during network activity has shown inconsistent responses. Therefore, using electrophysiological techniques, functional multicell calcium imaging, and neuronal population analysis in rat corticostriatal slices, we describe the effect of selective dopaminergic receptor activation in the striatal network by observing cell assembly configurations. At the microcircuit level, during striatal network activity, the selective activation of either D(1)- or D(2)-type receptors is reflected as overall increases in neuronal synchronization. However, graph theory techniques applied to the transitions between network states revealed receptor-specific configurations of striatal cell assemblies: D(1) receptor activation generated closed trajectories with high recurrence and few alternate routes favoring the selection of specific sequences, whereas D(2) receptor activation created trajectories with low recurrence and more alternate pathways while promoting diverse transitions among neuronal pools. At the single-cell level, the activation of dopaminergic receptors enhanced the negative-slope conductance region (NSCR) in D(1)-type-responsive cells, whereas in neurons expressing D(2)-type receptors, the NSCR was decreased. Consequently, receptor-specific network dynamics most probably result from the interplay of postsynaptic and presynaptic dopaminergic actions.

  20. Prokineticin-2 upregulation during neuronal injury mediates a compensatory protective response against dopaminergic neuronal degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Richard; Neal, Matthew L.; Luo, Jie; Langley, Monica R.; Harischandra, Dilshan S.; Panicker, Nikhil; Charli, Adhithiya; Jin, Huajun; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Woodruff, Trent M.; Zhou, Qun-Yong; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G.; Kanthasamy, Arthi

    2016-01-01

    Prokineticin-2 (PK2), a recently discovered secreted protein, regulates important physiological functions including olfactory biogenesis and circadian rhythms in the CNS. Interestingly, although PK2 expression is low in the nigral system, its receptors are constitutively expressed on nigrostriatal neurons. Herein, we demonstrate that PK2 expression is highly induced in nigral dopaminergic neurons during early stages of degeneration in multiple models of Parkinson's disease (PD), including PK2 reporter mice and MitoPark mice. Functional studies demonstrate that PK2 promotes mitochondrial biogenesis and activates ERK and Akt survival signalling pathways, thereby driving neuroprotection. Importantly, PK2 overexpression is protective whereas PK2 receptor antagonism exacerbates dopaminergic degeneration in experimental PD. Furthermore, PK2 expression increased in surviving nigral dopaminergic neurons from PD brains, indicating that PK2 upregulation is clinically relevant to human PD. Collectively, our results identify a paradigm for compensatory neuroprotective PK2 signalling in nigral dopaminergic neurons that could have important therapeutic implications for PD. PMID:27703142

  1. Quantification of dopaminergic neurotransmission SPECT studies with {sup 123}I-labelled radioligands. A comparison between different imaging systems and data acquisition protocols using Monte Carlo simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespo, Cristina; Aguiar, Pablo [Universitat de Barcelona - IDIBAPS, Unitat de Biofisica i Bioenginyeria, Departament de Ciencies Fisiologiques I, Facultat de Medicina, Barcelona (Spain); Gallego, Judith [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Barcelona (Spain); Institut de Bioenginyeria de Catalunya, Barcelona (Spain); Cot, Albert [Universitat de Barcelona - IDIBAPS, Unitat de Biofisica i Bioenginyeria, Departament de Ciencies Fisiologiques I, Facultat de Medicina, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Seccio d' Enginyeria Nuclear, Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Barcelona (Spain); Falcon, Carles; Ros, Domenec [Universitat de Barcelona - IDIBAPS, Unitat de Biofisica i Bioenginyeria, Departament de Ciencies Fisiologiques I, Facultat de Medicina, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER en Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Barcelona (Spain); Bullich, Santiago [Hospital del Mar, Center for Imaging in Psychiatry, CRC-MAR, Barcelona (Spain); Pareto, Deborah [CIBER en Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Barcelona (Spain); PRBB, Institut d' Alta Tecnologia, Barcelona (Spain); Sempau, Josep [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER en Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Barcelona (Spain); Lomena, Francisco [IDIBAPS, Servei de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain); Calvino, Francisco [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Seccio d' Enginyeria Nuclear, Departament de Fisica i Enginyeria Nuclear, Barcelona (Spain); Pavia, Javier [CIBER en Bioingenieria, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Barcelona (Spain); IDIBAPS, Servei de Medicina Nuclear, Hospital Clinic, Barcelona (Spain)

    2008-07-15

    {sup 123}I-labelled radioligands are commonly used for single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging of the dopaminergic system to study the dopamine transporter binding. The aim of this work was to compare the quantitative capabilities of two different SPECT systems through Monte Carlo (MC) simulation. The SimSET MC code was employed to generate simulated projections of a numerical phantom for two gamma cameras equipped with a parallel and a fan-beam collimator, respectively. A fully 3D iterative reconstruction algorithm was used to compensate for attenuation, the spatially variant point spread function (PSF) and scatter. A post-reconstruction partial volume effect (PVE) compensation was also developed. For both systems, the correction for all degradations and PVE compensation resulted in recovery factors of the theoretical specific uptake ratio (SUR) close to 100%. For a SUR value of 4, the recovered SUR for the parallel imaging system was 33% for a reconstruction without corrections (OSEM), 45% for a reconstruction with attenuation correction (OSEM-A), 56% for a 3D reconstruction with attenuation and PSF corrections (OSEM-AP), 68% for OSEM-AP with scatter correction (OSEM-APS) and 97% for OSEM-APS plus PVE compensation (OSEM-APSV). For the fan-beam imaging system, the recovered SUR was 41% without corrections, 55% for OSEM-A, 65% for OSEM-AP, 75% for OSEM-APS and 102% for OSEM-APSV. Our findings indicate that the correction for degradations increases the quantification accuracy, with PVE compensation playing a major role in the SUR quantification. The proposed methodology allows us to reach similar SUR values for different SPECT systems, thereby allowing a reliable standardisation in multicentric studies. (orig.)

  2. An imperfect dopaminergic error signal can drive temporal-difference learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiebke Potjans

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available An open problem in the field of computational neuroscience is how to link synaptic plasticity to system-level learning. A promising framework in this context is temporal-difference (TD learning. Experimental evidence that supports the hypothesis that the mammalian brain performs temporal-difference learning includes the resemblance of the phasic activity of the midbrain dopaminergic neurons to the TD error and the discovery that cortico-striatal synaptic plasticity is modulated by dopamine. However, as the phasic dopaminergic signal does not reproduce all the properties of the theoretical TD error, it is unclear whether it is capable of driving behavior adaptation in complex tasks. Here, we present a spiking temporal-difference learning model based on the actor-critic architecture. The model dynamically generates a dopaminergic signal with realistic firing rates and exploits this signal to modulate the plasticity of synapses as a third factor. The predictions of our proposed plasticity dynamics are in good agreement with experimental results with respect to dopamine, pre- and post-synaptic activity. An analytical mapping from the parameters of our proposed plasticity dynamics to those of the classical discrete-time TD algorithm reveals that the biological constraints of the dopaminergic signal entail a modified TD algorithm with self-adapting learning parameters and an adapting offset. We show that the neuronal network is able to learn a task with sparse positive rewards as fast as the corresponding classical discrete-time TD algorithm. However, the performance of the neuronal network is impaired with respect to the traditional algorithm on a task with both positive and negative rewards and breaks down entirely on a task with purely negative rewards. Our model demonstrates that the asymmetry of a realistic dopaminergic signal enables TD learning when learning is driven by positive rewards but not when driven by negative rewards.

  3. Sex-dependent diversity in ventral tegmental dopaminergic neurons and developmental programing: A molecular, cellular and behavioral analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, G E; Virdee, K; McArthur, S; Dalley, J W

    2014-12-12

    The knowledge that diverse populations of dopaminergic neurons within the ventral tegmental area (VTA) can be distinguished in terms of their molecular, electrophysiological and functional properties, as well as their differential projections to cortical and subcortical regions has significance for key brain functions, such as the regulation of motivation, working memory and sensorimotor control. Almost without exception, this understanding has evolved from landmark studies performed in the male sex. However, converging evidence from both clinical and pre-clinical studies illustrates that the structure and functioning of the VTA dopaminergic systems are intrinsically different in males and females. This may be driven by sex differences in the hormonal environment during adulthood ('activational' effects) and development (perinatal and/or pubertal 'organizational' effects), as well as genetic factors, especially the SRY gene on the Y chromosome in males, which is expressed in a sub-population of adult midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Stress and stress hormones, especially glucocorticoids, are important factors which interact with the VTA dopaminergic systems in order to achieve behavioral adaptation and enable the individual to cope with environmental change. Here, also, there is male/female diversity not only during adulthood, but also in early life when neurobiological programing by stress or glucocorticoid exposure differentially impacts dopaminergic developmental trajectories in male and female brains. This may have enduring consequences for individual resilience or susceptibility to pathophysiological change induced by stressors in later life, with potential translational significance for sex bias commonly found in disorders involving dysfunction of the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic systems. These findings highlight the urgent need for a better understanding of the sexual dimorphism in the VTA if we are to improve strategies for the prevention and treatment of

  4. Trichloroethylene induces dopaminergic neurodegeneration in Fisher 344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Mei; Choi, Dong-Young; Hunter, Randy L; Pandya, Jignesh D; Cass, Wayne A; Sullivan, Patrick G; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Gash, Don M; Bing, Guoying

    2010-02-01

    Trichloroethylene, a chlorinated solvent widely used as a degreasing agent, is a common environmental contaminant. Emerging evidence suggests that chronic exposure to trichloroethylene may contribute to the development of Parkinson's disease. The purpose of this study was to determine if selective loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons could be reproduced by systemic exposure of adult Fisher 344 rats to trichloroethylene. In our experiments, oral administration of trichloroethylene induced a significant loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta in a dose-dependent manner, whereas the number of both cholinergic and GABAergic neurons were not decreased in the striatum. There was a robust decline in striatal levels of 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid without a significant depletion of striatal dopamine. Rats treated with trichloroethylene showed defects in rotarod behavior test. We also found a significantly reduced mitochondrial complex I activity with elevated oxidative stress markers and activated microglia in the nigral area. In addition, we observed intracellular alpha-synuclein accumulation in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve, with some in nigral neurons, but little in neurons of cerebral cortex. Overall, our animal model exhibits some important features of Parkinsonism, and further supports that trichloroethylene may be an environmental risk factors for Parkinson's disease.

  5. Dopaminergic axon guidance: which makes what?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia ePrestoz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Mesotelencephalic pathways in the adult central nervous system have been studied in great detail because of their implication in major physiological functions as well as in psychiatric, neurological and neurodegenerative diseases. However, the ontogeny of these pathways and the molecular mechanisms that guide dopaminergic axons during embryogenesis have been only recently studied. This line of research is of crucial interest for the repair of lesioned circuits in adulthood following neurodegenerative diseases or common traumatic injuries. For instance, in the adult, the anatomic and functional repair of the nigrostriatal pathway following dopaminergic embryonic neuron transplantation suggests that specific guidance cues exist which govern embryonic fibers outgrowth, and suggests that axons from transplanted embryonic cells are able to respond to theses cues, which then guide them to their final targets. In this review, we first synthesize the work that has been performed in the last few years on developing mesotelencephalic pathways, and summarize the current knowledge on the identity of cellular and molecular signals thought to be involved in establishing mesotelencephalic dopaminergic neuronal connectivity during embryogenesis in the central nervous system of rodents. Then, we review the modulation of expression of these molecular signals in the lesioned adult brain and discuss their potential role in remodeling the mesotelencephalic dopaminergic circuitry, with a particular focus on Parkinson’s disease. Identifying guidance molecules involved in the connection of grafted cells may be useful for cellular therapy in Parkinsonian patients, as these molecules may help direct axons from grafted cells along the long distance they have to travel from the substantia nigra to the striatum.

  6. Necrostatin-1 protection of dopaminergic neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing-ru Wu; Jie Wang; Sheng-kui Zhou; Long Yang; Jia-le Yin; Jun-ping Cao; Yan-bo Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Necroptosis is characterized by programmed necrotic cell death and autophagic activation and might be involved in the death process of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson’s disease. We hypothesized that necrostatin-1 could block necroptosis and give protection to dopaminergic neurons. There is likely to be crosstalk between necroptosis and other cell death pathways, such as apoptosis and autophagy. PC12 cells were pretreated with necroststin-1 1 hour before expo-sure to 6-hydroxydopamine. We examined cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential and expression patterns of apoptotic and necroptotic death signaling proteins. The results showed that the autophagy/lysosomal pathway is involved in the 6-hydroxydopamine-induced death pro-cess of PC12 cells. Mitochondrial disability induced overactive autophagy, increased cathepsin B expression, and diminished Bcl-2 expression. Necrostatin-1 within a certain concentration range (5–30 μM) elevated the viability of PC12 cells, stabilized mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited excessive autophagy, reduced the expression of LC3-II and cathepsin B, and increased Bcl-2 expression. These findings suggest that necrostatin-1 exerted a protective effect against injury on dopaminergic neurons. Necrostatin-1 interacts with the apoptosis signaling pathway during this process. This pathway could be a new neuroprotective and therapeutic target in Par-kinson’s disease.

  7. Necrostatin-1 protection of dopaminergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-ru Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Necroptosis is characterized by programmed necrotic cell death and autophagic activation and might be involved in the death process of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson′s disease. We hypothesized that necrostatin-1 could block necroptosis and give protection to dopaminergic neurons. There is likely to be crosstalk between necroptosis and other cell death pathways, such as apoptosis and autophagy. PC12 cells were pretreated with necroststin-1 1 hour before exposure to 6-hydroxydopamine. We examined cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential and expression patterns of apoptotic and necroptotic death signaling proteins. The results showed that the autophagy/lysosomal pathway is involved in the 6-hydroxydopamine-induced death process of PC12 cells. Mitochondrial disability induced overactive autophagy, increased cathepsin B expression, and diminished Bcl-2 expression. Necrostatin-1 within a certain concentration range (5-30 μM elevated the viability of PC12 cells, stabilized mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited excessive autophagy, reduced the expression of LC3-II and cathepsin B, and increased Bcl-2 expression. These findings suggest that necrostatin-1 exerted a protective effect against injury on dopaminergic neurons. Necrostatin-1 interacts with the apoptosis signaling pathway during this process. This pathway could be a new neuroprotective and therapeutic target in Parkinson′s disease.

  8. Necrostatin-1 protection of dopaminergic neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jing-ru; Wang, Jie; Zhou, Sheng-kui; Yang, Long; Yin, Jia-le; Cao, Jun-ping; Cheng, Yan-bo

    2015-01-01

    Necroptosis is characterized by programmed necrotic cell death and autophagic activation and might be involved in the death process of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease. We hypothesized that necrostatin-1 could block necroptosis and give protection to dopaminergic neurons. There is likely to be crosstalk between necroptosis and other cell death pathways, such as apoptosis and autophagy. PC12 cells were pretreated with necroststin-1 1 hour before exposure to 6-hydroxydopamine. We examined cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential and expression patterns of apoptotic and necroptotic death signaling proteins. The results showed that the autophagy/lysosomal pathway is involved in the 6-hydroxydopamine-induced death process of PC12 cells. Mitochondrial disability induced overactive autophagy, increased cathepsin B expression, and diminished Bcl-2 expression. Necrostatin-1 within a certain concentration range (5–30 μM) elevated the viability of PC12 cells, stabilized mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibited excessive autophagy, reduced the expression of LC3-II and cathepsin B, and increased Bcl-2 expression. These findings suggest that necrostatin-1 exerted a protective effect against injury on dopaminergic neurons. Necrostatin-1 interacts with the apoptosis signaling pathway during this process. This pathway could be a new neuroprotective and therapeutic target in Parkinson's disease. PMID:26330837

  9. Are striatal tyrosine hydroxylase interneurons dopaminergic?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xenias, Harry S; Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Koós, Tibor; Tepper, James M

    2015-04-22

    Striatal GABAergic interneurons that express the gene for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) have been identified previously by several methods. Although generally assumed to be dopaminergic, possibly serving as a compensatory source of dopamine (DA) in Parkinson's disease, this assumption has never been tested directly. In TH-Cre mice whose nigrostriatal pathway had been eliminated unilaterally with 6-hydroxydopamine, we injected a Cre-dependent virus coding for channelrhodopsin-2 and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein unilaterally into the unlesioned midbrain or bilaterally into the striatum. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in striatal slices revealed that both optical and electrical stimulation readily elicited DA release in control striata but not from contralateral striata when nigrostriatal neurons were transduced. In contrast, neither optical nor electrical stimulation could elicit striatal DA release in either the control or lesioned striata when the virus was injected directly into the striatum transducing only striatal TH interneurons. This demonstrates that striatal TH interneurons do not release DA. Fluorescence immunocytochemistry in enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-TH mice revealed colocalization of DA, l-amino acid decarboxylase, the DA transporter, and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 with EGFP in midbrain dopaminergic neurons but not in any of the striatal EGFP-TH interneurons. Optogenetic activation of striatal EGFP-TH interneurons produced strong GABAergic inhibition in all spiny neurons tested. These results indicate that striatal TH interneurons are not dopaminergic but rather are a type of GABAergic interneuron that expresses TH but none of the other enzymes or transporters necessary to operate as dopaminergic neurons and exert widespread GABAergic inhibition onto direct and indirect spiny neurons.

  10. The antidepressant-like effect of Hedyosmum brasiliense and its sesquiterpene lactone, podoandin in mice: evidence for the involvement of adrenergic, dopaminergic and serotonergic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Ana Elisa; Bürger, Cristiani; Amoah, Solomon K S; Tolardo, Rogério; Biavatti, Maique W; de Souza, Márcia M

    2012-01-15

    We have recently shown that the ethanol extract of the leaves of Hedyosmum brasiliense exhibits an antidepressant-like effect in the tail suspension and forced swimming tests in mice. The present study investigates the mechanisms involved in the antidepressant-like effect of H. brasiliense extract, together with the antidepressant potential of podoandin, an isolated sesquiterpenoid. H. brasiliense (50mg/kg, i.p.) and podoandin (10mg/kg, i.p.) decreased the immobility time in the forced swimming test, without any accompanying changes in ambulation in the open-field test. The anti-immobility effect of the H. brasiliense extract was prevented by pre-treating the mice with ondansetron, NAN 190, pindolol, prazosin, yohimbine, haloperidol, SCH23390, and sulpiride. On the other hand, pre-treating the mice with: p-chlorophenylalanine (4 consecutive days), ketanserin, naloxone, naltrindole, bicuculline, phaclofen, or l-arginine did not block the antidepressant-like effect of H. brasiliense. In addition, pre-treatment of the animals with methylene blue, NG-nitro-l-arginine or 7-nitroindazole, at subeffective doses, did not cause a synergistic effect with H. brasiliense extract at an effective dose in the forced swimming test. The anti-immobility effect of podoandin was also prevented by pre-treating the mice with NAN-190, ondansetron, prazosin, yohimbine, sulpiride and haloperidol. The results indicate that the antidepressant-like effect of H. brasiliense (and podoandin) is dependent on the serotonergic, noradrenergic and dopaminergic systems, but not on the GABAergic, opioid and oxidonitrergic systems.

  11. Discovery of nigral dopaminergic neurogenesis in adult mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad E Morrison

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson′s disease is characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. As a result, intensive efforts have focused upon mechanisms that facilitate the death of mature dopaminergic neurons. Unfortunately, these efforts have been unsuccessful in providing an effective treatment to address neurodegeneration in this disease. Therefore, alternative theories of pathogenesis are being explored. Adult neurogenesis of dopaminergic neurons is an attractive concept that would provide a possible mechanism of neurodegeneration as well as offer an endogenous means to replenish affected neurons. To determine whether dopaminergic neurons experience neurogenesis in adult mice we developed a novel cell lineage tracing model that permitted detection of neurogenesis without many of the issues associated with popular techniques. Remarkably, we discovered that dopaminergic neurons are replenished in adult mice by Nestin+/Sox2- progenitor cells. What′s more, the rate of neurogenesis is similar to the rate of dopaminergic neuron loss reported using a chronic, systemic inflammatory response mouse model. This observation may indicate that neuron loss in Parkinson′s disease results from inhibition of neurogenesis.

  12. Pathological gambling: Relation of skin conductance response to dopaminergic neurotransmission and sensation-seeking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peterson, Ericka; Møller, Arne; Doudet, Doris;

    2010-01-01

    Absent Skin Conductance Response (SCR) in pathological gambling (PG) may relate to dopaminergic mechanisms. We recruited equal numbers of PG subjects and healthy control (HC) subjects, and then tested the claim that SCR is less conditioned by dopaminergic activity in PG subjects. During active...

  13. Dopamine and T cells: dopamine receptors and potent effects on T cells, dopamine production in T cells, and abnormalities in the dopaminergic system in T cells in autoimmune, neurological and psychiatric diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levite, M

    2016-01-01

    expression and/or responses to dopamine or production of dopamine, (xiii) drugs that affect the dopaminergic system have potent effects on T cells (e.g. dopamine=Intropin, L-dopa, bromocriptine, haloperidol, quinpirole, reserpine, pergolide, ecopipam, pimozide, amantadine, tetrabenazine, nomifensine, butaclamol). Dopamine-induced activation of resting Teffs and suppression of Tregs seem beneficial for health and may also be used for immunotherapy of cancer and infectious diseases. Independently, suppression of DRs in autoimmune and pro-inflammatory T cells, and also in cancerous T cells, may be advantageous. The review is relevant to Immunologists, Neurologists, Neuroimmunologists, Hematologists, Psychiatrists, Psychologists and Pharmacologists.

  14. NMDA receptors in dopaminergic neurons are crucial for habit learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei Phillip; Li, Fei; Wang, Dong; Xie, Kun; Wang, Deheng; Shen, Xiaoming; Tsien, Joe Z

    2011-12-22

    Dopamine is crucial for habit learning. Activities of midbrain dopaminergic neurons are regulated by the cortical and subcortical signals among which glutamatergic afferents provide excitatory inputs. Cognitive implications of glutamatergic afferents in regulating and engaging dopamine signals during habit learning, however, remain unclear. Here, we show that mice with dopaminergic neuron-specific NMDAR1 deletion are impaired in a variety of habit-learning tasks, while normal in some other dopamine-modulated functions such as locomotor activities, goal-directed learning, and spatial reference memories. In vivo neural recording revealed that dopaminergic neurons in these mutant mice could still develop the cue-reward association responses; however, their conditioned response robustness was drastically blunted. Our results suggest that integration of glutamatergic inputs to DA neurons by NMDA receptors, likely by regulating associative activity patterns, is a crucial part of the cellular mechanism underpinning habit learning.

  15. Evidence for the involvement of the serotonergic, noradrenergic, and dopaminergic systems in the antidepressant-like action of riparin III obtained from Aniba riparia (Nees) Mez (Lauraceae) in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Carla Thiciane Vasconcelos; de Carvalho, Alyne Mara Rodrigues; Moura, Brinell Arcanjo; Teixeira, Caroline Porto Leite; Vasconcelos, Leonardo Freire; Feitosa, Mariana Lima; de Oliveira, Gersilene Valente; Barbosa-Filho, José Maria; Chavez Gutierrez, Stanley Juan; de França Fonteles, Marta Maria; Vasconcelos, Silvânia Maria Mendes; de Sousa, Francisca Cléa Florenço

    2013-02-01

    Previous work has shown that intraperitoneal administration of riparin III (ripIII) reduces immobility time in the forced swimming test (FST), which suggests potential antidepressant activity. As the mechanism of action is not completely understood, this study is aimed at investigating the antidepressant-like action of ripIII. Following intraperitoneal administration of ripIII at doses of 25 and 50 mg/kg, there were decreases in the immobility time in the FST and tail suspension test without accompanying changes in ambulation (data not shown). The pretreatment of mice with sulpiride (50 mg/kg, i.p.), prazosin (1 mg/kg, i.p.), yohimbine (1 mg/kg, i.p.), and p-chlorophenylalanine (PCPA, 100 mg/kg, i.p. for, four consecutive days) significantly prevented the anti-immobility effect of ripIII in the FST. On the other hand, the anti-immobility effect of ripIII (50 mg/kg, v.o.) was not altered by pretreatment of mice with SCH23390 (15 μg/kg, i.p.) Furthermore, ripIII potentiated the sleeping latency and sleeping time of the pentobarbital-induced sleeping time test and also potentiated apomorphine (16 mg/kg, i.p.)-induced hypothermia in mice. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence that the antidepressant-like effect of ripIII is dependent on its interaction with the serotonergic, noradrenergic (α₁- and α₂- receptors), and dopaminergic (dopamine D₂ receptors) systems.

  16. Olfactory impairment in the rotenone model of Parkinson’s disease is associated with bulbar dopaminergic D2 activity after REM sleep deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Lais S.; Targa, Adriano D. S.; Noseda, Ana Carolina D.; Aurich, Mariana F.; Da Cunha, Cláudio; Lima, Marcelo M. S.

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deficits are commonly found in untreated subjects with a recent diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Additionally, different studies report declines in olfactory performance during a short period of sleep deprivation. Mechanisms underlying these clinical manifestations are poorly understood, and impairment of dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the olfactory bulb and the nigrostriatal pathway may have important roles in olfaction and REM sleep disturbances. Therefore, we hypothesized that modulation of the dopaminergic D2 receptors in the olfactory bulb could provide a more comprehensive understanding of the olfactory deficits in PD and REM sleep deprivation (REMSD). We decided to investigate the olfactory, neurochemical, and histological alterations generated through the administration of piribedil (a selective D2 agonist) or raclopride (a selective D2 antagonist) within the glomerular layer of the olfactory bulb, in rats subjected to intranigral rotenone and REMSD. Our findings provide evidence of the occurrence of a negative correlation (r = −0.52, P = 0.04) between the number of periglomerular TH-ir neurons and the bulbar levels of DA in the rotenone, but not sham, groups. A significant positive correlation (r = 0.34, P = 0.03) was observed between nigrostriatal DA levels and olfactory discrimination index (DI) for the sham groups, indicating that increased DA levels in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) are associated with enhanced olfactory discrimination performance. Also, increased levels in bulbar and striatal DA were induced by piribedil in the rotenone control and rotenone REMSD groups, consistent with reductions in the DI. The present evidence reinforce the idea that DA produced by periglomerular neurons, particularly the bulbar dopaminergic D2 receptors, is an essential participant in olfactory discrimination processes, as the SNpc, and the striatum. PMID:25520618

  17. Olfactory impairment in the rotenone model of Parkinson's disease is associated with bulbar dopaminergic D2 activity after REM sleep deprivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laís Soares Rodrigues

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory and rapid eye movement (REM sleep deficits are commonly found in untreated subjects with a recent diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD. Besides different studies reported declines in olfactory performances during a short period of sleep deprivation. Mechanisms underlying these clinical manifestations are poorly understood although the impairment in the dopamine (DA neurotransmission in the olfactory bulb and in the nigrostriatal pathway may have important roles in olfactory as well as in REM sleep disturbances. Therefore, we have led to the hypothesis that a modulation of the dopaminergic D2 receptors in the olfactory bulb could provide a more comprehensive understanding of the olfactory deficits in PD and after a short period of REM sleep deprivation (REMSD. We decided to investigate the olfactory, neurochemical and histological alterations generated by the administration of piribedil (a selective D2 agonist or raclopride (a selective D2 antagonist, within the glomerular layer of the olfactory bulb, in rats submitted to intranigral rotenone and REMSD. Our findings provided a remarkable evidence of the occurrence of a negative correlation (r = - 0.52, P = 0.04 between the number of periglomerular TH-ir neurons and the bulbar levels of DA in the rotenone, but not sham groups. A significant positive correlation (r = 0.34, P = 0.03 was observed between nigral DA and olfactory discrimination index (DI, for the sham groups, indicating that increased DA levels in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc are associated to enhanced olfactory discrimination performance. Also, increased levels in bulbar and striatal DA induced by piribedil in the rotenone control and rotenone REMSD groups were consistent with reduced amounts of DI. The present evidence reinforce that DA produced by periglomerular neurons, and particularly the bulbar dopaminergic D2 receptors, are essential participants in the olfactory discrimination processes, as well as SNpc

  18. Olfactory impairment in the rotenone model of Parkinson's disease is associated with bulbar dopaminergic D2 activity after REM sleep deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Lais S; Targa, Adriano D S; Noseda, Ana Carolina D; Aurich, Mariana F; Da Cunha, Cláudio; Lima, Marcelo M S

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deficits are commonly found in untreated subjects with a recent diagnosis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Additionally, different studies report declines in olfactory performance during a short period of sleep deprivation. Mechanisms underlying these clinical manifestations are poorly understood, and impairment of dopamine (DA) neurotransmission in the olfactory bulb and the nigrostriatal pathway may have important roles in olfaction and REM sleep disturbances. Therefore, we hypothesized that modulation of the dopaminergic D2 receptors in the olfactory bulb could provide a more comprehensive understanding of the olfactory deficits in PD and REM sleep deprivation (REMSD). We decided to investigate the olfactory, neurochemical, and histological alterations generated through the administration of piribedil (a selective D2 agonist) or raclopride (a selective D2 antagonist) within the glomerular layer of the olfactory bulb, in rats subjected to intranigral rotenone and REMSD. Our findings provide evidence of the occurrence of a negative correlation (r = -0.52, P = 0.04) between the number of periglomerular TH-ir neurons and the bulbar levels of DA in the rotenone, but not sham, groups. A significant positive correlation (r = 0.34, P = 0.03) was observed between nigrostriatal DA levels and olfactory discrimination index (DI) for the sham groups, indicating that increased DA levels in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) are associated with enhanced olfactory discrimination performance. Also, increased levels in bulbar and striatal DA were induced by piribedil in the rotenone control and rotenone REMSD groups, consistent with reductions in the DI. The present evidence reinforce the idea that DA produced by periglomerular neurons, particularly the bulbar dopaminergic D2 receptors, is an essential participant in olfactory discrimination processes, as the SNpc, and the striatum.

  19. Nesfatin-1 protects dopaminergic neurons against MPP+/MPTP-induced neurotoxicity through the C-Raf–ERK1/2-dependent anti-apoptotic pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xiao-Li; Song, Ning; Du, Xi-Xun; Li, Yong; Xie, Jun-Xia; Jiang, Hong

    2017-01-01

    Several brain-gut peptides have been reported to have a close relationship with the central dopaminergic system; one such brain-gut peptide is nesfatin-1. Nesfatin-1 is a satiety peptide that is predominantly secreted by X/A-like endocrine cells in the gastric glands, where ghrelin is also secreted. We previously reported that ghrelin exerted neuroprotective effects on nigral dopaminergic neurons, which implied a role for ghrelin in Parkinson’s disease (PD). In the present study, we aim to clarify whether nesfatin-1 has similar effects on dopaminergic neurons both in vivo and in vitro. We show that nesfatin-1 attenuates the loss of nigral dopaminergic neurons in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1, 2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced mouse model of PD. In addition, nesfatin-1 antagonized 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridillium ion (MPP+)-induced toxicity by restoring mitochondrial function, inhibiting cytochrome C release and preventing caspase-3 activation in MPP+-treated MES23.5 dopaminergic cells. These neuroprotective effects could be abolished by selective inhibition of C-Raf and the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Our data suggest that C-Raf-ERK1/2, which is involved in an anti-apoptotic pathway, is responsible for the neuroprotective effects of nesfatin-1 in the context of MPTP-induced toxicity. These results imply that nesfatin-1 might have therapeutic potential for PD. PMID:28106099

  20. Influence of dopaminergically mediated reward on somatosensory decision-making.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard Pleger

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Reward-related dopaminergic influences on learning and overt behaviour are well established, but any influence on sensory decision-making is largely unknown. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI while participants judged electric somatosensory stimuli on one hand or other, before being rewarded for correct performance at trial end via a visual signal, at one of four anticipated financial levels. Prior to the procedure, participants received either placebo (saline, a dopamine agonist (levodopa, or an antagonist (haloperidol.higher anticipated reward improved tactile decisions. Visually signalled reward reactivated primary somatosensory cortex for the judged hand, more strongly for higher reward. After receiving a higher reward on one trial, somatosensory activations and decisions were enhanced on the next trial. These behavioural and neural effects were all enhanced by levodopa and attenuated by haloperidol, indicating dopaminergic dependency. Dopaminergic reward-related influences extend even to early somatosensory cortex and sensory decision-making.

  1. Representation of spontaneous movement by dopaminergic neurons is cell-type selective and disrupted in parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Paul D; Dreyer, Jakob K; Jennings, Katie A; Syed, Emilie C J; Wade-Martins, Richard; Cragg, Stephanie J; Bolam, J Paul; Magill, Peter J

    2016-04-12

    Midbrain dopaminergic neurons are essential for appropriate voluntary movement, as epitomized by the cardinal motor impairments arising in Parkinson's disease. Understanding the basis of such motor control requires understanding how the firing of different types of dopaminergic neuron relates to movement and how this activity is deciphered in target structures such as the striatum. By recording and labeling individual neurons in behaving mice, we show that the representation of brief spontaneous movements in the firing of identified midbrain dopaminergic neurons is cell-type selective. Most dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), but not in ventral tegmental area or substantia nigra pars lateralis, consistently represented the onset of spontaneous movements with a pause in their firing. Computational modeling revealed that the movement-related firing of these dopaminergic neurons can manifest as rapid and robust fluctuations in striatal dopamine concentration and receptor activity. The exact nature of the movement-related signaling in the striatum depended on the type of dopaminergic neuron providing inputs, the striatal region innervated, and the type of dopamine receptor expressed by striatal neurons. Importantly, in aged mice harboring a genetic burden relevant for human Parkinson's disease, the precise movement-related firing of SNc dopaminergic neurons and the resultant striatal dopamine signaling were lost. These data show that distinct dopaminergic cell types differentially encode spontaneous movement and elucidate how dysregulation of their firing in early Parkinsonism can impair their effector circuits.

  2. Examination of the presynaptic dopaminergic system using positron emission tomography in a family with autosomal dominant parkinsonism and dementia due to pallido-ponto-nigral degeneration (PPNO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, M. [Neurodegenerative Disorders Centre, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)]|[Strahlenklinik und Poliklinik, Universitaetsklinikum Rudolf Virchow, Freie Univ. Berlin (Germany); Wszolek, Z.K. [Neurodegenerative Disorders Centre, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)]|[Section of Neurology, Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Pfeiffer, R.F. [Section of Neurology, Univ. of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE (United States); Calne, D.B. [Neurodegenerative Disorders Centre, Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    1993-12-31

    We report positron emission tomography (PET) examinations of presynaptic nigrostriatal dopaminergic function in a large family with an autosomal dominant neuro-degenerative disorder characterized pathologically by pallido-ponto-nigral degeneration, and clinically by parkinsonism, dystonia, paresis of conjugate gaze, apraxia of eyelid opening and closing, pyramidal tract dysfunction, and urinary incontinence. Dopaminergic function was studied and quantified with [{sup 18}F]-L-6-fluorodopa (6 FD) and PET in five affected patients, 13 individuals at-risk, and 15 similarly aged controls. The rate constant K{sub i} (mL/striatum/min) for 6 FD was decreased in all patients. None of the individuals at risk had reduced 6 FD uptake. In fact, three of them had increased values. Repeat scans have revealed a fall in 6 FD uptake in two out of the three with initially high constants. This may reflect a preclinical stage of involvement, but longer observation is necessary. (orig.) [Deutsch] Wir berichten ueber Untersuchungen der praesynaptischen dopaminergen Funktion mit der Positronenemissionstomographie bei einer grossen Familie mit autosomal-dominant vererbtem Parkinsonismus und Demenz. Die Erkrankung ist pathologisch-anatomisch gekennzeichnet durch eine pallido-ponto-nigrale Degeneration. Klinisch bestehen ein Parkinsonismus, Dystonien, eine Apraxie der Augenoeffnung und -schliessung, pyramidale Dysfunktionen und eine Harninkontinenz. Die praesynaptische dopaminerge Funktion wurde untersucht und quantifiziert mittels [{sup 18}F]-L-6-Fluorodopa (6FD) PET bei fuenf erkrankten Patienten, 13 Risikopatienten und 15 Kontrollpersonen vergleichbaren Alters. Die Transportkonstante K{sub i} (ml/Striatum/min) fuer die striatale Aufnahme des Radiotracers war bei allen erkrankten Patienten erniedrigt. Von den 13 Risikopatienten hatte keiner eine reduzierte Aufnahme von 6FD. Drei Risikopatienten zeigten sogar Werte fuer K{sub i}, die oberhalb des Referenzbereiches der Kontrollpersonen lagen

  3. Protective effect of alpha-synuclein knockdown on methamphetamine-induced neurotoxicity in dopaminergic neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunchun Tai; Ling Chen; Enping Huang; Chao Liu; Xingyi Yang; Pingming Qiu; Huijun Wang

    2014-01-01

    The over-expression of α-synuclein is a major factor in the death of dopaminergic neurons in a methamphetamine-induced model of Parkinson’s disease. In the present study, α-synuclein knockdown rats were created by injecting α-synuclein-shRNA lentivirus stereotaxically into the right striatum of experimental rats. At 2 weeks post-injection, the rats were injected intraper-itoneally with methamphetamine to establish the model of Parkinson’s disease. Expression ofα-synuclein mRNA and protein in the right striatum of the injected rats was significantly down-regulated. Food intake and body weight were greater in α-synuclein knockdown rats, and water intake and stereotyped behavior score were lower than in model rats. Striatal dopamine and tyrosine hydroxylase levels were significantly elevated in α-synuclein knockdown rats. Moreover, superoxide dismutase activity was greater in α-synuclein knockdown rat striatum, but the levels of reactive oxygen species, malondialdehyde, nitric oxide synthase and nitrogen monoxide were lower compared with model rats. We also found that α-synuclein knockdown inhibited metham-phetamine-induced neuronal apoptosis. These results suggest that α-synuclein has the capacity to reverse methamphetamine-induced apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons in the rat striatum by inhibiting oxidative stress and improving dopaminergic system function.

  4. Active optical zoom system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wick, David V.

    2005-12-20

    An active optical zoom system changes the magnification (or effective focal length) of an optical imaging system by utilizing two or more active optics in a conventional optical system. The system can create relatively large changes in system magnification with very small changes in the focal lengths of individual active elements by leveraging the optical power of the conventional optical elements (e.g., passive lenses and mirrors) surrounding the active optics. The active optics serve primarily as variable focal-length lenses or mirrors, although adding other aberrations enables increased utility. The active optics can either be LC SLMs, used in a transmissive optical zoom system, or DMs, used in a reflective optical zoom system. By appropriately designing the optical system, the variable focal-length lenses or mirrors can provide the flexibility necessary to change the overall system focal length (i.e., effective focal length), and therefore magnification, that is normally accomplished with mechanical motion in conventional zoom lenses. The active optics can provide additional flexibility by allowing magnification to occur anywhere within the FOV of the system, not just on-axis as in a conventional system.

  5. The BCL2 code to dopaminergic development and Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heide, L.P.; Smidt, M.P.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous, nonrandom cell death during development of the dopaminergic system is carefully orchestrated by locally secreted growth factors and the expression of transcription factors to ensure every neuron is carefully placed in its appropriate position and no 'miswiring' occurs. We hypothesize tha

  6. The experimental study of the damage of environmental neurotoxins on the cultured rat dopaminergic neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian; LU Chuanzhen; JIANG Yuping

    2000-01-01

    Objective To establish the culture system of rat dopaminergic neurons. and to determine whether Paraquat and Dieldrin selectively destroy cultured rat dopaminergic neurons respectively. Methods The cultured rat dopaminergic neurons were treated for 24h with Paraquat and Dieldrin(0.001 to 100 μ mol/L) respectively, Data were expressed as percentage of surviving TH-positive(TH+) cells and other cells per culture dish. Results Paraquat was not effective in selectively destroying TH+ neurons. Dieldrin (1 μ mol/L) selectively decreased the number of TH+ neurons without affecting other cells. The EC50 of Dieldrin on TH+ neurons was 27.6 l mol/L. Conclusion: Paraquat can not selectively destroy dopaminergic neurons in culture. Dieldrin (1 μ mol/L) can selectively destroy the dopaminergic neurons in culture, which make it a potential etiological agent for PD. The possible parkinsonogenic effect of Dieldrin is deserved for further investigation.

  7. Managing Parkinson's disease with continuous dopaminergic stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolters, Erik; Lees, Andrew J.; Volkmann, Jens; van Laar, Teus; Hovestadt, Ad

    2008-01-01

    The pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease is marked by the loss of dopaminergic neurons, which leads to striatal dopaminergic deficiency. This causes resting tremor, hypokinesia, rigidity, bradykinesia, and loss of postural reflexes. Most current treatments for Parkinson's disease aim to restore st

  8. CyPPA, a positive SK3/SK2 modulator, reduces activity of dopaminergic neurons, inhibits dopamine release, and counteracts hyperdopaminergic behaviors induced by methylphenidate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kjartan F. Herrik

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine (DA containing midbrain neurons play critical roles in several psychiatric and neurological diseases, including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, and the substantia nigra pars compacta neurons selectively degenerate in Parkinson’s disease. Pharmacological modulation of DA receptors and transporters are well established approaches for treatment of DA-related disorders. Direct modulation of the DA system by influencing the discharge pattern of these autonomously firing neurons has yet to be exploited as a potential therapeutic strategy. Small conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels (SK channels, in particular the SK3 subtype, are important in the physiology of DA neurons, and agents modifying SK channel activity could potentially affect DA-signaling and DA-related behaviors. Here we show that CyPPA (cyclohexyl-[2-(3,5-dimethyl-pyrazol-1-yl-6-methyl-pyrimidin-4-yl]-amine, a subtype-selective positive modulator of SK channels (SK3 > SK2 >>> SK1, IK, decreased spontaneous firing rate, increased the duration of the apamin-sensitive, medium duration afterhyperpolarization (mAHP, and caused an activity-dependent inhibition of current-evoked action potentials in DA neurons from both mouse and rat midbrain slices. Using a immunohistochemically and pharmacologically validated DA release assay employing cultured DA neurons from rats, we show that CyPPA repressed DA release in a concentration-dependent manner with a maximal effect equal to the D2 receptor agonist quinpirole. In vivo studies revealed that systemic administration of CyPPA attenuated methylphenidate-induced hyperactivity and stereotypic behaviors in mice. Taken together, the data accentuate the important role played by SK3 channels in the physiology of DA neurons, and indicate that their facilitation by CyPPA profoundly influences physiological as well as pharmacologically induced hyperdopaminergic behavior.

  9. 甲基苯丙胺依赖与中脑边缘多巴胺神经系统相关研究%Methamphetamine Dependence and Mesocorticolimbic Dopaminergic System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈群; 周文华

    2012-01-01

    以甲基苯丙胺为代表的苯胺类中枢兴奋剂滥用问题日益突出,文章对甲基苯丙胺依赖的作用途径和机制进行了概述,包括中脑边缘系统多巴胺神经通路、多巴胺受体、多巴胺转运体及其他神经递质,最后提出了当前甲基苯丙胺成瘾治疗研究的主要方向.%As one of the amphetamine type stimulants, methamphetamine has been abused widely in China. The methamphetamine dependence is related to the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system. This paper describes the mechanisms underlying methamphetamine dependence on the dopamine release, dopamine receptors and dopamine transporter.

  10. DeltaA/DeltaD regulate multiple and temporally distinct phases of notch signaling during dopaminergic neurogenesis in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Julia; Filippi, Alida; Driever, Wolfgang

    2010-12-08

    Dopaminergic neurons develop at distinct anatomical sites to form some of the major neuromodulatory systems in the vertebrate brain. Despite their relevance in neurodegenerative diseases and the interests in reconstitutive therapies from stem cells, mechanisms of the neurogenic switch from precursor populations to dopaminergic neurons are not well understood. Here, we investigated neurogenesis of different dopaminergic and noradrenergic neuron populations in the zebrafish embryo. Birth-dating analysis by EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) incorporation revealed temporal dynamics of catecholaminergic neurogenesis. Analysis of Notch signaling mutants and stage-specific pharmacological inhibition of Notch processing revealed that dopaminergic neurons form by temporally distinct mechanisms: dopaminergic neurons of the posterior tuberculum derive directly from neural plate cells during primary neurogenesis, whereas other dopaminergic groups form in continuous or wavelike neurogenesis phases from proliferating precursor pools. Systematic analysis of Notch ligands revealed that the two zebrafish co-orthologs of mammalian Delta1, DeltaA and DeltaD, control the neurogenic switch of all early developing dopaminergic neurons in a partially redundant manner. DeltaA/D may also be involved in maintenance of dopaminergic precursor pools, as olig2 expression in ventral diencephalic dopaminergic precursors is affected in dla/dld mutants. DeltaA/D act upstream of sim1a and otpa during dopaminergic specification. However, despite the fact that both dopaminergic and corticotropin-releasing hormone neurons derive from sim1a- and otpa-expressing precursors, DeltaA/D does not act as a lineage switch between these two neuronal types. Rather, DeltaA/D limits the size of the sim1a- and otpa-expressing precursor pool from which dopaminergic neurons differentiate.

  11. Nicotine, but not cotinine, partially protects dopaminergic neurons against MPTP-induced degeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parain, K; Marchand, V; Dumery, B; Hirsch, E

    2001-02-02

    In order to analyze the putative neuroprotective role of nicotine and cotinine in parkinsonian syndromes, these two compounds were administered in male C57Bl6 mice for 4 weeks. On day 8, four injections of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6,-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) were administered. MPTP intoxication induced a 50% loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and a 45% reduction in dopaminergic fibers in the striatum. Administration of cotinine did not affect MPTP toxicity in the nigrostriatal system but chronic nicotine treatment showed a slight protection (15%) of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons against MPTP.

  12. Non-dopaminergic treatments for motor control in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Susan H

    2013-09-01

    The pathological processes underlying Parkinson's disease (PD) involve more than dopamine cell loss within the midbrain. These non-dopaminergic neurotransmitters include noradrenergic, serotonergic, glutamatergic, and cholinergic systems within cortical, brainstem and basal ganglia regions. Several non-dopaminergic treatments are now in clinical use to treat motor symptoms of PD, or are being evaluated as potential therapies. Agents for symptomatic monotherapy and as adjunct to dopaminergic therapies for motor symptoms include adenosine A2A antagonists and the mixed monoamine-B inhibitor (MAO-BI) and glutamate release agent safinamide. The largest area of potential use for non-dopaminergic drugs is as add-on therapy for motor fluctuations. Thus adenosine A2A antagonists, safinamide, and the antiepileptic agent zonisamide can extend the duration of action of levodopa. To reduce levodopa-induced dyskinesia, drugs that target overactive glutamatergic neurotransmission can be used, and include the non-selective N-methyl D-aspartate antagonist amantadine. More recently, selective metabotropic glutamate receptor (mGluR₅) antagonists are being evaluated in phase II randomized controlled trials. Serotonergic agents acting as 5-HT2A/2C antagonists, such as the atypical antipsychotic clozapine, may also reduce dyskinesia. 5-HT1A agonists theoretically can reduce dyskinesia, but in practice, may also worsen PD motor symptoms, and so clinical applicability has not yet been shown. Noradrenergic α2A antagonism using fipamezole can potentially reduce dyskinesia. Several non-dopaminergic agents have also been investigated to reduce non-levodopa-responsive motor symptoms such as gait and tremor. Thus the cholinesterase inhibitor donepezil showed mild benefit in gait, while the predominantly noradrenergic re-uptake inhibitor methylphenidate had conflicting results in advanced PD subjects. Tremor in PD may respond to muscarinic M4 cholinergic antagonists (anticholinergics), but

  13. [Novel central dopaminergic agents derived from atypical di-substituted 2-aminoindane-4, 7. Synthesis and central pharmacological profile].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-Mavárez, Rosa Elena; Urdaneta-Gutierrez, Noribel Coromoto; Porta-Knabenschuh, Nicole; Rodríguez-Villasmil, Lucía Chiquinquirá; Rosales-Peña, Cecire Carolina; Espinoza, Gustavo Adolfo; Angel-Migliore, Ligia Biagina; Balza-Jiménez, Katherin del Carmen; Perdomo-Zavarce, Luis Eduardo; Faría-Quintero, Andrés Rafael; Dabian-Makarem, Akram Samear; Zapata-Cárdenas, Mariana Vanessa; Linero-Arrieta, Aarón Raúl; Acurero-Castellano, Gustavo Adolfo; Israel-Stern, Anita; Rosario Garrido, María; Suárez-Roca, Heberto; Migliore de Angel, Biagina del Carmen; Lopez-D'Sola, Simón Enrique; Charris-Charris, Jaime; Ramírez-Moran, María Matilde; Angel-Guío, Jorge Eduardo

    2015-06-01

    In recent decades, many compounds with central dopaminergic activity have been designed, synthesized and evaluated pharmacologically. However, it has not been possible to obtain a drug able to improve or cure diseases involving dopaminergic regulation in the central nervous system, such as Parkinson's disease and schizophrenia, among others. Taking into consideration the term "atypical pharmacophore" and from the compound 5, the aralkyl fragment was incorporated, and the compounds 10, 11, 13a-h and 14a-h were synthesized. Both the compounds 10 and 13a-h under its methoxylated form and the compounds 11 and 14a-h under the phenolic form, were evaluated to determine their pharmacologically agonistic and antagonistic effects on central dopaminergic activity. For this, the effect of intracerebroventricular injection of said compounds on the hydromineral balance and stereotyped behavior in rats, was determined. The results of the preliminary pharmacological evaluation show a centrally acting action through dopamine mechanisms, in which the compounds 10, 11, 13d-h and 14a showed responses as agonists, whereas compounds 14b-h, had responses as antagonists.

  14. System of Volcanic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. HÉDERVARI

    1972-06-01

    Full Text Available A comparison is made among the systems of B. G.
    Escher (3, of R. W. van Bemmelen (1 and that of the author (4. In this
    connection, on the basis of Esclier's classification, the terms of "constructiv
    e " and "destructive" eruptions are introduced into the author's system and
    at the same time Escher's concept on the possible relation between the depth
    of magma-chamber and the measure of the gas-pressure is discussed briefly.
    Three complementary remarks to the first paper (4 011 the subject of system
    of volcanic activity are added.

  15. Peripheral Inflammation Increases the Damage in Animal Models of Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration: Possible Implication in Parkinson's Disease Incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Machado

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory processes described in Parkinson’s disease (PD and its animal models appear to be important in the progression of the pathogenesis, or even a triggering factor. Here we review that peripheral inflammation enhances the degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system induced by different insults; different peripheral inflammations have been used, such as IL-1β and the ulcerative colitis model, as well as insults to the dopaminergic system such as 6-hydroxydopamine or lipopolysaccharide. In all cases, an increased loss of dopaminergic neurons was described; inflammation in the substantia nigra increased, displaying a great activation of microglia along with an increase in the production of cytokines such as IL-1β and TNF-α. Increased permeability or disruption of the BBB, with overexpression of the ICAM-1 adhesion molecule and infiltration of circulating monocytes into the substantia nigra, is also involved, since the depletion of circulating monocytes prevents the effects of peripheral inflammation. Data are reviewed in relation to epidemiological studies of PD.

  16. Quercetin and sesamin protect dopaminergic cells from MPP+-induced neuroinflammation in a microglial (N9)-neuronal (PC12) coculture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bournival, Julie; Plouffe, Marilyn; Renaud, Justine; Provencher, Cindy; Martinoli, Maria-Grazia

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that the majority of Parkinson's disease (PD) cases are associated with microglia activation with resultant elevation of various inflammatory mediators and neuroinflammation. In this study, we investigated the effects of 2 natural molecules, quercetin and sesamin, on neuroinflammation induced by the Parkinsonian toxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) in a glial-neuronal system. We first established that quercetin and sesamin defend microglial cells against MPP(+)-induced increases in the mRNA or protein levels of 3 pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6, IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-alpha), as revealed by real time-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay, respectively. Quercetin and sesamin also decrease MPP(+)-induced oxidative stress in microglial cells by reducing inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression as well as mitochondrial superoxide radicals. We then measured neuronal cell death and apoptosis after MPP(+) activation of microglia, in a microglial (N9)-neuronal (PC12) coculture system. Our results revealed that quercetin and sesamin rescued neuronal PC12 cells from apoptotic death induced by MPP(+) activation of microglial cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate that the phytoestrogen quercetin and the lignan sesamin diminish MPP(+)-evoked microglial activation and suggest that both these molecules may be regarded as potent, natural, anti-inflammatory compounds.

  17. Quercetin and Sesamin Protect Dopaminergic Cells from MPP+-Induced Neuroinflammation in a Microglial (N9-Neuronal (PC12 Coculture System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Bournival

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A growing body of evidence indicates that the majority of Parkinson’s disease (PD cases are associated with microglia activation with resultant elevation of various inflammatory mediators and neuroinflammation. In this study, we investigated the effects of 2 natural molecules, quercetin and sesamin, on neuroinflammation induced by the Parkinsonian toxin 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+ in a glial-neuronal system. We first established that quercetin and sesamin defend microglial cells against MPP+-induced increases in the mRNA or protein levels of 3 pro-inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6, IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, as revealed by real time-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay, respectively. Quercetin and sesamin also decrease MPP+-induced oxidative stress in microglial cells by reducing inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression as well as mitochondrial superoxide radicals. We then measured neuronal cell death and apoptosis after MPP+ activation of microglia, in a microglial (N9-neuronal (PC12 coculture system. Our results revealed that quercetin and sesamin rescued neuronal PC12 cells from apoptotic death induced by MPP+ activation of microglial cells. Altogether, our data demonstrate that the phytoestrogen quercetin and the lignan sesamin diminish MPP+-evoked microglial activation and suggest that both these molecules may be regarded as potent, natural, anti-inflammatory compounds.

  18. Comparison of the time courses of selective gene expression and dopaminergic depletion induced by MPP+ in MN9D cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianyong; Duhart, Helen M; Xu, Zengjun; Patterson, Tucker A; Newport, Glenn D; Ali, Syed F

    2008-05-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons with unknown etiology. MPP+ (1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion) is the active metabolite of the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), which induces Parkinson's-like symptoms in humans and animals. MPTP/MPP+ produces selective dopaminergic neuronal degeneration, therefore, these agents are commonly used to study the pathogenesis of PD. However, the mechanisms of their toxicity have not been fully elucidated. Recently, we reported in a microarray study using a midbrain-derived dopaminergic neuronal cell line, MN9D, that MPP+ induced significant changes in a number of genes known to be associated with the dopaminergic system. In this study, we investigated the expression time courses of six genes using real-time RT-PCR, and compared them with the progressive dopaminergic depletion caused by MPP+. Our data showed that dopamine content was significantly decreased after 0.5h of MPP+ (200 microM) exposure and was completely depleted after 40 h. The expression of Gpr37, which is closely related to the pathogenesis of autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinsonism, was up-regulated after 0.5h, and stayed up-regulated up to 48 h. Txnip, which is critical to the adjustment of cellular redox status, was down-regulated after 1h and stayed down-regulated up to 48 h. Ldh1 and Cdo1, which are also involved in oxidative stress, were down-regulated after 16 h and stayed down-regulated up to 48 h. Two pro-apoptotic genes, Egln3 and Bnip3, were down-regulated after 2 and 4h, and stayed down-regulated up to 48 h. These findings suggested that the time course of expression for multiple genes correlated with the dopaminergic depletion; and MPP+-induced neurotoxicity in MN9D cells could be used as a model to further explore the roles of these and other genes in the pathogenesis and possible treatment of PD.

  19. Paraquat induces selective dopaminergic nigrostriatal degeneration in aging C57BL/6 mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xia; YIN Jun; CHENG Chun-mei; SUN Jin-lai; LI Zheng; WU Ying-liang

    2005-01-01

    Background Paraquat (PQ; 1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium), a widely used herbicide that is structurally similar to the known dopaminergic neurotoxicant MPTP (1-methyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine), has been suggested as a potential etiologic factor for the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). Aging is an accepted risk factor for idiopathic Parkinson's disease. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that paraquat could induce PD-like nigrostriatal dopaminergic degeneration in aging C57BL/6 mice.Methods Senile male C57BL/6 mice were intraperitoneally injected with either saline or PQ at 2-day intervals for a total of 10 doses. Locomotor activity and performance on the pole test were measured 7 days after the last injection and animals were sacrificed one day later. Level of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites levels in the striatum were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with an electrochemical detector (HPLC-ECD), and numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive neurons were estimated using immunohistochemistry.Results Locomotor activities were significantly decreased and the behavioral performance on the pole test were significantly impaired in the PQ treated group. Level of DA and its metabolites levels in the striatum were declined by 8 days after the last injection. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that PQ was associated with a reduction in numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase positive neurons.Conclusions Long-term repeated exposes to PQ can selectively impair the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system of senile mice, suggesting that PQ could play an important role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Our results also validate a novel model of PD induced by exposure to a toxic environmental agent.

  20. Dopaminergic Receptors on CD4+ T Naive and Memory Lymphocytes Correlate with Motor Impairment in Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustrimovic, Natasa; Rasini, Emanuela; Legnaro, Massimiliano; Bombelli, Raffaella; Aleksic, Iva; Blandini, Fabio; Comi, Cristoforo; Mauri, Marco; Minafra, Brigida; Riboldazzi, Giulio; Sanchez-Guajardo, Vanesa; Marino, Franca; Cosentino, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by loss of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta, α-synuclein (α-syn)-rich intraneuronal inclusions (Lewy bodies), and microglial activation. Emerging evidence suggests that CD4+ T lymphocytes contribute to neuroinflammation in PD. Since the mainstay of PD treatment is dopaminergic substitution therapy and dopamine is an established transmitter connecting nervous and immune systems, we examined CD4+ T naive and memory lymphocytes in PD patients and in healthy subjects (HS), with specific regard to dopaminergic receptor (DR) expression. In addition, the in vitro effects of α-syn were assessed on CD4+ T naive and memory cells. Results showed extensive association between DR expression in T lymphocytes and motor dysfunction, as assessed by UPDRS Part III score. In total and CD4+ T naive cells expression of D1-like DR decrease, while in T memory cells D2-like DR increase with increasing score. In vitro, α-syn increased CD4+ T memory cells, possibly to a different extent in PD patients and in HS, and affected DR expression with cell subset-specific patterns. The present results support the involvement of peripheral adaptive immunity in PD, and may contribute to develop novel immunotherapies for PD, as well as to better use of current dopaminergic antiparkinson drugs. PMID:27652978

  1. Differentiation of neuroepithelial stem cells into functional dopaminergic neurons in 3D microfluidic cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Edinson Lucumi; Hachi, Siham; Hemmer, Kathrin; Trietsch, Sebastiaan J; Baumuratov, Aidos S; Hankemeier, Thomas; Vulto, Paul; Schwamborn, Jens C; Fleming, Ronan M T

    2015-06-07

    A hallmark of Parkinson's disease is the progressive loss of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. We derived human neuroepithelial cells from induced pluripotent stem cells and successfully differentiated them into dopaminergic neurons within phase-guided, three-dimensional microfluidic cell culture bioreactors. After 30 days of differentiation within the microfluidic bioreactors, in situ morphological, immunocytochemical and calcium imaging confirmed the presence of dopaminergic neurons that were spontaneously electrophysiologically active, a characteristic feature of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in vivo. Differentiation was as efficient as in macroscopic culture, with up to 19% of differentiated neurons immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase, the penultimate enzyme in the synthesis of dopamine. This new microfluidic cell culture model integrates the latest innovations in developmental biology and microfluidic cell culture to generate a biologically realistic and economically efficient route to personalised drug discovery for Parkinson's disease.

  2. Dopaminergic Differentiation of Human Embryonic Stem Cells on PA6-Derived Adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guloglu, M Oktar; Larsen, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are a promising source for cell replacement therapies. Parkinson's disease is one of the candidate diseases for the cell replacement therapy since the motor manifestations of the disease are associated with the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Stromal cell-derived inducing activity (SDIA) is the most commonly used method for the dopaminergic differentiation of hESCs. This chapter describes a simple, reliable, and scalable dopaminergic induction method of hESCs using PA6-derived adipocytes. Coculturing hESCs with PA6-derived adipocytes markedly reduces the variable outcomes among experiments. Moreover, the colony differentiation step of this method can also be used for the dopaminergic induction of mouse embryonic stem cells and NTERA2 cells as well.

  3. Hypothesizing Dopaminergic Genetic Antecedents in Schizophrenia and Substance Seeking Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Badgaiyan, Rajendra; Palomo, Tomas; Gold, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    The dopamine system has been implicated in both substance use disorder (SUD) and schizophrenia. A recent meta- analysis suggests that A1 allele of the DRD2 gene imposes genetic risk for SUD, especially alcoholism and has been implicated in Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS). We hypothesize that dopamine D2 receptor (DRD2) gene Taq1 A2 allele is associated with a subtype of non- SUD schizophrenics and as such may act as a putative protective agent against the development of addiction to alcohol or other drugs of abuse. Schizophrenics with SUD may be carriers of the DRD2 Taq1 A1 allele, and/or other RDS reward polymorphisms and have hypodopaminergic reward function. One plausible mechanism for alcohol seeking in schizophrenics with SUD, based on previous research, may be a deficiency of gamma type endorphins that has been linked to schizophrenic type psychosis.. We also propose that alcohol seeking behavior in schizophrenics, may serve as a physiological self-healing process linked to the increased function of the gamma endorphins, thereby reducing abnormal dopaminergic activity at the nucleus accumbens (NAc). These hypotheses warrant further investigation and cautious interpretation. We, therefore, encourage research involving neuroimaging, genome wide association studies (GWAS), and epigenetic investigation into the relationship between neurogenetics and systems biology to unravel the role of dopamine in psychiatric illness and SUD. PMID:24636783

  4. New developments of dopaminergic imaging in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varrone, A; Halldin, C

    2012-03-09

    The development of radioligands for the dopaminergic system has provided suitable imaging biomarkers for clinical research in Parkinson's disease (PD) and related movement disorders. Single photon emission tomography (SPECT) has played an important role as main molecular imaging modality because of the availability of imaging tools such as dopamine transporter (DAT) radioligands for wide clinical use. At present, SPECT imaging of the DAT is the main diagnostic imaging procedure for the assessment of patients with parkinsonism. However, in the recent years positron emission tomography (PET) has become an important clinical diagnostic modality, mainly in oncology, due to the wide availability of PET/CT systems with improved imaging performance and to the use of 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose ([18F]FDG) as main diagnostic agent. In this context, further development of 18F-radioligands is of high interest for their potential utility in the clinical setting. This review will give a general overview on the development of SPECT and PET radioligands for the dopaminergic system and describe the potential advantages of developing 18F-labelled radioligands for imaging of the dopaminergic system in PD and related movement disorders.

  5. Enduring, Sexually Dimorphic Impact of In Utero Exposure to Elevated Levels of Glucocorticoids on Midbrain Dopaminergic Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenda E. Gillies

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoid hormones (GCs released from the fetal/maternal glands during late gestation are required for normal development of mammalian organs and tissues. Accordingly, synthetic glucocorticoids have proven to be invaluable in perinatal medicine where they are widely used to accelerate fetal lung maturation when there is risk of pre-term birth and to promote infant survival. However, clinical and pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that inappropriate exposure of the developing brain to elevated levels of GCs, either as a result of clinical over-use or after stress-induced activation of the fetal/maternal adrenal cortex, is linked with significant effects on brain structure, neurological function and behaviour in later life. In order to understand the underlying neural processes, particular interest has focused on the midbrain dopaminergic systems, which are critical regulators of normal adaptive behaviours, cognitive and sensorimotor functions. Specifically, using a rodent model of GC exposure in late gestation (approximating human brain development at late second/early third trimester, we demonstrated enduring effects on the shape and volume of the ventral tegmental area (VTA and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc (origins of the mesocorticolimbic and nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways on the topographical organisation and size of the dopaminergic neuronal populations and astrocytes within these nuclei and on target innervation density and neurochemical markers of dopaminergic transmission (receptors, transporters, basal and amphetamine-stimulated dopamine release at striatal and prefrontal cortical sites that impact on the adult brain. The effects of antenatal GC treatment (AGT were both profound and sexually-dimorphic, not only in terms of quantitative change but also qualitatively, with several parameters affected in the opposite direction in males and females. Although such substantial neurobiological changes might presage marked

  6. ADASY (Active Daylighting System)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Moliní, Daniel; González-Montes, Mario; Fernández-Balbuena, Antonio Á.; Bernabéu, Eusebio; García-Botella, Ángel; García-Rodríguez, Lucas; Pohl, Wilfried

    2009-08-01

    The main objective of ADASY (Active Daylighting System) work is to design a façade static daylighting system oriented to office applications, mainly. The goal of the project is to save energy by guiding daylight into a building for lighting purpose. With this approach we can reduce the electrical load for artificial lighting, completing it with sustainable energy. The collector of the system is integrated on a vertical façade and its distribution guide is always horizontal inside of the false ceiling. ADASY is designed with a specific patent pending caption system, a modular light-guide and light extractor luminaire system. Special care has been put on the final cost of the system and its building integration purpose. The current ADASY configuration is able to illuminate 40 m2 area with a 300lx-400lx level in the mid time work hours; furthermore it has a good enough spatial uniformity distribution and a controlled glare. The data presented in this study are the result of simulation models and have been confirmed by a physical scaled prototype. ADASY's main advantages over regular illumination systems are: -Low maintenance; it has not mobile pieces and therefore it lasts for a long time and require little attention once installed. - No energy consumption; solar light continue working even if there has been a power outage. - High quality of light: the colour rendering of light is very high - Psychological benefits: People working with daylight get less stress and more comfort, increasing productivity. - Health benefits

  7. The peptidyl-prolyl isomerase Pin1 up-regulation and proapoptotic function in dopaminergic neurons: relevance to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Anamitra; Saminathan, Hariharan; Kanthasamy, Arthi; Anantharam, Vellareddy; Jin, Huajun; Sondarva, Gautam; Harischandra, Dilshan S; Qian, Ziqing; Rana, Ajay; Kanthasamy, Anumantha G

    2013-07-26

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative disease characterized by a slow and progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra. The pathophysiological mechanisms underlying PD remain unclear. Pin1, a major peptidyl-prolyl isomerase, has recently been associated with certain diseases. Notably, Ryo et al. (Ryo, A., Togo, T., Nakai, T., Hirai, A., Nishi, M., Yamaguchi, A., Suzuki, K., Hirayasu, Y., Kobayashi, H., Perrem, K., Liou, Y. C., and Aoki, I. (2006) J. Biol. Chem. 281, 4117-4125) implicated Pin1 in PD pathology. Therefore, we sought to systematically characterize the role of Pin1 in PD using cell culture and animal models. To our surprise we observed a dramatic up-regulation of Pin1 mRNA and protein levels in dopaminergic MN9D neuronal cells treated with the parkinsonian toxicant 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) as well as in the substantia nigra of the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced PD mouse model. Notably, a marked expression of Pin1 was also observed in the substantia nigra of human PD brains along with a high co-localization of Pin1 within dopaminergic neurons. In functional studies, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Pin1 almost completely prevented MPP(+)-induced caspase-3 activation and DNA fragmentation, indicating that Pin1 plays a proapoptotic role. Interestingly, multiple pharmacological Pin1 inhibitors, including juglone, attenuated MPP(+)-induced Pin1 up-regulation, α-synuclein aggregation, caspase-3 activation, and cell death. Furthermore, juglone treatment in the MPTP mouse model of PD suppressed Pin1 levels and improved locomotor deficits, dopamine depletion, and nigral dopaminergic neuronal loss. Collectively, our findings demonstrate for the first time that Pin1 is up-regulated in PD and has a pathophysiological role in the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system and suggest that modulation of Pin1 levels may be a useful translational therapeutic strategy in PD.

  8. Structural plasticity in mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons produced by drugs of abuse: critical role of BDNF and dopamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ginetta eCollo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons were suggested to be a critical physiopathology substrate for addiction disorders. Among neuroadaptive processes to addictive drugs, structural plasticity has attracted attention. While structural plasticity occurs at both pre- and post-synaptic levels in the mesolimbic dopaminergic system, the present review focuses only on dopaminergic neurons. Exposures to addictive drugs determine two opposite structural responses, hypothrophic plasticity produced by opioids and cannabinoids (in particular during the early withdrawal phase and hypertrophic plasticity, mostly driven by psychostimulants and nicotine. In vitro and in vivo studies indentified BDNF and extracellular dopamine as two critical factors in determining structural plasticity, the two molecules sharing similar intracellular pathways involved in cell soma and dendrite growth, the MEK-ERK1/2 and the PI3K-Akt-mTOR, via preferential activation of TrkB and dopamine D3 receptors, respectively. At present information regarding specific structural changes associated to the various stages of the addiction cycle is incomplete. Encouraging neuroimaging data in humans indirectly support the preclinical evidence of hypotrophic and hypertrophic effects, suggesting a possible differential engagement of dopamine neurons in parallel and partially converging circuits controlling motivation, stress and emotions.

  9. Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist Reduces Neonatal Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Long-Lasting Neurobehavioral Deficits and Dopaminergic Neuronal Injury in Adult Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Yi Pang; Lu-Tai Tien; Hobart Zhu; Juying Shen; Wright, Camilla F.; Jones, Tembra K.; Mamoon, Samir A.; Bhatt, Abhay J; Zhengwei Cai; Lir-Wan Fan

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study showed that a single lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment to neonatal rats could induce a long-lasting neuroinflammatory response and dopaminergic system injury late in life. This is evidenced by a sustained activation of microglia and elevated interleukin-1β (IL-1β) levels, as well as reduced tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression in the substantia nigra (SN) of P70 rat brain. The object of the current study was to test whether co-administration of IL-1 receptor antagonist (I...

  10. Withania somnifera alleviates parkinsonian phenotypes by inhibiting apoptotic pathways in dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Jay; Chouhan, Shikha; Yadav, Satyndra Kumar; Westfall, Susan; Rai, Sachchida Nand; Singh, Surya Pratap

    2014-12-01

    Maneb (MB) and paraquat (PQ) are environmental toxins that have been experimentally used to induce selective damage of dopaminergic neurons leading to the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). Although the mechanism of this selective neuronal toxicity in not fully understood, oxidative stress has been linked to the pathogenesis of PD. The present study investigates the mechanisms of neuroprotection elicited by Withania somnifera (Ws), a herb traditionally recognized by the Indian system of medicine, Ayurveda. An ethanolic root extract of Ws was co-treated with the MB-PQ induced mouse model of PD and was shown to significantly rescue canonical indicators of PD including compromised locomotor activity, reduced dopamine in the substantia nigra and various aspects of oxidative damage. In particular, Ws reduced the expression of iNOS, a measure of oxidative stress. Ws also significantly improved the MB + PQ mediated induction of a pro-apoptotic state by reducing Bax and inducing Bcl-2 protein expression, respectively. Finally, Ws reduced expression of the pro-inflammatory marker of astrocyte activation, GFAP. Altogether, the present study suggests that Ws treatment provides nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuroprotection against MB-PQ induced Parkinsonism by the modulation of oxidative stress and apoptotic machinery possibly accounting for the behavioural effects.

  11. Early effects of reward anticipation are modulated by dopaminergic stimulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thore Apitz

    Full Text Available The abilities to predict future rewards and assess the value of reward delivery are crucial aspects of adaptive behavior. While the mesolimbic system, including dopaminergic midbrain, ventral striatum and prefrontal cortex have long been associated with reward processing, recent studies also indicate a prominent role of early visual brain regions. However, the precise underlying neural mechanisms still remain unclear. To address this issue, we presented participants with visual cues predicting rewards of high and low magnitudes and probability (2 × 2 factorial design, while neural activity was scanned using magnetoencephalography. Importantly, one group of participants received 150 mg of the dopamine precursor levodopa prior to the experiment, while another group received a placebo. For the placebo group, neural signals of reward probability (but not magnitude emerged at ∼ 100 ms after cue presentation at occipital sensors in the event-related magnetic fields. Importantly, these probability signals were absent in the levodopa group indicating a close link. Moreover, levodopa administration reduced oscillatory power in the high (20-30 Hz and low (13-20 Hz beta band during both reward anticipation and delivery. Taken together, our findings indicate that visual brain regions are involved in coding prospective reward probability but not magnitude and that these effects are modulated by dopamine.

  12. Accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions within dopaminergic neurons triggers neuroprotective mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perier, Celine; Bender, Andreas; García-Arumí, Elena; Melià, Ma Jesus; Bové, Jordi; Laub, Christoph; Klopstock, Thomas; Elstner, Matthias; Mounsey, Ross B; Teismann, Peter; Prolla, Tomas; Andreu, Antoni L; Vila, Miquel

    2013-08-01

    Acquired alterations in mitochondrial DNA are believed to play a pathogenic role in Parkinson's disease. In particular, accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions has been observed in substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons from patients with Parkinson's disease and aged individuals. Also, mutations in mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma result in multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions that can be associated with levodopa-responsive parkinsonism and severe substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurodegeneration. However, whether mitochondrial DNA deletions play a causative role in the demise of dopaminergic neurons remains unknown. Here we assessed the potential pathogenic effects of mitochondrial DNA deletions on the dopaminergic nigrostriatal system by using mutant mice possessing a proofreading-deficient form of mitochondrial DNA polymerase gamma (POLGD257A), which results in a time-dependent accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions in several tissues, including the brain. In these animals, we assessed the occurrence of mitochondrial DNA deletions within individual substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons, by laser capture microdissection and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and determined the potential deleterious effects of such mitochondrial DNA alterations on mitochondrial function and dopaminergic neuronal integrity, by cytochrome c oxidase histochemistry and quantitative morphology. Nigral dopaminergic neurons from POLGD257A mice accumulate mitochondrial DNA deletions to a similar extent (∼40-60%) as patients with Parkinson's disease and aged individuals. Despite such high levels of mitochondrial DNA deletions, the majority of substantia nigra pars compacta dopaminergic neurons from these animals did not exhibit mitochondrial dysfunction or degeneration. Only a few individual substantia nigra pars compacta neurons appeared as cytochrome c oxidase-negative, which exhibited higher levels of mitochondrial DNA

  13. Sweet Taste and Nutrient Value Subdivide Rewarding Dopaminergic Neurons in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huetteroth, Wolf; Perisse, Emmanuel; Lin, Suewei; Klappenbach, Martín; Burke, Christopher; Waddell, Scott

    2015-01-01

    Summary Dopaminergic neurons provide reward learning signals in mammals and insects [1–4]. Recent work in Drosophila has demonstrated that water-reinforcing dopaminergic neurons are different to those for nutritious sugars [5]. Here, we tested whether the sweet taste and nutrient properties of sugar reinforcement further subdivide the fly reward system. We found that dopaminergic neurons expressing the OAMB octopamine receptor [6] specifically convey the short-term reinforcing effects of sweet taste [4]. These dopaminergic neurons project to the β′2 and γ4 regions of the mushroom body lobes. In contrast, nutrient-dependent long-term memory requires different dopaminergic neurons that project to the γ5b regions, and it can be artificially reinforced by those projecting to the β lobe and adjacent α1 region. Surprisingly, whereas artificial implantation and expression of short-term memory occur in satiated flies, formation and expression of artificial long-term memory require flies to be hungry. These studies suggest that short-term and long-term sugar memories have different physiological constraints. They also demonstrate further functional heterogeneity within the rewarding dopaminergic neuron population. PMID:25728694

  14. In vivo neurochemical evidence that newly synthesised GABA activates GABA(B), but not GABA(A), receptors on dopaminergic nerve endings in the nucleus accumbens of freely moving rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saigusa, T.; Aono, Y.; Sekino, R.; Uchida, T.; Takada, K.; Oi, Y.; Koshikawa, N.; Cools, A.R.

    2012-01-01

    GABA released from accumbal GABAergic interneurons plays an inhibitory role in the regulation of dopamine efflux through GABA(B) and GABA(A) receptors located on accumbal dopaminergic nerve endings. The cytosolic newly synthesised GABA alters vesicular GABA levels and, accordingly, the amount of GAB

  15. Nicotine modulates GABAergic transmission to dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng XIAO; Ke-chun YANG; Chun-yi ZHOU; Guo-zhang JIN; Jie WU; Jiang-hong YE

    2009-01-01

    Aim: Dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) play important roles in motor control and drug addiction. As the major afferent, GABAergic innervation controls the activity of SNc dopaminergic neurons. Although it is clear that nicotine modulates SNc dopaminergic neurons by activating subtypes of somatodendritic nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), the detailed mechanisms of this activation remain to be addressed.Methods: In the current study, we recorded GABAA receptor-mediated spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIP-SCs) from dissociated SNc dopaminergic neurons that were obtained using an enzyme-free procedure. These neurons preserved some functional terminals after isolation, including those that release GABA.Results: We found that both extra- and intra-cellular calcium modulates sIPSCs in these neurons. Furthermore, both nicotine and endogenous acetylcholine enhance the frequency of sIPSCs. Moreover, endogenous acetylcholine tonically facilitates sIPSC frequency, primarily by activating the a4B2* nAChRs on the GABAergic terminals.Conclusion: Nicotine facilitates GABA release onto SNc dopaminergic neurons mainly via the activation of presynaptic a4B2* nAChRs.

  16. Combining nitric oxide release with anti-inflammatory activity preserves nigrostriatal dopaminergic innervation and prevents motor impairment in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine model of Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Impagnatiello Francesco

    2010-11-01

    macrophage antigen-1 (Mac-1-positive microglial cells within the striatum and ventral midbrain, decreased expression of iNOS, Mac-1 and NADPH oxidase (PHOX, and downregulation of 3-Nitrotyrosine, a peroxynitrite finger print, in SNpc DAergic neurons. Conclusions Oral treatment with HCT1026 has a safe profile and a significant efficacy in counteracting MPTP-induced dopaminergic (DAergic neurotoxicity, motor impairment and microglia activation in ageing mice. HCT1026 provides a novel promising approach towards the development of effective pharmacological neuroprotective strategies against PD.

  17. CyPPA, a Positive SK3/SK2 Modulator, Reduces Activity of Dopaminergic Neurons, Inhibits Dopamine Release, and Counteracts Hyperdopaminergic Behaviors Induced by Methylphenidate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrik, Kjartan F; Redrobe, John P; Holst, Dorte

    2012-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) containing midbrain neurons play critical roles in several psychiatric and neurological diseases, including schizophrenia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and the substantia nigra pars compacta neurons selectively degenerate in Parkinson's disease. Pharmacological...... modulation of DA receptors and transporters are well established approaches for treatment of DA-related disorders. Direct modulation of the DA system by influencing the discharge pattern of these autonomously firing neurons has yet to be exploited as a potential therapeutic strategy. Small conductance Ca(2...... mouse and rat midbrain slices. Using an immunocytochemically and pharmacologically validated DA release assay employing cultured DA neurons from rats, we show that CyPPA repressed DA release in a concentration-dependent manner with a maximal effect equal to the D2 receptor agonist quinpirole. In vivo...

  18. Dopaminergic mechanisms underlying catalepsy, fear and anxiety: do they interact?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Ana Caroline; de Oliveira, Amanda Ribeiro; Reimer, Adriano Edgar; Brandão, Marcus Lira

    2013-11-15

    Haloperidol is a dopamine D2 receptor antagonist that induces catalepsy when systemically administered to rodents. The haloperidol-induced catalepsy is a state of akinesia and rigidity very similar to that seen in Parkinson's disease. There exists great interest in knowing whether or not some degree of emotionality underlies catalepsy. If so, what kind of emotional distress would permeate such motor disturbance? This study is an attempt to shed some light on this issue through an analysis of ultrasound vocalizations (USVs) of 22 kHz, open-field test, and contextual conditioned fear in rats with some degree of catalepsy induced by haloperidol. Systemic administration of haloperidol caused catalepsy and decreased exploratory activity in the open-field. There was no difference in the emission of USVs between groups during the catalepsy or the exploratory behavior in the open-field test. In the contextual conditioned fear, when administered before training session, haloperidol did not change the emission of USVs or the freezing response. When administered before testing session, haloperidol enhanced the freezing response and decreased the emission of USVs on the test day. These findings suggest that the involvement of dopaminergic mechanisms in threatening situations depends on the nature of the aversive stimulus. Activation of D2 receptors occurs in the setting up of adaptive responses to conditioned fear stimuli so that these mechanisms seem to be important for the emission of 22 kHz USVs during the testing phase of the contextual conditioned fear, but not during the training session or the open-field test (unconditioned fear stimuli). Catalepsy, on the other hand, is the result of the blockage of D2 receptors in neural circuits associated to motor behavior that appears to be dissociated from those directly linked to dopamine-mediated neural mechanisms associated to fear.

  19. Prostaglandin receptor EP2 protects dopaminergic neurons against 6-OHDA-mediated low oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Emilce; Werner, Peter; Casper, Diana

    2008-08-15

    Dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) selectively die in Parkinson's disease (PD), but it is unclear how and why this occurs. Recent findings implicate prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) and two of its four receptors, namely EP1 and EP2, as mediators of degenerative and protective events in situations of acute and chronic neuronal death. EP1 activation can exacerbate excitotoxic damage in stroke models and our recent study showed that EP1 activation may explain the selective sensitivity of dopaminergic neurons to oxidative stress. Conversely, EP2 activation may be neuroprotective, although toxic effects have also been demonstrated. Here we investigated if and how EP2 activation might alter the survival of dopaminergic neurons following selective low-level oxidative injury evoked by the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in primary neuronal cultures prepared from embryonic rat midbrain. We found that cultured dopaminergic neurons displayed EP2 receptors. Butaprost, a selective EP2 agonist, significantly reduced 6-OHDA neurotoxicity. EP2 receptors are coupled to stimulatory G-proteins (Gs), which activate adenylate cyclase, increasing cAMP synthesis, which then activates protein kinase A (PKA). Both dibutyryl cAMP and forskolin reduced dopaminergic cell loss after 6-OHDA exposure. Conversely, KT5720 and H-89, two structurally distinct high-affinity PKA inhibitors, abolished the protective effect of butaprost, implicating cAMP-dependent PKA activity in the neuroprotection by EP2 activation. Finally, we show that melanized dopaminergic neurons in the human SN express EP2. This pathway warrants consideration as a neuroprotective strategy for PD.

  20. Dopaminergic neurons write and update memories with cell-type-specific rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso, Yoshinori; Rubin, Gerald M

    2016-07-21

    Associative learning is thought to involve parallel and distributed mechanisms of memory formation and storage. In Drosophila, the mushroom body (MB) is the major site of associative odor memory formation. Previously we described the anatomy of the adult MB and defined 20 types of dopaminergic neurons (DANs) that each innervate distinct MB compartments (Aso et al., 2014a, 2014b). Here we compare the properties of memories formed by optogenetic activation of individual DAN cell types. We found extensive differences in training requirements for memory formation, decay dynamics, storage capacity and flexibility to learn new associations. Even a single DAN cell type can either write or reduce an aversive memory, or write an appetitive memory, depending on when it is activated relative to odor delivery. Our results show that different learning rules are executed in seemingly parallel memory systems, providing multiple distinct circuit-based strategies to predict future events from past experiences.

  1. Evidence of dopaminergic processing of executive inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajendra D Badgaiyan

    Full Text Available Inhibition of unwanted response is an important function of the executive system. Since the inhibitory system is impaired in patients with dysregulated dopamine system, we examined dopamine neurotransmission in the human brain during processing of a task of executive inhibition. The experiment used a recently developed dynamic molecular imaging technique to detect and map dopamine released during performance of a modified Eriksen's flanker task. In this study, young healthy volunteers received an intravenous injection of a dopamine receptor ligand ((11C-raclopride after they were positioned in the PET camera. After the injection, volunteers performed the flanker task under Congruent and Incongruent conditions in a single scan session. They were required to inhibit competing options to select an appropriate response in the Incongruent but not in the Congruent condition. The PET data were dynamically acquired during the experiment and analyzed using two variants of the simplified reference region model. The analysis included estimation of a number of receptor kinetic parameters before and after initiation of the Incongruent condition. We found increase in the rate of ligand displacement (from receptor sites and decrease in the ligand binding potential in the Incongruent condition, suggesting dopamine release during task performance. These changes were observed in small areas of the putamen and caudate bilaterally but were most significant on the dorsal aspect of the body of left caudate. The results provide evidence of dopaminergic processing of executive inhibition and demonstrate that neurochemical changes associated with cognitive processing can be detected and mapped in a single scan session using dynamic molecular imaging.

  2. Role of Slit and Robo proteins in the development of dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornide-Petronio, María Eugenia; Barreiro-Iglesias, Antón

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine plays a number of important roles in the nervous system and the dopaminergic system is affected in several brain disorders. It is therefore of great interest to study the axonal guidance systems that specifically participate in the correct establishment of dopaminergic projections during development and possibly during regenerative processes. In recent years, several reports have shown that Slits and their Robo receptors control the growth of longitudinal (both ascending and descending) mesodiencephalic dopaminergic axons to their appropriate target areas. In vitro studies have shown that Slit1, 2 and 3 are potent repellents of dopamine neurite extension. In vivo studies using both mice and zebrafish mutants for Slits and Robos have shown that Slits and Robos control the lateral and dorsoventral positioning of dopaminergic longitudinal projections during early development. In the present review, we aimed to compile the existing knowledge from both in vitro and in vivo studies on the role of Slit and Robo proteins in the development of dopaminergic neurons as a basis for future studies.

  3. Dysfunctional dopaminergic neurotransmission in asocial BTBR mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squillace, M; Dodero, L; Federici, M; Migliarini, S; Errico, F; Napolitano, F; Krashia, P; Di Maio, A; Galbusera, A; Bifone, A; Scattoni, M L; Pasqualetti, M; Mercuri, N B; Usiello, A; Gozzi, A

    2014-08-19

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by pronounced social and communication deficits and stereotyped behaviours. Recent psychosocial and neuroimaging studies have highlighted reward-processing deficits and reduced dopamine (DA) mesolimbic circuit reactivity in ASD patients. However, the neurobiological and molecular determinants of these deficits remain undetermined. Mouse models recapitulating ASD-like phenotypes could help generate hypotheses about the origin and neurophysiological underpinnings of clinically relevant traits. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), behavioural and molecular readouts to probe dopamine neurotransmission responsivity in BTBR T(+) Itpr3(tf)/J mice (BTBR), an inbred mouse line widely used to model ASD-like symptoms owing to its robust social and communication deficits, and high level of repetitive stereotyped behaviours. C57BL/6J (B6) mice were used as normosocial reference comparators. DA reuptake inhibition with GBR 12909 produced significant striatal DA release in both strains, but failed to elicit fMRI activation in widespread forebrain areas of BTBR mice, including mesolimbic reward and striatal terminals. In addition, BTBR mice exhibited no appreciable motor responses to GBR 12909. DA D1 receptor-dependent behavioural and signalling responses were found to be unaltered in BTBR mice, whereas dramatic reductions in pre- and postsynaptic DA D2 and adenosine A2A receptor function was observed in these animals. Overall these results document profoundly compromised DA D2-mediated neurotransmission in BTBR mice, a finding that is likely to have a role in the distinctive social and behavioural deficits exhibited by these mice. Our results call for a deeper investigation of the role of dopaminergic dysfunction in mouse lines exhibiting ASD-like phenotypes, and possibly in ASD patient populations.

  4. Dopaminergic signaling mediates the motivational response underlying the opponent process to chronic but not acute nicotine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieder, Taryn E; Sellings, Laurie H; Vargas-Perez, Hector; Ting-A-Kee, Ryan; Siu, Eric C; Tyndale, Rachel F; van der Kooy, Derek

    2010-03-01

    The mesolimbic dopamine (DA) system is implicated in the processing of the positive reinforcing effect of all drugs of abuse, including nicotine. It has been suggested that the dopaminergic system is also involved in the aversive motivational response to drug withdrawal, particularly for opiates, however, the role for dopaminergic signaling in the processing of the negative motivational properties of nicotine withdrawal is largely unknown. We hypothesized that signaling at dopaminergic receptors mediates chronic nicotine withdrawal aversions and that dopaminergic signaling would differentially mediate acute vs dependent nicotine motivation. We report that nicotine-dependent rats and mice showed conditioned place aversions to an environment paired with abstinence from chronic nicotine that were blocked by the DA receptor antagonist alpha-flupenthixol (alpha-flu) and in DA D(2) receptor knockout mice. Conversely, alpha-flu pretreatment had no effect on preferences for an environment paired with abstinence from acute nicotine. Taken together, these results suggest that dopaminergic signaling is necessary for the opponent motivational response to nicotine in dependent, but not non-dependent, rodents. Further, signaling at the DA D(2) receptor is critical in mediating withdrawal aversions in nicotine-dependent animals. We suggest that the alleviation of nicotine withdrawal primarily may be driving nicotine motivation in dependent animals.

  5. Managing Parkinson's disease with continuous dopaminergic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolters, Erik; Lees, Andrew J; Volkmann, Jens; van Laar, Teus; Hovestadt, Ad

    2008-04-01

    The pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease is marked by the loss of dopaminergic neurons, which leads to striatal dopaminergic deficiency. This causes resting tremor, hypokinesia, rigidity, bradykinesia, and loss of postural reflexes. Most current treatments for Parkinson's disease aim to restore striatal dopamine signaling by increasing the supply of dopamine with oral levodopa (L-dopa), stimulating dopamine receptors directly using dopamine agonists, or inhibiting the reuptake of endogenous dopamine. L-dopa is standard therapy for patients with Parkinson's disease. However, with continued treatment and disease progression, the response to oral dopaminergic drugs becomes unstable and motor fluctuations emerge, including off periods and dyskinesia. Direct duodenal-administered infusible L-dopa/carbidopa is effective for the management of refractory motor fluctuations in some patient populations. However, enteral infusions cannot mimic the function of the normal dopaminergic brain, and around-the-clock constant-rate administration carries the risk of causing refractory off periods associated with severe immobility and hyperpyrexia. Subthalamic nucleus (STN) deep brain stimulation (DBS) is also a promising treatment. DBS passes a high-frequency electrical current into the target area, mimicking the effect of lesioning the stimulated area. However, this treatment requires invasive surgery and is appropriate for a limited segment of the patient population. This supplement provides a rationale for the use of continuous dopaminergic receptor stimulation and offers guidelines on the individualization of treatment decisions, with special focus on continuous L-dopa infusion and STN DBS. Erik Wolters, MD, PhD, offers an introduction to the impact of continuous L-dopa infusion. Andrew J. Lees, MD, FRCP, provides an overview of the physiologic response to L-dopa and reviews clinical pharmacologic studies of intravenous and intraduodenal L-dopa. Jens Volkmann, MD, discusses

  6. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor and substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haixia Ding; Meijiang Feng; Xinsheng Ding

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive neurodegenerative central nervous system disease which occurs in the substantia nigra-corpus striatum system. The main pathological feature of PD is selective dopaminergic neuronal loss with distinctive Lewy bodies in populations of surviving dopaminergic neurons. In the clinical and neuropathological diagnosis of PD, brain-derived neurotrophic factor mRNA expression in the substantia nigra pars compacta is reduced by 70%, and surviving dopaminergic neurons in the PD substantia nigra pars compacta express less brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) mRNA (20%) than their normal counterparts. In recent years, knowledge surrounding the relationship between neurotrophic factors and PD has increased, and detailed pathogenesis of the role of neurotrophic factors in PD becomes more important.

  7. Development of a Dual Tracer PET Method for Imaging Dopaminergic Neuromodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Converse, Alexander K.; Dejesus, Onofre T.; Flores, Leo G.; Holden, James E.; Kelley, Ann E.; Moirano, Jeffrey M.; Nickles, Robert J.; Oakes, Terrence R.; Roberts, Andrew D.; Ruth, Thomas J.; Vandehey, Nicholas T.; Davidson, Richard J.

    2006-04-01

    The modulatory neurotransmittor dopamine (DA) is involved in movement and reward behaviors, and malfunctions in the dopamine system are implicated in a variety of prevalent and debilitating pathologies including Parkinson's disease, attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, schizophrenia, and addiction. Positron emission tomography (PET) has been used to separately measure changes in DA receptor occupancy and blood flow in response to various interventions. Here we describe a dual tracer PET method to simultaneously measure both responses with the aim of comparing DA release in particular areas of the brain and associated alterations in neural activity throughout the brain. Significant correlations between reductions in DA receptor occupancy and blood flow alterations would be potential signs of dopaminergic modulation, i.e. modifications in signal processing due to increased levels of extracellular DA. Methodological development has begun with rats undergoing an amphetamine challenge while being scanned with the blood flow tracer [17F]fluoromethane and the dopamine D2 receptor tracer [18F]desmethoxyfallypride.

  8. Fast transmission from the dopaminergic ventral midbrain to the sensory cortex of awake primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mylius, Judith; Happel, Max F K; Gorkin, Alexander G; Huang, Ying; Scheich, Henning; Brosch, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Motivated by the increasing evidence that auditory cortex is under control of dopaminergic cell structures of the ventral midbrain, we studied how the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra affect neuronal activity in auditory cortex. We electrically stimulated 567 deep brain sites in total within and in the vicinity of the two dopaminergic ventral midbrain structures and at the same time, recorded local field potentials and neuronal discharges in cortex. In experiments conducted on three awake macaque monkeys, we found that electrical stimulation of the dopaminergic ventral midbrain resulted in short-latency (~35 ms) phasic activations in all cortical layers of auditory cortex. We were also able to demonstrate similar activations in secondary somatosensory cortex and superior temporal polysensory cortex. The electrically evoked responses in these parts of sensory cortex were similar to those previously described for prefrontal cortex. Moreover, these phasic responses could be reversibly altered by the dopamine D1-receptor antagonist SCH23390 for several tens of minutes. Thus, we speculate that the dopaminergic ventral midbrain exerts a temporally precise, phasic influence on sensory cortex using fast-acting non-dopaminergic transmitters and that their effects are modulated by dopamine on a longer timescale. Our findings suggest that some of the information carried by the neuronal discharges in the dopaminergic ventral midbrain, such as the motivational value or the motivational salience, is transmitted to auditory cortex and other parts of sensory cortex. The mesocortical pathway may thus contribute to the representation of non-auditory events in the auditory cortex and to its associative functions.

  9. 海胆早期多巴胺能神经系统的发育及功能研究进展%Progress on the Research of the Development and Function of the Dopaminergic Nervous System of Sea Urchin in the Early Developmental Stage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汝少国; 王翠翠

    2015-01-01

    Sea urchin embryo and larvae in the early developmental stages is an important model for research on marine ecological toxicology. Sea urchin dopaminergic (DA) nervous system develops earlier than the cholinergic system, and it starts to regulate the morphogenesis and swimming behaviors much earlier than the serotonergic system. Here we used sea urchin in the early developmental stages as a model and reviewed the development and the functions of the dopaminergic nervous system. The synthesis of dopamine and the receptors precedes the development of the dopaminergic nervous system. The dopaminergic neuron precursor cell period starts after the synthesis of DA and the receptors. In this period DA and DA receptor 1 (DRD1) appears in the form of granules of which the diameter is 1-2 μm (DA/DRD1-Gs), and they are also expressed on the surface of the embryo and larvae from the rotational blastula stage to the metamorphosis stage. After the aggregation of DA/DRD1-Gs, dopaminergic cells with the axon contacts begin to develop in the labial ganglion and the base of the back oral arms in the early four-wrist larval stage. The number of dopaminergic cells reached the maximum in the eight-wrist larval stage. Then the dopaminergic nervous system continues to develop until the maturity. The morphogenesis in the early developmental stage is regulated by several neurotransmitter systems together, and the swimming behaviors in different early periods can be regulated by either the dopaminergic nervous system alone or together with other systems. In the end, we assessed the prospective studies on issues, such as the factors affecting the development of the dopaminergic nervous system in the early developmental stages of sea urchin, the functions and the signaling pathway of DA receptors, the primary-secondary relationship and the mechanisms of the up-/down-regulation of the three important neurotransmitter systems in early morphogenesis and swimming behaviors, and the influences of

  10. Mixed-mode oscillations in a three time-scale model for the dopaminergic neuron.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krupa, M.; Popovic, N.; Kopell, N.; Rotstein, H.G.

    2008-01-01

    Mixed-mode dynamics is a complex type of dynamical behavior that has been observed both numerically and experimentally in numerous prototypical systems in the natural sciences. The compartmental Wilson-Callaway model for the dopaminergic neuron is an example of a system that exhibits a wide variety

  11. Neural Inhibition of Dopaminergic Signaling Enhances Immunity in a Cell-Non-autonomous Manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiou; Aballay, Alejandro

    2016-09-12

    The innate immune system is the front line of host defense against microbial infections, but its rapid and uncontrolled activation elicits microbicidal mechanisms that have deleterious effects [1, 2]. Increasing evidence indicates that the metazoan nervous system, which responds to stimuli originating from both the internal and the external environment, functions as a modulatory apparatus that controls not only microbial killing pathways but also cellular homeostatic mechanisms [3-5]. Here we report that dopamine signaling controls innate immune responses through a D1-like dopamine receptor, DOP-4, in Caenorhabditis elegans. Chlorpromazine inhibition of DOP-4 in the nervous system activates a microbicidal PMK-1/p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway that enhances host resistance against bacterial infections. The immune inhibitory function of dopamine originates in CEP neurons and requires active DOP-4 in downstream ASG neurons. Our findings indicate that dopamine signaling from the nervous system controls immunity in a cell-non-autonomous manner and identifies the dopaminergic system as a potential therapeutic target for not only infectious diseases but also a range of conditions that arise as a consequence of malfunctioning immune responses.

  12. Alpha-synuclein promotes clathrin-mediated endocytosis of NMDA receptors in dopaminergic cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun Yu; Furong Cheng; Xin Li; Yaohua Li; Tao Wang; Guangwei Liu; Andrius Baskys

    2012-01-01

    Loss of dopaminergic i a compensatory increase in nput to the striatum associated with Parkinson' s disease brings about glutamate release onto the dopaminergic cell bodies in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc)[1] Glutamate over-activation of NMDA receptors on these cells can cause excitotoxicity and contribute to their further loss. NMDA receptor-mediated neuronal death is reduced by group I mGluR-mediated up-regulation of endocytosis protein RAB5B[2.3] Among proteins shown to interact with RAB5 proteins is a-synuclein

  13. Heme oxygenase-1 induction by dieldrin in dopaminergic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Kyung; Kim, Jae-Sung; Kim, Ji-Eun; Kim, Sung-Jun; Lee, Jung-Sup; Kim, Dae-Joong; Son, Jin H; Chun, Hong Sung

    2005-04-04

    We investigated the transcriptional events and signaling pathways involved in the induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) by dieldrin, an environmental risk factor of Parkinson's disease, in a dopaminergic neuronal cells (SN4741). Dieldrin exposure caused dose-dependent and time-dependent induction of heme oxygenase activity and HO-1 protein expression. Deletional and mutational analyses showed that the 5' distal enhancers, E1 and E2, mediate dieldrin-induced HO-1 gene transcription, and the AP-1 DNA binding sites in the E2 enhancer are critical for E2-mediated HO-1 gene activation. Furthermore, both the p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways are utilized for HO-1 transcriptional activation by dieldrin. HO-1 inhibitor, ZnPP IX reduced the expression of HO-1 but enhanced the cytotoxicity induced by dieldrin.

  14. Improved Active Vibration Isolation Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The control force, feedback gain, and actuator stroke of several active vibration isolation systems were analyzed based on a single-layer active vibration isolation system. The analysis shows that the feedback gain and actuator stroke cannot be selected independently and the active isolation system design must make a compromise between the feedback gain and actuator stroke. The performance of active isolation systems can be improved by the joint vibration reduction using an active vibration isolation system with an adaptive dynamic vibration absorber. The results show that the joint vibration reduction method can successfully avoid the compromise between the feedback gain and actuator stroke. The control force and the object vibration amplitude are also greatly reduced.

  15. Information system development activities and inquiring systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carugati, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a framework that maps information system development (ISD) activities on systems for the creation of knowledge. This work addresses the relevant and persisting problem of improving the chances of ISD success. The article builds upon previous research on knowledge aspects...... provides a new way to see the development of a system in terms of the knowledge created in the process. The main practical implication of the framework is that it improves the managers' ability to guide ISD activities as knowledge activities embedded in a knowledge process, a crucial element in development...... of ISD, abandoning the idea of a monolithic approach to knowledge and presenting a pluralistic approach based on the idea that different inquiring systems can support micro-level ISD activities. The article is divided into two parts. The first part presents the theoretical development of the framework...

  16. Distribution of serotonergic and dopaminergic nerve fibers in the salivary gland complex of the cockroach Periplaneta americana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kühnel Dana

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cockroach salivary gland consists of secretory acini with peripheral ion-transporting cells and central protein-producing cells, an extensive duct system, and a pair of reservoirs. Salivation is controled by serotonergic and dopaminergic innervation. Serotonin stimulates the secretion of a protein-rich saliva, dopamine causes the production of a saliva without proteins. These findings suggest a model in which serotonin acts on the central cells and possibly other cell types, and dopamine acts selectively on the ion-transporting cells. To examine this model, we have analyzed the spatial relationship of dopaminergic and serotonergic nerve fibers to the various cell types. Results The acinar tissue is entangled in a meshwork of serotonergic and dopaminergic varicose fibers. Dopaminergic fibers reside only at the surface of the acini next to the peripheral cells. Serotonergic fibers invade the acini and form a dense network between central cells. Salivary duct segments close to the acini are locally associated with dopaminergic and serotonergic fibers, whereas duct segments further downstream have only dopaminergic fibers on their surface and within the epithelium. In addition, the reservoirs have both a dopaminergic and a serotonergic innervation. Conclusion Our results suggest that dopamine is released on the acinar surface, close to peripheral cells, and along the entire duct system. Serotonin is probably released close to peripheral and central cells, and at initial segments of the duct system. Moreover, the presence of serotonergic and dopaminergic fiber terminals on the reservoir indicates that the functions of this structure are also regulated by dopamine and serotonin.

  17. Are Striatal Tyrosine Hydroxylase Interneurons Dopaminergic?

    OpenAIRE

    Xenias, Harry S.; Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Koós, Tibor; Tepper, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Striatal GABAergic interneurons that express the gene for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) have been identified previously by several methods. Although generally assumed to be dopaminergic, possibly serving as a compensatory source of dopamine (DA) in Parkinson's disease, this assumption has never been tested directly. In TH–Cre mice whose nigrostriatal pathway had been eliminated unilaterally with 6-hydroxydopamine, we injected a Cre-dependent virus coding for channelrhodopsin-2 and enhanced yellow...

  18. Meta-type analysis of dopaminergic effects on gene expression in the neuroendocrine brain of female goldfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason T Popesku

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dopamine (DA is a major neurotransmitter important for neuroendocrine control and recent studies have described genomic signalling pathways activated and inhibited by DA agonists and antagonists in the goldfish brain. Here we perform a meta-type analysis using microarray datasets from experiments conducted with female goldfish to characterize the gene expression responses that underlie dopaminergic signalling. Sexually mature, pre-spawning (GSI 4.5 ± 1.3% or sexually regressing ( GSI 3 ± 0.4% female goldfish (15-40 g injected intraperitoneally with either SKF 38393, LY 171555, SCH 23390, sulpiride, or a combination of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine and α-methyl-p-tyrosine. Microarray meta-type analysis identified 268 genes in the telencephalon and hypothalamus as having reciprocal (i.e. opposite between agonism and antagonism/depletion fold change responses, suggesting that these transcripts are likely targets for DA-mediated regulation. Noteworthy genes included ependymin, vimentin, and aromatase, genes that support the significance of DA in neuronal plasticity and tissue remodelling. Sub-network enrichment analysis (SNEA was used to identify common gene regulators and binding proteins associated with the differentially expressed genes mediated by DA. SNEA analysis identified gene expression targets that were related to three major categories that included cell signalling (STAT3, SP1, SMAD, Jun/Fos, immune response (IL6, IL1β, TNFs, cytokine, NF-κB, and cell proliferation and growth (IGF1, TGFβ1. These gene networks are also known to be associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinsons’ disease, well-known to be associated with loss of dopaminergic neurons. This study identifies genes and networks that underlie DA signalling in the vertebrate CNS and provides targets that may be key neuroendocrine regulators. The results provide a foundation for future work on dopaminergic regulation of gene expression in fish

  19. Disrupted Functional Connectivity with Dopaminergic Midbrain in Cocaine Abusers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomasi, D.; Tomasi, D.; Volkow, N.D.; Wang, R.; Carrillo, J.; Maloney, T.; Alia-Klein, N.; Woicik, P.A.; Telang, F.; Goldstein, R.Z.

    2010-06-01

    Chronic cocaine use is associated with disrupted dopaminergic neurotransmission but how this disruption affects overall brain function (other than reward/motivation) is yet to be fully investigated. Here we test the hypothesis that cocaine addicted subjects will have disrupted functional connectivity between the midbrain (where dopamine neurons are located) and cortical and subcortical brain regions during the performance of a sustained attention task. We measured brain activation and functional connectivity with fMRI in 20 cocaine abusers and 20 matched controls. When compared to controls, cocaine abusers had lower positive functional connectivity of midbrain with thalamus, cerebellum, and rostral cingulate, and this was associated with decreased activation in thalamus and cerebellum and enhanced deactivation in rostral cingulate. These findings suggest that decreased functional connectivity of the midbrain interferes with the activation and deactivation signals associated with sustained attention in cocaine addicts.

  20. Functional effects of cannabinoids during dopaminergic specification of human neural precursors derived from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanslowsky, Nancy; Jahn, Kirsten; Venneri, Anna; Naujock, Maximilian; Haase, Alexandra; Martin, Ulrich; Frieling, Helge; Wegner, Florian

    2016-03-30

    Among adolescents cannabis is one of the most widely used illicit drugs. In adolescence brain development continues, characterized by neuronal maturation and synaptic plasticity. The endocannabinoid system plays an important role during brain development by modulating neuronal function and neurogenesis. Changes in endocannabinoid signaling by Δ(9) -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the psychoactive component of cannabis, might therefore lead to neurobiological changes influencing brain function and behavior. We investigated the functional maturation and dopaminergic specification of human cord blood-derived induced pluripotent stem cell (hCBiPSC)-derived small molecule neural precursor cells (smNPCs) after cultivation with the endogenous cannabinoid anandamide (AEA) and the exogenous THC, both potent agonists at the cannabinoid 1 receptor (CB1 R). Higher dosages of 10-μM AEA or THC significantly decreased functionality of neurons, indicated by reduced ion currents and synaptic activity. A lower concentration of 1-μM THC had no marked effect on neuronal and dopaminergic maturation, while 1-μM AEA significantly enhanced the frequency of synaptic activity. As there were no significant effects on DNA methylation in promotor regions of genes important for neuronal function, these cannabinoid actions seem to be mediated by another than this epigenetic mechanism. Our data suggest that there are concentration-dependent actions of cannabinoids on neuronal function in vitro indicating neurotoxic, dysfunctional effects of 10-μM AEA and THC during human neurogenesis.

  1. Efficient generation of functional dopaminergic neurons from human induced pluripotent stem cells under defined conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swistowski, Andrzej; Peng, Jun; Liu, Qiuyue; Mali, Prashant; Rao, Mahendra S; Cheng, Linzhao; Zeng, Xianmin

    2010-10-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) reprogrammed from somatic cells represent a promising unlimited cell source for generating patient-specific cells for biomedical research and personalized medicine. As a first step, critical to clinical applications, we attempted to develop defined culture conditions to expand and differentiate human iPSCs into functional progeny such as dopaminergic neurons for treating or modeling Parkinson's disease (PD). We used a completely defined (xeno-free) system that we previously developed for efficient generation of authentic dopaminergic neurons from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and applied it to iPSCs. First, we adapted two human iPSC lines derived from different somatic cell types for the defined expansion medium and showed that the iPSCs grew similarly as hESCs in the same medium regarding pluripotency and genomic stability. Second, by using these two independent adapted iPSC lines, we showed that the process of differentiation into committed neural stem cells (NSCs) and subsequently into dopaminergic neurons was also similar to hESCs. Importantly, iPSC-derived dopaminergic neurons were functional as they survived and improved behavioral deficits in 6-hydroxydopamine-leasioned rats after transplantation. In addition, iPSC-derived NSCs and neurons could be efficiently transduced by a baculoviral vector delivering episomal DNA for future gene function study and disease modeling using iPSCs. We also performed genome-wide microarray comparisons between iPSCs and hESCs, and we derived NSC and dopaminergic neurons. Our data revealed overall similarity and visible differences at a molecular level. Efficient generation of functional dopaminergic neurons under defined conditions will facilitate research and applications using PD patient-specific iPSCs.

  2. Mesolimbic and Nigrostriatal Dopaminergic Systems: Behavioral Neuropharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    dopamine agonists could result from sustained dopamine synthesis inhibition or depletion of dopamine stores (Tarsy and Baldessarini 1974) and by chronic...enzyme in catecholamine synthesis , are decreased in the brains of Parkinsonian patients, both in the substantia nigra and in the ventral tegmental area... methadone or chlorpromazine in the guinea-pig. Psychopharmacology 48:132-146 Elkhawad AO, Woodruff GN (1975) Studies on the behavioural pharmacology of a

  3. The possible interaction of dopamine system in nucleus accumbens shell and glutamate system of prelimbic region on locomotor activity in rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatam Ahmadi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nucleus accumbens (NAc and prefrontal cortex (PFC dopaminergic and glutamatergic systems are involved in regulating of locomotor activity behaviors. This study has investigated the interaction of NAc shell dopaminergic system and prelimbic glutamatergic systems in regulating locomotor activity and related parameters. Methods: The aim of this study was the effect the drugs injection interaction in the brain of male Wistar rats on locomotor activity and related parameters, in the order of this purpose, open field apparatus that automatically recorded locomotor activity was employed. Unilateral intra-cerebral injection of drugs was done. Results: Unilateral intra-prelimbic injection of D-AP7 (N-methyl-D-aspartic acid= NMDA receptor antagonist; 0.25, 0.5 and 1μg/μl did not alter locomotor activity behaviors. However, infusion of NMDA (0.9μg/μl in this region increased locomotor activity (P<0.01, whereas decreased rearing (P<0.01 and grooming (P<0.01 which was blocked by D-AP7 (0.25μg/μl (P<0.01. Moreover, unilateral infusion of SCH23390 (dopamine D1 receptor antagonist; 0.25, 0.5 and 1μg/μl into the left NAc shell did not alter locomotor activity. However, injection of SKF38393 (dopamine D1 receptor agonist; 4μg/μl into the left NAc shell increased locomotor activity (P<0.05 which was blocked by SCH23390 (0.25μg/μl (P<0.01. Furthermore, the subthreshold dose infusion of SCH23390 (0.25μg/μl into the left NAc shell reduced the effect of intra- prelimbic NMDA on locomotor activity (P<0.01. In addition, intra-NAc shell administration of the subthreshold dose of SKF38393 (1μg/μl potentiated the middle dose (P<0.05, whereas decreased the higher dose of intra-left prelimbic NMDA response (P<0.05 on locomotor activity. Conclusion: The results suggested a modulatory effect of the NAc shell dopaminergic system on increased locomotor activity by activating glutamate system in prelimbic.

  4. MNC Headquarters as Activity Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nell, Phillip C.; Larsen, Marcus M.

    Recent literature has questioned why multinational corporations (MNC) relocate their headquarters activities overseas. In this paper, we investigate the consequences of this phenomenon. To do this, we conceptualize the MNC headquarters activities as an interdependent system, and develop a set of ...

  5. MNC Headquarters as Activity Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nell, Phillip C.; Møller Larsen, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    Recent literature has questioned why multinational corporations (MNC) relocate their headquarters activities overseas. In this paper, we investigate the consequences of this phenomenon. To do this, we conceptualize the MNC headquarters activities as an interdependent system, and develop a set of ...

  6. Complement 3-deficient mice are not protected against MPTP-induced dopaminergic neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yajie; Li, Shurong; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Yanling; Zhang, Yanliang; Wen, Can; Zou, Qiang; Su, Bingyin

    2007-10-31

    Recent studies have invoked inflammation as a major contributor to the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). Emerging evidence indicated that components of complement system may be involved in such disorder and contribute to its development. We thus observed the influence of deficiency of complement 3 (C3), the key component of complement system, on the death of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) and the loss of dopaminergic fibers in striatum induced by acute or chronic administration of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Immunohistochemical staining of dopaminergic neurons in SNpc and neurochemical analysis of dopamine and its metabolites in striata revealed that there was no significant difference between the two genotypes. Longer survival time also indicated that C3 might not mediate the spontaneous recovery of dopaminergic fibers in mouse striatum acutely challenged by MPTP. We conclude that, despite growing evidence indicating the involvement of complement system in the pathogenesis of PD, our data do not support a role for C3 in this established model of PD, as indicated by results from HPLC analysis and immunohistochemical staining.

  7. A natural compound macelignan protects midbrain dopaminergic neurons from inflammatory degeneration via microglial arginase-1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyofuji, Kana; Kurauchi, Yuki; Hisatsune, Akinori; Seki, Takahiro; Mishima, Satoshi; Katsuki, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Inflammatory events involving activated microglia have been recognized to play an important role in pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson disease. Compounds regulating activation profiles of microglia may provide therapeutic benefits for Parkinson disease characterized by degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Here we examined the effect of macelignan, a compound derived from nutmeg, on inflammatory degeneration of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Treatment of midbrain slice cultures with interferon (IFN)-γ and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) caused a substantial decrease in viable dopaminergic neurons and an increase in nitric oxide (NO) production indicated by extracellular nitrite accumulation. Application of macelignan (10 μM) concomitantly with LPS prevented the loss of dopaminergic neurons. Besides nitrite accumulation, up-regulation of inducible NO synthase protein expression in response to IFN-γ/LPS was confirmed by Western blotting, and immunohistochemical examination revealed expression of inducible NO synthase in a subpopulation of Iba-1-poitive microglia. However, macelignan did not affect any of these NO-related parameters. On the other hand, macelignan promoted expression of arginase-1 in midbrain slice cultures irrespective of the presence or the absence of IFN-γ/LPS treatment. Arginase-1 expression was mainly localized in a subpopulation of Iba-1-positive cells. Importantly, the neuroprotective effect of macelignan was antagonized by N(ω)-hydroxy-nor-L-arginine, a specific arginase inhibitor. The neuroprotective effect of macelignan was also prevented by GW9662, a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) antagonist. Overall, these results indicate that macelignan, a compound with PPARγ agonist activity, can provide neuroprotective effect on dopaminergic neurons in an arginase-dependent but NO-independent manner.

  8. Are dopaminergic genes involved in a predisposition to pathological aggression? Hypothesizing the importance of "super normal controls" in psychiatricgenetic research of complex behavioral disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Thomas J H; Blum, Kenneth; Mathews, Daniel; Fisher, Larry; Schnautz, Nancy; Braverman, Eric R; Schoolfield, John; Downs, Bernard W; Comings, David E

    2005-01-01

    We hypothesize that pathological aggression, a complex behavioral disorder, in adolescents may in part involve polymorphisms of the dopaminergic system. While a number of neurotransmitter systems must be involved, due to polygenic inheritance, one major pathway should involve the dopaminergic system. Advances in our knowledge of the neurobiology of aggression and violence have given rise to rational pharmacological treatments for these behaviors. The main biological systems that are known to be involved are certain reward neurotransmitters including: serotonin, opioid peptides, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and the catecholamines (dopamine and norepinephrine). It is our notion that pathological aggressive behavior is in part similar mechanistically to other forms of impulsive behaviors such as pathological gambling. By analogy to drug dependence, it has been speculated that the underlying pathology in pathological gambling is a reduction in the sensitivity of the reward system. While studying pathological gamblers and controls during a guessing game using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Reuter et al. observed a reduction of ventral striatal and ventromedial prefrontal activation in the pathological gamblers that were negatively correlated with gambling severity. Subsequently, linking hypo activation of these areas to disease severity. A positive correlation of both the dopamine D2 receptor gene (DRD2) and the dopamine transporter gene (DAT1) polymorphisms were observed with pathological violence in adolescents in a blinded clinical trial. Thus, this and other cited work preliminary suggest a role for both the DRD2 and DAT genes in pathological aggressive behavior. We further hypothesize that follow-up gene research in this area, albeit premature, resulting in confirmation of positive correlations with dopaminergic polymorphisms, and utilizing highly screened controls (eliminating any addictive, compulsive and impulsive behaviors in both proband and family) may

  9. Thioredoxin reductase deficiency potentiates oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death in dopaminergic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Lopert

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are considered major generators of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS which are implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD. We have recently shown that isolated mitochondria consume hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂ in a substrate- and respiration-dependent manner predominantly via the thioredoxin/peroxiredoxin (Trx/Prx system. The goal of this study was to determine the role of Trx/Prx system in dopaminergic cell death. We asked if pharmacological and lentiviral inhibition of the Trx/Prx system sensitized dopaminergic cells to mitochondrial dysfunction, increased steady-state H₂O₂ levels and death in response to toxicants implicated in PD. Incubation of N27 dopaminergic cells or primary rat mesencephalic cultures with the Trx reductase (TrxR inhibitor auranofin in the presence of sub-toxic concentrations of parkinsonian toxicants paraquat; PQ or 6-hydroxydopamine; 6OHDA (for N27 cells resulted in a synergistic increase in H₂O₂ levels and subsequent cell death. shRNA targeting the mitochondrial thioredoxin reductase (TrxR2 in N27 cells confirmed the effects of pharmacological inhibition. A synergistic decrease in maximal and reserve respiratory capacity was observed in auranofin treated cells and TrxR2 deficient cells following incubation with PQ or 6OHDA. Additionally, TrxR2 deficient cells showed decreased basal mitochondrial oxygen consumption rates. These data demonstrate that inhibition of the mitochondrial Trx/Prx system sensitizes dopaminergic cells to mitochondrial dysfunction, increased steady-state H₂O₂, and cell death. Therefore, in addition to their role in the production of cellular H₂O₂ the mitochondrial Trx/Prx system serve as a major sink for cellular H₂O₂ and its disruption may contribute to dopaminergic pathology associated with PD.

  10. Perspective food addiction, caloric restriction, and dopaminergic neurotransmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stankowska, Arwen Urrsula Malgorzata; Gjedde, Albert

    2013-01-01

    , and reduced activity in prefrontal regions of the cerebral cortex. The neurobiological characteristics suggest that obese people also have a pathological dependence in common with addicts, in the form of food addiction. Malnutrition and dieting both relate to binge eating, possibly as a compensation...... for a reduced cognitive reward condition. The combination of caloric restriction and food addiction imparts a high risk of relapse as a result of further reduction of dopaminergic neurotransmission and the subsequent loss of reward. As with drugs of abuse, ingestion of large quantities of sugar in circumstances...... of uncontrolled eating increases dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. This and other evidence suggests that abuse of food is a habit learned by means of mechanisms centred in the basal ganglia, with an increased risk of relapse in the presence of associative amplifiers. This risk is predicted...

  11. Dopaminergic and beta-adrenergic effects on gastric antral motility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, K; Hovendal, C P; Gottrup, F

    1984-01-01

    of bethanechol or pentagastrin inducing motor activity patterns as in the phase III of the MMC and the digestive state respectively. The stimulated antral motility was dose-dependently inhibited by dopamine. The effect was significantly blocked by specifically acting dopaminergic blockers, while alpha- and beta......-adrenergic blockers were without any significant effects. Dose-response experiments with bethanechol and dopamine showed inhibition of a non-competitive type. Isoprenaline was used alone and in conjunction with selective blockade of beta 1- and beta 2-receptors during infusion of bethanechol which induces a pattern...... similar to phase III in the migrating myoelectric complex. The stimulated antral motility was dose-dependently inhibited by isoprenaline. The effect could be significantly blocked by propranolol (beta 1 + beta 2-adrenoceptor blocker) and by using in conjunction the beta 1-adrenoceptor blocker practolol...

  12. Changes in firing rate and firing pattern of midbrain dopaminergic neurons after lesioning of the dorsal raphe nucleus by 5,7-drhydroxytryptamine in adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Shuang; Liu Jian; Wang Tao; Han Lingna; Zhang Qiaojun; Li Qiang

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of serotonergic efferent projection of the dorsal rophe nucleus (DRN) on the activity of substantia nigro pars compacta (SNc) and ventral tegmenta area (VTA) dopaminergic neurons after lesioning of the DRN by the neurotoxin 5,7-drhydroxytryptamine (5,7-DHT) in rot. Methods The changes in the firing rote and firing pattern of SNc and VTA dopaminergic neurons were observed with extrocellular recording in control and the lesioned rats. Results The results showed that the mean firing rotes of the fast-firing dopaminergic neurons of the SNc in control and the lesioned rots were (5.34±0. 13 ) Hz (n = 23 ) and ( 7.13±0. 49 ) Hz (n=37), respectively. The mean firing rote of the fast-firing dopaminergic neurons of the SNc in the lesioned rats was significantly increased when compared to that of control rots (P<0.01), while the mean firing rote of the slow-firing dopaminergic neurons of the SNc did not change. The mean firing rotes of dopaminergic neurons of the VTA in control and the lesioned rots were (5.27±0. 38)Hz (n=35) and (3.6±0.2)Hz (n=52), respectively. Lesioning of the DRN induced a significant decrease in the mean firing rote of dopaminergic neurons of the VTA. The firing pattern of SNc and VTA dopaminergic neurons changed towards a more bursting or irrgular firing after the lesioning. Conlusion These data suggest that the serotonergic efferent projections of the DRN significantly affect the activity of SNe and VTA dopaminergic neurons.

  13. Disrupted iron homeostasis causes dopaminergic neurodegeneration in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matak, Pavle; Matak, Andrija; Moustafa, Sarah; Aryal, Dipendra K; Benner, Eric J; Wetsel, William; Andrews, Nancy C

    2016-03-29

    Disrupted brain iron homeostasis is a common feature of neurodegenerative disease. To begin to understand how neuronal iron handling might be involved, we focused on dopaminergic neurons and asked how inactivation of transport proteins affected iron homeostasis in vivo in mice. Loss of the cellular iron exporter, ferroportin, had no apparent consequences. However, loss of transferrin receptor 1, involved in iron uptake, caused neuronal iron deficiency, age-progressive degeneration of a subset of dopaminergic neurons, and motor deficits. There was gradual depletion of dopaminergic projections in the striatum followed by death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Damaged mitochondria accumulated, and gene expression signatures indicated attempted axonal regeneration, a metabolic switch to glycolysis, oxidative stress, and the unfolded protein response. We demonstrate that loss of transferrin receptor 1, but not loss of ferroportin, can cause neurodegeneration in a subset of dopaminergic neurons in mice.

  14. Dopaminergic cell death induced by MPP(+), oxidant and specific neurotoxicants shares the common molecular mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, H S; Gibson, G E; DeGiorgio, L A; Zhang, H; Kidd, V J; Son, J H

    2001-02-01

    Recent etiological study in twins (Tanner et al. 1999) strongly suggests that environmental factors play an important role in typical, non-familial Parkinson's disease (PD), beginning after age 50. Epidemiological risk factor analyses of typical PD cases have identified several neurotoxicants, including MPP(+) (the active metabolite of MPTP), paraquat, dieldrin, manganese and salsolinol. Here, we tested the hypothesis that these neurotoxic agents might induce cell death in our nigral dopaminergic cell line, SN4741 (Son et al. 1999) through a common molecular mechanism. Our initial experiments revealed that treatment with both MPP(+) and the other PD-related neurotoxicants induced apoptotic cell death in SN4741 cells, following initial increases of H(2)O(2)-related ROS activity and subsequent activation of JNK1/2 MAP kinases. Moreover, we have demonstrated that during dopaminergic cell death cascades, MPP(+), the neurotoxicants and an oxidant, H(2)O(2) equally induce the ROS-dependent events. Remarkably, the oxidant treatment alone induced similar sequential molecular events: ROS increase, activation of JNK MAP kinases, activation of the PITSLRE kinase, p110, by both Caspase-1 and Caspase-3-like activities and apoptotic cell death. Pharmacological intervention using the combination of the antioxidant Trolox and a pan-caspase inhibitor Boc-(Asp)-fmk (BAF) exerted significant neuroprotection against ROS-induced dopaminergic cell death. Finally, the high throughput cDNA microarray screening using the current model identified downstream response genes, such as heme oxygenase-1, a constituent of Lewy bodies, that can be the useful biomarkers to monitor the pathological conditions of dopaminergic neurons under neurotoxic insult.

  15. Asymmetric cell division and Notch signaling specify dopaminergic neurons in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tio, Murni; Toh, Joanne; Fang, Wanru; Blanco, Jorge; Udolph, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    In Drosophila, dopaminergic (DA) neurons can be found from mid embryonic stages of development till adulthood. Despite their functional involvement in learning and memory, not much is known about the developmental as well as molecular mechanisms involved in the events of DA neuronal specification, differentiation and maturation. In this report we demonstrate that most larval DA neurons are generated during embryonic development. Furthermore, we show that loss of function (l-o-f) mutations of genes of the apical complex proteins in the asymmetric cell division (ACD) machinery, such as inscuteable and bazooka result in supernumerary DA neurons, whereas l-o-f mutations of genes of the basal complex proteins such as numb result in loss or reduction of DA neurons. In addition, when Notch signaling is reduced or abolished, additional DA neurons are formed and conversely, when Notch signaling is activated, less DA neurons are generated. Our data demonstrate that both ACD and Notch signaling are crucial mechanisms for DA neuronal specification. We propose a model in which ACD results in differential Notch activation in direct siblings and in this context Notch acts as a repressor for DA neuronal specification in the sibling that receives active Notch signaling. Our study provides the first link of ACD and Notch signaling in the specification of a neurotransmitter phenotype in Drosophila. Given the high degree of conservation between Drosophila and vertebrate systems, this study could be of significance to mechanisms of DA neuronal differentiation not limited to flies.

  16. The Shh coreceptor Cdo is required for differentiation of midbrain dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Yu-Rim; Jeong, Myong-Ho; Leem, Young-Eun; Lee, Sang-Jin; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Bae, Gyu-Un; Kang, Jong-Sun

    2014-09-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling is required for numerous developmental processes including specification of ventral cell types in the central nervous system such as midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. The multifunctional coreceptor Cdo increases the signaling activity of Shh which is crucial for development of forebrain and neural tube. In this study, we investigated the role of Cdo in midbrain DA neurogenesis. Cdo and Shh signaling components are induced during neurogenesis of embryonic stem (ES) cells. Cdo(-/-) ES cells show reduced neuronal differentiation accompanied by increased cell death upon neuronal induction. In addition, Cdo(-/-) ES cells form fewer tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and microtubule associated protein 2 (MAP2)-positive DA neurons correlating with the decreased expression of key regulators of DA neurogenesis, such as Shh, Neurogenin2, Mash1, Foxa2, Lmx1a, Nurr1 and Pitx3, relative to the Cdo(+/+) ES cells. Consistently, the Cdo(-/-) embryonic midbrain displays a reduction in expression of TH and Nurr1. Furthermore, activation of Shh signaling by treatment with Purmorphamine (Pur) restores the DA neurogenesis of Cdo(-/-) ES cells, suggesting that Cdo is required for the full Shh signaling activation to induce efficient DA neurogenesis.

  17. Active Stabilization of Aeromechanical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-05

    feedback, the resulting two-mode proportonal control law further extended the stable range of operation of the compresor . Stall flow coefficient was...active control of surge and stall in gas turbine engines. The use of small amplitude waves predicted by theory as stall precursors were tested with...stabilization system for rotating stall which was tested on both a single-stage and a three-stage axial compressor, increasing the stable operating range

  18. Ceftriaxone attenuates acute cocaine‐evoked dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens of the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, B A; Tallarida, C S; Scholl, J L; Forster, G L; Unterwald, E M; Rawls, S M

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Ceftriaxone is a β‐lactam antibiotic and glutamate transporter activator that reduces the reinforcing effects of psychostimulants. Ceftriaxone also reduces locomotor activation following acute psychostimulant exposure, suggesting that alterations in dopamine transmission in the nucleus accumbens contribute to its mechanism of action. In the present studies we tested the hypothesis that pretreatment with ceftriaxone disrupts acute cocaine‐evoked dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. Experimental Approach Adult male Sprague–Dawley rats were pretreated with saline or ceftriaxone (200 mg kg−1, i.p. × 10 days) and then challenged with cocaine (15 mg kg−1, i.p.). Motor activity, dopamine efflux (via in vivo microdialysis) and protein levels of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), the dopamine transporter and organic cation transporter as well as α‐synuclein, Akt and GSK3β were analysed in the nucleus accumbens. Key Results Ceftriaxone‐pretreated rats challenged with cocaine displayed reduced locomotor activity and accumbal dopamine efflux compared with saline‐pretreated controls challenged with cocaine. The reduction in cocaine‐evoked dopamine levels was not counteracted by excitatory amino acid transporter 2 blockade in the nucleus accumbens. Pretreatment with ceftriaxone increased Akt/GSK3β signalling in the nucleus accumbens and reduced levels of dopamine transporter, TH and phosphorylated α‐synuclein, indicating that ceftriaxone affects numerous proteins involved in dopaminergic transmission. Conclusions and Implications These results are the first evidence that ceftriaxone affects cocaine‐evoked dopaminergic transmission, in addition to its well‐described effects on glutamate, and suggest that its ability to attenuate cocaine‐induced behaviours, such as psychomotor activity, is due in part to reduced dopaminergic neurotransmission in the nucleus accumbens. PMID:26375494

  19. Molecular manipulation targeting regulation of dopaminergic differentiation and proliferation of neural stem cells or pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Yin-Xiu; Wei, Li-Chun; Wang, Ya-Zhou; Cao, Rong; Wang, Xi; Chen, Liang-Wei

    2011-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a severe deliberating neurological disease caused by progressive degenerative death of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra of midbrain. While cell replacement strategy by transplantation of neural stem cells and inducement of dopaminergic neurons is recommended for the treatment of PD, understanding the differentiation mechanism and controlled proliferation of grafted stem cells remain major concerns in their clinical application. Here we review recent studies on molecular signaling pathways in regulation of dopaminergic differentiation and proliferation of stem cells, particularly Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in stimulating formation of the dopaminergic phenotype, Notch signaling in inhibiting stem cell differentiation, and Sonic hedgehog functioning in neural stem cell proliferation and neuronal cell production. Activation of oncogenes involved in uncontrolled proliferation or tumorigenicity of stem cells is also discussed. It is proposed that a selective molecular manipulation targeting strategy will greatly benefit cell replacement therapy for PD by effectively promoting dopaminergic neuronal cell generation and reducing risk of tumorigenicity of in vivo stem cell applications.

  20. Dysregulated LRRK2 signaling in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress leads to dopaminergic neuron degeneration in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiyuan Yuan

    Full Text Available Mutation of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2 is the leading genetic cause of Parkinson's Disease (PD, manifested as age-dependent dopaminergic neurodegeneration, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Multiple roles of LRRK2 may contribute to dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress has also been linked to PD pathogenesis, but its interactive mechanism with PD genetic factors is largely unknown. Here, we used C. elegans, human neuroblastoma cells and murine cortical neurons to determine the role of LRRK2 in maintaining dopaminergic neuron viability. We found that LRRK2 acts to protect neuroblastoma cells and C. elegans dopaminergic neurons from the toxicity of 6-hydroxydopamine and/or human α-synuclein, possibly through the p38 pathway, by supporting upregulation of GRP78, a key cell survival molecule during ER stress. A pathogenic LRRK2 mutant (G2019S, however, caused chronic p38 activation that led to death of murine neurons and age-related dopaminergic-specific neurodegeneration in nematodes. These observations establish a critical functional link between LRRK2 and ER stress.

  1. Dysregulated LRRK2 signaling in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress leads to dopaminergic neuron degeneration in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Yiyuan; Cao, Pengxiu; Smith, Mark A; Kramp, Kristopher; Huang, Ying; Hisamoto, Naoki; Matsumoto, Kunihiro; Hatzoglou, Maria; Jin, Hui; Feng, Zhaoyang

    2011-01-01

    Mutation of leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) is the leading genetic cause of Parkinson's Disease (PD), manifested as age-dependent dopaminergic neurodegeneration, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Multiple roles of LRRK2 may contribute to dopaminergic neurodegeneration. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress has also been linked to PD pathogenesis, but its interactive mechanism with PD genetic factors is largely unknown. Here, we used C. elegans, human neuroblastoma cells and murine cortical neurons to determine the role of LRRK2 in maintaining dopaminergic neuron viability. We found that LRRK2 acts to protect neuroblastoma cells and C. elegans dopaminergic neurons from the toxicity of 6-hydroxydopamine and/or human α-synuclein, possibly through the p38 pathway, by supporting upregulation of GRP78, a key cell survival molecule during ER stress. A pathogenic LRRK2 mutant (G2019S), however, caused chronic p38 activation that led to death of murine neurons and age-related dopaminergic-specific neurodegeneration in nematodes. These observations establish a critical functional link between LRRK2 and ER stress.

  2. Beneficial effects of carnosic acid on dieldrin-induced dopaminergic neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Ae; Kim, Seung; Lee, Sook-Young; Kim, Chun-Sung; Kim, Do Kyung; Kim, Sung-Jun; Chun, Hong Sung

    2008-08-27

    Carnosic acid (CA) is one of the bioactive polyphenols present in extracts of the herb rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis). In this study, we examined possible protective effects of CA on neurotoxicity induced by dieldrin, an organochlorine pesticide implicated in sporadic Parkinson's disease, in cultured dopaminergic cells (SN4741). CA (5-10 muM) pretreatment showed potent protective effects in a concentration-related manner and prevented dieldrin (10 muM)-induced caspase-3 activation, Jun N-terminal kinase phosphorylation, and caspase-12 activation. Furthermore, dieldrin-induced downregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor production was significantly attenuated by CA. These results suggest that CA may safeguard dopaminergic neuronal cells from environmental neurotoxins by enhancing brain-derived neurotrophic factor and repressing apoptotic molecules.

  3. Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist Reduces Neonatal Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Long-Lasting Neurobehavioral Deficits and Dopaminergic Neuronal Injury in Adult Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Pang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Our previous study showed that a single lipopolysaccharide (LPS treatment to neonatal rats could induce a long-lasting neuroinflammatory response and dopaminergic system injury late in life. This is evidenced by a sustained activation of microglia and elevated interleukin-1β (IL-1β levels, as well as reduced tyrosine hydroxylase (TH expression in the substantia nigra (SN of P70 rat brain. The object of the current study was to test whether co-administration of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra protects against LPS-induced neurological dysfunction later in life. LPS (1 mg/kg with or without IL-1ra (0.1 mg/kg, or sterile saline was injected intracerebrally into postnatal day 5 (P5 Sprague-Dawley male rat pups. Motor behavioral tests were carried out from P7 to P70 with subsequent examination of brain injury. Our results showed that neonatal administration of IL-1ra significantly attenuated LPS-induced motor behavioral deficits, loss of TH immunoreactive neurons, as well as microglia activation in the SN of P70 rats. These data suggest that IL-1β may play a pivotal role in mediating a chronic neuroinflammation status by a single LPS exposure in early postnatal life, and blockading IL-1β might be a novel approach to protect the dopaminergic system against perinatal infection/inflammation exposure.

  4. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist reduces neonatal lipopolysaccharide-induced long-lasting neurobehavioral deficits and dopaminergic neuronal injury in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yi; Tien, Lu-Tai; Zhu, Hobart; Shen, Juying; Wright, Camilla F; Jones, Tembra K; Mamoon, Samir A; Bhatt, Abhay J; Cai, Zhengwei; Fan, Lir-Wan

    2015-04-17

    Our previous study showed that a single lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment to neonatal rats could induce a long-lasting neuroinflammatory response and dopaminergic system injury late in life. This is evidenced by a sustained activation of microglia and elevated interleukin-1β (IL-1β) levels, as well as reduced tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression in the substantia nigra (SN) of P70 rat brain. The object of the current study was to test whether co-administration of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) protects against LPS-induced neurological dysfunction later in life. LPS (1 mg/kg) with or without IL-1ra (0.1 mg/kg), or sterile saline was injected intracerebrally into postnatal day 5 (P5) Sprague-Dawley male rat pups. Motor behavioral tests were carried out from P7 to P70 with subsequent examination of brain injury. Our results showed that neonatal administration of IL-1ra significantly attenuated LPS-induced motor behavioral deficits, loss of TH immunoreactive neurons, as well as microglia activation in the SN of P70 rats. These data suggest that IL-1β may play a pivotal role in mediating a chronic neuroinflammation status by a single LPS exposure in early postnatal life, and blockading IL-1β might be a novel approach to protect the dopaminergic system against perinatal infection/inflammation exposure.

  5. PINK1 Primes Parkin-Mediated Ubiquitination of PARIS in Dopaminergic Neuronal Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjong Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1 and parkin cause autosomal-recessive Parkinson’s disease through a common pathway involving mitochondrial quality control. Parkin inactivation leads to accumulation of the parkin interacting substrate (PARIS, ZNF746 that plays an important role in dopamine cell loss through repression of proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1-alpha (PGC-1α promoter activity. Here, we show that PARIS links PINK1 and parkin in a common pathway that regulates dopaminergic neuron survival. PINK1 interacts with and phosphorylates serines 322 and 613 of PARIS to control its ubiquitination and clearance by parkin. PINK1 phosphorylation of PARIS alleviates PARIS toxicity, as well as repression of PGC-1α promoter activity. Conditional knockdown of PINK1 in adult mouse brains leads to a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra that is dependent on PARIS. Altogether, these results uncover a function of PINK1 to direct parkin-PARIS-regulated PGC-1α expression and dopaminergic neuronal survival.

  6. Midbrain dopaminergic neurons generate calcium and sodium currents and release dopamine in the striatum of pups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Carolina Ferrari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Midbrain dopaminergic neurons (mDA neurons are essential for the control of diverse motor and cognitive behaviors. However, our understanding of the activity of immature mDA neurons is rudimentary. Rodent mDA neurons migrate and differentiate early in embryonic life and dopaminergic axons enter the striatum and contact striatal neurons a few days before birth, but when these are functional is not known. Here, we recorded Ca2+ transients and Na+ spikes from embryonic (E16-E18 and early postnatal (P0-P7 mDA neurons with dynamic two photon imaging and patch clamp techniques in slices from tyrosine hydroxylase-GFP mice, and measured evoked dopamine release in the striatum with amperometry. We show that half of identified E16-P0 mDA neurons spontaneously generate non-synaptic, intrinsically-driven Ca2+ spikes and Ca2+ plateaus mediated by N- and L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Starting from E18-P0, half of the mDA neurons also reliably generate overshooting Na+ spikes with an abrupt maturation at birth (P0 = E19. At that stage (E18-P0, dopaminergic terminals release dopamine in a calcium-dependent manner in the striatum in response to local stimulation. We propose that the intrinsic spontaneous activity of mouse mDA neurons may impact the development/activity of the striatal network from birth.

  7. Dopaminergic regulation of neuronal excitability through modulation of Ih in layer V entorhinal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkranz, J Amiel; Johnston, Daniel

    2006-03-22

    The entorhinal cortex (EC) is a significant component of the systems that underlie certain forms of memory formation and recall. Evidence has been emerging that the dopaminergic system in the EC facilitates these and other functions of the EC. The effects of dopamine (DA) on membrane properties and excitability of EC neurons, however, are not known. We used in vitro whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from layer V pyramidal neuronal somata and dendrites of the adult rat lateral EC to investigate the effects of DA on the excitability of these neurons. We found that brief application of DA caused a reduction in the excitability of layer V EC pyramidal neurons. This effect was attributable to voltage-dependent modification of membrane properties that can best be explained by an increase in a hyperpolarization-activated conductance. Furthermore, the effects of DA were blocked by pharmacological blockade of h-channels, but not by any of a number of other ion channels. These actions were produced by a D1 receptor-mediated increase of cAMP but were independent of protein kinase A. A portion of the actions of DA can be attributed to effects in the apical dendrites. The data suggest that DA can directly influence the membrane properties of layer V EC pyramidal neurons by modulation of h-channels. These actions may underlie some of the effects of DA on memory formation.

  8. Dopaminergic and clinical correlates of pathological gambling in Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Mette Buhl; Hansen, Kim Vang; Gjedde, Albert

    2013-01-01

    Dopaminergic medication for motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease (PD) recently has been linked with impulse control disorders, including pathological gambling (PG), which affects up to 8% of patients. PG often is considered a behavioral addiction associated with disinhibition, risky decision......-making, and altered striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission. Using [(11)C]raclopride with positron emission tomography, we assessed dopaminergic neurotransmission during Iowa Gambling Task performance. Here we present data from a single patient with PD and concomitant PG. We noted a marked decrease in [(11)C......]raclopride binding in the left ventral striatum upon gambling, indicating a gambling-induced dopamine release. The results imply that PG in PD is associated with a high dose of dopaminergic medication, pronounced motor symptomatology, young age at disease onset, high propensity for sensation seeking, and risky...

  9. Inducing dopaminergic differentiation of expanded rat mesencephalic neural stem cells by ascorbic acid in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Min; WANG Dongmei; HOU Lingling; LI Haimin; XIE Chao; JIAO Wencang; BAI Cixian; WANG Yaping; PEI Xuetao

    2004-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AA) induced differentiation of neural stem cells (NSCs) into dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons is reported.NSCs derived from rat mesencephalon were maintained and expanded in a defined medium containing mitogens of basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF).Compared with the control, ascorbic acid treatment led to more DAergic neuronal differentiation as indicated by the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine transporter (DAT), which are specific markers of dopamine neurons.AA induction also enhanced expression of Nurr1 and Shh.PD98059, an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK) pathway, could block AA-induced Nurr1, TH and DAT mRNA expression.The results might suggest a new strategy to provide enough dopaminergic cells for the therapy of Parkinson's disease (PD), and Nurr1 and ERK signaling pathway might participate in the AA-induced DAergic differentiation.

  10. Endogenous Opioid-Induced Neuroplasticity of Dopaminergic Neurons in the Ventral Tegmental Area Influences Natural and Opiate Reward

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitchers, Kyle K.; Coppens, Caroline M.; Beloate, Lauren N.; Fuller, Jonathan; Van, Sandy; Frohmader, Karla S.; Laviolette, Steven R.; Lehman, Michael N.; Coolen, Lique M.

    2014-01-01

    Natural reward and drugs of abuse converge on the mesolimbic pathway and activate common mechanism of neural plasticity in the nucleus accumbens. Chronic exposure to opiates induces plasticity in dopaminergic neurons of the ventral tegmental area (VTA), which regulates morphine reward tolerance. Her

  11. Closing one's eyes to reality: evidence for a dopaminergic basis of psychoticism from spontaneous eye blink rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.S. Colzato; H.A. Slagter; W.P.M. van den Wildenberg; B. Hommel

    2009-01-01

    We tested the idea that Psychoticism, a major personality dimension, is rooted in individual differences in dopamine functioning. To this end, we related the spontaneous eye blink rate (EBR), a marker of striatal dopaminergic activity, to scores in the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Revised Short

  12. Association of Polymorphisms in BDNF, MTHFR, and Genes Involved in the Dopaminergic Pathway with Memory in a Healthy Chinese Population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Hu, Chung-Yi; Yeh, Ting-Chi; Lin, Pei-Jung; Wu, Chung-Hsin; Lee, Po-Lei; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2012-01-01

    The contribution of genetic factors to the memory is widely acknowledged. Research suggests that these factors include genes involved in the dopaminergic pathway, as well as the genes for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR). The activity of the products of these genes is affected by single…

  13. Simvastatin prevents the inflammatory process and the dopaminergic degeneration induced by the intranigral injection of lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Romero, María del Carmen; Argüelles, Sandro; Villarán, Ruth F; de Pablos, Rocío M; Delgado-Cortés, María José; Santiago, Marti; Herrera, Antonio J; Cano, Josefina; Machado, Alberto

    2008-04-01

    Anti-inflammatory strategies have attracted much interest for their potential to prevent further deterioration of Parkinson's disease. Recent experimental and clinical evidence indicate that statins - extensively used in medical practice as effective lipid-lowering agents - have also anti-inflammatory effects. In this study, we investigated the influence of simvastatin on the degenerative process of the dopaminergic neurons of the rat following intranigral injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a potent inductor of inflammation that we have previously used as an animal model of Parkinson's disease. We evaluated TH positive neurons, astroglial, and microglial populations and found that simvastatin prevented the inflammatory processes, as the induction of interleukin-1beta, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and iNOS and the consequent dopaminergic degeneration induced by LPS. Moreover, simvastatin produced the activation of the neurotrophic factor BDNF, along with the prevention of the oxidative damage to proteins. Moreover, it also prevents the main changes produced by LPS on different mitogen-activated protein kinases, featured as increases of P-c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase, P-extracellular signal-regulated kinase, p-38, and P-glycogen synthase kinase and the decrease of the promotion of cell survival signals such as cAMP response element-binding protein and Akt. Our results suggest that statins could delay the progression of dopaminergic degeneration in disorders involving inflammatory processes.

  14. Isoliquiritigenin isolated from licorice Glycyrrhiza uralensis prevents 6-hydroxydopamine-induced apoptosis in dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Cheol Kyu; Chun, Hong Sung

    2012-01-01

    Licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis) is a medicinal herb containing various bioactive components implicated in antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and neuroprotective effects, but the effects of licorice against Parkinson's disease (PD)-related dopaminergic cell death have not been studied. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of isoliquiritigenin (ISL) isolated from Glycyrrhiza uralensis on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in a dopaminergic cell line, SN4741. ISL (1 µM) significantly attenuated 6-OHDA (50 µM)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) generation and apoptotic cell death. ISL pretreatment effectively suppressed 6-OHDA-mediated upregulation of Bax, p-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p-p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase, cytochrome c release, and caspase 3 activation. In addition, ISL significantly attenuated 6-OHDA-induced Bcl-2, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) reduction. Pharmacological inhibitors of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) pathway reversed ISL-mediated neuroprotection against 6-OHDA toxicity in SN4741 cells. These results provide the first evidence that ISL can protect dopaminergic cells under oxidative stress conditions by regulating the apoptotic process.

  15. Efficient Conversion of Spermatogonial Stem Cells to Phenotypic and Functional Dopaminergic Neurons via the PI3K/Akt and P21/Smurf2/Nolz1 Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hao; Liu, Yang; Hai, Yanan; Guo, Ying; Yang, Shi; Li, Zheng; Gao, Wei-Qiang; He, Zuping

    2015-12-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by loss of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons. Generation of functional dopaminergic (DA) neurons is of unusual significance for treating Parkinson's disease (PD). However, direct conversion of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) to functional DA neurons without being reprogrammed to a pluripotent status has not been achieved. Here, we report an efficient approach to obtain morphological, phenotypic, and functional DA neurons from SSCs using a specific combination of olfactory ensheathing cell-conditioned medium (OECCM) and several defined growth factors (DGF). By following the current protocol, direct conversion of SSCs (both SSC line and primary SSCs) to neural cells and DA neurons was demonstrated by expression of numerous phenotypic genes and proteins for neural cells, as well as cell morphological features. More significantly, SSCs-derived DA neurons acquired neuronal functional properties such as synapse formation, electrophysiology activity, and dopamine secretion. Furthermore, PI3K/Akt pathway and p21/Nolz1 cascades were activated whereas Smurf2 was inactivated, leading to cell cycle exit during the conversion of SSCs into DA neurons. Collectively, this study could provide sufficient neural cells from SSCs for applications in the treatment of PD and offers novel insights into mechanisms underlying neural system development from the line of germ cells.

  16. DJ-1 mediates paraquat-induced dopaminergic neuronal cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyun Joo; Heo, Jun Young; Shim, Jung Hee; Park, Ji Hoon; Seo, Kang Sik; Ryu, Min Jeong; Han, Jeong Su; Shong, Minho; Son, Jin H; Kweon, Gi Ryang

    2011-04-25

    There are two causes of Parkinson's disease (PD): environmental insults and genetic mutations of PD-associated genes. Environmental insults and genetic mutations lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, and a combination of mitochondrial dysfunction and increased oxidative stress in dopaminergic neurons is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of PD. Among the PD-associated genes, DJ-1 acts as a redox sensor for oxidative stress and has been also proposed to maintain mitochondrial complex I activity. To understand molecular functions of DJ-1 in the cell, we have generated DJ-1 null cells from the DJ-1(-/-) mouse embryos. Using these null cells, we investigated the susceptibility to an environmental toxin, paraquat, which is known to inhibit mitochondrial complex I. Interestingly, we found that DJ-1 null cells showed a resistance to paraquat-induced apoptosis, including reduced poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and procaspase-3. Also DJ-1 null cells generated less superoxide than SN4741 cells by paraquat treatment. Consistent with the reduced paraquat sensitivity, DJ-1 null cells showed reduced complex I activity, which was partially rescued by ectopic DJ-I expression. In summary, our results suggest that DJ-1 is critical to maintain mitochondrial complex I and complex I could be a key target in interaction of paraquat toxicity and DJ-1 for giving rise to PD.

  17. How to make a midbrain dopaminergic neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arenas, Ernest; Denham, Mark; Villaescusa, J Carlos

    2015-06-01

    Midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neuron development has been an intense area of research during recent years. This is due in part to a growing interest in regenerative medicine and the hope that treatment for diseases affecting mDA neurons, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), might be facilitated by a better understanding of how these neurons are specified, differentiated and maintained in vivo. This knowledge might help to instruct efforts to generate mDA neurons in vitro, which holds promise not only for cell replacement therapy, but also for disease modeling and drug discovery. In this Primer, we will focus on recent developments in understanding the molecular mechanisms that regulate the development of mDA neurons in vivo, and how they have been used to generate human mDA neurons in vitro from pluripotent stem cells or from somatic cells via direct reprogramming. Current challenges and future avenues in the development of a regenerative medicine for PD will be identified and discussed.

  18. Nicotine enhances alcohol intake and dopaminergic responses through β2* and β4* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors

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    Tolu, Stefania; Marti, Fabio; Morel, Carole; Perrier, Carole; Torquet, Nicolas; Pons, Stephanie; de Beaurepaire, Renaud; Faure, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Alcohol and nicotine are the most widely co-abused drugs. Both modify the activity of dopaminergic (DA) neurons of the Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA) and lead to an increase in DA release in the Nucleus Accumbens, thereby affecting the reward system. Evidences support the hypothesis that distinct nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), the molecular target of acetylcholine (ACh) and exogenous nicotine, are also in addition implicated in the response to alcohol. The precise molecular and neuronal substrates of this interaction are however not well understood. Here we used in vivo electrophysiology in the VTA to characterise acute and chronic interactions between nicotine and alcohol. Simultaneous injections of the two drugs enhanced their responses on VTA DA neuron firing and chronic exposure to nicotine increased alcohol-induced DA responses and alcohol intake. Then, we assessed the role of β4 * nAChRs, but not β2 * nAChRs, in mediating acute responses to alcohol using nAChR subtypes knockout mice (β2−/− and β4−/− mice). Finally, we showed that nicotine-induced modifications of alcohol responses were absent in β2−/− and β4−/− mice, suggesting that nicotine triggers β2* and β4 * nAChR-dependent neuroadaptations that subsequently modify the responses to alcohol and thus indicating these receptors as key mediators in the complex interactions between these two drugs. PMID:28332590

  19. Pro-survival role for Parkinson's associated gene DJ-1 revealed in trophically impaired dopaminergic neurons.

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    Liviu Aron

    Full Text Available The mechanisms underlying the selective death of substantia nigra (SN neurons in Parkinson disease (PD remain elusive. While inactivation of DJ-1, an oxidative stress suppressor, causes PD, animal models lacking DJ-1 show no overt dopaminergic (DA neuron degeneration in the SN. Here, we show that aging mice lacking DJ-1 and the GDNF-receptor Ret in the DA system display an accelerated loss of SN cell bodies, but not axons, compared to mice that only lack Ret signaling. The survival requirement for DJ-1 is specific for the GIRK2-positive subpopulation in the SN which projects exclusively to the striatum and is more vulnerable in PD. Using Drosophila genetics, we show that constitutively active Ret and associated Ras/ERK, but not PI3K/Akt, signaling components interact genetically with DJ-1. Double loss-of-function experiments indicate that DJ-1 interacts with ERK signaling to control eye and wing development. Our study uncovers a conserved interaction between DJ-1 and Ret-mediated signaling and a novel cell survival role for DJ-1 in the mouse. A better understanding of the molecular connections between trophic signaling, cellular stress and aging could uncover new targets for drug development in PD.

  20. Conditional Expression of Parkinson's Disease-Related R1441C LRRK2 in Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons of Mice Causes Nuclear Abnormalities without Neurodegeneration

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    Tsika, Elpida; Kannan, Meghna; Foo, Caroline Shi-Yan; Dikeman, Dustin; Glauser, Liliane; Gellhaar, Sandra; Galter, Dagmar; Knott, Graham W.; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Moore, Darren J.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene cause late-onset, autosomal dominant Parkinson's disease (PD). The clinical and neurochemical features of LRRK2-linked PD are similar to idiopathic disease although neuropathology is somewhat heterogeneous. Dominant mutations in LRRK2 precipitate neurodegeneration through a toxic gain-of-function mechanism which can be modeled in transgenic mice overexpressing human LRRK2 variants. A number of LRRK2 transgenic mouse models have been developed that display abnormalities in dopaminergic neurotransmission and alterations in tau metabolism yet without consistently inducing dopaminergic neurodegeneration. To directly explore the impact of mutant LRRK2 on the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway, we developed conditional transgenic mice that selectively express human R1441C LRRK2 in dopaminergic neurons from the endogenous murine ROSA26 promoter. The expression of R1441C LRRK2 does not induce the degeneration of substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons or striatal dopamine deficits in mice up to 2 years of age, and fails to precipitate abnormal protein inclusions containing alpha-synuclein, tau, ubiquitin or autophagy markers (LC3 and p62). Furthermore, mice expressing R1441C LRRK2 exhibit normal motor activity and olfactory function with increasing age. Intriguingly, the expression of R1441C LRRK2 induces age-dependent abnormalities of the nuclear envelope in nigral dopaminergic neurons including reduced nuclear circularity and increased invaginations of the nuclear envelope. In addition, R1441C LRRK2 mice display increased neurite complexity of cultured midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Collectively, these novel R1441C LRRK2 conditional transgenic mice reveal altered dopaminergic neuronal morphology with advancing age, and provide a useful tool for exploring the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the R1441C LRRK2 mutation in PD. PMID:25174890

  1. Fibroblast growth factor-20 increases the yield of midbrain dopaminergic neurons derived from human embryonic stem cells

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    Ana Sofia Correia

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In the central nervous system, fibroblast growth factor (FGF-20 has been reported to act preferentially on midbrain dopaminergic neurons. It also promotes the dopaminergic differentiation of stem cells. We have analyzed the effects of FGF-20 on human embryonic stem cells (hESCs differentiation into dopaminergic neurons. We induced neuronal differentiation of hESCs by co-culturing those with PA6 mouse stromal cells for 3 weeks. When we supplemented the culture medium with FGF-20, the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH- expressing neurons increased fivefold, from 3% to 15% of the hESC-derived cells. The cultured cells also expressed other midbrain dopaminergic markers (PITX3, En1, Msx1, and Aldh1, suggesting that some had differentiated into midbrain dopaminergic neurons. We observed no effect of FGF-20 on the size of the soma area or neurite length of the TH-immunopositive neurons. Regardless of whether FGF-20 had been added or not, 17% of the hESC-derived cells expressed the pan-neuronal marker b-III-Tubulin. The proportion of proliferating cells positive for Ki-67 was also not affected by FGF-20 (7% of the hESC-derived cells. By contrast, after 3 weeks in culture FGF-20 significantly reduced the proportion of cells undergoing cell death, as revealed by immunoreactivity for cleaved caspase-8, Bcl-2 associated X protein (BAX and cleaved caspase-3 (2.5% to 1.2% of cleaved caspase-3-positive cells out of the hESC-derived cells. Taken together, our results indicate that FGF-20 specifically increases the yield of dopaminergic neurons from hESCs grown on PA6 feeder cells and at least part of this effect is due to a reduction in cell death.

  2. Electrophysiological effects of trace amines on mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons

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    Ada eLedonne

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Trace amines (TAs are a class of endogenous compounds strictly related to classic monoamine neurotransmitters with regard to their structure, metabolism and tissue distribution. Although the presence of TAs in mammalian brain has been recognized for decades, until recently they were considered to be by-products of amino acid metabolism or as ‘false’ neurotransmitters. The discovery in 2001 of a new family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, namely trace amines receptors, has re-ignited interest in TAs. In particular, two members of the family, trace amine receptor 1 (TA1 and trace amine receptor 2 (TA2, were shown to be highly sensitive to these endogenous compounds. Experimental evidence suggests that TAs modulate the activity of catecholaminergic neurons and that TA dysregulation may contribute to neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression and Parkinson’s disease, all of which are characterised by altered monoaminergic networks. Here we review recent data concerning the electrophysiological effects of TAs on the activity of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons. In the context of recent data obtained with TA1 receptor knockout mice, we also discuss the mechanisms by which the activation of these receptors modulates the activity of these neurons. Three important new aspects of TAs action have recently emerged: (a inhibition of firing due to increased release of dopamine; (b reduction of D2 and GABAB receptor-mediated inhibitory responses (excitatory effects due to dysinhibition; and (c a direct TA1 receptor-mediated activation of GIRK channels which produce cell membrane hyperpolarization. While the first two effects have been well documented in our laboratory, the direct activation of GIRK channels by TA1 receptors has been reported by others, but has not been seen in our laboratory (Geracitano et al., 2004. Further research is needed to address this point, and to further

  3. Oleuropein Prevents Neuronal Death, Mitigates Mitochondrial Superoxide Production and Modulates Autophagy in a Dopaminergic Cellular Model

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    Imène Achour

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, primarily affecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. There is currently no cure for PD and present medications aim to alleviate clinical symptoms, thus prevention remains the ideal strategy to reduce the prevalence of this disease. The goal of this study was to investigate whether oleuropein (OLE, the major phenolic compound in olive derivatives, may prevent neuronal degeneration in a cellular dopaminergic model of PD, differentiated PC12 cells exposed to the potent parkinsonian toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA. We also investigated OLE’s ability to mitigate mitochondrial oxidative stress and modulate the autophagic flux. Our results obtained by measuring cytotoxicity and apoptotic events demonstrate that OLE significantly decreases neuronal death. OLE could also reduce mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species resulting from blocking superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, quantification of autophagic and acidic vesicles in the cytoplasm alongside expression of specific autophagic markers uncovered a regulatory role for OLE against autophagic flux impairment induced by bafilomycin A1. Altogether, our results define OLE as a neuroprotective, anti-oxidative and autophagy-regulating molecule, in a neuronal dopaminergic cellular model.

  4. Oleuropein Prevents Neuronal Death, Mitigates Mitochondrial Superoxide Production and Modulates Autophagy in a Dopaminergic Cellular Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achour, Imène; Arel-Dubeau, Anne-Marie; Renaud, Justine; Legrand, Manon; Attard, Everaldo; Germain, Marc; Martinoli, Maria-Grazia

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, primarily affecting dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. There is currently no cure for PD and present medications aim to alleviate clinical symptoms, thus prevention remains the ideal strategy to reduce the prevalence of this disease. The goal of this study was to investigate whether oleuropein (OLE), the major phenolic compound in olive derivatives, may prevent neuronal degeneration in a cellular dopaminergic model of PD, differentiated PC12 cells exposed to the potent parkinsonian toxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). We also investigated OLE’s ability to mitigate mitochondrial oxidative stress and modulate the autophagic flux. Our results obtained by measuring cytotoxicity and apoptotic events demonstrate that OLE significantly decreases neuronal death. OLE could also reduce mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species resulting from blocking superoxide dismutase activity. Moreover, quantification of autophagic and acidic vesicles in the cytoplasm alongside expression of specific autophagic markers uncovered a regulatory role for OLE against autophagic flux impairment induced by bafilomycin A1. Altogether, our results define OLE as a neuroprotective, anti-oxidative and autophagy-regulating molecule, in a neuronal dopaminergic cellular model. PMID:27517912

  5. Hemoglobin is present as a canonical α2β2 tetramer in dopaminergic neurons.

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    Russo, Roberta; Zucchelli, Silvia; Codrich, Marta; Marcuzzi, Federica; Verde, Cinzia; Gustincich, Stefano

    2013-09-01

    Hemoglobin is the oxygen carrier in blood erythrocytes. Oxygen coordination is mediated by α2β2 tetrameric structure via binding of the ligand to the heme iron atom. This structure is essential for hemoglobin function in the blood. In the last few years, expression of hemoglobin has been found in atypical sites, including the brain. Transcripts for α and β chains of hemoglobin as well as hemoglobin immunoreactivity have been shown in mesencephalic A9 dopaminergic neurons, whose selective degeneration leads to Parkinson's disease. To gain further insights into the roles of hemoglobin in the brain, we examined its quaternary structure in dopaminergic neurons in vitro and in vivo. Our results indicate that (i) in mouse dopaminergic cell line stably over-expressing α and β chains, hemoglobin exists as an α2β2 tetramer; (ii) similarly to the over-expressed protein, endogenous hemoglobin forms a tetramer of 64kDa; (iii) hemoglobin also forms high molecular weight insoluble aggregates; and (iv) endogenous hemoglobin retains its tetrameric structure in mouse mesencephalon in vivo. In conclusion, these results suggest that neuronal hemoglobin may be endowed with some of the biochemical activities and biological function associated to its role in erythroid cells. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Oxygen Binding and Sensing Proteins.

  6. Histamine and spontaneous motor activity: biphasic changes, receptors involved and participation of the striatal dopamine system.

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    Chiavegatto, S; Nasello, A G; Bernardi, M M

    1998-01-01

    The time- and dose-related effects of exogenous histamine on spontaneous motor activity and receptors involved were evaluated in male rats. Intracerebroventricular administration of histamine (5.4 and 54.3 nmol) produced a biphasic effect with initial transitory hypoactivity and later hyperactivity expressed by locomotion frequency in an open-field. The rearing frequencies were only reduced by all doses of histamine used. The histamine-induced hypoactivity was inhibited by the H3-antagonist thioperamide and was also induced by the H3-agonist N-alpha-methylhistamine. The histamine-induced hyperactivity phase was blocked by the H1-antagonist mepyramine. The H2-antagonist ranitidine increased locomotion and rearing frequencies. The participation of other neurotransmitters in the persistent hypokinetic effect induced by 135.8 nmol of histamine was determined by HPLC in the striatum and hypothalamus as counter-proof. A decreased DOPAC/DA ratio was observed only in the striatum. In the hypothalamus, low levels of 5HT were detected, probably not correlated with motor activity. In conclusion, the present results suggest that the exogenous histamine-induced hypoactivity response is probably due to activation of H3-receptors as heteroreceptors reducing the activity of the striatal dopaminergic system. This effect can partially overlap with the expression of the hyperactivity induced by H1-receptor activation. The participation of H2-receptors requires further investigation.

  7. Abnormal striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission during rest and task production in spasmodic dysphonia.

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    Simonyan, Kristina; Berman, Brian D; Herscovitch, Peter; Hallett, Mark

    2013-09-11

    Spasmodic dysphonia is a primary focal dystonia characterized by involuntary spasms in the laryngeal muscles during speech production. The pathophysiology of spasmodic dysphonia is thought to involve structural and functional abnormalities in the basal ganglia-thalamo-cortical circuitry; however, neurochemical correlates underpinning these abnormalities as well as their relations to spasmodic dysphonia symptoms remain unknown. We used positron emission tomography with the radioligand [(11)C]raclopride (RAC) to study striatal dopaminergic neurotransmission at the resting state and during production of symptomatic sentences and asymptomatic finger tapping in spasmodic dysphonia patients. We found that patients, compared to healthy controls, had bilaterally decreased RAC binding potential (BP) to striatal dopamine D2/D3 receptors on average by 29.2%, which was associated with decreased RAC displacement (RAC ΔBP) in the left striatum during symptomatic speaking (group average difference 10.2%), but increased RAC ΔBP in the bilateral striatum during asymptomatic tapping (group average difference 10.1%). Patients with more severe voice symptoms and subclinically longer reaction time to initiate the tapping sequence had greater RAC ΔBP measures, while longer duration of spasmodic dysphonia was associated with a decrease in task-induced RAC ΔBP. Decreased dopaminergic transmission during symptomatic speech production may represent a disorder-specific pathophysiological trait involved in symptom generation, whereas increased dopaminergic function during unaffected task performance may be explained by a compensatory adaptation of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system possibly due to decreased striatal D2/D3 receptor availability. These changes can be linked to the clinical and subclinical features of spasmodic dysphonia and may represent the neurochemical basis of basal ganglia alterations in this disorder.

  8. Dopaminergic control of motivation and reinforcement learning: a closed-circuit account for reward-oriented behavior.

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    Morita, Kenji; Morishima, Mieko; Sakai, Katsuyuki; Kawaguchi, Yasuo

    2013-05-15

    Humans and animals take actions quickly when they expect that the actions lead to reward, reflecting their motivation. Injection of dopamine receptor antagonists into the striatum has been shown to slow such reward-seeking behavior, suggesting that dopamine is involved in the control of motivational processes. Meanwhile, neurophysiological studies have revealed that phasic response of dopamine neurons appears to represent reward prediction error, indicating that dopamine plays central roles in reinforcement learning. However, previous attempts to elucidate the mechanisms of these dopaminergic controls have not fully explained how the motivational and learning aspects are related and whether they can be understood by the way the activity of dopamine neurons itself is controlled by their upstream circuitries. To address this issue, we constructed a closed-circuit model of the corticobasal ganglia system based on recent findings regarding intracortical and corticostriatal circuit architectures. Simulations show that the model could reproduce the observed distinct motivational effects of D1- and D2-type dopamine receptor antagonists. Simultaneously, our model successfully explains the dopaminergic representation of reward prediction error as observed in behaving animals during learning tasks and could also explain distinct choice biases induced by optogenetic stimulation of the D1 and D2 receptor-expressing striatal neurons. These results indicate that the suggested roles of dopamine in motivational control and reinforcement learning can be understood in a unified manner through a notion that the indirect pathway of the basal ganglia represents the value of states/actions at a previous time point, an empirically driven key assumption of our model.

  9. Unexpected expression of α- and β-globin in mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons and glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioli, Marta; Pinto, Milena; Cesselli, Daniela; Zaninello, Marta; Lazarevic, Dejan; Roncaglia, Paola; Simone, Roberto; Vlachouli, Christina; Plessy, Charles; Bertin, Nicolas; Beltrami, Antonio; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Gallo, Vittorio; Santoro, Claudio; Ferrer, Isidro; Rivella, Stefano; Beltrami, Carlo Alberto; Carninci, Piero; Raviola, Elio; Gustincich, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    The mesencephalic dopaminergic (mDA) cell system is composed of two major groups of projecting cells in the substantia nigra (SN) (A9 neurons) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA) (A10 cells). A9 neurons form the nigrostriatal pathway and are involved in regulating voluntary movements and postural reflexes. Their selective degeneration leads to Parkinson's disease. Here, we report that gene expression analysis of A9 dopaminergic neurons (DA) identifies transcripts for α- and β-chains of hemoglobin (Hb). Globin immunoreactivity decorates the majority of A9 DA, a subpopulation of cortical and hippocampal astrocytes and mature oligodendrocytes. This pattern of expression was confirmed in different mouse strains and in rat and human. We show that Hb is expressed in the SN of human postmortem brain. By microarray analysis of dopaminergic cell lines overexpressing α- and β-globin chains, changes in genes involved in O2 homeostasis and oxidative phopshorylation were observed, linking Hb expression to mitochondrial function. Our data suggest that the most famed oxygen-carrying globin is not exclusively restricted to the blood, but it may play a role in the normal physiology of the brain and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:19717439

  10. Unexpected expression of alpha- and beta-globin in mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons and glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagioli, Marta; Pinto, Milena; Cesselli, Daniela; Zaninello, Marta; Lazarevic, Dejan; Roncaglia, Paola; Simone, Roberto; Vlachouli, Christina; Plessy, Charles; Bertin, Nicolas; Beltrami, Antonio; Kobayashi, Kazuto; Gallo, Vittorio; Santoro, Claudio; Ferrer, Isidro; Rivella, Stefano; Beltrami, Carlo Alberto; Carninci, Piero; Raviola, Elio; Gustincich, Stefano

    2009-09-08

    The mesencephalic dopaminergic (mDA) cell system is composed of two major groups of projecting cells in the substantia nigra (SN) (A9 neurons) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA) (A10 cells). A9 neurons form the nigrostriatal pathway and are involved in regulating voluntary movements and postural reflexes. Their selective degeneration leads to Parkinson's disease. Here, we report that gene expression analysis of A9 dopaminergic neurons (DA) identifies transcripts for alpha- and beta-chains of hemoglobin (Hb). Globin immunoreactivity decorates the majority of A9 DA, a subpopulation of cortical and hippocampal astrocytes and mature oligodendrocytes. This pattern of expression was confirmed in different mouse strains and in rat and human. We show that Hb is expressed in the SN of human postmortem brain. By microarray analysis of dopaminergic cell lines overexpressing alpha- and beta-globin chains, changes in genes involved in O(2) homeostasis and oxidative phopshorylation were observed, linking Hb expression to mitochondrial function. Our data suggest that the most famed oxygen-carrying globin is not exclusively restricted to the blood, but it may play a role in the normal physiology of the brain and neurodegenerative diseases.

  11. Neural ablation of the PARK10 candidate Plpp3 leads to dopaminergic transmission deficits without neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-López, Sandra; Martínez-Silva, Ana Valeria; Montiel, Teresa; Osorio-Gómez, Daniel; Bermúdez-Rattoni, Federico; Massieu, Lourdes; Escalante-Alcalde, Diana

    2016-04-11

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder, characterised by the progressive loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons and a variety of motor symptoms. The gene coding for the phospholipid phosphatase 3, PLPP3 (formerly PPAP2B or LPP3), maps within the PARK10 locus, a region that has been linked with increased risk to late-onset PD. PLPP3 modulates the levels of a range of bioactive lipids controlling fundamental cellular processes within the central nervous system. Here we show that PLPP3 is enriched in astroglial cells of the adult murine ventral midbrain. Conditional inactivation of Plpp3 using a Nestin::Cre driver results in reduced mesencephalic levels of sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1 (S1P1), a well-known mediator of pro-survival responses. Yet, adult PLPP3-deficient mice exhibited no alterations in the number of dopaminergic neurons or in the basal levels of striatal extracellular dopamine (DA). Potassium-evoked DA overflow in the striatum, however, was significantly decreased in mutant mice. Locomotor evaluation revealed that, although PLPP3-deficient mice exhibit motor impairment, this is not progressive or responsive to acute L-DOPA therapy. These findings suggest that disruption of Plpp3 during early neural development leads to dopaminergic transmission deficits in the absence of nigrostriatal degeneration, and without causing an age-related locomotor decline consistent with PD.

  12. Interaction of NMDA receptor and pacemaking mechanisms in the midbrain dopaminergic neuron.

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    Joon Ha

    Full Text Available Dopamine neurotransmission has been found to play a role in addictive behavior and is altered in psychiatric disorders. Dopaminergic (DA neurons display two functionally distinct modes of electrophysiological activity: low- and high-frequency firing. A puzzling feature of the DA neuron is the following combination of its responses: N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR activation evokes high-frequency firing, whereas other tonic excitatory stimuli (α-amino-3-hydroxyl-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate receptor (AMPAR activation or applied depolarization block firing instead. We suggest a new computational model that reproduces this combination of responses and explains recent experimental data. Namely, somatic NMDAR stimulation evokes high-frequency firing and is more effective than distal dendritic stimulation. We further reduce the model to a single compartment and analyze the mechanism of the distinct high-frequency response to NMDAR activation vs. other stimuli. Standard nullcline analysis shows that the mechanism is based on a decrease in the amplitude of calcium oscillations. The analysis confirms that the nonlinear voltage dependence provided by the magnesium block of the NMDAR determine its capacity to elevate the firing frequency. We further predict that the moderate slope of the voltage dependence plays the central role in the frequency elevation. Additionally, we suggest a repolarizing current that sustains calcium-independent firing or firing in the absence of calcium-dependent repolarizing currents. We predict that the ether-a-go-go current (ERG, which has been observed in the DA neuron, is the best fit for this critical role. We show that a calcium-dependent and a calcium-independent oscillatory mechanisms form a structure of interlocked negative feedback loops in the DA neuron. The structure connects research of DA neuron firing with circadian biology and determines common minimal models for investigation of robustness of oscillations

  13. Role of Dopaminergic Receptors in Glaucomatous Disease Modulation

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    Nicola Pescosolido

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Both studies on animals and humans suggest the presence of dopamine (DA receptors in the anterior segment of the eye. Their role in the dynamics of intraocular pressure (IOP is not yet clear. DA2 and DA3 receptors are mainly located on postganglionic sympathetic nerve endings. Their stimulation reduces the release of norepinephrine and suppresses the production of aqueous humor. DA1 receptors seem to be more expressed by the ciliary body and the outflow pathway of aqueous humor. The administration of DA1-selective agonists stimulates the production of aqueous humor, increasing IOP, whereas DA2- and DA3-selective agonists could reduce IOP and, therefore, the risk to develop a glaucoma (GL. GL is a broad spectrum of eye diseases which have in common the damage to the optic nerve and the progressive loss of the visual field. Further studies are desirable to clarify the role of the dopaminergic system and the usefulness of DA2 and DA3 agonists in reducing IOP.

  14. Dopaminergic Dysregulation, Artistic Expressiveness, and Parkinson’s Disease

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    S. López-Pousa

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most frequent behavioral manifestations in Parkinson’s disease (PD are attributed to the dopaminergic dysregulation syndrome (DDS, which is considered to be secondary to the iatrogenic effects of the drugs that replace dopamine. Over the past few years some cases of patients improving their creative abilities after starting treatment with dopaminergic pharmaceuticals have been reported. These effects have not been clearly associated to DDS, but a relationship has been pointed out. Methods: Case study of a patient with PD. The evolution of her paintings along medication changes and disease advance has been analyzed. Results: The patient showed a compulsive increase of pictorial production after the diagnosis of PD was made. She made her best paintings when treated with cabergolide, and while painting, she reported a feeling of well-being, with loss of awareness of the disease and reduction of physical limitations. Conclusions: Dopaminergic antagonists (DA trigger a dopaminergic dysfunction that alters artistic creativity in patients having a predisposition for it. The development of these skills might be due to the dopaminergic overstimulation due to the therapy with DA, which causes a neurophysiological alteration that globally determines DDS.

  15. Environmental enrichment has no effect on the development of dopaminergic and GABAergic fibers during methylphenidate treatment of early traumatized gerbils

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    Teuchert-Noodt Gertraud

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It is widely believed, that environmental factors play a crucial role in the etiology and outcome of psychiatric diseases such as Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD. A former study from our laboratory has shown that both methylphenidate (MP and handling have a positive effect on the dopaminergic fiber density in the prefrontal cortex (PFC of early traumatized gerbils (Meriones unguiculatus. The current study was performed to investigate if enriched environment during MP application has an additional influence on the dopaminergic and GABAergic fiber densities in the PFC and amygdala in this animal model. Animals received a single early dose of methamphetamine (MA; 50 mg/kg; i.p. on postnatal day (PD 14, which is known to cause multiple changes in the subsequent development of several neurotransmitter systems including the dopaminergic systems, and were then treated with oral daily applications of MP (5 mg/kg from PD30–60. Animals treated this way were either transferred to an enriched environment after weaning (on PD30 or were kept under impoverished rearing conditions. There was no effect of an enriched environment on the dopaminergic or GABAergic fiber density neither in the PFC nor in the amygdala. With regard to former studies these results underline the particular impact of MP in the treatment of ADHD.

  16. Enhanced proliferation and dopaminergic differentiation of ventral mesencephalic precursor cells by synergistic effect of FGF2 and reduced oxygen tension

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    Jensen, Pia [Department of Neurobiology Research, Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Winslowparken 21, DK-5000 Odense C (Denmark); Department of Neurosurgery, University of Bern, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland); Gramsbergen, Jan-Bert; Zimmer, Jens [Department of Neurobiology Research, Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Winslowparken 21, DK-5000 Odense C (Denmark); Widmer, Hans R. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Bern, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland); Meyer, Morten, E-mail: MMeyer@health.sdu.dk [Department of Neurobiology Research, Institute of Molecular Medicine, University of Southern Denmark, Winslowparken 21, DK-5000 Odense C (Denmark)

    2011-07-15

    Effective numerical expansion of dopaminergic precursors might overcome the limited availability of transplantable cells in replacement strategies for Parkinson's disease. Here we investigated the effect of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF2) and FGF8 on expansion and dopaminergic differentiation of rat embryonic ventral mesencephalic neuroblasts cultured at high (20%) and low (3%) oxygen tension. More cells incorporated bromodeoxyuridine in cultures expanded at low as compared to high oxygen tension, and after 6 days of differentiation there were significantly more neuronal cells in low than in high oxygen cultures. Low oxygen during FGF2-mediated expansion resulted also in a significant increase in tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive (TH-ir) dopaminergic neurons as compared to high oxygen tension, but no corresponding effect was observed for dopamine release into the culture medium. However, switching FGF2-expanded cultures from low to high oxygen tension during the last two days of differentiation significantly enhanced dopamine release and intracellular dopamine levels as compared to all other treatment groups. In addition, the short-term exposure to high oxygen enhanced in situ assessed TH enzyme activity, which may explain the elevated dopamine levels. Our findings demonstrate that modulation of oxygen tension is a recognizable factor for in vitro expansion and dopaminergic differentiation of rat embryonic midbrain precursor cells.

  17. α-Synuclein binds and sequesters PIKE-L into Lewy bodies, triggering dopaminergic cell death via AMPK hyperactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Seong Su; Zhang, Zhentao; Liu, Xia; Manfredsson, Fredric P; He, Li; Iuvone, P Michael; Cao, Xuebing; Sun, Yi E; Jin, Lingjing; Ye, Keqiang

    2017-01-31

    The abnormal aggregation of fibrillar α-synuclein in Lewy bodies plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating α-synuclein pathological effects are incompletely understood. Here we show that α-synuclein binds phosphoinositide-3 kinase enhancer L (PIKE-L) in a phosphorylation-dependent manner and sequesters it in Lewy bodies, leading to dopaminergic cell death via AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) hyperactivation. α-Synuclein interacts with PIKE-L, an AMPK inhibitory binding partner, and this action is increased by S129 phosphorylation through AMPK and is decreased by Y125 phosphorylation via Src family kinase Fyn. A pleckstrin homology (PH) domain in PIKE-L directly binds α-synuclein and antagonizes its aggregation. Accordingly, PIKE-L overexpression decreases dopaminergic cell death elicited by 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)), whereas PIKE-L knockdown elevates α-synuclein oligomerization and cell death. The overexpression of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) or α-synuclein induces greater dopaminergic cell loss and more severe motor defects in PIKE-KO and Fyn-KO mice than in wild-type mice, and these effects are attenuated by the expression of dominant-negative AMPK. Hence, our findings demonstrate that α-synuclein neutralizes PIKE-L's neuroprotective actions in synucleinopathies, triggering dopaminergic neuronal death by hyperactivating AMPK.

  18. Future testing of active safety systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, F.M.; Pelders, H.A.A.W.

    2010-01-01

    Active safety systems are increasingly becoming available in trucks and passenger vehicles. Developments in the field of active safety are shifting from increasing driver comfort towards increasing occupant safety. Furthermore, this shift is seen within active safety systems: safety functions are ad

  19. Malignant syndrome in Parkinson's disease without dopaminergic drug withdrawal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, C J Suresh

    2008-10-01

    Malignant syndrome is a rare complication occurring during the course of drug treatment for Parkinson's disease. It resembles neuroleptic malignant syndrome and is characterized by fever, marked rigidity, altered consciousness, leucocytosis and elevated creatine kinase. Malignant syndrome is a potentially fatal condition and awareness of this condition is imperative for prevention and treatment. The commonest precipitating factor is dopaminergic drug withdrawal or dose reduction. We report malignant syndrome (precipitated by hyponatremia) in a case of Parkinson's disease, in the absence of dopaminergic drug withdrawal. A 60-year-old man presented with fever, severe rigidity and altered sensorium following repeated vomiting. On investigation, he was found to have hyponatremia precipitated malignant syndrome. Treatment with hydration, cooling, correction of hyponatremia and dopaminergic drugs reversed his condition. The triad of fever, severe rigidity and altered sensorium should prompt evaluation for malignant syndrome in Parkinson's disease.

  20. Engrailed Homeoprotein Protects Mesencephalic Dopaminergic Neurons from Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rekaik, Hocine; Blaudin de Thé, François-Xavier; Fuchs, Julia; Massiani-Beaudoin, Olivia; Prochiantz, Alain; Joshi, Rajiv L.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Engrailed homeoproteins are expressed in adult dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra. In Engrailed1 heterozygous mice, these neurons start dying at 6 weeks, are more sensitive to oxidative stress, and progressively develop traits similar to those observed following an acute and strong oxidative stress inflected to wild-type neurons. These changes include DNA strand breaks and the modification (intensity and distribution) of several nuclear and nucleolar heterochromatin marks. Engrailed1 and Engrailed2 are biochemically equivalent transducing proteins previously used to antagonize dopaminergic neuron death in Engrailed1 heterozygous mice and in mouse models of Parkinson disease. Accordingly, we show that, following an acute oxidative stress, a single Engrailed2 injection restores all nuclear and nucleolar heterochromatin marks, decreases the number of DNA strand breaks, and protects dopaminergic neurons against apoptosis. PMID:26411690

  1. Involvement of the monoaminergic system in the antidepressant-like activity of chromium chloride in the forced swim test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotrowska, A; Siwek, A; Wolak, M; Pochwat, B; Szewczyk, B; Opoka, W; Poleszak, E; Nowak, G

    2013-08-01

    Bio-metal chromium(III) is a crucial microelement for the proper functioning of living organisms. Previous preclinical and clinical studies reported its potential antidepressant properties. The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of antidepressants and noradrenergic and dopaminergic receptor antagonists on chromium chloride (CrCl₃) activity in the forced swim test (FST) in mice and rats. Imipramine (5 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg) and reboxetine (5 mg/kg) but not bupropion (1 mg/kg), administered jointly with CrCl₃ at a dose of 6 mg/kg, reduced the immobility time in the FST in mice. The reduction of the immobility time induced by the active dose (12 mg/kg) of CrCl₃ was completely abolished by propranolol (2 mg/kg, β-adrenoceptor antagonist), SCH 23390 (0.5 mg/kg, a dopamine D₁ receptor antagonist), and partially by prazosin (1 mg/kg, an α₁-adrenoceptor antagonist), yohimbine (1 mg/kg, an α₂-adrenoceptor antagonist) and sulpiryd (50 mg/kg, a dopamine D₂/D₃ receptor antagonist) administration. The locomotor activity was significantly reduced by CrCl₃ + reboxetine treatment, which did not influence the reboxetine enhancement of the antidepressant-like effect of CrCl₃ in the FST. Moreover, CrCl₃ at a dose of 32 mg/kg (although not at 12 mg/kg) significantly reduced the immobility and enhanced the climbing (but not swimming) time in the FST in rats, which indicates the involvement of the noradrenergic pathway in this effect. The present study indicates that the antidepressant-like activity of chromium in the FST is dependent (although to a different extent) on the noradrenergic, dopaminergic and serotonin systems.

  2. The effects of long-term dopaminergic treatment on locomotor behavior in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Welinton Alessandro Oliveira de Almeida

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Long-term treatments with dopaminergic agents are associated with adverse effects, including augmentation. Augmentation consists of an exacerbation of restless legs syndrome (a sleep-related movement disorder symptoms during treatment compared to those experienced during the period before therapy was initiated. The objective of this study was to examine locomotor activity in rats after long-term dopaminergic treatment and its relationship with expression of the D2 receptor, in addition to demonstrating possible evidence of augmentation. The rats were divided into control (CTRL and drug (Pramipexole—PPX groups that received daily saline vehicle and PPX treatments, respectively, for 71 days. The locomotor behavior of the animals was evaluated weekly in the Open Field test for 71 days. The expression of the dopamine D2 receptor was evaluated by Western Blot analysis. The animals that received the PPX demonstrated a significant reduction in locomotor activity from day 1 to day 57 and a significant increase in immobility time from day 1 to day 64 relative to baseline values, but these values had returned to baseline levels at 71 days. No changes in the expression of the D2 receptor were demonstrated after treatment with a dopaminergic agonist. This study suggests changes in locomotor activity in rats after long-term PPX treatment that include an immediate reduction of locomotion and an increase in immobilization, and after 64 days, these values returned to baseline levels without evidence of augmentation. In addition, it was not possible to demonstrate a relationship between locomotor activity and the expression of D2 receptors under these conditions.

  3. The effects of long-term dopaminergic treatment on locomotor behavior in rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira de Almeida, Welinton Alessandro; Maculano Esteves, Andrea; Leite de Almeida-Júnior, Canuto; Lee, Kil Sun; Kannebley Frank, Miriam; Oliveira Mariano, Melise; Frussa-Filho, Roberto; Tufik, Sergio; Tulio de Mello, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Long-term treatments with dopaminergic agents are associated with adverse effects, including augmentation. Augmentation consists of an exacerbation of restless legs syndrome (a sleep-related movement disorder) symptoms during treatment compared to those experienced during the period before therapy was initiated. The objective of this study was to examine locomotor activity in rats after long-term dopaminergic treatment and its relationship with expression of the D2 receptor, in addition to demonstrating possible evidence of augmentation. The rats were divided into control (CTRL) and drug (Pramipexole—PPX) groups that received daily saline vehicle and PPX treatments, respectively, for 71 days. The locomotor behavior of the animals was evaluated weekly in the Open Field test for 71 days. The expression of the dopamine D2 receptor was evaluated by Western Blot analysis. The animals that received the PPX demonstrated a significant reduction in locomotor activity from day 1 to day 57 and a significant increase in immobility time from day 1 to day 64 relative to baseline values, but these values had returned to baseline levels at 71 days. No changes in the expression of the D2 receptor were demonstrated after treatment with a dopaminergic agonist. This study suggests changes in locomotor activity in rats after long-term PPX treatment that include an immediate reduction of locomotion and an increase in immobilization, and after 64 days, these values returned to baseline levels without evidence of augmentation. In addition, it was not possible to demonstrate a relationship between locomotor activity and the expression of D2 receptors under these conditions. PMID:26483930

  4. Dopaminergic differentiation of human neural stem cells mediated by co-cultured rat striatal brain slices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anwar, Mohammad Raffaqat; Andreasen, Christian Maaløv; Lippert, Solvej Kølvraa;

    2008-01-01

    Properly committed neural stem cells constitute a promising source of cells for transplantation in Parkinson's disease, but a protocol for controlled dopaminergic differentiation is not yet available. To establish a setting for identification of secreted neural compounds promoting dopaminergic...

  5. Effects of dopaminergic and subthalamic stimulation on musical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vugt, Floris T; Schüpbach, Michael; Altenmüller, Eckart; Bardinet, Eric; Yelnik, Jérôme; Hälbig, Thomas D

    2013-05-01

    Although subthalamic-deep brain stimulation (STN-DBS) is an efficient treatment for Parkinson's disease (PD), its effects on fine motor functions are not clear. We present the case of a professional violinist with PD treated with STN-DBS. DBS improved musical articulation, intonation and emotional expression and worsened timing relative to a timekeeper (metronome). The same effects were found for dopaminergic treatment. These results suggest that STN-DBS, mimicking the effects of dopaminergic stimulation, improves fine-tuned motor behaviour whilst impairing timing precision.

  6. IMPROVING CAUSE DETECTION SYSTEMS WITH ACTIVE LEARNING

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — IMPROVING CAUSE DETECTION SYSTEMS WITH ACTIVE LEARNING ISAAC PERSING AND VINCENT NG Abstract. Active learning has been successfully applied to many natural language...

  7. Lipophilic Cationic Cyanines Are Potent Complex I Inhibitors and Specific in Vitro Dopaminergic Toxins with Mechanistic Similarities to Both Rotenone and MPP(.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadigamuwa, Chamila C; Mapa, Mapa S T; Wimalasena, Kandatege

    2016-09-19

    We have recently reported that simple lipophilic cationic cyanines are specific and potent dopaminergic toxins with a mechanism of toxicity similar to that of the Parkinsonian toxin MPP(+). In the present study, a group of fluorescent lipophilic cyanines have been used to further exploit the structure-activity relationship of the specific dopaminergic toxicity of cyanines. Here, we report that all cyanines tested were highly toxic to dopaminergic MN9D cells with IC50s in the range of 60-100 nM and not toxic to non-neuronal HepG2 cells parallel to that previously reported for 2,2'- and 4,4'-cyanines. All cyanines nonspecifically accumulate in the mitochondria of both MN9D and HepG2 cells at high concentrations, inhibit the mitochondrial complex I with the inhibition potencies similar to the potent complex I inhibitor, rotenone. They increase the reactive oxygen species (ROS) production specifically in dopaminergic cells causing apoptotic cell death. These and other findings suggest that the complex I inhibition, the expression of low levels of antioxidant enzymes, and presence of high levels of oxidatively labile radical propagator, dopamine, could be responsible for the specific increase in ROS production in dopaminergic cells. Thus, the predisposition of dopaminergic cells to produce high levels of ROS in response to mitochondrial toxins together with their inherent greater demand for energy may contribute to their specific vulnerability toward these toxins. The novel findings that cyanines are an unusual class of potent mitochondrial toxins with specific dopaminergic toxicity suggest that their presence in the environment could contribute to the etiology of PD similar to that of MPP(+) and rotenone.

  8. The Sensory Impact of Nicotine on Noradrenergic and Dopaminergic Neurons of the Nicotine Reward - Addiction Neurocircuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jed E; Dehkordi, Ozra; Manaye, Kebreten F; Millis, Richard M; Cianaki, Salman Ameri; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni

    2016-04-01

    The sensory experience of smoking is a key component of nicotine addiction known to result, in part, from stimulation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) at peripheral sensory nerve endings. Such stimulation of nAChRs is followed by activation of neurons at multiple sites in the mesocorticolimbic reward pathways. However, the neurochemical profiles of CNS cells that mediate the peripheral sensory impact of nicotine remain unknown. In the present study in mice, we first used c-Fos immunohistochemistry to identify CNS cells stimulated by nicotine (NIC, 40 μg/kg, IP) and by a peripherally-acting analog of nicotine, nicotine pyrrolidine methiodide (NIC-PM, 30 μg/kg, IP). Sequential double-labelling was then performed to determine whether noradrenergic and dopaminergic neurons of the nicotine reward-addiction circuitry were primary targets of NIC and NIC-PM. Double-labelling of NIC and/or NIC-PM activated c-Fos immunoreactive cells with tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) showed no apparent c-Fos expression by the dopaminergic cells of the ventral tegmental area (VTA). With the exception of sparse numbers of TH immunoreactive D11 cells, dopamine-containing neurons in other areas of the reward-addiction circuitry, namely periaqueductal gray, and dorsal raphe, were also devoid of c-Fos immunoreactivity. Noradrenergic neurons of locus coeruleus (LC), known to innervate VTA, were activated by both NIC and NIC-PM. These results demonstrate that noradrenergic neurons of LC are among the first structures that are stimulated by single acute IP injection of NIC and NIC-PM. Dopaminergic neurons of VTA and other CNS sites, did not respond to acute IP administration of NIC or NIC-PM by induction of c-Fos.

  9. A dopaminergic projection to the rat mammillary nuclei demonstrated by retrograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase and tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalo-Ruiz, A.; Alonso, A.; Sanz, J. M.; Llinas, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    The presence and distribution of dopaminergic neurons and terminals in the hypothalamus of the rat were studied by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunohistochemistry. Strongly labelled TH-immunoreactive neurons were seen in the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, periventricular region, zona incerta, arcuate nucleus, and supramammillary nucleus. A few TH-positive neurons were also identified in the dorsal and ventral premammillary nucleus, as well as the lateral hypothalamic area. TH-immunoreactive fibres and terminals were unevenly distributed in the mammillary nuclei; small, weakly labelled terminals were scattered in the medial mammillary nucleus, while large, strongly labelled, varicose terminals were densely concentrated in the internal part of the lateral mammillary nucleus. A few dorsoventrally oriented TH-positive axon bundles were also identified in the lateral mammillary nucleus. A dopaminergic projection to the mammillary nuclei from the supramammillary nucleus and lateral hypothalamic area was identified by double labelling with retrograde transport of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase and TH-immunohistochemistry. The lateral mammillary nucleus receives a weak dopaminergic projection from the medial, and stronger projections from the lateral, caudal supramammillary nucleus. The double-labelled neurons in the lateral supramammillary nucleus appear to encapsulate the caudal end of the mammillary nuclei. The medial mammillary nucleus receives a very light dopaminergic projection from the caudal lateral hypothalamic area. These results suggest that the supramammillary nucleus is the principal source of the dopaminergic input to the mammillary nuclei, establishing a local TH-pathway in the mammillary complex. The supramammillary cell groups are able to modulate the limbic system through its dopaminergic input to the mammillary nuclei as well as through its extensive dopaminergic projection to the lateral septal nucleus.

  10. Graphene derivative scaffolds facilitate in vitro cell survival and maturation of dopaminergic SN4741 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Losada, Noela; Wendelbo, Rune; Garcia-fernandez, Maria; Pavia, Jose; Martinez-Montañez, Elisa; Lara Muñoz, José Pablo; Arenas, Ernest; Aguirre, José A.

    2014-01-01

    The emerging carbon nanomaterial Graphene (G), in the form of scaffold structure, has an efficient bioconjugation with common biomolecules and activates cell differentiation of neuronal stem cells, providing a promising approach for neural regeneration. We propose the use of G as a scaffold to re-address the dopaminergic (DA) neurons and the residual axons from dead or apoptotic DA neurons in Parkinson´s disease (PD). G could act as a physical support to promote the axonal sprout as a “decele...

  11. Modeling Cytoskeletal Active Matter Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwell, Robert

    Active networks of filamentous proteins and crosslinking motor proteins play a critical role in many important cellular processes. One of the most important microtubule-motor protein assemblies is the mitotic spindle, a self-organized active liquid-crystalline structure that forms during cell division and that ultimately separates chromosomes into two daughter cells. Although the spindle has been intensively studied for decades, the physical principles that govern its self-organization and function remain mysterious. To evolve a better understanding of spindle formation, structure, and dynamics, I investigate course-grained models of active liquid-crystalline networks composed of microtubules, modeled as hard spherocylinders, in diffusive equilibrium with a reservoir of active crosslinks, modeled as hookean springs that can adsorb to microtubules and and translocate at finite velocity along the microtubule axis. This model is investigated using a combination of brownian dynamics and kinetic monte carlo simulation. I have further refined this model to simulate spindle formation and kinetochore capture in the fission yeast S. pombe. I then make predictions for experimentally realizable perturbations in motor protein presence and function in S. pombe.

  12. Ascorbate prevents cell death from prolonged exposure to glutamate in an in vitro model of human dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballaz, Santiago; Morales, Ingrid; Rodríguez, Manuel; Obeso, José A

    2013-12-01

    Ascorbate (vitamin C) is a nonenzymatic antioxidant highly concentrated in the brain. In addition to mediating redox balance, ascorbate is linked to glutamate neurotransmission in the striatum, where it renders neuroprotection against excessive glutamate stimulation. Oxidative stress and glutamatergic overactivity are key biochemical features accompanying the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra that characterizes Parkinson's disease (PD). At present, it is not clear whether antiglutamate agents and ascorbate might be neuroprotective agents for PD. Thus, we tested whether ascorbate can prevent cell death from prolonged exposure to glutamate using dopaminergic neurons of human origin. To this purpose, dopamine-like neurons were obtained by differentiation of SH-SY5Y cells and then cultured for 4 days without antioxidant (antiaging) protection to evaluate glutamate toxicity and ascorbate protection as a model system of potential factors contributing to dopaminergic neuron death in PD. Glutamate dose dependently induced toxicity in dopaminergic cells largely by the stimulation of AMPA and metabotropic receptors and to a lesser extent by N-methyl-D-aspartate and kainate receptors. At relatively physiological levels of extracellular concentration, ascorbate protected cells against glutamate excitotoxicity. This neuroprotection apparently relies on the inhibition of oxidative stress, because ascorbate prevented the pro-oxidant action of the scavenging molecule quercetin, which occurred over the course of prolonged exposure, as is also seen with glutamate. Our findings show the relevance of ascorbate as a neuroprotective agent and emphasize an often underappreciated role of oxidative stress in glutamate excitotoxicity. Occurrence of a glutamate-ascorbate link in dopaminergic neurons may explain previous contradictions regarding their putative role in PD.

  13. Effects of (-)-sesamin on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells and dopaminergic neuronal cells of Parkinson's disease rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hyun Jin; Zhao, Ting Ting; Lee, Kyung Sook; Lee, Seung Ho; Shin, Keon Sung; Park, Keun Hong; Choi, Hyun Sook; Lee, Myung Koo

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of (-)-sesamin on 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity using PC12 cells and dopaminergic neuronal cells of 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD). In PC12 cells, treatment with (-)-sesamin (25 µM) reduced 6-OHDA (100 µM)-induced cell death and induced transient extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) phosphorylation and Bad phosphorylation at Ser112 (BadSer112). In contrast, sustained ERK1/2 phosphorylation, p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK1/2) phosphorylation, and cleaved-caspase-3 activity, all of which were induced by 6-OHDA (100 µM), were inhibited by treatment with (-)-sesamin (25 µM). Furthermore, co-treatment with (-)-sesamin (30 mg/kg, p.o.) once a day for 28 days significantly increased the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunopositive neuronal cells and the levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, and homovanillic acid in the substantia nigra-striatum of 6-OHDA-lesioned rat model of PD with or without L-DOPA treatment. These results suggest that (-)-sesamin protects 6-OHDA-induced cytotoxicity via the activation of transient ERK1/2-BadSer112 system and the inhibition of sustained ERK-p38MAPK-JNK1/2-caspase-3 system in PC12 cells. (-)-Sesamin also shows protective effects on long-term L-DOPA therapy in dopaminergic neuronal cells of PD rat models. (-)-Sesamin may serve as adjuvant therapeutics in PD.

  14. Dopaminergic Neuronal Imaging in Genetic Parkinson's Disease: Insights into Pathogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. McNeill (Alisdair); R-M. Wu (Ruey-Meei); K.-Y. Tzen (Kai-Yuan); P.C. Aguiar (Patricia); J.M. Arbelo (Jose); P. Barone (Paolo); K.P. Bhatia (Kailash); O.G. Barsottini (Orlando); V. Bonifati (Vincenzo); S. Bostantjopoulou (Sevasti); R.A. Bressan (Rodrigo); G. Cossu (Giovanni); P. Cortelli (Pietro); A.C. Felicio (Andre); H.B. Ferraz (Henrique); J. Herrera (Joanna); H. Houlden (Henry); M. Hoexter (Marcelo); C. Isla (Concepcion); A.J. Lees (Andrew); O. Lorenzo-Betancor (Oswaldo); N.E. Mencacci (Niccolo); P. Pastor (Pau); S. Pappata (Sabina); M.T. Pellecchia (Maria Teresa); L. Silveria-Moriyama (Laura); A. Varrone (Andrea); T. Foltynie (Thomas); A.H.V. Schapira (Anthony)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractObjectives:To compare the dopaminergic neuronal imaging features of different subtypes of genetic Parkinson's Disease.Methods:A retrospective study of genetic Parkinson's diseases cases in which DaTSCAN (123I-FP-CIT) had been performed. Specific non-displaceable binding was calculated fo

  15. Dopaminergic medication affects choice bias in Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nuland, A.J.M. van; Helmich, R.C.G.; Dirkx, M.F.M.; Zach, H.; Bloem, B.R.; Toni, I.; Cools, R.; Ouden, H.E.M. den

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Assess dopaminergic effects on choice bias in Parkinson's disease (PD). Background: Bradykinesia, rigidity and resting tremor are the core symptoms of PD, but many patients also suffer from cognitive dysfunction. For instance, PD patients have an increased tendency to learn from aversive

  16. Associations between visual perception accuracy and confidence in a dopaminergic manipulation study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina eAndreou

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Delusions are defined as fixed erroneous beliefs that are based on misinterpretation of events or perception, and cannot be corrected by argumentation to the opposite. Cognitive theories of delusions regard this symptom as resulting from specific distorted thinking styles that lead to biased integration and interpretation of perceived stimuli (i.e., reasoning biases. In previous studies, we were able to show that one of these reasoning biases, overconfidence in errors, can be modulated by drugs that act on the dopamine system, a major neurotransmitter system implicated in the pathogenesis of delusions and other psychotic symptoms. Another processing domain suggested to involve the dopamine system and to be abnormal in psychotic disorders is sensory perception. The present study aimed to investigate whether (lower-order sensory perception and (higher-order overconfidence in errors are similarly affected by dopaminergic modulation in healthy subjects. Thirty-four healthy individuals were assessed upon administration of L-dopa, placebo, or haloperidol within a randomized, double-blind, cross-over design. Variables of interest were hits and false alarms in an illusory perception paradigm requiring speeded detection of pictures over a noisy background, and subjective confidence ratings for correct and incorrect responses. There was a significant linear increase of false alarm rates from haloperidol to placebo to L-dopa, whereas hit rates were not affected by dopaminergic manipulation. As hypothesized, confidence in error responses was significantly higher with L-dopa compared to placebo. Moreover, confidence in erroneous responses significantly correlated with false alarm rates. These findings suggest that overconfidence in errors and aberrant sensory processing might be both interdependent and related to dopaminergic transmission abnormalities in patients with psychosis.

  17. Acute stress-induced cortisol elevations mediate reward system activity during subconscious processing of sexual stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oei, Nicole Y L; Both, Stephanie; van Heemst, Diana; van der Grond, Jeroen

    2014-01-01

    Stress is thought to alter motivational processes by increasing dopamine (DA) secretion in the brain's "reward system", and its key region, the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). However, stress studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), mainly found evidence for stress-induced decreases in NAcc responsiveness toward reward cues. Results from both animal and human PET studies indicate that the stress hormone cortisol may be crucial in the interaction between stress and dopaminergic actions. In the present study we therefore investigated whether cortisol mediated the effect of stress on DA-related responses to -subliminal-presentation of reward cues using the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST), which is known to reliably enhance cortisol levels. Young healthy males (n = 37) were randomly assigned to the TSST or control condition. After stress induction, brain activation was assessed using fMRI during a backward-masking paradigm in which potentially rewarding (sexual), emotionally negative and neutral stimuli were presented subliminally, masked by pictures of inanimate objects. A region of interest analysis showed that stress decreased activation in the NAcc in response to masked sexual cues (voxel-corrected, pcortisol levels were related to stronger NAcc activation, showing that cortisol acted as a suppressor variable in the negative relation between stress and NAcc activation. The present findings indicate that cortisol is crucially involved in the relation between stress and the responsiveness of the reward system. Although generally stress decreases activation in the NAcc in response to rewarding stimuli, high stress-induced cortisol levels suppress this relation, and are associated with stronger NAcc activation. Individuals with a high cortisol response to stress might on one hand be protected against reductions in reward sensitivity, which has been linked to anhedonia and depression, but they may ultimately be more vulnerable to increased reward

  18. Do CSF levels of t-Tau, p-Tau and β{sub 1-42} amyloid correlate with dopaminergic system impairment in patients with a clinical diagnosis of Parkinson disease? A {sup 123}I-FP-CIT study in the early stages of the disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiaravalloti, Agostino; Fiorentini, Alessandro; Lacanfora, Annamaria [University Tor Vergata, Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, Rome (Italy); Stefani, Alessandro [University Tor Vergata, Department of Neurosciences, Rome (Italy); IRCCS Santa Lucia, Rome (Italy); Stanzione, Paolo [University Tor Vergata, Department of Neurosciences, Rome (Italy); Schillaci, Orazio [University Tor Vergata, Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, Rome (Italy); IRCCS Neuromed, Pozzilli (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    To investigate the relationships among cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of t-Tau, p-Tau and Aβ{sub 1-42} amyloid peptide and {sup 123}I-FP-CIT uptake. The study included 58 subjects (31 men and 27 women, age 67 ± 9 years) with a clinical diagnosis of Parkinson disease diagnosed according to the United Kingdom Parkinson Disease Society Brain Bank criteria. All subjects underwent a CSF assay 28 ± 3 days before {sup 123}I-FP-CIT SPECT scanning. The relationships were evaluated by means of linear regression analysis and Pearson correlation. Striatal {sup 123}I-FP-CIT was positively related to both t-Tau and p-Tau CSF values with low levels of t-Tau and p-Tau being related to a low uptake of {sup 123}I-FP-CIT. In particular, differences with higher statistical significance were found for the striatum between the contralateral side and the side mainly affected on clinical examination (P < 0.001). No significant relationships were found between Aβ{sub 1-42} amyloid peptide and {sup 123}I-FP-CIT binding. The results of our study suggest that the presynaptic dopaminergic system is more involved in Parkinson disease patients with lower t-Tau and p-Tau CSF values while values of Aβ{sub 1-42} amyloid peptide seems not to be related to nigrostriatal degeneration in our series. (orig.)

  19. Performance of Active Wave Absorption Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tue; Frigaard, Peter

    A comparison of wave gauge based on velocity meter based active absorption systems is presented discussing advantages and disadvantages of the systems. In detail one system based on two surface elevations, one system based on a surface elevation and a horisontal velocity and one system based...... on a horisontal and vertical velocity are treated. All three systems are based on digital FIR-filters. For numerical comparison a performance function combining the frequency response of the set of filters for each system is derived enabling discussion on optimal filter design and system setup. Irregular wave...

  20. An active tactile perception system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petriu, E.; Greenspan, M.; Gelinas, F.; McMath, W. S.; Yeung, S. K.

    System development and application aspects are described for an experimental robotic system for the tactile perception of the global geometric profile of object surfaces which are larger than the dimensions of the tactile sensor. Local cutaneous information provided by a tactile sensor is integrated with the kinesthetic position parameters of a robot arm, resulting in a 3D geometric model of the tactile sensor pose on the explored object surface. Currently available tactile sensors provide poor information on the geometric profile of 3D object surfaces. In order to maximize the information available for 3D analysis, an instrumented passive compliant wrist was used to attach a pressure measuring tactile probe to the robot arm carrier. Data was collected by a noncompliant planar sensing array in direct contact with an object surface. Information recorded includes the following: positional and orientation data on the robot arm manipulator, passive compliance kinesthetic data as measured by the kinematics of the wrist, and cutaneous tactile data represented by the binary image of the sensors pose on the object. The dimensions of the sensor array were found to be a critical factor in system performance. Use of a large array results in fewer touch poses being required to explore an object's surface, on the other hand a large planar array will touch fewer and higher peaks thus missing surface detail. To improve performance, there is a need to design tactile sensors specifically for geometric profile measuring.

  1. REM sleep deprivation promotes a dopaminergic influence in the striatal MT2 anxiolytic-like effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noseda, Ana Carolina D.; Targa, Adriano D.S.; Rodrigues, Lais S.; Aurich, Mariana F.; Lima, Marcelo M.S.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible anxiolytic-like effects of striatal MT2 activation, and its counteraction induced by the selective blockade of this receptor. Furthermore, we analyzed this condition under the paradigm of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep deprivation (REMSD) and the animal model of Parkinson’s disease (PD) induced by rotenone. Male Wistar rats were infused with intranigral rotenone (12 μg/μL), and 7 days later were subjected to 24 h of REMSD. Afterwards the rats underwent striatal micro-infusions of selective melatonin MT2 receptor agonist, 8-M-PDOT (10 μg/μL) or selective melatonin MT2 receptor antagonist, 4-P-PDOT (5 μg/μL) or vehicle. Subsequently, the animals were tested in the open-field (OP) and elevated plus maze (EPM) tests. Results indicated that the activation of MT2 receptors produced anxiolytic-like effects. In opposite, the MT2 blockade did not show an anxiogenic-like effect. Besides, REMSD induced anxiolytic-like effects similar to 8-M-PDOT. MT2 activation generated a prevalent locomotor increase compared to MT2 blockade in the context of REMSD. Together, these results suggest a striatal MT2 modulation associated to the REMSD-induced dopaminergic supersensitivity causing a possible dopaminergic influence in the MT2 anxiolytic-like effects in the intranigral rotenone model of PD. PMID:27226821

  2. The Dopaminergic Midbrain Mediates an Effect of Average Reward on Pavlovian Vigor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoli, Francesco; Chew, Benjamin; Dayan, Peter; Dolan, Raymond J

    2016-09-01

    Dopamine plays a key role in motivation. Phasic dopamine response reflects a reinforcement prediction error (RPE), whereas tonic dopamine activity is postulated to represent an average reward that mediates motivational vigor. However, it has been hard to find evidence concerning the neural encoding of average reward that is uncorrupted by influences of RPEs. We circumvented this difficulty in a novel visual search task where we measured participants' button pressing vigor in a context where information (underlying an RPE) about future average reward was provided well before the average reward itself. Despite no instrumental consequence, participants' pressing force increased for greater current average reward, consistent with a form of Pavlovian effect on motivational vigor. We recorded participants' brain activity during task performance with fMRI. Greater average reward was associated with enhanced activity in dopaminergic midbrain to a degree that correlated with the relationship between average reward and pressing vigor. Interestingly, an opposite pattern was observed in subgenual cingulate cortex, a region implicated in negative mood and motivational inhibition. These findings highlight a crucial role for dopaminergic midbrain in representing aspects of average reward and motivational vigor.

  3. Implementation of Business Game Activity Support System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANABU Motonari

    2004-01-01

    Business game can be used not only as an educational tool for the development of decision making ability, but also can be used for supporting the knowledge creation activity in organizations. In this paper, some conceptual considerations to meanings of the business game in the knowledge creation activity by using the knowledge creation theory and other related theories are given,and business game activity concept which refers to game play and development is proposed. Then focusing on the business game activity as an instantiation of the knowledge creation activity, and a Web based gaming activity support system based on the former system called YBG that enables us to play and develop many business games through the standard web browser is proposed. This system also provides us a lot of opportunities to play and develop the business games over business game communities.

  4. Automobile active suspension system with fuzzy control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘少军; 黄中华; 陈毅章

    2004-01-01

    A quarter-automobile active suspension model was proposed. High speed on/off solenoid valves were used as control valves and fuzzy control was chosen as control method . Based on force analyses of system parts, a mathematical model of the active suspension system was established and simplified by linearization method. Simulation study was conducted with Matlab and three scale coefficients of fuzzy controller (ke, kec, ku) were acquired. And an experimental device was designed and produced. The results indicate that the active suspension system can achieve better vibration isolation performance than passive suspension system, the displacement amplitude of automobile body can be reduced to 55%. Fuzzy control is an effective control method for active suspension system.

  5. Abnormal dopaminergic modulation of striato-cortical networks underlies levodopa-induced dyskinesias in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, Damian M; Haagensen, Brian N; Christensen, Mark S; Madsen, Kristoffer H; Rowe, James B; Løkkegaard, Annemette; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2015-06-01

    Dopaminergic signalling in the striatum contributes to reinforcement of actions and motivational enhancement of motor vigour. Parkinson's disease leads to progressive dopaminergic denervation of the striatum, impairing the function of cortico-basal ganglia networks. While levodopa therapy alleviates basal ganglia dysfunction in Parkinson's disease, it often elicits involuntary movements, referred to as levodopa-induced peak-of-dose dyskinesias. Here, we used a novel pharmacodynamic neuroimaging approach to identify the changes in cortico-basal ganglia connectivity that herald the emergence of levodopa-induced dyskinesias. Twenty-six patients with Parkinson's disease (age range: 51-84 years; 11 females) received a single dose of levodopa and then performed a task in which they had to produce or suppress a movement in response to visual cues. Task-related activity was continuously mapped with functional magnetic resonance imaging. Dynamic causal modelling was applied to assess levodopa-induced modulation of effective connectivity between the pre-supplementary motor area, primary motor cortex and putamen when patients suppressed a motor response. Bayesian model selection revealed that patients who later developed levodopa-induced dyskinesias, but not patients without dyskinesias, showed a linear increase in connectivity between the putamen and primary motor cortex after levodopa intake during movement suppression. Individual dyskinesia severity was predicted by levodopa-induced modulation of striato-cortical feedback connections from putamen to the pre-supplementary motor area (Pcorrected = 0.020) and primary motor cortex (Pcorrected = 0.044), but not feed-forward connections from the cortex to the putamen. Our results identify for the first time, aberrant dopaminergic modulation of striatal-cortical connectivity as a neural signature of levodopa-induced dyskinesias in humans. We argue that excessive striato-cortical connectivity in response to levodopa produces an

  6. Communication Systems and Study Method for Active Distribution Power systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wei, Mu; Chen, Zhe

    Due to the involvement and evolvement of communication technologies in contemporary power systems, the applications of modern communication technologies in distribution power system are becoming increasingly important. In this paper, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO....... The suitability of the communication technology to the distribution power system with active renewable energy based generation units is discussed. Subsequently the typical possible communication systems are studied by simulation. In this paper, a novel method of integrating communication system impact into power...... system simulation is presented to address the problem of lack of off-shelf research tools on the power system communication. The communication system is configured and studied by the OPNET, and the performance of an active distribution power system integrated with the communication system is simulated...

  7. Changes in firing rate and firing pattern of midbrain dopaminergic neurons after lesioning of the dorsal raphe nucleus by 5,7-drhydroxytryptamine in adult rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of serotonergic efferent projection of the dorsal raphe nucleus(DRN)on the activity of substantia nigra pars compacta(SNc)and ventral tegmenta area(VTA)dopaminergic neurons after lesioning of the DRN by the neurotoxin 5,7-drhydroxytryptamine(5,7-DHT)in rat.Methods The changes in the firing rate and firing pattern of SNc and VTA dopaminergic neurons were observed with extracellular recording in control and the lesioned rats.Results The results showed that the mean firing rates o...

  8. Behavioral effects of lesions in the A10 dopaminergic area of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galey, D; Simon, H; Le Moal, M

    1977-03-18

    Experiments have been carried out with 150 rats in order to study some psychophysiological functions of the mesencephalocortico limbic dopaminergic A10 group. Lesions in the A10 area were made by using 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) local injections; 2 small volumes of injections were used at the same concentration (2 mug/1 mul or 1 mug/0.5 mul). In a first experiment the effects of these two injections were tested on locomotor activity measured in a circular corridor, 10 and 30 days after surgery. Injections provoked hyperactivity, mainly during nocturnal basal activity periods, but not during initial exploratory activity periods. The larger the injection, the more important the hyperactivity was. The larger injections induced important food spillage evidence through the wire floor of the home cage and perturbation in a passive avoidance learning. There was no change in body weight or in amount of ingested food. In a second experiment, the effects of local injection of 6-OHDA in the other CA structures or bundles situated in or near the ventral tegmental area were tested. Injections in the substantia nigra compacta, in the noradrenergic ventral bundle, in the dorsal periventricular system-tegmental radiations did not provoke locomotor hyperactivity. In a third experiment, a possible role of the median raphe (MR) nucleus in the A10-lesion induced hyperactivity was tested: first, radiofrequency MR lesions were made and no durable significant hyperactivity was recorded; secondly, 6-OHDA (1 mug/0.5 mul) was injected into the A10 area and activity was measured 10 days later: these injections provoked significant hyperactivity during the nocturnal basal and the diurnal basal activity periods. It might be concluded that neither the neighboring CA fibers nor the MR were directly involved in the ventral tegmental -- 6-OHDA lesions syndrome. Anatomical controls by using the Fink-Heimer silver impregnating method have demonstrated, first, that the 6-OHDA injections did not

  9. Midbrain dopaminergic axons are guided longitudinally through the diencephalon by Slit/Robo signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugan, James P; Stratton, Andrea; Riley, Hilary P; Farmer, W Todd; Mastick, Grant S

    2011-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurons from the ventral mesencephalon/diencephalon (mesodiencephalon) form vital pathways constituting the majority of the brain's dopamine systems. Mesodiencephalic dopaminergic (mdDA) neurons extend longitudinal projections anteriorly through the diencephalon, ascending toward forebrain targets. The mechanisms by which mdDA axons initially navigate through the diencephalon are poorly understood. Recently the Slit family of secreted axon guidance proteins, and their Robo receptors, have been identified as important guides for descending longitudinal axons. To test the potential roles of Slit/Robo guidance in ascending trajectories, we examined tyrosine hydroxylase-positive (TH+) projections from mdDA neurons in mutant mouse embryos. We found that mdDA axons grow out of and parallel to Slit-positive ventral regions within the diencephalon, and that subsets of the mdDA axons likely express Robo1 and possibly also Robo2. Slit2 was able to directly inhibit TH axon outgrowth in explant co-culture assays. The mdDA axons made significant pathfinding errors in Slit1/2 and Robo1/2 knockout mice, including spreading out in the diencephalon to form a wider tract. The wider tract resulted from a combination of invasion of the ventral midline, consistent with Slit repulsion, but also axons wandering dorsally, away from the ventral midline. Aberrant dorsal trajectories were prominent in Robo1 and Robo1/2 knockout mice, suggesting that an aspect of Robo receptor function is Slit-independent. These results indicate that Slit/Robo signaling is critical during the initial establishment of dopaminergic pathways, with roles in the dorsoventral positioning and precise pathfinding of these ascending longitudinal axons.

  10. The Role of Spinal Dopaminergic Transmission in the Analgesic Effect of Nefopam on Rat Inflammatory Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Yun; Chae, Joo Wung; Lim, Chang Hun; Heo, Bong Ha; Park, Keun Suk; Lee, Hyung Gon; Choi, Jeong Il; Yoon, Myung Ha

    2016-01-01

    Background Nefopam has been known as an inhibitor of the reuptake of monoamines, and the noradrenergic and/or serotonergic system has been focused on as a mechanism of its analgesic action. Here we investigated the role of the spinal dopaminergic neurotransmission in the antinociceptive effect of nefopam administered intravenously or intrathecally. Methods The effects of intravenously and intrathecally administered nefopam were examined using the rat formalin test. Then we performed a microdialysis study to confirm the change of extracellular dopamine concentration in the spinal dorsal horn by nefopam. To determine whether the changes of dopamine level are associated with the nefopam analgesia, its mechanism was investigated pharmacologically via pretreatment with sulpiride, a dopaminergic D2 receptor antagonist. Results When nefopam was administered intravenously the flinching responses in phase I of the formalin test were decreased, but not those in phase II of the formalin test were decreased. Intrathecally injected nefopam reduced the flinching responses in both phases of the formalin test in a dose dependent manner. Microdialysis study revealed a significant increase of the level of dopamine in the spinal cord by intrathecally administered nefopam (about 3.8 fold the baseline value) but not by that administered intravenously. The analgesic effects of intrathecally injected nefopam were not affected by pretreatment with sulpiride, and neither were those of the intravenous nefopam. Conclusions Both the intravenously and intrathecally administered nefopam effectively relieved inflammatory pain in rats. Nefopam may act as an inhibitor of dopamine reuptake when delivered into the spinal cord. However, the analgesic mechanism of nefopam may not involve the dopaminergic transmission at the spinal level. PMID:27413481

  11. Vanillin Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against Inflammation-Mediated Cell Death by Inhibiting ERK1/2, P38 and the NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xuan; Liu, Dian-Feng; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Dong; Xu, Shi-Yao; Chen, Guang-Xin; Huang, Bing-Xu; Ren, Wen-Zhi; Wang, Wei; Fu, Shou-Peng; Liu, Ju-Xiong

    2017-01-01

    Neuroinflammation plays a very important role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). After activation, microglia produce pro-inflammatory mediators that damage surrounding neurons. Consequently, the inhibition of microglial activation might represent a new therapeutic approach of PD. Vanillin has been shown to protect dopaminergic neurons, but the mechanism is still unclear. Herein, we further study the underlying mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PD models. In vivo, we firstly established rat models of PD by unilateral injection of LPS into substantia nigra (SN), and then examined the role of vanillin in motor dysfunction, microglial activation and degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. In vitro, murine microglial BV-2 cells were treated with vanillin prior to the incubation of LPS, and then the inflammatory responses and the related signaling pathways were analyzed. The in vivo results showed that vanillin markedly improved the motor dysfunction, suppressed degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and inhibited microglial over-activation induced by LPS intranigral injection. The in vitro studies demonstrated that vanillin reduces LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), IL-1β, and IL-6 through regulating ERK1/2, p38 and NF-κB signaling. Collectively, these data indicated that vanillin has a role in protecting dopaminergic neurons via inhibiting inflammatory activation. PMID:28208679

  12. Vanillin Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against Inflammation-Mediated Cell Death by Inhibiting ERK1/2, P38 and the NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Yan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuroinflammation plays a very important role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD. After activation, microglia produce pro-inflammatory mediators that damage surrounding neurons. Consequently, the inhibition of microglial activation might represent a new therapeutic approach of PD. Vanillin has been shown to protect dopaminergic neurons, but the mechanism is still unclear. Herein, we further study the underlying mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced PD models. In vivo, we firstly established rat models of PD by unilateral injection of LPS into substantia nigra (SN, and then examined the role of vanillin in motor dysfunction, microglial activation and degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. In vitro, murine microglial BV-2 cells were treated with vanillin prior to the incubation of LPS, and then the inflammatory responses and the related signaling pathways were analyzed. The in vivo results showed that vanillin markedly improved the motor dysfunction, suppressed degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and inhibited microglial over-activation induced by LPS intranigral injection. The in vitro studies demonstrated that vanillin reduces LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide (iNOS, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, IL-1β, and IL-6 through regulating ERK1/2, p38 and NF-κB signaling. Collectively, these data indicated that vanillin has a role in protecting dopaminergic neurons via inhibiting inflammatory activation.

  13. Vanillin Protects Dopaminergic Neurons against Inflammation-Mediated Cell Death by Inhibiting ERK1/2, P38 and the NF-κB Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xuan; Liu, Dian-Feng; Zhang, Xiang-Yang; Liu, Dong; Xu, Shi-Yao; Chen, Guang-Xin; Huang, Bing-Xu; Ren, Wen-Zhi; Wang, Wei; Fu, Shou-Peng; Liu, Ju-Xiong

    2017-02-12

    Neuroinflammation plays a very important role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). After activation, microglia produce pro-inflammatory mediators that damage surrounding neurons. Consequently, the inhibition of microglial activation might represent a new therapeutic approach of PD. Vanillin has been shown to protect dopaminergic neurons, but the mechanism is still unclear. Herein, we further study the underlying mechanisms in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced PD models. In vivo, we firstly established rat models of PD by unilateral injection of LPS into substantia nigra (SN), and then examined the role of vanillin in motor dysfunction, microglial activation and degeneration of dopaminergic neurons. In vitro, murine microglial BV-2 cells were treated with vanillin prior to the incubation of LPS, and then the inflammatory responses and the related signaling pathways were analyzed. The in vivo results showed that vanillin markedly improved the motor dysfunction, suppressed degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and inhibited microglial over-activation induced by LPS intranigral injection. The in vitro studies demonstrated that vanillin reduces LPS-induced expression of inducible nitric oxide (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), IL-1β, and IL-6 through regulating ERK1/2, p38 and NF-κB signaling. Collectively, these data indicated that vanillin has a role in protecting dopaminergic neurons via inhibiting inflammatory activation.

  14. Ganoderma Lucidum polysaccharides protect against MPP+ and rotenone-induced apoptosis in primary dopaminergic cell cultures through inhibiting oxidative stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shan-Shan; Cui, Xiao-Lan; Rausch, Wolf-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the progressive neurodegeneration in Parkinson’s disease (PD) which is responsible for disabling motor abnormalities in more than 6.5 million people worldwide. Polysaccharides are the main active constituents from Ganoderma lucidum which is characterized with anti-oxidant, antitumor and immunostimulant properties. In the present study, primary dopaminergic cell cultures prepared from embryonic mouse mesencephala were used to investigate the neuroprotective effects and the potential mechanisms of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (GLP) on the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons induced by the neurotoxins methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP+) and rotenone. Results revealed that GLP can protect dopamine neurons against MPP+ and rotenone at the concentrations of 100, 50 and 25 μg/ml in primary mesencephalic cultures in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, either with or without neurotoxin treatment, GLP treatment elevated the survival of THir neurons, and increased the length of neurites of dopaminergic neurons. The Trolox equivalent anti-oxidant capacity (TEAC) of GLP was determined to be 199.53 μmol Trolox/g extract, and the decrease of mitochondrial complex I activity induced by MPP+ and rotenone was elevated by GLP treatment (100, 50, 25 and 12.5 μg/ml) in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, GLP dramatically decreased the relative number of apoptotic cells and increased the declining mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) induced by MPP+ and rotenone in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, GLP treatment reduced the ROS formation induced by MPP+ and rotenone at the concentrations of 100, 50 and 25 μg/ml in a dose-dependent manner. Our study indicates that GLP possesses neuroprotective properties against MPP+ and rotenone neurotoxicity through suppressing oxidative stress in primary mesencephalic dopaminergic cell culture owning to its antioxidant activities. PMID:27335703

  15. Ganoderma Lucidum polysaccharides protect against MPP(+) and rotenone-induced apoptosis in primary dopaminergic cell cultures through inhibiting oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shan-Shan; Cui, Xiao-Lan; Rausch, Wolf-Dieter

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in the progressive neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD) which is responsible for disabling motor abnormalities in more than 6.5 million people worldwide. Polysaccharides are the main active constituents from Ganoderma lucidum which is characterized with anti-oxidant, antitumor and immunostimulant properties. In the present study, primary dopaminergic cell cultures prepared from embryonic mouse mesencephala were used to investigate the neuroprotective effects and the potential mechanisms of Ganoderma lucidum polysaccharides (GLP) on the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons induced by the neurotoxins methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP(+)) and rotenone. Results revealed that GLP can protect dopamine neurons against MPP(+) and rotenone at the concentrations of 100, 50 and 25 μg/ml in primary mesencephalic cultures in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, either with or without neurotoxin treatment, GLP treatment elevated the survival of THir neurons, and increased the length of neurites of dopaminergic neurons. The Trolox equivalent anti-oxidant capacity (TEAC) of GLP was determined to be 199.53 μmol Trolox/g extract, and the decrease of mitochondrial complex I activity induced by MPP(+) and rotenone was elevated by GLP treatment (100, 50, 25 and 12.5 μg/ml) in a dose dependent manner. Furthermore, GLP dramatically decreased the relative number of apoptotic cells and increased the declining mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) induced by MPP(+) and rotenone in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, GLP treatment reduced the ROS formation induced by MPP(+) and rotenone at the concentrations of 100, 50 and 25 μg/ml in a dose-dependent manner. Our study indicates that GLP possesses neuroprotective properties against MPP(+) and rotenone neurotoxicity through suppressing oxidative stress in primary mesencephalic dopaminergic cell culture owning to its antioxidant activities.

  16. Tryptamine-derived alkaloids from Annonaceae exerting neurotrophin-like properties on primary dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Fanny; Le Douaron, Gael; Champy, Pierre; Amar, Majid; Séon-Méniel, Blandine; Raisman-Vozari, Rita; Figadère, Bruno

    2010-07-15

    N-fatty acyl tryptamines constitute a scarce group of natural compounds mainly encountered in Annonaceous plants. No biological activity was reported so far for these rare molecules. This study investigated the neurotrophic properties of these natural tryptaminic derivatives on dopaminergic (DA) neurons in primary mesencephalic cultures. A structure-activity relationships study led us to precise the role of a nitrogen atom into the aliphatic chain conferring to the compounds a combined neuroprotective and neuritogenic activity in the nanomolar range. The potent antioxidant activity of these natural products seems to be involved in part of their mechanism of action. This study provides the first description of natural neurotrophin mimetics present in Annonaceae extracts, and led to the biological characterization of compounds, which present a potential interest in neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease.

  17. Circumpolar Active-Layer Permafrost System (CAPS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Circumpolar Active-Layer Permafrost System (CAPS) contains over 100 data sets pertaining to permafrost and frozen ground topics. It also contains detailed...

  18. Flight Activity and Crew Tracking System -

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — The Flight Activity and Crew Tracking System (FACTS) is a Web-based application that provides an overall management and tracking tool of FAA Airmen performing Flight...

  19. Active impedance matching of complex structural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macmartin, Douglas G.; Miller, David W.; Hall, Steven R.

    1991-01-01

    Viewgraphs on active impedance matching of complex structural systems are presented. Topics covered include: traveling wave model; dereverberated mobility model; computation of dereverberated mobility; control problem: optimal impedance matching; H2 optimal solution; statistical energy analysis (SEA) solution; experimental transfer functions; interferometer actuator and sensor locations; active strut configurations; power dual variables; dereverberation of complex structure; dereverberated transfer function; compensators; and relative power flow.

  20. PASS: Creating Physically Active School Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciotto, Carol M.; Fede, Marybeth H.

    2014-01-01

    PASS, a Physically Active School System, is a program by which school districts and schools utilize opportunities for school-based physical activity that enhance overall fitness and cognition, which can be broken down into four integral parts consisting of connecting, communicating, collaborating, and cooperating. There needs to be an…

  1. GDNF-Ret signaling in midbrain dopaminergic neurons and its implication for Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Edgar R; Liss, Birgit

    2015-12-21

    Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and its canonical receptor Ret can signal together or independently to fulfill many important functions in the midbrain dopaminergic (DA) system. While Ret signaling clearly impacts on the development, maintenance and regeneration of the mesostriatal DA system, the physiological functions of GDNF for the DA system are still unclear. Nevertheless, GDNF is still considered to be an excellent candidate to protect and/or regenerate the mesostriatal DA system in Parkinson disease (PD). Clinical trials with GDNF on PD patients are, however, so far inconclusive. Here, we review the current knowledge of GDNF and Ret signaling and function in the midbrain DA system, and their crosstalk with proteins and signaling pathways associated with PD.

  2. Dopaminergic neuronal imaging in genetic Parkinson's disease: insights into pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisdair McNeill

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To compare the dopaminergic neuronal imaging features of different subtypes of genetic Parkinson's Disease. METHODS: A retrospective study of genetic Parkinson's diseases cases in which DaTSCAN (123I-FP-CIT had been performed. Specific non-displaceable binding was calculated for bilateral caudate and putamen for each case. The right:left asymmetry index and striatal asymmetry index was calculated. RESULTS: Scans were available from 37 cases of monogenetic Parkinson's disease (7 glucocerebrosidase (GBA mutations, 8 alpha-synuclein, 3 LRRK2, 7 PINK1, 12 Parkin. The asymmetry of radioligand uptake for Parkinson's disease with GBA or LRRK2 mutations was greater than that for Parkinson's disease with alpha synuclein, PINK1 or Parkin mutations. CONCLUSIONS: The asymmetry of radioligand uptake in Parkinsons disease associated with GBA or LRRK2 mutations suggests that interactions with additional genetic or environmental factors may be associated with dopaminergic neuronal loss.

  3. Gender differences in nigrostriatal dopaminergic innervation are present at young-to-middle but not at older age in normal adults.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wong, K.K.; Muller, M.L.; Kuwabara, H.; Studenski, S.A.; Bohnen, N.I.

    2012-01-01

    Gender differences in brain dopaminergic activity have been variably reported in the literature. We performed an evaluation for gender effects on striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) binding in a group of normal subjects. Community-dwelling adults (n = 85, 50F/35M, mean age 62.7 +/- 16.2 SD, range 20

  4. Apoptosis-mediated testicular alteration in Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) in response to temporal phase relation of serotonergic and dopaminergic oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Somanshu; Tsutsui, Kazuyoshi; Chaturvedi, Chandra Mohini

    2016-05-15

    Reproductive performance of many avian species, including Japanese quail, is reported to be modulated by specific temporal phase relation of serotonergic and dopaminergic oscillations. Accordingly, it has been shown that the serotonin precursor 5-HTP and the dopamine precursor l-DOPA given 8 h apart induce gonadal suppression and given 12 h apart lead to gonadal stimulation, while other temporal relationships were found to be ineffective. In the present study, we investigated the effects of 8- and 12-h phase relation of neural oscillations on testicular responses including expression of GnRH-I, GnIH, pro-apoptotic proteins (p53 and Bax), inactive and active executioner caspase-3, and the uncleaved DNA repair enzyme PARP-1. Testicular volume and mass decreased significantly in 8-h quail and increased in 12-h quail compared with controls. Expression of ir-GnIH, p53, Bax and active-caspase-3 increased and that of GnRH-I, pro-caspase-3 and uncleaved PARP-1 decreased in 8-h quail compared with controls. A TUNEL assay also confirmed testicular regression in these quail. Testes of 12-h quail exhibited significantly increased expression of GnRH-I, pro-caspase-3 and uncleaved PARP-1 compared with the control group. Our findings suggest that differential response of avian testes to 8- and 12-h phase relation of serotonergic and dopaminergic neural oscillations may be attributed to autocrine/paracrine action of GnIH expression, which is upregulated in regressed testes, leading to apoptotic changes, and downregulated in developed testes, causing apoptotic inhibition. It is concluded that specific phase relation of neural oscillations may modulate the local testicular GnRH-GnIH system and alter the apoptotic mechanism in quail testes. Moreover, these findings highlight the physiological effects of time-dependent drug delivery, including the specific time intervals between two drugs.

  5. Neuromelanin Imaging and Dopaminergic Loss in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaias, Ioannis U.; Trujillo, Paula; Summers, Paul; Marotta, Giorgio; Mainardi, Luca; Pezzoli, Gianni; Zecca, Luigi; Costa, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder in which the major pathologic substrate is a loss of dopaminergic neurons from the substantia nigra. Our main objective was to determine the correspondence between changes in the substantia nigra, evident in neuromelanin and iron sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and dopaminergic striatal innervation loss in patients with PD. Eighteen patients and 18 healthy control subjects were included in the study. Using neuromelanin-MRI, we measured the volume of the substantia nigra and the contrast-to-noise-ratio between substantia nigra and a background region. The apparent transverse relaxation rate and magnetic susceptibility of the substantia nigra were calculated from dual-echo MRI. Striatal dopaminergic innervation was measured as density of dopamine transporter (DAT) by means of single-photon emission computed tomography and [123I] N-ω-fluoropropyl-2b-carbomethoxy-3b-(4-iodophenyl) tropane. Patients showed a reduced volume of the substantia nigra and contrast-to-noise-ratio and both positively correlated with the corresponding striatal DAT density. The apparent transverse relaxation rate and magnetic susceptibility values of the substantia nigra did not differ between patients and healthy controls. The best predictor of DAT reduction was the volume of the substantia nigra. Clinical and imaging correlations were also investigated for the locus coeruleus. Our results suggest that neuromelanin-MRI can be used for quantifying substantia nigra pathology in PD where it closely correlates with dopaminergic striatal innervation loss. Longitudinal studies should further explore the role of Neuromelanin-MRI as an imaging biomarker of PD, especially for subjects at risk of developing the disease. PMID:27597825

  6. Neuromelanin Imaging and Dopaminergic Loss in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Ugo Isaias

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder in which the major pathologic substrate is a loss of dopaminergic neurons from the substantia nigra. Our main objective was to determine the correspondence between changes in the substantia nigra, evident in neuromelanin and iron sensitive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and dopaminergic striatal innervation loss in patients with PD. Eighteen patients and eighteen healthy control subjects were included in the study. Using neuromelanin-MRI, we measured the volume of the substantia nigra and the contrast-to-noise-ratio between substantia nigra and a background region. The apparent transverse relaxation rate and magnetic susceptibility of the substantia nigra were calculated from dual-echo MRI. Striatal dopaminergic innervation was measured as density of dopamine transporter (DAT by means of single-photon emission computed tomography and [123I] N-ω-fluoropropyl-2b-carbomethoxy-3b-(4-iodophenyl tropane. Patients showed a reduced volume of the substantia nigra and contrast-to-noise-ratio and both positively correlated with the corresponding striatal DAT density. The apparent transverse relaxation rate and magnetic susceptibility values of the substantia nigra did not differ between patients and healthy controls. The best predictor of DAT reduction was the volume of the substantia nigra. Clinical and imaging correlations were also investigated for the locus coeruleus. Our results suggest that neuromelanin-MRI can be used for quantifying substantia nigra pathology in PD where it closely correlates with dopaminergic striatal innervation loss. Longitudinal studies should further explore the role of Neuromelanin-MRI as an imaging biomarker of PD, especially for subjects at risk of developing the disease.

  7. Dopaminergic and Cholinergic Modulation of Striatal Tyrosine Hydroxylase Interneurons

    OpenAIRE

    Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Xenias, Harry S.; Tepper, James M.; Koós, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    The recent electrophysiological characterization of TH-expressing GABAergic interneurons (THINs) in the neostriatum revealed an unexpected degree of diversity of interneurons in this brain area (Ibáñez-Sandoval et al., 2010, Unal et al., 2011, 2013). Despite being relatively few in number, THINs may play a significant role in transmitting and distributing extra- and intrastriatal neuromodulatory signals in the striatal circuitry. Here we investigated the dopaminergic and cholinergic regulatio...

  8. Active system monitoring applied on wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Parbo, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    A concept for active system monitoring (ASM) applied on wind turbines is presented in this paper. The concept is based on an injection of a small periodic auxiliary signal in the system. An investigation of the signature from the auxiliary input in residual (error) signals can then be applied...

  9. Active Fault Isolation in MIMO Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2014-01-01

    Active fault isolation of parametric faults in closed-loop MIMO system s are considered in this paper. The fault isolation consists of two steps. T he first step is group- wise fault isolation. Here, a group of faults is isolated from other pos sible faults in the system. The group-wise fault iso...

  10. Active imaging system with Faraday filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, James J.

    1993-01-01

    An active imaging system has a low to medium powered laser transmitter and receiver wherein the receiver includes a Faraday filter with an ultranarrow optical bandpass and a bare (nonintensified) CCD camera. The laser is locked in the vicinity of the passband of the Faraday filter. The system has high sensitivity to the laser illumination while eliminating solar background.

  11. Dopaminergic stimulation of subthalamic nucleus elicits oral dyskinesia in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, T J; Eberle-Wang, K; Lucki, I; Chesselet, M F

    1994-08-01

    The effects of dopaminergic stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus (STh) on motor behavior were examined in conscious rats. Unilateral infusion of apomorphine (0.1 to 3.2 micrograms) into the STh induced a dose-dependent increase in abnormal, nondirected orofacial movements without altering turning, sniffing, grooming, or rearing behaviors. Orofacial movements elicited by local infusion of apomorphine (1.0 microgram) into the STh were blocked by peripheral administration of the D1 antagonist, SCH 23390 (0.1 mg/kg, sc), but not by the D2 antagonists haloperidol (1.0 mg/kg, sc) or sulpiride (50 mg/kg, sc). Furthermore, coinfusion of SCH 23390 (1.0 microgram), but not sulpiride (5.0 micrograms), with apomorphine (1.0 microgram) into the STh blocked oral dyskinesia. Oral movements could not be reelicited by an infusion of apomorphine into the STh after a kainic acid lesion of the STh. In addition, infusion of apomorphine (1.0 microgram) into sites proximal to but deliberately outside of the STh failed to elicit nondirected oral movements above baseline levels. The results indicate that stimulation of D1 dopaminergic receptors within the STh induces abnormal orofacial movements. This highlights the importance of the dopaminergic input to the STh in the regulation of motor function and suggests that D1 receptor antagonists could prove useful in the treatment of orofacial dyskinesia in humans.

  12. Dopaminergic regulation of dendritic calcium: fast multisite calcium imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen-Liang; Oikonomou, Katerina D; Short, Shaina M; Antic, Srdjan D

    2013-01-01

    Optimal dopamine tone is required for the normal cortical function; however it is still unclear how cortical-dopamine-release affects information processing in individual cortical neurons. Thousands of glutamatergic inputs impinge onto elaborate dendritic trees of neocortical pyramidal neurons. In the process of ensuing synaptic integration (information processing), a variety of calcium transients are generated in remote dendritic compartments. In order to understand the cellular mechanisms of dopaminergic modulation it is important to know whether and how dopaminergic signals affect dendritic calcium transients. In this chapter, we describe a relatively inexpensive method for monitoring dendritic calcium fluctuations at multiple loci across the pyramidal dendritic tree, at the same moment of time (simultaneously). The experiments have been designed to measure the amplitude, time course and spatial extent of action potential-associated dendritic calcium transients before and after application of dopaminergic drugs. In the examples provided here the dendritic calcium transients were evoked by triggering the somatic action potentials (backpropagation-evoked), and puffs of exogenous dopamine were applied locally onto selected dendritic branches.

  13. Interleukin-4 Protects Dopaminergic Neurons In vitro but Is Dispensable for MPTP-Induced Neurodegeneration In vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hühner, Laura; Rilka, Jennifer; Gilsbach, Ralf; Zhou, Xiaolai; Machado, Venissa; Spittau, Björn

    2017-01-01

    Microglia are involved in physiological as well as neuropathological processes in the central nervous system (CNS). Their functional states are often referred to as M1-like and M2-like activation, and are believed to contribute to neuroinflammation-mediated neurodegeneration or neuroprotection, respectively. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is one the most common neurodegenerative disease and is characterized by the progressive loss of midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons in the substantia nigra resulting in bradykinesia, tremor, and rigidity. Interleukin 4 (IL4)-mediated M2-like activation of microglia, which is characterized by upregulation of alternative markers Arginase 1 (Arg1) and Chitinase 3 like 3 (Ym1) has been well studied in vitro but the role of endogenous IL4 during CNS pathologies in vivo is not well understood. Interestingly, microglia activation by IL4 has been described to promote neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects, which might be important to slow the progression of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, we addressed the role of endogenous and exogenous IL4 during MPP+-induced degeneration of mDA neurons in vitro and further addressed the impact of IL4-deficiency on neurodegeneration in the 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) mouse model of PD in vivo. Our results clearly demonstrate that exogenous IL4 is important to protect mDA neurons in vitro, but endogenous IL4 seems to be dispensable for development and maintenance of the nigrostriatal system as well as MPTP-induced loss of TH+ neurons in vivo. These results underline the importance of IL4 in promoting a neuroprotective microglia activation state and strengthen the therapeutic potential of exogenous IL4 for protection of mDA neurons in PD models. PMID:28337124

  14. Association of polymorphisms in genes involved in the dopaminergic pathway with blood pressure and uric acid levels in Chinese females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Ting-Kuang; Yeh, Ting-Chi; Weng, Chi-Feng; Shih, Bing-Fu; Tsao, Hsueh-Jen; Hsiao, Chien-Hua; Chuang, Fu-Tai; Hu, Chung-Yi; Chang, Chun-Yen

    2010-12-01

    Since the high degree of heritability of physiological traits was demonstrated by twin and adoption studies, contemporary researchers in the fields of clinical medicine, behavioral science, and genetics have acknowledged the crucial role of genetic factors in human physiology. The study described herein explores the association between physiological parameters and the dopaminergic system using molecular genetic techniques. A total of 558 Taiwanese female volunteers, ranging from 16 to 17 years, were recruited. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes involved in the dopaminergic pathway were selected for analysis. Systolic blood pressure and diastolic blood pressure were associated significantly with the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met polymorphism and the dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) C1021T polymorphism. Furthermore, plasma uric acid was associated significantly with the COMT Val158Met polymorphism. Our study suggests the possible involvement of genetic polymorphisms in COMT and DBH in the regulation of blood pressure and plasma uric acid.

  15. Active containment systems incorporating modified pillared clays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundie, P. [Envirotech (Scotland) Ltd., Aberdeen (United Kingdom)]|[Environmental Resource Industries Disposal Pty Ltd., Perth (Australia); McLeod, N. [Envirotreat Ltd., Kingswinford (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    The application of treatment technologies in active containment systems provides a more advanced and effective method for the remediation of contaminated sites. These treatment technologies can be applied in permeable reactive walls and/or funnel and gate systems. The application of modified pillared clays in active containment systems provides a mechanism for producing permeable reactive walls with versatile properties. These pillared clays are suitably modified to incorporate reactive intercalatants capable of reacting with both a broad range of organic pollutants of varying molecular size, polarity and reactivity. Heavy metals can be removed from contaminated water by conventional ion-exchange and other reactive processes within the clay structure. Complex contamination problems can be addressed by the application of more than one modified clay on a site specific basis. This paper briefly describes the active containment system and the structure/chemistry of the modified pillared clay technology, illustrating potential applications of the in-situ treatment process for contaminated site remediation.

  16. Neuroprotective effects of tadalafil on gerbil dopaminergic neurons following cerebral ischemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwang Taek Kim; Kyung Jin Chung; Han Sae Lee; Il Gyu Ko; Chang Ju Kim; Yong Gil Na; Khae Hawn Kim

    2013-01-01

    Impairment of dopamine function, which is known to have major effects on behaviors and cognition, is one of the main problems associated with cerebral ischemia. Tadalafil, a long-acting phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitor, is known to ameliorate neurologic impairment induced by brain injury, but not in dopaminergic regions. We investigated the neuroprotective effects of treatment with tadalafil on cyclic guanosine monophosphate level and dopamine function following cerebral ischemia. Forty adult Mongolian gerbils were randomly and evenly divided into five groups (n = 8 in each group): Sham-operation group, cerebral ischemia-induced and 0, 0.1, 1, and 10 mg/kg tadalafil-treated groups, respectively. Tadalafil dissolved in distilled water was administered orally for 7 consecutive days, starting 1 day after surgery. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate assay and immunohistochemistry were performed for thyrosine hydroxylase expression and western blot analysis for dopamine D2 receptor expression. A decrease in cyclic guanosine monophosphate level following cerebral ischemia was found with an increase in thyrosine hydroxylase activity and a decrease in dopamine D2 receptor expression in the striatum and substantia nigra region. However, treatment with tadalafil increased cyclic guanosine monophosphate expression, suppressed thyrosine hydroxylase expression and increased dopamine D2 receptor expression in the striatum and substantia nigra region in a dose-dependent manner. Tadalafil might ameliorate cerebral ischemia-induced dopaminergic neuron injury. Therefore, tadalafil has the potential as a new neuroprotective treatment strategy for cerebral ischemic injury.

  17. A PBX1 transcriptional network controls dopaminergic neuron development and is impaired in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaescusa, J Carlos; Li, Bingsi; Toledo, Enrique M; Rivetti di Val Cervo, Pia; Yang, Shanzheng; Stott, Simon Rw; Kaiser, Karol; Islam, Saiful; Gyllborg, Daniel; Laguna-Goya, Rocio; Landreh, Michael; Lönnerberg, Peter; Falk, Anna; Bergman, Tomas; Barker, Roger A; Linnarsson, Sten; Selleri, Licia; Arenas, Ernest

    2016-09-15

    Pre-B-cell leukemia homeobox (PBX) transcription factors are known to regulate organogenesis, but their molecular targets and function in midbrain dopaminergic neurons (mDAn) as well as their role in neurodegenerative diseases are unknown. Here, we show that PBX1 controls a novel transcriptional network required for mDAn specification and survival, which is sufficient to generate mDAn from human stem cells. Mechanistically, PBX1 plays a dual role in transcription by directly repressing or activating genes, such as Onecut2 to inhibit lateral fates during embryogenesis, Pitx3 to promote mDAn development, and Nfe2l1 to protect from oxidative stress. Notably, PBX1 and NFE2L1 levels are severely reduced in dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients and decreased NFE2L1 levels increases damage by oxidative stress in human midbrain cells. Thus, our results reveal novel roles for PBX1 and its transcriptional network in mDAn development and PD, opening the door for new therapeutic interventions.

  18. Effects of endoplasmic reticulum stress and related apoptosis on selective death of dopaminergic neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lan Wang; Shenggang Sun; Xuebing Cao; Zhentao Zhang; Li Xu

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To explore the mechanism of endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS) response and related apoptosis in dopaminergic neurons death. Methods: Nerve growth factor (NGF)-treatedPC12 cells were treated with 6-OHDA, MPP+ and rotenone. MTr assay and flow cytometry were used to measure the cell viability and the rate of celluar apoptosis induced by those neurotoxins. The expression of ERS-related gene XBP1, Grp78, CHOP, caspase-12 in drug-treated group and reserpine preincubation group was determined with RT-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Results: After the exposure to different toxins, the viability of PC12 cells were decreased by 52%, 44%, 40% at 100μM6-OHDA, 75 μM MPP+, 20 nM rotenone for 24 h respectively. FCM assay confirmed time-dependent cell apoptosis (P < 0.01 ). The gene and protein expression of XBP1, Grp78 in drug-treated group were significantly increased and reached their peaks 8 h after the treatment(P < 0.05).The expression levels of CHOP and caspase-12 gene were increased 16-24 h after the treatment(P < 0.01 ), but the expression level of caspase-12 was inhibited by reserpine preincubayion (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The excessive ERS and relative activated cell apoptosis pathway may be associated with selective death of dopaminergic neurons.

  19. Performance improvement clarification for refrigeration system using active system monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Torben; Niemann, Hans Henrik; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of determining whether a refrigeration plant has the possibility of delivering a better performance of the operation. The controllers are wellknown but detailed knowledge about the underlying dynamics of the refrigeration plant is not available. Thus, the question...... is if it is possible to achieve a better performance by changing the controller parameter. An approach to active system monitoring, based on active fault diagnosis techniques, is employed in order to evaluate changes in the system performance under operation....

  20. Non-opiate β-endorphin fragments and dopamine—VI Behavioural analysis of the interaction between γ-type endorphins and dopaminergic systems in the nucleus accumbens of rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ree, J.M. van; Király, I.

    1984-01-01

    Injection of small doses of apomorphine, bromocriptine and the new ergoline compound, GYKI-32887 into the nucleus accumbens decreased locomotor activity when rats were tested in a small open field. This effect was observed following injection of 1 pg of these substances; GYKI-32887 being more potent

  1. The rise and fall of mesodiencephalic dopaminergic neurons : Molecular programming by transcription factors Engrailed 1, Pitx3, and Nkx2.9 during the development of mesodiencephalic neurons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kouwenhoven, W.M.

    2016-01-01

    The mid- and hindbrain harbor two essential monoaminergic neuronal populations: the mesodiencephalic dopaminergic (mdDA) neurons in the midbrain and the serotonergic (5HT) neurons in the hindbrain. Both systems innervate multiple regions in the forebrain and are involved in the guidance of our mood,

  2. Neuropathologic Implication of Peripheral Neuregulin-1 and EGF Signals in Dopaminergic Dysfunction and Behavioral Deficits Relevant to Schizophrenia: Their Target Cells and Time Window

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Nawa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuregulin-1 and epidermal growth factor (EGF are implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. To test the developmental hypothesis for schizophrenia, we administered these factors to rodent pups, juveniles, and adults and characterized neurobiological and behavioral consequences. These factors were also provided from their transgenes or infused into the adult brain. Here we summarize previous results from these experiments and discuss those from neuropathological aspects. In the neonatal stage but not the juvenile and adult stages, subcutaneously injected factors penetrated the blood-brain barrier and acted on brain neurons, which later resulted in persistent behavioral and dopaminergic impairments associated with schizophrenia. Neonatally EGF-treated animals exhibited persistent hyperdopaminergic abnormalities in the nigro-pallido-striatal system while neuregulin-1 treatment resulted in dopaminergic deficits in the corticolimbic dopamine system. Effects on GABAergic and glutamatergic systems were transient or limited. Even in the adult stage, intracerebral administration and transgenic expression of these factors produced similar but not identical behavioral impairments, although the effects of intracerebral administration were reversible. These findings suggest that dopaminergic development is highly vulnerable to circulating ErbB ligands in the pre- and perinatal stages. Once maldevelopment of the dopaminergic system is established during early development, dopamine-associating behavioral deficits become irreversible and manifest at postpubertal stages.

  3. Device-Free Indoor Activity Recognition System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Abdulaziz Aide Al-qaness

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we explore the properties of the Channel State Information (CSI of WiFi signals and present a device-free indoor activity recognition system. Our proposed system uses only one ubiquitous router access point and a laptop as a detection point, while the user is free and neither needs to wear sensors nor carry devices. The proposed system recognizes six daily activities, such as walk, crawl, fall, stand, sit, and lie. We have built the prototype with an effective feature extraction method and a fast classification algorithm. The proposed system has been evaluated in a real and complex environment in both line-of-sight (LOS and none-line-of-sight (NLOS scenarios, and the results validate the performance of the proposed system.

  4. On the physiology of jouissance: interpreting the mesolimbic dopaminergic reward functions from a psychoanalytic perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazan, Ariane; Detandt, Sandrine

    2013-01-01

    Jouissance is a Lacanian concept, infamous for being impervious to understanding and which expresses the paradoxical satisfaction that a subject may derive from his symptom. On the basis of Freud’s “experience of satisfaction” we have proposed a first working definition of jouissance as the (benefit gained from) the motor tension underlying the action which was [once] adequate in bringing relief to the drive and, on the basis of their striking reciprocal resonances, we have proposed that central dopaminergic systems could embody the physiological architecture of Freud’s concept of the drive. We have then distinguished two constitutive axes to jouissance: one concerns the subject’s body and the other the subject’s history. Four distinctive aspects of these axes are discussed both from a metapsychological and from a neuroscience point of view. We conclude that jouissance could be described as an accumulation of body tension, fuelling for action, but continuously balancing between reward and anxiety, and both marking the physiology of the body with the history of its commemoration and arising from this inscription as a constant push to act and to repeat. Moreover, it seems that the mesolimbic accumbens dopaminergic pathway is a reasonable candidate for its underlying physiological architecture. PMID:24223543

  5. Imbalanced Dopaminergic Transmission Mediated by Serotonergic Neurons in L-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Navailles

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available L-DOPA-induced dyskinesias (LIDs are one of the main motor side effects of L-DOPA therapy in Parkinson's disease. The review will consider the biochemical evidence indicating that the serotonergic neurons are involved in the dopaminergic effects of L-DOPA in the brain. The consequences are an ectopic and aberrant release of dopamine that follows the serotonergic innervation of the brain. After mid- to long-term treatment with L-DOPA, the pattern of L-DOPA-induced dopamine release is modified. In several brain regions, its effect is dramatically reduced while, in the striatum, its effect is quite preserved. LIDs could appear when the dopaminergic effects of L-DOPA fall in brain areas such as the cortex, enhancing the subcortical impact of dopamine and promoting aberrant motor responses. The consideration of the serotonergic system in the core mechanism of action of L-DOPA opens an important reserve of possible strategies to limit LIDs.

  6. Interactive effects of morphine and dopaminergic compounds on spatial working memory in rhesus monkeys

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Hong Wang; Joshua Dominie Rizak; Yan-Mei Chen; Liang Li; Xin-Tian Hu; Yuan-Ye Ma

    2013-01-01

    Opiates and dopamine (DA) play key roles in learning and memory in humans and animals.Although interactions between these neurotransmitters have been found,their functional roles remain to be fully elucidated,and their dysfunction may contribute to human diseases and addiction.Here we investigated the interactions of morphine and dopaminergic neurotransmitter systems with respect to learning and memory in rhesus monkeys by using the Wisconsin General Test Apparatus (WGTA) delayed-response task.Morphine and DA agonists (SKF-38393,apomorphine and bromocriptine) or DA antagonists (SKF-83566,haloperidol and sulpiride) were co-administered to the monkeys 30 min prior to the task.We found that dose-patterned co-administration of morphine with D1 or D2 antagonists or agonists reversed the impaired spatial working memory induced by morphine or the compounds alone.For example,morphine at 0.01 mg/kg impaired spatial working memory,while morphine (0.01 mg/kg) and apomorphine (0.01 or 0.06 mg/kg) co-treatment ameliorated this effect.Our findings suggest that the interactions between morphine and dopaminergic compounds influence spatial working memory in rhesus monkeys.A better understanding of these interactive relationships may provide insights into human addiction.

  7. MEF2C enhances dopaminergic neuron differentiation of human embryonic stem cells in a parkinsonian rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Gyung Cho

    Full Text Available Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs can potentially differentiate into any cell type, including dopaminergic neurons to treat Parkinson's disease (PD, but hyperproliferation and tumor formation must be avoided. Accordingly, we use myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C as a neurogenic and anti-apoptotic transcription factor to generate neurons from hESC-derived neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs, thus avoiding hyperproliferation. Here, we report that forced expression of constitutively active MEF2C (MEF2CA generates significantly greater numbers of neurons with dopaminergic properties in vitro. Conversely, RNAi knockdown of MEF2C in NPCs decreases neuronal differentiation and dendritic length. When we inject MEF2CA-programmed NPCs into 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned parkinsonian rats in vivo, the transplanted cells survive well, differentiate into tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons, and improve behavioral deficits to a significantly greater degree than non-programmed cells. The enriched generation of dopaminergic neuronal lineages from hESCs by forced expression of MEF2CA in the proper context may prove valuable in cell-based therapy for CNS disorders such as PD.

  8. Performance Assessment and Active System Monitoring for Refrigeration Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Green, Torben

    the controller set-point corresponds to a temperature deviation,which will eventually harm the stored goods. The energy eciency is measured by the coecient of performance, COP, which basically is the delivered cooling power divided by the consumed electrical power of the system. The reliability criteria...... of the refrigeration system has been addressed in the project. The proposed methods for improvement relies on a minimum of detailed knowledge about the refrigeration system. In addition, since a refrigeration system often operates in steady state an active system monitoring setup has been proposed, to enable...

  9. Active Displacement Control of Active Magnetic Bearing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kertész Milan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide energy production nowadays is over 3400 GW while storage systems have a capacity of only 90 GW [1]. There is a good solution for additional storage capacity in flywheel energy storage systems (FES. The main advantage of FES is its relatively high efficiency especially with using the active magnetic bearing system. Therefore there exist good reasons for appropriate simulations and for creating a suitable magneto-structural control system. The magnetic bearing, including actuation, is simulated in the ANSYS parametric design language (APDL. APDL is used to create the loops of transient simulations where boundary conditions (BC are updated based upon a “gap sensor” which controls the nodal position values of the centroid of the shaft and the current density inputs onto the copper windings.

  10. Active Displacement Control of Active Magnetic Bearing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertész, Milan; Kozakovič, Radko; Magdolen, Luboš; Masaryk, Michal

    2014-12-01

    The worldwide energy production nowadays is over 3400 GW while storage systems have a capacity of only 90 GW [1]. There is a good solution for additional storage capacity in flywheel energy storage systems (FES). The main advantage of FES is its relatively high efficiency especially with using the active magnetic bearing system. Therefore there exist good reasons for appropriate simulations and for creating a suitable magneto-structural control system. The magnetic bearing, including actuation, is simulated in the ANSYS parametric design language (APDL). APDL is used to create the loops of transient simulations where boundary conditions (BC) are updated based upon a "gap sensor" which controls the nodal position values of the centroid of the shaft and the current density inputs onto the copper windings.

  11. Effects of 6-OHDA lesion of hippocampal CA3 dopaminergic system on conditioned fear memory in rats%损毁海马CA3区多巴胺能系统对大鼠条件性恐惧记忆的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文加玲; 时燕薇; 赵虎

    2012-01-01

    目的 研究大鼠海马CA3区多巴胺(DA)能系统在条件性恐惧记忆形成与保持中的作用.方法 条件性恐惧训练前2周向双侧海马CA3区注入6-羟基多巴胺(6-OHDA)进行损毁,训练后用Western blotting检测前额叶皮层、CA1、杏仁体GluR1及NR2B的表达变化.结果 (1)与生理盐水组[(66.44±16.58)%,(73.43±23.57)%,(55.27±20.57)%]比较,6-OHDA损毁组恐惧记忆获得的僵住反应[ (65.58±5.33)%]差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),短时恐惧记忆的僵住反应[(39.24±12.83)%]与长时恐惧记忆的僵住反应[(31.15±6.51)%]明显减少(P<0.05).(2)与生理盐水组比较,6-OHDA损毁组大鼠前额叶皮层,海马CA1区的GluR1蛋白表达差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),杏仁体BLA区的GluR1蛋白表达升高(P<0.01).与生理盐水组比较,6-OHDA损毁组大鼠前额叶皮层的NR2B蛋白表达升高(P<0.01),海马CA1区的NR2B蛋白表达差异无统计学意义(P>0.05),杏仁体BLA区的NR2B蛋白表达降低(P<0.01).结论 大鼠海马CA3区多巴胺能系统功能下调能损害恐惧记忆的巩固但不影响其获得,还可以调节其他脑区记忆相关蛋白的表达.%Objective To investigate the effects of hippocampal CA3 dopaminergic system in acquisition and consolidation of Pavlovian fear conditioning,and expression of GluR1 and NR2B in medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC),CA1 and basolateral amygdala (BLA) after fear conditioning training.Methods Bilateral injection 6-OHDA into hippocampal CA3 to lesion dopaminergic fibers 2 weeks before fear conditioning training.The change of GluR1 and NR2B were analyzed by western blot after training.Results Compared with the saline group ( (66.44 ± 16.58)% ),there were significant decreases ( (39.24 ± 12.83)%,(31.15 ±6.51 )% ) in the consolidation of short- and long- term fear memory (P < 0.05 ) but not the acquisition ( ( 65.58 ± 5.33 ) %,P > 0.05).The expression of GluR1 protein was significantly increased in BLA

  12. Study on Active Drive System for Colonoscope

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The paper deals with active drive system for colonoscope. The system is mainly composed of soft mobile mechanism for earthworm locomotion and turning mechanism based on shape memory effect. The soft mobile mechanism contacts colon wall with airin inflatable balloons, so the robot has better soft and non invasive properties. The turning mechanism can be actively bent by shape memory alloy components. It ensures the colonoscope to adapt to the tortuous shape of colon. Some experiment results are given in the paper.

  13. Pseudo energy wells in active systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sheshka, Raman; Truskinovsky, Lev

    2015-01-01

    Active stabilization in systems with zero or negative stiffness is an essential element of a wide variety of biological processes. We study a prototypical example of this phenomenon at a micro-scale and show how active rigidity, interpreted as a formation of a pseudo-well in the effective energy landscape, can be generated in an overdamped ratchet-type stochastic system. We link the transition from negative to positive rigidity with correlations in the noise and show that subtle differences in out-of-equilibrium driving may compromise the emergence of a pseudo-well.

  14. Dopaminergic stimulation enhances confidence and accuracy in seeing rapidly presented words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Hans C; Skewes, Joshua C; Thomsen, Kristine Rømer; Overgaard, Morten; Lau, Hakwan C; Mouridsen, Kim; Roepstorff, Andreas

    2011-02-23

    Liberal acceptance, overconfidence, and increased activity of the neurotransmitter dopamine have been proposed to account for abnormal sensory experiences, for instance, hallucinations in schizophrenia. In normal subjects, increased sensory experience in Yoga Nidra meditation is linked to striatal dopamine release. We therefore hypothesize that the neurotransmitter dopamine may function as a regulator of subjective confidence of visual perception in the normal brain. Although much is known about the effect of stimulation by neurotransmitters on cognitive functions, their effect on subjective confidence of perception has never been recorded experimentally before. In a controlled study of 24 normal, healthy female university students with the dopamine agonist pergolide given orally, we show that dopaminergic activation increases confidence in seeing rapidly presented words. It also improves performance in a forced-choice word recognition task. These results demonstrate neurotransmitter regulation of subjective conscious experience of perception and provide evidence for a crucial role of dopamine.

  15. ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF DOPAMINERGIC AND NONDOPAMINERGIC NEURONS IN ORGANOTYPIC SLICE CULTURES OF THE RAT VENTRAL MESENCEPHALON

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    STEENSEN, BH; NEDERGAARD, S; OSTERGAARD, K;

    1995-01-01

    -old organotypic slice cultures of the ventral mesencephalon prepared from newborn rats. Dopaminergic neurones were distinguished from non-dopaminergic neurones by staining with the autofluorescent serotonin analogue 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine and briefly viewing the preparation with short exposures to ultraviolet...... (UV) light (365 nm). Short exposures to UV light did not affect the electrophysiological properties. There were no significant differences between dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic neurones with regard to resting membrane potential or action potential threshold and amplitude, and in both types...

  16. 吗啡诱发的大鼠强迫性觅药动机及中脑神经元活动性改变%Compulsive drug-seeking motivation in rats provoked by escalating high-dose morphine pretreatment and the dopaminergic and nondopaminergic neuron activity in midbrain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭永华; 白云静; 梁璟; 郑希耕

    2011-01-01

    目的 考察不同剂量吗啡用药模式下大鼠的行为敏感化表达是否受到前期用药环境的调控,探索行为敏感化表达不受前期用药环境影响的动物模型及其中脑区域神经元的活动性改变.方法 按吗啡给药方式将大鼠分为3组:累加大剂量吗啡前处理组(HD组)、固定小剂量吗啡前处理组(LD组)和盐水前处理组(S组).戒断后,在"非用药环境"中考察大鼠经吗啡点燃后的水平运动和刻板运动.随后进行腹侧被盖区(VTA)和黑质(SN)的Fos蛋白和酪氨酸羟化酶(Tyrosine hydroxylase,TH)双重免疫组织化学染色.结果 10mg/kg吗啡点燃后,HD组水平运动和刻板运动均显著高于S组(水平运动和刻板运动,HD组:26907±2003和129.6±6.5;S组:14962±1888和89.9±10.9,均P<0.01).与S组比较,HD组在SNr整体及SNr外侧部Fos蛋白阳性神经元均显著增高(SNr和SNr外侧部Fos阳性神经元,HD组:29.14±5.27和9.83±2.84;S组:17.29±1.51和2.06±0.45;均P<0.05).结论 相对于固定小剂量吗啡用药,累加大剂量吗啡用药诱导的大鼠行为敏感化不受前期用药环境调控;SNr尤其是其外侧部的神经元活动性增加与累加大剂量吗啡用药大鼠的觅药动机表达有重要关系.%Objective To probe the different expression of psychomotor in different model of pretreatment and the influence of pretreatment context on the expression of psychomotor.And to compare dopaminergic and non-dopaminergic neuron activity in midbrain after different pretreatment.Methods Rats were pretreated by escalated high-dose morphine( HD group) ,fixed low-dose morphine( LD group) and saline as control(S group).After withdrawal, rats were challenged by morphine in non-drug used environment.Locomotor behavior and stereotypy behavior were monitored as the index of compulsive drug-seeking motivation.By double labeling immunohistochemistry of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and Fos protein, the plasticity of neuronal activity in ventral

  17. Corticotropin-releasing factor administration elicits a stress-like activation of cerebral catecholaminergic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, A J; Berridge, C W

    1987-08-01

    The cerebral content of the biogenic amines, dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), and serotonin (5-HT) and their catabolites 30 min after CRF or saline injections was determined using HPLC with electrochemical detection. Injection of CRF (1.0 micrograms) into the lateral ventricles (ICV) of mice produced a behavioral activation in which their motor movements appeared as bursts of activity followed by periods of immobility. CRF administration (ICV or SC) did not alter the concentrations of DA, NE, tryptophan, 5-HT, or 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in any brain region measured. ICV CRF increased the concentrations of dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), the major catabolite of DA, and of 3-methoxy,4-hydroxyphenylethyleneglycol (MHPG), the major catabolite of NE, in several brain regions. DOPAC:DA ratios were consistently increased in prefrontal cortex, septum, hypothalamus, and brain stem relative to animals injected with saline. MHPG:NE ratios were also increased in the prefrontal cortex and hypothalamus, with a marginal effect (p = 0.06) in brain stem. SC CRF significantly increased DOPAC:DA in prefrontal cortex, and MHPG:NE in prefrontal cortex, hypothalamus and brain stem. Pretreatment with naloxone did not prevent any of the neurochemical responses to ICV CRF, but naloxone alone increased DOPAC:DA in medial profrontal cortex, and decreased MHPG:NE in nucleus accumbens in CRF-injected mice. These results suggest that administration of CRF either centrally or peripherally induces an activation of both dopaminergic and noradrenergic systems in several regions of mouse brain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. A neural population model incorporating dopaminergic neurotransmission during complex voluntary behaviors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Fürtinger

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Assessing brain activity during complex voluntary motor behaviors that require the recruitment of multiple neural sites is a field of active research. Our current knowledge is primarily based on human brain imaging studies that have clear limitations in terms of temporal and spatial resolution. We developed a physiologically informed non-linear multi-compartment stochastic neural model to simulate functional brain activity coupled with neurotransmitter release during complex voluntary behavior, such as speech production. Due to its state-dependent modulation of neural firing, dopaminergic neurotransmission plays a key role in the organization of functional brain circuits controlling speech and language and thus has been incorporated in our neural population model. A rigorous mathematical proof establishing existence and uniqueness of solutions to the proposed model as well as a computationally efficient strategy to numerically approximate these solutions are presented. Simulated brain activity during the resting state and sentence production was analyzed using functional network connectivity, and graph theoretical techniques were employed to highlight differences between the two conditions. We demonstrate that our model successfully reproduces characteristic changes seen in empirical data between the resting state and speech production, and dopaminergic neurotransmission evokes pronounced changes in modeled functional connectivity by acting on the underlying biological stochastic neural model. Specifically, model and data networks in both speech and rest conditions share task-specific network features: both the simulated and empirical functional connectivity networks show an increase in nodal influence and segregation in speech over the resting state. These commonalities confirm that dopamine is a key neuromodulator of the functional connectome of speech control. Based on reproducible characteristic aspects of empirical data, we suggest a number

  19. Transport in active systems crowded by obstacles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Mu-Jie; Schofield, Jeremy; Kapral, Raymond

    2017-02-01

    The reactive and diffusive dynamics of a single chemically powered Janus motor in a crowded medium of moving but passive obstacles is investigated using molecular simulation. It is found that the reaction rate of the catalytic motor reaction decreases in a crowded medium as the volume fraction of obstacles increases as a result of a reduction in the Smoluchowski diffusion-controlled reaction rate coefficient that contributes to the overall reaction rate. A continuum model is constructed and analyzed to interpret the dependence of the steady-state reaction rate observed in simulations on the volume fraction of obstacles in the system. The steady-state concentration fields of reactant and product are shown to be sensitive to the local structure of obstacles around the Janus motor. It is demonstrated that the active motor exhibits enhanced diffusive motion at long times with a diffusion constant that decreases as the volume fraction of crowding species increases. In addition, the dynamical properties of a passive tracer particle in a system containing many active Janus motors is studied to investigate how an active environment influences the transport of non-active species. The diffusivity of a passive tracer particle in an active medium is found to be enhanced in systems with forward-moving Janus motors due to the cooperative dynamics of these motors.

  20. Supporting Classroom Activities with the BSUL System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Hiroaki; Saito, Nobuji A.; Paredes J., Rosa G.; San Martin, Gerardo Ayala; Yano, Yoneo

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the integration of ubiquitous computing systems into classroom settings, in order to provide basic support for classrooms and field activities. We have developed web application components using Java technology and configured a classroom with wireless network access and a web camera for our purposes. In this classroom, the…

  1. Active fault detection in MIMO systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2014-01-01

    The focus in this paper is on active fault detection (AFD) for MIMO systems with parametric faults. The problem of design of auxiliary inputs with respect to detection of parametric faults is investigated. An analysis of the design of auxiliary inputs is given based on analytic transfer functions...

  2. Harpagoside attenuates MPTP/MPP⁺ induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration and movement disorder via elevating glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoyu; Xiong, Zhongkui; Zhang, Yongfang; Meng, Ya; Xu, Gang; Xia, Zhiming; Li, Jiamei; Zhang, Rui; Ke, Zunji; Xia, Zongqin; Hu, Yaer

    2012-03-01

    Parkinson's disease is a chronic neurodegenerative movement disorder characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. New therapeutic approaches aiming at delaying or reversing the neurodegenerative process are under active investigations. In this work, we found that harpagoside, an iridoid purified from the Chinese medicinal herb Scrophularia ningpoensis, could not only prevent but also rescue the dopaminergic neurodegeneration in MPTP/MPP(+) intoxication with promising efficacy. Firstly, in cultured mesencephalic neurons, harpagoside significantly attenuated the loss of TH-positive neuron numbers and the shortening of axonal length. Secondly, in a chronic MPTP mouse model, harpagoside dose-dependently improved the loco-motor ability (rotarod test), increased the TH-positive neuron numbers in the substantia nigra pars compacta (unbiased stereological counting) and increased the striatal DAT density ((125) I-FP-CIT autoradiography). Thirdly, harpagoside markedly elevated the GDNF mRNA and GDNF protein levels in MPTP/MPP(+) lesioned models. However, the protecting effect of harpagoside on the dopaminergic degeneration disappeared when the intrinsic GDNF action was blocked by either the Ret inhibitor PP1 or the neutralizing anti-GDNF antibody. Taken together, we conclude that harpagoside attenuates the dopaminergic neurodegeneration and movement disorder mainly through elevating glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor.

  3. Involvement of dopaminergic and cholinergic pathways in the induction of yawning and genital grooming by the aqueous extract of Saccharum officinarum L. (sugarcane) in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamberini, Maria T; Gamberini, Maria C; Nasello, Antonia G

    2015-01-01

    Yawning, associated with genital grooming, is a physiological response that may be used for elucidating the mechanism of action of drugs. Preliminary analysis showed that aqueous extract (AE) of Saccharum induced yawns in rats. So, we aimed to quantify these behavioral responses and investigate the pharmacological mechanisms involved in these actions. During 120 min, after AE administration, the yawns and the genital grooming were quantified at 10 min intervals. Since dopaminergic and cholinergic pathways are implied in these responses, AE were evaluated in the presence of haloperidol 0.5 mg/kg and atropine 2 mg/kg. AE 0.5 g/kg increased the yawns, effect that was blocked both by haloperidol and atropine. Genital grooming could only be stimulated by AE 0.5 g/kg when dopaminergic receptors were blocked by haloperidol. However, it was inhibited when atropine was previously administered. So, we demonstrated a central action of Saccharum and it was postulated that neural circuits with the participation of dopaminergic and cholinergic pathways are involved. The fact that AE is comprised of innumerous compounds could justify the extract's distinct responses. Also, we cannot disregard the presence of different neural circuits that count on the participation of dopaminergic and cholinergic pathways and could be activated by the same induction agent.

  4. Experimental strategy to identify genes susceptible to oxidative stress in nigral dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Myung S; Kawamata, Hibiki; Kim, Dae J; Chun, Hong S; Son, Jin H

    2004-06-01

    Neuropathological evidence from both human and experimental models of Parkinson's disease (PD) firmly supports a significant role for oxidative stress (OS) in the death of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in substantia nigra. Largely unknown are the genes underlying selective susceptibility of nigral DA neuron to OS and how they effect nigral DA cell death. The major barriers to high-throughput identification of candidate genes are the paucity of nigral DA neurons as well as the dilution effect of non-DA cells both in primary cultures and brain tissues. To overcome these barriers, we have developed a DA cell line model, SN4741, appropriate for cDNA microarray analysis. Candidate genes were selected from both the microarray analysis and the molecular implication of their pathological mechanisms (i.e., decreased mitochondrial complex I activity and proteasomal dysfunction) of PD. Subsequent secondary validation tests were devised to characterize genes including clone #45 that may underlie selective vulnerability of nigral DA neuron to OS.

  5. Control Systems Cyber Security Standards Support Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Evans

    2009-01-01

    The Department of Homeland Security’s Control Systems Security Program (CSSP) is working with industry to secure critical infrastructure sectors from cyber intrusions that could compromise control systems. This document describes CSSP’s current activities with industry organizations in developing cyber security standards for control systems. In addition, it summarizes the standards work being conducted by organizations within the sector and provides a brief listing of sector meetings and conferences that might be of interest for each sector. Control systems cyber security standards are part of a rapidly changing environment. The participation of CSSP in the development effort for these standards has provided consistency in the technical content of the standards while ensuring that information developed by CSSP is included.

  6. Peripheral neural activity recording and stimulation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, D; Carboni, C; Angius, G; Angotzi, G N; Barbaro, M; Raffo, L; Raspopovic, S; Navarro, X

    2011-08-01

    This paper presents a portable, embedded, microcontroller-based system for bidirectional communication (recording and stimulation) between an electrode, implanted in the peripheral nervous system, and a host computer. The device is able to record and digitize spontaneous and/or evoked neural activities and store them in data files on a PC. In addition, the system has the capability of providing electrical stimulation of peripheral nerves, injecting biphasic current pulses with programmable duration, intensity, and frequency. The recording system provides a highly selective band-pass filter from 800 Hz to 3 kHz, with a gain of 56 dB. The amplification range can be further extended to 96 dB with a variable gain amplifier. The proposed acquisition/stimulation circuitry has been successfully tested through in vivo measurements, implanting a tf-LIFE electrode in the sciatic nerve of a rat. Once implanted, the device showed an input referred noise of 0.83 μVrms, was capable of recording signals below 10 μ V, and generated muscle responses to injected stimuli. The results demonstrate the capability of processing and transmitting neural signals with very low distortion and with a power consumption lower than 1 W. A graphic, user-friendly interface has been developed to facilitate the configuration of the entire system, providing the possibility to activate stimulation and monitor recordings in real time.

  7. Toxic influence of chronic oral administration of paraquat on nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in C57BL/6 mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Jin-peng; ZHAO Yu-wu; SUN Xiao-jiang

    2009-01-01

    Background Paraquat (PQ; 1,1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridinium), a widely used herbicide, has been repeatedly suggested as a potential etiologic factor for the development of Parkinson's disease (PD), owing to its structural similarity to the known dopaminergic neurotoxicant 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). This study aimed to observe the influence of paraquat on nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in C57BL/6 mice. Methods A total of 24 male C57BL/6 mice were assigned randomly to 3 groups: control group (treated by saline), PQ treated group, and MPTP treated group. Mice in PQ treated group were taken orally with PQ (10 mg/kg) daily for four months. Locomotor activity was measured. Level of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites levels in the striatum were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with an electrochemical detector (HPLC-ECD), and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) positive neurons were detected by using immunohistochemistry. At the same time, the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX), and the content of malondialdehyde (MDA) in substantia nigra were measured by spectrophotometry, mRNA expression of dopamine transporter (DAT) in dopaminergic neurons of substantia nigra was also determined by reverse transcription (RT)-PCR technique. Results Locomotor activities were significantly impaired in the PQ treated group. Level of DA and its metabolites levels in the striatum were declined. The activities of SOD and GSH-PX were decreased, and the content of MDA was increased in PQ treated mice compared with that in control group. Numbers of TH positive neurons and the mRNA expression of DAT in substantia nigra of mice were also decreased after PQ taken orally for four months.

  8. Neurophysiological evidence of impaired self-monitoring in schizotypal personality disorder and its reversal by dopaminergic antagonism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mireia Rabella

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: These results indicate that SPD individuals show deficits in self-monitoring analogous to those in schizophrenia. These deficits can be evidenced by neurophysiological measures, suggest a dopaminergic imbalance, and can be reverted by dopaminergic antagonists.

  9. The Transcription Factor Orthodenticle Homeobox 2 Influences Axonal Projections and Vulnerability of Midbrain Dopaminergic Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Chee Yeun; Licznerski, Pawel; Alavian, Kambiz N.; Simeone, Antonio; Lin, Zhicheng; Martin, Eden; Vance, Jeffery; Isacson, Ole

    2010-01-01

    Two adjacent groups of midbrain dopaminergic neurons, A9 (substantia nigra pars compacta) and A10 (ventral tegmental area), have distinct projections and exhibit differential vulnerability in Parkinson's disease. Little is known about transcription factors that influence midbrain dopaminergic subgroup phenotypes or their potential role in disease.…

  10. Ascending Midbrain Dopaminergic Axons Require Descending GAD65 Axon Fascicles for Normal Pathfinding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Marcela Garcia-Peña

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Nigrostriatal pathway (NSP is formed by dopaminergic axons that project from the ventral midbrain to the dorsolateral striatum as part of the medial forebrain bundle. Previous studies have implicated chemotropic proteins in the formation of the NSP during development but little is known of the role of substrate-anchored signals in this process. We observed in mouse and rat embryos that midbrain dopaminergic axons ascend in close apposition to descending GAD65-positive axon bundles throughout their trajectory to the striatum. To test whether such interaction is important for dopaminergic axon pathfinding, we analyzed transgenic mouse embryos in which the GAD65 axon bundle was reduced by the conditional expression of the diphtheria toxin. In these embryos we observed dopaminergic misprojection into the hypothalamic region and abnormal projection in the striatum. In addition, analysis of Robo1/2 and Slit1/2 knockout embryos revealed that the previously described dopaminergic misprojection in these embryos is accompanied by severe alterations in the GAD65 axon scaffold. Additional studies with cultured dopaminergic neurons and whole embryos suggest that NCAM and Robo proteins are involved in the interaction of GAD65 and dopaminergic axons. These results indicate that the fasciculation between descending GAD65 axon bundles and ascending dopaminergic axons is required for the stereotypical NSP formation during brain development and that known guidance cues may determine this projection indirectly by instructing the pathfinding of the axons that are part of the GAD65 axon scaffold.

  11. An effective inducer of dopaminergic neuron-like differentiation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenyu Fu; Cui Lv; Wenxin Zhuang; Dandan Chen; E Lv; Fengjie Li; Xiaocui Wang

    2013-01-01

    Rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were cultured and passaged in vitro. After induction with basic fibroblast growth factor for 24 hours, passage 3 bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells were additionally induced into dopaminergic neurons using three different combinations with basic fibroblast growth factor as follows: 20% Xiangdan injection; all-trans retinoic acid + glial-derived neurotrophic factor; or sonic hedgehog + fibroblast growth factor 8. Results suggest that the bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells showed typical neuronal morphological characteristics after induction. In particular, after treatment with sonic hedgehog + fibroblast growth factor 8, the expressions of nestin, neuron-specific enolase, microtubuleassociated protein 2, tyrosine hydroxylase and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 in cells were significantly increased. Moreover, the levels of catecholamines in the culture supernatant were significantly increased. These findings indicate that Xiangdan injection, all-trans retinoic acid + glial-derived neurotrophic factor, and sonic hedgehog + fibroblast growth factor 8 can all induce dopaminergic neuronal differentiation from bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. In particular, the efficiency of sonic hedgehog + fibroblast growth factor 8 was highest.

  12. Wireless system for seismic activity monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Безвесільна, Олена Миколаївна; Козько, Констянтин Сергійович

    2014-01-01

    The article examines the concepts and principles of sensor networks operations, especially the one that is used to monitor seismic activity and potential natural disasters. It also describes the operating principle of the geographically distributed wireless system, represented by block diagrams of typical sensor nodes and base station, as well as constructive electrical circuit sensor node and the frequency generator radio transmissions the base station and sensor nodes, we formulate to calcu...

  13. Parasympathetic nervous system activity and children's sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sheikh, Mona; Erath, Stephen A; Bagley, Erika J

    2013-06-01

    We examined indices of children's parasympathetic nervous system activity (PNS), including respiratory sinus arrhythmia during baseline (RSAB) and RSA reactivity (RSAR), to a laboratory challenge, and importantly the interaction between RSAB and RSAR as predictors of multiple parameters of children's sleep. Lower RSAR denotes increased vagal withdrawal (reductions in RSA between baseline and task) and higher RSAR represents decreased vagal withdrawal or augmentation (increases in RSA between baseline and task). A community sample of school-attending children (121 boys and 103 girls) participated [mean age = 10.41 years; standard deviation (SD) = 0.67]. Children's sleep parameters were examined through actigraphy for 7 consecutive nights. Findings demonstrate that RSAB and RSAR interact to predict multiple sleep quality parameters (activity, minutes awake after sleep onset and long wake episodes). The overall pattern of effects illustrates that children who exhibit more disrupted sleep (increased activity, more minutes awake after sleep onset and more frequent long wake episodes) are those with lower RSAB in conjunction with lower RSAR. This combination of low RSAB and low RSAR probably reflects increased autonomic nervous system arousal, which interferes with sleep. Results illustrate the importance of individual differences in physiological regulation indexed by interactions between PNS baseline activity and PNS reactivity for a better understanding of children's sleep quality.

  14. Lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) is a partial agonist of D2 dopaminergic receptors and it potentiates dopamine-mediated prolactin secretion in lactotrophs in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomelli, S; Palmery, M; Romanelli, L; Cheng, C Y; Silvestrini, B

    1998-01-01

    The hallucinogenic effects of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) have mainly been attributed to the interaction of this drug with the serotoninergic system, but it seems more likely that they are the result of the complex interactions of the drug with both the serotoninergic and dopaminergic systems. The aim of the present study was to investigate the functional actions of LSD at dopaminergic receptors using prolactin secretion by primary cultures of rat pituitary cells as a model. LSD produced a dose-dependent inhibition of prolactin secretion in vitro with an IC50 at 1.7x10(-9) M. This action was antagonized by spiperone but not by SKF83566 or cyproheptadine, which indicates that LSD has a specific effect on D2 dopaminergic receptors. The maximum inhibition of prolactin secretion achieved by LSD was lower than that by dopamine (60% versus 80%). Moreover, the fact that LSD at 10(-8)-10(-6) M antagonized the inhibitory effect of dopamine (10(-7) M) and bromocriptine (10(-11) M) suggests that LSD acts as a partial agonist at D2 receptors on lactotrophs in vitro. Interestingly, LSD at 10(-13)-10(-10) M, the concentrations which are 10-1000-fold lower than those required to induce direct inhibition on pituitary prolactin secretion, potentiated the dopamine (10(-10)-2.5x10(-9) M)-mediated prolactin secretion by pituitary cells in vitro. These results suggest that LSD not only interacts with dopaminergic receptors but also has a unique capacity for modulating dopaminergic transmission. These findings may offer new insights into the hallucinogenic effect of LSD.

  15. CPB-K mice a mouse model of schizophrenia? Differences in dopaminergic, serotonergic and behavioral markers compared to BALB/cJ mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panther, P; Nullmeier, S; Dobrowolny, H; Schwegler, H; Wolf, R

    2012-04-21

    Schizophrenia is characterized by disturbances in social behavior, sensorimotor gating and cognitive function, that are discussed to be caused by a termination of different transmitter systems. Beside morphological alterations in cortical and subcortical areas reduced AMPA- NMDA-, 5-HT2-receptor densities and increased 5-HT1-receptor densities are found in the hippocampus.The two inbred mouse strains CPB-K and BALB/cJ are known to display considerable differences in cognitive function and prepulse inhibition, a stable marker of sensorimotor gating. Furthermore, CPB-K mice exhibit lower NMDA-, AMPA- and increased 5-HT-receptor densities in the hippocampus as compared to BALB/cJ mice. We investigated both mouse strains in social interaction test for differences in social behavior and with immuncytochemical approaches for alterations of dopaminergic and serotonergic parameters. Our results can be summarized as follows: compared to BALB/cJ, CPB-K mice showed:(1) significantly reduced traveling distance and number of contacts in social interaction test, (2) differences in the number of serotonin transporter-immunoreactive neurons and volume of raphe nuclei and a lower serotonergic fiber density in the ventral and dorsal hippocampal subfields CA1 and CA3, (3) no alterations of dopaminergic markers like neuron number, neuron density and volume in subregions of substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area, but a significantly higher dopaminergic fiber density in the dorsal hippocampus, the ventral hippocampus of CA1 and gyrus dentatus, (4) no significant differences in serotonergic and dopaminergic fiber densities in the amygdala.Based on our results and previous studies, CPB-K mice compared to BALB/cJ may serve as an important model to understand the interaction of the serotonergic and dopaminergic system and their impact on sensorimotor gating and cognitive function as related to neuropsychiatric disorders like schizophrenia.

  16. Light and immune systems: activation of immunological activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zheng; Liu, Hong; Chen, Wei R.

    2006-02-01

    Light has been used to treat diseases for hundreds of years. Convenient and powerful light sources such as lasers make photomedicine a major branch in diseases treatment and detection. Originally, light was often used for local treatment, using photomechanical, photochemical, photothermal reactions and photomodulation as the major mechanisms. More and more investigators have become interested in the systemic effects of light, particularly in its effects on immune systems. Much work has been done to activate and/or enhance the host immune system to combat cancer, either using light as a direct tool or as an adjuvant method. Light has long been used for assisting disease detection and diagnosis. Advances in light technology have made photo-diagnostics ever more precise spatially and temporally. Many techniques facilitate observation of bio-molecule interactions and other biological processes at the cellular level, hence providing opportunities to detect and monitor immune activities. This manuscript will review recent photo-immunological research in treatment of cancer. The recent development of combination therapies involving lasers will be presented. Specifically, the results of cancer treatment using laser photothermal interaction, either with or without additional immunological stimulation will be discussed. The immunological effects of photodynamic therapy (PDT), and of its combination with immunotherapy in cancer treatment will also be discussed. Much interest has been recently concentrated in the immunological responses after laser treatment. Such responses at cellular and molecular levels will be discussed. The effect of these treatment modalities on the distant metastases also showed promise of light induced antitumor immunity. The combination therapy and induced immunological responses appear to be the key for long-term control of tumors.

  17. Processing abstract language modulates motor system activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenberg, Arthur M; Sato, Marc; Cattaneo, Luigi; Riggio, Lucia; Palumbo, Daniele; Buccino, Giovanni

    2008-06-01

    Embodiment theory proposes that neural systems for perception and action are also engaged during language comprehension. Previous neuroimaging and neurophysiological studies have only been able to demonstrate modulation of action systems during comprehension of concrete language. We provide neurophysiological evidence for modulation of motor system activity during the comprehension of both concrete and abstract language. In Experiment 1, when the described direction of object transfer or information transfer (e.g., away from the reader to another) matched the literal direction of a hand movement used to make a response, speed of responding was faster than when the two directions mismatched (an action-sentence compatibility effect). In Experiment 2, we used single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation to study changes in the corticospinal motor pathways to hand muscles while reading the same sentences. Relative to sentences that do not describe transfer, there is greater modulation of activity in the hand muscles when reading sentences describing transfer of both concrete objects and abstract information. These findings are discussed in relation to the human mirror neuron system.

  18. Cognitive judgment bias interacts with risk based decision making and sensitivity to dopaminergic challenge in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Drozd

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Although cognitive theory has implicated judgement bias in various psychopathologies, its role in decision making under risk remains relatively unexplored. In the present study we assessed the effects of cognitive judgment bias on risky choices in rats. First, we trained and tested the animals on the rat version of the probability-discounting task. During discrete trials, the rats chose between two levers; a press on the ‘small/certain’ lever always resulted in the delivery of one reward pellet, whereas a press on the ‘large/risky’ lever resulted in the delivery of four pellets. However, the probability of receiving a reward from the ‘large/risky’ lever gradually decreased over the four trial blocks. Subsequently, the rats were re-trained and evaluated on a series of ambiguous-cue interpretation tests, which permitted their classification according to the display of ‘optimistic’ or ‘pessimistic’ traits. Because dopamine has been implicated in both: risky choices and optimism, in the last experiment, we compared the reactivity of the dopaminergic system in the ‘optimistic’ and ‘pessimistic’ animals using the apomorphine (2mg/kg s.c. sensitivity test. We demonstrated that as risk increased, the proportion of risky lever choices decreased significantly slower in ‘optimists’ compared with ‘pessimists’ and that these differences between the two groups of rats were associated with different levels of dopaminergic system reactivity. Our findings suggest that cognitive judgement bias, risky decision-making and dopamine are linked, and they provide a foundation for further investigation of the behavioural traits and cognitive processes that influence risky choices in animal models.

  19. Content Analysis in Systems Engineering Acquisition Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-30

    qÜáêíÉÉåíÜ=^ååì~ä= ^Åèìáëáíáçå=oÉëÉ~êÅÜ= póãéçëáìã= tÉÇåÉëÇ~ó=pÉëëáçåë= sçäìãÉ=f= = Content Analysis in Systems Engineering Acquisition Activities Karen...Ü~åÖÉ= - 47 - Panel 3. Systems Engineering : New Thinking for a New Age Wednesday, May 4, 2016 11:15 a.m. – 12:45 p.m. Chair: John D. Burrow...Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Research, Development, Test, & Evaluation (DASN RDT&E) Rethinking the Systems Engineering Process in Light

  20. Th17 Cells Induce Dopaminergic Neuronal Death via LFA-1/ICAM-1 Interaction in a Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhan; Huang, Yan; Cao, Bei-Bei; Qiu, Yi-Hua; Peng, Yu-Ping

    2016-11-14

    T helper (Th)17 cells, a subset of CD4(+) T lymphocytes, have strong pro-inflammatory property and appear to be essential in the pathogenesis of many inflammatory diseases. However, the involvement of Th17 cells in Parkinson's disease (PD) that is characterized by a progressive degeneration of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons in the nigrostriatal system is unclear. Here, we aimed to demonstrate that Th17 cells infiltrate into the brain parenchyma and induce neuroinflammation and DAergic neuronal death in 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)- or 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+))-induced PD models. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption in the substantia nigra (SN) was assessed by the signal of FITC-labeled albumin that was injected into blood circulation via the ascending aorta. Live cell imaging system was used to observe a direct contact of Th17 cells with neurons by staining these cells using the two adhesion molecules, leukocyte function-associated antigen (LFA)-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, respectively. Th17 cells invaded into the SN where BBB was disrupted in MPTP-induced PD mice. Th17 cells exacerbated DAergic neuronal loss and pro-inflammatory/neurotrophic factor disorders in MPP(+)-treated ventral mesencephalic (VM) cell cultures. A direct contact of LFA-1-stained Th17 cells with ICAM-1-stained VM neurons was dynamically captured. Either blocking LFA-1 in Th17 cells or blocking ICAM-1 in VM neurons with neutralizing antibodies abolished Th17-induced DAergic neuronal death. These results establish that Th17 cells infiltrate into the brain parenchyma of PD mice through lesioned BBB and exert neurotoxic property by promoting glial activation and importantly by a direct damage to neurons depending on LFA-1/ICAM-1 interaction.

  1. The synchronous active neutron detection assay system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickrell, M.M.; Kendall, P.K.

    1994-08-01

    We have begun to develop a novel technique for active neutron assay of fissile material in spent nuclear fuel. This approach will exploit a 14-MeV neutron generator developed by Schlumberger. The technique, termed synchronous active neutron detection (SAND), follows a method used routinely in other branches of physics to detect very small signals in presence of large backgrounds. Synchronous detection instruments are widely available commercially and are termed ``lock-in`` amplifiers. We have implemented a digital lock-in amplifier in conjunction with the Schlumberger neutron generator to explore the possibility of synchronous detection with active neutrons. The Schlumberger system can operate at up to a 50% duty factor, in effect, a square wave of neutron yield. Results are preliminary but promising. The system is capable of resolving the fissile material contained in a small fraction of the fuel rods in a cold fuel assembly; it also appears resilient to background neutron interference. The interrogating neutrons appear to be non-thermal and penetrating. Work remains to fully explore relevant physics and optimize instrument design.

  2. Cardiac autonomic nervous system activity in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liatis, Stavros; Tentolouris, Nikolaos; Katsilambros, Nikolaos

    2004-08-01

    The development of obesity is caused by a disturbance of energy balance, with energy intake exceeding energy expenditure. As the autonomic nervous system (ANS) has a role in the regulation of both these variables, it has become a major focus of investigation in the fields of obesity pathogenesis. The enhanced cardiac sympathetic drive shown in most of the studies in obese persons might be due to an increase in their levels of circulating insulin. The role of leptin needs further investigation with studies in humans. There is a blunted response of the cardiac sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity in obese subjects after consumption of a carbohydrate-rich meal as well as after insulin administration. This might be due to insulin resistance. It is speculated that increased SNS activity in obesity may contribute to the development of hypertension in genetically susceptible individuals. It is also speculated that the increase in cardiac SNS activity under fasting conditions in obesity may be associated with high cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.

  3. LSST active optics system software architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sandrine J.; Chandrasekharan, Srinivasan; Lotz, Paul; Xin, Bo; Claver, Charles; Angeli, George; Sebag, Jacques; Dubois-Felsmann, Gregory P.

    2016-08-01

    The Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) is an 8-meter class wide-field telescope now under construction on Cerro Pachon, near La Serena, Chile. This ground-based telescope is designed to conduct a decade-long time domain survey of the optical sky. In order to achieve the LSST scientific goals, the telescope requires delivering seeing limited image quality over the 3.5 degree field-of-view. Like many telescopes, LSST will use an Active Optics System (AOS) to correct in near real-time the system aberrations primarily introduced by gravity and temperature gradients. The LSST AOS uses a combination of 4 curvature wavefront sensors (CWS) located on the outside of the LSST field-of-view. The information coming from the 4 CWS is combined to calculate the appropriate corrections to be sent to the 3 different mirrors composing LSST. The AOS software incorporates a wavefront sensor estimation pipeline (WEP) and an active optics control system (AOCS). The WEP estimates the wavefront residual error from the CWS images. The AOCS determines the correction to be sent to the different degrees of freedom every 30 seconds. In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of the AOS. More particularly, we will focus on the software architecture as well as the AOS interactions with the various subsystems within LSST.

  4. Scuba diving activates vascular antioxidant system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureda, A; Batle, J M; Ferrer, M D; Mestre-Alfaro, A; Tur, J A; Pons, A

    2012-07-01

    The aim was to study the effects of scuba diving immersion on plasma antioxidant defenses, nitric oxide production, endothelin-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor levels. 9 male divers performed an immersion at 50 m depth for a total time of 35 min. Blood samples were obtained before diving at rest, immediately after diving, and 3 h after the diving session. Leukocyte counts, plasma 8oxoHG, malondialdehyde and nitrite levels significantly increased after recovery. Activities of lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, catalase and superoxide significantly increased immediately after diving and these activities remained high after recovery. Plasma myeloperoxidase activity and protein levels and extracellular superoxide dismutase protein levels increased after 3 h. Endothelin-1 concentration significantly decreased after diving and after recovery. Vascular endothelial growth factor concentration significantly increased after diving when compared to pre-diving values, returning to initial values after recovery. Scuba diving at great depth activated the plasma antioxidant system against the oxidative stress induced by elevated pO₂ oxygen associated with hyperbaria. The decrease in endothelin-1 levels and the increase in nitric oxide synthesis could be factors that contribute to post-diving vasodilation. Diving increases vascular endothelial growth factor plasma levels which can contribute to the stimulation of tissue resistance to diving-derived oxidative damage.

  5. Alpha-synuclein cell-to-cell transfer and seeding in grafted dopaminergic neurons in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie Angot

    Full Text Available Several people with Parkinson's disease have been treated with intrastriatal grafts of fetal dopaminergic neurons. Following autopsy, 10-22 years after surgery, some of the grafted neurons contained Lewy bodies similar to those observed in the host brain. Numerous studies have attempted to explain these findings in cell and animal models. In cell culture, α-synuclein has been found to transfer from one cell to another, via mechanisms that include exosomal transport and endocytosis, and in certain cases seed aggregation in the recipient cell. In animal models, transfer of α-synuclein from host brain cells to grafted neurons has been shown, but the reported frequency of the event has been relatively low and little is known about the underlying mechanisms as well as the fate of the transferred α-synuclein. We now demonstrate frequent transfer of α-synuclein from a rat brain engineered to overexpress human α-synuclein to grafted dopaminergic neurons. Further, we show that this model can be used to explore mechanisms underlying cell-to-cell transfer of α-synuclein. Thus, we present evidence both for the involvement of endocytosis in α-synuclein uptake in vivo, and for seeding of aggregation of endogenous α-synuclein in the recipient neuron by the transferred α-synuclein. Finally, we show that, at least in a subset of the studied cells, the transmitted α-synuclein is sensitive to proteinase K. Our new model system could be used to test compounds that inhibit cell-to-cell transfer of α-synuclein and therefore might retard progression of Parkinson neuropathology.

  6. LDEF active optical system components experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, M. D.

    1992-01-01

    A preliminary report on the Active Optical System Components Experiment is presented. This experiment contained 136 components in a six inch deep tray including lasers, infrared detectors and arrays, ultraviolet light detectors, light-emitting diodes, a light modulator, flash lamps, optical filters, glasses, and samples of surface finishes. Thermal, mechanical, and structural considerations leading to the design of the tray hardware are discussed. In general, changes in the retested component characteristics appear as much related to the passage of time as to the effects of the space environment, but organic materials, multilayer optical interference filters, and extreme-infrared reflectivity of black paints show unexpected changes.

  7. Active Sensor Configuration Validation for Refrigeration Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hovgaard, Tobias Gybel; Blanke, Mogens; Niemann, Hans Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Major faults in the commissioning phase of refrigeration systems are caused by defects related to sensors. With a number of similar sensors available that do not differ by type but only by spatial location in the plant, interchange of sensors is a common defect. With sensors being used quite...... differently by the control system, fault-finding is difficult in practice and defects are regularly causing commissioning delays at considerable expense. Validation and handling of faults in the sensor configuration are therefore essential to cut costs during commissioning. With passive fault......-diagnosis methods falling short on this problem, this paper suggests an active diagnosis procedure to isolate sensor faults at the commissioning stage, before normal operation has started. Using statistical methods, residuals are evaluated versus multiple hypothesis models in a minimization process to uniquely...

  8. Spontaneous Oscillations in an Active Matter System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Robert; Tsang, Boyce; Granick, Steve

    Active matter (which consumes energy to move about) can organize into dynamic structures more interesting than those possible at steady-state. Here we show spontaneous periodic self-assembly in a simple three-component system of water, oil phase, and surfactant at constant room temperature, with emphasis on one model system. Benchtop experiments show that liquid crystal oil droplets spontaneously and collectively oscillate like a `beating heart' for several hours; contract, relax, and subsequently re-contract in a petri dish at a rate of a few `beats' per minute. These oscillations, emergent from the cooperative interaction of the three components, are driven by the competition between positive and negative feedback processes. This illustration of feedback in action reveals a new way to program self-assembled structures to vary with time.

  9. Dopaminergic neuron-specific deletion of p53 gene is neuroprotective in an experimental Parkinson's disease model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xin; Davis, Brandon; Chiang, Yung-Hsiao; Filichia, Emily; Barnett, Austin; Greig, Nigel H; Hoffer, Barry; Luo, Yu

    2016-09-01

    p53, a stress response gene, is involved in diverse cell death pathways and its activation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, whether the neuronal p53 protein plays a direct role in regulating dopaminergic (DA) neuronal cell death is unknown. In this study, in contrast to the global inhibition of p53 function by pharmacological inhibitors and in traditional p53 knock-out (KO) mice, we examined the effect of DA specific p53 gene deletion in DAT-p53KO mice. These DAT-p53KO mice did not exhibit apparent changes in the general structure and neuronal density of DA neurons during late development and in aging. However, in DA-p53KO mice treated with the neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP), we found that the induction of Bax and p53 up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) mRNA and protein levels by MPTP were diminished in both striatum and substantia nigra of these mice. Notably, deletion of the p53 gene in DA neurons significantly reduced dopaminergic neuronal loss in substantia nigra, dopaminergic neuronal terminal loss at striatum and, additionally, decreased motor deficits in mice challenged with MPTP. In contrast, there was no difference in astrogliosis between WT and DAT-p53KO mice in response to MPTP treatment. These findings demonstrate a specific contribution of p53 activation in DA neuronal cell death by MPTP challenge. Our results further support the role of programmed cell death mediated by p53 in this animal model of PD and identify Bax, BAD and PUMA genes as downstream targets of p53 in modulating DA neuronal death in the in vivo MPTP-induced PD model. We deleted p53 gene in dopaminergic neurons in late developmental stages and found that DA specific p53 deletion is protective in acute MPTP animal model possibly through blocking MPTP-induced BAX and PUMA up-regulation. Astrocyte activation measured by GFAP positive cells and GFAP gene up-regulation in the striatum shows no difference

  10. A Case of Painless Legs and Moving Toes Syndrome in Parkinson’s Disease Responsive to Dopaminergic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumihiro Kawajiri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Painless Legs and Moving Toes Syndrome (PoLMT is a rare movement disorder characterized by flexion, extension, abduction, adduction, and torsion of toes without pain. It is considered a variant of Painful Legs and Moving Toes Syndrome (PLMT, which is characterized by similar movements but with pain. Although neuropathy and several central nervous system (CNS involvements have been reported to be associated with PoLMT, the actual cause and mechanism remain unclear. Here we describe the first case of PoLMT in Parkinson’s Disease (PD, parallel to parkinsonism in severity, who demonstrated a good response to dopaminergic therapy.

  11. Dopaminergic control of cognitive flexibility in humans and animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne eKlanker

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Striatal dopamine is thought to code for learned associations between cues and reinforcers and to mediate approach behavior towards a reward. Less is known about the contribution of dopamine to cognitive flexibility – the ability to adapt behavior in response to changes in the environment. Altered reward processing and impairments in cognitive flexibility are observed in psychiatric disorders such as obsessive compulsive disorder. Patients with this disorder show a disruption of functioning in the frontostriatal circuit and alterations in dopamine signaling. In this review we summarize findings from animal and human studies that have investigated the involvement of striatal dopamine in cognitive flexibility. These findings may provide a better understanding of the role of dopaminergic dysfunction in cognitive inflexibility in psychiatric disorders, such as OCD.

  12. Oxygen Tension Within the Neurogenic Niche Regulates Dopaminergic Neurogenesis in the Developing Midbrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenführ, Lisa; Meyer, Anne Karen; Marrone, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Oxygen tension is an important factor controlling stem cell proliferation and maintenance in various stem cell populations with a particular relevance in midbrain dopaminergic progenitors. Further studies have shown that the oxygen-dependent transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) is involved in these processes. However, all available studies on oxygen effects in dopaminergic neuroprogenitors were performed in vitro and thus it remains unclear whether tissue oxygen tension in the embryonic midbrain is also relevant for the regulation of dopaminergic neurogenesis in vivo. We thus dissect here the effects of oxygen tension in combination with HIF-1α conditional knockout on dopaminergic neurogenesis by using a novel experimental design allowing for the control of oxygen tension within the microenvironment of the neurogenic niche of the murine fetal midbrain in vivo. The microenvironment of the midbrain dopaminergic neurogenic niche was detected as hypoxic with oxygen tensions below 1.1%. Maternal oxygen treatment of 10%, 21%, and 75% atmospheric oxygen tension for 48 h translates into robust changes in fetal midbrain oxygenation. Fetal midbrain hypoxia hampered the generation of dopaminergic neurons and is accompanied with restricted fetal midbrain development. In contrast, induced hyperoxia stimulated proliferation and differentiation of dopaminergic progenitors during early and late embryogenesis. Oxygen effects were not directly mediated through HIF-1α signaling. These data—in agreement with in vitro data—indicate that oxygen is a crucial regulator of developmental dopaminergic neurogenesis. Our study provides the initial framework for future studies on molecular mechanisms mediating oxygen regulation of dopaminergic neurogenesis within the fetal midbrain as its natural environment. PMID:26577812

  13. Gene expression profiling of embryonic human neural stem cells and dopaminergic neurons from adult human substantia nigra.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany E S Marei

    Full Text Available Neural stem cells (NSC with self-renewal and multipotent properties serve as an ideal cell source for transplantation to treat neurodegenerative insults such as Parkinson's disease. We used Agilent's and Illumina Whole Human Genome Oligonucleotide Microarray to compare the genomic profiles of human embryonic NSC at a single time point in culture, and a multicellular tissue from postmortem adult substantia nigra (SN which are rich in dopaminergic (DA neurons. We identified 13525 up-regulated genes in both cell types of which 3737 (27.6% genes were up-regulated in the hENSC, 4116 (30.4% genes were up-regulated in the human substantia nigra dopaminergic cells, and 5672 (41.93% were significantly up-regulated in both cell population. Careful analysis of the data that emerged using DAVID has permitted us to distinguish several genes and pathways that are involved in dopaminergic (DA differentiation, and to identify the crucial signaling pathways that direct the process of differentiation. The set of genes expressed more highly at hENSC is enriched in molecules known or predicted to be involved in the M phase of the mitotic cell cycle. On the other hand, the genes enriched in SN cells include a different set of functional categories, namely synaptic transmission, central nervous system development, structural constituents of the myelin sheath, the internode region of axons, myelination, cell projection, cell somata, ion transport, and the voltage-gated ion channel complex. Our results were also compared with data from various databases, and between different types of arrays, Agilent versus Illumina. This approach has allowed us to confirm the consistency of our obtained results for a large number of genes that delineate the phenotypical differences of embryonic NSCs, and SN cells.

  14. The Effects of Age, from Young to Middle Adulthood, and Gender on Resting State Functional Connectivity of the Dopaminergic Midbrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Andrew C.; Zhang, Sheng; Hu, Sien; Chao, Herta H.; Li, Chiang-shan R.

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunction of the dopaminergic ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) is implicated in psychiatric disorders including attention-deficit/ hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), addiction, schizophrenia and movement disorders such as Parkinson’s disease (PD). Although the prevalence of these disorders varies by age and sex, the underlying neural mechanism is not well understood. The objective of this study was to delineate the distinct resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) of the VTA and SNc and examine the effects of age, from young to middle-adulthood, and sex on the rsFC of these two dopaminergic structures in a data set of 250 healthy adults (18–49 years of age, 104 men). Using blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) signals, we correlated the time course of the VTA and SNc to the time courses of all other brain voxels. At a corrected threshold, paired t-test showed stronger VTA connectivity to bilateral angular gyrus and superior/middle and orbital frontal regions and stronger SNc connectivity to the insula, thalamus, parahippocampal gyrus (PHG) and amygdala. Compared to women, men showed a stronger VTA/SNc connectivity to the left posterior orbital gyrus. In linear regressions, men but not women showed age-related changes in VTA/SNc connectivity to a number of cortical and cerebellar regions. Supporting shared but also distinct cerebral rsFC of the VTA and SNc and gender differences in age-related changes from young and middle adulthood in VTA/SNc connectivity, these new findings help advance our understanding of the neural bases of many neuropsychiatric illnesses that implicate the dopaminergic systems. PMID:28223929

  15. Activity systems in the inquiry classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wortham, Donald William

    Inquiry science, as called for by reform-minded organizations such as the National Research Council (1996), offers a platform with the potential for introducing all students to the practice of science while maintaining focus on key concepts and theories. This project followed two small groups as they completed an inquiry unit on genetics at a Midwestern high school. I investigated whether levels of student-to-teacher, student-to-student, student-apparatus, and student-concept connections were approximately equal across all students in each of the two groups. I found differences among students in levels of student-to-teacher, student-to-student, and student-concept connections. From a situated idiopathic perspective, these differences may indicate different levels of opportunity-to-learn. At a more abstract (nomothetic) level, these differences may be due to emergent divisions of labor (roles) within the two groups. From the perspective of Activity Theory (Leont'ev, 1978; Engestrom, 1987), roles serve as important mediators that simultaneously allow the social unit to accomplish its objectives, while shaping the development of participants. I describe three roles that capture modes of participation for students interacting in the small groups, and that may contribute to what Engestrom (2001) calls subject-producing activity systems: networked contributor, social member, and isolate. This paper also describes tools for teachers and researchers to use in identifying levels of mediation and roles as they occur in small groups.

  16. 偏侧帕金森大鼠模型各个发病时期多巴胺能系统的动态监测%The unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine lesion rats' dynamic supervision about the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system in various stages of its pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曹非; 陈涵; 张潇潇; 孙圣刚

    2012-01-01

    Objective To dynamically supervise the changes of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic system of rats with unilateral 6-hydroxydopamine(6-OHDA) lesion in various stages of its pathogenesis and to find out the rules of the changes ,and to build up a model of treatment for the further research. Methods The unilateral lesioned rat models of Parkinsons Disease with 6-0HDA were treated with levodopa for 14 days after the successful models were made. Each 7 days during the course, we measure the behavioral rotations, count the numbers of the tyrosine hydroxylase(TH)positive cells ,the dopamine(DA) contents, and make the Nissle stain. Results At the first and the second time points, the concentration of DA collapsed by 16.7% and 80% , the numbers of TH positive cells decreased by 47. 97% and 93. 28% , besides the Nissl's bodies were cut by 31. 4% and 46. 4% . After the treatment with low dose of levodopa, the rotational behaviour and the number of the TH positive cells and the Nissl's bodies didn t change obviously. Only the concentration of DA increased to 58. 3% of that of the control group . Conclusion These items all positively related to each other during the pathogenesis. The low-dose administration of levodopa for a short time only had some effect on the ascending of the concentration of dopamine for in advanced Parkinsons disease.%目的 动态监测帕金森大鼠不同发病阶段多巴胺能系统的改变,掌握其变化规律和各指标间的量化关系,为进一步实验提供动物治疗模型.方法 偏侧两点注射法制作帕金森病大鼠模型,模型成功两周后给予小剂量左旋多巴治疗一周.每周检测纹状体多巴胺(DA)含量,黑质酪氨酸羟化酶(TH)染色和尼氏染色,观察行为学改变.结果 一周后即发病的代偿期,行为学开始出现向健侧的旋转;两周后即失代偿期,旋转次数加重至最高峰.前两周多巴胺含量分别较正常对照侧减少16.7%和80%,TH阳性细胞分别下降47.97

  17. Irisflorentin improves α-synuclein accumulation and attenuates 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic neuron degeneration, implication for Parkinson’s disease therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yue-Mi; Liu, Shih-Ping; Lin, Hsin-Lien; Chan, Ming-Chia; Chen, Yen-Chuan; Huang, Yu-Ling; Tsai, Min-Chen; Fu, Ru-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that is characterized by progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta as well as motor impairment. Aggregation of α-synuclein in neuronal cells plays a key role in this disease. At present, therapeutics for PD provides moderate symptomatic benefits, but it is not able to delay the development of the disease. Current efforts toward the treatment of PD are to identify new drugs th...

  18. Lack of sensorial innervation in the newborn female rats affects the activity of hypothalamic monoaminergic system and steroid hormone secretion during puberty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quiróz, Ubaldo; Morales-Ledesma, Leticia; Morán, Carolina; Trujillo, Angélica; Domínguez, Roberto

    2014-06-01

    There is evidence that sensory innervation plays a role regulating ovarian functions, including fertility.Since sensory denervation by means of capsaicin in newborn female rats results in a lower response togonadotropins, the present study analyzed the effects that sensory denervation by means of capsaicin in neonatal rats has on the concentration of monoamines in the anterior(AH) and medium (MH) hypothalamus, and on steroid hormone levels in serum. Groups of newborn female rats were injected subcutaneously with capsaicin and killed at 10, 20, and 30 days of age and on the first vaginal estrous.The concentrations of noradrenaline, dopamine, serotonin(5-HT), and their metabolites in the AH and MH were measured using HPLC, and the levels of estradiol (E),progesterone (P), testosterone (T), FSH, and luteinizing hormone using radioimmunoanalysis. The results show thatat 20 days of age, capsaicin-treated rats have lowernoradrenergic and serotonergic activities in the AH, and that the dopaminergic activity was lower in the MH. These results suggest that the sensorial system connections within the monoaminergic systems of the AH and MH are different.Capsaicin-treated animals had lower T, E, and P levels than in the control group, suggesting that the lower activity in the AH monoaminergic system and lower hormonesecretion could be explained by the blockade of information mediated by the sensory innervation (probably substance P), mainly between the ovary and the AH.

  19. Coupling Neurogenetics (GARS™ and a Nutrigenomic Based Dopaminergic Agonist to Treat Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS: Targeting Polymorphic Reward Genes for Carbohydrate Addiction Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Blum

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Earlier work from our laboratory, showing anti-addiction activity of a nutraceutical consisting of amino-acid precursors and enkephalinase inhibition properties and our discovery of the first polymorphic gene (Dopamine D2 Receptor Gene [DRD2] to associate with severe alcoholism serves as a blue-print for the development of "Personalized Medicine" in addiction. Prior to the later genetic finding, we developed the concept of Brain Reward Cascade, which continues to act as an important component for stratification of addiction risk through neurogenetics. In 1996 our laboratory also coined the term "Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS" to define a common genetic rubric for both substance and non-substance related addictive behaviors. Following many reiterations we utilized polymorphic targets of a number of reward genes (serotonergic, Opioidergic, GABAergic and Dopaminergic to customize KB220 [Neuroadaptogen- amino-acid therapy (NAAT] by specific algorithms. Identifying 1,000 obese subjects in the Netherlands a subsequent small subset was administered various KB220Z formulae customized according to respective DNA polymorphisms individualized that translated to significant decreases in both Body Mass Index (BMI and weight in pounds. Following these experiments, we have been successfully developing a panel of genes known as "Genetic Addiction Risk Score" (GARSpDX™. Selection of 10 genes with appropriate variants, a statistically significant association between the ASIMedia Version-alcohol and drug severity scores and GARSpDx was found A variant of KB220Z in abstinent heroin addicts increased resting state functional connectivity in a putative network including: dorsal anterior cingulate, medial frontal gyrus, nucleus accumbens, posterior cingulate, occipital cortical areas, and cerebellum. In addition, we show that KB220Z significantly activates, above placebo, seed regions of interest including the left nucleus accumbens, cingulate gyrus, anterior

  20. Increased innervation of forebrain targets by midbrain dopaminergic neurons in the absence of FGF-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumpel, R; Baron, O; Ratzka, A; Schröder, M-L; Hohmann, M; Effenberg, A; Claus, P; Grothe, C

    2016-02-09

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) regulate development and maintenance, and reduce vulnerability of neurons. FGF-2 is essential for survival of midbrain dopaminergic (DA) neurons and is responsible for their dysplasia and disease-related degeneration. We previously reported that FGF-2 is involved in adequate forebrain (FB) target innervation by these neurons in an organotypic co-culture model. It remains unclear, how this ex-vivo phenotype relates to the in vivo situation, and which FGF-related signaling pathway is involved in this process. Here, we demonstrate that lack of FGF-2 results in an increased volume of the striatal target area in mice. We further add evidence that the low molecular weight (LMW) FGF-2 isoform is responsible for this phenotype, as this isoform is predominantly expressed in the embryonic ventral midbrain (VM) as well as in postnatal striatum (STR) and known to act via canonical transmembrane FGF receptor (FGFR) activation. Additionally, we confirm that the phenotype with an enlarged FB-target area by DA neurons can be mimicked in an ex-vivo explant model by inhibiting the canonical FGFR signaling, which resulted in decreased extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation, while AKT activation remained unchanged.

  1. Brief dopaminergic stimulations produce transient physiological changes in prefrontal pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Anna R; Zhou, Wen-Liang; Potapenko, Evgeniy S; Kim, Eun-Ji; Antic, Srdjan D

    2011-01-25

    In response to food reward and other pertinent events, midbrain dopaminergic neurons fire short bursts of action potentials causing a phasic release of dopamine in the prefrontal cortex (rapid and transient increases in cortical dopamine concentration). Here we apply short (2s) iontophoretic pulses of glutamate, GABA, dopamine and dopaminergic agonists locally, onto layer 5 pyramidal neurons in brain slices of the rat medial prefrontal cortex (PFC). Unlike glutamate and GABA, brief dopaminergic pulses had negligible effects on the resting membrane potential. However, dopamine altered action potential firing in an extremely rapid (iontophoresis current artifact. Our present data imply that one population of PFC pyramidal neurons receiving direct synaptic contacts from midbrain dopaminergic neurons would stall during the 0.5s of the phasic dopamine burst. The spillover dopamine, on the other hand, would act as a positive stimulator of cortical excitability (30% increase) to all D2-receptor carrying pyramidal cells, for the next 40s.

  2. No association between 12 dopaminergic genes and schizophrenia in a large Dutch sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, Mechteld L C; Bakker, Steven C; Schnack, Hugo G; Selten, Jean-Paul C; Otten, Henny G; Verduijn, Willem; van der Heijden, Frank M M A; Pearson, Peter L; Kahn, René S; Sinke, Richard J

    2005-01-01

    It has been suggested that genes involved in dopamine neurotransmission contribute to the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. However, reported associations of the disorder with genetic markers in dopaminergic genes have yielded inconsistent results. Possible explanations are differences in phenotyping,

  3. Effects of combined BDNF and GDNF treatment on cultured dopaminergic midbrain neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sautter, J; Meyer, Morten; Spenger, C

    1998-01-01

    Neural transplantation is an experimental therapy for Parkinson's disease. Pretreatment of fetal donor tissue with neurotrophic factors may improve survival of grafted dopaminergic neurons. Free-floating roller tube cultures of fetal rat ventral mesencephalon were treated with brain...

  4. Effect of acupuncture on 6-hydroxydopamine-induced nigrostratal dopaminergic neuronal cell death in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeung-Kee; Lim, Hyung-Ho; Song, Yun-Kyung; Lee, Hee-Hyuk; Lim, Sabina; Han, Seung-Moo; Kim, Chang-Ju

    In this study, we investigated the effect of acupuncture at the Zusanli acupoint (ST36) on the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuronal cell death in the rats with Parkinson's disease. Two weeks after unilateral injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) into the striatum, an apomorphine-induced rotational behavior test showed significant rotational asymmetry in the rats with Parkinson's disease. Immunostaining for tyrosine hydroxylase demonstrated a dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantia nigra and dopaminergic fiber loss in the striatum. Acupuncture at the ST36 for 14 days significantly inhibited rotational asymmetry in the rats with Parkinson's disease, and also protected against 6-OHDA-induced nigrostriatal dopaminergic neuronal loss. These effects of acupuncture were not observed for the non-acupoint (hip) acupuncture. The present study shows that acupuncture at the ST36 acupoint can be used as a useful strategy for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  5. Dopaminergic neurotransmission in ventral and dorsal striatum differentially modulates alcohol Reinforcement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelder, Marcia; Hesseling, Peter; Styles, Matthew; Baars, Annemarie M; Lozeman-van 't Klooster, José G; Lesscher, Heidi M B; Vanderschuren, Louk J M J

    2017-01-01

    Dopaminergic neurotransmission in the striatum has been widely implicated in the reinforcing properties of substances of abuse. However, the striatum is functionally heterogeneous, and previous work has mostly focused on psychostimulant drugs. Therefore, we investigated how dopamine within striatal

  6. Abnormal dopaminergic modulation of striato-cortical networks underlies levodopa-induced dyskinesias in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herz, Damian M.; Haagensen, Brian N.; Christensen, Mark S.

    2015-01-01

    Dopaminergic signalling in the striatum contributes to reinforcement of actions and motivational enhancement of motor vigour. Parkinson's disease leads to progressive dopaminergic denervation of the striatum, impairing the function of cortico-basal ganglia networks. While levodopa therapy......-cortical connectivity as a neural signature of levodopa-induced dyskinesias in humans. We argue that excessive striato-cortical connectivity in response to levodopa produces an aberrant reinforcement signal producing an abnormal motor drive that ultimately triggers involuntary movements....

  7. Drugs of abuse modulate dopaminergic neurotransmission : effects on exocytosis and neurotransmitter receptor function

    OpenAIRE

    Hondebrink, L.

    2011-01-01

    An extensive amount of literature is available on drugs of abuse. However, current knowledge on cellular and molecular mechanisms of actions is insufficient and hampers treatment of intoxicated patients. Drugs of abuse cause 100.000 hospital admissions yearly only in the US. Therefore, we investigated theeffects commonly used illicit drugs have on dopaminergic neurotransmission. Most tested drugs induced opposite effects, e.g., decreasing cholinergic input (possibly decreasing dopaminergic ou...

  8. Evidences for the involvement of monoaminergic and GABAergic systems in antidepressant-like activity of garlic extract in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhingra Dinesh

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The present study was undertaken to investigate the effect of the ethanolic extract of Allium sativum L. (Family: Lilliaceae, commonly known as garlic, on depression in mice. Materials and Methods: Ethanolic extract of garlic (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg was administered orally for 14 successive days to young Swiss albino mice of either sex and antidepressant-like activity was evaluated employing tail suspension test (TST and forced swim test (FST. The efficacy of the extract was compared with standard antidepressant drugs like fluoxetine and imipramine. The mechanism of action of the extract was investigated by co-administration of prazosin (α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, sulpiride (selective D2-receptor antagonist, baclofen (GABA B agonist and p-CPA (serotonin antagonist separately with the extract and by studying the effect of the extract on brain MAO-A and MAO-B levels. Results: Garlic extract (25, 50 and 100 mg/kg significantly decreased immobility time in a dose-dependent manner in both TST and FST, indicating significant antidepressant-like activity. The efficacy of the extract was found to be comparable to fluoxetine (20 mg/kg p.o. and imipramine (15 mg/kg p.o. in both TST and FST. The extract did not show any significant effect on the locomotor activity of the mice. Prazosin, sulpiride, baclofen and p-CPA significantly attenuated the extract-induced antidepressant-like effect in TST. Garlic extract (100 mg/kg administered orally for 14 successive days significantly decreased brain MAO-A and MAO-B levels, as compared to the control group. Conclusion: Garlic extract showed significant antidepressant-like activity probably by inhibiting MAO-A and MAO-B levels and through interaction with adrenergic, dopaminergic, serotonergic and GABAergic systems.

  9. Treadmill exercise alleviates nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers in rotenone-induced Parkinson rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Mal-Soon; Kim, Tae-Woon; Lee, Jae-Min; Ji, Eun-Sang; Lim, Baek-Vin

    2017-01-01

    Parkinson disease is one of the common brain diseases caused by dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantia nigra and dopaminergic fiber loss in the striatum. In the present study, the effects of treadmill exercise on motor performance, dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers, and α-synuclein expression in the nigrostriatum were evaluated using rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. For the induction of Parkinson rats, 3-mg/kg rotenone was injected, once a day for 14 consecutive days. Treadmill running was conducted for 30 min once a day during 14 consecutive days. Rota-rod test for motor balance and coordination and immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase and α-synuclein in the nigrostriatum were performed. In the present study, motor balance and coordination was disturbed by induction of rotenone-induced Parkinson disease, in contrast, treadmill exercise alleviated motor dysfunction in the rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. Nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers was occurred by induction of rotenone-induced Parkinson disease, in contrast, treadmill exercise alleviated nigrostriatal dopaminergic loss of neurons and fibers in the rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. α-Synuclein expression in the nigrostriatum was enhanced by induction of rotenone-induced Parkinson disease, in contrast, treadmill exercise suppressed α-synuclein expression in the rotenone-induced Parkinson rats. Treadmill exercise improved motor function through preservation of nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons and fibers and suppression of nigrostriatal formation of Lewy bodies in rotenone-induced Parkinson rats.

  10. Information Systems as Dialectic, Tool - Mediated Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Hasan

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Information Systems (IS draws its significance from the uniqueness of computer-based information and communications tools and their place in shaping recent human history. Advances in the field come from a better understanding of how to develop and use these tools and what impact they have on the way we work, and live. As IS is still an evolving field of study, two views, the objective and the subjective, are in constant tension and, though these may be considered complementary, it is rare that they come together as a unified whole. A more balanced, and integrated, foundation for IS may be found in the subject-object dialectic arising out of the German philosophical tradition. An extension of this approach from the Cultural-Historical Activity Theory is presented in this paper. This theory views all human endeavour as a purposeful, dynamic, dialectic relationship between subject and object, mediated by tools, such as technology and information, and by the social environment or community. An adaptation of this holistic theory, to incorporate the best of other theoretical approaches used by IS researchers, could span and integrate the breadth of the field IS providing it with unity and identity.

  11. Curcumin protects nigral dopaminergic neurons by iron-chelation in the 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of Parkinson's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-Xun Du; Hua-Min Xu; Hong Jiang; Ning Song; Jun Wang; Jun-Xia Xie

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] Curcumin is a plant polyphenolic compound and a major component of spice turmeric (Curcuma longa).It has been reported to possess free radical-scavenging,iron-chelating,and anti-inflammatory properties in different tissues.Our previous study showed that curcumin protects MES23.5 dopaminergic cells from 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-induced neurotoxicity in vitro.The present study aimed to explore this neuroprotective effect in the 6-OHDAlesioned rat model of Parkinson's disease in vivo.[Methods] Rats were given intragastric curcumin for 24 days.6-OHDA lesioning was conducted on day 4 of curcumin treatment.Dopamine content was assessed by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection,tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-containing neurons by immunohistochemistry,and iron-containing cells by Perls' iron staining.[Results] The dopamine content in the striatum and the number of THimmunoreactive neurons decreased after 6-OHDA treatment.Curcumin pretreatment reversed these changes.Further studies demonstrated that 6-OHDA treatment increased the number of iron-staining cells,which was dramatically decreased by curcumin pretreatment.[Conclusion]The protective effects of curcumin against 6-OHDA may be attributable to the ironchelating activity of curcumin to suppress the iron-induced degeneration of nigral dopaminergic neurons.

  12. Design, synthesis and preliminary evaluation of dopamine-amino acid conjugates as potential D1 dopaminergic modulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutone, Marco; Chinnici, Aurora; Almerico, Anna Maria; Perricone, Ugo; Sutera, Flavia Maria; De Caro, Viviana

    2016-11-29

    The dopamine-amino acid conjugate DA-Phen was firstly designed to obtain a useful prodrug for the therapy of Parkinson's disease, but experimental evidence shows that it effectively interacts with D1 dopamine receptors (D1DRs), leading to an enhancement in cognitive flexibility and to the development of adaptive strategies in aversive mazes, together with a decrease in despair-like behavior. In this paper, homology modelling, molecular dynamics, and site mapping of D1 receptor were carried out with the aim of further performing docking studies on other dopamine conjugates compared with D1 agonists, in the attempt to identify new compounds with potential dopaminergic activity. Two new conjugates (DA-Trp 2C, and DA-Leu 3C) have been identified as the most promising candidates, and consequently synthesized. Preliminary evaluation in terms of distribution coefficient (D(pH7.4)), stability in rat brain homogenate, and in human plasma confirmed that DA-Trp (2C), and DA-Leu (3C) could be considered as very valuable candidates for further in vivo studies as new dopaminergic drugs.

  13. Protective effects of quercetin on dieldrin-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis in dopaminergic neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Euteum; Chun, Hong Sung

    2016-10-19

    Dieldrin, an organochlorine pesticide still used in several developing countries, has been proposed as a risk factor for Parkinson's disease. Quercetin is one of the potent bioactive flavonoids present in numerous plants. In this study, we investigated the protective effects of quercetin on neurotoxicity induced by dieldrin in cultured dopaminergic SN4741 cells. Our initial experiments showed that quercetin (10-40 μM) dose dependently prevented dieldrin (20 μM)-induced cytotoxicity in SN4741 cells. Pretreatment for 1 h with quercetin before dieldrin application could significantly suppress dieldrin-induced apoptotic characteristics, including nuclear condensation, DNA fragmentation, and caspase-3/7 activation. Results showed that dieldrin-induced markers of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response such as chaperone GRP78, heme oxygenase-1, and phosphorylation of the α subunit of eukaryotic initiation factor 2. In addition, dieldrin reduced antiapoptotic Bcl-2 expression, but significantly elevated a proapoptotic transcription factor CHOP. Furthermore, RNA interference to CHOP almost completely repressed dieldrin-induced apoptotic cell death. Interestingly, quercetin prevented the changes in dieldrin-induced ER stress markers. These results suggest that quercetin may suppress the ER stress-CHOP pathway and dieldrin-induced apoptosis in dopaminergic neurons.

  14. Child maltreatment, impulsivity, and antisocial behavior in African American children: Moderation effects from a cumulative dopaminergic gene index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibodeau, Eric L; Cicchetti, Dante; Rogosch, Fred A

    2015-11-01

    A model examining the effects of an increasing number of maltreatment subtypes experienced on antisocial behavior, as mediated by impulsivity and moderated by a polygenic index of dopaminergic genotypes, was investigated. An African American sample of children (N = 1,012, M age = 10.07) with and without maltreatment histories participated. Indicators of aggression, delinquency, and disruptive peer behavior were obtained from peer- and counselor-rated measures to form a latent variable of antisocial behavior; impulsivity was assessed by counselor report. Five genotypes in four dopaminergic genes (dopamine receptors D4, D2, known as DRD4, DRD2; dopamine active transporter 1, known as DAT1; and catechol-O-methyltransferase, known as COMT) conferring heightened environmental sensitivity were combined into one polygenic index. Using structural equation modeling, a first-stage, moderated-mediation model was evaluated. Age and sex were entered as covariates, both as main effects and in interaction with maltreatment and the gene index. The model had excellent fit: χ2 (32, N = 1,012) = 86.51, p impulsivity (β = 0.173, p impulsivity was stronger as children evinced more differentiating genotypes, thereby strengthening the mediational effect of impulsivity on antisocial behavior. These findings elucidate the manner by which maltreated children develop early signs of antisocial behavior, and the genetic mechanisms involved in greater vulnerability for maladaptation in impulse control within the context of child maltreatment.

  15. Extravehicular Activity Suit/Portable Life Support System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this project is to mature technologies and systems that will enable future Extravehicular Activity (EVA) systems. Advanced EVA systems have...

  16. Caffeic acid phenethyl ester protects against the dopaminergic neuronal loss induced by 6-hydroxydopamine in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros Silva, R; Santos, N A G; Martins, N M; Ferreira, D A S; Barbosa, F; Oliveira Souza, V C; Kinoshita, A; Baffa, O; Del-Bel, E; Santos, A C

    2013-03-13

    Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) is a botanical compound abundant in honeybees' propolis. It has anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antioxidant, immunomodulatory and antitumor properties. Its beneficial effects against neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease, have also been suggested and some mechanisms have been proposed. Mitochondrial damage and oxidative stress are critical events in neurodegeneration. Release of cytochrome c from mitochondria to cytosol and the downstream activation of caspase-3 have been suggested as targets of the protective mechanism of CAPE. Most of the studies addressing the protective effect of CAPE have been performed in cell culture. This is the first study to demonstrate the protective effect of CAPE against the dopaminergic neuronal loss induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) in rats. It also demonstrates, for the first time, the inhibitory effect of CAPE on mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), a mediator of neuronal death that triggers cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation. Scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and metal chelation was demonstrated in the brain-affected areas of the rats treated with 6-OHDA and CAPE. Additionally, we demonstrated that CAPE does not affect brain mitochondrial function. Based on these findings and on its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier, CAPE is a promising compound to treat Parkinson's and other neurodegenerative diseases.

  17. Neurokinin receptor 3 peptide exacerbates 6-hydroxydopamine-induced dopaminergic degeneration in rats through JNK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, John Man Tak; Chan, Ying Shing; Chen, Liang Wei; Yung, Ken Kin Lam

    2012-11-01

    Neurokinin 3 (NK3) receptor is predominantly expressed in striatum and substantia nigra (SN). Evidences have indicated the roles of NK3 receptor in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. By administrating NK3 receptor agonist senktide into 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rats, exacerbation of dopaminergic degeneration was found in striatum and substantia nigra pars compacta. From apomorphine rotation test, significant increase of contralateral rotation number was detected in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats with senktide injection. Furthermore, tyrosine hydroxylase expression in striatum and substantia nigra pars compacta were examined by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Further reduction of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivities was found in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats that received senktide treatment. Also, phosphorylation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1 subunit was investigated in SN region and significant up-regulation was revealed in senktide-treated 6-OHDA-lesioned rats. Finally, phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and c-Jun were examined in nigral region. Up-regulation of phosphorylated JNK molecules was shown in SN region after senktide injection. In line with this evidence, phosphorylation of c-Jun at Ser 63 and Ser 73 was also up-regulated by senktide treatment, thus presenting new aspects that NK3 peptide could exacerbate 6-OHDA toxicity in in vivo models and the possible mechanism may be contributed by the modulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 1 subunit and JNK pathway activities.

  18. Cntnap4 differentially contributes to GABAergic and dopaminergic synaptic transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karayannis, T; Au, E; Patel, J C; Kruglikov, I; Markx, S; Delorme, R; Héron, D; Salomon, D; Glessner, J; Restituito, S; Gordon, A; Rodriguez-Murillo, L; Roy, N C; Gogos, J A; Rudy, B; Rice, M E; Karayiorgou, M; Hakonarson, H; Keren, B; Huguet, G; Bourgeron, T; Hoeffer, C; Tsien, R W; Peles, E; Fishell, G

    2014-07-10

    Although considerable evidence suggests that the chemical synapse is a lynchpin underlying affective disorders, how molecular insults differentially affect specific synaptic connections remains poorly understood. For instance, Neurexin 1a and 2 (NRXN1 and NRXN2) and CNTNAP2 (also known as CASPR2), all members of the neurexin superfamily of transmembrane molecules, have been implicated in neuropsychiatric disorders. However, their loss leads to deficits that have been best characterized with regard to their effect on excitatory cells. Notably, other disease-associated genes such as BDNF and ERBB4 implicate specific interneuron synapses in psychiatric disorders. Consistent with this, cortical interneuron dysfunction has been linked to epilepsy, schizophrenia and autism. Using a microarray screen that focused upon synapse-associated molecules, we identified Cntnap4 (contactin associated protein-like 4, also known as Caspr4) as highly enriched in developing murine interneurons. In this study we show that Cntnap4 is localized presynaptically and its loss leads to a reduction in the output of cortical parvalbumin (PV)-positive GABAergic (γ-aminobutyric acid producing) basket cells. Paradoxically, the loss of Cntnap4 augments midbrain dopaminergic release in the nucleus accumbens. In Cntnap4 mutant mice, synaptic defects in these disease-relevant neuronal populations are mirrored by sensory-motor gating and grooming endophenotypes; these symptoms could be pharmacologically reversed, providing promise for therapeutic intervention in psychiatric disorders.

  19. Applications of SPECT imaging of dopaminergic neurotransmission in neuropsychiatric disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugaya, Akira; Fujita, Masahiro; Innis, R.B. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). School of Medicine

    2000-02-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) tracers selective for pre- and post-synaptic targets have allowed measurements of several aspects of dopaminergic (DA) neurotransmission. In this article, we will first review our DA transporter imaging in Parkinson's disease. We have developed the in vivo dopamine transporter (DAT) imaging with [{sup 123}I]{beta}-CIT ((1R)-2{beta}-Carbomethoxy-3{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane). This method showed that patients with Parkinson's disease have markedly reduced DAT levels in striatum, which correlated with disease severity and disease progression. Second, we applied DA imaging techniques in patients with schizophrenia. Using amphetamine as a releaser of DA, we observed the enhanced DA release, which was measured by imaging D2 receptors with [{sup 123}I]IBZM (iodobenzamide), in schizophrenics. Further we developed the measurement of basal synaptic DA levels by AMPT (alpha-methyl-paratyrosine)-induced unmasking of D2 receptors. Finally, we expanded our techniques to the measurement of extrastriatal DA receptors using [{sup 123}I]epidepride. The findings suggest that SPECT is a useful technique to measure DA transmission in human brain and may further our understanding of the pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. (author)

  20. Blockade of catecholamine-induced growth by adrenergic and dopaminergic receptor antagonists in Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica and Yersinia enterocolitica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyte Mark

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability of catecholamines to stimulate bacterial growth was first demonstrated just over a decade ago. Little is still known however, concerning the nature of the putative bacterial adrenergic and/or dopaminergic receptor(s to which catecholamines (norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine may bind and exert their effects, or even whether the binding properties of such a receptor are similar between different species. Results Use of specific catecholamine receptor antagonists revealed that only α, and not β, adrenergic antagonists were capable of blocking norepinephrine and epinephrine-induced growth, while antagonism of dopamine-mediated growth was achieved with the use of a dopaminergic antagonist. Both adrenergic and dopaminergic antagonists were highly specific in their mechanism of action, which did not involve blockade of catecholamine-facilitated iron-acquisition. Use of radiolabeled norepinephrine suggested that the adrenergic antagonists could be acting by inhibiting catecholamine uptake. Conclusion The present data demonstrates that the ability of a specific pathogen to respond to a particular hormone is dependent upon the host anatomical region in which the pathogen causes disease as well as the neuroanatomical specificity to which production of the particular hormone is restricted; and that both are anatomically coincidental to each other. As such, the present report suggests that pathogens with a high degree of exclusivity to the gastrointestinal tract have evolved response systems to neuroendocrine hormones such as norepinephrine and dopamine, but not epinephrine, which are found with the enteric nervous system.

  1. Folic acid supplementation rescues anomalies associated with knockdown of parkin in dopaminergic and serotonergic neurons in Drosophila model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastav, Saurabh; Singh, Sandeep Kumar; Yadav, Amarish Kumar; Srikrishna, Saripella

    2015-05-08

    parkin loss associated early-onset of Parkinson's disease, involves mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress as the plausible decisive molecular mechanisms in disease pathogenesis. Mitochondrial dysfunction involves several up/down regulation of gene products, one of which being p53 is found to be elevated. Elevated p53 is involved in mitochondrial mediated apoptosis of neuronal cells in Parkinson's patients who are folate deficient as well. The present study therefore attempts to examine the effect of Folic acid (FA) supplementation in alleviation of anomalies associated with parkin knockdown using RNAi approach, specific to Dopaminergic (DA) neurons in Drosophila model system. Here we show that FA supplementation provide protection against parkin RNAi associated discrepancies, thereby improves locomotor ability, reduces mortality and oxidative stress, and partially improves Zn levels. Further, metabolic active cell status and ATP levels were also found to be improved thereby indicating improved mitochondrial function. To corroborate FA supplementation in mitochondrial functioning further, status of p53 and spargel was checked by qRT-PCR. Here we show that folic acid supplementation enrich mitochondrial functioning as depicted from improved spargel level and lowered p53 level, which was originally vice versa in parkin knockdown flies cultured in standard media. Our data thus support the potential of folic acid in alleviating the behavioural defects, oxidative stress, augmentation of zinc and ATP levels in parkin knock down flies. Further, folic acid role in repressing mitochondrial dysfunction is encouraging to further explore its possible mechanistic role to be utilized as potential therapeutics for Parkinson's disease.

  2. Modelling of a targeted nanotherapeutic ‘stroma’ to deliver the cytokine LIF, or XAV939, a potent inhibitor of Wnt–β-catenin signalling, for use in human fetal dopaminergic grafts in Parkinson’s disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Wei Zhao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The endogenous reparative capacity of the adult human brain is low, and chronic neurodegenerative disorders of the central nervous system represent one of the greatest areas of unmet clinical need in the developing world. Novel therapeutic strategies to treat them include: (i growth factor delivery to boost endogenous repair and (ii replacement cell therapy, including replacing dopaminergic neurons to treat Parkinson’s disease (PD. However, these approaches are restricted not only by rapid degradation of growth factors, but also by the limited availability of cells for transplant and the poor survival of implanted cells that lack the necessary stromal support. We therefore hypothesised that provision of a transient artificial stroma for paracrine delivery of pro-survival factors could overcome both of these issues. Using leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF – a proneural, reparative cytokine – formulated as target-specific poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nano-particles (LIF-nano-stroma, we discovered that attachment of LIF-nano-stroma to freshly isolated fetal dopaminergic cells improved their survival fourfold: furthermore, in vivo, the number of surviving human fetal dopaminergic cells tended to be higher at 3 months after grafting into the striatum of nude rats, compared with controls treated with empty nanoparticles. In addition, we also analysed the effect of a novel nano-stroma incorporating XAV939 (XAV, a potent inhibitor of the developmentally important Wnt–β-catenin signalling pathway, to investigate whether it could also promote the survival and differentiation of human fetal dopaminergic precursors; we found that the numbers of both tyrosine-hydroxylase-positive neurons (a marker of dopaminergic neurons and total neurons were increased. This is the first demonstration that LIF-nano-stroma and XAV-nano-stroma each have pro-survival effects on human dopaminergic neurons, with potential value for target-specific modulation of

  3. Generation of reactive oxygen species in 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+ treated dopaminergic neurons occurs as an NADPH oxidase-dependent two-wave cascade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Das Mita

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Reactive oxygen species (ROS, superoxide and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, are necessary for appropriate responses to immune challenges. In the brain, excess superoxide production predicts neuronal cell loss, suggesting that Parkinson's disease (PD with its wholesale death of dopaminergic neurons in substantia nigra pars compacta (nigra may be a case in point. Although microglial NADPH oxidase-produced superoxide contributes to dopaminergic neuron death in an MPTP mouse model of PD, this is secondary to an initial die off of such neurons, suggesting that the initial MPTP-induced death of neurons may be via activation of NADPH oxidase in neurons themselves, thus providing an early therapeutic target. Methods NADPH oxidase subunits were visualized in adult mouse nigra neurons and in N27 rat dopaminergic cells by immunofluorescence. NADPH oxidase subunits in N27 cell cultures were detected by immunoblots and RT-PCR. Superoxide was measured by flow cytometric detection of H2O2-induced carboxy-H2-DCFDA fluorescence. Cells were treated with MPP+ (MPTP metabolite following siRNA silencing of the Nox2-stabilizing subunit p22phox, or simultaneously with NADPH oxidase pharmacological inhibitors or with losartan to antagonize angiotensin II type 1 receptor-induced NADPH oxidase activation. Results Nigral dopaminergic neurons in situ expressed three subunits necessary for NADPH oxidase activation, and these as well as several other NADPH oxidase subunits and their encoding mRNAs were detected in unstimulated N27 cells. Overnight MPP+ treatment of N27 cells induced Nox2 protein and superoxide generation, which was counteracted by NADPH oxidase inhibitors, by siRNA silencing of p22phox, or losartan. A two-wave ROS cascade was identified: 1 as a first wave, mitochondrial H2O2 production was first noted at three hours of MPP+ treatment; and 2 as a second wave, H2O2 levels were further increased by 24 hours. This second wave was eliminated by

  4. Basic components of construction enterprises’ management marketing activities system

    OpenAIRE

    Seleznova Olha Olexandrivna

    2015-01-01

    This article investigated the basic components of construction enterprises’ management marketing activities system. It is developed the model of the construction enterprises’ management marketing activities system. The article explores the essence of the stages of forming the construction enterprises’ management marketing activities system. The article reveals the basic elements of marketing management – mission, goals, strategy. It describes the basic functions of marketing management system...

  5. Effects of two commonly found strains of influenza A virus on developing dopaminergic neurons, in relation to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Landreau

    Full Text Available Influenza virus (InfV infection during pregnancy is a known risk factor for neurodevelopment abnormalities in the offspring, including the risk of schizophrenia, and has been shown to result in an abnormal behavioral phenotype in mice. However, previous reports have concentrated on neuroadapted influenza strains, whereas increased schizophrenia risk is associated with common respiratory InfV. In addition, no specific mechanism has been proposed for the actions of maternal infection on the developing brain that could account for schizophrenia risk. We identified two common isolates from the community with antigenic configurations H3N2 and H1N1 and compared their effects on developing brain with a mouse modified-strain A/WSN/33 specifically on the developing of dopaminergic neurons. We found that H1N1 InfV have high affinity for dopaminergic neurons in vitro, leading to nuclear factor kappa B activation and apoptosis. Furthermore, prenatal infection of mothers with the same strains results in loss of dopaminergic neurons in the offspring, and in an abnormal behavioral phenotype. We propose that the well-known contribution of InfV to risk of schizophrenia during development may involve a similar specific mechanism and discuss evidence from the literature in relation to this hypothesis.

  6. Effects of Two Commonly Found Strains of Influenza A Virus on Developing Dopaminergic Neurons, in Relation to the Pathophysiology of Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landreau, Fernando; Galeano, Pablo; Caltana, Laura R.; Masciotra, Luis; Chertcoff, Agustín; Pontoriero, A.; Baumeister, Elsa; Amoroso, Marcela; Brusco, Herminia A.; Tous, Mónica I.; Savy, Vilma L.; Lores Arnaiz, María del Rosario; de Erausquin, Gabriel A.

    2012-01-01

    Influenza virus (InfV) infection during pregnancy is a known risk factor for neurodevelopment abnormalities in the offspring, including the risk of schizophrenia, and has been shown to result in an abnormal behavioral phenotype in mice. However, previous reports have concentrated on neuroadapted influenza strains, whereas increased schizophrenia risk is associated with common respiratory InfV. In addition, no specific mechanism has been proposed for the actions of maternal infection on the developing brain that could account for schizophrenia risk. We identified two common isolates from the community with antigenic configurations H3N2 and H1N1 and compared their effects on developing brain with a mouse modified-strain A/WSN/33 specifically on the developing of dopaminergic neurons. We found that H1N1 InfV have high affinity for dopaminergic neurons in vitro, leading to nuclear factor kappa B activation and apoptosis. Furthermore, prenatal infection of mothers with the same strains results in loss of dopaminergic neurons in the offspring, and in an abnormal behavioral phenotype. We propose that the well-known contribution of InfV to risk of schizophrenia during development may involve a similar specific mechanism and discuss evidence from the literature in relation to this hypothesis. PMID:23251423

  7. Impaired dopaminergic neurotransmission in patients with traumatic brain injury: a SPET study using {sup 123}I-{beta}-CIT and {sup 123}I-IBZM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donnemiller, E.; Riccabona, G. [Innsbruck Univ. (Austria). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Brenneis, C.; Wissel, J.; Scherfler, C.; Poewe, W.; Wenning, G.K. [Dept. of Neurology, Univ. of Innsbruck (Austria)

    2000-09-01

    Structural imaging suggests that traumatic brain injury (TBI) may be associated with disruption of neuronal networks, including the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathway. However, to date deficits in pre- and/or postsynaptic dopaminergic neurotransmission have not been demonstrated in TBI using functional imaging. We therefore assessed dopaminergic function in ten TBI patients using [{sup 123}I]2-{beta}-carbomethoxy-3-{beta}-(4-iodophenyl)tropane ({beta}-CIT) and [{sup 123}I]iodobenzamide (IBZM) single-photon emission tomography (SPET). Average Glasgow Coma Scale score ({+-}SD) at the time of head trauma was 5.8{+-}4.2. SPET was performed on average 141 days (SD {+-}92) after TBI. The SPET images were compared with structural images using cranial computerised tomography (CCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). SPET was performed with an ADAC Vertex dual-head camera. The activity ratios of striatal to cerebellar uptake were used as a semiquantitative parameter of striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) and D2 receptor (D2R) binding. Compared with age-matched controls, patients with TBI had significantly lower striatal/cerebellar {beta}-CIT and IBZM binding ratios (P{<=}0.01). Overall, the DAT deficit was more marked than the D2R loss. CCT and MRI studies revealed varying cortical and subcortical lesions, with the frontal lobe being most frequently affected whereas the striatum appeared structurally normal in all but one patient. Our findings suggest that nigrostriatal dysfunction may be detected using SPET following TBI despite relative structural preservation of the striatum. Further investigations of possible clinical correlates and efficacy of dopaminergic therapy in patients with TBI seem justified. (orig.)

  8. Roles of octopaminergic and dopaminergic neurons in mediating reward and punishment signals in insect visual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unoki, Sae; Matsumoto, Yukihisa; Mizunami, Makoto

    2006-10-01

    Insects, like vertebrates, have considerable ability to associate visual, olfactory or other sensory signals with reward or punishment. Previous studies in crickets, honey bees and fruit-flies have suggested that octopamine (OA, invertebrate counterpart of noradrenaline) and dopamine (DA) mediate various kinds of reward and punishment signals in olfactory learning. However, whether the roles of OA and DA in mediating positive and negative reinforcing signals can be generalized to learning of sensory signals other than odors remained unknown. Here we first established a visual learning paradigm in which to associate a visual pattern with water reward or saline punishment for crickets and found that memory after aversive conditioning decayed much faster than that after appetitive conditioning. Then, we pharmacologically studied the roles of OA and DA in appetitive and aversive forms of visual learning. Crickets injected with epinastine or mianserin, OA receptor antagonists, into the hemolymph exhibited a complete impairment of appetitive learning to associate a visual pattern with water reward, but aversive learning with saline punishment was unaffected. By contrast, fluphenazine, chlorpromazine or spiperone, DA receptor antagonists, completely impaired aversive learning without affecting appetitive learning. The results demonstrate that OA and DA participate in reward and punishment conditioning in visual learning. This finding, together with results of previous studies on the roles of OA and DA in olfactory learning, suggests ubiquitous roles of the octopaminergic reward system and dopaminergic punishment system in insect learning.

  9. In vitro induced dopaminergic differentiation of expanded rat mesencephalic neural stem cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Min; WANG Dongmei; JIAO Wenchang; LI Haiming; ZHAO Lianxu; BAI Chixian; WANG Yaping; PEI Xuetao

    2003-01-01

    Neural stem cell (NSC) is the progenitor of the neural system with the character of self-renew and having the potential to differentiate into all the phenotypes in the central nervous system (CNS). NSC may serve as a source of cell transplantation for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases to replace degenerative neurons. In this study, NSCs derived from E12.5 rat mesencephalon were maintained and expanded using a serum-free defined medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and epidermal growth factor (EGF). While proliferating, the cells were immunoreactive for nestin and remained multipotent to generate neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes. After 15 times passage the total number of the cell expanded about 2.4×104 fold. Compared with untreated cultures, ascorbic acid (AA) treatment led to more dopaminergic (DAergic) differentitiation as indicated by the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). With the concentration increasing, more TH+ neurons were obtained. 100 μmol/L AA could lead to a increase more than 20-fold, and a concentration of 10 μmol/L could lead to nearly 5-fold increase in TH+ cells. However, the ratio of TH+ cells was not improved any longer with the AA increasing above the concentration of 100 μmol/L. The results demonstrate that expanded NSCs can be induced to differentiate into dopamine neurons in vitro, which can provide enough cell population for the cell transplantation, as a main intervention for the neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease.

  10. N-Acetyl Cysteine Protects against Methamphetamine-Induced Dopaminergic Neurodegeneration via Modulation of Redox Status and Autophagy in Dopaminergic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth Chandramani Shivalingappa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine- (MA- induced neurotoxicity is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and enhanced oxidative stress. Our previous study demonstrated that MA induces autophagy in a dopaminergic neuronal cell model (N27 cells. The cellular mechanisms underlying MA-induced autophagy and apoptosis remain poorly characterized. In the present study we sought to investigate the importance of GSH redox status in MA-induced neurotoxicity using a thiol antioxidant, N-acetylcysteine (NAC. Morphological and biochemical analysis revealed that MA-induced autophagy in N27 dopaminergic cells was associated with pronounced depletion of GSH levels. Moreover, pretreatment with NAC reduced MA-induced GSH depletion and autophagy, while depletion of GSH using L-buthionine sulfoximine (L-BSO enhanced autophagy. Furthermore, treatment with NAC significantly attenuated MA-induced apoptotic cell death as well as oxidative stress markers, namely, 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE. Together, these results suggest that NAC exhibits significant protective effects against MA-induced dopaminergic cell death, presumably via modulation of the GSH level and autophagy. Collectively, our data provide mechanistic insights into the role of cellular GSH redox status in MA-induced autophagy and apoptotic cell death, and additional studies are needed to determine the therapeutic effectiveness of cellular redox modifiers in attenuating dopaminergic neurodegeneration in vivo.

  11. Distinct effects of chronic dopaminergic stimulation on hippocampal neurogenesis and striatal doublecortin expression in adult mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachele eSalvi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available While adult neurogenesis is considered to be restricted to the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG and the subventricular zone (SVZ, recent studies in humans and rodents provide evidence for newly generated neurons in regions generally considered as non-neurogenic, e.g. the striatum. Stimulating dopaminergic neurotransmission has the potential to enhance adult neurogenesis in the SVZ and the DG most likely via D2/D3 dopamine (DA receptors. Here, we investigated the effect of two distinct preferential D2/D3 DA agonists, Pramipexole (PPX and Ropinirole (ROP, on adult neurogenesis in the hippocampus and striatum of adult naïve mice. To determine newly generated cells in the DG incorporating 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU a proliferation paradigm was performed in which two BrdU injections (100 mg/kg were applied intraperitoneally within 12 hours after a 14-day-DA agonist treatment. Interestingly, PPX, but not ROP significantly enhanced the proliferation in the DG by 42% compared to phosphate buffered saline (PBS-injected control mice. To analyze the proportion of newly generated cells differentiating into mature neurons, we quantified cells co-expressing BrdU and NeuN 32 days after the last of five BrdU injections (50 mg/kg applied at the beginning of 14-day DA agonist or PBS administration. Again, PPX only enhanced neurogenesis in the DG significantly compared to ROP- and PBS-injected mice. Moreover, we explored the pro-neurogenic effect of both DA agonists in the striatum by quantifying neuroblasts expressing doublecortin (DCX in the entire striatum, as well as in the dorsal and ventral sub-regions separately. We observed a significantly higher number of DCX+ neuroblasts in the dorsal compared to the ventral sub-region of the striatum in PPX-injected mice. These results suggest that the stimulation of hippocampal and dorsal striatal neurogenesis may be up-regulated by PPX. The increased generation of neural cells, both in constitutively active and

  12. Robust Vehicle Suspension System by Converting Active & Passive Control of a Vehicle to Semi-Active Control System Analytically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Elahi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research work a simplified translational model of an automotive suspension system is constructed by only considering the translation motion of one wheel of a car. Passive Vehicle Suspension System is converted into Semi Active Vehicle System. Major advantage achieved by this system is that it adjusts the damping of the suspension system without the application of any actuator by using MATLAB® simulations. The semi-active control is found to control the vibration of suspension system very well.

  13. Activity theory as a challenge to systems design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Susanne

    1991-01-01

    This paper suggests an improvement of the theoretical foundation of information systems research of the 1990s. This foundation is found in human activity theory. The paper deals with how human activity theory can help systems design change, theoretically and practically. Applying activity theory...

  14. Novel Method To Differentiate Human Embryonic Stem Cells Into Dopaminergic Nerve Cells | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Institute on Drug Abuse's Development and Plasticity Section is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize novel methods to differentiate human embryonic stem cells into dopaminergic nerve cells. The invention described here is a novel method of differentiating human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into dopaminergic nerve cells, which is preferable to the currently available dopaminergic differentiation techniques.

  15. Process of activation of a palladium catalyst system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A.; Knapke, Michael J.

    2011-08-02

    Improved processes for activating a catalyst system used for the reduction of nitrogen oxides are provided. In one embodiment, the catalyst system is activated by passing an activation gas stream having an amount of each of oxygen, water vapor, nitrogen oxides, and hydrogen over the catalyst system and increasing a temperature of the catalyst system to a temperature of at least 180.degree. C. at a heating rate of from 1-20.degree./min. Use of activation processes described herein leads to a catalyst system with superior NOx reduction capabilities.

  16. Glutamatergic synaptic currents of nigral dopaminergic neurons follow a postnatal developmental sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edouard ePearlstein

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The spontaneous activity pattern of adult dopaminergic (DA neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta